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Sample records for sprintail orchesella cincta

  1. Geographic variation for climatic stress resistance traits in the sprintail Orchesella cincta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrndorff, Simon; Holmstrup, Martin; Petersen, H.

    2006-01-01

    Multiple traits of stress resistance were investigated in the epedaphic springtail Orchesella cincta. Second generation adults from five laboratory populations were compared with respect to resistance to extreme temperatures and desiccation, and traits relevant to climatic adaptation. Populations...... were collected along a 2000-km latitudinal gradient ranging from Denmark to southern Italy and reared under the same standard laboratory conditions. Traits investigated were resistance to high and low temperature, desiccation resistance, body size and water loss rate (WLR). Results showed genetically...... based differences in resistance to high and low temperature, desiccation, WLR, water pool and body size between populations. Individuals from the most northern population had the highest desiccation-and cold shock resistance, and the lowest heat shock resistance. Females were significantly more...

  2. Recombinational micro-evolution of functionally different metallothionein promoter alleles from Orchesella cincta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Straalen Nico M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metallothionein (mt transcription is elevated in heavy metal tolerant field populations of Orchesella cincta (Collembola. This suggests that natural selection acts on transcriptional regulation of mt in springtails at sites where cadmium (Cd levels in soil reach toxic values This study investigates the nature and the evolutionary origin of polymorphisms in the metallothionein promoter (pmt and their functional significance for mt expression. Results We sequenced approximately 1600 bp upstream the mt coding region by genome walking. Nine pmt alleles were discovered in NW-European populations. They differ in the number of some indels, consensus transcription factor binding sites and core promoter elements. Extensive recombination events between some of the alleles can be inferred from the alignment. A deviation from neutral expectations was detected in a cadmium tolerant population, pointing towards balancing selection on some promoter stretches. Luciferase constructs were made from the most abundant alleles, and responses to Cd, paraquat (oxidative stress inducer and moulting hormone were studied in cell lines. By using paraquat we were able to dissect the effect of oxidative stress from the Cd specific effect, and extensive differences in mt induction levels between these two stressors were observed. Conclusion The pmt alleles evolved by a number of recombination events, and exhibited differential inducibilities by Cd, paraquat and molting hormone. In a tolerant population from a metal contaminated site, promoter allele frequencies differed significantly from a reference site and nucleotide polymorphisms in some promoter stretches deviated from neutral expectations, revealing a signature of balancing selection. Our results suggest that the structural differences in the Orchesella cincta metallothionein promoter alleles contribute to the metallothionein -over-expresser phenotype in cadmium tolerant populations.

  3. Impact of insect growth regulators on the predator Ceraeochrysa cincta (Schneider) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugno, Gabriel Rodrigo; Zanardi, Odimar Zanuzo; Bajonero Cuervo, Johanna; de Morais, Matheus Rovere; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2016-07-01

    The generalist predator Ceraeochrysa cincta (Schneider) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) is an important biological control agent of several arthropod pests in different agroecosystems. This study assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of six insect growth regulators sprayed on first-instar larvae of C. cincta. Lufenuron and diflubenzuron were highly harmful to first-instar larvae of C. cincta, causing 100 % of mortality before they reached the second instar. Buprofezin caused ~25 % mortality of the larvae and considerably reduced the fecundity and longevity of the insects, but substantially increased the proportion of females in the surviving population of C. cincta. Methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide did not affect the duration and survival of the immature stages, but methoxyfenozide significantly reduced the fecundity and longevity of the insects. Pyriproxyfen reduced the survival of the larval stage by 19.5 %, but did not affect the development, survival and reproduction of the surviving individuals. Based on reduction coefficient, the insecticides diflubenzuron and lufenuron were considered harmful to C. cincta, whereas buprofezin and methoxyfenozide were slightly harmful and tebufenozide and pyriproxyfen were harmless. The estimation of life-table parameters indicated that buprofezin and methoxyfenozide significantly reduced the R o , r and λ of C. cincta, whereas pyriproxyfen and tebufenozide caused no adverse effect on population parameters, indicating that these insecticides could be suitable for use in pest management programs towards the conservation and population increase of the predator in agroecosystems. However, more studies should be conducted to evaluate the compatibility of these insecticides with the predator C. cincta under semi-field and field conditions.

  4. Movement Patterns, Home Range Size and Habitat Selection of an Endangered Resource Tracking Species, the Black-Throated Finch (Poephila cincta cincta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechetelo, Juliana; Grice, Anthony; Reside, April Elizabeth; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Moloney, James

    2016-01-01

    Understanding movement patterns and home range of species is paramount in ecology; it is particularly important for threatened taxa as it can provide valuable information for conservation management. To address this knowledge gap for a range-restricted endangered bird, we estimated home range size, daily movement patterns and habitat use of a granivorous subspecies in northeast Australia, the black-throated finch (Poephila cincta cincta; BTF) using radio-tracking and re-sighting of colour banded birds. Little is known about basic aspects of its ecology including movement patterns and home range sizes. From 2011-2014 we colour-banded 102 BTF and radio-tracked 15 birds. We generated home ranges (calculated using kernel and Minimum Convex Polygons techniques of the 15 tracked BTF). More than 50% of the re-sightings occurred within 200 m of the banding site (n = 51 out of 93 events) and within 100 days of capture. Mean home-range estimates with kernel (50%, 95% probability) and Minimum Convex Polygons were 10.59 ha, 50.79 ha and 46.27 ha, respectively. Home range size differed between two capture sites but no seasonal differences were observed. BTF home ranges overlapped four habitat types among eight available. Habitat selection was different from random at Site 1 (χ2 = 373.41, df = 42, pmovements may be related to resource bottleneck periods. Daily movement patterns differed between sites, which is likely linked to the fact that the sites differ in the spatial distribution of resources. The work provides information about home range sizes and local movement of BTF that will be valuable for targeting effective management and conservation strategies for this endangered granivore.

  5. Traumatic ventriculitis following consumption of introduced insect prey (Hymenoptera) in nestling hihi (Notiomystis cincta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippon, Rosemary J; Alley, Maurice R; Castro, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Nestling mortality in the endangered and endemic Hihi, also called Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta), was studied over the 2008-09 breeding season at Zealandia-Karori Sanctuary, Wellington, New Zealand. Histopathology showed traumatic ventriculitis in seven of 25 (28%) dead nestlings. Single or multiple granulomas centered on chitinous insect remnants were found lodged within the gizzard mucosa, muscle layers, and ventricular or intestinal serosa. The insect remnants were confirmed as bee or wasp stings (Hymenoptera) using light and electron microscopy. Bacteria or yeasts were also found in some granulomas, and death was due to bacterial septicemia in four cases. Endemic New Zealand birds are likely to lack evolutionary adaptations required to safely consume introduced honey bees (Apis mellifera) and vespulid wasps (Vespula germanica [German wasp], and Vespula vulgaris [common wasp]). However, these insects are attracted to feeding stations used to support translocated Hihi populations. As contact between bees, wasps, and the endemic fauna of New Zealand seems inevitable, it may be necessary to minimize the numbers of these introduced insects in areas set aside for ecologic restoration.

  6. Comparative population analysis of metallothionein promoter alleles suggests stress-induced microevolution in the field.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, T.K.S.; Del Rio Lopez, R.; Mariën, A.G.H.; Timmermans, M.J.T.N.; Montagne-Wajer, K; van Straalen, N.M.; Roelofs, D.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a model system for microevolution of transcriptional regulation: metallothionein expression in springtails. A previous survey of the metallothionein promoter in Orchesella cincta (Collembola) revealed nine alleles with differential basal activities and responses to cadmium and

  7. Comparative population analysis of metallothionein promoter alleles suggests stress-induced microevolution in the field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Thierry K S; Lopéz, Ricardo del Rio; Mariën, Janine; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Montagne-Wajer, K; van Straalen, Nico M; Roelofs, Dick

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a model system for microevolution of transcriptional regulation: metallothionein expression in springtails. A previous survey of the metallothionein promoter in Orchesella cincta (Collembola) revealed nine alleles with differential basal activities and responses to cadmium and

  8. Temperature-induced plasticity in egg size and resistance of eggs to temperature stress in a soil arthropod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefting, M.; Weerenbeck, M.; Dooremalen, van C.; Ellers, J.

    2010-01-01

    Keywords:acclimation;cold shock;development rate;egg hatching;heat shock;phenotypic plasticity;Orchesella cincta;oviposition temperature Summary 1. Temperature is considered one of the most important mediators of phenotypic plasticity in ectotherms, resulting in predictable changes in egg size.

  9. Indications for the tracking of elevated nitrogen levels through the fungal route in a soil food web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogervorst, R.F.; Dijkhuis, M.A.J.; Schaar, M.A. van der; Berg, M.P.; Verhoef, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Elevated levels of N in soil can be tracked via fungi in the soil food web. - The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of elevated N in dead organic matter on the growth of fungi and to establish the consequences for the development of microbivores. Therefore, three fungal species were cultured on Scots pine litter differing in N content. The growth of the soil fungal species Trichoderma koningii, Penicillium glabrum and Cladosporium cladosporioides was directly influenced by the N content (ranging from 1.25 to 2.19% N) of the substrate. For all three fungal species maximum growth was highest at intermediate N content (1.55%) of the substrate. The fungivorous collembolan Orchesella cincta reached highest asymptotic body mass when fed with C. cladosporioides, grown on litter medium with intermediate N content (1.55%). The growth of O. cincta was lower when fed with C. cladosporioides from litter medium with the highest N content (2.19%). Similar results were obtained in mesocosm experiments in which pine litter with three levels of N (1.11, 1.78, 2.03% N) was used as substrate for the fungi. On litter with the highest N content (2.03%) hyphal length and asymptotic body mass of O. cincta were reduced. The results show that the N content of the substrate determines the growth of both fungi and fungivores, and suggest that elevated levels of N in soil track through the fungal part of the soil food web

  10. Indications for the tracking of elevated nitrogen levels through the fungal route in a soil food web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogervorst, R.F.; Dijkhuis, M.A.J.; Schaar, M.A. van der; Berg, M.P.; Verhoef, H.A

    2003-11-01

    Elevated levels of N in soil can be tracked via fungi in the soil food web. - The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of elevated N in dead organic matter on the growth of fungi and to establish the consequences for the development of microbivores. Therefore, three fungal species were cultured on Scots pine litter differing in N content. The growth of the soil fungal species Trichoderma koningii, Penicillium glabrum and Cladosporium cladosporioides was directly influenced by the N content (ranging from 1.25 to 2.19% N) of the substrate. For all three fungal species maximum growth was highest at intermediate N content (1.55%) of the substrate. The fungivorous collembolan Orchesella cincta reached highest asymptotic body mass when fed with C. cladosporioides, grown on litter medium with intermediate N content (1.55%). The growth of O. cincta was lower when fed with C. cladosporioides from litter medium with the highest N content (2.19%). Similar results were obtained in mesocosm experiments in which pine litter with three levels of N (1.11, 1.78, 2.03% N) was used as substrate for the fungi. On litter with the highest N content (2.03%) hyphal length and asymptotic body mass of O. cincta were reduced. The results show that the N content of the substrate determines the growth of both fungi and fungivores, and suggest that elevated levels of N in soil track through the fungal part of the soil food web.

  11. Transgenerational effects of nutrition are different for sons and daughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzari, Z V; van Straalen, N M; Ellers, J

    2016-07-01

    Food shortage is an important selective factor shaping animal life-history trajectories. Yet, despite its role, many aspects of the interaction between parental and offspring food environments remain unclear. In this study, we measured developmental plasticity in response to food availability over two generations and tested the relative contribution of paternal and maternal food availability to the performance of offspring reared under matched and mismatched food environments. We applied a cross-generational split-brood design using the springtail Orchesella cincta, which is found in the litter layer of temperate forests. The results show adverse effects of food limitation on several life-history traits and reproductive performance of both parental sexes. Food conditions of both parents contributed to the offspring phenotypic variation, providing evidence for transgenerational effects of diet. Parental diet influenced sons' age at maturity and daughters' weight at maturity. Specifically, being born to food-restricted parents allowed offspring to alleviate the adverse effects of food limitation, without reducing their performance under well-fed conditions. Thus, parents raised on a poor diet primed their offspring for a more efficient resource use. However, a mismatch between maternal and offspring food environments generated sex-specific adverse effects: female offspring born to well-fed mothers showed a decreased flexibility to deal with low-food conditions. Notably, these maternal effects of food availability were not observed in the sons. Finally, we found that the relationship between age and size at maturity differed between males and females and showed that offspring life-history strategies in O. cincta are primed differently by the parents. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  12. Diversity and metabolic potential of the microbiota associated with a soil arthropod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrndorff, Simon; de Jonge, Nadieh; Hansen, Jacob Kjerulf; Lauritzen, Jannik Mørk Skovgaard; Spanggaard, Lasse Holt; Sørensen, Mathias Hamann; Yde, Morten; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund

    2018-02-06

    Springtails are important members of the soil fauna and play a key role in plant litter decomposition, for example through stimulation of the microbial activity. However, their interaction with soil microorganisms remains poorly understood and it is unclear which microorganisms are associated to the springtail (endo) microbiota. Therefore, we assessed the structure of the microbiota of the springtail Orchesella cincta (L.) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Individuals were sampled across sites in the field and the microbiota and in particular the endomicrobiota were investigated. The microbiota was dominated by the families of Rickettsiaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Comamonadaceae and at the genus level the most abundant genera included Rickettsia, Chryseobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Stenotrophomonas. Microbial communities were distinct for the interior of the springtails for measures of community diversity and exhibited structure according to collection sites. Functional analysis of the springtail bacterial community suggests that abundant members of the microbiota may be associated with metabolism including decomposition processes. Together these results add to the understanding of the microbiota of springtails and interaction with soil microorganisms including their putative functional roles.

  13. Lethal body concentrations and accumulation patterns determine time-dependent toxicity of cadmium in soil arthropods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crommentuijn, T.; Doodeman, C.J.A.M.; Doornekamp, A.; Pol, J.J.C. van der; Bedaux, J.J.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. van (Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1994-11-01

    Time-dependent toxicity in bioassays is usually explained in terms of uptake and elimination kinetics of the toxicant. By comparing different species with essentially different accumulation kinetics, a firm test of this concept may be made. This article compares the sensitivity of six soil arthropods, the collembolans Orchesella cincta and Tomocerus minor, the oribatid mite Platynothrus peltifer, the isopods Porcellio scaber and Oniscus asellus, and the diplopod Cylindroiulus britannicus, when exposed to cadmium in the food. Survival was determined at various time intervals; accumulation of cadmium in the animals was measured at one time interval. Kinetic-based toxicity models were fitted to the data, and estimates were obtained for lethal body concentration, uptake rate constant, elimination rate constant, and ultimate LC50. Two different accumulation patterns could be discerned; these were correlated with time-survival relationships. One, species that have the possibility to eliminate cadmium will reach an equilibrium for the internal concentration and also an ultimate LC50. Two, species that are unable to eliminate cadmium but store it in the body will have an ultimate LC50 equal to zero. For these species the time in which the lethal body concentration is reached is more important. Taxonomically related species appeared to have comparable accumulation patterns, but lethal body concentrations differed. It is concluded that knowledge of the accumulation pattern is indispensable for the evaluation of species' sensitivities to toxicants.

  14. Successful determination of larval dispersal distances and subsequent settlement for long-lived pelagic larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelayo Salinas-de-León

    Full Text Available Despite its importance, we still have a poor understanding of the level of connectivity between marine populations in most geographical locations. Taking advantage of the natural features of the southeast coast of New Zealand's North Island, we deployed a series of settlement stations and conducted plankton tows to capture recent settlers and planktonic larvae of the common intertidal gastropod Austrolittorina cincta (6-8 week larval period. Satellite image analysis and ground truthing surveys revealed the absence of suitable intertidal rocky shore habitat for A. cincta over a 100 km stretch of coastline between Kapiti Island to the south and Wanganui to the north. Fifteen settlement stations (3 replicates × 5 sites, which were used to mimic intertidal habitat suitable for A. cincta, were deployed for two months around and north of Kapiti Island (at 0.5, 1, 5, 15, 50 km. In addition, we also conducted plankton tows at each settlement station when the stations were first deployed to collect A. cincta larvae in the water column. On collection, all newly settled gastropods and larvae in the plankton samples were individually isolated, and a species-specific microsatellite marker was used to positively identify A. cincta individuals. Most of the positively identified A. cincta settlers and larvae were collected at the first three sampling stations (<5 km. However, low numbers of A. cincta settlers and larvae were also recorded at the two more distant locations (15 and 50 km. Dispersal curves modeled from our data suggested that <1% of gastropod larvae would travel more than 100 km. While our data show that most larvae are retained close to their natal populations (<5 km, a small proportion of larvae are able to travel much larger geographic distances. Our estimates of larval dispersal and subsequent settlement are one of only a few for marine species with a long-lived larva.

  15. The responses of South African patellid limpets to invertebrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The starfish Marthasterias glacialis is a generalized predator, feeding particularly on Choromytilus meridionalis, but also on several limpets, notably Patella longicosta. Thais dubia (Gastropoda) feeds mainly on barnacles, mussels, and Patella granulans. The gastropods Burnupena delalandii and B. cincta are principally ...

  16. Toxicidad de Schinus molle L. (Anacardiaceae) a cuatro controladores biológicos de plagas agrícolas en el Perú

    OpenAIRE

    IANNACONE, José; ALVARIÑO, Lorena

    2010-01-01

    Schinus molle L. (Anacardiaceae) "molle" es una planta de importancia etnobotánica originaria de la zona altoandina y usada artesanalmente como agente insecticida para el control de plagas agrícolas en el Perú. Se evaluó el efecto ecotoxicológico de extractos acuosos de molle sobre cuatro organismos no blanco: Ceraeochrysa cincta (Schneider) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) en huevos y larvas de primer estadio, Chrysoperla asoralis (Bank) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) en huevos y larvas de primer estadi...

  17. Permanent genetic resources added to molecular ecology resources database 1 june 2011–31 july 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, F. Keith; Bell, James J.; Bogdanowicz, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    This article documents the addition of 112 microsatellite marker loci and 24 pairs of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sequencing primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Agelaius phoeniceus, Austrolittorina cincta, Circus cyaneus......, Circus macrourus, Circus pygargus, Cryptocoryne · purpurea Ridl. nothovar. purpurea, Mya arenaria, Patagioenas squamosa, Prochilodus mariae, Scylla serrata and Scytalopus speluncae. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Cryptocoryne · purpurea nothovar. purpurea, Cryptocoryne affinis...

  18. Evaluación del riesgo ambiental de carbofurano en bioensayos con organismos no blanco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Iannacone

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El carbofurano es uno de los plaguicidas más empleado en la agricultura peruana. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar el riesgo ambiental del carbofurano en bioensayos de toxicidad, sobre once especies no destinatarias. La siguiente secuencia relativa de mayor a menor cocientes de riesgo (CR del carbofurano para los 19 puntos finales de efecto en once especies fue encontrada: Daphnia magna (mortalidad > Lemna minor (inhibición de formación de las hojas > Paracheirodon innesi (nado extraño = P. innesi (incremento del movimiento opercular > Chironomus calligraphus (mortalidad > L. minor (necrosis > P. innesi (mortalidad > L. minor (clorosis > Tetrapygus niger (inhibición de la fecundación > Coturnix japonica (mortalidad > Oncorhynchus mykiss (incremento de coloración > Ceraeochrysa cincta (no eclosión de huevos > O. mykiss (mortalidad con oxígeno > O. mykiss (mortalidad sin oxígeno > Trichogramma pretiosum (mortalidad > C. cincta (mortalidad > T. pretiosum (no emergencia de adultos > Trichogramma pintoi (mortalidad > Beauveria bassiana (inhibición del crecimiento. Los cocientes de riesgo (CR indicaron en todos los casos un alto riesgo del carbofurano principalmente en el ambiente acuático en comparación con el terrestre.Carbofuran is one of the most employed pesticides in Peruvian agriculture. This research aimed to evaluate the risk assessment in bioassays of carbofuran on eleven non-target species. The following relative sequence in decreasing ecotoxicity order in terms of RQ (Risk quotient to carbofuran to 19 end points on 11 species was found: Daphnia magna (mortality > Lemna minor (inhibition of new fronds > Paracheirodon innesi (strange swim = P. innesi (increase of opercula movement > Chironomus calligraphus (mortality > L. minor (necrosis > P. innesi (mortality > L. minor (chlorosis > Tetrapygus niger (inhibition of fertilization> Coturnix japonica (mortality > Oncorhynchus mykiss (increase of coloration > Ceraeochrysa

  19. Identifying Possible Pheromones of Cerambycid Beetles by Field Testing Known Pheromone Components in Four Widely Separated Regions of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Jocelyn G; Mitchell, Robert F; Mongold-Diers, Judith A; Zou, Yunfan; Bográn, Carlos E; Fierke, Melissa K; Ginzel, Matthew D; Johnson, Crawford W; Meeker, James R; Poland, Therese M; Ragenovich, Iral; Hanks, Lawrence M

    2018-02-09

    The pheromone components of many cerambycid beetles appear to be broadly shared among related species, including species native to different regions of the world. This apparent conservation of pheromone structures within the family suggests that field trials of common pheromone components could be used as a means of attracting multiple species, which then could be targeted for full identification of their pheromones. Here, we describe the results of such field trials that were conducted in nine states in the northeastern, midwestern, southern, and western United States. Traps captured 12,742 cerambycid beetles of 153 species and subspecies. Species attracted in significant numbers to a particular treatment (some in multiple regions) included 19 species in the subfamily Cerambycinae, 15 species in the Lamiinae, one species in the Prioninae, and two species in the Spondylidinae. Pheromones or likely pheromones for many of these species, such as 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one and syn- and anti-2,3-hexanediols for cerambycine species, and fuscumol and/or fuscumol acetate for lamiine species, had already been identified. New information about attractants (in most cases likely pheromone components) was found for five cerambycine species (Ancylocera bicolor [Olivier], Elaphidion mucronatum [Say], Knulliana cincta cincta [Drury], Phymatodes aeneus LeConte, and Rusticoclytus annosus emotus [Brown]), and five lamiine species (Ecyrus dasycerus dasycerus [Say], Lepturges symmetricus [Haldeman], Sternidius misellus [LeConte], Styloleptus biustus biustus [LeConte], and Urgleptes signatus [LeConte]). Consistent attraction of some species to the same compounds in independent bioassays demonstrated the utility and reliability of pheromone-based methods for sampling cerambycid populations across broad spatial scales. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Systematic revision of the marbled velvet geckos (Oedura marmorata species complex, Diplodactylidae) from the Australian arid and semi-arid zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Paul M; Doughty, Paul

    2016-03-08

    Lizards restricted to rocky habitats often comprise numerous deeply divergent lineages, reflecting the disjunct nature of their preferred habitat and the capacity of rocky habitats to function as evolutionary refugia. Here we review the systematics and diversity of the predominantly saxicoline Australian marbled velvet geckos (genus Oedura) in the Australian arid and semi-arid zones using newly-gathered morphological data and previously published genetic data. Earlier work showed that four largely allopatric and genetically divergent lineages are present: Western (Pilbara and Gascoyne regions), Gulf (west and south of the Gulf of Carpentaria), Central (central ranges) and Eastern (Cooper and Darling Basins). None of these four populations are conspecific with true O. marmorata, a seperate species complex that is restricted to the Top End region of the Northern Territory. Top End forms share a short, bulbous tail whereas the other four lineages treated here possess a long, tapering tail. Morphological differences among the arid and semi-arid lineages include smaller body size, tapering lamellae and a shorter tail for the Gulf population, and a partially divided rostral scale in the Western population compared to the Central and Eastern populations. Accordingly, we resurrect O. cincta de Vis from synonymy for the Central and Eastern lineages, and regard this species as being comprised of two evolutionary significant units. We also describe the Gulf and Western lineages as new species: Oedura bella sp. nov. and O. fimbria sp. nov., respectively. We note that a predominantly arboreal lineage (the Eastern lineage of O. cincta) is more widely distributed than the other lineages and is phylogenetically nested within a saxicoline clade, but tends to have a deeper head and shorter limbs, consistent with morphological variation observed in other lizard radiations including both saxicoline and arboreal taxa.

  1. Soil and saproxylic species (Coleoptera, Collembola, Araneae in primeval forests from the Northern part of South-Easthern Carpathians

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    Eugen Nițu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2007 we carried out faunal investigations in the vernal, estival and autumnal seasons in the scientific reserve "Codrul Secular Giumalău" using quantitative sampling methods. We identified 189 species of Coleoptera, 70 of Collembola and 20 of Araneae. Of these, 11 phytophagous, 18 myceto/xylo-mycetophagous, 9 mixophagous, 18 xylo- and cambio-xylemophagous, 38 saproxylophagous, 125 (55 Coleoptera, 70 Collembola detritivorous (sapro-, copro- and necrophagous, 60 (40 Coleoptera, 20 Aranea predators/parasitoids. Hymenaphorura polonica Pomorski, 1990 (Collembola, and Leiodes rhaeticus Erichson, 1845 (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, are recorded for the first time in the Romanian fauna. The rare species and characteristic species for the old primeval spruce forests are analysed for each studied taxonomic group. The species richness and faunal diversity from the Giumalău primeval spruce forest are compared with those of other very well preserved forests from the Carpathians scientific reserves (Codrul Secular Slătioara, Pietrosul Rodnei. The species abundances were used to compute the similarity indexes between the sampled sectors of forest and to perform Cluster Analysis. We observed that the dead wood in the 2nd-6th phases of decomposition has a great influence not only on the saproxylic species but also on the soil fauna like ground beetles (Carabidae that use the logs as ecologic microrefuges (winter refugees or diurnal refugees. The structure of the soil fauna is influenced by wood extraction from the forest ecosystem or by natural perturbations, this consisting in the appearance of opportunistic species as Orchesella pontica (Collembola and in decreasing of species richness of Carabidae (Coleoptera.

  2. Soil and saproxylic species (Coleoptera, Collembola, Araneae in primeval forests from the northern part of South-Easthern Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Nitu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2007 we carried out faunal investigations in the vernal, estival and autumnal seasons in the scientific reserve "Codrul Secular Giumalãu" using quantitative sampling methods. We identified 189 species of Coleoptera, 70 of Collembola and 20 of Araneae. Of these, 11 phytophagous, 18 myceto/xylo-mycetophagous,9 mixophagous, 18 xylo- and cambio-xylemophagous, 38 saproxylophagous,125 (55 Coleoptera, 70 Collembola detritivorous (sapro-, copro- andnecrophagous, 60 (40 Coleoptera, 20 Aranea predators/parasitoids. Hymenaphorura polonica Pomorski, 1990 (Collembola, and Leiodes rhaeticus Erichson, 1845 (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, are recorded for the first time in the Romanian fauna. The rare species and characteristic species for the old primeval spruce forests are analysed for each studied taxonomic group. The species richness and faunal diversity from the Giumalãu primeval spruce forest are compared with those of other very well preserved forests from the Carpathians scientific reserves (Codrul Secular Slãtioara,Pietrosul Rodnei. The species abundances were used to compute the similarity indexes between the sampled sectors of forest and to perform Cluster Analysis. We observed that the dead wood in the 2nd-6th phases of decomposition has a great influence not only on the saproxylic species but also on the soil fauna like ground beetles(Carabidae that use the logs as ecologic microrefuges (winter refugees or diurnal refugees. The structure of the soil fauna is influenced by wood extraction from the forest ecosystem or by natural perturbations, this consisting in the appearance of opportunistic species as Orchesella pontica (Collembola and in decreasing ofspecies richness of Carabidae (Coleoptera.

  3. Equinodermos del Cámbrico de España: situación actual de las investigaciones y perspectivas futuras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamora, S.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews all finds of Cambrian echinoderms from Spain since their first discovery in the XIX century. Recent research techniques used for the study of echinoderms are also described, providing a guide for procedure. Sampling in new fossiliferous localities from the Cambrian of North Spain and the review of classic ones has yielded more than 2,000 echinoderm fossils. These include species belonging to five major classes, Cincta, Eocrinoidea, Edrioasteroidea, Stylophora and Ctenocystoidea, which show the highest diversity reported from Gondwana. These results suggest that echinoderms underwent major diversification during the middle Cambrian, with many groups more widely distributed than previously thought. These arguments suggest that many classes originated in the lower Cambrian where only a few taxa have been described. Finally, I offer some suggestions about where research efforts need to be focussed for a better knowledge of Cambrian echinoderm faunas in Gondwana.

    En este trabajo se presenta una revisión histórica de todos los equinodermos cámbricos descubier tos en España, desde su primer hallazgo a finales del siglo XIX y las técnicas actuales que se utilizan para su estudio. El muestreo sistemático de nuevas localidades cámbricas del Norte de España y la revisión de otras ya conocidas, ha proporcionado más de 2.000 ejemplares de equinodermos. En total se han reconocido taxones pertenecientes a cinco clases: Cincta, Eocrinoidea, Edrioasteroidea, Stylophora y Ctenocystoidea, que muestran la mayor diversidad para este periodo en Gondwana. Estos hallazgos muestran que los equinodermos alcanzaron su primer pico de diversidad durante el Cámbrico medio. Esto, unido a la amplia distribución paleobiogeográfica de algunos clados, nos advierte de un origen para muchos grupos en el Cámbrico inferior, donde sólo unos pocos taxones han sido descritos a nivel mundial. Por último se dan algunas ideas de hacia d

  4. EVALUATION OF FISH FAUNA STOCKS IN DAMS IN SOSSEGO MIME IN CANAÃ OF CARAJÁS (EASTERN AMAZON, CAPTURED WITH THE USE OF CAST NET BEFORE THE DEPOSIT OF TAILINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Furtado Junior

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to estimate the biomass of fish stocks in the area of the dam formed by tailings of Sossego mine in Canaã dos Carajás, captured with the use of cast nets for fish. The prospecting work was carried out during the period from 29 February to 6 March 2004, 6 months after closing the dam and immediately before the disposal of waste. The average values estimated for the capture per unit area covered by cast nets (CPUA and biomass were 8.4 g m-² and 16,922.7 kg, respectively. The most representative groups of fish were minnows, with 67.7% and discus with 24.8% of the total estimated biomass. The species caught were: Moenkhausia cf. sanctaefilomenae (redeye tetra fish, Tetragonopterus cf. argenteus (white tetra fish, Tetragonopterus chalceus (red tetra fish, Aequidens viridis (cichlasoma bimaculatum Crenicichla cincta (jacunda Hoplerythrinus unitaeniatus (jeju Curimata inornata (branquinha and Hoplias malabaricus (trahira. Keywords: fishing survey; yield per unit area; biomass; tailings dam.

  5. Molecular phylogeny of Glossodoris (Ehrenberg, 1831) nudibranchs and related genera reveals cryptic and pseudocryptic species complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Matsuda, Shayle B.; Gosliner, Terrence M.

    2017-01-01

    Chromodorid nudibranchs (Chromodorididae) are brightly coloured sea slugs that live in some of the most biodiverse and threatened coral reefs on the planet. However, the evolutionary relationships within this family have not been well understood, especially in the genus Glossodoris. Members of Glossodoris have experienced large-scale taxonomic instability over the last century and have been the subject of repeated taxonomic changes, in part due to morphological characters being the sole traditional taxonomic sources of data. Changing concepts of traditional generic boundaries based on morphology also have contributed to this instability. Despite recent advances in molecular systematics, many aspects of chromodorid taxonomy remain poorly understood, particularly at the traditional species and generic levels. In this study, 77 individuals comprising 32 previously defined species were used to build the most robust phylogenetic tree of Glossodoris and related genera using mitochondrial genes cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and 16S, and the nuclear gene 28S. Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony analyses verify the most recent hypothesized evolutionary relationships within Glossodoris. Additionally, a pseudocryptic and cryptic species complex within Glossodoris cincta and a pseudocryptic complex within Glossodoris pallida emerged, and three new species of Doriprismatica are identified.

  6. Gum in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L. shoots induced by methyl jasmonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Saniewski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been well known that some fungal pathogens (Monilia laxa, M. fructigena, Cytospora cincta, larvae of Grapholita molesta and plant hormone - ethylene, induce gummosis in apricot shoots. Methyl jasmonate (JA-Me was also found to induce gummosis in apricot shoots as well as biotic and abiotic factors mentioned above. In order to know the mode of action of JA-Me on gum induction and/or formation, chemical composition of polysaccharides (after hydrolysis in gums of apricot shoots induced by JA-Me compared with those by ethephon and their mixture, and naturally occurring ones was studied, resulted in the succesful identification of monosaccharides, and the similarity of a composition consisting of xylose, arabinose and galactose at molar ratio 1:10:14, respectively. These results suggest that beside different inducers of gum in apricot the mechanism of polysaccharides biosynthesis of gums is the same or similar. The physiological role for JA-Me on gum induction and/or formation in apricot shoots, and other species are also discussed.

  7. Molecular phylogeny of Glossodoris (Ehrenberg, 1831) nudibranchs and related genera reveals cryptic and pseudocryptic species complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Matsuda, Shayle B.

    2017-03-01

    Chromodorid nudibranchs (Chromodorididae) are brightly coloured sea slugs that live in some of the most biodiverse and threatened coral reefs on the planet. However, the evolutionary relationships within this family have not been well understood, especially in the genus Glossodoris. Members of Glossodoris have experienced large-scale taxonomic instability over the last century and have been the subject of repeated taxonomic changes, in part due to morphological characters being the sole traditional taxonomic sources of data. Changing concepts of traditional generic boundaries based on morphology also have contributed to this instability. Despite recent advances in molecular systematics, many aspects of chromodorid taxonomy remain poorly understood, particularly at the traditional species and generic levels. In this study, 77 individuals comprising 32 previously defined species were used to build the most robust phylogenetic tree of Glossodoris and related genera using mitochondrial genes cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and 16S, and the nuclear gene 28S. Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony analyses verify the most recent hypothesized evolutionary relationships within Glossodoris. Additionally, a pseudocryptic and cryptic species complex within Glossodoris cincta and a pseudocryptic complex within Glossodoris pallida emerged, and three new species of Doriprismatica are identified.

  8. Adaptive management for improving species conservation across the captive-wild spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, Stefano; Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Lahoz-Monfort, José J.; Southwell, Darren M; Armstrong, Doug P.; Chadès, Iadine; Lacy, Robert C; Converse, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation of endangered species increasingly envisages complex strategies that integrate captive and wild management actions. Management decisions in this context must be made in the face of uncertainty, often with limited capacity to collect information. Adaptive management (AM) combines management and monitoring, with the aim of updating knowledge and improving decision-making over time. We provide a guide for managers who may realize the potential of AM, but are unsure where to start. The urgent need for iterative management decisions, the existence of uncertainty, and the opportunity for learning offered by often highly-controlled captive environments create favorable conditions for AM. However, experiments and monitoring may be complicated by small sample sizes, and the ability to control the system, including stochasticity and observability, may be limited toward the wild end of the spectrum. We illustrate the key steps to implementing AM in threatened species management using four case studies, including the management of captive programs for cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and whooping cranes (Grus americana), of a translocation protocol for Arizona cliffroses Purshia subintegra and of ongoing supplementary feeding of reintroduced hihi (Notiomystis cincta) populations. For each case study, we explain (1) how to clarify whether the decision can be improved by learning (i.e. it is iterative and complicated by uncertainty) and what the management objectives are; (2) how to articulate uncertainty via alternative, testable hypotheses such as competing models or parameter distributions; (3) how to formally define how additional information can be collected and incorporated in future management decisions.

  9. Facial bristle feather histology and morphology in New Zealand birds: implications for function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Susan J; Alley, Maurice R; Castro, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of structure in biology may help inform hypotheses about function. Little is known about the histological structure or the function of avian facial bristle feathers. Here we provide information on morphology and histology, with inferences for function, of bristles in five predominantly insectivorous birds from New Zealand. We chose species with differing ecologies, including: brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), morepork (Ninox novaezealandae), hihi (Notiomystis cincta), New Zealand robin (Petroica australis), and New Zealand fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa). Average bristle length corrected for body size was similar across species. Bristles occurred in distinct groups on different parts of the head and upper rictal bristles were generally longest. The lower rictal bristles of the fantail were the longest possessed by that species and were long compared to bristles of other species. Kiwi were the only species with forehead bristles, similar in length to the upper rictal bristles of other species, and the lower rictal bristles of fantails. Herbst corpuscles (vibration and pressure sensitive mechanoreceptors) were found in association with bristle follicles in all species. Nocturnal and hole-nesting birds had more heavily encapsulated corpuscles than diurnal open-nesting species. Our results suggest that avian facial bristles generally have a tactile function in both nocturnal and diurnal species, perhaps playing a role in prey handling, gathering information during flight, navigating in nest cavities and on the ground at night and possibly in prey-detection. These differing roles may help explain the observed differences in capsule thickness of the corpuscles. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Additions to the knowledge of the land snails of Sabah (Malaysia, Borneo), including 48 new species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Jaap J.; Liew, Thor-Seng; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present reviews of the Sabah (Malaysia, on the island of Borneo) species of the following problematical genera of land snails (Mollusca, Gastropoda): Acmella and Anaglyphula (Caenogastropoda: Assimineidae); Ditropopsis (Caenogastropoda: Cyclophoridae); Microcystina (Pulmonata: Ariophantidae); Philalanka and Thysanota (Pulmonata: Endodontidae); Kaliella, Rahula, (Pulmonata: Euconulidae); Trochomorpha and Geotrochus (Pulmonata: Trochomorphidae). Next to this, we describe new species in previously revised genera, such as Diplommatina (Diplommatinidae); Georissa (Hydrocenidae); as well as some new species of genera not revised previously, such as Japonia (Cyclophoridae); Durgella and Dyakia (Ariophantidae); Amphidromus, and Trachia (Camaenidae); Paralaoma (Punctidae); Curvella (Subulinidae). All descriptions are based on the morphology of the shells. We distinguish the following 48 new species: Acmella cyrtoglyphe, Acmella umbilicata, Acmella ovoidea, Acmella nana, Acmella subcancellata, Acmella striata, and Anaglyphula sauroderma (Assimineidae); Ditropopsis davisoni, Ditropopsis trachychilus, Ditropopsis constricta, Ditropopsis tyloacron, Ditropopsis cincta, and Japonia anceps (Cyclophoridae); Diplommatina bidentata and Diplommatina tylocheilos (Diplommatinidae); Georissa leucococca and Georissa nephrostoma (Hydrocenidae); Durgella densestriata, Dyakia chlorosoma, Microcystina microrhynchus, Microcystina callifera, Microcystina striatula, Microcystina planiuscula, and Microcystina physotrochus (Ariophantidae); Amphidromus psephos and Trachia serpentinitica (Camaenidae); Philalanka tambunanensis, Philalanka obscura, Philalanka anomphala, Philalanka rugulosa, and Philalanka malimgunung (Endodontidae); Kaliella eurytrochus, Kaliella sublaxa, Kaliella phacomorpha, Kaliella punctata, Kaliella microsoma, Rahula delopleura, (Euconulidae); Paralaoma angusta (Punctidae); Curvella hadrotes (Subulinidae); Trochomorpha trachus, Trochomorpha haptoderma, Trochomorpha

  11. Improving supplementary feeding in species conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, John G; Walker, Leila; Canessa, Stefano; Groombridge, Jim J

    2015-04-01

    Supplementary feeding is often a knee-jerk reaction to population declines, and its application is not critically evaluated, leading to polarized views among managers on its usefulness. Here, we advocate a more strategic approach to supplementary feeding so that the choice to use it is clearly justified over, or in combination with, other management actions and the predicted consequences are then critically assessed following implementation. We propose combining methods from a set of specialist disciplines that will allow critical evaluation of the need, benefit, and risks of food supplementation. Through the use of nutritional ecology, population ecology, and structured decision making, conservation managers can make better choices about what and how to feed by estimating consequences on population recovery across a range of possible actions. This structured approach also informs targeted monitoring and more clearly allows supplementary feeding to be integrated in recovery plans and reduces the risk of inefficient decisions. In New Zealand, managers of the endangered Hihi (Notiomystis cincta) often rely on supplementary feeding to support reintroduced populations. On Kapiti island the reintroduced Hihi population has responded well to food supplementation, but the logistics of providing an increasing demand recently outstretched management capacity. To decide whether and how the feeding regime should be revised, managers used a structured decision making approach informed by population responses to alternative feeding regimes. The decision was made to reduce the spatial distribution of feeders and invest saved time in increasing volume of food delivered into a smaller core area. The approach used allowed a transparent and defendable management decision in regard to supplementary feeding, reflecting the multiple objectives of managers and their priorities. © 2014 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of Society for

  12. Responses of Cerambycidae and Other Insects to Traps Baited With Ethanol, 2,3-Hexanediol, and 3,2-Hydroxyketone Lures in North-Central Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D R; Crowe, C M; Mayo, P D; Silk, P J; Sweeney, J D

    2015-10-01

    In north-central Georgia, 13 species of woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae) were attracted to multiple-funnel traps baited with ethanol and one of the following pheromones: (1) racemic 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one; (2) racemic 3-hydroxyoctan-2-one; and (3) syn-2,3-hexanediol. The following species were attracted to traps baited with ethanol and 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one: Anelaphus pumilus (Newman), Eburia quadrigeminata (Say), Euderces pini (Olivier), Knulliana cincta (Drury), Neoclytus mucronatus (F.), Neoclytus scutellaris (Olivier), and Xylotrechus colonus (F.). Clytus marginicollis Castelnau & Gory, and Anelaphus parallelus (Newman) were attracted to traps baited with ethanol and 3-hydroxyoctan-2-one, whereas traps baited with ethanol and syn-2,3-hexanediol were attractive to Anelaphus villosus (F.), A. parallelus, Neoclytus acuminatus (F.), Neoclytus jouteli jouteli Davis, and Megacyllene caryae (Gahan). Ethanol enhanced catches of seven cerambycid species in traps baited with syn-2,3-hexanediol and 3,2-hydroxyketones. Catches of bark and ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in ethanol-baited traps were largely unaffected by the addition of syn-2,3-hexanediol and 3,2-hydroxyketone lures, except for two species. The mean catches of Hypothenemus rotundicollis Wood & Bright and Dryoxylon onoharaensum (Murayama) in ethanol-baited traps increased and decreased, respectively, with the addition of racemic 3-hydroxyoctan-2-one. Traps baited with ethanol and syn-2,3-hexanediol were attractive to Xylobiops basilaris (Say) (Bostrichidae) and Chariessa pilosa (Forster) (Cleridae), whereas Temnoscheila virescens (F.) (Trogossitidae) were attracted to traps baited with ethanol and 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one. The assassin bug, Apiomerus crassipes (F.) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), was attracted to traps baited with ethanol and 3,2-hydroxyketones. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US

  13. Interactions between Ethanol, syn-2,3-Hexanediol, 3-Hydroxyhexan-2-one, and 3-Hydroxyoctan-2-one Lures on Trap Catches of Hardwood Longhorn Beetles in Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D R; Crowe, C M; Mayo, P D; Reid, L S; Silk, P J; Sweeney, J D

    2017-10-01

    The effectiveness of a four-component "super lure" consisting of ethanol (E) and the cerambycid pheromones syn-2,3-hexanediol (D6), racemic 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one (K6), and racemic 3-hydroxyoctan-2-one (K8) on trap catches of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) was determined in southeast United States with seven trapping experiments in 2011-2013. We captured 74 species of longhorn beetles in our three-year study. Ethanol significantly increased the mean catches of seven species and increased the number of cerambycid species detected. Traps with the "super lure" were effective for 8 of 13 species of Cerambycidae previously shown to be attracted to binary combinations of ethanol plus one of the three pheromones. However, the "super lure" was less effective for the remaining five species with catch reductions of 40-90% compared with combinations of ethanol and one or two of the pheromones. For example, K6 + K8 lures reduced catches of Anelaphus villosus (F.) in traps with E + D6 by 90%. Similarly, catches of Anelaphus pumilus (Newman) in traps with E + K6 + D6 were reduced by 50% with the addition of K8. Catches of Knulliana cincta (Drury) in traps with K6 + K8 lures were interrupted by D6, an effect negated by the addition of ethanol. Given the interruptive effects on trap catches of some species when lures are combined in a single trap, developing optimal lure blends to maximize detection efficacy will be a challenge for managers of detection programs for non-native invasive species of longhorn beetles. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Marine Mollusca of isotope stages of the last 2 million years in New Zealand. Part 3, Gastropoda (Vetigastropoda - Littorinimorpha)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beu, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    ?) Tongaporutuan-Opoitian; Eunaticina cincta (Hutton), holotype illustrated. (author). 427 refs., 22 figs.

  15. Nouvelle interpretation des echinodermes de Collado de Tosas (Gerona, Espagne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meléndez, B.

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available The revision of the echinoderms from Collado de Tosas, based on the original specimens and additional material, is undertaken. The study shows that the initial attribution to the genus Trochocystites belonging to the Homalozoa Cincta has been induced by the tectonic deformation and the presence of recristallization lamellae in the natural molds. New observations allow to conclude without ambiguity that these skeletal elements are isolated columnals with a broad lumen, of crinoids. The presence of Cambrian in the section, established exclusively on the initial determinations, cannot longer be maintained.Los fósiles de Equinodermos del Collado de Tosas fueron dados a conocer en 1911 por F. Azpeitia que los atribuyó a Trochocystites bohemicus Bar. Posteriormente, M. Faura (1912 hizo notar la presencia de fósiles ordovícicos en esta misma localidad, y propuso una interpretación estratigráfica que incluía un contacto anómalo con el supuesto Cámbrico determinado por los Trochocystites. Todo ello fue revisado por B. Meléndez en 1954, que creyó poder confirmar que los fósiles en cuestión (fig. 1, eran realmente Carpoideos. El estudio de nuevo material recogido in situ, así como de los ejemplares conservados en el Museo del Seminario Conciliar de Barcelona, nos ha llevado a la conclusión de que la atribución inicial de estos discutidos fósiles al género Trochocystites, fue debida a la deformación tectónica que les ha dado forma ovalada, y a la presencia de láminas de recristalización, en disposición radial, en los moldes (fig. 6, lám. 1, que dan la falsa apariencia de placas marginales. Las nuevas observaciones nos permiten afirmar que estos fósiles son placas columnales, aisladas, probablemente del pedúnculo de Crinoides, con cavidad central muy amplia (Iám. 1, figs. 15, aunque eventualmente, también podrían haber pertenecido a Cystideos. En consecuencia, la presencia del Cámbrico en esta localidad, basada únicamente en la

  16. Improving supplementary feeding in species conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, John G; Walker, Leila; Canessa, Stefano; Groombridge, Jim J

    2015-01-01

    Supplementary feeding is often a knee-jerk reaction to population declines, and its application is not critically evaluated, leading to polarized views among managers on its usefulness. Here, we advocate a more strategic approach to supplementary feeding so that the choice to use it is clearly justified over, or in combination with, other management actions and the predicted consequences are then critically assessed following implementation. We propose combining methods from a set of specialist disciplines that will allow critical evaluation of the need, benefit, and risks of food supplementation. Through the use of nutritional ecology, population ecology, and structured decision making, conservation managers can make better choices about what and how to feed by estimating consequences on population recovery across a range of possible actions. This structured approach also informs targeted monitoring and more clearly allows supplementary feeding to be integrated in recovery plans and reduces the risk of inefficient decisions. In New Zealand, managers of the endangered Hihi (Notiomystis cincta) often rely on supplementary feeding to support reintroduced populations. On Kapiti island the reintroduced Hihi population has responded well to food supplementation, but the logistics of providing an increasing demand recently outstretched management capacity. To decide whether and how the feeding regime should be revised, managers used a structured decision making approach informed by population responses to alternative feeding regimes. The decision was made to reduce the spatial distribution of feeders and invest saved time in increasing volume of food delivered into a smaller core area. The approach used allowed a transparent and defendable management decision in regard to supplementary feeding, reflecting the multiple objectives of managers and their priorities. Mejoría de la Alimentación Suplementaria en la Conservación de Especies Resumen La alimentaci

  17. North-Western Palaearctic species of Pristiphora (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Prous

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available North-Western Palaearctic species of Pristiphora Latreille, 1810 are revised. Altogether, 90 species are treated, two of which are described as new: P. caraganae Vikberg & Prous, sp. n. from Finland and P. dedeara Liston & Prous, sp. n. from Germany. Host plant of P. caraganae is Caragana arborescens Lam. Pristiphora dasiphorae (Zinovjev, 1993 (previously known from East Palaearctic and P. cadma Wong & Ross, 1960 (previously known from North America are recorded for the first time from Europe. Nematus nigricans Eversmann, 1847 [= Pristiphora nigricans (Eversmann, 1847, comb. n.], N. breviusculus Eversmann, 1847 [= Euura melanocephalus (Hartig, 1837], and N. caudalis Eversmann, 1847 [= E. caudalis (Eversmann, 1847, comb. n.] are removed from synonymy with P. pallidiventris (Fallén, 1808, N. paralellus Hartig, 1840 [= P. paralella (Hartig, 1840, comb. n.] is removed from synonymy with P. bufo (Brischke, 1883, and P. mesatlantica Lacourt, 1976 is removed from synonymy with P. insularis Rohwer, 1910. The following 29 new synonymies are proposed: P. nigropuncticeps Haris, 2002, syn. n. with P. albitibia (Costa, 1859; Lygaeonematus karvoneni Lindqvist, 1952, syn. n. with P. alpestris (Konow, 1903; P. (P. anivskiensis Haris, 2006, syn. n. with P. appendiculata (Hartig, 1837; Nematus canaliculatus Hartig, 1840, syn. n with P. carinata (Hartig, 1837; P. nigrogroenblomi Haris, 2002, syn. n. with P. cincta Newman, 1837; Tenthredo flavipes Zetterstedt, 1838, syn. n., Nematus congener W.F. Kirby, 1882, syn. n., and P. thomsoni Lindqvist, 1953, syn. n. with P. dochmocera (Thomson, 1871; P. atrata Lindqvist, 1975, syn. n. with P. friesei (Konow, 1904; P. gelida Wong, 1968, syn. n. with P. frigida (Boheman, 1865; Pachynematus nigricorpus Takagi, 1931, syn. n. with P. laricis (Hartig, 1837; Nematus (Pikonema piceae Zhelochovtsev in Zhelochovtsev and Zinovjev, 1988, syn. n. and P. (P. hoverlaensis Haris, 2001, syn. n. with P. leucopodia (Hartig, 1837; Mesoneura