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Sample records for stabilize chromium monoxide

  1. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Stabilization/solidification; ordinary portland cement; ammonium dichromate; differential microcalorimetry; conductometry;. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. 1. Introduction. The stabilization/solidification process of the chromium wastes generated from steel production, chrome plating, pigments and leather ...

  2. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  3. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Office of Dietary Supplements Health Professional Other Resources Chromium Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet Have a question? Ask ... of chromium Chromium and Healthful Diets References Disclaimer Chromium: What is it? Chromium is a mineral that ...

  4. Stabilization of carbon dioxide and chromium slag via carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingxing; Yu, Binbin; Xu, Wei; Fan, Zheng; Wu, Zucheng; Zhang, Huimin

    2017-08-01

    As the main greenhouse gas, CO 2 is considered as a threat in the context of global warming. Many available technologies to reduce CO 2 emission was about CO 2 separation from coal combustion and geological sequestration. However, how to deal with the cost-effective storage of CO 2 has become a new challenge. Moreover, chromium pollution, the treatment of which requires huge energy consumption, has attracted people's widespread attention. This study is aimed to develop the sequestration of CO 2 via chromium slag. A dynamic leaching experiment of chromium slag was designed to testify the ability of CO 2 adsorption onto chromium slag and to release Cr(VI) for stabilization. The results showed that the accumulative amounts of Cr(VI) were ca. 2.6 mg/g released from the chromium slag after 24 h of leaching. In addition, ca. 89 mg/g CO 2 was adsorbed by using pure CO 2 in the experiment at 12 h. Calcite is the only carbonate species in the post-carbonated slag analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. The approach provides the feasibility of the utilization of chromium slag and sequestration of the carbon dioxide at the same time at ordinary temperatures and pressures.

  5. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration.

  6. Effect of yttria addition on the stability of porous chromium oxide ceramics in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Ziqiang; Chen Weixing; Zheng Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Porous chromium oxide (Cr 2 O 3 ) ceramics were prepared by oxidizing highly porous chromium carbides that were obtained by a reactive sintering method, and were evaluated at temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 625 °C in supercritical water (SCW) environments with a fixed pressure of 25–30 MPa. Reactive element yttrium was introduced to the porous oxide ceramic by adding various amounts of yttria of 5, 10 and 20 wt.%, respectively, prior to reactive sintering. The exposure in SCW shows that the porous chromium oxide is quite stable in SCW at 375 °C. However, the stability decreased with increasing temperature. It is well known that chromium oxide can be oxidized to soluble chromium (VI) species in SCW when oxygen is present. Adding yttria increases the stability of chromium oxide in SCW environments. However, adding yttria higher than 5 wt.% increased the weight loss of porous chromium oxide samples because of the direct dissociation of Y 2 O 3 in SCW.

  7. Analysis on the stability of chromium in mineral phases in stainless steel slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Long-hu; Liu, Cheng-jun; Zhao, Qing; Jiang, Mao-fa

    2017-11-01

    Stainless steel slag from high alloy steel is hardly used in the construction industry. The chromium leaching in unstable phase is the limiting factor for the application in the slag. The aim of this study is to investigate the stability of mineral phases in stainless steel slag. In this work, the mineral phases were firstly confirmed through experimental results by SEM-EDS and XRD. Thermodynamic calculation and leaching test were adopted to characterize the theoretical stability of mineral phases in aqueous solution. The results showed that the main phases in the stainless steel slag were spinel, melilite [solid solution of gehlenite (Ca2Al2SiO7) and akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7)], dicalcium silicate, merwinite and periclase phases. It can be concluded that the minerals behave differently when dissolving in aqueous solution and the dissolution of dicalcium silicate (Ca2SiO4), merwinite (Ca3MgSi2O8), akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7) and periclase phase could be generally higher, especially at lower pH values. In addition, the solubility of chromium in the spinel phase is considered low. The leaching test demonstrated that the formation of spinel phase can limit the leaching of chromium and the chromium existing in the silicate and periclase phases can facilitate the chromium leaching.

  8. [Stabilization and long-term effect of chromium contaminated soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Qi-Shi; Zhang, Chang-Bo; Tan, Liang; Li, Xu

    2013-10-01

    Short-term (3 d and 28 d) and long-term (1 a) stabilization effects of Cr contaminated soil were investigated through nature curing, using four amendments including ferrous sulfide, ferrous sulfate, zero-valent iron and sodium dithionite. The results indicated that ferrous sulfide and zero-valent iron were not helpful for the stabilization of Cr(VI) when directly used because of their poor solubility and immobility. Ferrous sulfate could effectively and rapidly decrease total leaching Cr and Cr(VI) content. The stabilization effect was further promoted by the generation of iron hydroxides after long-term curing. Sodium dithionite also had positive effect on soil stabilization. Appropriate addition ratio of the two chemicals could help maintain the soil pH in range of 6-8.

  9. Composition and color stability of carbon monoxide treated dried porcine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, P R; Gomide, L A M; Fontes, E A F; Ramos, E M; Ramos, A L S

    2010-07-01

    Color stability of swine blood was studied over 12 weeks of storage in plastic bags, after pH (7.40, 6.70, or 6.00) adjustment, saturation with carbon monoxide (CO) and spray-drying. CO-treated dried blood presented a redder color and higher reflectance between 610 and 700 nm, compared to a brownish-red color and lower reflectance of untreated samples. As indicated by reflectance spectra, blood pH adjustment did not influence (P>0.05) the initial color of dried blood but influenced (Pvalues, which was more pronounced in polyethylene (OTR=4130 cm(3)/m(2)/day/atm) packaged samples. After 12 weeks of storage, CO-treated samples packaged in high OTR bags presented color indexes similar to those of the untreated dried samples. CO-treated samples packaged in nylon-polyethylene (OTR=30-60 cm(3)/m(2)/day/atm) bags showed a smaller rate of discoloration and color difference (DeltaE(*)) between the CO-treated and untreated samples. Even with some darkening, packaging CO-treated dry blood in low OTR bags still gives an acceptable reddish color after 12 weeks of storage while untreated dry blood has a brownish color just after drying. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cementitious stabilization of chromium, arsenic, and selenium in a cooling tower sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Bleier, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting studies and treatment method development under the treatability exclusion of RCRA for those mixed wastes for which treatment methods and capabilities have yet to be defined. One of these wastes is a radioactive cooling tower sludge. This paper presents some results of a treatability study of the stabilization of this cooling tower sludge in cementitious waste forms. The sample of the cooling tower sludge obtained for this study was found to be not characteristically hazardous in regard to arsenic, barium, chromium, lead, and selenium, despite the waste codes associated with this waste. However, the scope of this study included spiking three RCRA metals to two orders of magnitude above the initial concentration to test the limits of cementitious stabilization. Chromium and arsenic were spiked at concentrations of 200, 2,000, and 20,000 mg/kg, and selenium was spiked at 100, 1,000, and 10,000 mg/kg (concentrations based on the metal in the sludge solids). Portland cement, Class F fly ash, and slag were selected as stabilizing agents in the present study. Perlite, a fine, porous volcanic rock commonly used as a filter aid, was used as a water-sorptive agent in this study in order to control bleed water for high water contents. The highly porous perlite dust absorbs large amounts of water by capillary action and does not present the handling and processing problems exhibited by clays used for bleed water control

  11. Amorphous iron–chromium oxide nanoparticles with long-term stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iacob, Mihail [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Institute of Chemistry of ASM, Academiei str. 3, Chisinau 2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Cazacu, Maria, E-mail: mcazacu@icmpp.ro [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Turta, Constantin [Institute of Chemistry of ASM, Academiei str. 3, Chisinau 2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Doroftei, Florica [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Botko, Martin; Čižmár, Erik; Zeleňáková, Adriana; Feher, Alexander [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, SK-04154 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Fe–Cr oxide nanoparticles with pre-established metals ratio were obtained. • The amorphous state and its long-term stability were highlighted by X-ray diffraction. • The average diameter of dried nanoparticles was 3.5 nm, as was estimated by TEM, AFM. • In hexane dispersion, nanoparticles with diameter in the range 2.33–4.85 nm were found. • Superparamagnetic state of NPs co-exists with diamagnetism of the organic layer. - Abstract: Iron–chromium nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained through the thermal decomposition of μ{sub 3}-oxo heterotrinuclear (FeCr{sub 2}O) acetate in the presence of sunflower oil and dodecylamine (DA) as surfactants. The average diameter of the NPs was 3.5 nm, as estimated on the basis of transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. Both techniques revealed the formation of roughly approximated spheres with some irregularities and agglomerations in larger spherical assemblies of 50–100 nm. In hexane, NPs with diameters in the 2.33–4.85 nm range are individually dispersed, as emphasized by dynamic light scattering measurements. The amorphous nature of the product was emphasized by X-ray powder diffraction. The study of the magnetic properties shows the presence of superparamagnetic state of iron–chromium oxide NPs and the diamagnetic contribution from DA layer forming a shell of NPs.

  12. Evaluation of carbon monoxide treatment in modified atmosphere packaging or vacuum packaging to increase color stability of fresh beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasingh, P; Cornforth, D P; Carpenter, C E; Whittier, D

    2001-11-01

    Our goal was to obtain > 21 days red color stability for carbon monoxide (CO)-treated beef steaks in vacuum packaging (VP). In preliminary tests, pretreatment for 24 h in a 5% CO modified atmosphere package (MAP) was needed to maintain redness after re-packaging in VP. Pressure pretreatment with 5% CO for 2 h developed redness, but was impractical for large-scale application. Color stability and microbial load were then compared after treatment of steaks in 5% CO-MAP for 24 h, then VP; 100% CO-MAP for 1 h, then VP; steaks and ground beef in 0.5% CO-MAP; and steaks and ground beef in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) wrap. Steaks remained red for 5, 6, 8 and 10(6)cfu/cm(2)) at 5, 6, 7 and <2-weeks, respectively. Thus, extended color stability in VP was achieved by pretreatment with 5% CO for 24 h or 100% CO for 1 h.

  13. Investigation of the stability of platinum clusters and the adsorption of nitrogen monoxide: First principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Bothina; El-Bayyari, Zuheir; Marashdeh, Ali

    2014-10-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations are performed to investigate the structural, energetic, electronic and magnetic properties of bare Ptn (n = 2-6, 8, 10, 13, 30 and 39) isomers. Our calculations show that small sized Pt configurations prefer to form planar structures, while for larger size clusters, the structures tend to be compact. The most stable isomers have been selected to study the adsorption of nitrogen monoxide molecule (NO) on them. Our results show that the most stable adsorption sites of NO on Pt clusters are the top site for Pt with n = 2-4, while the bridge site is favorable for the rest of the clusters (Pt with n = 5, 6, 39). Our findings show that the bridge site of large clusters softens the NO bond more than the top site of smaller clusters.

  14. Diffusion and leachability index studies on stabilization of chromium contaminated soil using fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchinadham, Sri Bala Kameswari; Narasimman, L M; Pedaballe, Vihita; Kalyanaraman, Chitra

    2015-10-30

    Experiments were performed to establish a feasible treatment process for the solidification and stabilization (S/S) of soil contaminated by leaching of Cr(VI) from Chromite ore processing residue (COPR). Reduction of the highly mobile Cr(VI) was performed using calcium polysulfide (CaS5) with a dosage of 3 times the molar stoichiometric ratio for the initial concentration of Cr(VI) present in the chromium contaminated soil (CCS). The CCS was solidified and stabilized (S/S) using fly ash (FA) in various proportions i.e., 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 (FA: CCS) with and without using reducing agent i.e., CaS5. Leachability tests such as Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and semi-dynamic long term leachability tests indicated that the CaS5 was effective in reduction of Cr(VI) followed by the S/S process. Leachability Index was derived from the results of the semi-dynamic long term leachability tests and was between 8 and 9, indicating that FA is an effective treatment for disposal into secured landfills for CCS. The characteristic compressive strength of the CaS5 treated CCS with FA mortar blocks were between 24.47 and 40.49 kg/cm(2). Considering the cost of CaS5 and FA, a total expenditure of Rs. 7826 i.e., US $ 130.4 would be required for remediation of one tonne of CCS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential mechanisms of carbon monoxide and high oxygen packaging in maintaining color stability of different bovine muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenglong; Zhang, Yimin; Yang, Xiaoyin; Liang, Rongrong; Mao, Yanwei; Hou, Xu; Lu, Xiao; Luo, Xin

    2014-06-01

    The objectives were to compare the effects of packaging methods on color stability, metmyoglobin-reducing-activity (MRA), total-reducing-activity and NADH concentration of different bovine muscles and to explore potential mechanisms in the enhanced color stability by carbon monoxide modified atmosphere packaging (CO-MAP, 0.4% CO/30% CO2/69.6% N2). Steaks from longissimus lumborum (LL), psoas major (PM) and longissimus thoracis (LT) packaged in CO-MAP, high-oxygen modified atmosphere packaging (HiOx-MAP, 80% O2/20% CO2) or vacuum packaging were stored for 0day, 4days, 9days, and 14days or stored for 9days then displayed in air for 0day, 1day, or 3days. The CO-MAP significantly increased red color stability of all muscles, and especially for PM. The PM and LT were more red than LL in CO-MAP, whereas PM had lowest redness in HiOx-MAP. The content of MetMb in CO-MAP was lower than in HiOx-MAP. Steaks in CO-MAP maintained a higher MRA compared with those in HiOx-MAP during storage. After opening packages, the red color of steaks in CO-MAP deteriorated more slowly compared with that of steaks in HiOx-MAP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect Of Chromium Nicotinate On Oxidative Stability, Chemical Composition And Meat Quality Of Growing-Finishing Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Bučko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different organic sources of Cr on growth, feed efficiency and carcass value is known but there is a lack of information between chromium nicotinate (CrNic and pork quality. Therefore, purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of CrNic on chemical composition, quality and oxidative stability of pork meat. In the study, pigs of Large White breed (40 pcs were used. The pigs were divided into two groups, namely the control and the experimental of 20 pcs with equal number of barrows and gilts. The pigs were fed the same diet which consisted of three feed mixtures applied at the different growth phases, from 30 - 45 kg OS-03, 45 - 70 kg OS-04 and 70 - 100 kg OS-05. The pigs were allowed ad libitum access to feed and water. The diet of experimental group was supplemented with 0.75 mg.kg-1 CrNic in the form of chromium-inactivated yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The fattening period in pigs lasted from 30 to 100 kg. The chromium supplementation led to a significantly higher content of chromium in longissimus thoracis muscle (LT of experimental pigs. In addition, the results showed a statistically significant difference (p ≤0.05 in retention of chromium in the LT, monounsaturated and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids content in experimental group compared with control. Moreover, there was highly significant (p £0.05 difference in essential fatty acids, as well as in oxidative stability in 7 days, among the groups. The highly significant differences were also observed among sexes, namely in total water, protein and intramuscular fat contents, colour CIE b* in both times, and oxidative stability. However, physical-technological parameters (pH, drip loss, shear force and meat colour were not affected when pigs were fed the supplement. On the whole, the positive effect of chromium nicotinate in most of investigated parameters may be beneficial not only for pork industry but also for consumers. Normal 0 21 false false false

  17. Flexible high power-per-weight perovskite solar cells with chromium oxide-metal contacts for improved stability in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Adam, Getachew; Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Drack, Michael; Schwödiauer, Reinhard; Leonat, Lucia; Apaydin, Dogukan Hazar; Groiss, Heiko; Scharber, Markus Clark; White, Matthew Schuette; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Bauer, Siegfried

    2015-10-01

    Photovoltaic technology requires light-absorbing materials that are highly efficient, lightweight, low cost and stable during operation. Organolead halide perovskites constitute a highly promising class of materials, but suffer limited stability under ambient conditions without heavy and costly encapsulation. Here, we report ultrathin (3 μm), highly flexible perovskite solar cells with stabilized 12% efficiency and a power-per-weight as high as 23 W g(-1). To facilitate air-stable operation, we introduce a chromium oxide-chromium interlayer that effectively protects the metal top contacts from reactions with the perovskite. The use of a transparent polymer electrode treated with dimethylsulphoxide as the bottom layer allows the deposition-from solution at low temperature-of pinhole-free perovskite films at high yield on arbitrary substrates, including thin plastic foils. These ultra-lightweight solar cells are successfully used to power aviation models. Potential future applications include unmanned aerial vehicles-from airplanes to quadcopters and weather balloons-for environmental and industrial monitoring, rescue and emergency response, and tactical security applications.

  18. Removal of Chromium and Cadmium from Wastewater in Waste Stabilization Ponds, Yazd-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Samaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heavy metals have destructive and irreversible effects on the human, plants and animals. Some industries in Yazd enter industrial wastewater to municipal wastewater collection system. This can lead to high levels of heavy metals in wastewater and in turn in the wastewater treatment plant effluent. Methods: This study was carried out during four months from December 22, 2009 to May 20, 2010. The experiment was performed on the inflow, outlet of anaerobic pond and first and second facultative ponds of wastewater treatment plant and then transferred to the laboratory and measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results: The results of the experiments showed that the average cadmium concentrations in the inflow, anaerobic pond outlet, and first and second facultative pond outlet were 0.0066, 0.0087, 0.0076, and 0.0083μg/l, respectively. The average amounts of chromium in the inflow, anaerobic pond outlet, and first and second facultative pond outlet were 0.0076, 0.0065, 0.0043, and 0.0056 μg/l, respectively. Cadmium concentration in the effluent was higher than standard. Conclusion: The comparison of the obtained data with Iranian standards for wastewater treatment for reuse in irrigation shows that the cadmium concentration exceeded the standard and the chromium concentration was lower than the standard. Therefore, it is not suitable for reuse in the crop farms and aquatic life

  19. Simultaneous speciation of arsenic, selenium, and chromium: species, stability, sample preservation, and analysis of ash and soil leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Morman, Suzette A.; Hageman, Philip L.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography separation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection previously developed for the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) has been adapted to allow the determination of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Cr(III), and Cr(VI) under the same chromatographic conditions. Using this method, all six inorganic species can be determined in less than 3 min. A dynamic reaction cell (DRC)-ICP-MS system was used to detect the species eluted from the chromatographic column in order to reduce interferences. A variety of reaction cell gases and conditions may be utilized with the DRC-ICP-MS, and final selection of conditions is determined by data quality objectives. Results indicated all starting standards, reagents, and sample vials should be thoroughly tested for contamination. Tests on species stability indicated that refrigeration at 10° C was preferential to freezing for most species, particularly when all species were present, and that sample solutions and extracts should be analyzed as soon as possible to eliminate species instability and interconversion effects. A variety of environmental and geological samples, including waters and deionized water [leachates] and simulated biological leachates from soils and wildfire ashes have been analyzed using this method. Analytical spikes performed on each sample were used to evaluate data quality. Speciation analyses were conducted on deionized water leachates and simulated lung fluid leachates of ash and soils impacted by wildfires. These results show that, for leachates containing high levels of total Cr, the majority of the chromium was present in the hexavalent Cr(VI) form. In general, total and hexavalent chromium levels for samples taken from burned residential areas were higher than those obtained from non-residential forested areas. Arsenic, when found, was generally in the more oxidized As(V) form. Selenium (IV) and (VI) were present

  20. Assessment of zerovalent iron for stabilization of chromium, copper, and arsenic in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpiene, Jurate; Ore, Solvita; Renella, Giancarlo; Mench, Michel; Lagerkvist, Anders; Maurice, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Stabilization of soil contaminated with trace elements is a remediation practice that does not reduce the total content of contaminants, but lowers the amounts of mobile and bioavailable fractions. This study evaluated the efficiency of Fe to reduce the mobility and bioavailability of Cr, Cu, As and Zn in a chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-contaminated soil using chemical, biochemical and biotoxicity tests. Contaminated soil was stabilized with 1% iron grit. This treatment decreased As and Cr concentrations in leachates (by 98% and 45%, respectively), in soil pore water (by 99% and 94%, respectively) and in plant shoots (by 84% and 95%, respectively). The stabilization technique also restored most of analyzed soil enzyme activities and reduced microbial toxicity, as evaluated by the BioTox TM test. After stabilization, exchangeable and bioaccessible fractions of Cu remained high, causing some residual toxicity in the treated soil. - Zerovalent iron effectively reduces mobility and bioavailability of As and Cr, but does not adequately stabilize Cu

  1. Microstructure stability and creep behaviour of advanced high chromium ferritic steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenička, Václav; Kuchařová, Květa; Kudrman, J.; Svoboda, Milan; Kloc, Luboš

    43 2005, č. 1 (2005), s. 20-33 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/02/0608; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041101; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : 9-12%Cr steels * microstructure stability * creep behaviour * nonsteady creep loading Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.973, year: 2005

  2. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  4. Influence of carbon monoxide on the colour stability of defrosted yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) muscle stored under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethling, Nikki E; Hoffman, Louwrens C; Britz, Trevor J; O'Neill, Bernadette

    2015-06-01

    The use of carbon monoxide (CO) and various packaging types has been suggested to improve/stabilise the colour and oxidative processes of red meats, thereby improving the retail value and revenue. The main aim of this study was to investigate the influence of packaging type and CO treatment on the colour and oxidative stability of tuna. The addition of CO significantly increased the redness (a(*) ) of the tuna steaks but the redness was not equally stable for all treatments. The aerobically packaged steaks showed a temporal decrease in redness while the redness of anaerobically packaged steaks remained relatively stable. The addition of CO did not significantly affect (P >0.05) the brownness (b(*) ) (with one exception) and lightness (L(*) ) of the steaks. The anaerobically packaged steaks showed a significant difference (P 0.05) in lipid or protein oxidation were observed between treatments. The aerobically packaged steaks had a significant temporal increase (P <0.05) in lipid oxidation while no such trend was apparent in the anaerobically packaged steaks. Protein oxidation remained relatively stable over time for both aerobically and anaerobically packaged steaks. Storing CO treated tuna steaks in anaerobic packaging can improve the oxidative and colour stability of tuna. Such treatment can reduce spoilage and wastage thereby potentially increasing revenue. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Chromium allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M B; Johansen, J D; Menné, Torkil

    2003-01-01

    Most studies investigating chromium allergy have been performed with Cr(VI). However, real exposure to chromium from leather products includes both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). We have determined and compared the minimum elicitation threshold (MET) concentration for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Cr......(III) was concluded to play an important role in chromium allergy, because Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were both capable of eliciting eczema at low concentrations. Rather than regarding chromium dermatitis as a result of Cr(VI) allergy alone, it may be more correct to consider it as a result of a combined Cr(III) and Cr...

  6. The effect of carbon monoxide pretreatment exposure time on the colour stability and quality attributes of vacuum packaged beef steaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooyen, Lauren Anne; Allen, Paul; Crawley, Sarah M; O'Connor, David I

    2017-07-01

    The effect of 5% CO pretreatments prior to vacuum packaging of beef striploin steaks (Longissimus thoracis et lumborum, LTL) on quality attributes, primarily colour stability was investigated. The aim was to determine the optimum pretreatment that would induce the desirable red colour, while allowing discoloration to occur by the end of a 28-day display period (2°C), so as to not mask spoilage. A range of pretreatment exposure times (1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 15 and 24h) were applied to steaks using a gas mixture of 5% CO, 60% CO 2 and 35% N 2 . The 5h CO pretreatment exposure time achieved the desirable colour and discoloration reached unacceptable levels (a*=12, C*=16) by the use-by date (28days), thus ensuring consumers' of a reliable visual indication of freshness and addressing concerns about safety. The 5% CO pretreatment had no negative effect on microbiological safety, lipid oxidation, cooking loss and WBSF measurements at the end of storage (P>0.05). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. ...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  9. Determination of stability constants of iron(III and chromium(III-nitrilotriacetate-methyl cysteine mixed complexes by electrophoretic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brij Bhushan Tewari

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The stability constants of Fe(III and Cr(III with methyl cysteine and nitrilotriacetate (NTA were determined by paper electrophoretic technique. Beside binary ternary complexes have also been studied, in which nitrilotriacetate and methyl cysteine acts as primary and secondary ligand, respectively. The stability constants of mixed ligand complexes metal (M-nitrilotriacetate-methyl cysteine have been found to be 5.72 plus or minus 0.09 and 5.54 plus or minus 0.11 (log K values for Fe(III and Cr(III complexes, respectively, at 35 oC and ionic strength 0.1 M.

  10. Hydrogen bonding of formamide, urea, urea monoxide and their thio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ab initio and DFT methods have been employed to study the hydrogen bonding ability of formamide, urea, urea monoxide, thioformamide, thiourea and thiourea monoxide with one water molecule and the homodimers of the selected molecules. The stabilization energies associated with themonohydrated adducts and ...

  11. Hydrogen bonding of formamide, urea, urea monoxide and their thio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Ab initio and DFT methods have been employed to study the hydrogen bonding ability of for- mamide, urea, urea monoxide, thioformamide, thiourea and thiourea monoxide with one water molecule and the homodimers of the selected molecules. The stabilization energies associated with the monohydrated ...

  12. Carbothermal synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon-supported nano zero-valent iron with enhanced stability and activity for hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Hu, Yuchen; Jiang, Baojiang; Zou, Jinlong; Tian, Guohui; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-15

    Composites of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) are prepared by using simultaneous carbothermal reduction methods. The reactivity and stability of nZVI are expected to be enhanced by embedding it in the ordered pore channels. The structure characteristics of nZVI/OMC and the removal pathway for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by nZVI/OMC are investigated. Results show that nZVI/OMC with a surface area of 715.16 m(2) g(-1) is obtained at 900 °C. nZVI with particle sizes of 20-30 nm is uniformly embedded in the OMC skeleton. The stability of nZVI is enhanced by surrounding it with a broad carbon layer and a little γ-Fe is derived from the passivation of α-Fe. Detection of ferric state (Fe 2p3/2, around 711.2eV) species confirms that part of the nZVI on the outer surface is inevitably oxidized by O2, even when unused. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) (50 mg L(-1)) by nZVI/OMC is near 99% within 10 min through reduction (dominant mechanism) and adsorption. nZVI/OMC has the advantage in removal efficiency and reusability in comparison to nZVI/C, OMC and nZVI. This study suggests that nZVI/OMC has the potential for remediation of heavy metal pollution in water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chromium Oxidation State in Planetary Basalts: Oxygen Fugacity Indicator and Critical Variable for Cr-Spinel Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A. S.; Burger, P. V.; Le, Loan; Papike, J. J.; Jone, J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cr is a ubiquitous and relatively abundant minor element in basaltic, planetary magmas. At the reduced oxidation states (stability and Cr concentration of magmatic phases such as spinel, clinopyroxene, and olivine. However, understanding the Cr valence in quenched melts has historically been plagued with analytical issues, and only recently has reliable methodology for quantifying Cr valence in quenched melts been developed. Despite this substantial difficulty, the pioneering works of Hanson and Jones and Berry and O'Neill provided important insights into the oxidation state of Cr in in silicate melts. Here we present a series of 1-bar gas mixing experiments performed with a Fe-rich basaltic melt in which have determined the Cr redox ratio of the melt at over a range of fO2 values by measuring this quantity in olivine with X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). The measured Cr redox ratio of the olivine phenocrysts can be readily converted to the ratio present in the conjugate melt via the ratio of crystal-liquid partition coefficients for Cr3+ and Cr2+. We have applied these results to modeling Cr spinel stability and Cr redox ratios in a primitive, iron-rich martian basalt.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  15. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  16. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Import Surveillance International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vented fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters and fireplaces. Watch This Video View CO ... Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, ...

  18. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and ... Fear Act Data USA.gov Report an Unsafe Product Contact Us: ...

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... United States CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC ... and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004– ...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Job Opportunities Inspector General Regulations, Laws & Standards ... monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. More than 150 people in the Unites States ...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon ... All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center ... Camping Equipment Home Heating Equipment On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Website Feedback Connect with Us: Facebook Instagram YouTube Twitter Blog SlideShare GooglePlus Flickr Report an Unsafe Product ...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with ... Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the ...

  8. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  9. Gum karaya (Sterculia urens) stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles: characterization and applications for the removal of chromium and volatile organic pollutants from water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinod, V.T.P.; Waclawek, S.; Senan, Ch.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Pešková, K.; Černík, M.; Somashekarappa, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 23 (2017), s. 13997-14009 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : nanoscale zerovalent iron * ray photoelectron-spectroscopy * groundwater remediation * hexavalent chromium * xanthan gum * guar gum * waste-water Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  10. Study of mechanism of methanol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using radioactive carbon isotope C14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Yu.B.; Rozovskij, A.Ya.; Liberov, L.G.; Slivinskij, E.V.; Lin, G.I.; Loktev, S.M.; Bashkirov, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanism of methanol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen (in the presence of CO 2 ) on various catalysts using radioactive carbon oxides C 14 O and C 14 O 2 was investigated. In the presence of copper-zinc-aluminum and zinc-chromium oxides the methanol synthesis from CO and H 2 occurs via carbon dioxide intermediacy. On a fused iron catalyst the synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is the main rout to get the lowest alcohols

  11. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreola, F.; Barbieri, L.; Bondioli, F.; Cannio, M.; Ferrari, A.M.; Lancellotti, I.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr 0.04 Sn 0.97 SiO 5 and green Ca 3 Cr 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr 2 O 3 . The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr 2 O 3

  12. On-site remediation of chromium-contaminated sediments by combination of sediment washing and stabilization with magnesium oxide/limestone mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildt, C.; Gibert, O.; Cortina, J.L. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Coscera, G. [Compania General de Sondeos CGS, S.A., Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The remediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soils and sediments is of significant value to industrial areas around the world. The spread of such pollutants can result in a potential risk of entering the groundwater system and being transported to potential receptors. Leaching techniques can be an effective treatment option for the metal removal from soils and sediments. This approach consists of washing or leaching the contaminated soil with an appropriate reagent and the subsequent treatment of the leaching in an above-ground installation (on-site treatment) where metals can be removed and concentrated into a smaller volume. Among the heavy metals, chromium is a commonly identified soil contaminant, particularly in sites with intensive economic activities including agriculture, industrial, mining and mineral processing. (orig.)

  13. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is important in the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates . It stimulates fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis, which are important for brain function and other body processes. Chromium also aids in insulin action and glucose metabolism. Food Sources The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast. ...

  14. Chromium carcinogenicity: California strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeff, G V; Satin, K; Painter, P; Zeise, L; Popejoy, C; Murchison, G

    1989-10-01

    Hexavalent chromium was identified by California as a toxic air contaminant (TAC) in January 1986. The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) concurred with the findings of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate the carcinogenicity of chromium in both animals and humans. CDHS did not find any compelling evidence demonstrating the existence of a threshold with respect to chromium carcinogenesis. Experimental data was judged inadequate to assess potential human reproductive risks from ambient exposures. Other health effects were not expected to occur at ambient levels. The theoretically increased lifetime carcinogenic risk from a continuous lifetime exposure to hexavalent chromium fell within the range 12-146 cancer cases per nanogram hexavalent chromium per cubic meter of air per million people exposed, depending on the potency estimate used. The primary sources found to contribute significantly to the risk of exposure were chrome platers, chromic acid anodizing facilities and cooling towers utilizing hexavalent chromium as a corrosion inhibitor. Evaluation of genotoxicity data, animal studies and epidemiological studies indicates that further consideration should be given to the potential carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium via the oral route.

  15. Iron monoxide photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestakov, D. A.; Parker, D. H.; Baklanov, A. V.

    2005-02-01

    The photodissociation of Fe56O was studied by means of the velocity map imaging technique. A molecular beam of iron atoms and iron monoxide molecules was created using an electrical discharge with an iron electrode in a supersonic expansion of molecular oxygen. The ground state iron atom Fe(D45) and FeO concentrations in the molecular beam have been estimated. The dissociation energy of the FeO XΔ5 ground electronic state was found to be D00(FeO )=4.18±0.01eV. The effective absorption cross section of FeO at 252.39nm (vac), leading to the Fe(D45)+O(P3) dissociation channel, is ˜1.2×10-18cm2. A (1+1) resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectrum of Fe56O in the region 39550-39580 cm-1 with rotational structure has been observed, but not assigned. Angular distributions of Fe(D45) and Fe(D35) products for the channel FeO →Fe(D4,35)+O(P3) have been measured at several points in the 210-260nm laser light wavelength region. The anisotropy parameter varies strongly with wavelength for both channels.

  16. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium......, the stabilities of reductant and luminol solutions were studied. The linear range of the calibration curve for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was 1-400 mu g l(-1). The detection limit was 0.12 mu g l(-1) for chromium(III) and 0.09 mu g l(-1) for chromium(VI), respectively. The precision at the 20 mu g l(-1) level...... was 1.4% for chromium(III) and 2.5% for chromium(VI), respectively. The accuracy of the chromium(III) determination was determined by analysis of the NIST standard reference material 1643c, Trace elements in water with the result 19.1 +/- 1.0 mu g Cr(III) l(-1) (certified value 19.0 +/- 0.6 mu g Cr...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  18. 29 CFR 1917.24 - Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monoxide content of the atmosphere in a room, building, vehicle, railcar, or any enclosed space shall be... employees shall be removed from the enclosed space if the carbon monoxide concentration exceeds a ceiling of 100 ppm (0.01%). (b) Testing. Tests to determine carbon monoxide concentration shall be made when...

  19. Chromium and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  20. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...

  1. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  2. Sociomateriality - More than Jargon Monoxide?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kautz, Karlheinz; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2012-01-01

    to new insights, others expose a cursory treatment and partial appreciation of the idea. In addition, sociomateriality as a new worldview has been criticized for introducing yet more academic jargon monoxide. Although existing research and debates show some potential for progressing the theorizing...... in IS. Towards this aim, the reader is invited to attend a prolonged monologue – characterized by honesty, frank observations and wit – delivered by the court jester and directed to the sovereigns based on their writings. The intention is to contribute with a stimulating recital that builds on open...

  3. Electrocatalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel de Jesus Santiago Farias

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses some important aspects related to the carbon monoxide electrooxidation reaction on Pt single crystal electrodes in acidic media. The mechanistic aspects are discussed in terms of the formation of compact structures developed when CO is adsorbed. The main ideas presented here are focused on the mechanistic aspects that take into account the existence of such structures. The classical kinetic mechanisms of Lagmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal are discussed considering the superficial mobility of CO or nucleation-growing of islands formed by oxygen-containing adsorbates.

  4. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  5. NAMMA CARBON MONOXIDE BY ATTENUATED LASER TRANSMISSION (COBALT) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Carbon mOnoxide By Attenuated Laser Transmission (COBALT) dataset includes measurements of the carbon monoxide mixing ratio and derived carbon monoxide...

  6. Determination of total chromium in tanned leather samples used in car industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, Michaela; Rezić, Iva; Ujević, Darko; Steffan, Ilse

    2011-03-01

    Despite the high competition of synthetic fibers leather is nowadays still widely used for many applications. In order to ensure a sufficient stability of the skin matrix against many factors, such as microbial degradation, heat and sweat, a tanning process is indispensable. Using chromium (III) for this purpose offers a multitude of advantages, thus this way of tanning is widely applied. During the use of chromium tanned leather as clothing material as well as for decoration/covering purposes, chromium is extracted from the leather and may then cause nocuous effects to human skin, e.g. allergic reactions. Thus the knowledge of the total chromium content of leather samples expected to come into prolonged touch with human skin is very important. In car industry leather is used as cover for seats, steering wheel and gearshift lever The chromium contents often chromium tanned leather samples used in car industry were determined. First all samples were dried at 65 degrees C overnight and then cut in small pieces using a ceramic knife, weighed and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma--optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after acidic microwave assisted digestion. The total chromium amounts found were in the range from 19 mg/g up to 32 mg/g. The extraction yield of chromium from leather samples in sweat is approximately 2-7%. Thus especially during long journeys in summer chromium can be extracted in amounts which may cause nocuous effects for example on the palm of the hands or on the back.

  7. Chromium in Postmortem Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek-Adamska, Danuta; Lech, Teresa; Konopka, Tomasz; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2018-04-17

    Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the negative effects caused by the presence and constant increase in concentration of heavy metals in the environment, as well as to the determination of their content in human biological samples. In this paper, the concentration of chromium in samples of blood and internal organs collected at autopsy from 21 female and 39 male non-occupationally exposed subjects is presented. Elemental analysis was carried out by an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. Reference ranges of chromium in the blood, brain, stomach, liver, kidneys, lungs, and heart (wet weight) in the population of Southern Poland were found to be 0.11-16.4 ng/mL, 4.7-136 ng/g, 6.1-76.4 ng/g, 11-506 ng/g, 2.9-298 ng/g, 13-798 ng/g, and 3.6-320 ng/g, respectively.

  8. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  9. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0% and nickel does not exceed 50.0%

  10. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  11. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI... cement; or (4) Where the employer has objective data demonstrating that a material containing chromium or...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms... objective data demonstrating that a material containing chromium or a specific process, operation, or...

  13. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...... established that codeposition of Cr2O3 nanoparticles is a general feature of DC chromium electrodeposition....

  14. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1910.1026 Section 1910.1026 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms... objective data demonstrating that a material containing chromium or a specific process, operation, or...

  15. Mechanism of chromium poisoning the conventional cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Yu, Guangsen; Zeng, Shumao; Parbey, Joseph; Xiao, Shuhao; Li, Baihai; Li, Tingshuai; Andersson, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Chromium poisoning the La0.875Sr0.125MnO3 (LSM) cathode for solid oxide fuel cells is a critical issue that can strongly affect the stability. In this study, we evaluate the temperature distribution in a SOFC based on a 3D model and then combine conductivity test and material computation to reveal the effects of chromium in SUS430 stainless steels on LSM conductivities. The starch concentration in LSM pellets and the applied pressure on the contact with interconnect materials show close relationships with the chromium poisoning behavior. The density functional theory (DFT) computing results indicate that chromium atoms preferably adsorb on the MnO2-terminated and La (Sr)-O-terminated (001) surfaces. The resulting conclusions are expected to deeply understand mechanism of chromium deactivating conventional cathodes at some typical operational conditions, and offer crucial information to optimize the structure to avoid the poisoning effect.

  16. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet İbrahim Turan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of death following attempted suicide and accidental exposures. Although clinical presentation depends on the duration and the intensity of exposure, the assessment of the severity of intoxication is difficult. A small percentage of patients who show complete initial recovery may develop delayed neurological deficits. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning is a rare and poor prognosis neurologic disorders and there is no specific treatment. We present a case with early onset of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning with typical cranial imaging findings in a child with atypical history and clinical presentation.

  17. Chromium oxide catalysts in the dehydrogenation of alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airaksinen, S.

    2005-07-01

    Light alkenes, such as propene and butenes, are important intermediates in the manufacture of fuel components and chemicals. The direct catalytic dehydrogenation of the corresponding alkanes is a selective way to produce these alkenes and is frequently carried out using chromia/alumina catalysts. The aim of this work was to obtain structure-activity information, which could be utilised in the optimisation of this catalytic system. The properties of chromia/alumina catalysts were investigated by advanced in situ and ex situ spectroscopic methods, and the activities were measured in the dehydrogenation of isobutane. The dehydrogenation activity of chromia/alumina was attributed to coordinatively unsaturated redox and non- redox Cr{sup 3+} ions at all chromium loadings. In addition, the oxygen ions in the catalyst appeared to participate in the reaction. The reduction of chromia/alumina resulted in formation of adsorbed surface species: hydroxyl groups bonded to chromia and alumina were formed in reduction by hydrogen and alkanes, and carbon- containing species in reduction by carbon monoxide and alkanes. Prereduction with hydrogen or carbon monoxide decreased the dehydrogenation activity. The effect by hydrogen was suggested to be related to the amount of OH/H species on the reduced surface affecting the number of coordinatively unsaturated chromium sites, and the effect by carbon monoxide to the formation of unselective chromium sites and carboncontaining species. The chromia/alumina catalysts were deactivated with time on stream and in cycles of (pre)reduction- dehydrogenation-regeneration. The deactivation with time on stream was caused mainly by coke formation. The nature of the coke species changed during dehydrogenation. Carboxylates and aliphatic hydrocarbon species formed at the beginning of the reaction and unsaturated/aromatic hydrocarbons and graphite- like species with increasing time on stream. The deactivation in several dehydrogenation- regeneration

  18. Protect Yourself from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-20

    Learn about carbon monoxide - a colorless, odorless gas - and how to protect yourself and your family.  Created: 11/20/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 12/4/2007.

  19. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  20. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker...... after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months of followup....

  1. An unusual case of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, P L; Levesque, B; Martel, R; Prud'homme, H; Bellemare, D; Barbeau, C; Lachance, P; Rhainds, M

    1999-07-01

    Carbon monoxide, a gas originating from incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, is an important cause of human deaths. In this paper, we describe an unusual carbon monoxide poisoning in a dwelling without obvious sources of combustion gases, for which two adults had to be treated in a hyperbaric chamber. Carbon monoxide readings were taken in the house and in the neighboring homes. Methane gas and nitrogen oxide levels were also monitored in the house air. Soil samples were collected around the house and tested for hydrocarbon residues. The investigation revealed the presence of a pocket of carbon monoxide under the foundation of the house. The first readings revealed carbon monoxide levels of 500 ppm in the basement. The contamination lasted for a week. The investigation indicated that the probable source of contamination was the use of explosives at a nearby rain sewer construction site. The use of explosives in a residential area can constitute a major source of carbon monoxide for the neighboring populations. This must be investigated, and public health authorities, primary-care physicians, governmental authorities, and users and manufacturers of explosives must be made aware of this problem.

  2. Electrocatalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel de Jesus Santiago Farias

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho discute alguns aspectos importantes relacionados à reação de eletrooxidação do monóxido de carbono sobre monocristais de platina, em meio ácido. Aspectos mecanísticos são discutidos em termos da formação das estruturas compactas que o CO forma quando este é adsorvido. As principais idéias aqui apresentadas, levam em consideração as existências dessas estruturas. Os clássicos mecanismos Lagmuir-Hinshelwood e Eley-Rideal são aqui discutidos, especialmente o primeiro considerando a mobilidade do CO e também a nucleação e crescimento de ilhas formadas por espécies adsorvidas contendo oxigênio.////////// This work discusses some important aspects related to the carbon monoxide electrooxidation reaction on Pt single crystal electrodes in acidic media. The mechanistic aspects are discussed in terms of the formation of compact structures developed when CO is adsorbed. The main ideas presented here are focused on the mechanistic aspects that take into account the existence of such structures. The classical kinetic mechanisms of Lagmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal are discussed considering the superficial mobility of CO or nucleation-growing of islands formed by oxygen-containing adsorbates.

  3. Acute Severe Chromium Poisoning After Dermal Exposure to Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chi Lin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute chromium poisoning related to dermal involvement has rarely been reported in the literature. We report a case of acute severe chromium poisoning through skin exposure as a result of a chemical burn of 15% of the body surface area and multiple organ failure after short-term exposure. Medical interventions, including mechanical ventilation, continuous venovenous hemofiltration, and plasmapheresis were performed. In addition, a chelating agent, dimercapto-propane sulfonic acid, was infused intravenously, combined with intravenous N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid as adjuvant therapy. The patient was discharged on day 33 without long-term sequelae. The consequence of transdermal exposure of hexavalent chromium should not be overlooked.

  4. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes normally are used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium-nickel steels in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  5. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall......, the studies show that the reactions have many similarities, but also a few critical differences. In agreement with experiment, the chromium system requires a change from low- to high-spin in the catalytic cycle, whereas the manganese system can proceed either with spin inversion or entirely on the high......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  6. Chromium Uptake Efficiency of Spinacea olaracea from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the uptake of chromium by Spinacea olaracea and its accumulation in roots and shoots of plants grown in pots at various concentrations of chromium (30, 60, 90,120,150 mg/l). The results revealed that the levels of chromium accumulation in roots and shoots were higher at minimum ...

  7. Unstable angina and exposure to carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzan, M V; Cacciottolo, J M; Mifsud, S

    1994-10-01

    Inhalation of small amounts of carbon monoxide diminishes the pain threshold in patients with stable angina pectoris. The aim of this study was to identify and describe patients who had been exposed unknowingly to toxic inhalations of this gas and subsequently presented to hospital with a clinical picture of unstable angina. Blood carboxyhaemoglobin levels of 104 patients referred with unstable angina to a coronary care unit were determined on admission. The likely source of carbon monoxide was identified in all patients. Three patients had definite carbon monoxide intoxication. Another five patients had evidence of minor exposure. When the three cases with carbon monoxide poisoning were excluded, the mean carboxyhaemoglobin level was 2.5% (+/- 1.3) for smokers (n = 30) and 0.6% (+/- 0.5) for non-smokers (n = 71). Use of fossil fuel combustion in an enclosed environment was responsible for the three most serious intoxications and one of the minor cases. We suggest that a number of patients admitted for coronary care with unstable angina may have significant carbon monoxide poisoning. This intoxication is often overlooked by attending physicians with the result that high concentration oxygen therapy is not administered, when it is in fact a necessary part of treatment.

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkharov, V.I.; Yar-Mukhamedov, Sh.Kh.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings has been studied depending on the conditions of their formation; the specific features of the mechanism of oxidation at 1200 deg in an air atmosphere have been elucidated. It has been established that kinetics of high temperature oxidation of the coatings depends essentially on the conditions of their formation and on the composition of steel to which the coating is applied. It has been shown that two oxidation mechanisms are possible: by diffusion of the residual chromium through a carbide layer along the carbide grain boundaries outwards or, when there is no residual chromium, by chemical reaction of carbon combustion and oxidation of the liberated chromium. The comparison of oxidation kinetic curves of the samples of 38KhMYuA, 35KhGSA, and DI-22 steels with and without coating has shown that the coatings under study have a better protective effect on 38KhMYuA steel than on 35KhGSA, although without coating oxidability of the first steel is higher than that of the second

  9. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium (chromium (VI) ion from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    taye

    2015-04-01

    Apr 1, 2015 ... industrial discharges (Wang and Cheng, 2009). Hexavalent Chromium (Cr (VI) is a by-product released into the aquatic environment by many industrial activities such as leather tanning, chrome plating, stainless steel welding, pigment production and nuclear weapon production (Gonzalez et al., 2003).

  10. Environmental biochemistry of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, M E; Amrhein, C; Frankenberger, W T

    1994-01-01

    Chromium is a d-block transitional element with many industrial uses. It occurs naturally in various crustal materials and is discharged to the environment as industrial waste. Although it can occur in a number of oxidation states, only 3+ and 6+ are found in environmental systems. The environmental behavior of Cr is largely a function of its oxidation state. Hexavalent Cr compounds (mainly chromates and dichromates) are considered toxic to a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and are mobile in soil/water systems, much more so than trivalent Cr compounds. This is largely because of differing chemical properties: Hexavalent Cr compounds are strong oxidizers and highly soluble, while trivalent Cr compounds tend to form relatively inert precipitates at near-neutral pH. The trivalent state is generally considered to be the stable form in equilibrium with most soil/water systems. A diagram of the Cr cycle in soils and water is given in Fig. 6 (Bartlett 1991). This illustration provides a summary of environmentally relevant reactions. Beginning with hexavalent Cr that is released into the environment as industrial waste, there are a number of possible fates, including pollution of soil and surface water and leaching into groundwater, where it may remain stable and, in turn, can be taken up by plants or animals, and adsorption/precipitation, involving soil colloids and/or organic matter. Herein lies much of the environmental concern associated with the hexavalent form. A portion of the Cr(VI) will be reduced to the trivalent form by inorganic electron donors, such as Fe2+ and S2-, or by bioprocesses involving organic matter. Following this conversion, Cr3+ can be expected to precipitate as oxides and hydroxides or to form complexes with numerous ligands. This fraction includes a vast majority of global Cr reserves. Soluble Cr3+ complexes, such as those formed with citrate, can undergo oxidation when they come in contact with manganese dioxide, thus reforming

  11. The electrochemistry of chromium, chromium-boron and chromium-phosphorus alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, T.P.; Ruf, R.R.; Latanision, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    It is fairly well established that chromium-metalloid interactions represent the key to understanding the remarkable corrosion behavior of TM-Cr-M glasses; (Fe, Ni, Co,...)-Cr-(P, Si, C, S). The character and kinetics of passive film growth on the glasses are being studied ni order to assess the role of the film former, chromium, and the metalloids in the passivation process. A series of thin film microcrystalline chromium, Cr-B and Cr-P binary alloys have been fabricated by physical vapor deposition techniques. Vacuum melted conventionally processed chromium has also been studied. Examination of these materials in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and lM HCl by voltammetry, potentiostatic and impedance techniques yields the following conclusion: 1. Pure chromium with a grain size varying from < 400 A to 0.5 mm exhibits no well defined differences in electrochemical behavior in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. 2. The tremendous corrosion resistance of Cr-B alloys has been confirmed. 3. The beneficial effects observed for boron alloyed with chromium may be considered surprising in view of the neutral/negative influence of alloying boron with iron, i.e. Fe/sub 80/B/sub 20/. 4. The interaction of the electrochemistry of the metalloid constituent with that of the transition base element determines the corrosion behavior. 5. Preliminary work with Cr-P alloys indicates that certain compositions exhibit promising properties - certain films were found to be intact after two days of immersion in concentrated HCl. Further work is in progress

  12. Iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A specification is given for iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloys suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding, which utilize the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and are characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. A range of compositions is given. (author)

  13. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...

  14. Chromium Chemistry in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium (VI) (Cr) is carcinogenic and a threat to human and ecological health. There are adequate and acceptable methods to characterize and assess Cr contaminated sites. Cr chemistry in the environment is well understood. There are documented methods to address Cr contaminat...

  15. Combustion characteristics of hydrogen. Carbon monoxide based gaseous fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, J. J.; White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.; Lecren, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating the combuston performance of a family of fuel gases based on a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These gases, in addition to being members of a family, were also representative of those secondary fuels that could be produced from coal by various gasification schemes. In particular, simulated Winkler, Lurgi, and Blue-water low and medium energy content gases were used as fuels in the experimental combustor rig. The combustor used was originally designed as a low NOx rich-lean system for burning liquid fuels with high bound nitrogen levels. When used with the above gaseous fuels this combustor was operated in a lean-lean mode with ultra long residence times. The Blue-water gas was also operated in a rich-lean mode. The results of these tests indicate the possibility of the existence of an 'optimum' gas turbine hydrogen - carbon monoxide based secondary fuel. Such a fuel would exhibit NOx and high efficiency over the entire engine operating range. It would also have sufficient stability range to allow normal light-off and engine acceleration. Solar Turbines Incorporated would like to emphasize that the results presented here have been obtained with experimental rig combustors. The technologies generated could, however, be utilized in future commercial gas turbines.

  16. Pulmonary edema in acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kun Sang; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Myung Uk

    1974-01-01

    Acute carbon monoxide poisoning has frequently occurred in Korean, because of the coal briquette being widely used as fuel in Korean residences. Carbon monoxide poisoning has been extensively studied, but it has been sparsely reported that pulmonary edema may develop in acute CO poisoning. We have noticed nine cases of pulmonary edema in acute CO poisoning last year. Other possible causes of pulmonary edema could be exclude in all cases but one. The purpose of this paper is to describe nine cases of pulmonary edema complicated in acute CO poisoning and discuss the pathogenesis and the prognosis

  17. Treatment of chromium contaminated soil using bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwanti, Ipung Fitri; Putri, Tesya Paramita; Kurniawan, Setyo Budi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium contamination in soil occurs due to the disposal of chromium industrial wastewater or sludge that excess the quality standard. Chromium concentration in soil is ranged between 1 to 300 mg/kg while the maximum health standard is 2.5 mg/kg. Bioremediation is one of technology that could be used for remediating heavy metal contamination in soil. Bacteria have an ability to remove heavy metal from soil. One bacteria species that capable to remove chromium from soil is Bacillus subtilis. The aim of this research was to know the chromium removal percentage in contaminated soil by Bacillus subtilis. Artificial chromium contaminated soil was used by mixing 425gram sand and chromium trichloride solution. Concentration of chromium added into the spiked soil were 50, 75, and 100 mg/L. During 14 days, pH, soil temperature and soil moisture were tested. Initial and final number of bacterial colony and chromium concentration analysed. The result showed that the highest percentage of chromium removal was 11% at a chromium concentration of 75 mg/L

  18. NAMMA CARBON MONOXIDE BY ATTENUATED LASER TRANSMISSION (COBALT) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA COBALT dataset measures the carbon monoxide mixing ratio and derives carbon monoxide mixing ratio profiles in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere...

  19. Remediation of soils contaminated with chromium using citric and hydrochloric acids: the role of chromium fractionation in chromium leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu-Fen; Huang, Chin-Yuan; Tu, Yao-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Acid washing is a common method for soil remediation, but is not always efficient for chromium-contaminated soil. Both soil particle size and the forms of chromium existing in the soil affect the efficiency of soil washing. Laboratory batch and column dissolution experiments were conducted to determine the efficiencies of citric and hydrochloric acids as agents to extract chromium from soils contaminated with chromium. The effects of soil particle size and chromium fractionation on Cr leaching were also investigated. About 90% of chromium in the studied soil existed either in residual form or bound to iron and manganese oxides, and Cr fraction distributions were similar for all soil particle sizes. Almost all exchangeable and carbonate-bound chromium was removed by washing once with 0.5 M HCl, whereas organic chromium was more effectively removed by washing with citric acid rather than with HCl solution of the same concentration. For chromium fractions that were either bound to Fe-Mn oxides or existed as residual forms, the efficiencies of acid washing were usually 20% or less, except for 0.5 M HCl solution, which had much higher efficiencies. Separation of the soil sample by particle size before the separate washing of the soil fractions had little improvement on the chromium removal.

  20. Carbon Monoxide as Indoor Pollutant in Kano Metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    ABSTRACT: The level of carbon monoxide concentrations in three different residential areas of Kano municipality has been determined. Health effects of carbon monoxide are not only determined by its pollution level, but the time spent breathing polluted air. Samples of carbon monoxide gas in three different residential ...

  1. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1994-01-01

    According to the measurements made in this study, the only situation in which chromium (+6) could exist in a plutonium process solution is one in which a feed containing chromium is dissolved in a glass pot dissolver in high nitric acid concentration and at high temperature. But when the resulting feed is prepared for ion exchange, the chemical treatment reduces chromium to the +3 state. Any solution being processed through the evaporator will only contain chromium in the +3 state and any chromium salts remaining in the evaporator bottoms will be chromium +3 salts

  2. Carbon monoxide observation in M31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combes, F.; Encrenaz, P.J.; Lucas, R.; Weliachew, L.

    1978-01-01

    Emission from carbon monoxide has been detected in the spiral arms of the galaxy Andromeda (M31), and a partial radial distribution along the major axis is presented. This latter shows that CO emission is only found in the inside of the HI spiral arms [fr

  3. Cutaneous manifestations of acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, R.; Greer, K.E.; Harman, L.E. Jr.

    1979-10-01

    A patient with acute carbon monoxide poisoning due to leakage of gas from the exhaust system in his automobile noted edema and blister formation over large areas of the skin of one half of his body. Rhabdomyolysis, acute but transient renal insufficiency, and hemolytic anemia developed subsequently.

  4. CARBON MONOXIDE AND THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, tasteless, odorless, and non-irritating gas formed when carbon in fuel is not burned completely. It enters the bloodstream through the lungs and attaches to hemoglobin (Hb), the body's oxygen carrier, forming carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and there...

  5. Responses of endogenous proline in rice seedlings under chromium exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroponic experiments were performed to exam the dynamic change of endogenous proline in rice seedlings exposed to potassium chromate chromium (VI or chromium nitrate chromium (III. Although accumulation of both chromium species in rice seedlings was obvious, more chromium was detected in plant tissues of rice seedlings exposed to chromium (III than those in chromium (VI, majority being in roots rather than shoots. Results also showed that the accumulation capacity of chromium by rice seedlings was positively correlated to chromium concentrations supplied in both chromium variants and the accumulation curve depicted an exponential trend in both chromium treatments over the entire period of exposure. Proline assays showed that both chromium variants induced the change of endogenous proline in shoots and roots of rice seedlings. Chromium (VI of 12.8 mg/L increased proline content significantly (p

  6. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, A; Goldenstein, H.; Mei, P.R.; Albertin, E.; Fuoco, R.; Mariotto, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  7. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  8. A homoleptic chromium(iii) carboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydora, O L; Hart, R T; Eckert, N A; Martinez Baez, E; Clark, A E; Benmore, C J

    2018-04-03

    Structurally characterized chromium(iii) carboxylates form clusters with a variety of bridging groups introduced from aqueous reaction conditions. The first homoleptic monomeric chromium(iii) carboxylate has been prepared using an anhydrous salt metathesis synthetic route. The carboxylate groups coordinate the chromium in a bidentate chelate yielding an aliphatic soluble complex. The complex was characterized by a variety of methods including high energy X-ray diffraction, FD-MS, IR and Raman spectroscopy, complemented by DFT modeling.

  9. Serum chromium concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FPG). Lower serum chromium concentrations and poor chromium status are common in type 2 diabetics in Osogbo, Nigeria. Keywords: Diabetes, serum chromium, glucose tolerance, insulin. International Journal of Natural and Applied Sciences ...

  10. On the composition of nonstoichiometric europium monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat'eva, N.I.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of of investigation into chemical composition, homogeneity region, type of disordering of nonstoichiometric europium monoxide. Precision methods of X-ray diffraction, electron-microscopic, atomic-absorption chemical analysis were used. It is shown that lattice volume reduces with increase of oxygen content in the oxide. For monocrystal of EuO 1.01 composition a=5.146 A. All samples of europium monoxide are characterized by low conductivity. Conductivity value changes by two orders (from 10 -8 to 10 -6 Θ -1 ·cm -1 ) when passing from the sample of stoichiometric composition to maximally disordered one. The disordering is considered according to the type of charged cation vacancies, leading to occurrence of equivalent number of electron defects of positive holes. 4 refs.; 1 tab

  11. Elastic and mechanical properties of lanthanide monoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafiq, M. [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Arif, Suneela [Department of Physics, Hazara University, Mansehra (Pakistan); Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ahma5532@gmail.com [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Asadabadi, S. Jalali [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Hezar Gerib Avenue, Isfahan 81744 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maqbool, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306 (United States); Rahnamaye Aliabad, H.A. [Department of Physics, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Elastic, mechanical and thermal properties of rare-earth lanthanide monoxide are theoretically investigated. • Higher values of Young’s modulus indicate that these compounds are stiffer. • These compounds show anisotropic character and also show resistance against deforming force due to compressible character. • These mechanically stable materials can be effectively used for practical applications. - Abstract: In this article we communicate theoretical results of the mechanical properties of lanthanide monoxide LnO (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Ho, Er and Yb) i.e., bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, anisotropic ratio, Kleinman parameters, Poisson’s ratio, Lame’s coefficients, sound velocities for shear and longitudinal waves, and Debye temperature. Cauchy pressure and B/G ratio are also investigated to explore the ductile and brittle nature of these compounds. The calculations are performed with the density functional theory based full potential linearized augmented plane waves (FP-LAPW) method. The calculated results reveal that lanthanide based monoxides are mechanically stable and possess good resistive power against elastic deformations. Therefore, these mechanically stable materials can effectively be used for practical applications. The computed DOSs shows the metallic character of these compounds. Contour plots of the electron charge densities are also computed to reveal the nature of bonding in these compounds.

  12. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  13. Principles of alloy design in high nitrogen 12% chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goecmen, A.; Ernst, P.; Holmes, P.

    1999-01-01

    12% chromium steels are hardened by a martensitic transformation and by precipitation reactions of the martensite during a subsequent tempering treatment. The original alloy design of these steels is based on the intensifying effect of C on the martensitic transformation hardening as well as on the effects of V and Mo on intensity and stability of carbide precipitation hardening reactions. Advanced alloy design of high carbon 12% chromium steels makes use of f.c.c.-MX type carbonitrides to improve grain refinement and tempering resistance, whereas alloying with about 0.05 wt.-% nitrogen already plays a decisive role. In this paper, new alloy design opportunities provided by high nitrogen are reviewed, which promise to achieve a best possible compromise between grain size limitation, particle hardening and particle stability of 12% chromium steels. The crucial effects of the solubility product of MX-type phases on grain coarsening resistance, precipitation hardening and particle stability are reviewed. The advantages of high nitrogen steels to improve these properties are rationalized to result from the lower solubility of nitrides compared with carbides. As an advantageous opportunity of the achievable higher grain coarsening resistance, the normalizing temperature in high nitrogen steels can be increased in order to increase the amount of the less soluble and thereby slow coarsening f.c.c.-nitrides. In addition, as a consequence of a higher normalizing temperature, the solubility gap of nitrides in the austenite is expanded, which in turn enables an effective precipitation hardening due to low soluble nitrides in the metastable austenite before the martensitic transformation

  14. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  15. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium +6 could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium +3 to chromium +6 by nitric. acid; and the reduction of chromium +6 back to chromium +3 by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium +3 to chromium +6 was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium +6 back to chromium +3 by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the +6 oxidation state and would not exist in the +6 state in the final process waste solutions

  16. Roentgenoelectronic investigation into oxidation of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, A.G.; Rozenfel'd, I.L.; Kazanskij, L.P.; Machavariani, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    Kinetics of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloy oxidation (of the Kh13 and Kh18N10T steels) in oxygen was investigated using X-ray electron spectroscopy. It was found that according to X-ray electron spectra chromium oxidation kinetics in the iron-chromium alloy differs significantly from oxidation kinetics of chromium pattern. Layer by layer X-ray electron analysis showed that chromium is subjected to a deeper oxidation as compared to iron, and accordingly, Cr 2 O 3 layer with pure iron impregnations is placed between the layer of mixed oxide (Fe 3 O 4 +Cr 2 O 3 ) and metal. A model of the iron-chromium alloy surface is suggested. The mixed oxide composition on the steel surface is presented as spinel Fesub(2+x)Crsub(1-x)Osub(y)

  17. Chromium tolerance and reduction potential of Staphylococci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to study the microbiology of chromium tolerance and reduction at a fly ash dumping site in South Africa, 15 core samples were investigated. It was shown that the 30 year old dumping site exhibited high concentrations of Cr (VI) ranging from 1.6 to 9.6 mg/g. From this contaminated fly ash dumping site, 67 chromium ...

  18. Utilization of alum sludge as chromium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahari, Nazirul Mubin; Sidek, Lariyah Mohd; Zulkifli, Muhammad Azmeer Asyraf; Hua, Chua Kok; Jalil, Nurulhidayah Abdul

    2017-09-01

    The amount of alum sludge produced at water treatment plant has become a problem where it is highly costly in order to dispose them. Various research was conducted to find the most suitable and economic alternative to recycle and reused of alum sludge. In this study, alum sludge was retrieved from Waterworks where it was dewatered, dried, grounded and sieved to obtain smallest particle sizes of alum sludge. The synthetic water was prepared at the laboratory in as it was used to imitate the properties of real water contaminated with chromium. This study was conducted to determine the percentage reduction of chromium concentration in synthetic water by using alum sludge as absorbent. The percentage reduction of chromium was observed under the effect of initial concentration of chromium and the height of alum sludge. The result indicates that chromium concentration reduction was the highest at the lowest initial concentration and at the highest height of alum sludge and vice versa.

  19. Compact Instrument for Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposed the development of a rugged, compact, and automated instrument for the high sensitivity measurement of tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO)....

  20. Carbon Monoxide Exposure in Youth Ice Hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnow, Theodore; Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P

    2017-11-01

    To examine the effect of ice resurfacer type on carboxyhemoglobin levels in youth hockey players. We hypothesized that players in arenas with electric resurfacers would have normal, stable carboxyhemoglobin levels during games, whereas those in arenas with internal combustion engine (IC) resurfacers would have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin levels. Prospective cohort study. Enclosed ice arenas in the northeastern United States. Convenience sample of players aged 8 to 18 years old in 16 games at different arenas. Eight arenas (37 players) used an IC ice resurfacer and 8 arenas (36 players) an electric resurfacer. Carboxyhemoglobin levels (SpCO) were measured using a pulse CO-oximeter before and after the game. Arena air was tested for carbon monoxide (CO) using a metered gas detector. Players completed symptom questionnaires. The change in SpCO from pregame to postgame was compared between players at arenas with electric versus IC resurfacers. Carbon monoxide was present at 6 of 8 arenas using IC resurfacers, levels ranged from 4 to 42 parts per million. Carbon monoxide was not found at arenas with electric resurfacers. Players at arenas with IC resurfacers had higher median pregame SpCO levels compared with those at electric arenas (4.3% vs 1%, P electric group (2.8% vs 1%, P = 0.01). There were no significant differences in symptom scores. Players at arenas operating IC resurfacers had significantly higher SpCO levels. Youth hockey players in arenas with IC resurfacers have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin during games and have elevated baseline carboxyhemoglobin levels compared with players at arenas with electric resurfacers. Electric resurfacers decrease the risk of CO exposure.

  1. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  2. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10...

  3. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, E.

    1994-01-01

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  4. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, E.

    1994-12-31

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and {gamma}-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG).

  5. Three-body abrasive wear behaviour of metastable spheroidal carbide cast irons with different chromium contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, Vasily; Pastukhova, Tatiana; Chabak, Yuliia; Efremenko, Alexey; Shimizu, Kazumichi; Kusumoto, Kenta; Brykov, Michail

    2018-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment and chromium contents (up to 9.1 wt.%) on the wear resistance of spheroidal carbide cast iron (9.5 wt.% V) was studied using optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, dilatometry and three-body abrasive testing. It was found that quenching from 760 C and 920 C improved the alloys' wear resistance compared to the as-cast state due to the formation of metastable austenite transforming into martensite under abrasion. The wear characteristics of alloys studied are 1.6 - 2.3 times higher than that of reference cast iron (12 wt.% V) having stable austenitic matrix. Chromium addition decreases surface damage due to the formation of M_7C_3 carbides, while it reduces wear resistance owing to austenite stabilization to abrasion-induced martensite transformation. The superposition of these factors results in decreasing the alloys' wear behaviour with chromium content increase.

  6. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  7. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  8. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darko H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction. Migration of chromium in the soil is conditioned by the level of chromium soil contamination, the soil organic matter content, and rainwater acidity. Chromium (III and chromium(VI were determined by spectrophotometric method with diphenilcarbazide in acidic media. Comparing the results of chromium speciation in leachate obtained by experimental model systems and geochemical modelling calculations using Visual MINTEQ model, a correlation was observed regarding the influence of the tested parameters. Leachate solutions showed that the concentration of Cr depended on the organic matter content. The influence of pH and soil organic matter content is in compliance after its definition through experimental and theoretical way. The computer model - Stockholm Humic Model used to evaluate the leaching results corresponded rather well with the measured values.

  9. Chromium VI adsorption on cerium oxide nanoparticles and morphology changes during the process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recillas, Sonia; Colon, Joan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Engineering School, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Casals, Eudald; Gonzalez, Edgar [Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Autonomous University of Barcelona Campus, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Puntes, Victor [Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Autonomous University of Barcelona Campus, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Catalan Institute of Research and Advanced Studies, Passeig Lluis Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Sanchez, Antoni, E-mail: antoni.sanchez@uab.cat [Department of Chemical Engineering, Engineering School, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Font, Xavier [Department of Chemical Engineering, Engineering School, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    In this study, suspended cerium oxide nanoparticles stabilized with hexamethylenetetramine were used for the removal of dissolved chromium VI in pure water. Several concentrations of adsorbent and adsorbate were tested, trying to cover a large range of possible real conditions. Results showed that the Freundlich isotherm represented well the adsorption equilibrium reached between nanoparticles and chromium, whereas adsorption kinetics could be modeled by a pseudo-second-order expression. The separation of chromium-cerium nanoparticles from the medium and the desorption of chromium using sodium hydroxide without cerium losses was obtained. Nanoparticles agglomeration and morphological changes during the adsorption-desorption process were observed by TEM. Another remarkable result obtained in this study is the low toxicity in the water treated by nanoparticles measured by the Microtox commercial method. These results can be used to propose this treatment sequence for a clean and simple removal of drinking water or wastewater re-use when a high toxicity heavy metal such as chromium VI is the responsible for water pollution.

  10. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both...... species were detected by use of the luminol-hydrogen peroxide chemiluminescence system. Linear calibration for both species was established over the concentration range 1-1000 micrograms l-1. The precision at the 20 micrograms l-1 level was 3.5% for chromium(iii) and 3.3% for chromium(vi), respectively...

  11. Sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on lead sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on lead sulfide was investigated in dependence on pH, time of sorption, and on the concnetrations of sorbate and sorbent. The mechanisms of the sorption of Crsup(3+) and CrOsub(4)sup(2-) traces on lead sulfide are discussed; a difference between CrOsub(4)sup(2-) sorption on PbS and α-Fesub(2)Osub(3) was found. Sulfates and molybdates affect the removal of chromates from aqueous solutions. Lead sulfide carrier prepared in this work was also used for the preconcentration of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) from tap water. (author)

  12. Reaction of Oxygen with Chromium and Chromium Carbide at Low O2 Pressures and High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Dong O.; Kang, Sung G.; Paik, Young N.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation rate of chromium carbide has been measured continuously using thermogravimetric analysis at different oxygen pressures ranging from 1.33x10 -2 to 2.67x10 -1 Pa O 2 at 1000-1300 .deg. C. The oxidation of pure chromium has also been studied between 1000-1300 .deg. C under 6.67x10 -2 Pa O 2 and compared with that of chromium carbide. The oxidation of chromium carbide showed a linear behavior which was different from that of chromium. The oxidation rate of chromium carbide increased with increasing temperature and oxygen pressure was lower than of pure chromium. Above 1200 .deg. C, the volatile oxide was formed and evaporated causing a weight loss. The compositions and morphology of the oxide were studied with X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope, respectively. The morphology of oxide changed with varying temperature and pressure. The oxide scale was consisted of mainly two different layers of Cr 2 O 3 and CrO, and the properties of oxide scale were correlated with oxidation behavior. The oxide film formed in the above test condition has been detached from the carbide surface. The crack and pore were thought to be from CO gas evolving at the interface of chromium carbide and its oxide and the major factor of the linear behavior of chromium carbide

  13. Potential of Live Spirulina platensis on Biosorption of Hexavalent Chromium and Its Conversion to Trivalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colla, Luciane Maria; Dal'Magro, Clinei; De Rossi, Andreia; Thomé, Antônio; Reinehr, Christian Oliveira; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalga biomass has been described worldwide according their capacity to realize biosorption of toxic metals. Chromium is one of the most toxic metals that could contaminate superficial and underground water. Considering the importance of Spirulina biomass in production of supplements for humans and for animal feed we assessed the biosorption of hexavalent chromium by living Spirulina platensis and its capacity to convert hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium, less toxic, through its metabolism during growth. The active biomass was grown in Zarrouk medium diluted to 50% with distilled water, keeping the experiments under controlled conditions of aeration, temperature of 30°C and lighting of 1,800 lux. Hexavalent chromium was added using a potassium dichromate solution in fed-batch mode with the aim of evaluate the effect of several additions contaminant in the kinetic parameters of the culture. Cell growth was affected by the presence of chromium added at the beginning of cultures, and the best growth rates were obtained at lower metal concentrations in the medium. The biomass removed until 65.2% of hexavalent chromium added to the media, being 90.4% converted into trivalent chromium in the media and 9.6% retained in the biomass as trivalent chromium (0.931 mg.g(-1)).

  14. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metalceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C, according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. Results. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p < 0.01 and elastic modulus (p < 0.001 of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Conclusion. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  15. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-06-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive/weaker reactions were observed to disc B (1 of 10), disc C (1 of 10), and disc D, disc E, and disc I (4 of 10 each). As no controls reacted to any of the discs, the weak reactions indicate allergic reactions. Positive patch test reactions to 1770 ppm chromium(VI) in the serial dilutions of potassium dichromate were observed in 7 of 10 patients. When the case group was narrowed down to include only the patients with a current positive patch test reaction to potassium dichromate, elicitation of dermatitis by both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) discs was observed in 4 of 7 of patients. Many of the patients reacted to both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surfaces. Our results indicate that both chromium(VI) and chromium(III) pose a risk to chromium-allergic patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  17. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods and bare electrodes - approved 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    This specification covers corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods for use with the atomic hydrogen and gas-tungsten-arc welding processes and bare electrodes for use with the submerged arc and gas metal-arc welding processes. These welding rods and electrodes include those alloy steels designated as corrosion- or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4% and nickel does not exceed 50%

  18. Electrochemistry of chromium(0)-aminocarbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskovcova, Irena; Rohacova, Jana; Meca, Ludek; Tobrman, Tomas; Dvorak, Dalimil; Ludvik, Jiri

    2005-01-01

    Two series of chromium(0)-(aryl)aminocarbene complexes substituted on the ligand phenyl ring were prepared and electrochemically investigated: pentacarbonyl((N,N-dimethylamino)(phenyl)carbene(chromium(0) (Ia-e) and chelated tetracarbonyl((η 2 -N-allyl-N-allylamino)(phenyl)carbene(chromium(0) (IIa, c-e). For comparison, a tungsten analogue of IIc (III) and a chromium chelate bearing a methyl substituent instead of the phenyl group IV were taken into the study. The intramolecular interactions of p-substituents on the ligand phenyl ring with the reduction and oxidation centres of the molecule of complex (followed electrochemically using LFER [P. Zuman, Substituent Effects in Organic Polarography, Plenum Press, New York, 1967]) enabled to localize the corresponding electron transfer. The influence of the type of coordination, the substituent on the ligand phenyl ring and the central metal atom on oxidation and reduction potentials is discussed

  19. Thermal reactions in mixtures of micron-sized silicon monoxide and titanium monoxide: redox paths overcoming passivation shells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jandová, V.; Pokorná, D.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Bezdička, Petr; Křenek, T.; Netrvalová, M.; Cuřínová, P.; Pola, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2018), s. 503-516 ISSN 0922-6168 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Silicon monoxide * Titanium monoxide * High-temperature * Oxygen-transfer reactions * Titanium suboxides * Titanium silicide * Methylene blue depletion Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 1.369, year: 2016

  20. Thermal Reactions in Mixtures of Micron-sized Silicon Monoxide and Titanium Monoxide - Redox Paths Overcoming Passivation Shells.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jandová, Věra; Pokorná, Dana; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Bezdička, Petr; Křenek, T.; Netrvalová, M.; Cuřínová, Petra; Pola, Josef

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2018), s. 503-516 ISSN 0922-6168 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04010169 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : silicon monoxide * titanium monoxide * hifh-temperature Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.369, year: 2016

  1. Color evaluation of carbon monoxide treated porcine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, P R; Gomide, L A M; Ramos, E M; Stringheta, P C; Parreiras, J F M

    2004-12-01

    The stability of liquid porcine blood, treated with carbon monoxide (CO) at different pH values (7.40, 6.70, and 6.00) up to its complete saturation, was studied. Lowering the pH from 7.40 to 6.70 resulted in a decrease in the amount of CO necessary to obtain 100% carboxyhemoglobin. Further pH lowering to 6.00 did not result in additional reduction in the amount of gas. During 4 days of refrigerated storage CO treated liquid blood maintained, at every pH, a more stable and attractive red color than fresh blood, which was a result of an increase (Predness) and b(*) (yellowness) values and no variation (P>0.05) on L(*) (lightness) value. Hue (h(*)) and chroma (C(*)) decreased in the untreated blood but not in the CO-treated blood. The results indicate that blood saturation with CO yields a product having greater potential for use in meat products without compromising its visual appearance.

  2. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from water at pH≤7 and in 90 min contact time. Maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 0.788 mg Cr+6/g granular ferric hydroxide. Although relatively good adsorption of sulfate and chloride had been specified in this study, the interfering effects of these two anions had not been detected in concentrations of 200 and 400 mg/L. The absorbability of hexavalent chromium by granular ferric hydroxide could be expressed by Freundlich isotherm with R2>0.968. However, the disadvantage was that the iron concentration in water was increased by the granular ferric hydroxide. Nevertheless, granular ferric hydroxide is a promising adsorbent for chromium removal, even in the presence of other interfering compounds, because granular ferric hydroxide treatment can easily be accomplished and removal of excess iron is a simple practice for conventional water treatment plants. Thus, this method could be regarded as a safe and convenient solution to the problem of chromium-polluted water resources.

  3. Chromium in human nutrition: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, W

    1993-04-01

    This review summarizes the results of 15 controlled studies supplementing defined Cr(III) compounds to subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Three of these (3-4 mumol Cr/d for > 2 mo) produced no beneficial effects: serum glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations remained unchanged. The remaining 12 interventions improved the efficiency of insulin or the blood lipid profile of subjects (ranging from malnourished children and healthy middle-aged individuals to insulin-requiring diabetics). In addition, three cases of impaired glucose tolerance after long-term total parenteral alimentation responding to Cr supplementation have been reported. Chromium potentiates the action of insulin in vitro and in vivo; maximal in vitro activity requires a special chemical form, termed Glucose Tolerance Factor and tentatively identified as a Cr-nicotinic acid complex. Its complete structural identification is a major challenge to chromium research. The development and validation of a procedure to diagnose chromium status is the second challenge. Such a test would allow the assessment of incidence and severity of deficiency in the population and the selection of deficiency in the population and the selection of chromium-responsive individuals. The third challenge is the definition of chromium's mode of action on parameters of lipid metabolism that have been reported from some studies but not others. Future research along these lines might establish whether chromium deficiency is a factor in the much discussed "Syndrome X" of insulin resistance.

  4. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...... the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) as well. The amounts of chromium found in all skin layers were significantly higher when potassium dichromate was applied to the skin compared with chromium chloride or chromium nitrate. Chromium could only be detected in the recipient phase after application...... of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...

  5. Reduction of carbon monoxide. Past research summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrock, R.R.

    1981-10-01

    Research programs for the year on the preparation, characterization, and reactions of binuclear tantalum complexes are described. All evidence to date suggest the following of these dimeric molecules: (1) the dimer does not break into monomers under mild conditions; (2) intermolecular hydride exchange is not negligible, but it is slow; (3) intermolecular non-ionic halide exchange is fast; (4) the ends of the dimers can rotate partially with respect to one another. The binuclear tantalum hydride complexes were found to react with carbon monoxide to give a molecule which is the only example of reduction of CO by a transition metal hydride to give a complex containing a CHO ligand. Isonitrides also reacted in a similar manner with dimeric tantalum hydride. (ATT)

  6. Lead Monoxide: Two-Dimensional Ferromagnetic Semiconductor Induced by Hole-Doping

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yao

    2017-04-12

    We employ first-principles calculations to demonstrate ferromagnetic ground states for single- and multi-layer lead monoxide (PbO) under hole-doping, originating from a van Hove singularity at the valence band edge. Both the sample thickness and applied strain are found to have huge effects on the electronic and magnetic properties. Multi-layer PbO is an indirect band gap semiconductor, while a direct band gap is realized in the single-layer limit. In hole-doped single-layer PbO, biaxial tensile strain can enhance the stability of the ferromagnetic state.

  7. Chromium-molybdenum steels for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Because ferritic steels have been found to have excellent resistance to swelling when irradiated in a fast-breeder reactor, Cr-Mo steels have recently become of interest for nuclear applications, both as cladding and duct material for fast-breeder reactors and as a first-wall and blanket structural material for fusion reactors. In this paper we will assess the Cr-Mo steels for fusion reactor applications. Possible approaches on how Cr-Mo steels may be further developed for this application will be proposed. Generally, the Cr-Mo steels can be divided into two categories: unmodified, basically Cr-Mo-C steels and Cr-Mo-C steels modified by the addition of carbide-forming elements - in addition to chromium and molybdenum. Extensive research and development efforts have been conducted on the unmodified steels, especially 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 12 Cr-Mo steels. Considerable work has also been done on 12 Cr-Mo steels modified with additions of vanadium, niobium, titanium and tungsten. In recent years much of the research effort on this type of alloy has been directed at developing modified Cr-Mo steels with less than 12% Cr (approx. <= 9%) for applications where the 'stainless' properties imparted by chromium additions of at least 12% are not needed. We will examine the unmodified and modified steels in terms of hardenability, precipitation processes (stability at elevated temperatures), strength, and toughness. Where possible, we will discuss the effects of irradiation on these properties. Such a study leads to the types of tradeoffs that may be necessary when choosing between the well-researched unmodified 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel and a high-chromium modified steel. (orig.)

  8. Exposure to chromium dust from homes in a Chromium Surveillance Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, N C; Stern, A H; Lioy, P J

    1997-01-01

    Investigators used a Lioy-Weisel-Wainman sampler to analyze the chromium content in house-dust samples obtained from households near chromium waste sites in Hudson County, New Jersey. Chromium concentrations in dust (microg/g)-indicative of non-background source contributions-were significantly higher in Jersey City homes than in control homes outside of Hudson County (228 and 111 microg/g, respectively; p amount of chromium available for contact and a direct measure of exposure potential, were also higher in Jersey City homes than in control homes (31 ng/cm2 and 14 ng/cm2, respectively; p = .008). Near some of the sites, investigators found elevated chromium dust loads more frequently in homes occupied by at least one household member who had elevated urine chromium, as determined in a separate screening project, than in homes occupied by members whose urine chromium was not elevated. Individuals with elevated urine chromium levels were found less frequently in homes in which good housekeeping practices were evident than in homes absent such practices.

  9. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  10. Epidemiology of acute carbon monoxide poisoning in a Spanish region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas-Laita, A; Ruiz-Mambrilla, M; Gandía, F; Cerdá, R; Martín-Escudero, J C; Pérez-Castrillón, J L; Díaz, G

    2001-01-01

    In Spain, as in most of the world, the incidence of acute carbon monoxide poisoning is probably underestimated. During an eighteen-month period we studied, by means of a standardized data collection form, all the cases of acute carbon monoxide poisoning that were diagnosed in 2 university hospitals. During the study, 154 patients were diagnosed with carbon monoxide poisoning. The mean age was 32.2+/-15.5 years. The two principal exposure sites were the kitchen (43%) and bathroom (23%). The majority of the cases related to malfunction of the water heater (30%) and of the central heating (23%) and 68% occurred in the home. Improper combustion of butane (31%), propane (13%), and natural gas (12%) were most frequent. The most prevalent clinical manifestations were headache (94%), dizziness (56%), nausea (45%), loss of consciousness (38%), and weakness (34%). Five patients died. In 14.4%, symptoms suggested delayed neurological syndrome. The largest number of cases of poisoning occurred during the months of December and January. Compared with previous Spanish series or with the antecedent year, acute carbon monoxide poisoning has a high prevalence in our region. Two factors appear to be essential to the accurate diagnosis of acute carbon monoxide poisoning: 1) the ability of emergency room physicians to recognize the clinical symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning and 2) access to a carbon monoxide-oximeter.

  11. Separation of valent forms of chromium (3) and chromium (6) by coprecipitation with iron (3) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirmadov, B.; Khamidov, B.O.; Egorova, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Soption 9.62x10 -5 mol/l of 51 Cr radioactive isotope in oxidation states 3 and 6 by iron(3) hydroxide in 1 mol/l of KNO 3 and KCl depending on pH medium is investigated. The region of practically total concentration of Cr(3) and Cr(6 + ) (pH=3-6.5) is determined. The results of spectrophotometric investigations, calculational data on distribution of hydroxocation forms of chromium (3) and of chromium (6) anions and sorption by iron (3) hydroxide permit to characterize sorption of chromium forms in different stages of oxidation. The methods of chromium (3) and chromium (6) separation by coprecipitation of iron (3) hydroxide and their precipitation from it is developed on the above foundation

  12. Oral Chromium Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Brocato, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen when inhaled. However, inhalational exposure to Cr(VI) affects only a small portion of the population, mainly by occupational exposures. In contrast, oral exposure to Cr(VI) is widespread and affects many people throughout the globe. In 2008, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) released a 2-year study demonstrating that ingested Cr(VI) was carcinogenic in rats and mice. The effects of Cr(VI) oral exposure is mitigated by reduction in the gut, however a portion evades the reductive detoxification and reaches target tissues. Once Cr(VI) enters the cell, it ultimately gets reduced to Cr(III), which mediates its toxicity via induction of oxidative stress during the reduction while Cr intermediates react with protein and DNA. Cr(III) can form adducts with DNA that may lead to mutations. This review will discuss the potential adverse effects of oral exposure to Cr(VI) by presenting up-to-date human and animal studies, examining the underlying mechanisms that mediate Cr(VI) toxicity, as well as highlighting opportunities for future research. PMID:26231506

  13. Oral Chromium Exposure and Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2015-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen when inhaled. However, inhalational exposure to Cr(VI) affects only a small portion of the population, mainly by occupational exposures. In contrast, oral exposure to Cr(VI) is widespread and affects many people throughout the globe. In 2008, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) released a 2-year study demonstrating that ingested Cr(VI) was carcinogenic in rats and mice. The effects of Cr(VI) oral exposure are mitigated by reduction in the gut; however, a portion evades the reductive detoxification and reaches target tissues. Once Cr(VI) enters the cell, it ultimately gets reduced to Cr(III), which mediates its toxicity via induction of oxidative stress during the reduction while Cr intermediates react with protein and DNA. Cr(III) can form adducts with DNA that may lead to mutations. This review will discuss the potential adverse effects of oral exposure to Cr(VI) by presenting up-to-date human and animal studies, examining the underlying mechanisms that mediate Cr(VI) toxicity, as well as highlighting opportunities for future research.

  14. Chromium getter studies in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.; Blanchard, W.R.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied the effects of the deposition of thin films (approx.0.1 μm) of chromium onto approx.70% of the torus area of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The purpose of these experiments was to test the difference between high surface coverage and high pumping speed gettering schemes with respect to minimizing oxygen impurity generation in high power tokamak discharges. The initial Cr deposition had significant effects on vessel outgassing and subsequent plasma performance: the outgassing of H 2 O, CO, and CO 2 decreased by a factor of ten, oxygen impurity radiation decreased by a factor of two, the plasma Z/sub eff/ decreased from 1.3 to 1.1, and the plasma density limit increased by 20%. This improvement correlates with a significant reduction of the edge radiation as the density limit is approached. The effects of the initial and subsequent Cr depositions were relatively long lasting, exhibiting time constants of the order of weeks. We attribute the observed impurity reduction to a modification of the oxide surface on the vessel wall, which is apparently a significant impurity source for oxygen. 17 refs., 6 figs

  15. Syncope Associated with Carbon Monoxide Poisoning due to Narghile Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Ozkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Narghile smoking is a traditional method of tobacco use, and it has been practiced extensively for 400 years. Traditionally, narghile smoking is a matter of culture mainly in Middle East, Asia, and Africa. In recent years, its use as a social activity has increased worldwide, especially among young people. Narghile smoking is an unusual cause of carbon monoxide poisoning. Narghile smoking, compared to cigarette smoking, can result in more smoke exposure and greater levels of carbon monoxide. We present an acute syncope case of a 19-year-old male patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning after narghile smoking.

  16. Electrochemical and chemical corrosion of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drazic, Dragutin M.; Popic, Jovan P.

    2004-01-01

    It was shown that chromium in deaerated sulfuric acid of pH 1 exhibits two stable corrosion potentials, depending whether the metal had previously been in contact with air or subjected to activation by cathodic evolving hydrogen. Electrochemical polarization measurements, as well as the measurements of the actual metal dissolution rate at the corrosion potential, anodic or cathodic polarization, using the analytical determination of Cr ions in the solution, or volumes of hydrogen evolved, showed that hydrogen can evolve on chromium by three different reaction mechanisms. The first one is the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction from H + ions at the bare chromium surface obtained by cathodic activation. This reaction and the active anodic dissolution of chromium determine one stable corrosion potential. The second reaction is the reaction of H + ions on the oxidized chromium surface which, coupled with the anodic dissolution of passivated chromium determines the other stable corrosion potential. The third one is the 'anomalous' or chemical reaction of chromium with water molecules and hydrogen ions whereby hydrogen is liberated. This is a potential independent reaction, occurring on the bare metal surface, and which is at pH 1 several times faster at the corrosion potential than the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction. The consequence is that the overall corrosion rate is several times faster than that determined by the usual electrochemical methods. The measurements were performed in the temperature interval 20 - 65 o C and apparent energies of activation for anodic, cathodic and anomalous dissolution reactions were estimated as 63.1, 19.5 and 66.9 kJ mol -1 , respectively. This implies that the anomalous dissolution rate increases more with the increase of temperature than the electrochemical corrosion rate. The applicability of the different methods of measuring electrochemical corrosion rates is discussed. (Author)

  17. Biotransformation of hexavalent chromium into extracellular chromium(III) oxide nanoparticles using Schwanniomyces occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Pallavi T; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita S

    2016-03-01

    To demonstrate biotransformation of toxic Cr(VI) ions into Cr2O3 nanoparticles by the yeast Schwanniomyces occidentalis. Reaction mixtures containing S. occidentalis NCIM 3459 and Cr(VI) ions that were initially yellow turned green after 48 h incubation. The coloration was due to the synthesis of chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles (Cr2O3NPs). UV-Visible spectra of the reaction mixtures showed peaks at 445 and 600 nm indicating (4)A2g → (4)T1g and (4)A2g → (4)T2g transitions in Cr2O3, respectively. FTIR profiles suggested the involvement of carboxyl and amide groups in nanoparticle synthesis and stabilization. The Cr2O3NPs ranged between 10 and 60 nm. Their crystalline nature was evident from the selective area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction patterns. Energy dispersive spectra confirmed the chemical composition of the nanoparticles. These biogenic nanoparticles could find applications in different fields. S. occidentalis mediated biotransformation of toxic Cr(VI) ions into crystalline extracellular Cr2O3NPs under benign conditions.

  18. Relative effects of chromium and niobium on microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of oxygen content in TiAl alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamirand, M.; Bonnentien, J.-L.; Ferriere, G.; Guerin, S.; Chevalier, J.-P.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of 2 at.% chromium and niobium on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-48Al-x(Cr, Nb) have been investigated for alloys with different oxygen content, ranging from ultra-high purity to doped alloys. Chromium and niobium additions have significant effects for the high purity alloys, whereas for alloys containing oxygen, no significant modification is observed due to the strong stabilizing effect of oxygen on the lamellar microstructure

  19. Chromium-induced skin damage among Taiwanese cement workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Po-Chih; Wu, Jyun-De; Sheu, Shiann-Cherng

    2016-10-01

    Little research has been done on the relationships between chromium exposure, skin barrier function, and other hygienic habits in cement workers. Our purpose was to investigate chromium-induced skin barrier disruption due to cement exposure among cement workers. One hundred and eight cement workers were recruited in this study. Urinary chromium concentration was used to characterize exposure levels. The biological exposure index was used to separate high and low chromium exposure. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was used to assess the skin barrier function. TEWL was significantly increased in workers with high chromium exposure levels than those with low chromium exposure levels (p = 0.048). A positive correlation was also found between urinary chromium concentration and TEWL (R = 0.28, p = 0.004). After adjusting for smoking status and glove use, a significant correlation between urinary chromium concentrations and TEWL remained. Moreover, workers who smoked and had a high chromium exposure had significantly increased TEWL compared to nonsmokers with low chromium exposure (p = 0.01). Skin barrier function of cement workers may have been disrupted by chromium in cement, and smoking might significantly enhance such skin barrier perturbation with chromium exposure. Decreased chromium skin exposure and smoking cessation should be encouraged at work. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chrome plating, pigments and leather tanning industries is an important and complex issue (EPA. 1994; Spence & Shi 2005). Among the various forms of ..... Giergiczny Z and Krol A 2008 Immobilization of heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Cr, Zn, Cd, Mn) in the mineral additions containing concrete composites. J. Hazard. Mater.

  1. The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, F.X.; Hahn, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Studies of ion implanted thermally oxidised chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhl, S.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of 99.99% pure chromium containing precise amounts of foreign elements has been studied and compared to the oxidation of pure chromium. Thirty-three foreign elements including all of the naturally occurring rare earth metals were ion implanted into chromium samples prior to oxidation at 750 0 C in oxygen. The role of radiation induced damage, inherent in this doping technique, has been studied by chromium implantations at various energies and doses. The repair of the damage has been studied by vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 800 0 C prior to oxidation. Many of the implants caused an inhibition of oxidation, the greatest being a 93% reduction for 2 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 of praseodymium. The distribution of the implant was investigated by the use of 2 MeV alpha backscattering and ion microprobe analysis. Differences in the topography and structure of the chromic oxide on and off the implanted area were studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to investigate if a rare earth-chromium compound of a perovskite-type structure had been formed. Lastly, the electrical conductivity of chromic oxide on and off the implanted region was examined at low voltages. (author)

  3. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevinc, Alper; Savli, Haluk; Atmaca, Hasan

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  4. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: Acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevinc, A.; Savli, H.; Atmaca, H. [Gaziantep University, Gaziantep (Turkey). School of Medicine

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  5. CT and clinical patterns in suicidal carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobovschek, M.; Geretsegger, C.; Weinberger, R.; Fartacek, R.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial CT is important to exclude the presence of a mass in the cavum cranii in case of an unclear suicide attempt, particularly a traumatic mass. It can be helpful also in cases of carbon monoxide intoxications. (orig.) [de

  6. Silicon Monoxide at 1 atm and Elevated Pressures: Crystalline or Amorphous?

    KAUST Repository

    AlKaabi, Khalid

    2014-03-05

    The absence of a crystalline SiO phase under ordinary conditions is an anomaly in the sequence of group 14 monoxides. We explore theoretically ordered ground-state and amorphous structures for SiO at P = 1 atm, and crystalline phases also at pressures up to 200 GPa. Several competitive ground-state P = 1 atm structures are found, perforce with Si-Si bonds, and possessing Si-O-Si bridges similar to those in silica (SiO2) polymorphs. The most stable of these static structures is enthalpically just a little more stable than a calculated random bond model of amorphous SiO. In that model we find no segregation into regions of amorphous Si and amorphous SiO2. The P = 1 atm structures are all semiconducting. As the pressure is increased, intriguing new crystalline structures evolve, incorporating Si triangular nets or strips and stishovite-like regions. A heat of formation of crystalline SiO is computed; it is found to be the most negative of all the group 14 monoxides. Yet, given the stability of SiO2, the disproportionation 2SiO (s) → Si(s)+SiO2(s) is exothermic, falling right into the series of group 14 monoxides, and ranging from a highly negative ΔH of disproportionation for CO to highly positive for PbO. There is no major change in the heat of disproportionation with pressure, i.e., no range of stability of SiO with respect to SiO2. The high-pressure SiO phases are metallic. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  7. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  8. Technological investigations of ferritic chromium steels with extra low concentrations of carbon and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, E.

    1976-01-01

    Ferritic chromium steels with extra low concentrations of C and N were examined by the Strauss Test and by other methods. The results show that resistance against intergranular corrosion can be reached by titanium concentrations ten times higher than the sum of C and N concentrations, whereas stability against pitting corrosion can be achieved by adding 1.3 % Mo. On grounds of the excellent corrosion resistance these steels will be of interest in nuclear technology

  9. Chromium Stable Isotope Fractionation - An Indicator of Hexavalent Chromium Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, A.; Johnson, T. M.; Bullen, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    Chromium is a common anthropogenic contaminant in surface water and ground water, and is also of interest in oceanography. It is redox-active; the two common valences in natural waters are Cr(VI), which is highly soluble and toxic, and Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble. Redox reactions thus control Cr mobility in aqueous solutions, and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is the most important reaction controlling attenuation of Cr in groundwater. Our results show that Cr(VI) reduction favors the lighter isotopes and leads to enrichment of heavier isotopes in the remaining Cr(VI). Cr isotope measurements thus show great promise as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction. We report here the first measurements of the magnitude of Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction and variations in δ 53Cr values obtained from three contaminated sites. Experiments were conducted to measure Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by suspensions of magnetite and unamended sediments from a local pond, Urbana, IL and San Francisco Estuary near Martinez, CA. Suspensions were incubated anaerobically with constant shaking, and complete Cr(VI) reduction occurred within a few days. Cr(VI) from intermediate time points in the experiments was purified via ion exchange and 53Cr/52Cr ratios were measured via TIMS with a double isotope spike. The instantaneous per mil fractionation, ɛ , was calculated assuming a Rayleigh fractionation model. The ɛ for Cr(VI) reduction on magnetite surfaces yielded a fractionation of -3.5 ‰ . The ɛ values for the pond and estuary sediments were -3.5 ‰ and -3.3 ‰ respectively. The size of this Cr isotope fractionation is encouraging, as current precision is 0.2 \\permil. δ 53Cr values in dissolved Cr(VI) from three contaminated sites range from 1.1 ‰ to 5.8 ‰ , suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred and has induced isotopic fractionation in these settings. δ 53Cr values measured from Cr(VI) in plating baths show little or no

  10. Inhibition of CO poisoning on Pt catalyst coupled with the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium in a dual-functional fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Hyoung-il; Chung, Young-Hoon; Lee, Myeong Jae; Yoo, Sung Jong; Bokare, Alok D; Choi, Wonyong; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2014-12-12

    We propose a method to enhance the fuel cell efficiency with the simultaneous removal of toxic heavy metal ions. Carbon monoxide (CO), an intermediate of methanol oxidation that is primarily responsible for Pt catalyst deactivation, can be used as an in-situ reducing agent for hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) with reactivating the CO-poisoned Pt catalyst. Using electro-oxidation measurements, the oxidation of adsorbed CO molecules coupled with the concurrent conversion of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was confirmed. This concept was also successfully applied to a methanol fuel cell to enhance its performance efficiency and to remove toxic Cr (VI) at the same time.

  11. Hexavalent Chromium IV-Free Primer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Michael J.; Buck, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Primer materials provide corrosion protection for metal parts as well as an increased adhesion between metallic substrates and thermal protection systems (TPSs). Current primers for use in cryogenic applications contain hexavalent chromium. This hexavalent chromium provides excellent corrosion protection even in a cryogenic environment, but it is a carcinogen that requires special equipment and waste control procedures to use. The hazardous nature of hexavalent chromium makes it an obsolescence risk in the future. This study included two phases of evaluation. Thirteen primers were initially identified as candidates and twelve of those primers were tested in phase 1. Four of the best performing candidates from phase 1 continued into phase 2 testing. Phase 1 testing consisted mostly of liquid constituent and physical property testing. Cryoflex and salt fog testing were included in phase 1 because of their importance to the overall success of a candidate material. Phase 2 consisted of physical, thermal, and mechanical properties for nominally processed and fabricated specimens.

  12. Review: hemodynamic response to carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, D.G.

    1988-04-01

    Historically, and at present, carbon monoxide is a major gaseous poison responsible for widespread morbidity and mortality. From threshold to maximal nonlethal levels, a variety of cardiovascular changes occur, both immediately and in the long term, whose homeostatic function it is to renormalize tissue oxygen delivery. However, notwithstanding numerous studies over the past century, the literature remains equivocal regarding the hemodynamic responses in animals and humans, although CO hypoxia is clearly different in several respects from hypoxic hypoxia. Factors complicating interpretation of experimental findings include species, CO dose level and rate, route of CO delivery, duration, level of exertion, state of consciousness, and anesthetic agent used. Augmented cardiac output usually observed with moderate COHb may be compromised in more sever poisoning for the same reasons, such that regional or global ischemia result. The hypotension usually seen in most animal studies is thought to be a primary cause of CNS damage resulting from acute CO poisoning, yet the exact mechanism(s) remains unproven in both animals and humans, as does the way in which CO produces hypotension. This review briefly summarizes the literature relevant to the short- and long-term hemodynamic responses reported in animals and humans. It concludes by presenting an overview using data from a single species in which the most complete work has been done to date.

  13. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  14. Carbon monoxide concentration forecasting in Santiago, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Patricio; Palacios, Rodrigo; Castillo, Alejandro

    2004-08-01

    In the city of Santiago, Chile, air quality is defined in terms of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 microm (PM10) concentrations. An air quality forecasting model based on past concentrations of PM10 and meteorological conditions currently is used by the metropolitan agency for the environment, which allows restrictions to emissions to be imposed in advance. This model, however, fails to forecast between 40 and 50% of the days considered to be harmful for the inhabitants every year. Given that a high correlation between particulate matter and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations is observed at monitoring stations in the city, a model for CO concentration forecasting would be a useful tool to complement information about expected air quality in the city. Here, the results of a neural network-based model aimed to forecast maximum values of the 8-hr moving average of CO concentrations for the next day are presented. Forecasts from the neural network model are compared with those produced with linear regressions. The neural network model seems to leave more room to adjust free parameters with 1-yr data to predict the following year's values. We have worked with 3 yr of data measured at the monitoring station located in the zone with the worst air quality in the city of Santiago, Chile.

  15. Formation and Reduction of Carbon Monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostami AA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The total amounts of carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 in the mainstream smoke of a burning cigarette during a steady draw were measured by a non-dispersive infrared (IR technique for a variety of flow rates. The temperature profiles in the cigarette were also measured under the same flow conditions. The data were used in a diffusion model to estimate the concentrations of these gases downstream of the pyrolysis zone. The contribution of pyrolysis in the generation of these gases was calculated using a kinetic model. The remaining CO and CO2 are attributed to processes occurring in the combustion zone. The calculated mean concentrations of carbon oxides behind the pyrolysis zone are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The contributions of pyrolysis and combustion to the formation of CO were found to be approximately 1/3 and 2/3 respectively. The results show that the peak temperature rises with an increase in the mainstream flow rate in the limited range of 0 to 200 mL/min. As a result, the concentrations of carbon oxides behind the pyrolysis zone also increase with the flow rate and reach plateaus at higher flow rates.

  16. Elevated carboxyhemoglobin: sources of carbon monoxide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchelli Ramirez, Herminia; Fernández Alvarez, Ramón; Rubinos Cuadrado, Gemma; Martinez Gonzalez, Cristina; Rodriguez Jerez, Francisco; Casan Clara, Pere

    2014-11-01

    Inhalation of carbon monoxide (CO) can result in poisoning, with symptoms ranging from mild and nonspecific to severe, or even death. CO poisoning is often underdiagnosed because exposure to low concentrations goes unnoticed, and threshold values for normal carboxyhemoglobin vary according to different authors. The aim of our study was to analyze carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels in an unselected population and detect sources of CO exposure In a cross-sectional descriptive study, we analyzed consecutive arterial blood gas levels processed in our laboratory. We selected those with COHb≥2.5% in nonsmokers and ≥5% in smokers. In these cases a structured telephone interview was conducted. Elevated levels of COHb were found in 64 (20%) of 306 initial determinations. Of these, data from 51 subjects aged 65±12 years, 31 (60%) of which were men, were obtained. Mean COHb was 4.0%. Forty patients (78%) were non-smokers with mean COHb of 3.2%, and 11 were smokers with COHb of 6.7%. In 45 patients (88.2%) we detected exposure to at least one source of ambient CO other than cigarette smoke. A significant proportion of individuals from an unselected sample had elevated levels of COHb. The main sources of CO exposure were probably the home, so this possibility should be explored. The population should be warned about the risks and encouraged to take preventive measures. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. First-Principles Investigations on Europium Monoxide

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2011-05-01

    Europium monoxide is both an insulator and a Heisenberg ferromagnet (Tc=69 K). In the present thesis, the author has investigated the electronic structure of different types of EuO by density functional theory. The on-site Coulomb interaction of the localized Eu 4f and 5d electrons, which is wrongly treated in the standard generalized gradient approximation method, is found to be crucial to obtain the correct insulating ground state as observed in experiments. Our results show that the ferromagnetism is stable under pressure, both hydrostatic and uniaxial. For both types of pressure an insulator-metal transition is demonstrated. Moreover, the experimentally observed insulator-metal transition in oxygen deficient and gadolinium-doped EuO is reproduced in our calculations for impurity concentrations of 6.25% and 25%. Furthermore, a 10- layer EuO thin film is theoretically predicted to be an insulator with a narrow band gap of around 0.08 eV, while the Si/EuO interface shows metallic properties with the Si and O 2p as well as Eu 5d bands crossing the Fermi level.

  18. Residential carbon monoxide poisoning from motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2011-01-01

    Although morbidity and mortality from accidental carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning are high in the United States, identification of common but poorly recognized sources should help prevention efforts. The study aimed to describe CO poisoning of home occupants due to a vehicle left running in an attached garage. News stories reporting incidents of US CO poisoning were collected daily from March 2007 to September 2009 via a news.Google.com search and data extracted. Patients were individuals reported in the media to have been poisoned with CO in their home by a vehicle running in the attached garage. Main outcome measures were frequency of occurrence, geographic distribution, patient demographics, and mortality. Of 837 CO poisoning incidents reported in US news media over 2 and a half years, 59 (8%) were the result of a vehicle left running in the garage. The elderly were disproportionately affected, with incidents most common in states with larger elderly populations and 29% of cases with age specified occurring in individuals older than 80 years. Among those older than 80 years, 15 of 17 were found dead at the scene. Residential CO poisoning from a vehicle running in the garage is common, disproportionately affects the elderly, has a high mortality rate, and should be preventable with a residential CO alarm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Recovery of Proteins and Chromium Complexes from Chromium – Containing Leather Waste (CCLW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gutti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromium – Containing Leather Waste (CCLW constitutes an environmental pollution problem to leather industries disposing the waste by landfill. The waste mainly consists of collagen and chromium III complexes. This work is a design of reactors to recover gelatin, polypeptides and chromium from CCLW. The results of the experiment shows that 68% of protein, based on dry weight of leather scraps, could be recovered. Three reactors with a total volume of 18 m3 was designed to handle 10,431 kg of waste generated from the tanning industries.

  20. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.J.; Qian, Q.F.; Hou, X.L.; Feng, W.Y.; Chai, Z.F.

    2000-01-01

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  1. Characteristics of autoignited laminar lifted flames in heated coflow jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-06-01

    The characteristics of autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. In result, as the jet velocity increased, the blowoff was directly occurred from the nozzle-attached flame without experiencing a stabilized lifted flame, in the non-autoignited regime. In the autoignited regime, the autoignited lifted flame of carbon monoxide diluted by nitrogen was affected by the water vapor content in the compressed air oxidizer, as evidenced by the variation of the ignition delay time estimated by numerical calculation. In particular, in the autoignition regime at low temperatures with added hydrogen, the liftoff height of the autoignited lifted flames decreased and then increased as the jet velocity increased. Based on the mechanism in which the autoignited laminar lifted flame is stabilized by ignition delay time, the liftoff height can be influenced not only by the heat loss, but also by the preferential diffusion between momentum and mass diffusion in fuel jets during the autoignition process. © 2012 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  2. Native Chromium Resistant Staphylococci Species from a Fly Ash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty-six chromium-resistant Staphylococci species belonging to S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. saprophyticus and S. arlettae were previously isolated from a chromium-polluted Fly ash (FA) dumping site in South Africa. However the genetic mechanisms responsible for chromium resistance were not known. Polymerase chain ...

  3. Quantitative determination of chromium in some vegetables in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium has been known to be a micronutrient for mammals for more than four decades. Deficiency in the body results to diabetes, infertility and cardiovascular diseases. However, progress in elucidating the role of chromium has proceeded slowly. Recent studies have shown a potential role of chromium in maintaining ...

  4. Assessment of the level of chromium species in the discharged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of chromium species in the discharged effluents of selected tanneries in the Amhara Region; Haik and Debre Berhan tanneries. The level of total chromium, and hexavalent chromium in the discharged effluent of the studied tanneries were determined using the ICP-OES, and ...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining a...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.2327 Section 73.2327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens shall conform in identify and specifications to the...

  7. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.1327 Section 73.1327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium oxide greens is principally chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3). (2) Color additive...

  8. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No. 1308-38-9...

  9. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan. SUMMARY... order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.2326 Section 73.2326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and specifications.The color additive chromium hydroxide green shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  12. Levels of Lead, Cadmium and Chromium in Oreochromis Niloticus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lead (Pb), Cadmium (Cd) and Chromium (Cr) levels in Oreochromis niloticus, aquatic plants, water and sawdust were collected and analyzed for Lead, Cadmium and Chromium using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results obtained showed that sawdust had the highest Lead and Chromium contents of 32.0 + 0.99 μg/g ...

  13. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  14. Effects of yttrium, aluminum and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted on thermal barrier systems to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium and aluminum in nickel-base alloy bond coatings and the effect of bond coating thickness on yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating life. Without yttrium in the bond coatings, the zirconia coatings failed very rapidly. Increasing chromium and aluminum in the Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coatings increased total coating life. This effect was not as great as that due to yttrium. Increased bond coat thickness was also found to increase life.

  15. Effect of carbon and silicon on nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium and iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khyakkinen, V.I.; Bezobrazov, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    The study is aimed at specifying the role of carbon and silicon in high-chromium melts nitridation processes. It is shown that in high-chromium melts of the Cr-Fe-C system the nitrogen solubility is reduced with the growth of carbon content and in the chromium concentration range of 70-100% at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa it is described by the lg[%N] Cr-Fe-C =lg[%N] cr-fe -0.098[%C] equation. While decreasing the temperature the nitrogen solubility in alloys is increased. Silicon essentially decreases the nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium. For the 0-10% silicon concentration range the relation between the equilibrium content of nitrogen and silicon at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa is described by the straight line equation [%N] Cr-Si =6.1-0.338 [%Si

  16. Metallic component with a chromium carbide base protective coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfla, T.A.; Tucker, R.C. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a coating system to protect metal components in sodium and helium cooled nuclear reactors. It includes a nickel or iron based alloy metal substrate, a first coat formed on the substrate and comprising chromium carbides and a binder selected among the chromium-nickel, chromium-cobalt, chromium-iron alloys and the super-alloys, the first coating being between 25 and 380 microns thick, and a surface coating comprising pure chromium carbides and being between 12.5 and 125 microns thick [fr

  17. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...... allergy, emphasizing that the investigation of chromium allergy is still far from complete. Our review article on chromium focuses on the allergen’s chemical properties, its potential exposure sources, and the allergen’s interaction with the skin, and also provides an overview of the regulations...

  18. Solar cycle variations in mesospheric carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae N.; Wu, Dong L.; Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Fontenla, Juan

    2018-05-01

    As an extension of Lee et al. (2013), solar cycle variation of carbon monoxide (CO) is analyzed with MLS observation, which covers more than thirteen years (2004-2017) including maximum of solar cycle 24. Being produced primarily by the carbon dioxide (CO2) photolysis in the lower thermosphere, the variations of the mesospheric CO concentration are largely driven by the solar cycle modulated ultraviolet (UV) variation. This solar signal extends down to the lower altitudes by the dynamical descent in the winter polar vortex, showing a time lag that is consistent with the average descent velocity. To characterize a global distribution of the solar impact, MLS CO is correlated with the SORCE measured total solar irradiance (TSI) and UV. As high as 0.8 in most of the polar mesosphere, the linear correlation coefficients between CO and UV/TSI are more robust than those found in the previous work. The photochemical contribution explains most (68%) of the total variance of CO while the dynamical contribution accounts for 21% of the total variance at upper mesosphere. The photochemistry driven CO anomaly signal is extended in the tropics by vertical mixing. The solar cycle signal in CO is further examined with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) 3.5 simulation by implementing two different modeled Spectral Solar Irradiances (SSIs): SRPM 2012 and NRLSSI. The model simulations underestimate the mean CO amount and solar cycle variations of CO, by a factor of 3, compared to those obtained from MLS observation. Different inputs of the solar spectrum have small impacts on CO variation.

  19. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  20. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...

  1. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption of Chromium from aqueous solution using river Watari sediment as an adsorbent was modeled. The influence of initial pH, solution temperature, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations on the adsorption efficiency was investigated using batch equilibrium assays. From the results obtained for the adsorption ...

  2. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  3. seasonal variation in chromium hexavalent and copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    GLOBAL JOURNAL OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES VOL 8, NO. 2, 2010: 143- ... Seasonal variation in heavy metal contamination of groundwater in the Jimeta- Yola area was investigated. The objectives ... and anthropogenic input is the only source influencing the contamination indices in the case of chromium hexavalent.

  4. Chromium Tolerance and Bioremoval by Cyanobacteria Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cyanobacterial species Nostoc calcicola HH-12 and Chroococcus minutus HH-11 isolated from a textile mill oxidation pond were examined individually and as consortium for their chromium(VI) tolerance and bioremoval from aqueous solutions. Both species were tolerant to the metal and showed significant increase ...

  5. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    In this study, removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Palmyra palm fruit seed carbon. (PPFSC) and commercial ... have studied the feasibility of less expensive materials such as alginate beads [15], wheat straw. [16], carbon develop from ... Arecaceae) is a largely populated tree in south India. EXPERIMENTAL.

  6. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Pt-, Fe-, and Zn-doped SnO2 Nanospheres and Carbon Monoxide Sensing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure and M-doped (M = Pt, Fe, and Zn SnO2 nanospheres were successfully synthesized via a simple and facile hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Chemical gas sensors were fabricated based on the as-synthesized nanostructures, and carbon monoxide sensing properties were systematically measured. Compared to pure, Fe-, and Zn-doped SnO2 nanospheres, the Pt-doped SnO2 nanospheres sensor exhibits higher sensitivity, lower operating temperature, more rapid response and recovery, better stability, and excellent selectivity. In addition, a theoretical study based on the first principles calculation was conducted. All results demonstrate the potential of Pt dopant for improving the gas sensing properties of SnO2-based sensors to carbon monoxide.

  7. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting the simu......Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...... the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) as well. The amounts of chromium found in all skin layers were significantly higher when potassium dichromate was applied to the skin compared with chromium chloride or chromium nitrate. Chromium could only be detected in the recipient phase after application...... of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...

  8. The Chromium is an essential element in the human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado Gamez, A.; Blanco Saenz, R.; Mora Morales, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Chromium is an essential element for human and animals, because it a preponderant function in the insulin metabolism as a glucose tolerance factor (GTF). The deficiency of chromium engenders a deterioration in the glucose metabolism due to bad efficiency of insulin. Because the importance of this element an exhaustive reference review was made and this presents some studies realized in laboratory animals and in human beings where it is prove with resuits the effect of chromium over the improvement of patients with non-insulin dependant diabetes. Three substances are presented as chromium active biological forms: a material rich in chromium known as glucose tolerance factor, chromium picolinate and a substance of low molecular weight LMWCr in its forms of apo and holo that contains chromium and it links the insulin receptor and improves its activity. Also this paper presents information about the condition of diabetes in Costa Rica. (Author) [es

  9. Extraction Of Chromium From Leather Chrome Shaving Dust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiqur Rahaman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Leather processing involves transformation of putrescible animal hides and skin into non putrescible leather. Leather industry generates a huge amount of solid waste containing chromium. These solid wastes were disposed of through land filling which causes leaching out of in soil and water. Now a day increasing environmental legislations have encouraged tannery industry to develop a new technology. In this study we incinerated chrome shaving dust at 500oC to 7000C for chromium extraction. Various oxidizing acids with different concentration were used for chromium extraction. Extracted chromium was measured by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Recovery of chromium was in the range of 297 mgL to 222 mgL. Nitric acid extracted maximum amount of chromium while sulfuric acid extracted minimum amount of chromium.

  10. Positron and nanoindentation study of helium implanted high chromium ODS steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veternikova, Jana Simeg; Fides, Martin; Degmova, Jarmila; Sojak, Stanislav; Petriska, Martin; Slugen, Vladimir

    2017-12-01

    Three oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels with different chromium content (MA 956, MA 957 and ODM 751) were studied as candidate materials for new nuclear reactors in term of their radiation stability. The radiation damage was experimentally simulated by helium ion implantation with energy of ions up to 500 keV. The study was focused on surface and sub-surface structural change due to the ion implantation observed by mostly non-destructive techniques: positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The applied techniques demonstrated the best radiation stability of the steel ODM 751. Blistering effect occurred due to high implantation dose (mostly in MA 956) was studied in details.

  11. [Exposure to carbon monoxide in wildland firefighters during wildfires suppression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo Leyenda, Belén; Rodríguez-Marroyo, José A; López-Satué, Jorge; Avila Ordás, Concepción; Pernía Cubillo, Raúl; Villa Vicente, José Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    Health and occupational performance in wildland firefighters are mainly impaired for the carbon monoxide inhalation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the personal exposure to carbon monoxide in wildland firefighters during wildfires suppression. Carbon monoxide exposure was monitorized in 44 subjects during 58 real wildfires. Moreover, we analyzed the time weighted average exposure for an 8h shift (VA-ED). The wildfires were classified according to the work done (direct attack, indirect attack and mixed attack) and the current fuel (grass, bush, understory and mixed). The mean exposure to carbon monoxide was of 18,4 ± 1,7 ppm, what supposed a VA-ED of 7,0 ± 1,0 ppm. The highest exposures to carbon monoxide were found during the mixed attack (20,4 ± 2,3 ppm) and direct attack (17,5 ± 2,7 ppm). We only obtained significant differences (p wildfires suppression and the type of fuel involved. Mean values obtained in this study were within safety limits described by different Spanish (INSHT) and international (NIOSH, OSHA) occupational safety and health agencies.

  12. Development of an enzymatic sensor for carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado, Clara; Gomez, Diana; Larmat, Fernando; Torres, Walter; Cuervo, Raul; Bravo, Enrique; Benitez, Neyla

    2003-01-01

    The detection and the pursuit of gases that contribute in the increase of the atmospheric contamination are a necessity, for what the electrochemical sensors have potential industrial applications for the control of the quality of the air. The development of amperometric sensor based on enzymes offers advantages, since the use of the biological component provides him high selectivity due to the great specificity of the substrate of the enzyme. The monoxide of carbon (CO) it is a polluting, poisonous gas, taken place during the incomplete combustion of organic materials (natural gas, petroleum, gasoline, coal and vegetable material). The determination of monoxide of carbon (CO) it can be reached by electrochemical mediums using the methylene blue like the electronic mediator for the enzyme monoxide of carbon oxidase (COx)

  13. Amendment of arsenic and chromium polluted soil from wood preservation by iron residues from water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Skov; Petersen, L. R.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    , mostly in the deepest samplers. This is likely due to the formation of a pseudo-gley because of precipitation surplus. Stabilization of arsenic and chromium contaminated soil using WTR is a promising method but the transformation of ferrihydrite in soil proves a concern in case of waterlogged soils......An iron-rich water treatment residue (WTR) consisting mainly of ferrihydrite was used for immobilization of arsenic and chromium in a soil contaminated by wood preservatives. A leaching batch experiment was conducted using two soils, a highly contaminated soil (1033mgkg−1 As and 371mgkg−1 Cr......) and slightly contaminated soil (225mgkg−1 As and 27mgkg−1 Cr). Compared to an untreated reference soil, amendment with 5% WTR reduced leaching in the highly contaminated soil by 91% for Cr and 98% for As. No aging effect was observed after 103d. In a small field experiment, soil was mixed with 2.5% WTR in situ...

  14. PALS investigation of chromium effect in ferritic/martensitic steels implanted with helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krsjak, Vladimir [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Slugen, Vladimir; Petriska, Martin; Veternikova, Jana [Slovak University of Technology, FEI, Bratislava (Slovakia); Sojak, Stanislav

    2009-11-15

    Chromium is an element with significant effect on the elevated temperature corrosion resistance and the low radiation induced void swelling. There were several studies carried out with regard to effect of Cr on the defect creation and stability[1,2], but this issue is not fully understood yet. This paper contributes to this research with the study of Fe-Cr binary alloys with different Cr content, implanted by helium by the use of cascade accelerator and investigated by conventional PALS set-up. Our measurements show that chromium plays a role in the formation of small vacancy clusters, affecting the size and distribution of these defects. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia.

  16. High-valent imido complexes of manganese and chromium corroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicola Y; Eikey, Rebecca A; Loring, Megan I; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2005-05-16

    The oxidation reaction of M(tpfc) [M = Mn or Cr and tpfc = tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole] with aryl azides under photolytic or thermal conditions gives the first examples of mononuclear imido complexes of manganese(V) and chromium(V). These complexes have been characterized by NMR, mass spectrometry, UV-vis, EPR, elemental analysis, and cyclic voltammetry. Two X-ray structures have been obtained for Mn(tpfc)(NMes) and Cr(tpfc)(NMes) [Mes = 2,4,6-(CH(3))(3)C(6)H(2)]. Short metal-imido bonds (1.610 and 1.635 Angstroms) as well as nearly linear M-N-C angles are consistent with triple M triple-bond NR bond formation. The kinetics of nitrene [NR] group transfer from manganese(V) corroles to various organic phosphines have been defined. Reduction of the manganese(V) corrolato complex affords phosphine imine and Mn(III) with reaction rates that are sensitive to steric and electronic elements of the phosphine substrate. An analogous manganese complex with a variant corrole ligand containing bromine atoms in the beta-pyrrole positions, Mn(Br(8)tpfc)(NAr), has been prepared and studied. Its reaction with PEt(3) is 250x faster than that of the parent tpfc complex, and its Mn(V/IV) couple is shifted by 370 mV to a more positive potential. The EPR spectra of chromium(V) imido corroles reveal a rich signal at ambient temperature consistent with Cr(V) triple-bond NR (d(1), S = 1/2) containing a localized spin density in the d(xy) orbital, and an anisotropic signal at liquid nitrogen temperature. Our results demonstrate the synthetic utility of organic aryl azides in the preparation of mononuclear metal imido complexes previously considered elusive, and suggest strong sigma-donation as the underlying factor in stabilizing high-valent metals by corrole ligands.

  17. Hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions from biomass burning in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J. P.; Zimmerman, P. R.; Heidt, L.; Pollock, W.

    1984-02-01

    Field measurements of hydrocarbon emissions from biomass burning in the cerrado (grasslands) and selva (tropical forest) regions of Brazil in 1979 and 1980 are characterized and quantified here. Regional consequences of burning activities include increased background mixing ratios of carbon monoxide and ozone, as well as reduced visibility, over extensive areas. Global extrapolation of the emission rate of hydrocarbons from these fires indicates that 6×1013 g C of gas phase hydrocarbons and 8×1014 g CO may be released annually from biomass burning. These emissions contribute significantly to the global budgets of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.

  18. Terpolymerization of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R.; Steinberg, M.

    This invention relates to high molecular weight terpolymer of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide stable to 280/sup 0/C and containing as little as 36 mo1% ethylene and about 41 to 51 mo1% sulfur dioxide, and to the method of producing said terpolymer by irradiation of a liquid and gaseous mixture of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide by means of Co-60 gamma rays or an electron beam, at a temperature of about 10 to 50/sup 0/C, and at a pressure of about 140 to 680 atmospheres, to initiate polymerization.

  19. Structural and magnetic properties of mechanochemically synthesized nanocrystalline titanium monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barudžija Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-sized titanium monoxide (TiO powder was prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. A mixture of commercial Ti and TiO2 (rutile powders with the molar ratio of 1:1 was milled in a planetary ball mill for 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 min under argon atmosphere. The final single-phase titanium monoxide sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, magnetic measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (SQUID and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The temperature dependency of the magnetic susceptibility is characterized by significant contribution of Pauli paramagnetism due to conduction electrons.

  20. 75 FR 65067 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks... Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; Group I Polymers and Resins; Marine Tank... Proposed Action NESHAP for: OECA contact \\1\\ OAQPS contact \\2\\ Hard and Decorative Chromium Scott Throwe...

  1. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  2. Citric-acid preacidification enhanced electrokinetic remediation for removal of chromium from chromium-residue-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fansheng; Xue, Hao; Wang, Yeyao; Zheng, Binghui; Wang, Juling

    2018-02-01

    Electrokinetic experiments were conducted on chromium-residue-contaminated soils collected from a chemical plant in China. Acidification-electrokinetic remediation technology was proposed in order to solve the problem of removing inefficient with ordinary electrokinetic. The results showed that electrokinetic remediation removal efficiency of chromium from chromium-contaminated soil was significantly enhanced with acidizing pretreatment. The total chromium [Cr(T)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal rate of the group acidized by citric acid (0.9 mol/L) for 5 days was increased from 6.23% and 19.01% in the acid-free experiments to 26.97% and 77.66% in the acidification-treated experiments, respectively. In addition, part of chromium with the state of carbonate-combined will be converted into water-soluble state through acidification to improve the removal efficiency. Within the appropriate concentration range, the higher concentration of acid was, the more chromium was released. So the removal efficiency of chromium depended on the acid concentration. The citric acid is also a kind of complexing agent, which produced complexation with Cr that was released by the electrokinetic treatment and then enhanced the removal efficiency. The major speciation of chromium that was removed from soils by acidification-electrokinetics remediation was acid-soluble speciation, revivification speciation and oxidation speciation, which reduced biological availability of chromium.

  3. The Zr-O-W/100/ emitter and coadsorption of zirconium and carbon monoxide on W/100/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, L. R.

    1981-11-01

    The lowering of the surface work function of a zirconiated tungsten field emitter by the introduction of carbon is investigated in view of the potential of such a low-work-function emitter in an unignited thermionic converter with little or no cesium. Auger electron spectroscopy and surface work function measurements by both thermionic emission and field emission retarding potential techniques were made of W(100) single crystals coated by Zr in the clean state and following exposure to bulk carbon, methane, and carbon monoxide, and zirconium and carbon monoxide simultaneously. The thermionic work function of the Zr-O-W-(100) emitter from 1450 to 1800 K is measured at 2.54 eV, while the field-emission retarding potential work function is 2.75-2.80 eV. Bulk carbon is found to reduce emitter lifetime, while heating in carbon monoxide causes zirconium diffusion into the bulk, and vacuum annealing restores it to the surface. Coabsorption of Zr and CO on W(100) followed by vacuum annealing is found to produce a minimum work function of 2.3 eV. The coabsorbed surface differs from that of Zr-O-W(100) by the lack of bulk diffusion, and by a lower high-temperature stability. The Zr-O-C-W(100) surface is concluded to be an excellent candidate for either a thermionic or field emitter.

  4. 40 CFR 86.316-79 - Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide... Test Procedures § 86.316-79 Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications. (a) Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide measurements are to be made with nondispersive infrared (NDIR) an analyzers. (b...

  5. Cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt coatings processed by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giren, B.G.; Szkodo, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt clads were tested, each of them for three cases: (1) without additional processing; (2) after laser heating of the solid state and (3) after laser remelting of the material. Armco iron, carbon steel 45 and chromium-nickel steel 0H18N9T were used as substrates. C.W. CO 2 laser with a beam power of 1000 W was used as a source of radiation. The investigated samples were subjected to cavitation impingement in a rotating disk facility. The results indicate that laser processing of the thick, electrode deposited coatings by laser beam leads in some cases to an increase of their cavitation resistance. Strong dependence of the coatings performance on the substrate, both for the laser processed or unprocessed parts of the materials was also discovered. (author)

  6. Determination of tracer quantities of chromium in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huart, A.

    1959-01-01

    A method is described for the photometric determination of chromium in uranium by absorbency at 540 mμ of the Cr(VI) diphenylcarbazide combination. After attack by nitric acid, the solution is made perchloric, and the chromium oxidised at the boiling point by permanganate. Excess oxidant is removed by hydrochloric acid. Study of operating conditions resulted in a method with an accuracy of ± 0,5 ppm for 0,5 to 15 ppm chromium in the metal. (author) [fr

  7. Environmental exposure to arsenic and chromium in an industrial area

    OpenAIRE

    Vimercati, Luigi; Gatti, Maria F; Gagliardi, Tommaso; Cuccaro, Francesco; De Maria, Luigi; Caputi, Antonio; Quarato, Marco; Baldassarre, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic and chromium are widespread environmental contaminants that affect global health due to their toxicity and carcinogenicity. To date, few studies have investigated exposure to arsenic and chromium in a population residing in a high-risk environmental area. The aim of this study is to evaluate the exposure to arsenic and chromium in the general population with no occupational exposure to these metals, resident in the industrial area of Taranto, Southern Italy, through biological monitor...

  8. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zand, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  9. Electrodeposition of chromium on nickel electrode modified with pyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomchenko, I.G.; Zolotovitskaya, L.V.

    1995-01-01

    Organic substance adsorption layer effect on chromium electrodeposition on the surface of a nickel electrode is studied. Pyridine, possessing high chemical resistance to oxidation including such medium as chromium acid, is used as a modifying agent. Electrode modification does not lead to a change of polarization curve slope. E-lg i - curve slope changes in electrolyte with pyridine addition which may be linked with the change of chromium electrodeposition mechanism in the presence of pyridine addition in electrolyte. 6 refs.; 5 figs

  10. Ethylene and Carbon Monoxide Production by Septoria musiva

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Brown-Skrobot; L. R. Brown; T. H. Filer

    1984-01-01

    An investigation into the mechanism by which Septoria musiva causes the premature defoliation of cottonwood trees was undertaken. Gas-chromatograpic analysis of the atmosphere overlying the original culture indicated that this fungus produced significant quantities of ethylene and carbon monoxide. Subcultures failed to produce either gas on a variety...

  11. Effect of carbon monoxide on Swiss albino mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC50 values were determined for male Swiss albino mice exposed to different concentrations of carbon monoxide in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. These values are compared to values reported in the literature. The LC50 for a 30 minute exposure was 3570 ppm CO.

  12. Poisoning by carbon monoxide in Morocco from 1991 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghandous, Rachida; Chaoui, Hanane; Rhalem, Naima; Semllali, Ilham; Badri, Mohamed; Soulaymani, Abdelmajid; Ouammi, Lahcen; Soulaymani-Bencheikh, Rachida

    2012-04-01

    To describe the characteristics relating to the provenance of statements, patients and to evaluate the spatiotemporal evolution of carbon monoxide poisoning reported to Poison Control Center and Pharmacovigilance of Morocco (CAPM). This is a retrospective study over a period of 18 years from 1991 to 2008, for all cases of poisoning by carbon monoxide reported to CAPM. The epidemiological study focused on 12 976 cases of carbon monoxide poisoning reported to CAPM between 1991 and 2008. The average age of patients was 25.5 +/- 15.6 years, sex ratio was 0.5. The poisoning occurred by accident in 98.7% of cases, especially at home (96.7%) and in cold months. The urban population was the most affected (89.0%). The region of Meknes Tafilalt was the most concerned with 16.6% of cases. The symptomatology was characterized by the predominance of gastrointestinal tract diseases (37.1%). Deaths have reached a percentage of 0.9%. These qualitative and quantitative information is useful to highlight warnings and plan a strategy against carbon monoxide poisoning in Morocco.

  13. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Death on Mount McKinley,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-08

    va liabilitY Coden jAvai 1- and/or/or 11I)ISt Special. ’CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING CARBONI MONOX I DE FOIB 0N I NGm DEATH- ON MVOUINT Mvc IN .EY...plateau which contains numerous campsites during %;’no Spring climbing season. The National Park Service/University of Alaska medical/rescue tent is

  14. Air quality assessment of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Air quality in urban areas is a cause of concern because of increased industrial activities that contribute to large quantities of emissions. The study assess levels and variations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in Blantyre, Malawi using a stationary environmental monitoring station ...

  15. Carbon monoxide poisoning mimicking long-QT induced syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. Onvlee-Dekker (Irene); A.C.H. de Vries (Andrica); A.D.J. ten Harkel (Arend)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCarbon monoxide (CO)poisoning is a rare cause of QT prolongation, and is therefore easily missed. The case of a patient with unexplained syncope and QT prologation on the electrocardiogram that turned out to be related to CO poisoning is reported here. In patients with QT prolongation,

  16. 21 CFR 177.1312 - Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...), Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, or at the National... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers. 177.1312 Section 177.1312 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  17. Spatial distribution of atmospheric carbon monoxide over Bay of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 117; Issue 4. Spatial distribution of atmospheric carbon monoxide over Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea: Measurements during pre-monsoon period of 2006. V R Aneesh G Mohankumar S Sampath. Volume 117 Issue 4 August 2008 pp 449-455 ...

  18. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.; Hales, R.

    1977-01-01

    During selective chromium oxidation of stainless steels the changes in chromium concentration at the metal surface and in the metal have an important bearing on the overall oxidation performance. It has been proposed that an analogue of chromium behaviour during selective oxidation is obtained from volatilisation of chromium during high temperature vacuum annealing. In the present report the evaporation of chromium from 316 type of steel, vacuum annealed at 1,000 0 C, has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels is rate controlled by interdiffusion in the alloy. As predicted the chromium concentration at the metal surface decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in good agreement with the previously derived model apart from an anomalous region near the surface. Here the higher resolution of the neutron activation technique indicated a zone within approximately 2μm of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (orig.) [de

  19. Laboratory Automatic Titration of Chromium Plating and Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    .... The analytical chemistry literature lacks an adequate automatic titration method for the monitoring of chromic acid in chromium plating solutions and the monitoring of phosphoric and sulfuric acids...

  20. A Real-Time Monitoring System of Industry Carbon Monoxide Based on Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiachen; Zhou, Jianxiong; Lv, Zhihan; Wei, Wei; Song, Houbing

    2015-11-20

    Carbon monoxide (CO) burns or explodes at over-standard concentration. Hence, in this paper, a Wifi-based, real-time monitoring of a CO system is proposed for application in the construction industry, in which a sensor measuring node is designed by low-frequency modulation method to acquire CO concentration reliably, and a digital filtering method is adopted for noise filtering. According to the triangulation, the Wifi network is constructed to transmit information and determine the position of nodes. The measured data are displayed on a computer or smart phone by a graphical interface. The experiment shows that the monitoring system obtains excellent accuracy and stability in long-term continuous monitoring.

  1. Investigation of alternative phosphating treatments for nickel and hexavalent chromium elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazbinsek, Luiz Antonio Rossi

    2014-01-01

    obtained with passivation treatment in niobium containing solution could be considered as a promising alternative to replace passivation with hexavalent chromium ions. Despite of the promising results, adjustments in the baths to obtain stability are still needed and should guide the next steps of the subject of this research. (author)

  2. Utilization of Ion Chromatography and Statistics to Determine Important Acids in Chromium Plating and Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    1991-01-01

    Inadequate monitoring of sulfuric and chromic acids in chromium plating solutions and phosphoric and sulfluric acids in electropolishing solutions can cause serious problems for the chromium plating...

  3. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel bare and composite metal cored and stranded arc welding electrodes and welding rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for corrosion or heat resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes and welding rods. These electrodes and welding rods are normally used for arc welding and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  4. Analysis of chromium volatility in the DWTF incinerator and in the molten salt processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic methods have been applied to calculate the volatility of chromium both in atmospheres and in milligrams per cubic meter (stp) of offgas for the decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) incinerator and the Rockwell molten salt processor. The known chromium species which have relatively high stabilities under oxidizing conditions and which contain elements found in either the DWTF incinerator or the molten salt processor are CrO 2 (OH) 2 (g), CrO 2 OH(g), CrO 3 (g), CrO 2 Cl 2 (g), and CrOF(g) and CrO 2 F 2 (g). This study demonstrates that these species as well as others such as CrO(OH) 2 (g), CrOOH(g), CrO(OH) 3 (g), CrO 2 Cl(g), CrOC1 2 (g), CrOCl(g), CrOC1 3 (g), CrOC1 4 (g), and CrO 2 F(g) can all be important species which contribute to the overall volatility of chromium in waste oxidation processes

  5. Ultra low nanowear in novel chromium/amorphous chromium carbide nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yate, Luis; Martínez-de-Olcoz, Leyre; Esteve, Joan; Lousa, Arturo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we report the first observation of novel nanocomposite thin films consisting of nanocrystalline chromium embedded in an amorphous chromium carbide matrix (nc-Cr/a-CrC) with relatively high hardness (∼22,3 GPa) and ultra low nanowear. The films were deposited onto silicon substrates using a magnetic filtered cathodic arc deposition system at various negative bias voltages, from 50 to 450 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggested the co-existence of chromium and chromium carbide phases, while high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the presence of the nc-Cr/a-CrC structure. The friction coefficient measured with the ball-on disk technique and the nanowear results showed a strong correlation between the macro and nano-tribological properties of the samples. These novel nanocomposite films show promising properties as solid lubricant and wear resistant coatings with relatively high hardness, low friction coefficient and ultra low nanowear.

  6. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: black chromium.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotsedi, L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra...

  7. Bioreduction of chromium (VI) to chromium (III) by a novel yeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction of heavy metal compounds like chromium, lead, arsenic and mercury into the environment generally induces morphological and physiological changes in the microbial communities hence exerting a selective pressure on the microorganisms. Generally, sites which are contaminated with heavy metals are the ...

  8. Chromium in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabek, Tomasz; Socha, Katarzyna; Kudelski, Jacek; Darewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz-Zukowska, Renata; Chlosta, Piotr; Borawska, Maria

    2017-12-23

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies report a strong role of chemical carcinogens in the etiology of bladder cancer. However, the involvement of heavy metals in tumourigenesis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has been poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) and bladder cancer. Chromium concentration in two 36-sample series of bladder cancer tissue and sera from patients with this neoplasm were matched with those of a control group. The amount of trace elements in every tissue sample was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. This was correlated with tumour stage. While the median chromium concentration levels reached statistically higher values in the bladder cancer tissue, compared with the non-cancer tissue (99.632ng/g and 33.144ng/g, respectively; p<0.001), the median Cr levels in the sera of the patients with this carcinoma showed no statistical difference when compared to those of the control group (0.511μg/l and 0.710μg/l, respectively; p=0.408). The median levels of Cr in the bladder tissue, depending on the stage of the tumour, compared with the tissue without the neoplasm, observed the same relationship for both non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive tumours (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). This study shows that patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder had higher tissue Cr levels than people without tumour, while no difference was found in the Cr serum levels between the two groups of patients under investigation.

  9. Development of electrochemical ion exchange electrodes for the treatment of wastes containing chromium or cesium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manosso, Helena Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays, environmental preservation using technologies that do not attack it, generating non-toxic residues and reduced volumes, has been discussed. Hazardous effluents, containing metals, as chromium, have been poured in the soils and rivers, degrading the water. Not different are the problems originated from some nuclear activities that generate wastes, as in chemical research laboratories. Although those wastes are not poured in the environment, sometimes they are inadequately stored, what can cause serious accidents. With the purpose of solving this problem, there are some techniques to waste treatment, between them there is the electrochemical ion exchange (EIX). EIX is an advanced process that has advantages over traditional ion exchange and the fact of using the electron as the only reagent, reduces the volume of the solution to be treated. This technique consists of development of an electrode, where an ion exchanger is physically incorporated in an electrode structure with a binder. In this study, cationic resin Amberlite CG-50 and zirconium phosphate have been chosen for the separation of chromium and cesium from waste, respectively. They were chosen because they present high chemical stability in oxidizing media and at ionizing radiation. The quantity of charcoal, graphite and binder used in formulation of electrode have been studied either. Before choosing the best electrode, it was verified sorption percentage of 99,3% for chromium and 99,8% for cesium. The greater advantage of this process is the total elution of chromium as much as cesium, without reagents addition, being possible to reuse the electrode without losing its capacity. Beside on the results, a continuous process for the wastes containing Cr and Cs, using a flux electrolytic cell (CELFLUX) of high retention capacity, was presented. The high efficiency of this cell for both retention and elution, leading to an important reduction of waste volume, and, every more, making possible the

  10. Chromium liquid waste inertization in an inorganic alkali activated matrix: Leaching and NMR multinuclear approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzoni, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.ponzoni@unimore.it [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Modena (Italy); Lancellotti, Isabella; Barbieri, Luisa [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Modena (Italy); Spinella, Alberto; Saladino, Maria Luisa [University of Palermo CGA-UniNetLab, Palermo (Italy); Martino, Delia Chillura [University of Palermo, Department STEBICEF, Palermo (Italy); Caponetti, Eugenio [University of Palermo CGA-UniNetLab, Palermo (Italy); University of Palermo, Department STEBICEF, Palermo (Italy); Armetta, Francesco [University of Palermo, Department STEBICEF, Palermo (Italy); Leonelli, Cristina [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Modena (Italy)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • Inertization of chromium liquid waste in aluminosilicate matrix. • Water less inertization technique exploiting the waste water content. • Liquid waste inertization without drying step. • Long term stabilization study through leaching test. • SEM analysis and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR in relation with long curing time. - Abstract: A class of inorganic binders, also known as geopolymers, can be obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicate powders at room temperature. The process is affected by many parameters (curing time, curing temperature, relative humidity etc.) and leads to a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous waste. In this study an industrial liquid waste containing a high amount of chromium (≈2.3 wt%) in the form of metalorganic salts is inertized into a metakaolin based geopolymer matrix. One of the innovative aspects is the exploitation of the water contained in the waste for the geopolymerization process. This avoided any drying treatment, a common step in the management of liquid hazardous waste. The evolution of the process - from the precursor dissolution to the final geopolymer matrix hardening - of different geopolymers containing a waste amount ranging from 3 to 20% wt and their capability to inertize chromium cations were studied by: i) the leaching tests, according to the EN 12,457 regulation, at different curing times (15, 28, 90 and 540 days) monitoring releases of chromium ions (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) and the cations constituting the aluminosilicate matrix (Na, Si, Al); ii) the humidity variation for different curing times (15 and 540 days); iii) SEM characterization at different curing times (28 and 540 days); iv) the trend of the solution conductivity and pH during the leaching test; v) the characterization of the short-range ordering in terms of T−O−T bonds (where T is Al or Si) by {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al solid state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (ss MAS NMR) for

  11. Thermal and chemical stabilities of some synthesized inorganic ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, I.M.; Abou-Mesalam, M. M.; El-Shorbagy, M.M.; Shady, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Chromium and cerium titanate as inorganic ion exchange materials were synthesized by the reaction of potassium chromate or ammonium ceric nitrate with titanium tetrachloride with molar ratio equal unity. The crystal system of both chromium and cerium titanates were determined and set to be monoclinic and orthorhombic systems, respectively. The chemical composition of both chromium and cerium titanates were determined by X-ray fluorescence technique and based on the data obtained with other different techniques. We can proposed molecular formula for chromium and cerium titanates as Cr 2 Ti 1 2O27. 13H 2 O and Ce 2 ThO10. 7.46 H 2 O, respectively. Thermal stability of both ion exchangers was investigated at different heating temperatures. Also the stability of chromium and cerium titanates for chemical attack was studied in different media. The data obtained showed high thermal and chemical stabilities of chromium and cerium titanate ion exchangers compared to the same group of ion exchange materials. The ion exchange capacities of chromium and cerium titanates at different heating temperature were investigated

  12. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  13. Advances In Hexavalent Chromium Removal At Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshem, D.O.; Riddelle, J.

    2012-01-01

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  14. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using activated carbon derived from palmyra palm fruit seed. A. Kannan, S. Thambidurai. Abstract. In this study, removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Palmyra palm fruit seed carbon (PPFSC) and commercial activated carbon (CAC) was investigated.

  15. Chromium, Nickel and Zinc Induced Histopathological Alterations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Degenerative histopathalogical alterations were seen in liver due to chronic exposure of the fish, Labeo rohita to chlorides of chromium, nickel and zinc for 30 days. However, more severe degenerative changes were observed in case of zinc chloride exposed fish than nickel chloride and chromium chloride treated fishes, ...

  16. Optical emission from laser-produced chromium and magnesium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parametric study of optical emission from two successive laser pulses produced chromium and magnesium plasma is presented. The line emission from chromium and magnesium plasma showed an increase by more than six times for double laser pulse excitation than for single-pulse excitation. An optimum increase in ...

  17. Chromium, Nickel and Zinc Induced Histopathological Alterations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: Degenerative histopathalogical alterations were seen in liver due to chronic exposure of the fish, Labeo rohita to chlorides of chromium, nickel and zinc for 30 days. However, more severe degenerative changes were observed in case of zinc chloride exposed fish than nickel chloride and chromium chloride ...

  18. Removal of chromium and lead from drill cuttings using activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Palm kernel shell and Palm kernel husk, two readily available agricultural waste products have been used as low-cost potential adsorbents to remove chromium and lead from drill cuttings. Batch adsorption studies were carried out as a function of parameters such as pH, contact time and carbon dosage. Chromium and ...

  19. Optical emission from laser-produced chromium and magnesium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Parametric study of optical emission from two successive laser pulses pro- duced chromium and magnesium plasma is presented. The line emission from chromium and magnesium plasma showed an increase by more than six times for double laser pulse excitation than for single-pulse excitation. An optimum ...

  20. Optical emission from laser-produced chromium and magnesium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parametric study of optical emission from two successive laser pulses produced chromium and magnesium plasma is presented. The line emission from chromium and magnesium plasma showed an increase by more than six times for double laser pulse excitation than for single-pulse excitation. An optimum increase in ...

  1. Effect of chromium toxicity on germination and early seedling growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... This study was conducted to determine and compare the inhibitory effects of chromium on seed germination and early seedling growth of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Chromium applications were controls; 2.5, 5, 10, 25, 50, 75, 100, 200 and 300 mgl-1 Cr in germination stage, and controls; 2.5, 5, 10,. 20, 30 ...

  2. remediation potential of Eichornia sp in conjunction with chromium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Evaluation of Cr (VI) removal by indigenous chromium resistant bacterial strains alone and in ... Chromium (Cr) is one of the toxic heavy metals ... membranes, ion exchange resins and reverse osmosis [3]. These expensive methodologies generate toxic by-products, so ecologically cost effective methods are ...

  3. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents the after shock heated structural and morphological studies of chromium film coated on hypersonic test model as a passive drag reduction element. The structural changes and the composition of phases of chromium due to shock heating (2850 K) are characterized using X-ray diffraction studies ...

  4. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the treatment of the flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. Homogenizing 1 g of the activated carbon with 100 ml of the flocculation ...

  5. Biosorption of chromium by mangrove-derived Aplanochytrium sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microbial dried biomass of Thraustochytrids is used as bioadsorbent for the removal of the chromium in aqueous solution. In this investigation, three species of Thraustochydrids namely Aplanochytrium sp., Thraustochytrium sp. and Schizochytrium sp. were tested for the efficiency of chromium accumulation by culturing ...

  6. Optimization of chromium biosorption in aqueous solution by marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization of a chromium biosorption process was performed by varying three independent variables pH (0.5 to 3.5), initial chromium ion concentration (10 to 30 mg/L), and Yarrowia lipolytica dosage (2 to 4 g/L) using a Doehlert experimental design (DD) involving response surface methodology (RSM). For the maximum ...

  7. Serum chromium concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A highly refined diet that contains too few micronutrients has been recognized as the dominant factor in the rising incidence of diabetes and other insulin related conditions. Among the missing micronutrients, chromium has the greatest impact on insulin response. The objective of this study was to determine serum chromium ...

  8. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-1090 (Review)] Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Termination of five-year... revocation of the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead...

  9. Increased chromium uptake in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from burned patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.M.; Illner, H.; Dineen, P.

    1984-01-01

    Following thermal injury neutrophil function is severely impaired and thought to be hypometabolic; however, the host is considered to be hypermetabolic. To further investigate the metabolism and the function of neutrophils following thermal injury, neutrophil migration and chromium uptake were studied using radio-labelled neutrophils. Random and directed migration were found to be significantly reduced compared to control values. Neutrophil lysozyme content was also reduced in these burn cells while serum lysozyme from the same patients was significantly elevated over control values. These data suggest lysozyme is released by the neutrophil into the circulatory system. The influx of chromium in cells from burned patients was much greater than the influx in normal cells used in studies for chemotaxis. Influx of chromium over time and over varying concentrations of chromium was linear in cells from burned patients and normals. Cells from burned patients, however, took up more chromium than normals. Influx velocity of chromium was also determined and found to be greater in burn cells than normal cells. Since it has been shown that chromium influx is an energy-dependent reaction it is suggested that cellular energy stores are being depleted by the influx of chromium. Whether this is a response to an intracellular deficit or uncoupling of metabolic pathways is not known at this time

  10. Effects of chromium uptake on the growth characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were positive correlations between the concentration of chromium in the culture media and the amounts of the metal accumulated in the tissues of E. crassipes at any ... Plant growth analysis techniques were applied to assess the effects of chromium on the growth characteristics of the treated E. crassipes plants.

  11. induced Oxidation of Chromium(iii) by Peroxodisulphate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    plating, production of paints and pigments and paper and pulp production. The chemistry of chromium tailings from these industries in the environment is rather complex and not fully quantified.2,3. It is estimated that South Africa holds about 72% of the world's chromium reserves and is currently one of the largest chromate.

  12. Bioremediation of chromium in tannery effluent by microbial consortia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... Chromium is the most toxic and common among the heavy metal pollutants of industrial effluents. In the present work the chromium ... Heavy metals are ubiquitous and persistent environmen- tal pollutants that are introduced .... of other heavy metals like uranium in its cells might also match with its tendency.

  13. The removal of chromium from wastewaters by activated bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellah, A.; Chegrouche, S.; Ait Ghezala, H.; Douar, L.

    1994-12-01

    The adsorption of chromium onto activated bentonite has been investigated. Adsorption isotherms were analysed to obtain the Langmuir and freundlich constants. The operating parameters (i.e pH, contact time, solid/liquid ratio, temperatureand initial chromium concentration) influenced the rate of adsorption have been studied

  14. An in situ study of growth of Lemongrass Cymbopogon flexuosus (Nees ex Steud.) W. Watson on varying concentration of Chromium (Cr+6) on soil and its bioaccumulation: Perspectives on phytoremediation potential and phytostabilisation of chromium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Deepak Kumar; Pradhan, Chinmay; Patra, Hemanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Chromium (Cr) contamination in soil is a growing concern in sustainable agricultural production and food safety. Remediation of Cr from contaminated soils is a challenging task which may not only help in sustaining agriculture but also in minimizing adverse environmental impacts. Pot culture experiments were performed with the application of varied concentration of Cr +6 to assess the Chromium accumulation potential of Lemongrass and to study the impact of toxic concentration of Cr +6 on morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters of the plant. The results showed an increasing accumulation trend of Chromium with increasing Chromium concentrations in both root and shoot of 60 days old Lemongrass plants, while the protein and chlorophyll contents decreased. Similarly, accumulation of Cr increased the levels of proline and antioxidant enzymes indicating the enhanced damage control activity. The potentiality of the plant with the capacity to accumulate and stabilize Cr compound in Cr contaminated soil by phytoremediation process has been explored in the present investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure and magnetic properties of chromium doped cobalt molybdenum nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guskos, Niko; Żołnierkiewicz, Grzegorz; Typek, Janusz; Guskos, Aleksander; Adamski, Paweł; Moszyński, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Four nanocomposites containing mixed phases of Co 3 Mo 3 N and Co 2 Mo 3 N doped with chromium have been prepared. A linear fit is found for relation between Co 2 Mo 3 N and chromium concentrations. The magnetization in ZFC and FC modes at different temperatures (2–300 K) and in applied magnetic fields (up to 70 kOe) have been investigated. It has been detected that many magnetic characteristics of the studied four nanocomposites correlate not with the chromium concentration but with nanocrystallite sizes. The obtained results were interpreted in terms of magnetic core-shell model of a nanoparticle involving paramagnetic core with two magnetic sublattices and a ferromagnetic shell related to chromium doping. - Highlights: • A new chromium doped mixed Co-Mn-N nanocomposites were synthesized. • Surface ferromagnetism was detected in a wide temperature range. • Core-shell model was applied to explain nanocomposites magnetism.

  16. Effects of UV light and chromium ions on wood flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnárné Hamvas, L.; Németh, K.; Stipta, J.

    2003-01-01

    The individual and simultaneous effect of UV light and chromium ions was investigated by spectrophotometric methods on inert surfaces impregnated with quercetin or robinetin. The UV-VIS spectra of the silica gel plates impregnated with these flavonoids were modified characteristically after irradiating ultraviolet light. Even a half an hour of irradiation has caused irreversible changes in the molecule structure. A certain chemical - presumably complexation - was concluded from the change of spectral bands assigned to flavonoids when impregnated with chromic ions. Hexavalent chromium caused more complex changes in the absorption spectra. The differences in the spectra could indicate either the oxidation and decomposition of flavonoids, or some kind of coordination process and the reduction of hexavalent chromium. The simultaneous application of UV light and chromium ions caused more pronounced effects. The complexation process between chromium(III) and flavonoid was completed

  17. New Evidence against Chromium as an Essential Trace Element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, John B

    2017-12-01

    Nearly 60 y ago, chromium, as the trivalent ion, was proposed to be an essential element, but the results of new studies indicate that chromium currently can only be considered pharmacologically active and not an essential element. Regardless, articles still continue to appear in the literature claiming chromium is an essential element. Chromium has been marketed as an agent to reduce body mass and develop muscle; however, such marketing claims are no longer allowed in the United States because these claims, similar to claims of essential status, are not supported by experiments. Trivalent chromium has also been proposed as a therapeutic agent to increase insulin sensitivity and affect lipid metabolism. Although effective in certain rodent models, beneficial effects in humans have not been unequivocally established. Molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the beneficial effects but have not been definitively shown to occur in animals. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. CHROMIUM BIOACCUMULATION FROM COMPOSTS AND VERMICOMPOSTS BASED ON TANNERY SLUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GONDEK

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of waste substances is not indifferent to ecological equilibrium in the environment therefore should not be the ultimate way to limit waste arduousness. Therefore, the conducted investigations aimed to determine the effect of tannery composts and vermicomposts loaded with chromium on this element bioaccumulation in earthworm bodies and biomass of selected plants. Chromium in composts and vermicomposts based on tannery sludges occurred in small quantities and easily soluble compounds. Chromium concentrations in redworm biomass points to this metal accumulation in Eisenia fetida body tissues. This element content in redworm biomass was signifi cantly positively correlated with its content in composts. Chromium content in plants was diversifi ed and on treatments was generally smaller than on mineral treatment or farmyard manure. Chromium absorbed by plants was stored mainly in the root systems, and over the norm content of this element found in vermicomposts did not cause its excessive accumulation in plant biomass.

  19. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    1996-01-01

    A method and composition for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdnum, copper, cobalt, maganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  20. Retrograde amnesia following carbon monoxide poisoning: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acland, Peter R; Heaver, Catriona

    2008-07-01

    Retrograde amnesia is a recognised neurological complication of carbon monoxide poisoning. This article describes the case of a female found dead in her bath where initial post-mortem findings and the surrounding circumstances raised strong suspicions of homicide, especially when there was contradictory evidence from her husband who was the only other person present. He was later diagnosed as having retrograde amnesia between his two visits to the bathroom to attend to his wife which caused him to merge them into one event, thus arousing suspicions of foul play. The discussion explores the current clinical views on non-fatal carbon monoxide poisoning as well as problems of interpretation of information derived from case work.

  1. Effect of carbon monoxide on plants. [Mimosa pudica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, P.W.; Crocker, W.; Hitchcock, A.E.

    1933-01-01

    Of 108 species of plants treated with one per cent carbon monoxide, 45 showed epinastic growth of leaves. Several species showed hyponasty which caused upward curling of leaves. Other effects included: retarded stem elongation; abnormally small new leaves; abnormal yellowing of the leaves, beginning with the oldest; abscission of leaves usually associated with yellowing; and hypertrophied tissues on stems and roots. During recovery an abnormally large number of side shoots arose from latent buds of many species. Motion pictures of Mimosa pudica showed a loss of correlation, normal equilibrium position to gravity, and sensitiveness to contact or heat stimuli; however, the leaves moved about more rapidly than those of controls. Since carbon monoxide causes growth rigor and loss of sensitiveness to external stimuli, it is here considered as an anesthetic.

  2. Colloidal gold nanoparticle probe-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of chromium ions in water and serum samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xi; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Fu, Qiang-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Hui; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-09-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using gold nanoparticles coated with monoclonal antibody (McAb) for the detection of chromium ions (Cr) in water and serum samples was developed, optimized, and validated. Gold nanoparticles coated with affinity- purified monoclonal antibodies against isothiocyanobenzyl-EDTA (iEDTA)-chelated Cr3+ were used as the detecting reagent in this completive immunoassay-based one- step test strip. The ICA was investigated to measure chromium speciation in water samples. Chromium standard samples of 0-80 ng/mL in water were determined by the test strips. The results showed that the visual lowest detection limit (LDL) of the test strip was 50.0 ng/mL. A portable colorimetric lateral flow reader was used for the quantification of Cr. The results indicated that the linear range of the ICA with colorimetric detection was 5-80 ng/mL. The ICA was also validated for the detection of chromium ions in serum samples. The test trips showed high stability in that they could be stored at at 37 C for at least 12 weeks without significant loss of activity. The test strip also showed good selectivity for Cr detection with negligible interference from other heavy metals. Because of its low cost and short testing time (within 5 min), the test strip is especially suitable for on-site large- scale screening of Cr-polluted water samples, biomonitoring of Cr exposure, and many other field applications.

  3. Phosphate solubilization and chromium (VI) remediation potential of Klebsiella sp. strain CPSB4 isolated from the chromium contaminated agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratishtha; Kumar, Vipin; Usmani, Zeba; Rani, Rupa; Chandra, Avantika

    2018-02-01

    In this study, an effort was made to identify an efficient phosphate solubilizing bacterial strain from chromium contaminated agricultural soils. Based on the formation of a solubilized halo around the colonies on Pikovskaya's agar amended with chromium (VI), 10 strains were initially screened out. Out of 10, strain CPSB4, which showed significantly high solubilization zone at different chromium concentrations, was selected for further study. The strain CPSB4 showed significant plant growth promotion traits with chromium (VI) stress under in-vitro conditions in broth. The plant growth promotion activities of the strain decreased regularly, but were not completely lost with the increase in concentration of chromium up to 200 mg L -1 . On subjected to FT-IR analysis, the presence of the functional group, indicating the organic acid aiding in phosphate solubilization was identified. At an optimal temperature of 30  ° C and pH 7.0, the strain showed around 93% chromium (VI) reduction under in-vitro conditions in broth study. In soil condition, the maximum chromium (VI) reduction obtained was 95% under in-vitro conditions. The strain CPSB4 was identified as Klebsiella sp. on the basis of morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This study shows that the diverse role of the bacterial strain CPSB4 would be useful in the chromium contaminated soil as a good bioremediation and plant growth promoting agent as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Determination of chromium in treated crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by electrothermal ASS: study of chromium accumulation in different tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, F.; Diaz, J.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.

    1986-06-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of chromium in muscle, hepatopancreas, antennal glands, and gills of Procambarus clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following Cr(VI)-exposure. Determinations of chromium were made by using Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and the standard additions method.

  5. Bilateral brachial plexus injury following acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmani, Mounia; Belaidi, Halima; Benabdeljlil, Maria; Bouchhab, Wafa; El Jazouli, Nadia; El Brini, Asmae; Aidi, Saadia; Ouazzani, Reda M; El Alaoui Faris, Mustapha

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication is a leading cause of severe neuropsychological impairments. Peripheral nerve injury has rarely been reported. It consists usually in a demyelinating polyneuropathy or mononeuropathy affecting mainly the lower limbs. Isolated involvement of both upper extremities has been described in only 4 patients related to root damage. We report the first case of bilateral brachial plexus injury following CO poisoning and review all previous CO-induced neuropa...

  6. Molybdopterin in carbon monoxide oxidase from carboxydotrophic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, O; Rajagopalan, K V

    1984-01-01

    The carbon monoxide oxidases (COXs) purified from the carboxydotrophic bacteria Pseudomonas carboxydohydrogena and Pseudomonas carboxydoflava were found to be molybdenum hydroxylases, identical in cofactor composition and spectral properties to the recently characterized enzyme from Pseudomonas carboxydovorans (O. Meyer, J. Biol. Chem. 257:1333-1341, 1982). All three enzymes exhibited a cofactor composition of two flavin adenine dinucleotides, two molybdenums, eight irons and eight labile sul...

  7. Carbon monoxide and isocyanide complexes of trivalent uranium metallocenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mar Conejo, M. del; Parry, J.S.; Carmona, E.; Schultz, M.; Brennann, J.G.; Beshouri, S.M.; Andersen, R.A.; Rogers, R.D.; Coles, S.; Hursthouse, M.

    1999-01-01

    The [Cp' 3 U] metallocenes contain substituted cyclopentadienyl ligands and U III with f 3 electron configuration. They are good π donors and bind π-accepting ligands (L) such as carbon monoxide and isocyanides to form the corresponding adducts [Cp' 3 U(L)]. The π-donating capability of the [Cp' 3 U] fragments appears to be readily modulated by the substituents on the cyclopentadienyl ligand. (orig.)

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teksam, M.; Casey, S.O.; Michel, E.; Liu, H.; Truwit, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) of two patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning demonstrated white matter and cortical hyperintensities. In one patient, the changes on the FLAIR sequence were more subtle than those on DWI. The DWI abnormality in this patient represented true restriction. In the second patient, repeated exposure to CO caused restricted diffusion. DWI may be helpful for earlier identification of the changes of acute CO poisoning. (orig.)

  9. High-strength chromium--molybdenum rails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Y.E.; Sawhill, J.M. Jr.; Cias, W.W.; Eldis, G.T.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted with the aim of developing an as-rolled rail of over 100 ksi (689 N/mm 2 ) yield strength. A series of compositions providing both pearlitic and bainitic microstructures was evaluated. A fine pearlitic structure was developed in a 0.73 percent C -- 0.83 percent Mn -- 0.16 percent Si -- 0.75 percent Cr -- 0.21 percent Mo steel by simulating the mill cooling rate of 132-lb/yd (65.5-kg/m) rail. Two 100-ton commercial heats were made of this approximate composition and processed into 132-lb/yd (65.5-kg/m) rail. Samples tested in the laboratory ranged from 109 to 125 ksi (750 to 860 N/mm 2 ) in yield strength. The chromium-molybdenum rails also exhibited excellent fracture toughness and fatigue properties. Sections of the rail were joined by both flash-butt welding and thermite welding. The hardness peaks produced in the flash-butt welds could be reduced by applying either a postweld current or an induction heating cycle. The high-strength chromium-molybdenum rails have been in service for over eight months in curved sections of an ore railway that carries over 55 million gross long tons per year. 7 tables, 18 figs

  10. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Agroindustrial Waste for Lead and Chromium Biosorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana P. Boeykens

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to re-evaluate the residues generated in industrial processes for the production of new raw material, reducing the volume of waste. In this regard, the biosorption is a low-cost alternative method for treating effluents compared to conventional methods. The main objectives of this research were: the evaluation of the biosorbent capacity of six waste materials for the extraction of chromium(VI and lead(II ions from aqueous solutions and, the determination of the adsorption and kinetic parameters for the more efficient system. The materials evaluated were: peanut shell (Arachis hypagaea, sugarcane bagasse (Saccharum officinarum, avocado peel (Persea americana, pecan nutshell (Carya illinoinensis, wheat bran (Triticum aestivum and banana peel (Mussa paradisiaca. The highest percentage of lead removal was obtained with wheat bran (89%. For chromium, the percentage was generally much lower compared with lead for all tested biosorbents, the banana peel being the most efficient with a 10% removal. The models that better describe the adsorption processes were: Langmuir and Freundlich. The pseudo-second order kinetic model allowed obtaining the parameters for both systems. The equilibrium time, in both systems, was reached after 60 minutes. The study of Fourier Transformed Infrared spectra and the results of desorption experiments allowed to hypothesize on the mechanisms involved in the adsorption of these metals.

  12. EXTRACTION AND SPECIATION OF CHROMIUM(VI AND CHROMIUM(III AS ION-ASSOCIATION COMPLEXES OF TETRAMETHYLAMMONIUM-CHROMATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia Widiyaningrum Wandoyo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A specific, selective and simple method for speciation of chromium(VI and chromium(III has been developed. This method is based on the quantitative extraction of chromium(VI and chromium(III as an ion association of tetramethylammonium-chromate in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK, followed by back extraction and preconcentration with an acidic diphenylcarbazide (DPC solution. Back extraction was applied to achieve further preconcentration by a final factor of 20. The chromium(VI-DPC complex was determined by a UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The optimum conditions of this method are as follows, optimum wavelength at 545 nm, MIBK as organic solvent, 7.5 mL of nitric acid (65% for each 100 mL sample, mole ratio of TMAC to Cr(VI of 2x104:1, 5 min shaking time, mole ratio of DPC to chromium(VI of 8:1, and immediate UV-Vis measurement after obtaining of back-extract. The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range 0.00-0.40 µg.mL-1 of chromium(VI with a regression equation of Abs=0.0038+1.7427x, in which x was the chromium species concentration ( µg.mL-1. The correlation coefficient (r for the curve was 0.9991 and the detection limit was found to be 0.946 µg.mL-1. The result of analysis and speciation of chromium in water samples from a river near a leather processing plant in Yogyakarta area showed that the total content of chromium was in the range of 0.04 - 0.05 µg.mL-1 consisting of 0.03 - 0.04 µg.mL-1 of chromium(VI and 0.002 - 0.01 µg.mL-1 of chromium(III. This result indicates that the concentration of chromium in the river is still below the safety limit.   Keywords: extraction, speciation, chromium, preconcentration, ion-association, tetramethylammonium

  13. Mobile Carbon Monoxide Monitoring System Based on Arduino-Matlab for Environmental Monitoring Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azieda Mohd Bakri, Nur; Junid, Syed Abdul Mutalib Al; Razak, Abdul Hadi Abdul; Idros, Mohd Faizul Md; Karimi Halim, Abdul

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays, the increasing level of carbon monoxide globally has become a serious environmental issue which has been highlighted in most of the country globally. The monitoring of carbon monoxide content is one of the approaches to identify the level of carbon monoxide pollution towards providing the solution for control the level of carbon monoxide produced. Thus, this paper proposed a mobile carbon monoxide monitoring system for measuring the carbon monoxide content based on Arduino-Matlab General User Interface (GUI). The objective of this project is to design, develop and implement the real-time mobile carbon monoxide sensor system and interfacing for measuring the level of carbon monoxide contamination in real environment. Four phases or stages of work have been carried out for the accomplishment of the project, which classified as sensor development, controlling and integrating sensor, data collection and data analysis. As a result, a complete design and developed system has been verified with the handheld industrial standard carbon monoxide sensor for calibrating the sensor sensitivity and measurement in the laboratory. Moreover, the system has been tested in real environments by measuring the level of carbon monoxide in three different lands used location; industrial area; residential area and main road (commercial area). In this real environment test, the industrial area recorded the highest reading with 71.23 ppm and 82.59 ppm for sensor 1 and sensor 2 respectively. As a conclusion, the mobile realtime carbon monoxide system based on the Arduino-Matlab is the best approach to measure the carbon monoxide concentration in different land-used since it does not require a manual data collection and reduce the complexity of the existing carbon monoxide level concentration measurement practise at the same time with a complete data analysis facilities.

  14. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, Sergey S.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ 13 C, δ 18 O and Δ 17 O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated 13 CO/ 12 CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in 13 C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH 4 ) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH 4 to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in 13 C, were found significant when explicitly simulated. The

  15. Determination of chromium(III) and total chromium using dual channels on glass chip with chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som-Aum, Waraporn; Threeprom, Jirasak; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2007-03-30

    A simple, rapid and sensitive method for the determination of chromium(III) and total chromium using the simple dual T channels on glass chip with negative pressure pumping system and chemiluminescence (CL) detection is presented. The CL reaction was based on luminol oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in basic aqueous solution catalyzed by chromium(III). Total chromium in form of chromium(III) was achieved after chromium(VI) was completely reduced by acidic sodium hydrogen sulfite. Total chromium could then be determined with the same strategy as the chromium(III). The CL reagent was composed of 1.0x10(-4)mol/L luminol, 1.0x10(-2)mol/L hydrogen peroxide and 0.10mol/L sodium bromide in 0.050mol/L carbonate buffer (pH 11.00). The 1.0x10(-2)mol/L ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was added into the sample solution in order to improve the selectivity. Chromium(III) could be detected at a notably concentration of 1.6x10(-16)mol/L and a linear calibration curve was obtained from 1.0x10(-15) to 1.0x10(-13)mol/L. The sample and CL reagent consumption were only 15 and 20microL, respectively. The analysis time was less than 1 min per sample with the precision (%R.S.D.) was 4.7%. The proposed method has been applied successfully to the analysis of river water, mineral waters, drinking waters and tap water. Its performance was verified by the analysis of certified total chromium-reference materials and by recovery measurement on spiked synthetic seawater sample.

  16. Biomass Combustion Control and Stabilization Using Low-Cost Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Piteľ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes methods for biomass combustion process control and burning stabilization based on low-cost sensing of carbon monoxide emissions and oxygen concentration in the flue gas. The designed control system was tested on medium-scale biomass-fired boilers and some results are evaluated and presented in the paper.

  17. Thermal degradation kinetics of polyketone based on styrene and carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Jiali; Fan, Wenjun; Shan, Shaoyun; Su, Hongying; Wu, Shuisheng; Jia, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The PK were synthesized from carbon monoxide and styrene in the presence of PANI-PdCl 2 catalyst and PdCl 2 catalyst. • The structures and thermal behaviors of PK prepared by homogenous and the supported catalyst were investigated. • The microstructures of PK were changed in the supported catalyst system. • The alternating PK copolymer (PANI-PdCl 2 catalyst) was more thermally stable than PK (PdCl 2 catalyst). • The degradation activation energy values were estimated by Flynn–Wall–Ozawa method and Kissinger method. - Abstract: Copolymerization of styrene with carbon monoxide to give polyketones (PK) was carried out under homogeneous palladium catalyst and polyaniline (PANI) supported palladium(II) catalyst, respectively. The copolymers were characterized by 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR and GPC. The results indicated that the PK catalyzed by the supported catalyst has narrow molecular weight distribution (PDI = 1.18). For comparison purpose of thermal behaviors of PK prepared by the homogeneous and the supported catalyst, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) were conducted at different heating rates. The peak temperatures (396–402 °C) for PK prepared by the supported catalyst are higher than those (387–395 °C) of PK prepared by the homogeneous catalyst. The degradation activation energy (E k ) values were estimated by Flynn–Wall–Ozawa method and Kissinger method, respectively. The E k values, as determined by two methods, were found to be in the range 270.72 ± 0.03–297.55 ± 0.10 kJ mol −1 . Structures analysis and thermal degradation analysis revealed that the supported catalyst changed the microstructures of PK, resulting in improving thermal stability of PK

  18. 77 FR 39141 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... 0750-AH39 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium... policies relating to the use of material containing hexavalent chromium. DATES: Effective Date: June 29... environmental risks related to the use of hexavalent chromium. Hexavalent chromium is a chemical that has been...

  19. Electrochemical modification of chromium surfaces using 4-nitro- and4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Mogens; Cecatto, Marcel; Kingshott, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer......Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer...

  20. 76 FR 71926 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... 0750-AH39 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium... the use of materials containing hexavalent chromium. DATES: Comment Date: Comments on the proposed... human health and environmental risks related to the use of hexavalent chromium. Hexavalent chromium is a...

  1. 40 CFR 424.70 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic chromium subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electrolytic chromium subcategory. 424.70 Section 424.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Electrolytic Chromium Subcategory § 424.70 Applicability; description of the electrolytic chromium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of chromium...

  2. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption

  3. Substoichiometric determination of chromium by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, K.; Shigematsu, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1977-01-01

    A method of radioactivation analysis has been developed for the determination of chromium. It is based on the substoichiometric extraction of chromium diethyldithiocarbamate into methyl-isobutyl-ketone from acetate buffer solution in the presence of EDTA and potassium cyanide. A solution of NaDDC was prepared by dissolving an appropriate amount of GR grade salt in bidistelled water. The concentration of NaDDC was determined by substoichiometric isotope dilution method using 64 Cu or sup(114m)In tracer of known specific activity. The extraction of chromium is not influenced by the presence of EDTA or potassium cyanide while the extraction of chromium is inhibited in tartrate or citrate solution. All metal ions examined are extracted by NaDDC together with chromium and become to interfere for the substoichiometric extraction of chromium. This can be avoided, however, by the addition of EDTA except for copper and silver. The method has been applied for the determination of chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate and NBS glasses as standard reference materials. (T.G.)

  4. Electro-deposition behaviors of trivalent chromium during pulse plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong

    2010-10-01

    Thick trivalent chromium layers were prepared in a modified chromium sulfate bath by pulse plating to replace hexavalent hard chromium coating in industrial fields; layer microstructure development was systematically studied by using electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to give a model for nucleation and growth behaviors during the pulse plating. Finer columnar grain was formed by pulse plating due to its high nucleation rate at the same current density. Average deposition rate of the trivalent chromium layers is in the range of 32.4 μm/h to 49.7 μm/h. The deposition rate increases as the diameter of cylindrical shape of chromium cluster in a columnar grain is reduced. The highest deposition rate in this study was observed under the conditions of direct current density of 0.4 Acm-2, combined with a rectangular shape pulse current density of 1.5 Acm-2 with a 10/2 on-off time ratio. Most of the inner-cracks of the trivalent chromium layers have dimensions in the range of about 39 nm. Ultrasonic agitation during pulse plating resulted in an increase of neutral salt fog spray life, which is related to smaller crack size and broader size distribution in the trivalent chromium.

  5. Sorption of chromium(VI) and chromium(III) on aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that influence the sorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) on aluminium hydroxide were investigated. The sorption of chromates decreases as the pH of the suspension increases. The mechanism of CrOsub(4)sup(2-) sorption was interpreted in terms of reactions between chromates and -OH and/or Hsub(2)O groups at the hydroxide/liquid interface. It was shown that chromates are more tightly sorbed on aluminium hydroxide compared to other anions, e.g. chlorides. On the other hand, specifically absorbed anions, such as molybdates, compete strongly with chromates for the sorption sites. The sorption of chromium(III) increases with the pH of the suspension. Also, the sorption of chromium(III) is suppressed in the presence of citrate ions. The best conditions for the fixation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by aluminium hydroxide are presented. (author)

  6. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb3Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures' presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb 3 Sn strand

  7. Spectroscopic analysis of chromium bioremediation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Marcus, M. A.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J. T.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination frequently involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to identify the biogeochemical reactions that control in situ chromium reduction in the presence of different dominant electron acceptors, i.e., NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-. It was hypothesized that indirect, abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) by reduced metabolic products [Fe(II) and sulfides] would dominate over direct enzymatic reduction by denitrifying, iron-reducing, or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is further hypothesized that the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) would produce relatively pure chromium hydroxide precipitates, whereas indirect reduction would result in mixed Cr-Fe hydroxide solid phases. Flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the 100H site at Hanford, WA were subjected to nitrate-, sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions in the presence of 5 µM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions from the nitrate- and sulfate-reducing columns; however only a small amount of Cr(VI) was removed under iron-reducing conditions. Preliminary analysis of micro X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the untreated and iron-reducing column sediments contained pre-existing Cr in the form of primary minerals, e.g. chromite and/or Cr-bearing micas. However, there was an increase in the relative abundance of mixed-phase Cr-Fe hydroxides, i.e., Cr1-xFex(OH)3 in the nitrate- and sulfate-treated columns. A possible explanation for the observations is that the production of Fe(II) was enhanced under the nitrate- and sulfate- reducing conditions, and was most likely sulfide-driven in the latter case. The Fe(II) was subsequently available for reduction of Cr(VI) resulting in the mixed-phase precipitates. The results from the spectroscopic analysis support the hypothesis that Fe(II)-mediated Cr reduction prevails over direct

  8. Coupling of Nanoporous Chromium, Aluminium-Containing Silicates with an Ionic Liquid for the Transformation of Glucose into 5-(Hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela A. Valente

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro/mesoporous chromium, aluminium-containing silicates of the type TUD-1 (Al-TUD-1, Cr-TUD-1, CrAl-TUD-1 and zeolite BEA, Cr-BEA, and related composites BEA/TUD-1 and Cr-BEA/TUD-1, were prepared, characterised, and tested as solid acids coupled with the ionic liquid (IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([bmim]Cl as solvent, in the transformation of d-glucose into 5-(hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (Hmf, at 120 °C. The chromium-containing catalytic systems lead to considerably higher Hmf yields in comparison to the related systems without chromium. The IL is a favourable solvent for this target reaction (in terms of Hmf yields reached compared to water or dimethylsulfoxide. A detailed study on the stabilities of the nanoporous solid acids in the IL medium is presented.

  9. Plasma Spraying and Characterization of Chromium Carbide-Nickel Chromium Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Prantnerová, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 281-290, č. článku PCCC-2016-09-16-339. ISSN 2008-2134 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma spraying * Chromium carbide * Slurry abrasion * Dry rubber wheel test * Friction * Microhardness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass http://www.pccc.icrc.ac.ir/?xid=0113010121000001804&id=976

  10. Carbon monoxide may be an important molecule in migraine and other headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik W; Hauge, Mette K

    2014-01-01

    of cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathways. Here, we review the literature about carbon monoxide-induced headache and its possible mechanisms. CONCLUSION: We suggest, for the first time, that carbon monoxide may play an important role in the mechanisms of migraine and other headaches.......INTRODUCTION: Carbon monoxide was previously considered to just be a toxic gas. A wealth of recent information has, however, shown that it is also an important endogenously produced signalling molecule involved in multiple biological processes. Endogenously produced carbon monoxide may thus play...... an important role in nociceptive processing and in regulation of cerebral arterial tone. DISCUSSION: Carbon monoxide-induced headache shares many characteristics with migraine and other headaches. The mechanisms whereby carbon monoxide causes headache may include hypoxia, nitric oxide signalling and activation...

  11. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  12. Surfactant Enhanced Chromium Removal Using a Silica Gel Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rajesh

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid method is proposed for the removal of chromium based on its adsorption as an ion pair with Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTABr on a silica gel colurnn. The surfactant (CTABr is bonded to chromate by electrostatic force of attraction and the resulting ion-association complex is held on a silica gel column. The resulting solution from the column is analyzed for chromium by the standard diphenyl carbazide spectrophotometric procedure. The method has been applied successfully to study the recovery of chromium in various synthetic mixtures.

  13. Chromium removal from tannery wastewater by using of flying ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil P, E.; Saldarriaga M, C.

    1998-01-01

    A simple and economic method to chromium removal from tannery wastewater by means of flying ash is presented. The chromium removal operation is a discontinuous process that involve the mass of flying ash, time of contact and temperature or ph as variables, their which are optimized through Box-Wilson type experimental design. The results were successful: From an initial fluid whit chromium concentration of 1850m ppm, final concentrations of 0.008 ppm and 0.5 ppm of Cr+3 and Cr+6 respectively were achieved. These post-treatment concentrations are into the approved range definite by Government's Laws to this waste type

  14. High frequency of serum chromium deficiency and association of chromium with triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations in patients awaiting bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Karla V G; Lima, Raquel P A; Gonçalves, Maria C R; Faintuch, Joel; Morais, Liana C S L; Asciutti, Luiza S R; Costa, Maria J C

    2014-05-01

    To our knowledge, the frequency of serum chromium deficiency in patients awaiting bariatric surgery has not been determined. This study was designed to assess chromium concentration and its association with glycemic levels and lipid profile in patients prior to bariatric surgery. This study recruited 73 candidates for bariatric surgery between March and September 2012. Their sociodemographic, anthropometric, and biochemical data were collected. Of the 73 patients, 55 (75.3%) were women (75.34%). Mean patient age was 37.20 ± 9.92 years, and mean body mass index was 47.48 kg/m2 (range, 43.59 to 52.50 kg/m2). Chromium deficiency was observed in 64 patients (87.7%). Correlation analysis showed significant negative relationships between chromium concentration and BMI and zinc concentration and a significant positive relationship between chromium and glycated hemoglobin. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that serum chromium concentration was significantly associated with total cholesterol (β = 0.171, p = 0.048) and triglyceride (β = -0.181, p = 0.039) concentrations. Serum chromium deficiency is frequent in candidates for bariatric surgery and is associated with total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Early nutritional interventions are needed to reduce nutritional deficiencies and improve the lipid profile of these patients.

  15. Separation of valence forms of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) by coprecipitation with iron(III) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirmadov, B.; Khamidov, B.O.; Egorova, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of 9.62·10 -5 M of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) with iron hydroxide in 1 M potassium nitrate and potassium chloride was investigated in relation to the pH of the medium. Experimental data on the sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) with iron(III) hydroxide made it possible to determine the region of practically complete concentration of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) (pH = 3-6.5). The results from spectrophotometric investigations, calculated data on the distribution of the hydroxocationic forms of chromium(III) and the anions of chromium(IV), and their sorption by iron-(III) hydroxide made it possible to characterize the sorbability of the cationic and anionic forms of chromium in various degrees of oxidation. On this basis a method was developed for the separation of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) by coprecipitation on iron(III) hydroxide and their separation from the iron(III) hydroxide support

  16. Cobalt-Chromium Metallosis With Normal Electroretinogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Lola M; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H; Hood, Donald C; Odel, Jeffrey G

    2016-12-01

    Ocular cobalt toxicity is a rare phenomenon reported with increased frequency due to the rise of cobalt-chromium metal hip implants. We report the case of a 66-year-old previously healthy man who developed decreased vision due to cobalt-chromium toxicity from a metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Our objective was to determine whether the origin of his visual loss was due to toxicity of the optic nerve, of the retina, or of both. Ocular examination, 10-2 SITA-Standard Humphrey Visual Field (VF), standard full-field electroretinogram (ERG) as indicated by the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV), multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG), multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were conducted. Ocular examination revealed decreased visual acuity, poor color vision, normal funduscopy, and cecocentral scotomas on VF testing. Because his right eye was amblyopic since childhood, test results from only the left eye are shown. Electrophysiology studies revealed an ISCEV standard full-field ERG with photopic and scotopic responses within normal limits, mfERG with amplitudes and latencies within normal limits, and mfVEP with latencies within normal limits, but with decreased central amplitudes. Peripapillary and macular OCT showed retinal nerve fiber layer and retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness within normal limits. Because decreased color vision and cecocentral scotoma on 10-2 VF are most consistent with toxic optic neuropathy, and decreased central amplitudes on mfVEP are suggestive of neural dysfunction, we hypothesize that our patient presented with an early stage of optic nerve toxicity that was not yet apparent as a structural abnormality on OCT.

  17. Study on the surface oxidation resistance of uranium metal in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou

    1999-01-01

    The surface reactions of different layers on uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 25, 80 and 200 degree C are studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental results show that the carbon monoxide is adsorbed on the surface oxide layer of uranium and interacted each other. The content of oxygen in the surface oxide and O/U ratio are decreased with increasing the exposure of carbon monoxide to the surface layer. The effect of reduction on the metal surface is more obviously with a higher temperature and increasing of layer thickness. The investigation indicates the uranium metal has resistance to further oxidation in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide

  18. XPS study on the surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Huang Ruiliang

    1996-12-01

    The surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The carbon monoxide adsorption on the surface oxide layer resulted in U4f peak shifting to the lower binding energy and the content of oxygen in the oxide is decreased. O/U radio decreases with increasing the exposure of carbon monoxide to the surface layer. The investigation indicated the surface layer of uranium metal was further reduced in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide at high temperature. (3 refs., 5 figs.)

  19. Carbon monoxide poisoning - Immediate diagnosis and treatment are crucial to avoid complications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, L.D. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless, tasteless gas produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon-containing fuels (oil, kerosene, coal, wood) or the inadequate ventilation of natural gas. When carbon monoxide is introduced into the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, reducing the number of binding sites available for oxygen. Carbon monoxide also changes the structure of the hemoglobin molecule, which makes it even more difficult for oxygen that has attached to be released into tissues. The resulting tissue ischemia can lead to organ failure, permanent changes in cognition, or death. Carbon monoxide poisoning is the leading cause of death by poisoning in industrialized countries.

  20. Influence of promoters and oxidants on propane dehydrogenation over chromium-oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Shaporeva, N.Yu.; Trushin, D.V.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    2010-12-30

    Possibilities for increasing the efficiency of supported on SiO{sub 2} chromium-oxide catalysts in propane oxidative dehydrogenation in CO{sub 2} presence are investigated: the introduction of Li, Na, K, Ca in catalysts and the addition of O{sub 2} in the reaction mixture. It was been found that the positive role of K - the increase of the selectivity to propene and stability of catalysts at long-duration tests - appeared at the relation of Cr:K=20. It was shown that the presence of little amount of O{sub 2} (2%) in the reaction mixtures of propane and carbon dioxide resulted in the increase of propene yield and catalyst stability. (orig.)

  1. Polymeric precursors method for obtaining pigments based on Inorganic oxides of chromium and iron deposited on TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Everlania M. da; Galvao, Sheila B.; Paskocimas, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The case study was the use of chromium oxides and iron, as a precursor in the synthesis of inorganic pigments. The synthesis was based on the dissolution of citric acid as a complexing agent, addition of metal oxides, such as ion chromophores; polymerization with ethylene glycol and doping with titanium oxide. Going through pre-calcination, breakdown, calcination at different temperatures (700, 900 and 1100 deg C resulting in pigments: green for pigment and chromium deposited on TiO2, orange for iron on TiO2. The thermal analysis (TG and DTA), evaluated their thermal decompositions, the XRD revealed the formation of crystalline phases such as iron titanate and chrome titanate; SEM showed the formation of hexagonal particles for both oxides. Under the different analysis, one can see the potential stability of pigments and powders, can be proposed its use as pigments in polymers. (author)

  2. Cholesterol-lowering drug, in combination with chromium chloride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lovastatin, being an inhibitor of HMG-CoA-Reductase, inhibitsinfection by cholesterol depletion, while chromium chloride complexes, at their higher concentrations, are reported toexhibit cytotoxicity. In intracellular amastigotes, cytotoxicity has been checked by assessing various manifestation of celldeath, viz.

  3. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the tissues of the largemouth yellowfish, Labeobarbus kimberleyensis (Gilchrist and Thompson, 1913), from the Vaal Dam, South Africa, and associated consumption risks.

  4. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. This vulnerability results because chromium is essential for the fabrication of corrosion-resisting steels and high-temperature, oxidation-resisting alloys in applications that are vital to the nation's technological well-being; because no substitutes are known for these materials in those applications; and because the known, substantial deposits of chromite ore are only in a few geographical locations that could become inaccessible to the United States as a result of political actions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution

  5. Synthesis and spectral properties of Chromium(III) complex of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISSCH) with chromium(III) chloride. The complex was characterized by molar conductance, magnetic moment, infrared, far-infrared and electronic spectra and elemental analysis. The ligand exists in keto tantomeric form and it coordinates through ...

  6. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Chromium in Alleviating Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yinan; Clark, Suzanne; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular anomalies and is a major health problem approaching global epidemic proportions. Insulin resistance, a prediabetic condition, precedes the onset of frank type 2 diabetes and offers potential avenues for early intervention to treat the disease. Although lifestyle modifications and exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, compliance has proved to be difficult, warranting pharmacological interventions. However, most of the currently available drugs that improve insulin sensitivity have adverse effects. Therefore, attractive strategies to alleviate insulin resistance include dietary supplements. One such supplement is chromium, which has been shown reduce insulin resistance in some, but not all, studies. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of chromium in alleviating insulin resistance remain elusive. This review examines emerging reports on the effect of chromium, as well as molecular and cellular mechanisms by which chromium may provide beneficial effects in alleviating insulin resistance. PMID:22423897

  8. Mössbauer and magnetization studies of nanosize chromium ferrite

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. Synthesized chromium ferrite powders were in good phase and showed spinel structure in the XRD pattern. Nanocrystalline CrF powder ...

  9. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Electronic Supplementary Material. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation by A Bellifa (pp 669–677). Figure S1. Structural schemes of anatase to rutile transition. Figure S2. Analysis ATG-ATD for different samples.

  10. Recovery of Chromium (III) from Tannery wastewater | ALI AWAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three aqueous oxidants, Hydrogen peroxide, Sodium Hypochlorite and Calcium Hypochlorite were employed independently in oxidizing Chromium (III) containing tannery wastewaters to soluble chromate (CrO42-) under alkaline conditions. The amount of chromate recovered was determined via spectrophotometry.

  11. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbard, W.A.; Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates

  12. Composite Coatings of Chromium and Nanodiamond Particles on Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidikova N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrome plating is used to improve the properties of metal surfaces like hardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance in machine building. To further improve these properties, an electrodeposited chromium coating on steel, modified with nanodiamond particles is proposed. The nanodiamond particles (average size 4 nm measured by TEM are produced by detonation synthesis (NDDS. The composite coating (Cr+NDDS has an increased thickness, about two times greater microhardness and finer micro-structure compared to that of unmodified chromium coating obtained under the same galvanization conditions. In the microstructure of specimen obtained from chrome electrolyte with concentration of NDDS 25 g/l or more, “minisections” with chromium shell were found. They were identified by metallographic microscope and X-ray analyser on etched section of chromium plated sample. The object of further research is the dependence of the presence of NDDS in the composite coating from the nanodiamond particles concentration in the chroming electrolyte.

  13. Determination of Wastewater Acids from Chromium Plating and Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    1995-01-01

    ... Laboratories vessel plating program. The chemical literature provides offline laboratory detection of chromic acid from chromium plating wastewater solutions, as well as phosphoric and sulfuric acids from electropolishing wastewater solutions...

  14. Transient PrOx carbon monoxide measurement, control, and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inbody, M. A. (Michael A.); Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.); Tafoya, J. (Jose I.)

    2002-01-01

    Fuel processing systems for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems require control of the carbon monoxide concentration to less than 100 ppm to 10 ppm in the anode feed. Conventional hydrocarbon fuel processors use a water-gas shift (WGS) reactor to react CO with water to form H2 and reduce the CO concentration. The CO conversion is limited by equilibrium at the outlet temperature of the WGS reactor. The WGS outlet CO concentration can range from over 1% to 2000 ppm depending on the system and its operating parameters. At these concentrations, CO poisons low temperature PEM fuel cells and the concentrations needs to be reduced further.

  15. Pengaruh konsentrasi cobalt chromium pada uji hemolisis sebagai implan gigi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosaphat Bayu Rosanto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of concentration of cobalt chromium in hemolysis test for dental implant. Dental implants are used to replace tooth/teeth loss and its function. Cobalt chromium has ideal characteristics to be made as dental implants material. It is required that the material to be implanted must be biocompatible with cells and tissues. One of biocompatibility characteristics is hemocompatibility. Hemocompatibility of materials can be observed with hemolysis test. Thus the purpose of this research is to know whether cobalt chromium as dental implants material affect the hemolysis of rabbit blood or not. This research was done with rabbit blood (Oryctolagus cuniculus and devided into 3 groups (treatment, positive and negative control. The tested material was cobalt chromium Remanium® GM 800, a product from Dentaurum. The contact between blood and material was done with ASTM-F075 hemolysis test. Cobalt chromium was not hemolytic at 2,5%, 5%, and 10% of concentration, slightly hemolytic at 20% of concentration, and hemolytic at 40% and 80% of concentration. The conclusion of this research was variety of concentration of cobalt chromium affected hemolysis percentage signi cantly. ABSTRAK Implan gigi digunakan untuk mengganti gigi yang hilang untuk dan dapat mengembalikan fungsi gigi. Cobalt chromium memiliki sifat-sifat yang memenuhi persyaratan sebagai material implan. Material yang diimplankan dalam tubuh harus memiliki sifat biokompatibilitas. Salah satu sifat biokompatibilitas yang harus dimiliki material yang diimplankan dalam tubuh adalah sifat hemokompatibilitas. Sifat hemokompatibilitas dapat diketahui dengan uji hemolisis. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui ada/tidaknya pengaruh logam cobalt chromium sebagai material implan gigi terhadap hemolisis pada darah kelinci. Penelitian ini dilakukan menggunakan sampel darah yang didapat dari kelinci (Oryctolagus cuniculus yang dibagi menjadi 3 kelompok, yaitu perlakuan, kontrol

  16. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  17. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  18. Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, F.M.; Guidotti, R.A.; McCarthy, D.K.

    A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)/sub 3/Cl, Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)OH, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

  19. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, H.F.; Korenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A method is specified for heat treating age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloys to obtain a morphology of the gamma-double prime phase enveloping the gamma-prime, the alloy consisting essentially of from 25% to 45% nickel, 10% to 16% chromium, 1.5% to 3% of molybdenum or niobium, about 2% titanium, about 3% aluminum, and the remainder substantially all iron. (author)

  20. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. XII Appendix XII to Part 266—Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be...

  2. Cytokine detection for the diagnosis of chromium allergy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luis Eduardo Agner Machado; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patch testing remains the gold standard method for the identification of the etiologic agent of allergic contact dermatitis. However, it is a subjective, time-consuming exam whose technique demands special care and which presents some contraindications, which hamper its use. In a recent study, we showed that the proliferation assay can suitably replace patch testing for the diagnosis of chromium allergy, which had been previously demonstrated only for nickel allergy. In this study, we try to refine the method by reducing the incubation period of cultures for lymphocyte proliferation assays in response to chromium. OBJECTIVE Develop an alternative or complementary diagnostic test for chromium allergic contact dermatitis. METHODS We compared the production of 9 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17 and RANTES) between 18 chromium-allergic patients and 19 controls. RESULTS Chromium increased the production of IFN-y, IL-5, IL-2 and IL-13 in allergic patients, but only IL-2 and especially IL-13 helped discriminate allergic patients from controls. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy found with IL-13 were about 80%. CONCLUSIONS IL-13 and IL-2 detection may be used to diagnose chromium allergy in 2-day cultures. However, in general, the 6-day cultures seem to be superior for this purpose. PMID:24173176

  3. Removal of Chromium and Lead from Industrial Wastewater Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hilal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research an attempt is made on the ability of aerobic treatment of synthetic solutions containing lead and chromium using effective microorganisms within the reactor. To achieve the desired objectives of the research, synthetic aqueous solutions of lead and chromium was used in the concentration of chromium and lead ions of 5, 10,50 and 100 mg / l .The work was done at constant pH equal to 4.5 and temperature of 30 ± 1 º C. Effective microorganisms solutions was added to the reactor at Vol.% of 1/50 ,1/100 ,1/500 and 1/1000, with retention time was 24 hours to measure the heavy metals concentration the atomic absorption device was used. The experimental results showed that each 1mg / l of lead and chromium ions need 24 mg of effective microorganisms to achieve removal of 92.0% and 82.60% for lead and chromium respectively. Increasing the concentration of effective microorganisms increases the surface of adsorption and thus increasing the removal efficiency. It is found that the microorganisms activity occur in the first five hours of processing and about 94% of adsorption capacity of biomass will take place. It is also found the selectivity of microorganisms to lead ions is higher than for chromium ions.

  4. Cobalt, nickel and chromium release from dental tools and alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettelarij, Jolinde A B; Lidén, Carola; Axén, Emmy; Julander, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloys are used as casting alloys by dental technicians when producing dental prostheses and implants. Skin exposure and metal release from alloys and tools used by the dental technicians have not been studied previously. To study the release of cobalt, nickel and chromium from alloys and tools that come into contact with the skin of dental technicians. Cobalt and nickel release from tools and alloys was tested with the cobalt spot test and the dimethylglyoxime test for nickel. Also, the release of cobalt, nickel and chromium in artificial sweat (EN1811) at different time-points was assessed. Analysis was performed with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Sixty-one tools were spot tested; 20% released nickel and 23% released cobalt. Twenty-one tools and five dental alloys were immersed in artificial sweat. All tools released cobalt, nickel and chromium. The ranges were 0.0047-820, 0.0051-10 and 0.010-160 µg/cm(2) /week for cobalt, nickel and chromium, respectively. All dental alloys released cobalt in artificial sweat, with a range of 0.0010-17 µg/cm(2) /week, and they also released nickel and chromium at low concentrations. Sensitizing metals are released from tools and alloys used by dental technicians. This may cause contact allergy and hand eczema. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment...... of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0.01–0.20 µg...

  6. Production of medically useful nitric monoxide using AC arc discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S R; Huang, Y F; Liu, Z; Sui, M H; Liu, J M; Yan, K P

    2018-02-28

    Inhaled nitric monoxide (iNO) is increasingly used as a medical treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome. A course of the existing nitric monoxide (NO) therapy with gas cylinders could cost up to approximately $15,000 for an average of 30.2 h. Moreover, a gas cylinder containing a mixture of N 2 and NO may potentially leak NO. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient and cost-effective on-site iNO generation system. In the present setup, NO was generated by using dry air or mixed oxygen/nitrogen (O 2 /N 2 ) and an AC power source with an output power level of 5-30 W at atmospheric pressure. The simultaneously produced NO 2 was eliminated with an ammonium sulfite ((NH 4 ) 2 SO 3 ) solution. The effects of the O 2 /N 2 ratio, gas flow rate, discharge gap distance, output energy density and electrode structure on NO x concentration and the NO/NO 2 ratio are reported. The concentrations of NO and NO 2 reached 62 ppm and 3 ppm, respectively, after absorption and dilution at a gas flow rate of 6 L/min. With the present setup, the AC arc discharge produced NO x at a stable concentration for at least 6 h using dry air. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Linne, Diane L.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrocarbons. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquid. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  8. A carbon monoxide passive sampler: Research and development needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Diamond, R.C.; Woods, A.L.

    1991-11-01

    In rare instances, carbon monoxide (CO) levels in houses can reach dangerously high concentrations, causing adverse health effects ranging from mild headaches to, under extreme conditions, death. Hundreds of fatal accidental carbon monoxide poisonings occur each year primarily due to the indoor operation of motor vehicles, the indoor use of charcoal for cooking, the operation of malfunctioning vented and unvented combustion appliances, and the misuse combustion appliances. Because there is a lack of simple, inexpensive, and accurate field sampling instrumentation, it is difficult for gas utilities and researchers to conduct field research studies designed to quantify the concentrations of CO in residences. Determining the concentration of CO in residences is the first step towards identifying the high risk appliances and high-CO environments which pose health risks. Thus, there exists an urgent need to develop and field-validate a CO-quantifying technique suitable for affordable field research. A CO passive sampler, if developed, could fulfill these requirements. Existing CO monitoring techniques are discussed as well as three potential CO-detection methods for use in a CO passive sampler. Laboratory and field research needed for the development and validation of an effective and cost-efficient CO passive sampler are also discussed.

  9. Bilateral brachial plexus injury following acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mounia; Belaidi, Halima; Benabdeljlil, Maria; Bouchhab, Wafa; El Jazouli, Nadia; El Brini, Asmae; Aidi, Saadia; Ouazzani, Reda M; El Alaoui Faris, Mustapha

    2013-12-07

    Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication is a leading cause of severe neuropsychological impairments. Peripheral nerve injury has rarely been reported. It consists usually in a demyelinating polyneuropathy or mononeuropathy affecting mainly the lower limbs. Isolated involvement of both upper extremities has been described in only 4 patients related to root damage. We report the first case of bilateral brachial plexus injury following CO poisoning and review all previous CO-induced neuropathy described in literature. After being unconscious for three hours, a 42 years old man experienced bilateral brachial weakness associated with edema of the face and the upper limbs. Neurological examination showed a brachial diplegia, distal vibratory, thermic and algic hypoesthesia, deep tendon areflexia in upper limbs. There was no sensory or motor deficit in lower extremities. No cognitive disturbances were detected. Creatine kinase was elevated. Electroneuromyogram patterns were compatible with the diagnosis of bilateral C5 D1 brachial axonal plexus injury predominant on the left side. Clinical course after hyperbaric oxygen therapy was marked by a complete recovery of neurological disorders. Peripheral neuropathy is an unusual complication of CO intoxication. Bilateral brachial plexus impairment is exceptional. Various mechanisms have been implicated including nerve compression secondary to rhabdomyolysis, nerve ischemia due to hypoxia and direct nerve toxicity of carbon monoxide. Prognosis is commonly excellent without any sequelae.

  10. Carbon monoxide adsorption on silver doped gold clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haeck, Jorg; Veldeman, Nele; Claes, Pieterjan; Janssens, Ewald; Andersson, Mats; Lievens, Peter

    2011-03-24

    Well controlled gas phase experiments of the size and dopant dependent reactivity of gold clusters can shed light on the surprising discovery that nanometer sized gold particles are catalytically active. Most studies that investigate the reactivity of gold clusters in the gas phase focused on charged, small sized clusters. Here, reactivity measurements in a low-pressure reaction cell were performed to investigate carbon monoxide adsorption on neutral bare and silver doped gold clusters (Au(n)Ag(m); n = 10-45; m = 0, 1, 2) at 140 K. The size dependence of the reaction probabilities reflects the role of the electronic shells for the carbon monoxide adsorption, with closed electronic shell systems being the most reactive. In addition, the cluster's reaction probability is reduced upon substitution of gold atoms for silver. Inclusion of a single silver atom causes significant changes in the reactivity only for a few cluster sizes, whereas there is a more general reduction in the reactivity with two silver atoms in the cluster. The experimental observations are qualitatively explained on the basis of a Blyholder model, which includes dopant induced features such as electron transfer from silver to gold, reduced s-d hybrization, and changes in the cluster geometry.

  11. Modulation of growth cone filopodial length by carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is physiologically produced via heme degradation by heme oxygenase enzymes. Whereas CO has been identified as an important physiological signaling molecule, the roles it plays in neuronal development and regeneration are poorly understood. During these events, growth cones guide axons through a rich cellular environment to locate target cells and establish synaptic connections. Previously, we have shown that another gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO), has potent effects on growth cone motility. With NO and CO sharing similar cellular targets, we wanted to determine whether CO affected growth cone motility as well. We assessed how CO affected growth cone filopodial length and determined the signaling pathway by which this effect was mediated. Using two well-characterized neurons from the freshwater snail, Helisoma trivolvis, it was found that the CO donor, carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2), increased filopodial length. CO utilized a signaling pathway that involved the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G, and ryanodine receptors. While increases in filopodial length often occur from robust increases in intracellular calcium levels, the timing in which CO increased filopodial length corresponded with low basal calcium levels in growth cones. Taken together with findings of a heme oxygenase-like protein in the Helisoma nervous system, these results provide evidence for CO as a modulator of growth cone motility and implicate CO as a neuromodulatory signal during neuronal development and/or regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 677-690, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Suicidal carbon monoxide poisoning using a gas-powered generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blässer, Katharina; Tatschner, Thomas; Bohnert, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The presented case deals with an unusual suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning. In a car parked in a highway rest area, the body of a middle-aged man was found. In the open trunk of the car there was a gas-powered generator which was switched on, but no longer running. The tank was three quarters full. At autopsy, bright-red livores, cherry-pink fingernails, cherry-red blood and salmon-red skeletal musculature were found. According to the toxicological analysis performed during autopsy, the COHb content in the corpse blood was 68%. To reconstruct the event, the emergency generator was started again in the man's car. By means of measuring probes placed in the interior of the car, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxygen were measured and recorded in a concentration-time curve; the concentration of cyanide was measured at the end of the experiment. The lower explosion limit of 500 ppm CO was reached after 30s already. For technical reasons, no further values could be recorded. After about 14 min the engine started stuttering with approximately 14 vol.% of oxygen in the air, but continued to run at a lower speed until the experiment was stopped after 25 min. The final concentration of cyanide was 7.5 ppm. In view of the rapid CO increase in the interior of the vehicle it is to be assumed that the victim lost consciousness very fast. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chromium, CLA, and ractopamine for finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolla, C S; Holanda, D M; Ferreira, S V; Rocha, G C; Serão, N V L; Duarte, M S; Abreu, M L T; Saraiva, A

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dietary chromium, CLA, and ractopamine on performance, carcass traits, and pork quality of finishing pigs slaughtered at 115 kg BW. Ninety-six crossbred barrows (initial BW = 70.21 ± 1.98 kg) were randomly assigned to 1 of 6 dietary treatments. There were 8 replicates per treatment (48 pens; 2 pigs/pen). A diet formulated according to the nutritional requirements was used as the control (CON). The other 5 diets were based on the CON and supplemented as follows: 0.4 mg/kg Cr yeast (CrY); 0.5% CLA; 0.4 mg/kg CrY and 0.5% CLA (CrY + CLA); 20 mg/kg ractopamine (RAC); 0.4 mg/kg CrY and 20 mg/kg RAC (CrY + RAC). Lysine levels on diets containing ractopamine were raised by 20% compared to CON to meet the greater requirements of pigs fed ractopamine. Pigs fed RAC and CrY + RAC were fed CON for the first 17 d, and then the respective diets for the last 28 d on trial. Data were analyzed in a model including the fixed effect of treatment (6 levels) and initial BW as a covariate for all characteristics, with the exception of carcass traits, in which final BW was used as a covariate. Least-squares means were separated using Tukey-Kramer's method. Differences were considered when probability values were lower than 0.05. Pigs fed RAC and CrY + RAC had the greatest ( 0.05) pork quality, except for color. No differences ( > 0.05) were observed for carcasses pH and temperature. The values for pigs fed RAC were greater ( = 0.01) than pigs fed other diets. Pigs fed RAC had lower ( < 0.01) values compared to pigs fed other experimental diets. Serum urea nitrogen concentration (SUN) was lower ( = 0.02) in pigs fed CrY + RAC than in pigs fed CON and RAC and similar to pigs fed the other feeding additives. In summary, it was demonstrated that, when combined, CrY and RAC increase LM area and carcass yield, and reduce SUN, suggesting that chromium could improve nutrient utilization by muscle cells in RAC-fed pigs. Additionally, the additives have

  14. Study of the catalytic activity of mixed non-stoichiometric uranium-thorium oxides in carbon monoxide oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, G.

    1969-06-01

    The aim of this work has been to study the catalytic properties of non-stoichiometric uranium-thorium oxides having the general formula U x Th 1-x O 2+y , for the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The preparation of pure, homogeneous, isotropic solids having good structural stability and a surface area as high as possible calls for a strict control of the conditions of preparation of these oxides right from the preparation of 'mother salts': the mixed oxalates U x Th 1-x (C 2 O 4 ) 2 , 2H 2 O. A study has been made of their physico-chemical properties (overall and surface chemical constitution, texture, structure, electrical conductivity), as well as of their adsorption properties with respect to gaseous species occurring in the catalytic reaction. This analysis has made it possible to put forward a reaction mechanism based on successive oxidations and reductions of the active surface by the reactants. A study of the reactions kinetics has confirmed the existence of this oxidation-reduction mechanism which only occurs for oxides having a uranium content of above 0.0014. The carbon dioxide produced by the reaction acts as an inhibitor by blocking the sites on which carbon monoxide can be adsorbed. These non-stoichiometric mixed oxides are a particularly clear example of catalysis by oxygen exchange between the solid and the gas phase. (author) [fr

  15. Reduction of nitric oxide by carbon monoxide over a silica supported platinum catalyst infrared and kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorimer, D' Arcy Harold [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1978-07-01

    The reduction of nitric oxide by carbon monoxide over a 4.5 weight precent platinum catalyst supported on silica was studied at 300 C. Reaction rate data was obtained together with in situ infrared spectra of species on the catalyst surface. The kinetics of the system were found to exhibit two distinct trends, depending on the molar ratio of CO/NO in the reactor. For net reducing conditions (CO/NO> 1) the catalyst underwent a transient deactivation, the extent of which was dependent on the specific CO/NO ratio during reaction. Reactivation of the catalyst was obtained with both oxidizing and reducing pretreatments. For molar feed ratios of CO/NO less than one, carbon monoxide conversion was typically 95 to 100%, resulting in strongly oxidizing conditions over the catalyst. Under these conditions no deactivation was apparent. Infrared spectra recorded under reaction conditions revealed intense bands at 2075 and 2300 cm-1 , which were identified as carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pt and Si-NCO, respectively. Isocyanate bands formed under reducing conditions were more intense and exhibited greater stability than those formed under oxidizing conditions. A reaction mechanism based on the dissociation of nitric oxide as the rate-limiting step was used to correlate nitric oxide reaction rates and nitrous oxide selectivities observed under reducing conditions. As part of this mechanism it is assumed that nitrous bxide is formed via a Langmuir-Hinshelwood process in which an adsorbed nitrogen atom reacts with an adsorbed nitric oxide molecule. The nitric oxide reaction rate was found to be first order in nitric oxide partial pressure, and inverse second order in carbon monoxide partial pressure. A mechanism is proposed to qualitatively explain the deactivation process observed under reducing conditions. The essential part of this mechanism is the formation of an isocyanate species on the Pt crystallites of the catalyst and the subsequent transient diffusion of these

  16. Secondhand cigarette smoke as a cause of chronic carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachulis, C.J.

    1981-07-01

    Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning in a nonsmoking patient continued for several years until her husband stopped smoking cigarettes near her. Carbon monoxide poisoning should be considered in non-smokers when characteristic toxic symptoms occur (ie, lethargy, irritability, headache, blurred vision, slowed reaction time, and decreased concentration). Toxicity may develop simply from breathing second-hand smoke.

  17. Dehydrogenation of propane in the presence of carbon dioxide over chromium and gallium oxides catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Menshova, M.V.; Kunusova, R.M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    Effective chromium and gallium oxides supported catalysts were prepared and tested in longduration experiments for propane dehydrogenation in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The optimal concentrations of active metals were found. It was shown that the activity, selectivity and stability of chromium oxides catalysts were higher than these parameters for gallium ones. Mechanism of propane oxidative dehydrogenation was studied over both catalysts using unstationary and spectroscopic methods. The employment of these methods allowed to establish the differences in process mechanism. It was shown that surface hydroxides took participation in propene formation over Cr-catalysts and hydrides - over Ga-ones. Propane and carbon dioxide participated in the reaction from the adsorbed state over both catalysts but they were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: CO2 was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over both catalysts, CO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} were tied more strongly with Cr-catalysts than with Ga-ones. It was shown that CO{sub 2} took active participation in reverse watergas shift reaction and in oxidation of catalyst surface over chromium oxides catalysts. The main role of CO{sub 2} in propane dehydrogenation over gallium catalysts consisted in a decrease of coke formation. Step-schemes of propene and cracking products formation were proposed on the basis of literature and obtained data: via the redox mechanism over Cr-catalysts and through a heterolytic dissociation reaction pathway over Ga-ones. (orig.)

  18. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1987-08-25

    The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. CW-Laser-Induced Solid-State Reactions in Mixed Micron-Sized Particles of Silicon Monoxide and Titanium Monoxide: Nano-Structured Composite with Visible Light Absorption

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křenek, T.; Tesař, J.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Netrvalová, M.; Pola, M.; Jandová, Věra; Pokorná, Dana; Cuřínová, Petra; Bezdička, Petr; Pola, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2017), s. 1640-1648 ISSN 1574-1443 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : Cw CO2 laser heating * IR laser imaging * Silicon monoxide * Solid state redox reactions * Ti/Si/O composite * Titanium monoxide Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry; CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering (UCHP-M) OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry; Chemical process engineering (UCHP-M) Impact factor: 1.577, year: 2016

  20. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    Along with chromium, nickel and cobalt are the clinically most important metal allergens. However, unlike for nickel and cobalt, there is no validated colorimetric spot test that detects chromium. Such a test could help both clinicians and their patients with chromium dermatitis to identify culprit...... exposures. To evaluate the use of diphenylcarbazide (DPC) as a spot test reagent for the identification of chromium(VI) release. A colorimetric chromium(VI) spot test based on DPC was prepared and used on different items from small market surveys. The DPC spot test was able to identify chromium(VI) release...

  1. Digital image analysis of fingernail colour in cadavers comparing carbon monoxide poisoning to controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Neil E I

    2010-03-01

    Carbon monoxide is a component of motor vehicle exhaust fumes, provided a functional catalytic converter is not present. This gas binds avidly to the hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells preventing its oxygen transport function, effectively poisoning the body by starving it of oxygen. In binding to hemoglobin, carbon monoxide forms carboxyhemoglobin, which has a characteristic bright pink color. It has been remarked that the fingernails of victims of carbon monoxide tend to exhibit pink color, otherwise fingernails of deceased bodies tend towards a dark red to blue color. This study sought to objectively determine by using digital image analysis if a color difference occurred between the fingernails of a group of cadavers with carbon monoxide poisoning compared to a group of controls. The fingernails of the carbon monoxide group did tend to be more red than the controls, but due to overlap between the two groups assessment of the fingernails cannot be recommended as a rapid screening test.

  2. Identifying and managing adverse environmental health effects: 6. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelsohn, Alan; Sanborn, Margaret D.; Jessiman, Barry J.; Weir, Erica

    2002-01-01

    CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING IS AN ENIGMATIC ILLNESS. The symptoms are often nonspecific or masked by an exacerbation of an underlying illness, such as congestive heart failure, that has been triggered by carbon monoxide inhalation. The effects can range from mild, annoying symptoms relieved by removal of the source to severe morbidity with profound central nervous system dysfunction, acute complications and delayed sequelae. Estimates suggest that about one-third of nonfatal cases of carbon monoxide poisoning go undetected and undiagnosed. We present a case of residential carbon monoxide poisoning to illustrate these points and to demonstrate the usefulness of a simple tool based on the CH2OPD2 mnemonic (Community, Home, Hobbies, Occupation, Personal habits, Diet and Drugs) that physicians can use to obtain an environmental exposure history. We outline the clinical management of carbon monoxide poisoning and provide strategies and resources to prevent exposure. PMID:12126326

  3. A Rare Terminal Dinitrogen Complex of Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mock, Michael T.; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; O' Hagan, Molly J.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-10-12

    The reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia from N2 and H2 is currently carried out by the Haber-Bosch process, an energy intensive process that requires high pressures and high temperatures and accounts for the production of millions of tons of ammonia per year. The development of a catalytic, energy-efficient process for N2 reduction is of great interest and remains a formidable challenge. In this communication, we are reporting the preparation, characterization and computational electronic structure analysis of a rare 'Chatt-type' ((P-P)2M(N2)2, P-P = diphosphine ligand) complex of chromium, cis-[Cr(N2)2(PPh2NBn2)2] and its reactivity with CO. This complex is supported by the diphosphine ligand PPh2NBn2, containing non-coordinating pendant amine bases, to serve as proton relays. Future studies for this complex are aimed at answering fundamental questions regarding the role of proton relays in the second coordination sphere in their ability to facilitate proton movement from an external acid to metal-bound dinitrogen ligands in the challenging multi-proton/electron reduction of N2 to ammonia.

  4. Carbon monoxide-related deaths from 1984 to 1993 in Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, D; Schneider, B

    1995-05-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning occurs frequently in industrialized countries. Between 1970 and 1978 in Vienna, the capital of Austria, carbon-monoxide-rich coal gas was replaced with natural gas. Despite this fact, people still die of unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning. The main purpose of this study was to determine the reasons for unintentional carbon monoxide-related deaths, and further to describe the epidemiology of these fetal poisonings in Vienna between 1984 and 1993. A secondary purpose was to investigate whether intentional carbon monoxide poisoning still plays a role among suicides as was the case up to the 1970s. For this purpose we analyzed carbon monoxide-related deaths in Vienna from 1984 to 1993, based on actual autopsy reports of postmortems performed at the Viennese Institute of Forensic Medicine. Deaths due to fire were excluded. The main reason for unintentional carbon monoxide-related deaths in Vienna between 1984 and 1993 was flueless gas-fueled water heating appliances, overused especially by old people during the cold period of the year. The frequency of unintentional carbon monoxide-related deaths in 1993 was almost as high as in 1984. A total of 53% of deceased persons were over age 60. Most fatal carbon monoxide poisoning occurred during the cold period of the year. Suicides decreased significantly during the investigation period. In 76% of these deaths car exhaust fumes were inhaled, especially by men. In conclusion, we recommend programs to prevent unintentional carbon monoxide-related deaths. These programs should especially target the elderly. Flueless gas boilers should not be overused. Furthermore, apartments should be aired sufficiently, even during the cold period of the year.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. 40 CFR 89.112 - Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter exhaust emission standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....112 Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter exhaust emission... emissions of oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nonmethane hydrocarbon are measured using... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide...

  6. Effect of chromium contents on material properties of high chromium ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masanori; Wakai, Takashi; Aoto, Kazumi

    2003-05-01

    High chromium ferritic steel, having both advanced thermal properties and high temperature strength, is a candidate for the structural material of the future Japanese Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). In this study, material physical properties of several kinds of 12Cr steel and high purity Fe-Cr alloys are measured to suggest the adequate high chromium steel for the structural material of FBR. The following conclusions are obtained from measured data and the literature data of 2.25Cr-1Mo and Mod.9Cr-1Mo steels. (1) Thermal conductivity decrease with Cr contents increase. However, the difference of the thermal conductivity caused by Cr contents becomes not so significant in high temperature. (2) Thermal expansion decreases with Cr contents increase. However, Cr dope in the iron more than 30mass% is not so efficient to suppress the thermal expansion. (3) Young's modulus increase with Cr contents increase. (4) In this study, the effect of W contents on the 12Cr steels is insignificant. (5) Improving the performance against thermal stress by doping Cr is expected as far as the iron contains low Cr. (6) About results suggest that there is limited utility to improve the physical properties of high Cr ferritic steel for FBR by control of Cr contents. (author)

  7. Properties of the pressure-induced extended-solid carbon monoxide under different synthesis and processing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Nhan; Ciezak-Jenkins, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The discovery of the high-energy-density pressure-induced extended-solid/polymeric carbon monoxide (poly-CO) has opened a new paradigm of energetic materials. Considerable studies have been made to understand properties of poly-CO. However factors which control the morphology and meta-stability of recovered samples at ambient conditions have not been identified. In this presentation, we report the variations of morphology and meta-stability of poly-CO synthesized under different conditions in the GPa range. It has been found that the morphology and meta-stability of poly-CO depend on sample volume, rate of polymeric phase transition and additives. Poly-CO synthesized with a faster compression rate appears to be more structurally disordered and have higher rates of decomposition. Samples synthesized in a larger volume require either a longer time at elevated pressure or a higher pressure for the polymeric phase transitions to occur. Also, results of kinetic studies of photochemical reaction of CO at 4.5 GPa in presence of traces of H2 O, HCl (1M), and concentrated H2SO4 will be presented and influences of these additives on the morphology and meta-stability of polymeric CO will be discussed.

  8. Color stability of ground beef packaged in a low carbon monoxide atmosphere or vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jong Youn; Claus, James R

    2011-01-01

    Ground beef was either packaged in an atmosphere of 0.4% CO, 30% CO₂, and 69.6% N₂ (CO-MAP) or vacuum. After storage (48 h, 2-3°C), packages of CO-MAP and vacuum were opened and overwrapped with polyvinyl chloride. Other CO-MAP and vacuum packages were left intact. Packages were initially displayed for 7 days (2-3°C). Intact packages were further displayed up to 35 days before being opened and displayed (1 or 3 days). Intact CO-MAP packaged ground beef was always more red than intact vacuum-packaged ground beef. Color was relatively stable for both types of intact packages over 35 days of display. Upon opening CO-MAP packaged ground beef, the red color decreased slower than in ground beef from vacuum packages. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Alkaline electrochemical advanced oxidation process for chromium oxidation at graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yudong; Zheng, Shili; Sun, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Jin, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Alkaline electrochemical advanced oxidation processes for chromium oxidation and Cr-contaminated waste disposal were reported in this study. The highly graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes g-MWCNTs modified electrode was prepared for the in-situ electrochemical generation of HO 2 - . RRDE test results illustrated that g-MWCNTs exhibited much higher two-electron oxygen reduction activity than other nanocarbon materials with peak current density of 1.24 mA cm -2 , %HO 2 - of 77.0% and onset potential of -0.15 V (vs. Hg/HgO). It was originated from the highly graphitized structure and good electrical conductivity as illustrated from the Raman, XRD and EIS characterizations, respectively. Large amount of reactive oxygen species (HO 2 - and ·OH) were in-situ electro-generated from the two-electron oxygen reduction and chromium-induced alkaline electro-Fenton-like reaction. The oxidation of Cr(III) was efficiently achieved within 90 min and the conversion ratio maintained more than 95% of the original value after stability test, offering an efficient and green approach for the utilization of Cr-containing wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of thermogravimetry and thermodynamic calculations for specifying chromium diffusion occurring in alloys containing chromium carbides during high temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthod, Patrice; Conrath, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    The chromium diffusion is of great importance for the high temperature oxidation behaviour of the chromium-rich carbides-strengthened superalloys. These ones contain high chromium quantities for allowing them well resisting hot corrosion by constituting and maintaining a continuous external scale of chromia. Knowing how chromium can diffuse in such alloys is thus very useful for predicting the sustainability of their chromia-forming behaviour. Since Cr diffusion occurs through the external part of the alloy already affected by the previous steps of oxidation (decarburized subsurface) it is more judicious to specify this diffusion during the oxidation process itself. This was successfully carried out in this work in the case of a model chromia-forming nickel-based alloy containing chromium carbides, Ni(bal.)–25Cr–0.5C (in wt.%). This was done by specifying, using real-time thermogravimetry, the mass gain kinetic due to oxidation, and by combining it with the post-mortem determination of the Cr concentration profiles in subsurface. The values of D Cr thus obtained for 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C in the alloy subsurface are consistent with the values obtained in earlier works for similar alloy's chemical compositions. - Highlights: • A Ni25Cr0.50C alloy was oxidized at high temperature in a thermo-balance. • The mass gain files were analysed to specify the Cr 2 O 3 volatilization constant K v . • Concentration profiles were acquired to specify the chromium gradient. • The diffusion coefficient of chromium through the subsurface was deduced. • The obtained diffusion coefficient is consistent with values previously obtained.

  11. Microscopic analysis of the chromium content in the chromium-induced malignant and premalignant bronchial lesions of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yuji; Kondo, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Sumiyo; Uchihara, Hiroshi; Fujino, Haruhiko; Sawada, Naruhiko; Miyoshi, Takanori; Sakiyama, Shoji; Izumi, Keisuke; Monden, Yasumasa

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Our previous studies demonstrated that the frequency of gene instability in lung cancer of chromate workers was very high, but the frequencies of the p53 and ras gene mutations were low. To clarify the carcinogenesis of chromate in the lung, we established a chromate-induced cancer model in the rat proximal airway and examined the relationship between chromium accumulations and the chromium-induced cancer and premalignant bronchial lesions of the rat. Methods: Fifteen male, bred, 12-week-old Jcl-Wister rats were used. A pellet of strontium chromate were inserted into the bronchus of the rats. The rats were sacrificed 9 months after the pellet was inserted. We pathologically examined the region of the bronchi to which the pellet was attached. We quantified the amount of chromium accumulation in the bronchial lesions using a microscopic X-ray fluorescence analyzer. Results: Of the 15 rats, 1 rat had a lesion of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 7 rats had carcinoma in situ (CIS) or dysplasia, 8 rats had squamous metaplasia, and 5 rats had goblet cell hyperplasia. The amounts of chromium accumulation in normal epithelium (n=24), goblet cell hyperplasia (n=14), squamous metaplasia (n=8), and dysplasia plus CIS plus SCC (n=9) were 500±1354, 713±1062, 941±1328, and 3511±4473 (mean±SD) counts/s/mA, respectively. The amount of chromium accumulation was significantly increased according to the progression of malignant change of the bronchial epithelium (Spearman's correlation coefficient by ranks, rs=0.454, P<0.01). Conclusions: The amount of chromium accumulation was significantly increased according to the progression of malignant change of the bronchial epithelium. Examining the genetic alterations of histologic changes in this model was helpful in elucidating the process of carcinogenesis of chromium in the lung

  12. X-Ray Fluorescence On-Stream Analysis of Standard Reference Solution Concentrations of Chromium Plating and Polishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    1991-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence is evaluated as a means to quantitatively analyze standard reference solution concentrations of chromium plating and polishing solutions for chromium, sulfur, phosphorus, and iron...

  13. The Use of Wetting Agents/Fume Suppressants for Minimizing the Atmospheric Emissions from Hard Chromium Electroplating Baths

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paulson, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    ...) chemical additive to hard chromium electroplating baths reduces hexavalent chromium airborne emissions to the environment and reduces employee occupational exposures in the electroplating shop...

  14. Review article. Adverse hematological effects of hexavalent chromium: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Rina Rani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Workers of tanneries, welding industries, factories manufacturing chromate containing paints are exposed to hexavalent chromium that increas¬es the risk of developing serious adverse health effects. This review elucidates the mode of action of hexavalent chromium on blood and its adverse effects. Both leukocyte and erythrocyte counts of blood sharply decreased in Swiss mice after two weeks of intraperitoneal treatment with Cr (VI, with the erythrocytes transforming into echinocytes. The hexavalent chromium in the blood is readily reduced to trivalent form and the reductive capacity of erythrocytes is much greater than that of plasma. Excess Cr (VI, not reduced in plasma, may enter erythrocytes and lymphocytes and in rodents it induces microcytic anemia. The toxic effects of chromium (VI include mitochondrial injury and DNA damage of blood cells that leads to carcinogenicity. Excess Cr (VI increases cytosolic Ca2+ activity and ATP depletion thereby inducing eryptosis. Se, vitamin C, and quercetin are assumed to have some protective effect against hexavalent chromium induced hematological disorders.

  15. Purification Method of Industrial Waste Water with Hexavalent Chromium Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Banafsheafshan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Common sources of chromium in wastewater are electroplating and leather industries. Thus, the aim of this study is synthesis activated carbon fiber/zinc oxide composite to remove of Cr (VI from polluted water.Materials and Methods: The immobilization of zinc oxide (ZNO on activated carbon fiber (ACF was accomplished by Sol-gel method and synthesized activated carbon fiber composite (ACF/ZNO,was used to reduction of chromium under ultraviolet light from aqueous solution. And characterized by BET, SEM, XRD. After the design of the reactor, hexavalent chromium stock solution, using a solution of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7 in distilled water, were prepared. The residual concentration of chromium was analyzed by the 1,5-diphenylcar-bazide method using a spectrophotometer at a wave length of 540 nm.Results: The XRD results showed that a typical hexagonal phase for ZnO. The SEM results showed that zinc oxide were distributed on the ACF surface. It showed that the BET surface area was related to adsorption capacity for composite. Parameters effect, including concentration of pollutants, composite dose and pH were studied.Conclusion: In optimal conditions, initial chromium concentration of 5 mg/l, composite dose 2.5 g/l and a pH of 3, after 120 minutes, system removal efficiency was 85%.

  16. Anthropogenic Chromium Emissions in China from 1990 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×105t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×104t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  17. Structure and magnetic properties of chromium doped cobalt molybdenum nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guskos, Niko; Żołnierkiewicz, Grzegorz; Typek, Janusz; Guskos, Aleksander [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Piastów 48, 70-311 Szczecin (Poland); Adamski, Paweł; Moszyński, Dariusz [Institute of Inorganic Chemical Technology and Environment Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Pułaskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    Four nanocomposites containing mixed phases of Co{sub 3}Mo{sub 3}N and Co{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}N doped with chromium have been prepared. A linear fit is found for relation between Co{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}N and chromium concentrations. The magnetization in ZFC and FC modes at different temperatures (2–300 K) and in applied magnetic fields (up to 70 kOe) have been investigated. It has been detected that many magnetic characteristics of the studied four nanocomposites correlate not with the chromium concentration but with nanocrystallite sizes. The obtained results were interpreted in terms of magnetic core-shell model of a nanoparticle involving paramagnetic core with two magnetic sublattices and a ferromagnetic shell related to chromium doping. - Highlights: • A new chromium doped mixed Co-Mn-N nanocomposites were synthesized. • Surface ferromagnetism was detected in a wide temperature range. • Core-shell model was applied to explain nanocomposites magnetism.

  18. [Occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, M; Gatto, M P; Gordiani, A; Paci, E; Proietto, A

    2007-01-01

    Hygienists are interested in hexavalent chromium due to its genotoxic and carcinogenic effect on humans. The use of products containing hexavalent chromium is decreasing in many industrial fields because of the substitution with less-toxic compounds. In the aeronautical industry, however, the chromate are added to primer paint as a corrosion inhibitor of aircrafts surfaces: so hexavalent chromium compounds are available in many primers with a composition ranging from 10% to 13%. The application of these primers by using electrostatic guns potentially exposes painting and coating workers at high concentrations of aerosols containing Cr(VI). The aim of the present study is the evaluation of professional exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting, by adopting both environmental personal sampling and biological monitoring. To valuate workers exposure levels the personal measurements results have been compared with the exposure limit values (TLV-TWA) and the urinary chromium contents with the biological exposure indices (IBE). Moreover the strategy of coupling environmental sampling with biological monitoring seems to be a useful instrument to measure the validity of the individual protection devices.

  19. Four deaths due to carbon monoxide poisoning in car washes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, H J; Stephens, P J

    1999-09-01

    In a period of 13 months, three separate incidents of lethal carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in closed car wash bays resulted in the deaths of 4 white men aged 20 to 36 years. Each man appears to have been intoxicated with mind-altering substances, which may impair judgment, perception of outside conditions, and self-awareness. All four died in winter months. For three men, the deaths were ruled accidental, and for the remaining man, the previous deaths appear to have provided a model for suicide. Warning signs may not be effective to prevent future CO deaths in car washes because of the possible role of intoxication. Mechanical or electronic methods to prevent a bay door from closing completely may be preferable.

  20. The Distribution of Carbon Monoxide in the GOCART Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaobiao; Chin, Mian; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important trace gas because it is a significant source of tropospheric Ozone (O3) as well as a major sink for atmospheric hydroxyl radical (OH). The distribution of CO is set by a balance between the emissions, transport, and chemical processes in the atmosphere. The Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to simulate the atmospheric distribution of CO. The GOCART model is driven by the assimilated meteorological data from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS) in an off-line mode. We study the distribution of CO on three time scales: (1) day to day fluctuation produced by the synoptic waves; (2) seasonal changes due to the annual cycle of CO sources and sinks; and (3) interannual variability induced by dynamics. Comparison of model results with ground based and remote sensing measurements will also be presented.

  1. Carbon monoxide inhalation induces headache in a human headache model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenously produced signalling molecule that has a role in nociceptive processing and cerebral vasodilatation. We hypothesized that inhalation of CO would induce headache and vasodilation of cephalic and extracephalic arteries. Methods In a randomized......, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, 12 healthy volunteers were allocated to inhalation of CO (carboxyhemoglobin 22%) or placebo on two separate days. Headache was scored on a verbal rating scale from 0-10. We recorded mean blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) by transcranial...... Doppler, diameter of the superficial temporal artery (STA) and radial artery (RA) by high-resolution ultrasonography and facial skin blood flow by laser speckle contrast imaging. Results Ten volunteers developed headache after CO compared to six after placebo. The area under the curve for headache (0...

  2. UV-induced carbon monoxide emission from living vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    The global burden of carbon monoxide (CO) is rather uncertain. In this paper we address the potential for UV-induced CO emission by living terrestrial vegetation surfaces. Real-time measurements of CO concentrations were made with a cavity enhanced laser spectrometer connected in closed loop...... to either an ecosystem chamber or a plant-leaf scale chamber. Leaves of all examined plant species exhibited emission of CO in response to artificial UV-radiation as well as the UV-component of natural solar radiation. The UV-induced rate of CO emission exhibited a rather low dependence on temperature......, indicating an abiotic process. The emission of CO in response to the UV-component of natural solar radiation was also evident at the ecosystem scale....

  3. Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication: Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez Gomez, S.; Aguilera Navarro, J.M.; Gonzalez Garcia, A.; Gonzalez Marcos, J.R.; Fernandez Cruz, J.

    1993-01-01

    We present a case of acute carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication in a previously healthy 13-year-old girl, who was found in the bathroom, unconscious and with the gas-burning hot water thank operating. The neuroradiological study showed bilateral, symmetrical cortical and subcortical parietooccipital and temporal lesions as well as damage to the basal lymph nodes. These lesions were related to the anoxic situation induced by this type of intoxication. Clinicoradiological follow-up included CT and MR sequences over a period of 10 months. In this cases, we stress the greater sensitivity of MR in the early detection of the characteristic lesions in this situation and we analyze the evolution of the process. (Author)

  4. Air Quality Criteria for Carbon Monoxide (Final Report, 2000) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgates national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) on the basis of scientific information contained in integrated science assessments (ISAs), formerly known as air quality criteria documents (AQCDs). The ISA is a concise review, synthesis, and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science, and it communicates critical science judgments relevant to the NAAQS review. The most recent ISA for carbon monoxide (CO) was completed in 2010, and is available under related links (below). In 2000, EPA released a revised criteria document for CO which reviewed the latest evidence available at the time regarding sources, atmospheric chemistry, population exposure, dosimetry, pharmacokinetics, and health effects of CO, including effects in susceptible populations.

  5. Air Quality Criteria for Carbon Monoxide (Final Report, 1991) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgates national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) on the basis of scientific information contained in integrated science assessments (ISAs), formerly known as air quality criteria documents (AQCDs). The ISA is a concise review, synthesis, and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science, and it communicates critical science judgments relevant to the NAAQS review. A more recent ISA for carbon monoxide (CO) was completed in 2010, and is available under downloads. In 1991, EPA released a revised criteria document for CO which reviewed the latest evidence available at the time regarding sources, atmospheric chemistry, population exposure, dosimetry, pharmacokinetics, and health effects of CO, including effects in susceptible populations. This document was revised and updated in 2000. The 2000 CO AQCD is available under downloads.

  6. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  7. Development of a coprecipitation system for the speciation/preconcentration of chromium in tap waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatepe, Aslihan, E-mail: karatepea@gmail.com [Nevsehir University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 50000 Nevsehir (Turkey); Korkmaz, Esra [Bozok University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, Yozgat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Elci, Latif [Pamukkale University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    A method for the speciation of chromium(III), chromium(VI) and determination of total chromium based on coprecipitation of chromium(III) with dysprosium hydroxide has been investigated and applied to tap water samples. Chromium(III) was quantitatively recovered by the presented method, while the recovery values for chromium(VI) was below 10%. The influences of analytical parameters including amount of dysprosium(III), pH, centrifugation speed and sample volume for the quantitative precipitation were examined. No interferic effects were observed from alkali, earth alkali and some transition metals for the analyte ions. The detection limits (k = 3, N = 15) were 0.65 {mu}g/L for chromium(III) and 0.78 {mu}g/L for chromium(VI). The validation of the presented method was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials.

  8. Development of a coprecipitation system for the speciation/preconcentration of chromium in tap waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karatepe, Aslihan; Korkmaz, Esra; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif

    2010-01-01

    A method for the speciation of chromium(III), chromium(VI) and determination of total chromium based on coprecipitation of chromium(III) with dysprosium hydroxide has been investigated and applied to tap water samples. Chromium(III) was quantitatively recovered by the presented method, while the recovery values for chromium(VI) was below 10%. The influences of analytical parameters including amount of dysprosium(III), pH, centrifugation speed and sample volume for the quantitative precipitation were examined. No interferic effects were observed from alkali, earth alkali and some transition metals for the analyte ions. The detection limits (k = 3, N = 15) were 0.65 μg/L for chromium(III) and 0.78 μg/L for chromium(VI). The validation of the presented method was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials.

  9. Low toenail chromium concentration and increased risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guallar, E.; Jimenez, J.; Veer, van 't P.; Bode, P.; Riemersma, R.A.; Gomez-Aracena, J.; Kark, J.D.; Arab, L.; Kok, F.J.; Martin-Moreno, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Chromium intake may increase insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and the ratio of high density lipoprotein cholesterol to low density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the epidemiologic evidence on the association between chromium and cardiovascular disease is very limited. To determine whether

  10. Technology Demonstration of the Zero Emissions Chromium Electroplating System; Appendix I: CHPPM Report on Air Sampling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hay, K. J; Maloney, Stephen W; Cannon, John J; Phelps, Max R; Modrell, Jason

    2008-01-01

    This volume is an Appendix to the main report, Volume 1, which documents the demonstration of a technology developed by PRD, Inc, for control of chromium emissions during hard chromium electroplating...

  11. Chromium-nanodiamond coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering and their tribological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamanov, M. V.; Khrushchov, M. M.; Marchenko, E. A.; Shevchenko, N. V.; Levin, I. S.; Petrzhik, M. I.; Miroshnichenko, V. I.; Relianu, M. D.

    2017-07-01

    Peculiarities of structure, chemical and phase composition, micromechanical and tribological properties of chromium-based coatings obtained by magnetron-sputtering of composite and/or compacted chromium-nanodiamond targets have been investigated.

  12. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  13. Plant Line Trial Evaluation of Viable Non-Chromium Passivation Systems for Electrolytin Tinplate, ETP (TRP 9911)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Sinsel

    2003-06-30

    Plant trial evaluations have been completed for two zirconium-based, non-chromium passivation systems previously identified as possible alternatives to cathodic dichromate (CDC) passivation for electrolytic tinplate (ETP). These trials were done on a commercial electrolytic tin plating line at Weirton Steel and extensive evaluations of the materials resulting from these trials have been completed. All this was accomplished as a collaborative effort under the AISI Technology Roadmap Program and was executed by seven North American Tin Mill Products producers [Bethlehem Steel (now acquired by International Steel Group (ISG)), Dofasco Inc., National Steel (now acquired by U.S. Steel), U.S. Steel, USS-Posco, Weirton Steel, and Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel] with funding partially from the Department of Energy (DOE) and partially on an equal cost sharing basis among project participants. The initial phases of this project involved optimization of application procedures for the non-chromium systems in the laboratories at Bethlehem Steel and Betz Dearborn followed by extensive testing with various lacquer formulations and food simulants in the laboratories at Valspar and PPG. Work was also completed at Dofasco and Weirton Steel to develop methods to prevent precipitation of insoluble solids as a function of time from the zirconate system. The results of this testing indicated that sulfide staining characteristics for the non-chromium passivation systems could be minimized but not totally eliminated and neither system was found to perform quite as good, in this respect, as the standard CDC system. As for the stability of zirconate treatment, a method was developed to stabilize this system for a sufficient period of time to conduct plant trial evaluations but, working with a major supplier of zirconium orthosulfate, a method for long term stabilization is still under development.

  14. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  15. Fresh meat packaging: consumer acceptance of modified atmosphere packaging including carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebitus, Carola; Jensen, Helen H; Roosen, Jutta; Sebranek, Joseph G

    2013-01-01

    Consumers' perceptions and evaluations of meat quality attributes such as color and shelf life influence purchasing decisions, and these product attributes can be affected by the type of fresh meat packaging system. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) extends the shelf life of fresh meat and, with the inclusion of carbon monoxide (CO-MAP), achieves significant color stabilization. The objective of this study was to assess whether consumers would accept specific packaging technologies and what value consumers place on ground beef packaged under various atmospheres when their choices involved the attributes of color and shelf life. The study used nonhypothetical consumer choice experiments to determine the premiums that consumers are willing to pay for extended shelf life resulting from MAP and for the "cherry red" color in meat resulting from CO-MAP. The experimental design allowed determination of whether consumers would discount foods with MAP or CO-MAP when (i) they are given more detailed information about the technologies and (ii) they have different levels of individual knowledge and media exposure. The empirical analysis was conducted using multinomial logit models. Results indicate that consumers prefer an extension of shelf life as long as the applied technology is known and understood. Consumers had clear preferences for brighter (aerobic and CO) red color and were willing to pay $0.16/lb ($0.35/kg) for each level of change to the preferred color. More information on MAP for extending the shelf life and on CO-MAP for stabilizing color decreased consumers' willingness to pay. An increase in personal knowledge and media exposure influenced acceptance of CO-MAP negatively. The results provide quantitative measures of how packaging affects consumers' acceptance and willingness to pay for products. Such information can benefit food producers and retailers who make decisions about investing in new packaging methods.

  16. Campaign to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning : fall-winter 2007-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, B.; Chabot, L.; Gratton, J.; Lacoursiere, D.

    2009-01-01

    Quebec launched a public health campaign for the Montreal region to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. The objectives of the campaign were to communicate the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning, its potential sources, its effects on public health, and the means to prevent poisoning. Its purpose was to inform the public of the risks and strategies to be used in case of carbon monoxide poisoning and to lay out the merits of household carbon monoxide alarms. The communication was done by way of the media, in cooperation with community organizations and school boards. Other tools used in the campaign included the Internet, flyers and press releases. A poll taken in 2008 showed that 59 per cent of the respondents had one or more sources for carbon monoxide in their homes, including fireplaces, and that 28 per cent had a functioning alarm for carbon monoxide detection. A future survey will be held to follow-up on the evolution of the campaign. The development of various activities will help decrease the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. tabs., figs.

  17. Oxidative dehydrogenation of C{sub 3}-C{sub 4} paraffins in the presence of CO{sub 2} over chromium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Botavina, M.A.; Agafonov, A.A.; Trushin, D.V.; Makashov, A.V.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Gaidai, N.A. [N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    Supported chromium catalysts show good activity and selectivity in the reaction of propane and isobutane oxidative dehydrogenation in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The most active, selective and stable is the catalyst containing 5% (wt.%) of Cr supported on silica and prepared by impregnation method. It was found that the addition up to 5,0% (vol.) of oxygen results in a significant increase of catalyst activity and stability at little decrease of catalyst selectivity. (orig.)

  18. Theoretical study of the correlation between magnetism and the properties of defects in iron, chromium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulairol, R.

    2011-09-01

    This PhD thesis is devoted to the study of the correlation between the magnetism and the properties of defects in 3d metals, mainly iron- and chromium-based systems, which are used in many technological applications, such as the new-generation nuclear reactors. This work is based on two complementary approaches: the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and a Tight Binding model (TB). We begin this study by the properties of pure materials such as chromium and α-iron. For the first one, we observe that the presence of a spin density wave (SDW) induces an anisotropy in the formation of point defects as well as the migration of vacancies. For the second, the solution energy of various 3d impurities depends on two terms: a chemical contribution mainly linked to the difference between the number of d electrons of iron and solute, and a magnetic contribution that reveals to be predominant in Fe-Cr. In the following parts, we tackle the correlation between magnetism and extended defects. We show in particular that the existence of magnetic frustrations near Fe/Cr interfaces can lead to the creation of non collinear magnetic structures. It also influences the energetic stability of these interfaces. We have noticed, in agreement with experimental findings, the presence of SDW near Fe/Cr interfaces, which is able to decrease those magnetic frustrations at the interface. We have also studied the magnetic structure of iron or chromium clusters embedded in an Fe-Cr alloy. We have finally shown, in the last part of this work, how the TB approach was able to account for the energetic and magnetic properties of defects not only in pure iron or chromium, but also in Fe-Cr alloys. (author)

  19. Electrochemical investigation of chromium oxide-coated Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Viswanathan; Zeng, Haitong; Lawrynowicz, Daniel; Zhang, Zongtao; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2011-08-01

    Hard coatings for articulating surfaces of total joint replacements may improve the overall wear resistance. However, any coating approach must take account of changes in corrosion behavior. This preliminary assessment analyzes the corrosion kinetics, impedance and mechanical-electrochemical stability of 100 μm thick plasma sprayed chromium oxide (Cr₂O₃) coatings on bearing surfaces in comparison to the native alloy oxide films on Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-6V. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and mechanical abrasion under potentiostatic conditions were performed on coated and substrate surfaces in physiological saline. SEM analysis characterized the coating morphology. The results showed that the corrosion current density values of chromium oxide coatings (0.4-1.2 μA/cm²) were of the same order of magnitude as Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Mechanical abrasion did not increase corrosion rates of chromium oxide coatings but did for uncoated Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V. The impedance response of chromium oxide coatings was very different than Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V native oxides characterized by a defected coating model. More of a frequency-independent purely resistive response was seen in mid-frequency range for the coatings (CPE(coat) : 40-280 nF/cm² (rad/s)(1-α) , α: 0.67-0.83) whereas a more capacitive character is seen for Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V (CPE(ox) around 20 μF/cm² (rad/s)(1-α) , α around 0.9). Pores, interparticle gaps and incomplete fusion typical for thermal spray coatings were present in these oxides which could have influenced corrosion resistance. The coating microstructure could have allowed some fluid penetration. Overall, these coatings appear to have suitable corrosion properties for wear surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    OpenAIRE

    D. Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai.  The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater against the different pH, fungi biomass and chromium(VI) concentration (dilution ratio).  The results of this study indicated that the order of ...

  1. Toxic effects of chromium on Schistosoma haematobium miracidia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolmarans, C.T.; Yssel, E.; Hamilton-Attwell, V.L.

    1988-12-01

    Various heavy metals have recently been evaluated as molluscicides for freshwater snails, which act as intermediate hosts of trematode parasites of medical or veterinary importance. Very little information, however, is available on heavy metals that may be suitable to eliminate the parasites as such. Suitable compounds should also inhibit the penetration ability of parasites as well as stunt the development of those who do not penetrate their hosts. In the light of these requirements, the present study evaluated the effect of chromium on the miracidia of Schistosoma haematobium, which causes urinary bilharzia. Attention was mainly focused on (1) the chromium concentration which resulted in 100% mortality (2) the effect of chromium on the external and internal morphology of the miracidia, and (3) the ability of the miracidia to form sporocytes in vitro and in vivo and to penetrate their intermediate host snail, Bulinus africanus.

  2. On the rational alloying of structural chromium-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astaf'ev, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on the influence of chromium nickel, phosphorus on the critical brittleness temperature of Cr-Ni-Mo-V structural steels. It is shown that the critical brittleness temperature of these steels increases at chromium content more over than 2% and nickel content more than 2% in the result of carbide transformations during tempering. Increase of nickel content in Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels strengthens the tendency to embrittlement during slow cooling, from tempering temperature owing to development of process of phosphorus grain-boundary segregation. Two mentioned mechanisms of embrittlement determine principles of rational steel alloying. The extreme dependence of the critical brittleness temperature on chromium and nickel content, which enables to choose the optimum composition of Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels, was established

  3. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  4. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V. [Central Scientific-Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  5. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  6. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents.

  7. THE ESTROGENS / CHROMIUM INTERACTION IN THE NITRIC OXIDE GENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, Ewa; Piwowar, Agnieszka; Musiala, Tomasz; Dlugosz, Anna

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of estrogens with environmental toxins in free radicals generation: reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which participates in cancerogenesis is not yet recognized. Chromium(VI) is widely present in environment. One of its toxicity pathway is free radicals generation. Estrogens have the ability to scavenge free radicals, but may also act as prooxidants. Both chromium(VI) and estrogens are classified by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as carcinogens, so synergistic effect seems very dangerous. The interaction of chromium and estrogens in ROS generation are partly described but there are no reports on estrogen/chromium interaction on nitric oxide (NO) generation. The aim of the study was to examine the interaction of chromium(VI) and 17-p-estradiol (E2) on NO level in human blood as well as the role of E2 metabolites: 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2) and 16a-hydroxyestrone (16α-OHE1) in these processes. The NO level was estimated with the diagnostic kit (Nitric Oxide Colorimetric Detection Kit from Arbor Assays) in human blood in vitm. The results showed that Cr(VI) in used concentration (0.5; 1.0 and 5.0 gg/mL) decreases significantly NO level in blood, acting antagonistically to E2 and 4-OHE2. Estrogens (E2, 4-OHE2 and 16α-OHEI) do not protect against inhibiting effect of Cr(VI) on nitric oxide generation in blood because after combined exposure the decreased production of NO in blood was noted. In conclusion, presented results provide the information about the character of estrogen/Cr(VI) interaction in NO level in human blood. It is important knowledge for cardio protected effect e.g., hormone replacement therapy in environmental or occupational exposure to Cr(VI), chromium supplementation, also important for cancer risk evaluation.

  8. Adsorption of Chromium from Aqueous Solution Using Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Riahi Samani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available New group of polymers have been synthesized that are conductive of electricity so they are called conducting polymers. One of the most conducting polymers is "polyaniline". In the present study, polyaniline was synthesized by oxidizing aniline monomer under strongly acidic conditions using potassium iodate as an initiator of oxidative polymerization. Synthesized polyaniline as a powder used as an adsorbent to remove chromium from aqueous solution. Experiments were conducted in batch mode with variables such as amount of polyaniline, chromium solution pH and adsorbtion isotherms. Due to presence of Cr (III in solution after using polyaniline, removal mechanism is the combination of surface adsorption and reduction. It seems that polyaniline reduces the Cr(VI to Cr(III and adsorbs the Cr(III and a part of remaining  Cr(VI. It is well known that nitrogen atom in compounds of amine derivative makes co-ordinate bond with positive charge of metals due to the presence of electron in sp3 orbital of nitrogen. The majority of total chromium removal  occurred at 30minute for polyaniline  and the optimum  time for  hexavalent chromium  removal was about 5 min. Polyaniline has the maximum total cheomiume removal at pH, 3-9. The maximum hexavalent chromium removal occurred at acidic pH for polyanilines. The equilibrium adsorption data for polyaniline fitted both Freundlich’s and Langmuir’s isotherms. This research shows that polyaniline can be used as an adsorbent  for removal chromium from aqueous solution.

  9. Influence of carbon monoxide to the surface layer of uranium metal and its oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Huang Ruiliang

    1996-09-01

    The surface structures of uranium metal and triuranium octaoxide (U 3 O 8 ) and the influence of carbon monoxide to the surface layers have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). After exposure to carbon monoxide, contents of oxygen in the surface oxides of uranium metal and U 3 O 8 are decreased and O/U ratios decrease 7.2%, 8.0% respectively. The investigation indicated the surface layers of uranium metal and its oxides were forbidden to further oxidation in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. (11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.)

  10. Study on the influence of carbon monoxide to the surface oxide layer of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Duan Rongliang; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Zuo Changming; Zhao Chunpei; Chen Hong

    1997-01-01

    The influence of carbon monoxide to the surface oxide layer of uranium metal has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and gas chromatography (GC). Carbon monoxide adsorption on the oxide layer resulted in U4f peak shifting to the lower binding energy. The content of oxygen in the oxide is decreased and the atomic ratio (O/U) is decreased by 7.2%. The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere after the surface reaction is increased by 11.0%. The investigation indicates that the surface layer can prevent the further oxidation uranium metal in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide

  11. The Kinetics of the Silver(i)-induced Oxidation of Chromium(iii) by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) compounds play an important role in natural oxidation processes in terrestrial and atmospheric water. During the oxidation of SO2, peroxodisulphate is formed as an intermediate. In acidic and neutral solutions, peroxodisulphate oxidizes chromium(III) very slowly. This reaction rate is ...

  12. Chromium supplementation alters both glucose and lipid metabolism in feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossbred steers (n = 20; 235 +/- 4 kg) were fed 53 days during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0...

  13. Chromium supplementation alters the glucose and lipid metabolism of feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossbreed steers (n = 20; 235 ± 4 kg) were fed 53 d during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brand Chromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0 (C...

  14. 75 FR 18041 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ...-AG35 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS... Regulation Supplement (DFARS) to address requirements for minimizing the use of hexavalent chromium in... of items containing hexavalent chromium under DoD contracts unless an exception applies. DATES...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2097 - Azo chromium complex dyestuff preparation (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Azo chromium complex dyestuff... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2097 Azo chromium complex dyestuff preparation... substance identified generically as an azo chromium complex dyestuff preparation (PMN P-95-240) is subject...

  16. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in steers supplemented with chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty steers received a premix that added 0 (control) or 0.2 mg/kg of chromium (KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) to the total diet on a dry matter basis for 55 d. Steer...

  17. 77 FR 61431 - Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ...] Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of... requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium Standards for General Industry (29 CFR 1910.1026), Shipyard... information (29 U.S.C. 657). The information collection requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium (Cr...

  18. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject to...

  19. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg. No...

  20. 40 CFR 749.68 - Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hexavalent chromium-based water... Cooling Systems § 749.68 Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems. (a) Chemicals subject to this section. Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals that contain...

  1. 77 FR 32998 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium... order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or... USITC Publication 4325 (May 2012), entitled Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet from Japan...

  2. Evaluation of flexural bond strength of porcelain to used nickel-chromium alloy in various percentages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNV Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Fresh nickel-chromium alloy shows the greatest porcelain adherence.There is no significant change in bond strength of ceramic to alloy with up to 75% of used nickel-chromium alloy.At least 25%- of new alloy should be added when recycled nickel-chromium alloy is being used for metal ceramic restorations.

  3. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barret, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate-coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000, and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni, Ni-50 at.% Cr, and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. From these equations corrosion isopleths were prepared. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  4. Primary and secondary crystallization of modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations of crystallization of modified hypoeutectic wear resistant chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 2% and chromium on three levels (12%, 18% and 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification ( boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and mischmetal (RE. The investigations of crystallization were conducted the DTA method in DTA-C and DTA-Is testers. The influence on the course of the process of primary and secondary crystallization was observed.

  5. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenviro......Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  6. Hexavalent chromium reduction by a hypocrea tawa fungal strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Guillen-Jimenez, F. M.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial transformation of the highly toxic, water-soluble and mobile hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], to the less toxic, insoluble and immobile trivalent chromium [Cr(III)], is an economically feasible alternative for the treatment of wastewaters contaminated with Cr(VI). The main purpose of this work was to isolate, identify and characterize a microbial strain water by batch enrichment culture techniques, and further identified as Hypocrea tawa by its D1/D2 domain sequence of the 26S rRNA gene with 99,44% similarity. (Author)

  7. Dielectric properties of polyamide 12-chromium(III) oxide nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Vjacheslav V.; Shapoval, Ekaterina S.; Sakhatskii, Aleksandr S.

    2016-08-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy was employed to study polymer nanocomposites based on PA12 filled with of nanosized chromium(III) oxide. The experimental dielectric data were analyzed within the formalisms of complex permittivity and electric modulus. Three relaxation processes and Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) interfacial polarizations were observed. It was found that presence of nanosized amphoteric chromium(III) oxide leads to softening of polyamide matrix that manifested in decrease of the activation energy of the α- and β-relaxation processes and glass transition temperatures. The softening of polymer matrix is the reason of the decrease of mechanical strength of polymer nanocomposites as compared with neat PA12.

  8. Reducing chromium losses from a chromium plating bath. 1987 summer intern report. Project conducted at New Dimension Plating, Hutchinson, Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achman, D.

    1987-12-31

    The company employs about forty people and operates for one or two eight hour shifts with an average of 315 racks of chrome plating per eight hour day. They plate a variety of metals including copper, nickel, gold, brass and chromium. Chromium is the major metal plated and is usually the last step in plating cycle. Most parts are copper plated and then nickel plated in preparation for chrome plating. The main difference between New Dimension Plating and other plating shops is the variety of parts plated. As New Dimension Plating is a job shop, a wide range of parts such as motorcycle accessories, stove parts, and custom items are metal finished. The plating lines are manual, meaning employees dip the racks into the tanks by hand. This fact along with the fact that parts vary greatly in size and shape accounts for the significant drag-out on the chromium plating line.

  9. Cable Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2014-01-01

    Superconductor stability is at the core of the design of any successful cable and magnet application. This chapter reviews the initial understanding of the stability mechanism, and reviews matters of importance for stability such as the nature and magnitude of the perturbation spectrum and the cooling mechanisms. Various stability strategies are studied, providing criteria that depend on the desired design and operating conditions.

  10. MLS/Aura Level 2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for carbon monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  11. Carbon Monoxide NAAQS Designations, Region 9, 2011, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Polygon Feature class of Nonattainment Areas for Carbon Monoxide. Nonattainment areas are geographic areas which have not met National Ambient Air Quality Standards...

  12. Carbon monoxide toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the mechanism and clinical manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure, including the effects on the liver, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. Topics include studies of the carbon monoxide binding affinity with hemoglobin, measurement of carboxyhemoglobin in humans and various animal species, carbon monoxide levels resulting from tobacco and marijuana smoke, occupational exposure and the NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) biological exposure index, symptomology and percent of blood CO, and intrauterine exposure. Air pollution, tobacco smoking, and occupational exposure are discussed as primary sources of carbon monoxide exposure. The effects of cigarette smoking on fetal development and health are excluded and examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 172 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. MLS/Aura Near-Real-Time L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO_NRT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Near-Real-Time (NRT) product for carbon monoxide (CO). This product contains daily CO profiles taken from the...

  14. MLS/Aura Level 2 Bromine Monoxide (BrO) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2BRO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for bromine monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  15. Carbon monoxide toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the mechanism and clinical manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure, including the effects on the liver, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. Topics include studies of the carbon monoxide binding affinity with hemoglobin, measurement of carboxyhemoglobin in humans and various animal species, carbon monoxide levels resulting from tobacco and marijuana smoke, occupational exposure and the NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) biological exposure index, symptomology and percent of blood CO, and intrauterine exposure. Air pollution, tobacco smoking, and occupational exposure are discussed as primary sources of carbon monoxide exposure. The effects of cigarette smoking on fetal development and health are excluded and examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Carbon monoxide toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the mechanism and clinical manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure, including the effects on the liver, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. Topics include studies of the carbon monoxide binding affinity with hemoglobin, measurement of carboxyhemoglobin in humans and various animal species, carbon monoxide levels resulting from tobacco and marijuana smoke, occupational exposure and the NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) biological exposure index, symptomology and percent of blood CO, and intrauterine exposure. Air pollution, tobacco smoking, and occupational exposure are discussed as primary sources of carbon monoxide exposure. The effects of cigarette smoking on fetal development and health are excluded and examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. MLS/Aura L2 Chlorine Monoxide (ClO) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CLO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for chlorine monoxide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  18. MLS/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for carbon monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  19. MLS/Aura L2 Bromine Monoxide (BRO) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2BRO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for bromine monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  20. MLS/Aura L2 Chlorine Monoxide (ClO) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CLO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for chlorine monoxide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  1. MLS/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for carbon monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  2. MLS/Aura L2 Bromine Monoxide (BRO) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2BRO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for bromine monoxide derived from radiances measured by the 640 GHz radiometer. The current...

  3. MLS/Aura Level 2 Chlorine Monoxide (ClO) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2CLO is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for chlorine monoxide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  4. Regulation of multiple carbon monoxide consumption pathways in anaerobic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Techtmann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO, well known as a toxic gas, is increasingly recognized as a key metabolite and signaling molecule. Microbial utilization of CO is quite common, evidenced by the rapid escalation in description of new species of CO-utilizing bacteria and archaea. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH, the protein complex that enables anaerobic CO utilization has been well-characterized from an increasing number of microorganisms, however the regulation of multiple CO-related gene clusters in single isolates remains unexplored. Many species are extroraordinarily resistant to high CO concentrations, thiriving under pure CO at more than one atmosphere. We hypothesized that, in strains that can grow exclusively on CO, both carbon acquisition via the CODH/Acetyl CoA synthase complex and energy conservation via a CODH-linked hydrogenase must be differentially regulated in response to the availability of CO. The CO-sensing transcriptional activator, CooA is present in most CO-oxidizing bacteria. Here we present a genomic and phylogenetic survey of CODH operons and cooA genes found in CooA-containing bacteria. Two distinct groups of CooA homologs were found: One clade (CooA-1 is found in the majority of CooA containing bacteria, whereas the other clade (CooA-2 is found only in genomes that encode multiple CODH clusters, suggesting that the CooA-2 might be important for cross-regulation of competing CODH operons. Recombinant CooA-1 and CooA-2 regulators from the prototypical CO-utilizing bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans were purified, and promoter binding analyses revealed that CooA-1 specifically regulates the hydrogenase-linked CODH, whereas CooA-2 is able to regulate both the hydrogenase-linked CODH and the CODH/ACS operons. These studies point to the ability of dual CooA homologs to partition CO into divergent CO-utilizing pathways resulting in efficient consumption of a single limiting growth substrate available across a wide range of

  5. Possibility of sorption purification of chromium comprising waste waters of galvanic production by inorganic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaynakov, S.A.; Likov, E.P.; Bortun, A.I.; Belyukov, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to possibilities of sorption purification of chromium comprising waste waters of galvanic production by inorganic ion exchangers. Thus, the comparative study of sorption of chromium ions on anion exchanger A B-17 and on inorganic ion exchangers on the basis of hydrated titanium and zirconium dioxides in static and dynamic conditions is conducted. The influence of chromium ions concentration, solutions acidity (ph=1÷12) and presence of base electrolyte on sorption is studied. The state of chromium ions sorbed by inorganic ion exchangers is studied by means of infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopy. It is defined that inorganic sorbents could be used for chromium extraction from different solutions.

  6. A study of carbon monoxide distribution determinations for a global transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Leonard K.

    1988-01-01

    The primary objective of this grant was to further the development of a global transport/chemistry model that simulates the physico-chemical behavior of methane and carbon monoxide in the troposphere. The computer simulation model is designed to analyze the processes that occur as methane and carbon monoxide are transported from their respective sources to their ultimate fate, e.g., final conversion to CO2, transport to the stratosphere, deposition at ground level, etc.

  7. Adsortion-catalytic method for removing carbon monoxide from gas streams and catalysts for that method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasenko, V.M.; Solov`ev, S.A.; Belokleitseva, G.M.

    1992-07-20

    Effective catalysts have been developed for the adsorption-catalytic removal of carbon monoxide from gases; a method of adsorption-catalytic removal of carbon monoxide from gases over a manganese oxide catalyst on a mordenite carrier which permits purification with almost no increase in gas temperature. A procedure for regeneration of the catalyst which ensures reproducibility of the adsorption process. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Accidental carbon monoxide poisoning presenting without a history of exposure: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bennetto, Luke; Powter, Louise; Scolding, Neil J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Carbon monoxide poisoning is easy to diagnose when there is a history of exposure. When the exposure history is absent, or delayed, the diagnosis is more difficult and relies on recognising the importance of multi-system disease. We present a case of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Case presentation A middle-aged man, who lived alone in his mobile home was found by friends in a confused, incontinent state. Initial signs included respiratory failure, cardiac ischaem...

  9. Selected constituents in the smokes of foreign commercial cigaretts: tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.; Quincy, R.B.; Guerin, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide contents of the smokes of 220 brands of foreign commercial cigarettes are reported. In some instances, filter cigarettes of certain brands were found to deliver as much or more smoke constituents than their nonfilter counterparts. Also, data indicated that there can be a great variation in the tar, nicotine, or carbon monoxide content of the smoke of samples of a given brand of cigarettes, depending on the nation in which they are purchased. 24 tables.

  10. Recipients of hyperbaric oxygen treatment for carbon monoxide poisoning and exposure circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clower, Jacquelyn H; Hampson, Neil B; Iqbal, Shahed; Yip, Fuyuen Y

    2012-07-01

    Unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning is preventable. Severe cases are often referred for hyperbaric oxygen treatment. To guide prevention efforts and treatment practices, this study provides some of the most detailed current information about patients with carbon monoxide poisoning who have been treated at hyperbaric facilities across the United States and the circumstances surrounding their exposures. This study can help improve efforts to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning and enhance treatment practices. From August 2008 to January 2010, nonidentifiable, patient-level data were reported by 87 hyperbaric facilities in 39 states via an online reporting system. This reporting system was developed collaboratively by the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among the 864 patients reported to receive hyperbaric oxygen treatment for unintentional, non-fire-related, carbon monoxide poisoning, most of the patients were white men aged between 18 and 44 years. Only 10% of patients reported the presence of a carbon monoxide alarm at their exposure location, and 75% reported being part of a group exposure. Nineteen patients (2%) reported a prior carbon monoxide exposure. About half (55%) of the patients treated were discharged after treatment; 41% were hospitalized. The findings in this report expand the knowledge about patients with carbon monoxide poisoning. These results suggest that prevention efforts, such as educating the public about using carbon monoxide alarms and targeting the most at-risk populations, may help reduce the number of exposures, the number of persons with chronic cognitive sequelae, and the resulting burden on the health care system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The range of 1-3 keV electrons in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlenschlaeger, M.; Andersen, H.H.; Schou, J.; Soerensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror-substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements on solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than that in nitrogen whereas the range in carbon monoxide is about 20% larger than that in the nitrogen. (orig.)

  12. 21 CFR 176.160 - Chromium (Cr III) complex of N-ethyl-N-heptadecylfluoro-octane sulfonyl glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chromium (Cr III) complex of N-ethyl-N... § 176.160 Chromium (Cr III) complex of N-ethyl-N-heptadecylfluoro-octane sulfonyl glycine. The chromium... by weight of the chromium (Cr III) complex of heptadecylfluoro-octane sulfonic acid may be safely...

  13. Corrosion behavior of chromium oxide based ceramics in supercritical water (SCW) environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Ziqiang; Chen, Weixing; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion behavior of Cr 2 O 3 ceramics in various SCW environments was investigated. ► The corrosion of Cr 2 O 3 was affected by ceramic morphologies and testing variables. ► Grain boundaries of Cr 2 O 3 are susceptible for occurring of cracks and disintegration. ► Adding proper amounts of Yttria or YSZ can enhance the stability of Cr 2 O 3 ceramics. - Abstract: The stability of chromium oxide (Cr 2 O 3 ) ceramics with various amounts of yttrium oxide (Y 2 O 3 ) or yttrium oxide-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ – 8 mol.% Y 2 O 3 ) added was evaluated in static and flowing supercritical water (SCW) environments. It was found that the corrosion behavior of Cr 2 O 3 -based ceramics was affected by their morphologies as well as SCW test variables. The results of loop tests showed that Cr 2 O 3 -based ceramics were stable at 650 °C in flowing SCW with low to moderate oxygen concentration (8 ppb to 8 ppm). However, these ceramics suffered obvious degradation when exposed to SCW with higher oxygen concentrations (4 vol.% hydrogen peroxide).

  14. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, K.S.; Holloway, C.L.; Hegsted, M.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100μCi of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium

  15. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ††Laboratory of Catalysis and Synthesis in Organic Chemistry, University of Tlemcen, Algeria. MS received 23 February 2013. Abstract. MTiX samples with different atomic chromium percentages were synthesized by sol–gel method and calcined at 400 °C under air. The effects of Cr and temperature on titanium dioxide ...

  16. FEATURES OF CHROMIUM DOPING OF WEAR-RESISTANT CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work analysis of the influence of chromium on the process of carbide formation, changes in chemical composition of the metal substrate in the areas adjacent to the carbides and at the hardness of iron while economy nickel and manganesealloying.

  17. Effects of high concentration of chromium stress on physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the effects of high concentration of chromium (Cr) stress on physiological and biochemical characters and accumulation of Cr in Pingyang Tezao tea [Camellia sinensis (L) O. Kutze 'Pingyangtezao'] through a pot experiment. The results show that the indicators of photosynthesis were all suppressed with ...

  18. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion ... currently being done by oil drilling and exploration and production (E and P) waste .... model, the separation factor r, according to Calvo et al (2001) cited in Rozada et al. (2005), may be ...

  19. 264 Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Various Matrices in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ignacy cukrowski

    production of chromium metal and ferroalloys, in the use of chromate solutions for electroplating and in the ... involving DTPA was previously optimised mainly for seawater samples16, 19, 28, 36 and water samples with ... 2.1. Apparatus. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric measurements were performed using a Metrohm.

  20. Chromium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Yeast biomass enriched with chromium ions was extracted with 0⋅1 mol/l NH4OH assuming that the extracts had the glucose tolerance factor (GTF). Then the extracts were passed through a gel-filtration column in order to isolate and purify the GTF. The presence of GTF in the purified fractions was determined by measuring ...

  1. Removal of Lead and Chromium from Aqueous Solution onto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWASOGO

    pH, initial concentration as well as adsorbent dosage on the removal efficiency of both metal ions was investigated via batch adsorption. ... lead and chromium in wastewater as indicated by the United. States Environmental Protection ... electro dialysis, membrane separations, reverse osmosis and solvent extraction in the ...

  2. Chromium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yeast biomass enriched with chromium ions was extracted with 0.1 mol/l NH4OH assuming that the extracts had the glucose tolerance factor (GTF). Then the extracts were passed through a gel-filtration column in order to isolate and purify the GTF. The presence of GTF in the purified fractions was determined by measuring ...

  3. Mössbauer and magnetization studies of nanosize chromium ferrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nanosize chromium ferrite (CrF) powder samples were synthesized by citrate precursor route in the size range of 6 to 35 nm. The structural and magnetic behaviour of these samples were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. Synthesized ...

  4. Chromium-induced accumulation of peroxide content, stimulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium (Cr)-induced oxidative damage and changes in contents of chlorophyll, protein, peroxide and malondialdehyde (MDA) and activities of enzymatic antioxidants were investigated in 4-day-old green gram (Vigna radiata L. cv. Wilczek) seedlings. Cr increased the contents of peroxide and MDA but decreased the ...

  5. Local field corrections in the lattice dynamics of chromium | Ndukwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work extends the inclusion of local field corrections in the calculation of the phonon dispersion curves to the transition metal, chromium (Cr3+) using the formalism of lattice dynamics based on the transition metal model potential approach in the adiabatic and hatmonic approximations. The results obtained here have a ...

  6. Studies on Chromium-free Conversion coatings on Aluminum | Oki ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of a chromium-free conversion coating on aluminum has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Auger Electron (AES) and Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) techniques. Within the limits of the resolution of the TEM, the coating is uniformly clear and featureless. It is composed ...

  7. Selective removal of chromium from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The selective removal of chromium, a trace impurity that degrades the whiteness of titanium(IV) oxide pigments, from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ilmenite, was investigated by solvent extraction with xylene solutions of trioctylamine. Important factors of commercial significance affecting the extraction operation have been ...

  8. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hexavalent chromium exists in aquatic media as water soluble complex anions and persist. These are concentrated in industrial waste water especially from the tannery industries and release of effluents from industries adversely affects the environment. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions is carried ...

  9. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    The chromium (Cr) isotopic composition of carbonates can potentially be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during...

  10. Extended followup of a cohort of chromium production workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Peter St. John; Wang, Jing; Grace O'Leary, Keri

    2015-01-01

    Background The current study evaluates the mortality of 2,354 workers first employed at a Baltimore chromate production plant between 1950 and 1974. Methods The National Death Index (NDI Plus) was used to determine vital status and cause of death. Cumulative chromium (VI) exposure and nasal and skin irritation were evaluated as risk factors for lung cancer mortality. Results There are 91,186 person‐years of observation and 217 lung cancer deaths. Cumulative chromium (VI) exposure, nasal irritation, nasal perforation, nasal ulceration, and other forms of irritation (e.g., skin irritation) were associated with lung cancer mortality. Conclusion Cumulative chromium (VI) exposure was a risk factor for lung cancer death. Cancer deaths, other than lung cancer, were not significantly elevated. Irritation may be a possible mechanism for chromium (VI)‐induced lung cancer. Am. J. Ind. Med. 58:905–913, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26041683

  11. Chromium toxicity to nitrifying bacteria: implications to wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium, a heavy metal that enters wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) through industrial discharges, can be toxic to microorganisms carrying out important processes within biological wastewater treatment systems. The effect of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on ammonia dependent specific ox...

  12. Chromium Distribution between Liquid Slag and Matte Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, R. Hurman

    The distribution of chromium between liquid silicate slags and copper-iron-nickel matte phases encountered in electric smelting of PGM containing South African sulphide concentrates were experimentally studied under controlled partial pressures of oxygen and sulphur. The reported experiments were conducted under silica saturation through the use of silica crucibles. Seven representative slag compositions were equilibrated with a typical sulphur deficient matte containing 18% Ni, 11% Cu, 42% Fe and 29% S. The slag constituents varied in the following ranges: SiO2: 42-58%, Al2O3: 3.5-9.0%, Fe2O3: 13-21%, MgO: 15.6-25%, CaO: 2-15%, Cr2O3: 0.2-3.5%. The slag and matte samples were synthetically prepared from pure components. The chromium content of the two phases was analysed chemically. According to the present available results of this ongoing research it was found that the partition of chromium to the matte phase decreased with an increase in the partial pressures of both oxygen and sulphur where the value of the distribution coefficient of chromium between the matte and the slag phase varied from as low as 0.07 to as high as 5.5.

  13. Differents remediation methodos for lead, chromium and cadmium contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trelles, G.; Pochintesta, L.; Ehrlich, S.

    2008-01-01

    The usage of phosphates in the remediation of plots contaminated with heavy metals appears to be a good strategy to lessen the danger of these metals. This study analyses the effect of the mobilization of: Lead, chromium and cadmium by utilizing diverse forms of phosphates in contaminated soils of three different origins with ph modification and without it

  14. An investigation of the bioaccumulation of chromium and uranium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KONANANI

    2013-11-13

    Nov 13, 2013 ... heavy metal such as chromium (Cr) and uranium (U) which poses enormous threat to the environment even at small quantity. The study focuses mainly on bioaccumulation of Cr and U in soil by Cynodon ... bioaccumulate toxic metals Cr and U from the mine tailings making them potential phytoremediation.

  15. Cholesterol-lowering drug, in combination with chromium chloride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit Kumar Verma

    Cholesterol-lowering drug, in combination with chromium chloride, induces early apoptotic signals in intracellular. L. donovani amastigotes, leading to death. AMIT KUMAR VERMA, BHAKTI LAHA, MONIKA PANDEY, UTTARIYA PAL and. MONIDIPA GHOSH. ,*. Department of Biotechnology, National Institute of Technology ...

  16. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MTi samples with different atomic chromium percentages were synthesized by sol–gel method and calcined at 400 °C under air. The effects of Cr and temperature on titanium dioxide phase transition were studied. In situ measurement showed the presence of anatase phase for all samples at temperature < 500 °C. Without ...

  17. Production performance of quails given chromium organic in ration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deden Sudrajat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Egg production of quails depends on quality of ration. Nutrient manipulation by chromiun inclusion in ration is a possible way to improve production. It is known that chromium mineral in form of GTF in blood has a role not only in enhancement of glucose entering cells through improvement of insulin activity but also in metabolism of lipid and synthesis of protein and elimination of heat stress to improve egg production. This study aimed at assessing egg production of quails fed ration containing chromium-yeast. Sixty-four quails aged 40 days were used. A completely randomized design with 4 treatments and 4 replication was applied in this study. Treatment consisted of commercial ration + Cr 0 ppm (R1, commercial ration + Cr 0.5 ppm (R2, commercial ration + Cr 1 ppm (R3, and commercial ration+ Cr 1.5 ppm (R4. Measurements were taken on feed intake, egg weight, egg mass production, hen day, feed conversion rate, egg index, and egg shell thickness. Results showed that A ration containing organic chromium as much as 1,5 ppm did not affect feed intake, egg production, egg weight, and eggshell thickness, however lowered feed conversion rate by up to 32.25% from that of control. Supplementation of 0,5 ppm chromium in the ration lowered the value of eggs index in the fourth week.

  18. Evaluation of selected wetland plants for removal of chromium from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wastewater from leather processing industries is very complex and leads to water pollution if discharged untreated, especially due to its high organic loading and chromium content. In this study, the phytoremediation efficiency of selected wetland plant species in subsurface flow (SSF) constructed wetlands receiving ...

  19. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m 2 g − 1 and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on ...

  20. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. MTiX samples with different atomic chromium percentages were synthesized by sol–gel method and calcined at 400 °C under air. The effects of Cr and temperature on titanium dioxide phase transition were studied. In situ measurement showed the presence of anatase phase for all samples at temperature < 500 ...

  1. Evaluation of some trace elements (zinc, chromium, cadmium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Throughout the world, tuberculosis (TB) infection is on the increase and it has remained one of the most important causes of death among adults in developing countries. This study evaluated the serum concentrations of some trace elements -Zinc (Zn), Manganese (Mn), Chromium (Cr) and Cadmium (Cd), in 100 blood ...

  2. effects of dietary chromium tripicolinate and lysine on growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    These results show that CrPic has minimal effects on growth efficiency, while lysine affects significantly growth performance, carcass characteristics and most of plasma metabolites in growing-finishing pigs. Key-words : Pig, chromium, lysine, growth, metabolites, USA. RESUME. EFFETS DU TRIPICOLINATE DE CHROME ...

  3. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m 2 g − 1 and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on ...

  4. Adsorption kinetics for the removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adsorption kinetics for the removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions on the activated carbons prepared from agricultural wastes. ... The batch removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution using low-cost adsorbents such as cornelian cherry, apricot stone and almond shell under different experimental conditions was ...

  5. Spin-wave and critical neutron scattering from chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Axe, J.D.; Shirane, G.

    1971-01-01

    Chromium and its dilute alloys are unique examples of magnetism caused by itinerant electrons. The magnetic excitations have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering using a high-resolution triple-axis spectrometer. Spin-wave peaks in q scans at constant energy transfer ℏω could, in general...

  6. The effect of chromium coating in RP technology for airfoil ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The file data is sliced into cross sections of 0·0762 to 0·254 mm. thickness. The cross sections are then fabricated in a layer additive process using one of the three available. RP technologies. The precursor study wind tunnel model was constructed using the fused deposition method (FDM) and FDM model with chromium ...

  7. Mechanism for partial oxidation of Cyclohexene by Chromium (VI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oxidation of cyclohexene by chromium (VI) oxide in aqueous and acetic media has been studied. The reaction products were analysed using classical method, IR and GC/MS analyses. The major products of the oxidation reaction in acetic acid medium are cyclohexanol, cyclohexanone, cyclohex-2-en-1-one, ...

  8. An investigation of the bioaccumulation of chromium and uranium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mine waste, including tailings is generally outlined as one of the largest environmental concern which faces defunct mines in South Africa and New Union Gold Mine is no exception. These tailing contain heavy metal such as chromium (Cr) and uranium (U) which poses enormous threat to the environment even at small ...

  9. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated temperature in hypersonic environment ... Centre for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, India; Department of Aerospace ...

  10. Effects of chromium supplementation on growth, nutrient digestibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of chromium picolinate (CrPic) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and protein and lipid quality of five anatomical parts in growing pigs. The 30-day study was conducted on eight castrated Topigs growing male pigs, with an initial bodyweight of 17.16 ± 0.62 kg.

  11. Effect Of Chromium- Picolinat On Biochemical And Histopathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium III tris (picolinate) [Cr(pic)3]is a popular nutritional supplement; however its safety has been questioned, especially with regard to its ability to act as a clastogen. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the biochemical and morphological changes in the liver following oral administration of Cr-picolinate and ...

  12. The chromium accumulation and its physiological effects in juvenile rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii, exposed to different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile rockfish (mean length 13.7±1.7 cm, and mean weight 55.6±4.8 g) were exposed for 4 weeks with the different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) at 0, 30, 60, 120 and 240 mg/kg. The profile of chromium in the tissues of rockfish is dependent on the exposure periods and chromium concentration. After 4 weeks, the order of chromium accumulation in tissues was liver>kidney>spleen>intestine>gill>muscle. The dietary chromium exposure decreased the growth rate and hepatosomatic index of rockfish. The major hematological findings were significant decrease in the red blood cell (RBC) count, hematocrit (Ht) value, and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration exposed to ≥120 mg/kg chromium concentrations. The dietary chromium exposure (≥120 mg/kg) led to notable increase in glucose, cholesterol, glutamic oxalate transaminase (GOT), and glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT) in plasma, whereas there was no considerable change in calcium, magnesium, total protein, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The results indicated that the dietary chromium exposure to rockfish can induce significant chromium accumulation in the specific tissues, inhibition of growth, and hematological alterations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron alloyed with chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-04-15

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of chromium content on the plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron (ADI). ADIs containing 0, 0.3 and 0.5 wt.% chromium were austempered over a range of temperatures to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Plane strain fracture toughness of all these materials was determined and correlated with microstructure and chromium content. The chromium content was found to influence the fracture toughness through its influence on the processing window. Since the chromium addition shifts the processing window to shorter durations, the higher chromium alloys at higher austempering temperatures tend to fall outside of the processing window, resulting in less than optimum microstructure and inferior fracture toughness. A small chromium addition of 0.3 wt.% was found to be beneficial for the fracture toughness of ADI.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed Ultrafine Chromium Oxide Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Feng; Jiang Xianliang; Yu Yueguang; Zeng Keli; Ren Xianjing; Li Zhenduo

    2007-01-01

    Ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were prepared by plasma spraying with ultrafine feedstock. Processing parameters of plasma spraying were optimized. Optical microscope (OM) was used to observe the microstructure of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology and particle size of ultrafine powder feedstock as well as to examine the microstructure of the chromium oxide coating. In addition, hardness and bonding strength of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were measured. The results showed that the optimized plasma spraying parameters were suitable for ultrafine chromium oxide coating and the properties and microstructure of the optimized ultrafine chromium oxide coating were superior compared to conventional chromium oxide wear resistant coatings

  15. Residual effects of chromium gettering on the outgassing behavior of a stainless steel vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, J.E.; Blanchard, W.R.; Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    Laboratory experiments that compared chromium and titanium gettering showed that with chromium, unlike titanium, there is no appreciable diffusion of hydrogen isotopes into the film. It was concluded from these experiments that chromium gettering on tokamaks is more desirable than titanium gettering, since chromium should provide higher hydrogen recycling, minimize tritium inventories, and avoid hydrogen embrittlement. Large-scale sublimation sources, consisting of hollow elongated chromium spheres with internal resistance heaters, were developed for use on tokamaks. These sources have been used to getter both the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). In both bases, significant effects on plasma performance were observed, including lower Z/sub eff/ and radiated power losses and an increase in the density limit. In TFTR these effects were observed for a period of weeks after a single chromium deposition. This paper reports the results of laboratory experiments made to examine the gettering characteristics of chromium films under conditions simulating those in TFTR

  16. Determination of Chromium in Beef Heifers Nellore Supplemented with Chelate Chrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S.A Moreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the amount of total chromium in beef heifers supplemented with chelated chromium in the rearing and finishing. We used 80 Nelore heifers at 12 months of age with mineral supplementation associated or not to chelate chromium, with average live weight of 220 kg. Were selected 36 heifer seach experimental group for analysis of meat samples. For the determination of chromium residue in the muscle tissue of the sample was1.5 g digested in a mixture of 5 ml 65% nitric acid and 1 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide at 120° C for 12 hours block microdigestor. The total content of chromium was determined by spectrophotometry of atomic absorption flame. The experimental design was completely randomized and the results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA at 5% significance. It is concluded that the inclusion of chromium in the chelate heifers mineral supplementation increased the chromium content in the meat

  17. Carbon monoxide reduces near-infrared spectroscopy determined 'total' hemoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Mads J; Sørensen, Henrik; Siebenmann, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    to normoxia (68.9 ± 6.9%; p determined ScO2 remained unchanged during CO/O2 and O2 inhalations but oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin decreased (by 19.7 μM (median; IQR 2.8-34.8; p = .016) and 37.3 μM (30.8-46.6; p = .004), respectively) during inhalation of CO/O2 compared...... to inhalation of O2. Therefore, NIRO-200NX determined 'total' hemoglobin (sum of O2Hb and HHb) decreased (by 62.1 μM; 44.5-78.2; p = .001). In conclusion, exposure to CO did not increase MCAVmean, and neither NIRO-200NX nor INVOS-5100 detected a change in ScO2 when CO was added to inhalation of oxygen......Carbon monoxide (CO) increases middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCAVmean), but the effect of CO on the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) determined cerebral oxygenation (ScO2) is not detailed. In our study, 11 non-smoking subjects breathed 100% O2 through a closed circuit. A CO2 scrubber...

  18. The Role of Oxygen Therapies in Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman Metin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to climate and socio-economic issues in Turkey, the incidence of carbon monoxide (CO poisoning is high, especially in winter. Clinical manifestations may vary depending on the type of CO source, concentration and duration of exposure. The symptoms of CO poisoning predominantly manifest in lots of organs and systems with high oxygen utilization, especially the brain and the heart. The primary aim in oxygen therapy is to eliminate CO and to reduce its toxic effects. In this context, normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen therapy are used to achieve these goals. Normobaric oxygen (NBO treatment is an easily accessible and relatively not expensive modality, where hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy requires specific equipment, certified staff and is available only in some centers. Additionally, HBO treatment has several additional advantages over NBO treatment. Despite its benefits, it is compulsory to search for some criteria in selecting patients to be treated because of the limited availability and access of hyperbaric facilities. For an effective evaluation and an optimal treatment, advanced education of the healthcare professionals on the use of oxygen delivery modalities in the management of CO poisoning is imperative. In this review, it has been aimed to outline the significance of oxygen treatment modalities and to determine patient selection criteria for HBO treatment in the management of CO poisoning which continues to be an important threat to community health care. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(4.000: 487-494

  19. The immunomodulatory role of carbon monoxide during transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amano Mariane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number of organ and tissue transplants has increased worldwide in recent decades. However, graft rejection, infections due to the use of immunosuppressive drugs and a shortage of graft donors remain major concerns. Carbon monoxide (CO had long been regarded solely as a poisonous gas. Ultimately, physiological studies unveiled the endogenous production of CO, particularly by the heme oxygenase (HO-1 enzyme, recognizing CO as a beneficial gas when used at therapeutic doses. The protective properties of CO led researchers to develop uses for it, resulting in devices and molecules that can deliver CO in vitro and in vivo. The resulting interest in clinical investigations was immediate. Studies regarding the CO/HO-1 modulation of immune responses and their effects on various immune disorders gave rise to transplantation research, where CO was shown to be essential in the protection against organ rejection in animal models. This review provides a perspective of how CO modulates the immune system to improve transplantation and suggests its use as a therapy in the field.

  20. Carbon monoxide: from toxin to endogenous modulator of cardiovascular functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Johnson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a pollutant commonly recognized for its toxicological attributes, including CNS and cardiovascular effects. But CO is also formed endogenously in mammalian tissues. Endogenously formed CO normally arises from heme degradation in a reaction catalyzed by heme oxygenase. While inhibitors of endogenous CO production can raise arterial pressure, heme loading can enhance CO production and lead to vasodepression. Both central and peripheral tissues possess heme oxygenases and generate CO from heme, but the inability of heme substrate to cross the blood brain barrier suggests the CNS heme-heme oxygenase-CO system may be independent of the periphery. In the CNS, CO apparently acts in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS promoting changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission and lowering blood pressure. At the periphery, the heme-heme oxygenase-CO system can affect cardiovascular functions in a two-fold manner; specifically: 1 heme-derived CO generated within vascular smooth muscle (VSM can promote vasodilation, but 2 its actions on the endothelium apparently can promote vasoconstriction. Thus, it seems reasonable that the CNS-, VSM- and endothelial-dependent actions of the heme-heme oxygenase-CO system may all affect cardiac output and vascular resistance, and subsequently blood pressure.