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Sample records for spreading inoculation inoculation

  1. Inoculation effects on root-colonizing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities spread beyond directly inoculated plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Janoušková

    Full Text Available Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF may improve plant performance at disturbed sites, but inoculation may also suppress root colonization by native AMF and decrease the diversity of the root-colonizing AMF community. This has been shown for the roots of directly inoculated plants, but little is known about the stability of inoculation effects, and to which degree the inoculant and the inoculation-induced changes in AMF community composition spread into newly emerging seedlings that were not in direct contact with the introduced propagules. We addressed this topic in a greenhouse experiment based on the soil and native AMF community of a post-mining site. Plants were cultivated in compartmented pots with substrate containing the native AMF community, where AMF extraradical mycelium radiating from directly inoculated plants was allowed to inoculate neighboring plants. The abundances of the inoculated isolate and of native AMF taxa were monitored in the roots of the directly inoculated plants and the neighboring plants by quantitative real-time PCR. As expected, inoculation suppressed root colonization of the directly inoculated plants by other AMF taxa of the native AMF community and also by native genotypes of the same species as used for inoculation. In the neighboring plants, high abundance of the inoculant and the suppression of native AMF were maintained. Thus, we demonstrate that inoculation effects on native AMF propagate into plants that were not in direct contact with the introduced inoculum, and are therefore likely to persist at the site of inoculation.

  2. Inoculation effects on root-colonizing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities spread beyond directly inoculated plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušková, Martina; Krak, Karol; Vosátka, Miroslav; Püschel, David; Štorchová, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may improve plant performance at disturbed sites, but inoculation may also suppress root colonization by native AMF and decrease the diversity of the root-colonizing AMF community. This has been shown for the roots of directly inoculated plants, but little is known about the stability of inoculation effects, and to which degree the inoculant and the inoculation-induced changes in AMF community composition spread into newly emerging seedlings that were not in direct contact with the introduced propagules. We addressed this topic in a greenhouse experiment based on the soil and native AMF community of a post-mining site. Plants were cultivated in compartmented pots with substrate containing the native AMF community, where AMF extraradical mycelium radiating from directly inoculated plants was allowed to inoculate neighboring plants. The abundances of the inoculated isolate and of native AMF taxa were monitored in the roots of the directly inoculated plants and the neighboring plants by quantitative real-time PCR. As expected, inoculation suppressed root colonization of the directly inoculated plants by other AMF taxa of the native AMF community and also by native genotypes of the same species as used for inoculation. In the neighboring plants, high abundance of the inoculant and the suppression of native AMF were maintained. Thus, we demonstrate that inoculation effects on native AMF propagate into plants that were not in direct contact with the introduced inoculum, and are therefore likely to persist at the site of inoculation.

  3. Inoculating for smallpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jan

    2003-04-01

    In California, one hospital decided the time was right to inoculate staff volunteers with the smallpox vaccine. Weighing the same pros and cons--civic responsibility, health risk, cost and reluctance of staff--other hospitals opted out of inoculations, at least for now. What led these organizations to such divergent decisions?

  4. RHIZOBIUM CROSS-INOCULATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-01-13

    Jan 13, 1993 ... Six introduced and one native nitrogen fixing tree species were grown in a potted non-sterilized Inceptisol inoculated with: species-specific rhizobia strains; Rhizobium strain TAL 1145, a Leucaena isolate;. Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain TAL 169, and without inoculation. Twelve weeks later, significant.

  5. Automatic agar tray inoculation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Automatic agar tray inoculation device is simple in design and foolproof in operation. It employs either conventional inoculating loop or cotton swab for uniform inoculation of agar media, and it allows technician to carry on with other activities while tray is being inoculated.

  6. Biological Inoculants in Forage Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Peter Szucs

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available 3rd generation biological inoculants –containing lactic acid bacteria and enzymes – are prefered nowadays in order to coordinate the fermentation in such a way that they increase lactic acid production by leaps and bounds at the beginning of the fermentation and improve the quality and stability of silage during the fermentation and feeding. The quality of raw material (maturity of plant, chop lenght, spreading of inoculant uniformly and the proper filling, compacting, covering and wrapping have a great influence on the effectiveness of the inoculant. The mycotoxin content of malfermented silages is an undesirable risk factor. The authors established, that the Lactobacillus buchneri and enzymes containing inoculant protected better the carotene content of low, medium- and high wilteed lucerne haylages (P<0,05 compare to untreated ones Aerobic stability experiment by Honnig 1990 method was carried out with medium wilted (36 % DM lucerne haylage which was treatedtreated before ensilage with , the dosage of 105 CFU/g Pediococcus acidilactici, 1,5x105 CFU/g Lactobacillus buchneri and cellulase and hemicellulase enzimes (20 000 CMC /g remained stabyle, unspoiled after 9 days exposure to the air, while the untreated haylages spoiled after 2;4;or 7days on aerobic condition. The different Lactobacillus plantarum strains (50.000 CFU of Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 16568 + 50.000 CFU of Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 4784/ g FM of maize applied together were able to improve the aerobic stability of silomaize silage.

  7. [Design of SCM inoculation device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Mingli; Xie, Haiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The first step of bacilli culture is inoculation bacteria on culture medium. Designing a device to increase efficiency of inoculation is significative. The new device is controlled by SCM. The stepper motor can drive the culture medium rotating, accelerating, decelerating, overturn and suspending. The device is high practicability and efficient, let inoculation easy for operator.

  8. Inoculation Technique for Fungus Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Ramon M.

    1972-01-01

    A plastic straw and wood applicator stick serve as a simple, inexpensive, and disposable inoculation unit for fungal studies. The method gives a uniform and intact inoculum. The technique is especially useful because a large number of agar plates can be inoculated rapidly. Images PMID:5059618

  9. Inoculation in Political Campaign Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Michael; Burgoon, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Posits a strategy of resistance to the influence of attack messages in political campaigns. Finds that political campaign messages can be designed to inoculate supporters of candidates against subsequent attack messages of opposing candidates. (MS)

  10. Inoculation Effects of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solidification sequence of graphite eutectic cells of A and D types, as well as globular and cementite eutectics. The morphology of eutectic cells in cast iron, the equations for their growth and the distances between the graphite precipitations in A and D eutectic types were analyzed. It is observed a critical eutectic growth rate at which one type of eutectic transformed into another. A mathematical formula was derived that combined the maximum degree of undercooling, the cooling rate of cast iron, eutectic cell count and the eutectic growth rate. One type of eutectic structure turned smoothly into the other at a particular transition rate, transformation temperature and transformational eutectic cell count. Inoculation of cast iron increased the number of eutectic cells with flake graphite and the graphite nodule count in ductile iron, while reducing the undercooling. An increase in intensity of inoculation caused a smooth transition from a cementite eutectic structure to a mixture of cementite and D type eutectic structure, then to a mixture of D and A types of eutectics up to the presence of only the A type of eutectic structure. Moreover, the mechanism of inoculation of cast iron was studied.

  11. Inoculation of sugarcane with diazotrophic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivaldo Schultz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane industry, a strategic crop in Brazil, requires technological improvements in production efficiency to increase the crop energy balance. Among the various currently studied alternatives, inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria proved to be a technology with great potential. In this context, the efficiency of a mixture of bacterial inoculant was evaluated with regard to the agronomic performance and N nutrition of sugarcane. The experiment was carried out on an experimental field of Embrapa Agrobiologia, in Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro, using a randomized block, 2 × 3 factorial design (two varieties and three treatments with four replications, totaling 24 plots. The varieties RB867515 and RB72454 were tested in treatments consisting of: inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria, N-fertilized control with 120 kg ha-1 N and absolute control (no inoculation and no N fertilizer. The inoculum was composed of five strains of five diazotrophic species. The yield, dry matter accumulation, total N in the shoot dry matter and the contribution of N by biological fixation were evaluated, using the natural 15N abundance in non-inoculated sugarcane as reference. The bacterial inoculant increased the stalk yield of variety RB72454 similarly to fertilization with 120 kg ha-1 N in the harvests of plant-cane and first ratoon crops, however the contribution of biological N fixation was unchanged by inoculation, indicating that the benefits of the inoculant in sugarcane may have resulted from plant growth promotion.

  12. Comparison of artificial inoculation methods for studying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Establishment of disease by artificial inoculation is essential for studies of various aspects of plant pathology. Keeping this in mind, five inoculation methods were compared namely spraying, infiltration, wounding, spore suspension drop and spore suspension drop along with agarose method. The findings of the present ...

  13. Developing microbial inoculants for native Hawaiian trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim H. Wilkinson

    2002-01-01

    We use certain microbial inoculants in the nursery as a part of supporting the objectives of accelerating rehabilitation of degraded land and ecosystem function, as well as reducing costs in establishment and maintenance of forest plantings. Microbial inoculants re-create natural partnerships between plants and some of the beneficial microorganisms that support plants...

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Eric W [Middleton, WI; Kaeppler, Shawn M [Oregon, WI; Chelius, Marisa K [Greeley, CO

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  15. Inoculating Students against Using Smokeless Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Melody Powers; Riggs, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    This article describes a teaching technique based on a method intended to develop skills among junior and senior high school youth to resist pressure to use smokeless tobacco. This method is referred to as "inoculation" and "resistance training." (IAH)

  16. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  17. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  18. New inoculants on maize silage fermentation

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    Fábia Giovana do Val de Assis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bacterial inoculants at two inoculation rates on chemical and biological characteristics of maize silage. The treatments consisted of two inoculating rates (5 and 6 log cfu g-1 of forage for each strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB identified as Lactobacillus buchneri, L. hilgardii, or L. plantarum. The maize was ensiled in experimental PVC silos. Samples were taken for the determination of the contents of dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC, organic acids and alcohols, for the evaluation of the populations of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, filamentous fungi, and for the determination of pH values during ensilage and after 30 or 90 days of fermentation. The doses of inoculants did not promote significant differences on the evaluated characteristics. There was effect of inoculants on acetic acid, 1.2-propanediol, LAB population, filamentous fungi, and pH value. No significant influence of the treatments with inoculants was observed in the variables DM, WSC, CP, lactic acid concentrations, or ethanol. The maximum temperature, i.e., the time to achieve the maximum temperature (TMT and aerobic stability (AS, was not influencied by treatments. However, a decrease in maximum temperature, an increase in TMT, and improvement in the AS were observed after 90 days of fermentation. These results proved the advantage of microbial inoculation. The treatments influenced LAB populations and filamentous fungi, but no effect was observed on the yeast population. The best inoculation dose is 6 cfu g-1 of forage because it provides higher reduction of filamentous fungi in maize silage, thereby decreasing the aerobic deterioration by these microorganisms.

  19. Automatic surface inoculation of agar trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.; Boykin, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a machine and technique for the automatic inoculation of a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture, using either a conventional inoculation loop or a cotton swab. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. The described technique makes possible the visualization of the overall qualitative and, to some extent, quantitative relationships of various bacterial types in a sample tested.

  20. Artificial inoculation-perspectives in tailings phytostabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrisor, Ioana G; Dobrota, Smaranda; Komnitsas, Kostas; Lazar, Ioan; Kuperberg, J Michael; Serban, Mihai

    2004-01-01

    Intensive mining and processing activities worldwide resulted in the generation of huge amounts of waste (tailings), generally characterized as toxic, radioactive, and/or hazardous. The exposure potential and, hence, the risk posed by such wastes is enhanced by a general lack of vegetation. Phytostabilization has proven to be efficient in reducing this risk. However, establishing vegetation on tailing dumps may be expensive due to the intensive use of amendments and chemical fertilizers. In this article, investigations on artificial inoculation of mine tailings with bacterial strains as a means to improve the development of vegetative covers and reduce application cost by eliminating chemical fertilization are presented and discussed. The development of plants and microbial communities from tailings, as well as the impact of inoculation on metal uptake in plants, were studied. Experiments were carried out in greenhouse using two types of mine tailings (phosphogypsum and sulphidic tailings) from the Romanian Black Sea coast. Indigenous herbaceous plants were cultivated on tailings with the addition of chemical fertilizers versus bacterial inoculation. After a 6-month experimental period, excellent plant growth, which is associated with a rich microbial community, was observed in all inoculated treatments, in contrast with poor plant growth and microbiota from the chemical fertilization treatments alone. Additionally, artificial inoculation improved plant resistance to heavy metals by reducing the uptake of some toxic metals. Once a rich microbial community is established, inoculation may be discontinued. Based on these results, efficient and cost-effective phytostabilization schemes can be proposed.

  1. Legume bioactive compounds: influence of rhizobial inoculation

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    Luis R. Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Legumes consumption has been recognized as beneficial for human health, due to their content in proteins, fiber, minerals and vitamins, and their cultivation as beneficial for sustainable agriculture due to their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen in symbiosis with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. The inoculation with these baceria induces metabolic changes in the plant, from which the more studied to date are the increases in the nitrogen and protein contents, and has been exploited in agriculture to improve the crop yield of several legumes. Nevertheless, legumes also contain several bioactive compounds such as polysaccharides, bioactive peptides, isoflavones and other phenolic compounds, carotenoids, tocopherols and fatty acids, which makes them functional foods included into the nutraceutical products. Therefore, the study of the effect of the rhizobial inoculation in the legume bioactive compounds content is gaining interest in the last decade. Several works reported that the inoculation of different genera and species of rhizobia in several grain legumes, such as soybean, cowpea, chickpea, faba bean or peanut, produced increases in the antioxidant potential and in the content of some bioactive compounds, such as phenolics, flavonoids, organic acids, proteins and fatty acids. Therefore, the rhizobial inoculation is a good tool to enhance the yield and quality of legumes and further studies on this field will allow us to have plant probiotic bacteria that promote the plant growth of legumes improving their functionality.

  2. Persistence of Rhizobium Inoculants originating from Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TonukariJ

    Ten core soil samples were collected from experimental plots at IITA, SW Nigeria that were previously inoculated with Rhizobium ... pot experiment and plant reinfection experiment in the greenhouse. At 0–15 cm and ... agricultural practice and environmental pollution abatement for non-use of chemical nitrogen fertilizers.

  3. Persistence of Rhizobium inoculants originating from Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten core soil samples were collected from experimental plots at IITA, SW Nigeria that were previously inoculated with Rhizobium strains (IRC1045 and IRC 1050) specific for Leucaena leucocephala at two depths; 0—15 cm and 15—30 cm. The control soil samples were collected at similar depths from an adjacent field with ...

  4. Sequential inoculation versus co-inoculation in Cabernet Franc wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Pedro Miguel Izquierdo; Romero, Esteban García; Pérez-Martín, Fátima; Seseña, Susana; Palop, María Llanos

    2015-04-01

    A study has been carried out in order to determine the effect of the lactic acid bacteria inoculation time on the kinetic of vinification and on chemical and sensory characteristics of Cabernet Franc wines. Traditional vinifications, with lactic acid bacteria inoculated after completion of alcoholic fermentation were compared with vinifications where yeast and bacteria were co-inoculated at the beginning of vinification. One commercial yeast strain and an autochthonous Oenococcus oeni strain (C22L9), previously identified and selected at our laboratory, were used. Monitoring of alcoholic and malolactic fermentations was carried out by yeast and lactic acid bacteria counts and by measuring l-malic acid concentration. Wines were chemically characterized and analysed for volatile compounds content. A sensory analysis, consisting of a descriptive and a triangular test, was also carried out. Results from this study showed that the concurrent yeast/bacteria inoculation of musts at the beginning of vinification produced a reduction in duration of the process without an excessive increase in volatile acidity. Differences in volatile compounds content and the corresponding impact on the sensorial profile of wines were also displayed. These results suggest that co-inoculation is a worthwhile alternative for winemaking of Cabernet Franc wines, if compared with traditional post-alcoholic fermentation lactic acid bacteria inoculation. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Comparison of artificial inoculation methods for studying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    divya

    2013-05-01

    May 1, 2013 ... value of number of initial disease lesions in drop plus agarose method was highest in all of the time intervals ... V-8 agar (10% V-8 juice, 0.02% CaCO3 and 2% agar) at 24°C for three to .... pathogen inoculation methods (spraying, infiltration, wounding, drop plus agarose and drop) at different time intervals ...

  6. Inoculation Stress Hypothesis of Environmental Enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofton, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions. PMID:25449533

  7. The Effects of Stress Inoculation, Physical Relaxation and Skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the physical relaxation was more effective than the other treatment conditions in reducing psychophysiological symptoms, the stress inoculation was more effective in reducing the participants worry and emotionality reactions to evaluative situations. Keywords: Stress Inoculation; Physical Relaxation; Stress Management.

  8. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF BUSINESS IN AGARWOOD INOCULATION AT DIFFERENT STEM DIAMETERS AND INOCULATION PERIODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Suharti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia signifies as the biggest agarwood producer country in the world. Its demand and price tend to increase and have brought about over exploitation of agarwood. Consequently, its population in nature has decreased significantly. To overcome the situation, since 1995, agarwood has been included in the CITES Appendix II. However, illegal exploitation remains persistent and reaches an excessive level. In order to deal with it, agarwood cultivation and its artificial production have been undertaken at several provinces in Indonesia. Some supporting factors for agarwood cultivation and artificial production are the availability of potential land for extensive cultivation, appropriate agro climate condition, simple cultivation technique and already being well adopted by farmers, the availability of necessary pathogen for agarwood inoculation, and the increasing demand with relatively high price. The research aims to analyze the feasibility study of agarwood inoculation business at several stem diameters (15 - 25 cm; 26 -35 cm and 36 - 40 cm and periods of inoculation (1 - 5 years. Data were collected through field observation and literature study. The results showed that inoculation on agarwood producer tree stands at 12.5% interest rate afforded positive net present value (NPV,  internal rate of return (IRR is much higher than market interest and benefit cost (B/C ratio >2 for those three diameter classes. Furthermore, if agarwood harvesting is delayed until five years after inoculation, NPV,  IRR and B/C ratio would be much higher. It can be concluded that inoculation on agarwood producer tree stands (at appropriate age for inoculation is feasible to be developed.

  9. Effects of genotype x bradyrhizobium inoculation or x fertilizer n ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symbiotic fixation). A set of 52 random lines from a broad-based reference population was evaluated for 2 years with and without B.japonicum inoculation in a split-plot design. Inoculation increased ... Genotype x: Inoculation Interactions, Nitrogen fixation ..... genotype x N treatment interaction was non significant each year ...

  10. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall be...

  11. Comparative evaluation of commercial rhizobial inoculants of soybean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inoculation of soybean seeds with root-nodule bacteria results in a significant increase in nodulation and yield. Two commercial rhizobial inoculants available on the South African market were tested for their efficacy under standardised conditions in a short-term greenhouse experiment. The rhizobial inoculants used were: ...

  12. Comparison of bedside inoculation of culture media with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bedside inoculation of culture media with CSF may improve yields. Objective: To compare the culture yield of CSF inoculated onto culture medium at the bedside to that of CSF inoculated onto culture medium in the microbiology laboratory. Design: Cross-sectional comparative study. Setting: Accident and Emergency ...

  13. Effects of route of inoculation on Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in captive house finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhondt, Keila V; Dhondt, André A; Ley, David H

    2007-12-01

    The routes by which Mycoplasma gallisepticum initiates infection during outbreaks of conjunctivitis in house finches remain uncertain. As M. gallisepticum recovered from the cloaca of chickens remains viable for up to 3 days in chicken faeces, the possibility of spread via faecal contamination has been suggested. To test the hypothesis that food or water contaminated with M. gallisepticum may initiate infection, 20 house finches were experimentally inoculated by the oral or the conjunctival route. Clinical and immunological responses were compared. All inoculated birds seroconverted, thus demonstrating infection. Only two of the birds inoculated via the oral route developed very mild unilateral conjunctivitis while all 10 of those infected by eye-drop inoculation developed severe bilateral conjunctivitis. The orally inoculated birds had reduced levels of activity for only a few days, while those infected by conjunctival inoculation had reduced activity for several weeks. M. gallisepticum DNA was detected in conjunctival swabs by polymerase chain reaction in only three orally inoculated birds but in all birds in the conjunctivally inoculated group. Antibodies developed more slowly after oral inoculation than after conjunctival inoculation. We showed that oral exposure to M. gallisepticum can initiate infection, disease, and a serological response, which suggests that food or water contaminated with secretions or excretions may be a route of transmission between house finches.

  14. The inoculation method affects colonization and performance of bacterial inoculant strains in the phytoremediation of soil contaminated with diesel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Yousaf, Sohail; Reichenauer, Thomas G; Sessitsch, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Plants in combination with microorganisms can remediate soils, which are contaminated with organic pollutants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. Inoculation of plants with degrading bacteria is one approach to improve remediation processes, but is often not successful due to the competition with resident microorganisms. It is therefore of high importance to address the persistence and colonization behavior of inoculant strains. The objective of this study was to determine whether the inoculation method (seed imbibement and soil inoculation) influences bacterial colonization, plant growth promotion and hydrocarbon degradation. Italian ryegrass was grown in non-sterilized soil polluted with diesel and inoculated with different alkane-degrading strains Pantoea sp. ITSI10, Pantoea sp. BTRH79 and Pseudomonas sp. MixRI75 individually as well as in combination. Inoculation generally had a beneficial effect on plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation, however, strains inoculated in soil performed better than applied by seed imbibement. Performance correlated with the colonization efficiency of the inoculated strains. The highest hydrocarbon degradation was observed in the treatment, in which all three strains were inoculated in combination into soil. Our study revealed that besides the degradation potential and competitive ability of inoculant strains the inoculation method plays an important role in determining the success of microbial inoculation.

  15. Yeast interactions in inoculated wine fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio eCiani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process.

  16. Co-inoculation effects of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co-inoculation effects of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Azospirillum sp. on competitive nodulation and rhizosphere eubacterial community structures of soybean under rhizobia-established soil conditions.

  17. Effects of single and combined inoculations of selected Trichoderma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of single and combined inoculations of selected Trichoderma and Bacillus isolates on growth of dry bean and biological control of Rhizoctonia solani damping-off. ... Greenhouse trials showed that combined inoculations of T. atroviride strain 6 and B. subtilis B69 gave the highest growth promotion of bean in terms of ...

  18. Biolistic inoculation of cassava ( Manihot esculenta Crantz) with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report for the first time successful infection, induced by SACMV DNA A and B dimer, of cassava cultivar TMS60444 using biolistic inoculation. Typical mosaic symptoms started to show at 14 days post-inoculation (dpi) in infected cassava plants, and SACMV replication was confirmed using PCR. Potential applications of ...

  19. Potential woodpecker nest trees through artificial inoculation of heart rots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; James G. Dickson; J. Howard Williamson

    1983-01-01

    We suggest that the fungus Spongipellis pachyodon might be used to artificially create suitable hardwood nest trees for woodpeckers in both young and older trees and when supplies of potential nest trees are limited. Sizes of trees suitable for inoculation, inoculation heights, and densities of snags are suggested for six species of woodpeckers.

  20. Effect of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria inoculation on plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria inoculation on plant growth, productivity and economics of Basmati rice. ... Egyptian Journal of Biology ... Abstract. A field experiment was conducted in a wet season (Kharif) to study the effects of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria(PGPR) inoculation on agronomic traits and ...

  1. Effects of rhizobium inoculation, sulfur and phosphorus applications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... This study was carried out to determine the effects of sulfur and phosphorus application and rhizobium inoculation ... they were obtained from 80 kg ha-1 P with 879 kg ha-1 from 100 kg ha-1 S with 818 and from inoculation with 784 kg ... Fertilizer P was applied in bands 3 cm below rows sown to chick pea.

  2. Microbial inoculants for small scale composting of putrescible kitchen wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, J; Okamitsu, K

    2010-06-01

    This research looked at the need for ligno-cellulolytic inoculants (EM bacteria and Trichoderma sp.) in small to medium scale composting of household wastes. A mixture of household organic waste comprised of kitchen waste, paper, grass clippings and composted material was subjected to various durations of thermo composting followed by vermicomposting with and without microbial inoculants for a total of 28days. The results revealed that ligno-celluloytic inoculants are not essential to speed up the process of composting for onsite small scale household organic waste treatment as no significant difference was observed between the control and those inoculated with Trichoderma and EM in terms of C:N ratio of the final product. However, it was observed that EM inoculation enhanced reproductive rate of earthworms, and so probably created the best environment for vermicomposting, in all treatment groups. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mycorrhizal inoculation affects the phytochemical content in strawberry fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Cecatto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of the inoculation date of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the fruit quality and the content of phytochemicals in a strawberry soilless growing system. The experiment was performed in Huelva (Spain and was conducted in a greenhouse on the La Rábida Campus of Huelva University under natural light and temperature from October 2013 to June 2014. Three short-day strawberry cultivars (‘Splendor’, ‘Sabrina’ and ‘Fortuna’ were grown in polyethylene bags filled with coconut fibres. Randomized block design, with 3 repetitions and factorial arrangement (3 cultivars x 3 treatments, was established. Each replicate consisted of one bag with 12 plants supporting structures at 40 cm height. The treatments were: T1 = mycorrhizal inoculation in the transplantation; T2 = mycorrhizal inoculation 30 days after transplantation (DAT; and T0 = control treatment, without inoculation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation significantly affected the contents of anthocyanin and phenolics. When the inoculation is performed in the transplantation, the fruits showed a high content of anthocyanin and total phenolics. The mycorrhizal inoculation influences decreasing the acidity in fruit throughout the growing season and increase firmness only during the early stage of production.

  4. Inoculation message treatments for curbing noncommunicable disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alicia M; Miller, Claude H

    2013-07-01

    To study the effect of various types of inoculation message treatments on resistance to persuasive and potentially deceptive health- and nutrition-related (HNR) content claims of commercial food advertisers. A three-phase experiment was conducted among 145 students from a Midwestern U.S. university. Quantitative statistical analyses were used to interpret the results. RESULTS provide clear evidence that integrating regulatory focus/fit considerations enhances the treatment effectiveness of inoculation messages. Inoculation messages that employed a preventative, outcome focus with concrete language were most effective at countering HNR advertising claims. The findings indicate that inoculation fosters resistance equally across the most common types of commercially advertised HNR product claims (e.g., absolute, general, and structure/function claims). As the drive to refine the inoculation process model continues, further testing and application of this strategy in a public health context is needed to counter ongoing efforts by commercial food advertisers to avoid government regulations against deceptive practices such as dubious health/nutrition claims. This research advances inoculation theory by providing evidence that 1) good regulatory fit strengthens the effect of refutational preemption and 2) an inoculation approach is highly effective at fostering resistance to commercial advertisers' HNR content claims. This macro approach appears far superior to education or information-based promotional health campaigns targeted solely at specific populations demonstrating rising rates of noncommunicable disease.

  5. Growth and nutrients uptake in Euterpe edulis Martius inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

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    Sandro Lucio Silva Moreira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Euterpe edulis Martius is one of the endangered species of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest which presents low germination rate and slow seedling growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are known by their symbiosis with plants, promoting an increase of water and nutrientes uptake. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of AMF inoculation on the initial growth (6 months and nutrients uptake in E. edulis seedlings. Treatments consisted of the inoculation of pre-germinated seeds with AMF spores collected from three sites (forest, Juçara and crop, as well as a control with no inoculation. Seedlings growth, number of AMF spores in the substrate and uptake of the N, P, K, Ca and Mg macronutrients in plant tissues were analyzed. Inoculation with AMF improved the initial growth of seedlings, regardless of the source of inoculum used in the experiment, and the inoculation with material collected from rhizosphere increased the shoot and root dry biomass of seedlings by 43 % and 61 %, respectively. Inoculation with AMF provided a greater accumulation of all nutrients assessed in the shoot and root of seedlings, especially when spores were collected at the Juçara site. Inoculation with AMF is a promising strategy to improve the spread of this species.

  6. Effects of Rhizobuim leguminosarum inoculation on the growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    g per plant in 2008 and 2009 seasons, respectively. The findings suggested that inoculation of Mucuna flagellipies with Rhizobium is beneficial and produced high seed yield and could be use as biofertilizer an alternative to nitrogen fertilizer.

  7. Formation of ectomycorrhizae following inoculation of containerized Sitka spruce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.G. Shaw; R. Molina

    1980-01-01

    Containerized Sitka spruce, [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] were inoculated at sowing with pure cultures of either Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch, Laccaria laccata (Scop. ex Fr.) Berk. & Br., Astraeus pteridis (Shear) Feller, Amanita pantherina...

  8. Effect of bradyrhizobial inoculation and n fertilization on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of bradyrhizobial inoculation and n fertilization on promiscuous soybean and subsequent maize yield grown in degraded “terre de barre” in Benin. P Houngnandan, F Zapata, P Boekx, O Van Cleemput ...

  9. Inoculation of Ceratonia siliqua L. with native arbuscular mycorrhizal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inoculation of Ceratonia siliqua L. with native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi mixture improves seedling establishment under greenhouse conditions. Ouahmane Lahcen, Ndoye Ibrahima, Morino Abdessadek, Ferradous Abderrahim, Sfairi Youssef, Al Faddy Mohamed Najib, Abourouh Mohamed ...

  10. Plant Inoculation with the Fungal Leaf Pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruma, Kei; Saijo, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    After Colletotrichum storage methods in Chapter 23 , we describe here experimental methods for the inoculation of Colletotrichum higginsianum (C.h.) on Arabidopsis leaves. We put a particular focus on the methods for lesion measurements after the drop-inoculation of the leaves and on C.h. biomass measurements in the leaves by RT-qPCR analysis. As an option, we also briefly describe methods for counting C.h. entry ratio.

  11. Influenza virus respiratory infection and transmission following ocular inoculation in ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Belser

    Full Text Available While influenza viruses are a common respiratory pathogen, sporadic reports of conjunctivitis following human infection demonstrates the ability of this virus to cause disease outside of the respiratory tract. The ocular surface represents both a potential site of virus replication and a portal of entry for establishment of a respiratory infection. However, the properties which govern ocular tropism of influenza viruses, the mechanisms of virus spread from ocular to respiratory tissue, and the potential differences in respiratory disease initiated from different exposure routes are poorly understood. Here, we established a ferret model of ocular inoculation to explore the development of virus pathogenicity and transmissibility following influenza virus exposure by the ocular route. We found that multiple subtypes of human and avian influenza viruses mounted a productive virus infection in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets following ocular inoculation, and were additionally detected in ocular tissue during the acute phase of infection. H5N1 viruses maintained their ability for systemic spread and lethal infection following inoculation by the ocular route. Replication-independent deposition of virus inoculum from ocular to respiratory tissue was limited to the nares and upper trachea, unlike traditional intranasal inoculation which results in virus deposition in both upper and lower respiratory tract tissues. Despite high titers of replicating transmissible seasonal viruses in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets inoculated by the ocular route, virus transmissibility to naïve contacts by respiratory droplets was reduced following ocular inoculation. These data improve our understanding of the mechanisms of virus spread following ocular exposure and highlight differences in the establishment of respiratory disease and virus transmissibility following use of different inoculation volumes and routes.

  12. Genetic diversity of symbiotic Bradyrhizobium elkanii populations recovered from inoculated and non-inoculated Acacia mangium field trials in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrineau, M M; Le Roux, C; de Faria, S M; de Carvalho Balieiro, F; Galiana, A; Prin, Y; Béna, G

    2011-07-01

    Acacia mangium is a legume tree native to Australasia. Since the eighties, it has been introduced into many tropical countries, especially in a context of industrial plantations. Many field trials have been set up to test the effects of controlled inoculation with selected symbiotic bacteria versus natural colonization with indigenous strains. In the introduction areas, A. mangium trees spontaneously nodulate with local and often ineffective bacteria. When inoculated, the persistence of inoculants and possible genetic recombination with local strains remain to be explored. The aim of this study was to describe the genetic diversity of bacteria spontaneously nodulating A. mangium in Brazil and to evaluate the persistence of selected strains used as inoculants. Three different sites, several hundred kilometers apart, were studied, with inoculated and non-inoculated plots in two of them. Seventy-nine strains were isolated from nodules and sequenced on three housekeeping genes (glnII, dnaK and recA) and one symbiotic gene (nodA). All but one of the strains belonged to the Bradyrhizobium elkanii species. A single case of housekeeping gene transfer was detected among the 79 strains, suggesting an extremely low rate of recombination within B. elkanii, whereas the nodulation gene nodA was found to be frequently transferred. The fate of the inoculant strains varied depending on the site, with a complete disappearance in one case, and persistence in another. We compared our results with the sister species Bradyrhizobium japonicum, both in terms of population genetics and inoculant strain destiny. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Watering, fertilization, and slurry inoculation promote recovery of biological crust function in degraded soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Fernando T; Martín, Noelia; Díez, Beatriz; López-Poma, Rosario; Santos, Fernando; Luque, Ignacio; Cortina, Jordi

    2006-10-01

    Biological soil crusts are very sensitive to human-induced disturbances and are in a degraded state in many areas throughout their range. Given their importance in the functioning of arid and semiarid ecosystems, restoring these crusts may contribute to the recovery of ecosystem functionality in degraded areas. We conducted a factorial microcosm experiment to evaluate the effects of inoculation type (discrete fragments vs slurry), fertilization (control vs addition of composted sewage sludge), and watering frequency (two vs five times per week) on the cyanobacterial composition, nitrogen fixation, chlorophyll content, and net CO2 exchange rate of biological soil crusts inoculated on a semiarid degraded soil from SE Spain. Six months after the inoculation, the highest rates of nitrogen fixation and chlorophyll a content were found when the biological crusts were inoculated as slurry, composted sewage sludge was added, and the microcosms were watered five times per week. Net CO2 exchange rate increased when biological crusts were inoculated as slurry and the microcosms were watered five times per week. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and phylogenetic analyses indicated that most of the cyanobacterial species already present in the inoculated crust had the capability to spread and colonize the surface of the surrounding soil. These analyses showed that cyanobacterial communities were less diverse when the microcosms were watered five times per week, and that watering frequency (followed in importance by the addition of composted sewage sludge and inoculation type) was the treatment that most strongly influenced their composition. Our results suggest that the inoculation of biological soil crusts in the form of slurry combined with the addition of composted sewage sludge could be a suitable technique to accelerate the recovery of the composition and functioning of biological soil crusts in drylands.

  14. GERMINATION OF GRASSES DUE TO INOCULATION DIAZOTROPHIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. A. Moreira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The germination of forage grasses suffers from numbness and a natural tendency to low quality. The use of microorganisms inoculated in seeds with the purpose of increasing and meet the demand of some nutrient has been shown to be efficient, but the role of the microorganism in germination and rate of force is still unknown. Therefore the goal as study was to evaluate the germination rate of seeds of three cultivars of Brachiaria brizantha CV. Marandu, b., b. brizantha CV. Xaraés and b. humidícola cv Tupi and a cultivar of millet, P. hybrid cv Massai depending on the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense diazotrofic inoculation (nitrogen-fixing. Germination test was used in seed dispersal to assess the effect of first count (VPC in the treatments with and without inoculation. It was done also conducted further tests of electrical conductivity, weight of thousand seeds and water content. The delineation used was randomized entirely (DIC and the statistical analysis carried out through the analysis of variance and comparison of means using the Tukey test, the 5% probability. Massai grass seeds have the highest rate of force of first count in both treatments. Inoculation of bacterium Azospirillum brasilense did not affect the values of force of first count on seeds of the cultivars Marandu, Xaraés, Tupi and Massai. The seeds of the massai have higher germination speed relative the other cultivars evaluated when inoculated.

  15. Key factors to inoculate Botrytis cinerea in tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álefe Vitorino Borges

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies addressing the biological control of Botrytis cinerea have been unsuccessful because of fails in inoculating tomato plants with the pathogen. With the aim of establishing a methodology for inoculation into stems, experiments were designed to assess: i. the aggressiveness of pathogen isolates; ii. the age at which tomato plants should be inoculated; iii. the susceptibility of tissues at different stem heights; iv. the need for a moist chamber after inoculation; and v. the effectiveness of gelatin regarding inoculum adhesion. Infection with an isolate from tomato plants that was previously inoculated into petioles and then re-isolated was successful. An isolate from strawberry plants was also aggressive, although less than that from tomato plants. Tomato plants close to flowering, at 65 days after sowing, and younger, middle and apical stem portions were more susceptible. There was positive correlation between lesion length and sporulation and between lesion length and broken stems. Lesion length and the percentage of sporulation sites were reduced by using a moist chamber and were not affected by adding gelatin to the inoculum suspension. This methodology has been adopted in studies of B. cinerea in tomato plants showing reproducible results. The obtained results may assist researchers who study the gray mold.

  16. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocheli de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPlant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria.

  17. Sunflower growth according to seed inoculation with endophytic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Fernandes dos Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The sunflower crop has a great importance worldwide, due to the oil of excellent quality extracted from its seeds and in natura grains that are consumed in various ways. However, drought is one of the main environmental factors that limit its yield. An experiment was carried out under controlled greenhouse conditions, in a completely randomized experimental design, in order to determine the effect of endophytic bacteria inoculation (Bacillus sp. and Enterobacter cloacae on the growth and contents of nutrients and organic solutes, in sunflower leaves and roots under water deficit. Plant height, stem diameter, fresh and dry biomass of shoot and roots, as well as contents of N, P, K, soluble carbohydrates, free proline, free amino acids and soluble proteins, were determined at 35 days after the plant emergence. The water deficit reduced plant growth regardless inoculation. However, under optimum conditions of soil moisture, the combination of both endophytic bacteria increased the sunflower growth. The water deficit also increased the N and K contents in leaves, as well as the organic solutes content in shoots, especially in inoculated plants. These results suggest that the inoculation of endophytic bacteria may increase the capacity of drought stressed plants to perform the osmotic adjustment through a higher accumulation of organic solutes, when compared to plants not inoculated.

  18. Inoculation of soil native cyanobacteria to restore arid degraded soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raúl Román Fernández, José; Roncero Ramos, Beatriz; Chamizo de la Piedra, Sonia; Rodríguez Caballero, Emilio; Ángeles Muñoz Martín, M.; Mateo, Pilar; Cantón Castilla, Yolanda

    2017-04-01

    Restoration projects in semiarid lands often yield poor results. Water scarcity, low soil fertility, and poor soil structure strongly limit the survival and growth of planted seedlings in these areas. Under these conditions, a previous stage that improves edaphic conditions would turn out to a successful plant restoration. By successfully colonizing arid soils, cyanobacteria naturally provide suitable edaphic conditions, enhancing water availability, soil fertility and soil stability. Furthermore, cyanobacteria can be easily isolated and cultured ex-situ to produce high quantities of biomass, representing a potential tool to restore large areas efficiently. The objective of this study was to test the effect of inoculated cyanobacteria on degraded soils at three different semiarid areas from southeast Spain: Tabernas badlands, a limestone quarry located in Gádor, and grazed grassland in Las Amoladeras (Cabo de Gata). Soil native cyanobacteria belonging to three representative N-fixing genera (Nostoc, Scytonema and Tolypothrix) were isolated from such soils and cultured in BG110 medium. Each strain was inoculated (6 g m-2), separately and mixed (all in the same proportion), on Petri dishes with 80 g of each soil. Biocrust development was monitored during 3 months in these soils under laboratory conditions, at a constant temperature of 25oC. During the experiment, two irrigation treatments were applied simulating a dry (180 mm) and a wet (360 mm) rainfall year (average recorded in the study sites). After 3 months, net CO2 flux, spectral response and soil surface microtopography (1 mm spatial resolution) of inoculated and control soils was measured under wet conditions, all of them as a surrogate of biocrust development. Samples of the surface crust were collected in order to determine total soil organic carbon (SOC) content. The inoculated soils showed positive values of net CO2 flux, thus indicating a net CO2 uptake, whereas control soils showed CO2 fluxes closed to

  19. Inoculation method could impact the outcome of microbiological experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Alhede, Maria; Rybtke, Morten

    2018-01-01

    characteristics with biofilms such as increased antibiotic tolerance. We have investigated how aggregates develop and what influences this development in LBC of Pseudomonas aeruginosa We focused on how the method of inoculation impacted aggregation by assessing aggregate frequency and size using confocal laser...... of biofilm aggregates in a LBC, with inoculation directly from a plate resulting in the most numerous and largest aggregates. These large aggregates had an overall impact on the cultures' subsequent tolerance towards tobramycin indicating that the inoculation method has a profound impact on antibiotic...... tolerance. We also observed a mechanism where pre-formed aggregates recruited single cells from the surrounding culture in a "snowball effect", building up aggregated biomass in the culture. This recruitment was found to rely heavily on the exopolysaccharide Psl. Additionally, we found that both Escherichia...

  20. Inducing Resistance to Conspiracy Theory Propaganda: Testing Inoculation and Metainoculation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, John A.; Miller, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the boundaries of inoculation theory by examining how inoculation can be applied to conspiracy theory propaganda as well as inoculation itself (called metainoculation). A 3-phase experiment with 312 participants compared 3 main groups: no-treatment control, inoculation, and metainoculation. Research questions explored…

  1. Experimental inoculation of equine coronavirus into Japanese draft horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Manabu; Oue, Yasuhiro; Morita, Yoshinori; Kanno, Toru; Kinoshita, Yuta; Niwa, Hidekazu; Ueno, Takanori; Katayama, Yoshinari; Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Recently, outbreaks associated with equine coronavirus (ECoV) have occurred in Japan and the United States. While ECoV is likely to be pathogenic to horses, it has not been shown that experimental inoculation of horses with ECoV produces clinical signs of disease. In this study, we inoculated three Japanese draft horses with an ECoV-positive diarrheic fecal sample to confirm infection after inoculation and to investigate the clinical course and virus shedding patterns of ECoV. Virus neutralization tests showed that all three horses became infected with ECoV. Two of the three horses developed clinical signs similar to those observed during ECoV outbreaks, including fever, anorexia, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. All horses excreted a large amount of virus into their feces for more than 9 days after inoculation regardless of the presence or absence of clinical signs, which suggests that feces are an important source of ECoV infection. ECoV was also detected in nasal swabs from all horses, suggesting that respiratory transmission of ECoV may occur. Both symptomatic horses developed viremia, while the asymptomatic horse did not. White blood cell counts and serum amyloid A concentrations changed relative to the clinical condition of the inoculated horses; these may be useful markers for monitoring the clinical status of horses infected with ECoV. This is the first report of induction of clinical signs of ECoV infection in horses by experimental inoculation. These clinical and virological findings should aid further investigation of the pathogenesis of ECoV.

  2. Effects of co-inoculation and sequential inoculation of Tetragenococcus halophilus and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii on soy sauce fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanthi, Putu Virgina Partha; Linforth, Robert; Onyeaka, Helen; Gkatzionis, Konstantinos

    2018-02-01

    The use of Tetragenococcus halophilus and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii as starter cultures is essential for desirable volatiles production during moromi stage of soy sauce fermentation. In this study, the effect of simultaneous and sequential inoculation of cultures in moromi fermentation models, with respect to viability, physicochemical changes, and volatiles formation (using SPME-GC/MS) was investigated. Interestingly, an antagonism was observed as T. halophilus only proliferated (3 log increase) in the presence of Z. rouxii, while Z. rouxii growth was suppressed by 4 log in concurrence with pH increase to 7.31. Final content of reducing sugars, ethanol, acetic acid, and amino nitrogen did not differ significantly (p<0.05) between co-inoculation and sequential inoculation. However, Z. rouxii promoted alcohols formation and produced a more complex aroma profile under suppression. According to Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the inoculation sequence (co-inoculation and sequential) has impacts on volatile compound profiles during moromi fermentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High Infection Rates for Adult Macaques after Intravaginal or Intrarectal Inoculation with Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalca, Aysegul; Rossi, Franco D.; Miller, Lynn J.; Wiley, Michael R.; Perez-Sautu, Unai; Washington, Samuel C.; Norris, Sarah L.; Wollen-Roberts, Suzanne E.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Kimmel, Adrienne E.; Bloomfield, Holly A.; Valdez, Stephanie M.; Sprague, Thomas R.; Principe, Lucia M.; Bellanca, Stephanie A.; Cinkovich, Stephanie S.; Lugo-Roman, Luis; Cazares, Lisa H.; Pratt, William D.; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Bavari, Sina; Pitt, M. Louise; Nasar, Farooq

    2017-01-01

    Unprotected sexual intercourse between persons residing in or traveling from regions with Zika virus transmission is a risk factor for infection. To model risk for infection after sexual intercourse, we inoculated rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with Zika virus by intravaginal or intrarectal routes. In macaques inoculated intravaginally, we detected viremia and virus RNA in 50% of macaques, followed by seroconversion. In macaques inoculated intrarectally, we detected viremia, virus RNA, or both, in 100% of both species, followed by seroconversion. The magnitude and duration of infectious virus in the blood of macaques suggest humans infected with Zika virus through sexual transmission will likely generate viremias sufficient to infect competent mosquito vectors. Our results indicate that transmission of Zika virus by sexual intercourse might serve as a virus maintenance mechanism in the absence of mosquito-to-human transmission and could increase the probability of establishment and spread of Zika virus in regions where this virus is not present. PMID:28548637

  4. Erythema at BCG Inoculation Site in Kawasaki Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Shahmohammadi, Soheila

    2014-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limiting childhood systemic vasculitis with unknown etiology. Because there is no diagnostic test for Kawasaki disease, the diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. An important clinical sign that is not included in the classical clinical criteria for Kawasaki disease is a reaction at the Bacille Calmette-Guérin inoculation site that are present in about 30-50% of Kawasaki disease patients. of this review was to highlight the usefulness of the inflammation at the Bacille Calmette-Guérin inoculation site for early diagnosis of Kawasaki disease, we conducted a literature review on Medline in PubMed area, Google scholar, Magiran and Scientific Information Database using the search terms "Kawasaki disease, Erythema, BCG, inoculation site, children, cardiac complications, coronary artery lesion, aneurysm, incomplete Kawasaki in 2013. A total of 15 articles had been found. Erythema at the Bacille Calmette-Guérin inoculation site was found in 49.87% of Kawasaki disease patients. Coronary artery abnormalities were found in 10.3% of cases. According to this review, BCGitis is more prevalent than cervical lymphadenopathy and rash and it can be a useful criterion in the diagnosis of incomplete Kawasaki disease in cases not fulfills the classic criteria of at least four of the five findings.

  5. New Inoculants Containing Lactic Bacteria Applied in Forage Ensiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor Vintila

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In a first study, the capacity of lactic bacteria to accumulate biomass in different culture media and temperatures was tested and the biosynthesis parameters were established. In the second study, the strains producing the highest quantity of biomass and determining the most rapid pH drop in culture medium were conditioned in solid supports. The obtained solid products containing lactic bacteria were used to inoculate different types of forages. Ensilage was carried out in laboratory silos made from O2-impermeable plastic flasks, vacuumed using a vacuum pump. The experiment was 2 x 2 factorial with two types of forage (alfalfa and sorghum, each of them inoculated and not inoculated with lactic bacteria. The evolution of lactic bacteria, pH value, and the concentration in volatile acids was verified. In the third experiment, lactic bacteria were used to inoculate silages in farm conditions. The obtained results recommend the tested strain for the improvement of preserving conditions and nutritive value in ensiled forages.

  6. Inoculation of peritoneal dialysate fluid into blood culture bottles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty conventional cultures (54%) were positive compared with 33 (89%) done according to the Bactec system (P < 0,002). In only 1 case did the former technique prove superior. Direct inoculation of peritoneal fluid into Bactec blood culture bottles is therefore superior to conventional methods and has obvious therapeutic ...

  7. Effect of tillage, rhizobium inoculation in maize-soybean based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiment was conducted at Research Farm of Institute for Agricultural Research, Ahmadu Bello University, Samaru, Nigeria, to investigate the effect of tillage, rhizobium inoculation in maize-soybeanbased cropping systems and nitrogen fertilizer application on chemical fertility status of a savanna Alfisol. The study ...

  8. Inoculation of Ceratonia siliqua L. with native arbuscular mycorrhizal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ouhmane

    In Morocco, the production of carob was estimated only to 8% of the world production. This production considered .... mycorrhizal maize roots were used for the control treatment. Mycorrhizal inoculation of C. siliqua seedlings and plant .... Hence the selection of efficient AM fungi is a key factor to ensure the success of soil.

  9. Effects of bacterial inoculants and an enzyme on the fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jannes

    where 500 g of sample from each jar was loosely packed in an open plastic jar that was covered with two layers of .... (2009), who reported a lack of effect on pH with bacterial inoculation to sweet sorghum straw at ... in sweet sorghum straws, which can easily produce a rapid drop in silage pH without the use of additives.

  10. Inoculation effects of two South African cyanobacteria strains on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two South African cyanobacteria strains (coded 3g and 7e) of the genus Nostoc were evaluated for improvement of the aggregate stability of a silty loam soil with low organic C content and compared with Nostoc strain 9v isolated from a Tanzanian soil. The soil was either cropped with maize or non-cropped and inoculated ...

  11. Inoculation, colonization and distribution of fungal endophytes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    inoculated in tissue culture banana plants, must occur at high frequencies in the plant and be able to persist in the plant ..... New Zealand. Journal of Agricultural Research, 27, 271-277. Caroll, F. E., Muller, E. and Sutton, B. C. 1977. Preliminary studies on the incidence of needle endophytes in some. European conifers.

  12. Rhizosphere dynamics of inoculated cyanobacteria and their growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are the predominant flora in waterlogged paddy fields which contribute significantly towards nitrogen budgeting in these ecosystems. Their establishment and role in plant growth promotion and soil microbial activity is poorly known. Under greenhouse conditions, pots were inoculated with one ...

  13. Polymers selection for a liquid inoculant of Azospirillum brasilense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sandra Lucia Cortes Patiño

    2015-08-19

    Aug 19, 2015 ... Sci. Asia 33(1):69-77. Velineni S, Brahmaprakash GP (2011). Survival and phosphate solubilizing ability of Bacillus megaterium in liquid inoculants under high temperature and desiccation stress. J. Agric. Sci. Technol. 13(5):795-802. Vessey JK (2003) Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria as biofertilizers.

  14. Effects of rhizobia and plant growth promoting bacteria inoculation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to observe the effect of PGPR and Rhizobial inoculation on seed germination, seedling emergence, growth and development of lowland rice variety MR219. The experiment was conducted under laboratory condition using filter paper in Petri dish. The design of the experiment was ...

  15. Inoculating against Pro-Plagiarism Justifications: Rational and Affective Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Josh; Pfau, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Student plagiarism continues to threaten academic integrity. This investigation assessed whether an inoculation message strategy could combat university plagiarism by protecting student attitudes against pro-plagiarism justification arguments. Additionally, we sought theoretical confirmation of previous findings on involvement and accessibility in…

  16. Polymers selection for a liquid inoculant of Azospirillum brasilense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we used a method of accelerated degradation to select a polymer and a concentration to maintain cell stability of a liquid inoculant based on the strain C16 Azospirillum brasilense. A screening at 45°C was made to compare the protectant effect of five polymers on the viability of the strain (p/v): carrageenan ...

  17. Response of Common Bean to Rhizobium Inoculation and Fertilizers.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Agronomy Journal. 84:1020-1028. Gobara, L.A.M,. A.A. Mahdi,. A.M. El-Til'ib and M.H.M. Abdel. (1993). Response of llaricot bean to inoculation, nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization in Sudan. East African. Agricultural and Forestry Journal.

  18. Effects of bacterial inoculants and an enzyme on the fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The jars were opened on days 3, 7 and 15 to determine pH, while those of day 25 were sampled to determine nutrient composition, fermentation characteristics and aerobic stability. Inoculation reduced pH, butyric acid and ammonia-N and increased lactic acid content in sweet sorghum silage compared with the control.

  19. Protection against a malaria challenge by sporozoite inoculation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roestenberg, M.; McCall, M.B.B.; Hopman, J.C.W.; Wiersma, J.; Luty, A.J.F.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Vegte-Bolmer, M.G. van de; Schaijk, B.C.L. van; Teelen, K.A.E.M.; Arens, T.; Spaarman, L.; Mast, Q. de; Roeffen, W.F.G.; Snounou, G.; Renia, L.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Hermsen, C.C.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An effective vaccine for malaria is urgently needed. Naturally acquired immunity to malaria develops slowly, and induction of protection in humans can be achieved artificially by the inoculation of radiation-attenuated sporozoites by means of more than 1000 infective mosquito bites.

  20. The effects of psychological inoculation on cognitive barriers against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Past studies have shown that in attempts to prevent HIV, health education yields little change in condom use. The reason may be that education fails to target barriers for changing behaviour. The present controlled pilot study tested whether psychological inoculation (PI) reduces such barriers for using male condoms.

  1. Effect of earthworm inoculation on the bioremediation of used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in the without-earthworm but manually tilled and the without-earthworm and untilled samples where compared with samples inoculated with earthworm for bioremediation, both samples without worms recorded higher bioremediation rates. Keywords: Concentration, Time, Total petroleum hydrocarbon, vermicomposting, ...

  2. smallholder farmers' use and profitability of legume inoculants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Logit and tobit regression models were used to assess drivers of the inoculants use and gross margin analysis to examine profitability. The area under the crop, distance to local markets, knowledge of legume root nodules, education level, contacts with organisations promoting biological N fixation (BNF) technologies, group ...

  3. Growth Response of Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.)Walp to Inoculation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to assess the variation in performance of four arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus clarum, Glomus etunicatum, Glomus intraradices, and Gigaspora rosea) with and without Rhizobium inoculation in promoting growth and nutrient (N and P) uptake in Gliricidia sepium. Gliricidia seedlings were ...

  4. Effects of bacterial inoculation on the fermentation characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of bacterial inoculation on the fermentation and aerobic stability of two ensiled whole plant soybean (WPSB) cultivars was determined in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Two WPSB cultivars, Link LF6466 and Pannar 522 RR, were harvested at their R6 growth stage, chopped to 25 mm and ensiled in 1.5 L anaerobic jars.

  5. Immune responses of pigs inoculated with a recombinant fowlpox ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... 1Departmet of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao,Shandong 266109, PR China. 2Military ... Mongolia)/FMDV (O/NY00) and neutralizing antibody, PK15 cells (BHK21) inoculated with recombinant ... Key words: PCV2, rFPV, FMDV, immune response, prime-boost.

  6. The effect of bacterial inoculation and different nitrogen doses on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-05

    Jan 5, 2009 ... chickpea ICARDA, aleppo, Syria, p. 127-158. Togay N, Togay Y, Cimrin KM, Turan M (2008). Effects of rhizobium inoculation, sulfur and phosphorus applications on yield, yield components and nutrient uptakes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) Afr. J. Biotechnol. 7(6): 776-782. Vadavia AT, Kalaria KK, Patel ...

  7. Effect of salinity and inoculation with Azosprillium on carbohydrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The measured parameters were chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthesis (Ps) rates, carbohydrates, nitrate, ammonium and protein content, nitrogenase activity, yield and yield components. The results showed that salinity decreased plant height and grain yield (GY) in all levels. GY reduction in the inoculated treatment was ...

  8. Response of chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L.) to inoculation with native ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of pot and two consecutive crop-year field experiments were conducted from 2011 to 2012 in Southern Ethiopia to determine the effectiveness of Mesorhizobium strains on two cultivars of chickpea (Shasho and Nattoli). The eight treatments included: Six rhizobial inoculants, the four best indigenous strains (Cp8, ...

  9. Production of cell wall enzymes in pepper seedlings, inoculated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pepper seedlings inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal AM fungus, Glomus etunicatum, produced cellulase, polygal-acturonase and pectin methylestrase enzymes. The activities of the enzymes increased as the pepper seedlings matured in age, showing that the activity of the enzymes in the seedlings was age mediated.

  10. Effect of Trichoderma spp. inoculation on the chemical composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To evaluate the cultural ability of some Trichoderma isolates on wheat straw and the influence of their exogenous enzyme activities on chemical compositions as well as in vitro digestibility and upgrading of the nutritive value of lignocellulolytic materials, sterilized and non sterilized wheat straw were inoculated with ...

  11. smallholder farmers' use and profitability of legume inoculants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Research on the use of Rhizobia inoculants has been conducted in Africa since 1950s. However, the technology has not been widely applied by farmers on the continent. In Kenya, wide-scale adoption of this innovation among the smallholder farmers is still low. The aim of this study was to examine factors that drive the use ...

  12. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation on growth, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation on growth, and nutrient uptake of the two grass species, Leptochloa fusca (L.) Stapf and Sporobolus robustus ... MD and shoot mineral contents (especially P) varied with AMF host plants. ... Key words: Grass species, symbiosis, mycorrhizal dependency, mineral nutrition.

  13. Effects of bacterial inoculation on the fermentation characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNkosi

    2016-05-11

    May 11, 2016 ... The chopped forages were treated with or without the bacterial inoculant Lalsil Dry (LD) and treatments were as .... addition, samples collected on days 0 and 90 were used to determine nutritive values and fermentation ... concentration was determined using heat stable α-amylase (Sigma-Aldrich Co. LTD.

  14. Inoculation ofperitoneal dialysate fluid into blood culture bottles im ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract The aiIn of the study was to detennine if direct inoculation of peritoneal fluid into Bactec blood culture bottles would improve the positive bacteriological yield compared with conventional techniques in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients with peritonitis. All patients presenting with suspected ...

  15. Inoculation method could impact the outcome of microbiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Alhede, Maria; Rybtke, Morten; Stavnsberg, Camilla; Jensen, Peter Ø; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Whiteley, Marvin; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2017-12-21

    For the last 150 years, bacteria have primarily been investigated in liquid bacth cultures (LBC). Contrary to most expectations, these cultures are not a homogeneous mixture of single-celled bacteria as free-floating bacterial aggregates eventually develop in most LBC. These aggregates share characteristics with biofilms such as increased antibiotic tolerance. We have investigated how aggregates develop and what influences this development in LBC of Pseudomonas aeruginosa We focused on how the method of inoculation impacted aggregation by assessing aggregate frequency and size using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Four traditional methods of initiating an overnight bacterial culture were investigated comprising inoculation directly from frozen culture, using agar grown cells, or using cells grown in liquid. We discovered a direct link between the inoculation method and the size and frequency of biofilm aggregates in a LBC, with inoculation directly from a plate resulting in the most numerous and largest aggregates. These large aggregates had an overall impact on the cultures' subsequent tolerance towards tobramycin indicating that the inoculation method has a profound impact on antibiotic tolerance. We also observed a mechanism where pre-formed aggregates recruited single cells from the surrounding culture in a "snowball effect", building up aggregated biomass in the culture. This recruitment was found to rely heavily on the exopolysaccharide Psl. Additionally, we found that both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus also produce aggregates in LBC. Our results stress the importance of inoculation consistency throughout experiments and the substantial impact aggregate development in LBC has on the output of microbiological experiments.IMPORTANCE Liquid pure cultures are fundamental to the field of microbiological research. These cultures are normally thought of as a homogeneous mix of single cell bacteria. The present study shows how this is not always true

  16. Cast Iron Inoculation Enhanced by Supplementary Oxy-sulfides Forming Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riposan, Iulian; Stan, Stelian; Uta, Valentin; Stefan, Ion

    2017-09-01

    Inoculation is one of the most important metallurgical treatments applied to the molten cast iron immediately prior to casting, to promote solidification without excessive eutectic undercooling, which favors carbides formation usually with undesirable graphite morphologies. The paper focused on the separate addition of an inoculant enhancer alloy [S, O, oxy-sulfides forming elements] with a conventional Ca-FeSi alloy, in the production of gray and ductile cast irons. Carbides formation tendency decreased with improved graphite characteristics as an effect of the [Ca-FeSi + Enhancer] inoculation combination, when compared to other Ca/Ca, Ba/Ca, RE-FeSi alloy treatments. Adding an inoculant enhancer greatly enhances inoculation, lowers inoculant consumption up to 50% or more and avoids the need to use more costly inoculants, such as a rare earth bearing alloy. The Inoculation Specific Factor [ISF] was developed as a means to more realistically measure inoculant treatment efficiency. It compares the ratio between the improved characteristic level and total inoculant consumption for this effect. Addition of any of the commercial inoculants plus the inoculant enhancer offered outstanding inoculation power [increased ISF] even at higher solidification cooling rates, even though the total enhancer addition was at a small fraction of the amount of commercial inoculant used.

  17. Challenges of formulation and quality of biofertilizers for successful inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Laetitia; Lesueur, Didier

    2013-10-01

    The interest in biofertilizers is increasing and so is the potential for their use in sustainable agriculture. However, many of the products that are currently available worldwide are often of very poor quality, resulting in the loss of confidence from farmers. The formulation of an inoculant is a crucial multistep process that should result in one or several strains of microorganisms included in a suitable carrier, providing a safe environment to protect them from the often harsh conditions during storage and ensuring survival and establishment after introduction into soils. One of the key issues in formulation development and production is the quality control of the products, at each stage of the process. This review presents the different components and the major steps involved in the formulation of good quality biofertilizers, including the techniques used to assess the quality of the products following production. The quality of currently available inoculants is also reviewed, emphasizing the need for better quality control systems worldwide.

  18. Effects of culture concentration and inoculation temperature on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of culture concentration and inoculation temperature on physicochemical, microbial and organoleptic properties of yoghurt. ... The result also showed a significant (P<0.001) difference in titratable acidity of the yoghurts (ranging from 1.31% to 2.52%), pH (4.49 to 5.38) and total solids (12.4% to 17.1%). Total protein ...

  19. The effects of wilting, molasses and inoculants on the fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective was to determine the effects of wilting, molasses and inoculants on the biochemistry and in vitro and in situ digestion of lucerne silage. Lucerne containing 200 g/kg of dry matter (DM) was ensiled as fresh or wilted (370 g/kg DM). Molasses, at application rates of 0, 50 and 100 g molasses/kg DM, was added to ...

  20. More on Inoculating Against Reactance to Persuasive Health Messages: The Paradox of Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Adam S; Banas, John A; Magid, Yoav

    2017-07-01

    This research examined the efficacy of inoculation as a strategy to mitigate psychological reactance based on the level of threat communicated in the forewarning and subsequent persuasive health appeal. Two 2 (inoculation) × 2 (freedom-threatening language) experiments were conducted. The first (N = 181) used elaborated inoculation designed to enhance the threat of impending reactance to a message advocating for responsible alcohol consumption. The second (N = 159) used limited inoculation designed to minimize the threat of impending reactance to a message advocating for responsible soft drink consumption. Results showed that elaborated inoculation increased reactance, whereas limited inoculation decreased reactance but only when the subsequent appeal used less freedom-threatening language. These findings suggest that inoculation has the potential to facilitate or buffer reactance depending on the level of threat communicated in inoculation forewarnings and in subsequent persuasive health appeals.

  1. Granulomatous enteritis following oral inoculation of newborn rabbits with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis of bovine origin.

    OpenAIRE

    Mokresh, A H; Butler, D G

    1990-01-01

    To assess the rabbit as a model for the study of paratuberculosis infection, two groups of newborn rabbits were orally inoculated at one to two days of age with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (ATCC 19698 or field strain 22206) and compared to uninoculated controls. Nine of thirteen rabbits (69%) inoculated with ATCC 19698, and all three rabbits inoculated with 22206, experienced episodes of intermittent diarrhea starting four months after inoculation. Multifocal granulomas containing acid-fas...

  2. Cellular response of loblolly pine to wound inoculation with bark beetle-associated fungi and chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier D. Klepzig; Charles H. Walkinshaw

    2003-01-01

    We inoculated loblolly pines with bark beetle-associated fungi and a fungal cell wall component, chitosan, known to induce responses in some pines and many other plants. Trees in Florida were inoculated with Leptographium procerum, L. terebrantis, Ophiostoma minus, or chitosan. Trees in Louisiana were inoculated with O. minus,...

  3. Seasonal trends in response to inoculation of coast live oak with Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard S. Dodd; Daniel Hüberli; Tamar Y. Harnik; Brenda O' Dell; Matteo Garbelotto

    2006-01-01

    We developed a branch cutting inoculation method to provide a controlled system for studying variation in response to inoculation of coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) with Phytophthora ramorum. This method has advantages over inoculations of trees in the field, in containing the inoculum and in allowing high levels of replication...

  4. The Potential of Inoculation in Promoting Resistance to the Effectiveness of Comparative Advertising Messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Examines the potential of the inoculation message strategy to deflect the persuasiveness of comparative advertisements. Indicates modest potential for inoculation, confirming that inoculation pretreatments confer resistance to a comparative ad's influence on consumer attitudes, especially on behalf of high-involving products. (SR)

  5. Repeated inoculations with the lung and heartworm nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum result in increasing larval excretion and worm burden in the red fox (Vulpes vulpes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woolsey, Ian David; Webster, P.; Thamsborg, Stig Milan

    2017-01-01

    The French heartworm Angiostongylus vasorum is found in European red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and dog populations, where it appears to be spreading geographically. Once introduced into new areas, it establishes in local fox populations, typically to over 50% prevalence in a few years. High...... and elevated excretion of L1 in feces. Experimentally infected foxes were subsequently inoculated via stomach tube once (9 weeks post initial inoculation) or twice (9 and 13 weeks post inoculation (wpi)) with 100 third stage A. vasorum larvae (L3) previously isolated from aquatic snails infected with L1 from...... a naturally infected dog. Despite large variation in fecal larval excretion for the individual animals within the groups, excretion of L1 was significantly higher in foxes twice inoculated as compared to foxes inoculated only once. With an outlier in the once inoculated group removed, excretion became...

  6. The counselor's trauma as counseling motivation: vulnerability or stress inoculation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Sharon Rae; Mitchell, Jessica L; Baird, Stephanie; Whitfield, Sarah Roby; Meyer, Heather Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Should counselors with interpersonal trauma histories work with similarly traumatized clients? How does the work affect them? Current research is inconsistent. This study examines 101 sexual assault and domestic violence counselors' recalled motivations for trauma work, their reported subjective personal changes, and their secondary and vicarious trauma symptoms and burnout. Counselors motivated by interpersonal trauma report both more symptoms and positive changes (including dealing with their own trauma). Those seeking personal meaning report becoming more hypervigilant and self-isolating. Those saying they learned from clients rate symptoms lower, suggesting stress inoculation. Supervisors of trauma counselors should facilitate learning from clients separately from processing the counselor's trauma.

  7. Cellular responses in the skin of merino sheep to repeated inoculation with Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, T M; Robertson, G M; Sutherland, S S; Gregory, A R

    1987-10-01

    The cellular response in the skin of Merino sheep was examined after three successive inoculations with Dermatophilus congolensis. There was a massive neutrophil influx into the infected epidermis and underlying dermis at 4-10 days after the first inoculation. A lymphocyte-macrophage response occurred at 10-12 days, followed by a plasma cell response at 14-38 days. Resolution of skin lesions after the first inoculation corresponded to the time when the plasma cell response in the skin was most intense. A second inoculation with D. congolensis, 70 days after the first, failed to produce skin lesions typical of dermatophilosis. Typical lesions of dermatophilosis did develop after a third inoculation of the same sheep 140 days after the first inoculation, but the lesions resolved in most sheep within 13 days. Dermatophilosis did not develop in some of these sheep at sites inoculated with 100-1000-fold lower infective doses of D. congolensis, whereas control sheep did develop lesions.

  8. THE EFFECTS OF INOCULANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ON THE FERMENTATION AND AEROBIC STABILITY OF SUNFLOWER SILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisun Koc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of actic acid bacterial inoculant on the fermentation and aerobic stability of sunflower silages. Sunflower was harvested at the milk stage. Inoculant-1174 (Pioneer®,USA was used as homofermentative lactic acid bacterial inoculant. Inoculant was applied 6.00 log10 cfu/g silage levels. Silages with no additive served as controls. After treatment, the chopped sunflower was ensiled in the PVC type laboratory silos. Three silos for each group were sampled for chemical and microbiological analysis on days 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 56 after ensiling. At the end of the ensiling period, all silages were subjected to an aerobic stability test for 14 days. Neither inoculant improved the fermentation parameters of sunflower silages. At the end of the ensiling period, inoculant increased lactic acid bacteria (LAB and decreased yeast and mould numbers of silages. Inoculant treatment did not affect aerobic stability of silages.

  9. Response of chickpea cultivars to foliar, seed and soil inoculations with Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujeebur Rahman KHAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four cultivars of chickpea were evaluated for their susceptibility to the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea using foliar, seed and soil inoculation at 2, 4 and 8 g fungus per plant, per kg seed or per kg soil. At 8 g the inoculum caused necrotic lesions to all 24 cultivars with foliar inoculation, to 23 cultivars except cv. CH-2007-22 with seed inoculation and to 17 cultivars with soil inoculation, and reduced yield by 7–43% (foliar inoculation, 3–34% (seed inoculation and 3–26% (soil inoculation. Foliar or seed inoculation with 4 g of the fungus significantly reduced the yield of all cultivars tested except CH-2007-22 with foliar inoculation, and 4 cultivars with seed inoculation. Soil inoculation at 4 g fungus kg-1 soil, significantly reduced the yield of eight cultivars. Foliar and seed inoculations at 2 g of the fungus significantly reduced the yield of 16 and 7 cultivars of chickpea respectively; but soil inoculation at this concentration, did not significantly reduce yield in any cultivar. The greatest significant decline in yield was recorded with foliar inoculation in the cv. BG-256, 43% at 8 g, 40% at 4 g and 26% at 2 g inoculum level. The cv. CH-2007-22 was tolerant to B. cinerea as it exhibited only 3–7% yield loss at 8 g inoculum. The fungal population, especially that on the phylloplane, increased exponentially from January to March and declined drastically in April. At the high inoculum level of 8 g fungus kg-1 soil, B. cinerea may initiate infection through the soil. There was a positive correlation between disease severity and yield decline, and a disease severity above 2 significantly reduced yield.   

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Wheat Inoculated with Fusarium graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa eErayman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants are frequently exposed to microorganisms like fungi, bacteria and viruses that cause biotic stresses. Fusarium head blight (FHB is an economically risky wheat disease, which occurs upon Fusarium graminearum (Fg infection. Moderately susceptible (cv. ‘Mizrak 98’ and susceptible (cv. ‘Gun 91’ winter type bread wheat cultivars were subjected to transcriptional profiling after exposure to Fg infection. To examine the early response to the pathogen in wheat, we measured gene expression alterations in mock and pathogen inoculated root crown of moderately susceptible and susceptible cultivars at 12 hours after inoculation (hai using 12X135K microarray chip. The transcriptome analyses revealed that out of 39,179 transcripts, 3,668 genes in microarray were significantly regulated at least in one time comparison. The majority of differentially regulated transcripts were associated with disease response and the gene expression mechanism. When the cultivars were compared, a number of transcripts and expression alterations varied within the cultivars. Especially membrane related transcripts were detected as differentially expressed. Moreover, diverse transcription factors showed significant fold change values among the cultivars. This study presented new insights to understand the early response of selected cultivars to the Fg at 12 hai. Through the KEGG analysis, we observed that the most altered transcripts were associated with starch and sucrose metabolism and gluconeogenesis pathways.

  11. Accumulation of Transcripts Abundance after Barley Inoculation with Cochliobolus sativus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Imad Eddin Arabi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spot blotch caused by the hemibiotrophic pathogen Cochliobolus sativus has been the major yield-reducing factor for barley production during the last decade. Monitoring transcriptional reorganization triggered in response to this fungus is an essential first step for the functional analysis of genes involved in the process. To characterize the defense responses initiated by barley resistant and susceptible cultivars, a survey of transcript abundance at early time points of C. sativus inoculation was conducted. A notable number of transcripts exhibiting significant differential accumulations in the resistant and susceptible cultivars were detected compared to the non-inoculated controls. At the p-value of 0.0001, transcripts were divided into three general categories; defense, regulatory and unknown function, and the resistant cultivar had the greatest number of common transcripts at different time points. Quantities of differentially accumulated gene transcripts in both cultivars were identified at 24 h post infection, the approximate time when the pathogen changes trophic lifestyles. The unique and common accumulated transcripts might be of considerable interest for enhancing effective resistance to C. sativus.

  12. Agro-industrial waste materials and wastewater sludge for rhizobial inoculant production: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Rebah, F; Prévost, D; Yezza, A; Tyagi, R D

    2007-12-01

    Inoculating legumes with commercial rhizobial inoculants is a common agriculture practice. Generally, inoculants are sold in liquid or in solid forms (mixed with carrier). The production of inoculants involves a step in which a high number of cells are produced, followed by the product formulation. This process is largely governed by the cost related to the medium used for rhizobial growth and by the availability of a carrier source (peat) for production of solid inoculant. Some industrial and agricultural by-products (e.g. cheese whey, malt sprouts) contain growth factors such as nitrogen and carbon, which can support growth of rhizobia. Other agro-industrial wastes (e.g. plant compost, filtermud, fly-ash) can be used as a carrier for rhizobial inoculant. More recently, wastewater sludge, a worldwide recyclable waste, has shown good potential for inoculant production as a growth medium and as a carrier (dehydrated sludge). Sludge usually contains nutrient elements at concentrations sufficient to sustain rhizobial growth and heavy metals are usually below the recommended level. In some cases, growth conditions can be optimized by a sludge pre-treatment or by the addition of nutrients. Inoculants produced in wastewater sludge are efficient for nodulation and nitrogen fixation with legumes as compared to standard inoculants. This new approach described in this review offers a safe environmental alternative for both waste treatment/disposal and inoculant production.

  13. Network Inoculation: Heteroclinics and phase transitions in an epidemic model

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hui; Gross, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    In epidemiological modelling, dynamics on networks, and in particular adaptive and heterogeneous networks have recently received much interest. Here we present a detailed analysis of a previously proposed model that combines heterogeneity in the individuals with adaptive rewiring of the network structure in response to a disease. We show that in this model qualitative changes in the dynamics occur in two phase transitions. In a macroscopic description one of these corresponds to a local bifurcation whereas the other one corresponds to a non-local heteroclinic bifurcation. This model thus provides a rare example of a system where a phase transition is caused by a non-local bifurcation, while both micro- and macro-level dynamics are accessible to mathematical analysis. The bifurcation points mark the onset of a behaviour that we call network inoculation. In the respective parameter region exposure of the system to a pathogen will lead to an outbreak that collapses, but leaves the network in a configuration wher...

  14. Ripening for improving the quality of inoculated cheese Rhizopus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTINI PANGASTUTI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Estikomah SA, Sutarno, Pangastuti A 2010. Ripening for improving the quality of inoculated cheese Rhizopus oryzae. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 1-6. Cheese is dairy product resulted from fermented milk in which the fermentation process can be done by lactic acid bacteria or fungus. Rhizopus oryzae is able to produce lactic acid, protease and lipase. The ripening process changes the taste and texture. The purpose of this study is ripening to improve the quality of inoculated cheese R. oryzae. In this research the ripening was conducted the concentration variation of temperature (5oC, 10oC, 15oC, and time (7 days, 14 days. The procedure of research consisted of two steps, namely un-ripened cheese preparation followed by ripening cheese preparation. Cheese produced in this study analyzed the value of pH, fat content, protein content, amino acid levels and identification of microbe with ANOVA then followed by DMRT at 5% level of significance. Data results were analyzed with the like’s nonparametric statistical test, followed by Fridman Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test (WSRT at 5% level significance. The results showed that the preferred ripened cheese panelist was at a temperature of 15oC for 14 days. Ripening conditions affect pH, fat content, protein content and do not affect the levels of amino acids that formed ripened cheese. The best quality ripened cheese i.e. at a temperature of 15°C for 14 days, had a pH value of 4.40, the highest protein content of 9.78%, and fat content of 35.02%. The results of identified microbe in un-ripened cheese and ripened cheese include Enterococcus hirae (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, and Aspergillus sp.

  15. Rapid Dissemination of SIV Follows Multisite Entry after Rectal Inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prétet, Jean-Luc; Michel-Salzat, Alice; Messent, Valérie; Bogdanova, Anna; Couëdel-Courteille, Anne; Souil, Evelyne; Cheynier, Rémi; Butor, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    Receptive ano-rectal intercourse is a major cause of HIV infection in men having sex with men and in heterosexuals. Current knowledge of the mechanisms of entry and dissemination during HIV rectal transmission is scarce and does not allow the development of preventive strategies. We investigated the early steps of rectal infection in rhesus macaques inoculated with the pathogenic isolate SIVmac251 and necropsied four hours to nine days later. All macaques were positive for SIV. Control macaques inoculated with heat-inactivated virus were consistently negative for SIV. SIV DNA was detected in the rectum as early as four hours post infection by nested PCR for gag in many laser-microdissected samples of lymphoid aggregates and lamina propria but never in follicle-associated epithelium. Scarce SIV antigen positive cells were observed by immunohistofluorescence in the rectum, among intraepithelial and lamina propria cells as well as in clusters in lymphoid aggregates, four hours post infection and onwards. These cells were T cells and non-T cells that were not epithelial cells, CD68+ macrophages, DC-SIGN+ cells or fascin+ dendritic cells. DC-SIGN+ cells carried infectious virus. Detection of Env singly spliced mRNA in the mucosa by nested RT-PCR indicated ongoing viral replication. Strikingly, four hours post infection colic lymph nodes were also infected in all macaques as either SIV DNA or infectious virus was recovered. Rapid SIV entry and dissemination is consistent with trans-epithelial transport. Virions appear to cross the follicle-associated epithelium, and also the digestive epithelium. Viral replication could however be more efficient in lymphoid aggregates. The initial sequence of events differs from both vaginal and oral infections, which implies that prevention strategies for rectal transmission will have to be specific. Microbicides will need to protect both digestive and follicle-associated epithelia. Vaccines will need to induce immunity in lymph nodes

  16. The roles of inoculants' carbon source use in the biocontrol of potato scab disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pingping; Zhao, Xinbei; Shangguan, Nini; Chang, Dongwei; Ma, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Despite the application of multiple strains in the biocontrol of plant diseases, multistrain inoculation is still constrained by its inconsistency in the field. Nutrients, especially carbons, play an important role in the biocontrol processes. However, little work has been done on the systematic estimation of inoculants' carbon source use on biocontrol efficacies in vivo. In the present study, 7 nonpathogenic Streptomyces strains alone and in different combinations were inoculated as biocontrol agents against the potato scab disease, under field conditions and greenhouse treatments. The influence of the inoculants' carbon source use properties on biocontrol efficacies was investigated. The results showed that increasing the number of inoculated strains did not necessarily result in greater biocontrol efficacy in vivo. However, single strains with higher growth rates or multiple strains with less carbon source competition had positive effects on the biocontrol efficacies. These findings may shed light on optimizing the consistent biocontrol of plant disease with the consideration of inoculants' carbon source use properties.

  17. USER MANUAL: A Practical Guide to Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Ecological Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-05

    transporting them back to their host plant . These fungi can also provide plants with non- nutritional benefits by alleviating environmental stressors such...CONTENTS SUMMARY iii BACKGROUND ON RESTORATION, PLANT ECOLOGY AND SOIL MICROBES 1 OBJECTIVES OF GUIDE 2 WHY INOCULATE WITH AM FUNGI ?: THE...Figure 2. Case study of plants inoculated with AM fungi versus those that were non- inoculated in a restoration Figure 3. Case study of plants

  18. Carbon decomposition by inoculating Phanerochaete chrysosporium during drum composting of agricultural waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, V Sudharsan; Ramu, Kamma; Kalamdhad, Ajay S

    2015-05-01

    The effect of Phanerochaete chrysosporium inoculation during drum composting of agricultural waste was performed at different composting stages. Three trials were carried out with (5:4:1) combination of vegetable waste, cattle manure, and sawdust along with 10 kg of dried leaves with a total mass of 100 kg in a 550 L rotary drum composter. Trial 1 was a control without inoculation of fungus, while trial 2 was inoculated during the initial day (0th day of composting), and trial 3 was inoculated after the thermophilic phase, i.e., on the 8th day of composting period. The inoculation of fungus increased the volatile solids reduction by 1.45-fold in trial 2 and 1.7-fold in trial 3 as compared to trial 1 without any fungal inoculation. Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) was observed with 2.31, 2.62, and 2.59% in trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively, at the end of 20 days of composting period. Hence, it can be concluded that inoculation of white-rot fungus increased the decomposition rate of agricultural waste within shorter time in drum composting. However, inoculation after the thermophilic phase was found more effective than inoculation during initial days of composting for producing more stabilized and nutrient-rich compost.

  19. Non-anthocyanin polyphenolic transformation by native yeast and bacteria co-inoculation strategy during vinification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Apramita; Archana, Kodira Muthanna; Bhavya, Panikuttria Kuttappa; Anu-Appaiah, Konerira Aiyappaa

    2017-07-22

    Co-inoculation has been adapted by many wine-producing countries because it enhances the success of malolactic fermentation and reduces the fermentation cost, as well as time. However, wine phenolics have been sparsely highlighted during co-inoculation, even though polyphenols are an important parameter affecting wine colour, astringency and aroma. In the present study, we investigated the impact of co-inoculation on non-anthocyanin polyphenol profile for two different grape varieties. Co-inoculation of native yeast strain (AAV2) along with Oenococcus oeni was adapted for Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz wine. It was observed that the co-inoculation had minimal yet significant impact on the phenolic composition of wines for both the grape varieties. Color loss, as well as fruity aroma development, was observed in co-inoculated wines. The wines were on a par with the commercial wine, as well as wines without malolactic fermentation, in terms of phenolic compounds and overall organoleptic acceptance. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis further suggested that the varietal influence on phenolic composition was dominating compared to inoculation strategies. Among the varieties, the inoculation strategies have significantly influenced the Cabernet wines compared to Shiraz wines. The results of the present study demonstrate that the phenolic compounds are not drastically affected by metabolic activities of malolactic bacteria during co-inoculation and, hence, are equally suitable for wine fermentation. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Discussion on grain refining mechanism of AM30 alloy inoculated by MgCO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Du

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AM30 was inoculated by MgCO3 powder with different holding time. The influence of MgO decomposed by MgCO3 on the grain refinement effect was mainly discussed in the present study. Three sets of comparative samples were prepared. They were AM30 alloy inoculated by MgO and pure Mg inoculated by MgO and MgCO3. The possible nucleating particles were observed and analyzed by EPMA and SEM. AM30 alloy could be effectively refined by either MgCO3 or MgO inoculation. Grain refining efficiency and fading effect of MgO inoculation were better than those of MgCO3 inoculation. However, pure Mg could not be refined by these two inoculants. Al is an indispensable element to determine the grain refinement of Mg alloys inoculated by either MgCO3 or MgO. MgO should not be the effective substrates for α-Mg phase. A novel grain refining mechanism of MgCO3 inoculation on AM30 alloy was proposed by combining experimental results with theoretical calculation, i.e., MgAl2O4 should be the potent nuclei of α-Mg grain for the AM30 alloy in addition to Al4C3.

  1. Establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius (Arecaceae): effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Zapata, José A; Orellana, Roger; Allen, Edith B

    2006-03-01

    Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has often promoted increased growth of plants but very little work has been done in the tropics to evaluate the effects of inoculation on the establishment and development of seedlings in forests. Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius is a scandent palm present both in early and late succession, and consequently can be used in restoration processes. A test was conducted to determine the effect of AM on the establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos in tropical forest in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Thirty inoculated and 30 non-inoculated seedlings were introduced in two sites of different successional age, a mature forest and an eight-year old abandoned cornfield (acahual). Survival and growth parameters were evaluated after 12 months. Leaf area and phosphorus, but not height, were greater in inoculated than non-inoculated plants in the forest but not in the acahual. However, mycorrhizae had a clear effect on plant survival in both sites, with a threefold increase in survival of inoculated compared with non-inoculated plants bassed on an odds ratio. The results suggest that inoculation will be important to increase the establishment of this commercially important palm.

  2. Effect of host age, virus dose, and route of inoculation on tumor incidence, latency, and morphology in Syrian hamsters inoculated intravenously with oncogenic DNA simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, G T; McLane, M F

    1975-08-01

    Three-week-old to 12-month-old male Syrian hamsters were inoculated iv with 10(8.5) median tissue culture infective dose of simian virus 40 (SV40). Three-week-old hamsters were similarly inoculated with aliquots of SV40 of progressively decreasing titers. The tumor incidence and, to a lesser extent, the tumor latency were directly dependent on the age of the animals at the time of virus exposure and on the dose of the virus. However, this age-dose dependence was not of the magnitude usually observed in hamsters inoculated with SV40 sc or im. Moreover, the wide morphologic spectrum of neoplasms induced, i.e., lymphosarcoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, and osteogenic sarcoma, by iv route of inoculation, contrasted sharply with the anaplastic and spindle-cell sarcomas which were the only types of malignant tumors resulting when other routes were used.

  3. Solubilisation of inorganic phosphates by inoculant strains from tropical legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Marciano Marra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial solubilisation of low soluble inorganic phosphates is an important process contributing for the phosphorus available to plants in tropical soils. This study evaluates the ability of inoculant strains for tropical legumes to solubilise inorganic phosphates of low solubility that are found in tropical soils. Seven strains of Leguminosae nodulating bacteria (LNB were compared with one another and with a non-nodulating positive control, Burkholderia cepacia (LMG 1222T. Four of the strains are used as inoculants for cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata (Bradyrhizobium sp. UFLA 03-84; Bradyrhizobium elkani INPA 03-11B and Bradyrhizobium japonicum BR3267 or for common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris (Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899T. Rhizobium etli UFLA 02-100 and Rhizobium leguminosarum 316C10a are also efficient nodulators of beans and Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG 19424T nodulates on Mimosa pudica. Two experiments, with solid and liquid media, were performed to determine whether the strains were able to solubilise CaHPO4, Al(H2PO43 or FePO4.2H2O. On solid GELP medium none of the strains dissolved FePO4.2H2O, but LMG 1222, UFLA 03-84 and CIAT 899 solubilised CaHPO4 particularly well. These strains, along with LMG 19424 and BR 3267, were also able to increase the solubility of Al(H2PO43. In liquid GELP medium, LMG 1222 solubilised all phosphate sources, but no legume nodulating strain could increase the solubility of Al(H2PO43. The strains CIAT 899 and UFLA 02-100 were the only legume nodulating bacteria able to solubilise the other phosphate sources in liquid media, dissolving both CaHPO4 and FePO4.2H2O. There was a negative correlation between the pH of the culture medium and the concentration of soluble phosphate when the phosphorus source was CaHPO4 or FePO4.2H2O. The contribution of these strains to increasing the phosphorus nutrition of legumes and non-legume plant species should be investigated further by in vivo experiments.

  4. Quality assessment of truffle-inoculated seedlings in Italy: proposing revised parameters for certification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domizia Donnini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: the main aims of this study were to evaluate the quality of truffle-inoculated seedlings produced by commercial nurseries in Italy and to identify their minimum requisites in terms of plant age, health, homogeneity, and cut-off percentage of inoculated Tuber and non-Tuber ectomycorrhizae, based on the analysis of an extensive sample of seedlings subjected to quality control and certification.Area of study: truffle-inoculated seedlings produced by Italian commercial nurseries.Material and Methods: analysis of truffle-inoculated seedlings for health and quality standards; recording of presence of inoculated Tuber spp. and other concurrent fungi according to the official Italian method for certification; selective amplification of ectomycorrhizal DNA by PCR species-specific primers.Main results: We showed that mycorrhization levels in truffle-inoculated seedlings increased with time after truffle-spore inoculation. The highest mean percentage of the inoculated Tuber spp., but also the highest presence of contaminants, were recorded after three years. The mycorrhization level of Tuber melanosporum and T. aestivum was higher in Corylus and Ostrya seedlings than in Q. ilex and Q. pubescens, but the latter two host species showed the lowest presence of other ectomycorrhizal fungi. Mycorrhization level distribution in truffle-inoculated seedlings of suitable batches differed very little from the distribution in only all suitable seedlings. Truffle seedlings with other Tuber spp. were very few and even absent after three years. The general quality of Italian truffle-inoculated seedlings is high but can be improved even further by revising the parameters used for their certification.Research highlights: Mycorrhization assessment in truffle-inoculated seedlings produced by commercial nurseries and a revision of the parameters of quality standards following several years of certification in Italy.Keywords: Truffle cultivation; truffle

  5. [The effect of chronic stress on neutrophil function in tumor-inoculated rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Naomi; Fujioka, Yosei; Midorikawa, Taishi; Ishizaki, Kaori; Machida, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    In order to clarify the relation between stress load and inoculated tumor growth in conjunction with neutrophil functions, several kinds of stress such as physical (Ph) and psychological (Ps) stress were loaded on rats either SST-2 tumor cell inoculated or control, and the functions of their peripheral neutrophils were determined. A communication box was used for stress load on rats. SST-2 cells were inoculated in to rats in the tumor-inoculation groups. Two weeks after inoculation, the tumors were removed from the backs of the rats and weighed. The functions of neutrophils in the peripheral blood collected from the tail vein, were determined by the NBT deoxidization method. Tumor growth was enhanced when rats were loaded with either Ph or Ps stresses, but was inhibited when tumor cells were inoculated following either Ph or Ps stresses. These results show that chronological differences of loaded stresses influence immunological functions differently. The O2- production from the neutrophils stimulated by NBT-treated Staphilococcus aureus was suppressed in tumor-inoculated Ph and Ps groups, more markedly in the tumor-inoculated Ph group. It is logically relevant that the size of tumors increased in these groups, predominantly in the tumor-inoculated Ph group. On the other hand, O2- production from the neutrophils was enhanced and tumor growth decreased in tumor-inoculated animals following either Ph or Ps stresses. Our experiments, it revealed that the function of neutrophils is strongly enhanced by stress load and O2- production is inhibited by the tumor inoculation as shown in stimulation tests. Therefore, our findings suggested that neutrophils may participate in the inhibition of tumor growth.

  6. Biocontrol of Sclerotium rolfsii in Groundnut by Using Microbial Inoculants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khirood DOLEY

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sclerotium rolfsii (Sacc. is the causal agent of stem-rot in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.crop. With the increase in demand for the groundnut, control of stem-rot efficiently by microbial strains is fast becoming inevitable as the conventional system of chemicals is degrading our ecosystem. This investigation here emphasizes on inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and Trichoderma species for growth achievement and disease control. The present investigation showed that these microbial strains were found to be worth applying as they stimulated growth and decreased harmful effects of S. rolfsii (cv. ‘Western-51’. The increased biochemical parameters and antioxidant activities also indicated their defence related activities in groundnut plants. In spite of positive attributes meted out by these microbial strains towards groundnut crop, the interaction among AM fungi and Trichoderma species seemed to be less co-operative between each other which were noted when mycorrhizal dependency and percent root colonization were observed. However, in summary more practical application of low-input AM fungi along with Trichoderma species may be needed for the advancement of modern agricultural systems.

  7. Evaluation of effect of inoculation of Azospirillum on the yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The grain yield of the inoculated plants was significantly higher compared to the control plants. Both the panicle and the seed weight increased due to inoculation. Among the inocula of A. lipoferum tested, Inoculum-2 (In-2) was found superior to the other two inocula. Further, seasonal (Kharif and Rabi) variations in growth ...

  8. The effect of adding a lactic acid bacterial inoculant to maize at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    The effect of adding a lactic acid bacterial inoculant to maize at ensiling on milk production and ... bacteria on a crop at harvesting could result in a delay in the drop of pH of plant material during ensiling, higher ... inoculant to maize at ensiling on the intake and milk production of Jersey cows fed maize silage diets. Material ...

  9. Fermentative profile and bacterial diversity of corn silages inoculated with new tropical lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A O; Ávila, C L S; Pinto, J C; Carvalho, B F; Dias, D R; Schwan, R F

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of inoculation of strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from sugarcane grown in a Brazil on the quality of corn silage. Three strains of Lactobacillus buchneri (UFLA SLM11, UFLA SLM103 and UFLA SLM108), five strains of Lactobacillus plantarum (UFLA SLM08, UFLA SLM41, UFLA SLM45, UFLA SLM46 and UFLA SLM105), and one strain of Leuconostoc mesenteroides (UFLA SLM06) were evaluated at 0, 10, 30, 60 and 90 day after inoculating corn forage. The inoculation of the LAB strains did not influence the chemical composition of the silage, but pH, acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol were affected by treatment. The silages inoculated with UFLA SLM11 and SLM108 contained the lowest yeast and filamentous fungi counts during fermentation. Bacteria belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family, Clostridium genus were detected in the silages inoculated with Lact. buchneri UFLA SLM 11, 103 and 108, as shown by DGGE analysis. Silages inoculated with Lact. buchneri UFLA SLM 11 showed higher aerobic stability. The Lact. buchneri UFLA SLM11 strain was considered promising as a starter culture or inoculant for corn silages. The selection of microbial inoculants for each crop promotes improvement of silage quality. Studies on the chemical and microbiological characteristics of silage provide useful information for improving ensiling techniques. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Boosting the Potency of Resistance: Combining the Motivational Forces of Inoculation and Psychological Reactance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Claude H.; Ivanov, Bobi; Sims, Jeanetta; Compton, Josh; Harrison, Kylie J.; Parker, Kimberly A.; Parker, James L.; Averbeck, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of inoculation theory has been confirmed by decades of empirical research, yet optimizing its effectiveness remains a vibrant line of investigation. The present research turns to psychological reactance theory for a means of enhancing the core mechanisms of inoculation--threat and refutational preemption. Findings from a multisite…

  11. Effects of a dual-purpose bacterial inoculant on the fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of inoculating Lactisil Maize, a dual-purpose inoculant, on the fermentation characteristics and nutritive value of high-moisture maize silage and the performance of lactating cows receiving the silage in their diets. Whole-crop maize was harvested at 253 g dry matter ...

  12. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Physiology and Cognitive Control of Behavior in Stress Inoculated Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Karen J.; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Lindley, Steven E.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Lyons, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Monkeys exposed to stress inoculation protocols early in life subsequently exhibit diminished neurobiological responses to moderate psychological stressors and enhanced cognitive control of behavior during juvenile development compared to non-inoculated monkeys. The present experiments extended these findings and revealed that stress inoculated…

  13. Response of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean genotypes to inoculation with rhizobium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In most common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production regions of Latin America, inoculants are rarely used by farmers in spite of several studies that demonstrate the importance of Rhizobium inoculation on commercial production of legume crops. This study investigated specific bean host plant-Rhizo...

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation of peanut in low-fertile tropical soil. II. Alleviation of drought stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quilambo, OA; Weissenhorn, I.; Doddema, H; Kuiper, PJC; Stulen, I.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of drought stress and inoculation with an indigenous Mozambican and a commercial arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) inoculant on root colonization and plant growth and yield was studied in two peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivars-a traditional, low-yielding Mozambican landrace (Local) and a

  15. Effect of the different timing of AMF inoculation on plant growth and flower quality of chrysanthemum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sohn, B.K.; Kim, K.Y.; Chung, S.J.; Kim, W.S.; Park, S.M.; Kang, J.G.; Rim, Y.S.; Cho, J.S.; Kim, T.H.; Lee, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Plant growth and flower quality of an ornamental plant (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat) var. Baekgwang in response to the different timing of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) inoculation were examined. To evaluate the effects of AMF inoculation timing on growth of chrysanthemum cuttings, AMF was

  16. Delayed versus Immediate Bedside Inoculation of Culture Media for Diagnosis of Vaginal Trichomonosis

    OpenAIRE

    Schwebke, Jane R.; Venglarik, Moira F.; Morgan, Shellie C.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of delayed versus immediate inoculation of culture medium for the diagnosis of trichomonosis was conducted. The sensitivities of the two methods were 100 and 97.4%, respectively. Delayed inoculation of culture medium for women without evidence of trichomonosis on direct microscopic examination is a valid diagnostic procedure.

  17. Effect of thermo-tolerant actinomycetes inoculation on cellulose degradation and the formation of humic substances during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Zhechao; Wei, Yuquan; Wang, Huan; Lu, Qian; Li, Yanjie; Wei, Zimin

    2017-10-01

    The inoculum containing four cellulolytic thermophilic actinomycetes was screened from compost samples, and was inoculated into co-composting during different inoculation phases. The effect of different inoculation phases on cellulose degradation, humic substances formation and the relationship between inoculation and physical-chemical parameters was determined. The results revealed that inoculation at different phases of composting improved cellulase activities, accelerated the degradation of cellulose, increased the content of humic substances and influenced the structure of actinomycetic community, but there were significant differences between different inoculation phases. Redundancy analysis showed that the different inoculation phases had different impacts on the relationship between exogenous actinobacteria and physical-chemical parameters. Therefore, based on the promoting effort of inoculation in thermophilic phase of composting for the formation of humic substances, we suggested an optimized inoculation strategy to increase the content of humic substances, alleviate CO 2 emission during composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of amoxicillin in healthy and Salmonella Typhimurium-inoculated pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerso, H.; Friis, C.; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Objective--To determine pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of amoxicillin in healthy and Salmonella Typhimurium-inoculated pigs. Animals--12 healthy pigs and 12 S Typhimurium-inoculated pigs. Procedure-Concentration of amoxicillin in tissue was measured by use of high-performance liquid...... chromatography 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after IM administration. Pharmacokinetic values of amoxicillin in plasma were assessed by use of a l-compartment model with first-order absorption. Results--Inoculation caused diarrhea and increased rectal temperature and WBC count. Absorption half-life was shorter...... pigs and from 0.22 to 0.36 in inoculated pigs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Salmonella Typhimurium inoculation altered absorption of amoxicillin from the injection sire and prolonged elimination half-life. However, distribution of amoxicillin to intestinal tract tissue was only affected...

  19. Effect of mycorrhizal inoculations on the growth of Shorea robusta seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASHWANI TAPWAL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tapwal A, Kumar R, Borah D. 2015. Effect of mycorrhizal inoculations on the growth of Shorea robusta seedlings. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 1-5. Shorea robusta is one of important timber yielding tree species of northeast India and known to have both ectomycorrhizal (EcM and endomycorrhizal (AM associations. It is hypothesized that under favorable conditions different mycorrhizal fungi present in soil develop symbiotic association with fine roots of trees. In present investigations, mycorrhizal inoculum of EcM and AM fungi applied to S. robusta seedlings raised in polyethylene bags in nursery. Observations on growth characters and mycorrhizal colonization were recorded at the interval of three months. The results revealed that irrespective of type of mycorrhizal inoculation, growth of the seedlings increased significantly in comparison to control. Maximum growth was observed for the seedlings inoculated with EcM alone, followed by dual inoculations (EcM+AM, seedlings inoculated with AM fungi and minimum in control.

  20. Timing of malolactic fermentation inoculation in Shiraz grape must and wine: influence on chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamse, Caroline E; Bartowsky, Eveline J

    2012-01-01

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF) is an integral step in red winemaking, which in addition to deacidifying wine can also influence the composition of volatile fermentation-derived compounds with concomitant affects on wine sensory properties. Long-established winemaking protocols for MLF induction generally involve inoculation of bacteria starter cultures post alcoholic fermentation, however, more recently there has been a trend to introduce bacteria earlier in the fermentation process. For the first time, this study shows the impact of bacterial inoculation on wine quality parameters that define red wine, including wine colour and phenolics, and volatile fermentation-derived compounds. This study investigates the effects of inoculating Shiraz grape must with malolactic bacteria at various stages of alcoholic fermentation [beginning of alcoholic fermentation (co-inoculation, with yeast), mid-alcoholic fermentation, at pressing and post alcoholic fermentation] on the kinetics of MLF and wine chemical composition. Co-inoculation greatly reduced the overall fermentation time by up to 6 weeks, the rate of alcoholic fermentation was not affected by the presence of bacteria and the fermentation-derived wine volatiles profile was distinct from wines produced where bacteria were inoculated late or post alcoholic fermentation. An overall slight decrease in wine colour density observed following MLF was not influenced by the MLF inoculation regime. However, there were differences in anthocyanin and pigmented polymer composition, with co-inoculation exhibiting the most distinct profile. Differences in yeast and bacteria metabolism at various stages in fermentation are proposed as the drivers for differences in volatile chemical composition. This study demonstrates, with an in-depth analysis, that co-inoculation of yeast and bacteria in wine fermentation results in shorter total vinification time and produces sound wines, thus providing the opportunity to stabilise wines more

  1. Selection of Infective Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Isolates for Field Inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Pellegrino

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi play a key role in host plant growth and health, nutrient and water uptake, plant community diversity and dynamics. AM fungi differ in their symbiotic performance, which is the result of the interaction of two fungal characters, infectivity and efficiency. Infectivity is the ability of a fungal isolate to establish rapidly an extensive mycorrhizal symbiosis and is correlated with pre-symbiotic steps of fungal life cycle, such as spore germination and hyphal growth. Here, different AM fungal isolates were tested, with the aim of selecting infective endophytes for field inoculation. Greenhouse and microcosm experiments were performed in order to assess the ability of 12 AM fungal isolates to produce spores, colonize host roots and to perform initial steps of symbiosis establishment, such as spore germination and hyphal growth. AM fungal spore production and root colonization were significantly different among AM fungal isolates. Spore and sporocarp densities ranged from 0.8 to 7.4 and from 0.6 to 2.0 per gram of soil, respectively, whereas root colonization ranged from 2.9 to 72.2%. Percentage of spore or sporocarp germination ranged from 5.8 to 53.3% and hyphal length from 4.7 to 79.8 mm. The ordination analysis (Redundancy Analysis, RDA showed that environmental factors explained about 60% of the whole variance and their effect on fungal infectivity variables was significant (P = 0.002. The biplot clearly showed that variables which might be used to detect infective AM fungal isolates were hyphal length and root colonization. Such analysis may allow the detection of the best parameters to select efficient AM fungal isolates to be used in agriculture.

  2. Chicken cecal microRNAs in the response to Campylobacter jejuni inoculation by Solexa sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Liu, Liying; Zhang, Maozhi; Wang, Huicui; Yang, Ning; Li, Xianyao

    2016-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is one of major foodborne pathogen that cause human diarrhea by consuming C. jejuni contaminated chicken products. MicroRNAs play an integral role in many different biological processes including bacteria and virus inoculation in chickens. In this study, we identified chicken miRNAs responding to C. jejuni inoculation through Solexa sequencing in the cecum. As a result, four miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between inoculated and non-inoculated groups. There were 1,114 putative target genes regulated by those differentially expressed miRNAs predicted by miRanda, TargetScan, and miRTarget softwares. Functional analysis of those target genes showed that 113 gene ontology biological process terms and 14 pathways were significantly enriched. Hedgehog signaling pathway may contribute to chicken C. jejuni inoculation. MiR-155 played vital role in the C. jejuni inoculation. The result herein will lay the foundation for the further study of regulatory mechanism of chicken miRNAs in the response to C. jejuni inoculation. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  3. Re-Thinking Anxiety: Using Inoculation Messages to Reduce and Reinterpret Public Speaking Fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ben; Compton, Josh; Thornton, Ashleigh L; Dimmock, James A

    2017-01-01

    Inoculation theory offers a framework for protecting individuals against challenges to an existing attitude, belief, or state. Despite the prevalence and damaging effects of public speaking anxiety, inoculation strategies have yet to be used to help individuals remain calm before and during public speaking. We aimed to test the effectiveness of an inoculation message for reducing the onset of public speaking anxiety, and helping presenters interpret their speech-related anxiety more positively. Participants (Mage = 20.14, SD = 2.72) received either an inoculation (n = 102) or control (n = 128) message prior to engaging a public speaking task and reported a range of anxiety-related perceptions. Accounting for personality characteristics and perceptions of task importance, and relative to control participants, those who received the inoculation message reported significantly lower pre-task anxiety, and following the task, reported that they had experienced lower somatic anxiety, and that the inoculation message had caused them to view their nerves in a less debilitating light. Inoculation messages may be an effective strategy for helping participants reframe and reduce their apprehension about public speaking, and investigating their efficacy in other stress-inducing contexts may be worthwhile.

  4. Leishmania braziliensis ssp. in the nasal mucosa of guinea pigs inoculated in the tarsi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose V. Scorza

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Two lots of 20 young male guinea pigs were inoculated subcutaneously in the tarsi with 10 (elevated to fourth potency amastigotes of Leishmania braziliensis or L. b. guyanensis to study the susceptibility of this Neotropical hystricomorph rodent the autochthonous parasites. Almost 50% of the animals showed lesions in the inoculation site and had parazitations that were infective to hamsters, as shown by inoculating homogenates of the dermal lesion, of the spleen, of the liver, and of the nasal mucosa into hamsters at 20, 40, 60 and 120 days after inoculation of the guinea pig. Smears of the above organs showed the presence of amastigotes. Parasites inoculated into the tarsi were detected early in the skin, spleen, and liver of the guinea pig host. Blood cultures made by cardiopuncture on sacrifice of the guinea pigs were uniformly negative. The nasal mucosa of nearly all animals positive in the skin or viscera was invaded early by the parasites, although with grater frequency between 60 and 120 days post-inoculation. The use of this model for the study of mucocutaneous parasitism by L. brasiliensis is discussed, together with the phenomena of parasitism at a distance from the inoculation site, the temperature of the body regions affected, and the possible genetic influence on susceptibility of the guinea pig to L. brasiliensis.

  5. [Queries related to the technology of soybean seed inoculation with Bradyrhizobium spp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of exploiting symbiotic nitrogen fixation, soybean crops are inoculated with selected strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens or Bradyrhizobium elkanii (collectively referred to as Bradyrhizobium spp.). The most common method of inoculation used is seed inoculation, whether performed immediately before sowing or using preinoculated seeds or pretreated seeds by the professional seed treatment. The methodology of inoculation should not only cover the seeds with living rhizobia, but must also optimize the chances of these rhizobia to infect the roots and nodulate. To this end, inoculated rhizobia must be in such an amount and condition that would allow them to overcome the competition exerted by the rhizobia of the allochthonous population of the soil, which are usually less effective for nitrogen fixation and thus dilute the effect of inoculation on yield. This optimization requires solving some queries related to the current knowledge of seed inoculation, which are addressed in this article. I conclude that the aspects that require further research are the adhesion and survival of rhizobia on seeds, the release of rhizobia once the seeds are deposited in the soil, and the movement of rhizobia from the vicinity of the seeds to the infection sites in the roots. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Growth of a leguminous tree (Centrolobium tomentosum Guill. ex Benth.) inoculated with Rhizobium and mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M S; Gonçalves, L M; Lemos-Filho, J P; Rocha, D; Vale, M T; Scotti, M R

    1997-01-01

    Leguminous trees are being suggested for revegetation programs due to their ability to develop associations with rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi. The growth of a native species of the Tropical Atlantic Forest, Centrolobium tomentosum, was evaluated in a native forest soil and in a Eucalyptus forest soil under different treatments of inoculation. C. tomentosum produced more biomass under nursery conditions after inoculation with Rhizobium BHICB-Ab1 associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM). This treatment improved shoot and root growth and nodule weight under forest soil condition, while in eucalyptus soil only shoot biomass and nodule weight were significantly modified. In another experiment, using forest soil, height and stem diameter were also increased by dual inoculation procedures. The height and diameter growth promoting effect was observed when BHICB-Ab1 was used as inoculant associated with AM, but not with BHICB-Ab1 alone. In contrast, plants inoculated with BHICB-Ab3 alone were similar in height and diameter growth, to those which were inoculated with BHICB-Ab3 associated with AM. These results suggest that benefits of dual inoculation depend on triparty symbiosis and especially on the choice of Rhizobium strain.

  7. Rhizobial Inoculation, Alone or Coinoculated with Azospirillum brasilense, Promotes Growth of Wetland Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Hahn

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Rhizobia and associative bacteria promote growth in rice plants (Oryza sativa L. through a series of mechanisms, but most studies on inoculation have been performed based on inoculation with these bacteria in a separate or singular manner. The objective of this study was to assess the efficiency of single/isolated inoculation and inoculation combined with symbiotic rhizobia from forage legume and with Azospirillum brasilense on promoting growth and the root colonization process in wetland rice. Two rhizobia among four isolates from a greenhouse and a laboratory experiment were selected that efficiently promoted seed germination and rice plant growth in a sterilized substrate and in soil. The two most efficient isolates (UFRGS Vp16 and UFRGS Lc348 were inoculated alone or in combination with a commercial product containing A. brasilense in two field experiments using two wetland rice cultivars over two growing seasons. In the field experiments, these isolates coinoculated with A. brasilense promoted larger increases in the agronomic variables of wetland rice compared to the control without inoculation. Confocal laser microscopy confirmed the presence of inoculated bacteria tagged with gfp (UFRGS Vp16, UFRGS Lc348, and A. brasilense colonizing the root surface of the rice seedlings, mainly in the root hairs and lateral roots.

  8. Effects of Funnelliformis mosseae inoculation on alleviating atrazine damage in Canna indica L. var. flava Roxb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Yang, Jixian; Zhang, Xue; Zhao, Ting; Qi, Shanshan

    2017-01-02

    Atrazine residue in the environment continually damages plants and therefore requires immediate attention and effective development of methods for its decontamination. The effects of Funnelliformis mosseae inoculation on growth and physiology in atrazine-treated Canna indica L. var. flava Roxb. were investigated. At atrazine concentrations up to 15 mg L-1, the growth of C. indica plants were negatively affected. Inoculation with F. mosseae alleviated the atrazine inhibition of plant growth and biomass. Furthermore, the chlorophyll content and root function increased under F. mosseae inoculation, and the oxidative stress of malondialdehyde, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities induced by atrazine were also alleviated by F. mosseae inoculation. The removal rate of atrazine by untreated C. indica was significant, with removal rates of 20.5-55.3% by the end of a 14-day experiment; however, F. mosseae inoculation increased the removal rate to 35.6-75.1%. In conclusion, F. mosseae inoculation can alleviate the damage induced by atrazine in C. indica. Accordingly, C. indica inoculated with F. mosseae has excellent potential to be used in phytoremediation in habitats polluted by high atrazine concentrations.

  9. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor regulation by stress inoculation in squirrel monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex G. Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent mildly stressful situations provide opportunities to learn, practice, and improve coping in a process called stress inoculation. Stress inoculation also enhances cognitive control and response inhibition of impulsive motivated behavior. Cognitive control and motivation have been linked to striatal dopamine D2 and/or D3 receptors (DRD2/3 in rodents, monkeys, and humans. Here, we study squirrel monkeys randomized early in life to stress inoculation with or without maternal companionship and a no-stress control treatment condition. Striatal DRD2/3 availability in adulthood was measured in vivo by [11C]raclopride binding using positron emission tomography (PET. DRD2/3 availability was greater in caudate and putamen compared to ventral striatum as reported in PET studies of humans and other non-human primates. DRD2/3 availability in ventral striatum was also consistently greater in stress inoculated squirrel monkeys compared to no-stress controls. Squirrel monkeys exposed to stress inoculation in the presence of their mother did not differ from squirrel monkeys exposed to stress inoculation without maternal companionship. Similar effects in different social contexts extend the generality of our findings and together suggest that stress inoculation increases striatal DRD2/3 availability as a correlate of cognitive control in squirrel monkeys.

  10. Development and hydrology of biological soil crusts -- first results from a surface inoculation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykhailova, Larysa; Raab, Thomas; Gypser, Stella; Fischer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Representing a set of various micro-biocoenoses, biocrusts often reside in adjacent patches, which not necessarily relate to structural elements of the habitat, like (micro-) topography or vegetational patterns. Such biocrust patches may become more stable through the formation of mutually dependent ecohydrological regimes. For example, algal patches inhibiting infiltration and generating runoff alternate with runoff-receiving moss patches possessing high water holding capacities. Here, we preliminarily report on a lysimeter field experiment where natural biocrust isolates were used for surface inoculation to (I) prove stochastic vs. deterministic biocrust development and (II) to quantitatively relate biocrust development to soil hydrology. Lysimeter sand was collected from 3-4 m below surface at natural dune outcrops in south-eastern Brandenburg, Germany (Glashütte (GLA) and Neuer Lugteich (LUG)), where biocrust samples were collected at the respective dune bases. The lysimeters were designed to prevent runoff. In a completely randomized full-factorial design, three factors were considered. (A) Inocolum in three treatments (bare control, mosses, algae), (B) mineral substrate texture in two treatments (GLA: 55% and LUG: 79% particles >630 μm), and (C) surface compaction in two treatments (control, 41.5 kN m-2 for 30 seconds). The samples were kept dry and re-moistened to -60 hPa two days before inoculation. After a species inventory, the inoculate was isolated by gently washing off sand particles from the biocrust samples. Algal/lichen crusts were dominated by Zygogonium ericetorum and Cladonia sp. at both sites. All moss crusts were dominated by Polytrichum piliferum and Ceratodon purpureus, whereas Brachythecium albicans was present at GLA only. 20 g of homogenized moist inoculate were spread over the surface of each lysimeter (Ø 19 cm, 22 cm depth). We performed autochthonous inoculation, i.e. biocrust isolates collected from GLA were used for inoculation of

  11. Recovery and Behaviour of Stressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells on Rocket Leaf Surfaces Inoculated by Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANAS A. AL-NABULSI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available E. coli O157:H7 is an emerging public health concern worldwide because of its low infectious dose and ability to survive under adverse conditions. Tests were conducted to determine the abilityof unstressed E. coli O157:H7 cells or those stressed by acid, cold, salt exposure or starvation to survive on the surfaces of rocket leaves after contamination by three methods (dip, spray or spot inoculation and following storage at 10 or 25ºC. E. coli O157:H7 numbers recovered from rocket leaves contaminated by the different techniques were in the order of dip > spot > spray inoculation.Numbers of stressed E. coli O157:H7 recovered after inoculation by all three methods increased significantly over 7d storage at 10 or 25ºC, while unstressed E. coli O157:H7 only grew following dip inoculation. Exposure to adverse environmental conditions may increase the risk of E. coli O157:H7 survival and spread on leafy green vegetables.

  12. Differential response of kabuli and desi chickpea genotypes toward inoculation with PGPR in different soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Asma; Mirza, Muhammad S.; Shah, Tariq M.; Malik, Kauser A.; Hafeez, Fauzia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pakistan is among top three chickpea producing countries but the crop is usually grown on marginal lands without irrigation and fertilizer application which significantly hampers its yield. Soil fertility and inoculation with beneficial rhizobacteria play a key role in nodulation and yield of legumes. Four kabuli and six desi chickpea genotypes were, therefore, evaluated for inoculation response with IAA-producing Ochrobactrum ciceri Ca-34T and nitrogen fixing Mesorhizobium ciceri TAL-1148 in single and co-inoculation in two soils. The soil type 1 was previously unplanted marginal soil having low organic matter, P and N contents compared to soil type 2 which was a fertile routinely legume-cultivated soil. The effect of soil fertility status was pronounced and fertile soil on average, produced 31% more nodules, 62% more biomass and 111% grain yield than marginal soil. Inoculation either with O. ciceri alone or its co-inoculation with M. ciceri produced on average higher nodules (42%), biomass (31%), grains yield (64%) and harvest index (72%) in both chickpea genotypes over non-inoculated controls in both soils. Soil 1 showed maximum relative effectiveness of Ca-34T inoculation for kabuli genotypes while soil 2 showed for desi genotypes except B8/02. Desi genotype B8/02 in soil type 1 and Pb-2008 in soil type 2 showed significant yield increase as compared to respective un-inoculated controls. Across bacterial inoculation treatments, grain yield was positively correlated to growth and yield contributing parameters (r = 0.294* to 0.838*** for desi and r = 0.388* to 0.857** for kabuli). PCA and CAT-PCA analyses clearly showed a site-specific response of genotype x bacterial inoculation. Furthermore, the inoculated bacterial strains were able to persist in the rhizosphere showing colonization on root and within nodules. Present study shows that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculation should be integrated with national chickpea breading program in

  13. Rapidly acquired cytotoxicity of lymphoid cells from ice inoculated with allogeneic spleen cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavina, E G; Karmanova, N V; Leipunskaya, I L; Zinzar, S N; Reinhöfer, J; Svet-Moldavsky, G J

    1976-12-01

    Spleen cells from C57BL/6J or CBA mice inoculated iv with spleen cells from BALB/c mice produced a strong nonspecific cytotoxic effect on target cells (mouse L-cells). Lymph node cells from CBA or C57BL/6J mice inoculated sc with BALB/c spleen cells also destroyed L-cells. Lymph node cells from mice inoculated with syngeneic spleen cells were not cytotoxic. The cytotoxic effect was observed ion of allogeneic but not syngeneic spleen cells. This effect was considerably reduced or completely suppressed after partial or total removal of plastic-adherent cells.

  14. The Initial Assessment of Effectiveness of the Impulse Method of Introducing an Inoculant into Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derda-Ślęzak A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An initial assessment of the effectiveness of cast iron inoculation, performed by the method of impulse introducing the master alloy into cast iron, is presented. The experiment was concerned with the hypoeutectic gray cast iron inoculated with either the Alinoc or the Barinoc master alloy by means of an experimental device for pneumatic transportation. Examinations involved pneumatic injection of the powdered inoculant carried in a stream of gaseous medium (argon into the metal bath held in the crucible of an induction furnace. It was found that the examined process is characterised by both high effectiveness and stability.

  15. Hematology of layers chickens vaccinated with fowl cholera vaccine and experimentally inoculated with virulent Pasteurella multocida serotypes in Zaria, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Madaki Lekko

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion The PCV significantly decrease P≤0.05 in layers vaccinated and inoculated with P. multocida but increase in unvaccinated layers inoculated P. multocida. The mean serum ALP concentration significantly increase P≤0.05 in unvaccinated layers inoculated with P. multocida when compared to layers vaccinated and inoculated with P. multocida. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(3.000: 234-240

  16. Repeated inoculations with the lung and heartworm nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum result in increasing larval excretion and worm burden in the red fox (Vulpes vulpes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian David Woolsey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The French heartworm Angiostongylus vasorum is found in European red fox (Vulpes vulpes and dog populations, where it appears to be spreading geographically. Once introduced into new areas, it establishes in local fox populations, typically to over 50% prevalence in a few years. High susceptibility and constant excretion of first stage larvae (L1 by the definitive hosts are prerequisites for sustaining high parasite biomass in a particular habitat. The present study explores the hypothesis that repeated ingestion of gastropods in nature will result in accumulation of adult worms and elevated excretion of L1 in feces. Experimentally infected foxes were subsequently inoculated via stomach tube once (9 weeks post initial inoculation or twice (9 and 13 weeks post inoculation (wpi with 100 third stage A. vasorum larvae (L3 previously isolated from aquatic snails infected with L1 from a naturally infected dog. Despite large variation in fecal larval excretion for the individual animals within the groups, excretion of L1 was significantly higher in foxes twice inoculated as compared to foxes inoculated only once. With an outlier in the once inoculated group removed, excretion became significantly higher in the three times inoculated group. Establishment of adult worms varied and only a trend to higher worm burdens was found in the group of foxes inoculated three times. However, this became significant with the same single outlier removed. Overall, it appears that protective immunity to A. vasorum does not appear to occur in V. vulpes with animals exhibiting high infection intensities without obvious clinical signs. The increasing larval excretion in foxes being repeatedly exposed to A. vasorum L3 support the hypothesis that foxes under natural conditions may repeatedly ingest infected gastropods and remain a source of environmental contamination for several months, potentially contributing to the establishment of endemic foci through increasing L1

  17. Initial fungal colonizer affects mass loss and fungal community development in Picea abies logs 6 yr after inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Lindner; Rimvydas Vasaitis; Ariana Kubartova; Johan Allmer; Hanna Johannesson; Mark T. Banik; Jan. Stenlid

    2011-01-01

    Picea abies logs were inoculated with Resinicium bicolor, Fomitopsis pinicola or left un-inoculated and placed in an old-growth boreal forest. Mass loss and fungal community data were collected after 6 yr to test whether simplification of the fungal community via inoculation affects mass loss and fungal community development. Three...

  18. Immune Responses in Cattle Inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle were inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii to compare antigen-specific immune responses to varied patterns of mycobacterial disease. Disease expression ranged from colonization with associated pathology (M. bovis), colonization without path...

  19. Serum and skin surface antibody responses in merino sheep given three successive inoculations with Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, S S; Ellis, T M; Robertson, G M; Gregory, A R

    1987-11-01

    Three antigens prepared from different phases of the life cycle of Dermatophilus congolensis were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum and skin surface antibody responses in sheep after a first, second and third inoculation with D. congolensis. After the first inoculation, a strong antibody response to the flagella, filament and soluble antigens was detected after 7-21 days in the sera from sheep that were regularly biopsied; the antibody response at the skin surface was detected 28-42 days after inoculation, when the lesions were resolving. Strong anamnestic responses were detected in the serum of sheep that were biopsied and some of the nonbiopsied sheep after the second and third inoculations, but the skin surface antibody response at these times was variable.

  20. The effect of an inoculant and enzymes on fermentation and nutritive value of sorghum straw silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, L; Chen, L J; Han, L J

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of inoculant, enzymes and inoculant-enzymes mixture on fermentation quality, nutritive value, and microbial changes of sorghum straw silage. Sorghum straws were collected and treated with distilled water (control), inoculant, enzymes and inoculant+enzymes prior to ensiling. Three bag silos for each silage (denoted C, I, E and I+E, respectively) were opened after 3, 7, 11, 15, 30 and 60 days for chemical and microbial analyses. For all the silages, there was a rapid decline in pH during the first 3 days of ensiling. Relative to silage C, all the treatment (I, E and I+E) had higher (Penzymes, can effectively (Penzymes (E, I+E) can also improve significantly silage IVDMD and IVNDFD concentration. These results indicated that the addition of additives can improve the sorghum straw silage fermentation quality at different extent.

  1. Multistep introduction of bacteria to natural substrates at different initial inoculation doses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kupriyanov, A.A.; Semenov, A.M.; Kunenkova, N.N.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2009-01-01

    The population dynamics of the saprotrophic Pseudomonas fluorescens 32 gfp bacteria and two conventionally pathogenic enterobacteria (Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium) were investigated in their inoculation at different doses into cattle excreta and their subsequent

  2. Xylem sap flow of Norway spruce after inoculation with the blue‐stain fungus Ceratocystis polonica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirisits, T; Offenthaler, I

    2002-01-01

    In a field experiment, the sap flow of Norway spruce ( Picea abies ) was measured in response to inoculation with Ceratocystis polonica , a virulent fungal associate of the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus...

  3. An investigation into the susceptibility of cattle to bovine leukosis virus following inoculation by various routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D H; Lucas, M H; Wibberley, G; Chasey, D

    1982-03-06

    The effect of different routes of inoculation on the incubation period, as indicated by the detection of antibody and by the detection of bovine leukosis virus (BLV) in lymphocytes, were compared. None of the 12-month-old steers exposed to BLV by the oral route developed BLV infection. Intratracheal, subcutaneous and intradermal inoculations were found to be particularly effective in establishing BLV infection, which was detected three to four weeks after inoculation. In the majority of animals, serum antibody and virus were detected at the same time. One out of four in-oestrus heifers inoculated via the uterus with mixtures of BLV infected lymphocytes and semen became infected. It appears that there is an inhibitory factor in fresh semen that prevents BLV infection from becoming established. Viral antigen was detected earlier in BLV infected lymphocytes using the cocultivation method than by electron microscopy to demonstrate BLV particles in mitogen stimulated lymphocytes.

  4. insect antagonistic bio-inoculants for natural control of leaf-mining

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    inoculants to produce extracellular enzymes, as well as determine their impact on French beans seedling emergence and growth, and leaf miner fecundity and pupation. Laboratory and greenhouse experiments were conduct at the International ...

  5. The effect of Bacillus sp. OSU-142 inoculation at various levels of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Bacillus sp. OSU-142 inoculation at various levels of nitrogen fertilization on growth, tuber distribution and yield of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Z Ekin, F Oguz, M Erman, E Ögün ...

  6. Increased Biomass of Nursery-Grown Douglas-Fir Seedlings upon Inoculation with Diazotrophic Endophytic Consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareen Khan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii seedlings are periodically challenged by biotic and abiotic stresses. The ability of endophytes to colonize the interior of plants could confer benefits to host plants that may play an important role in plant adaptation to environmental changes. In this greenhouse study, nursery-grown Douglas-fir seedlings were inoculated with diazotrophic endophytes previously isolated from poplar and willow trees and grown for fifteen months in nutrient-poor conditions. Inoculated seedlings had significant increases in biomass (48%, root length (13% and shoot height (16% compared to the control seedlings. Characterization of these endophytes for symbiotic traits in addition to nitrogen fixation revealed that they can also solubilize phosphate and produce siderophores. Colonization was observed through fluorescent microscopy in seedlings inoculated with gfp- and mkate-tagged strains. Inoculation with beneficial endophytes could prove to be valuable for increasing the production of planting stocks in forest nurseries.

  7. Growth and nutrition of eucalyptus clones seedlings inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco deSousa Lima; Carla daSilva Sousa

    2014-01-01

    ... (five fungal species and five eucalyptus clones), with five replications. In general, the mycorrhizal symbiosis significantly increased the growth and nutrition of eucalyptus seedlings, when compared to the non-inoculated seedlings...

  8. Insect antagonistic bio-inoculants for natural control of leaf-mining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inoculants to produce extracellular enzymes, as well as determine their impact on French beans seedling emergence and growth, and leaf miner fecundity and pupation. Laboratory and greenhouse experiments were conduct at the International ...

  9. Inoculation of weaned pigs with E. coli reduces depots of vitamin E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Charlotte; Vestergaard, Ellen-Margrethe; Højsgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    of weaning) and 9 of the experiment, and serum was analyzed for α-tocopherol concentration. On day 10 of the experiment, pigs were killed and samples of liver, heart, muscle, adipose tissue and intestinal epithelium were obtained, and immune cells (alveolar macrophages) were harvested, and analyzed for α......This study was designed to investigate the effect of vitamin E supplementation on vitamin E depots and immune responses in weaned pigs after an E. coli inoculation. The design was a 2 × 2 factorial with vitamin E supplementation (150 mg/kg RRR-α-tocopheryl acetate versus a control diet containing...... 60 mg all-rac-α-tocopheryl acetate) and E. coli 0 149 inoculation (inoculation of 1 × 108 CFU on day 2 and 3 after weaning versus inoculation of vehicle). The pigs were housed individually during the experiment which lasted for 10 days from weaning at 7 weeks of age. Blood was sampled on day 1 (day...

  10. Effects of Rhizobium inoculation on Trifolium resupinatum antioxidant system under sulfur dioxide pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Bayat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plant growth stimulating rhizobacteria are beneficial bacteria that can cause resistance to various stresses in plants. One of these stresses is SO2 air pollution. SO2 is known as a strong damaging air pollutant that limits growth of plants. The aim of this study is evaluation of the effects of bacterial inoculation with native and standard Rhizobium on Persian clover root growth and antioxidants activity and capacity under air SO2 pollution. Materials and methods: In this study, 31 days plants (no-inoculated and inoculated with two strains of Rhizobium exposed to the different concentrations of SO2 (0 as a control, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 ppm for 5 consecutive days and 2 hours per day. Results: Results showed different concentrations of SO2 had a significant effect on Persian clover root weight and antioxidant system. Increasing SO2 stress decreased root fresh and dry weight and antioxidant capacities (IC50 and increased antioxidant activities (I% of Persian clover leaves significantly in comparison to the control plants (under 0 ppm and increased SOD, CAT and GPX activity. Inoculation of Persian clover plants with native and standard Rhizobium increased root weight and did not show a significant effect on antioxidants activity and capacity, but interaction between Rhizobium inoculation and SO2 treatment reduced significantly the stress effects of high concentration of SO2 on root growth and antioxidants activity and capacity. In fact, level of this change of root growth and antioxidant system under SO2 pollution stress in inoculated plants was lower than in the non-inoculated plants. Discussion and conclusion: As a result, an increase in SO2 concentration caused a decrease in root weight, increase in antioxidants activity and capacity of Persian clover. Inoculation with Rhizobium strains could alleviate the effect of SO2 pollution on antioxidant system by effects on root growth.

  11. Different aspects of Lactobacillus inoculants on the improvement of quality and safety of alfalfa silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Zielińska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant range of bacterial inoculants for forage ensiling, but there is still a need for formulations to improve the safety of feed. The objective of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of three lactobacilli strains in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. The following bacterial inoculants were used: Lactocacillus plantarum K KKP 593p (LPK, L. plantarum C KKP 788p (LPC, L. buchneri KKP 907p (LB, and mix of all three strains (LPK+LPC+LB. The application of bacterial inoculants in alfalfa ensiling resulted in a reduction of the total number of molds, Clostridium perfringens and Listeria sp. (up to 5, 7, and 5 times respectively for LB inoculant in comparison to untreated silage. Total inhibition of Salmonella sp. and Escherichia coli growth was achieved in silages treated with all inoculants except for LPC. Aerobic stability in the control silage was the lowest (77 h and doubled under the influence of bacterial inoculants. The most stable according to aerobic stability was silage treated with LB inoculant (175 h, where the highest concentrations of acetic acid (4.8 g kg-1, propionic acid (0.7 g kg-1 and 1,2-propanediol (526 mg kg-1 were reported. The study discussed that it is important to evaluate not only the effect of bacterial inoculants on physicochemical and microbiological silage properties, as the presence and expression of antibiotic resistance genes in lactic acid bacteria have been reported. The results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the strains showed that almost all minimum inhibitory concentrations values for eight antibiotics were equal to or below the corresponding breakpoints proposed by the European Food Safety Authority, Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed Panel.

  12. Joint use of fungicides, insecticides and inoculants in the treatment of soybean seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Yara Cristiane Buhl; Dalchiavon, Flávio Carlos; Valadão, Franciele Caroline de Assis

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interference of the joint application of pesticides with seed inoculation on the survival of Bradyrhizobium has been reported in the last years. So, the objective of this study was to evaluate the joint use of fungicides, insecticides and inoculant in the treatment of soybean seeds on various parameters of Bradyrhizobium nodulation in soybean as well as on crop productivity parameters. The experiment was conducted during the 2013/2014 crop in the experimental field of the Institu...

  13. Zika virus preferentially replicates in the female reproductive tract after vaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanteri, Marion; Zarbock, Katie; Rourke, Tracy; Ma, Zhong-min; O’Connor, Shelby

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus that can cause severe defects in an infected fetus. ZIKV is also transmitted by sexual contact, although the relative importance of sexual transmission is unclear. To better understand the role of sexual transmission in ZIKV pathogenesis, a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of vaginal transmission was developed. ZIKV was readily transmitted to mature cycling female rhesus macaque (RM) by vaginal inoculation with 104–106 plaque-forming units (PFU). However, there was variability in susceptibility between the individual RM with 1–>8 vaginal inoculations required to establish infection. After treatment with Depoprovera, a widely used contraceptive progestin, two RM that initially resisted 8 vaginal ZIKV inoculations became infected after one ZIKV inoculation. Thus, Depoprovera seemed to enhance susceptibility to vaginal ZIKV transmission. Unexpectedly, the kinetics of virus replication and dissemination after intravaginal ZIKV inoculation were markedly different from RM infected with ZIKV by subcutaneous (SQ) virus inoculation. Several groups have reported that after SQ ZIKV inoculation vRNA is rapidly detected in blood plasma with vRNA less common in urine and saliva and only rarely detected in female reproductive tract (FRT) secretions. In contrast, in vaginally inoculated RM, plasma vRNA is delayed for several days and ZIKV replication in, and vRNA shedding from, the FRT was found in all 6 animals. Further, after intravaginal transmission ZIKV RNA shedding from FRT secretions was detected before or simultaneously with plasma vRNA, and persisted for at least as long. Thus, ZIKV replication in the FRT was independent of, and often preceded virus replication in the tissues contributing to plasma vRNA. These results support the conclusion that ZIKV preferentially replicates in the FRT after vaginal transmission, but not after SQ transmission, and raise the possibility that there is enhanced fetal infection and pathology

  14. Evaluation of spray and point inoculation methods for the phenotyping of Puccinia striiformis on wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Chris Khadgi; Thach, Tine; Hovmøller, Mogens Støvring

    2016-01-01

    The fungus Puccinia striiformis causes yellow (stripe) rust on wheat worldwide. In the present article, new methods utilizing an engineered fluid (Novec 7100) as a carrier of urediniospores were compared with commonly used inoculation methods. In general, Novec 7100 facilitated a faster and more...... for the assessment of quantitative epidemiological parameters. New protocols for spray and point inoculation of P. striiformis on wheat are presented, along with the prospect for applying these in rust research and resistance breeding activities....

  15. Purification of Encephalitozoon Cultures Contaminated by Mycoplasmas by Murine Intraperitoneal Inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridoux, Olivier; Foucault, Cédric; Drancourt, Michel

    1998-01-01

    Encephalitozoon species are strict intracellular microsporidia. Cocultures with eukaryotic cell lines can become accidently contaminated by mycoplasmas. We propose a decontamination protocol based on differential cell targeting after intraperitoneal inoculation in mice. Mycoplasma-free microsporidia were isolated from the brains and spleens of inoculated mice 24 h postinoculation by using the centrifugation shell vial system. Identification was confirmed by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA. PMID:9666031

  16. Preempting Performance Challenges: The Effects of Inoculation Messaging on Attacks to Task Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ben; Compton, Josh; Whiddett, Ryan; Anthony, David R.; Dimmock, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Although inoculation messages have been shown to be effective for inducing resistance to counter-attitudinal attacks, researchers have devoted relatively little attention toward studying the way in which inoculation theory principles might support challenges to psychological phenomena other than attitudes (e.g., self-efficacy). Prior to completing a physical (i.e., balance) task, undergraduates (N = 127, Mage = 19.20, SD = 2.16) were randomly assigned to receive either a control or inoculation message, and reported their confidence in their ability regarding the upcoming task. During the task, a confederate provided standardized negative feedback to all participants regarding their performance, and following the completion of the task, participants again reported their self-efficacy along with measures assessing in-task processes. Findings supported the viability of efficacy inoculation; controlling for pre-task self-efficacy, task performance, and relevant psycho-social variables (e.g., resilience, self-confidence robustness), participants in the inoculation condition reported greater confidence in their ability (i.e., task self-efficacy) than those in the control condition at post-task. Relative to those in the inoculation condition, participants in the control condition also experienced greater concentration disruption and self-presentation concerns during the task. PMID:25898287

  17. Glässer's disease in piglets produced by intraperitoneal inoculation with Haemophilus parasuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozumi, T; Hiramune, T; Kobayashi, K

    1981-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis was inoculated into the abdominal cavities of piglets. Its infective doses varied from 1.4 X 10(6) to 1.0 X 10(9) organisms. When inoculated with 1.0 X 10(9) or 1.6 X 10(8) organisms, piglets were affected with fibrinous polyserositis associated with arthritis and purulent meningitis. The three disorders were considered to be characteristic of Glässer's disease. Septicemia was also found in many of the infected piglets, some of which died within a few days after inoculation. No lesions were observed in piglets inoculated with 1.4 X 10(7) or 1.4 X 10(6) organisms. It was difficult to reisolate H.parasuis from lesions, especially those in the abdominal cavities of piglets killed on the 6th day after inoculation. Agglutinating and complement-fixing antibodies were present in the piglets with Glässer's syndrome examined on the 6th day after inoculation. Neither of them was detected in any piglet manifesting no clinical signs, except transient pyrexia.

  18. Experimental inoculation of raccoons (Procyon lotor) with Spiroplasma mirum and transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamir, Amir N; Greenlee, Justin J; Stanton, Thad B; Smith, Jodi D; Doucette, Stephanie; Kunkle, Robert A; Stasko, Judith A; Richt, Juergen A; Kehrli, Marcus E

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether or not Spiroplasma mirum would be capable of producing lesions of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) when inoculated in raccoons (Procyon lotor) and, if that was possible, to compare the clinicopathological findings with those of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) in the same experimental model. For this purpose, 5 groups (n = 5) of raccoon kits were inoculated intracerebrally with either S. mirum and/or TME. Two other groups (n = 5) of raccoon kits served as sham-inoculated controls. All animals inoculated with TME, either alone or in combination, showed clinical signs of neurologic disorder and were euthanized within 6 mo post-inoculation (MPI). None of the carcasses revealed gross lesions. Spongiform encephalopathy was observed by light microscopy and the presence of abnormal disease-causing prion protein (PrP(d)) was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot (WB) techniques in only the raccoons administered TME. Raccoons inoculated with Spiroplasma, but not administered TME agent, were euthanized at 30 MPI. They did not show clinical neurologic signs, their brains did not have lesions of spongiform encephalopathy, and their tissues were negative for S. mirum by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for PrP(d) by IHC and WB techniques. The results of this study indicate that Spiroplasma mirum does not induce TSE-like disease in raccoons.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii infections in red-tailed hawks inoculated orally with tissue cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, D S; Dubey, J P; Blagburn, B L

    1991-04-01

    The response to inoculation of Toxoplasma gondii tissue cysts was examined in 3 red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). One hawk (hawk 1) was inoculated orally with 3.000 tissue cysts of the GT-1 isolate of T. gondii and 2 hawks (hawks 2 and 3) each were inoculated orally with 12,000 tissue cysts of a mixture of 8 isolates of T. gondii. None of the hawks developed clinical signs of toxoplasmosis. Serum antibodies were measured with the modified direct agglutination test using formalin-fixed tachyzoites. Hawk 1 had a titer of 1:40 prior to inoculation and did not have an increase in titer during the study. Hawks 2 and 3 had titers of 1:5 and 1:10, respectively, prior to inoculation, and both had increased titers (titers greater than or equal to 1:60) by 1 wk postinoculation and remained T. gondii antibody positive throughout the 10 wk of the study. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from the heart and breast muscle of hawk 1. The biologic behavior of this T. gondii isolate was different from the 1 inoculated, and it probably represents a prior natural infection. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from the brain, heart, breast muscle, and a mixture of gizzard and proventriculus from hawk 2 and from breast muscle of hawk 3. Toxoplasma gondii was not isolated from the eye, lung, liver, kidney, or spleen of any red-tailed hawk.

  20. Phanerochaete chrysosporium inoculation shapes the indigenous fungal communities during agricultural waste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiachao; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Yaoning; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Binbin; Sun, Weimin; Chen, Ming; Yu, Man; Huang, Hongli; Zhu, Yi

    2014-09-01

    Inoculation with exogenous white-rot fungi has been proven to be an efficient method to promote lignocellulose biodegradation during agricultural waste composting. Indigenous fungal communities, the most important organisms responsible for mineralization and decomposition of lignocellulosic materials in composts, can be affected by sample properties and other biotic factors. This research was conducted to determine the effects of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium inoculation on the indigenous fungal communities during agricultural waste composting. Fungal communities in samples with different inoculation regimes were investigated by sequencing and quantitative PCR. Results showed that P. chrysosporium inoculants produced significant negative effects on the indigenous fungal community abundance during the thermophilic stage. Samples inoculated during Phase II contained higher proportion of Acremonium chrysogenum and Galactomyces geotrichum, while those non-inoculated samples were dominated by Coprinopsis cinerea and Scytalidium thermophilum. Moreover, the indigenous fungal community abundance was significantly correlated with the C/N ratio, water soluble carbon and moisture content (P < 0.05). Redundancy analysis indicated that the most variation in distribution of indigenous fungal community structure was statistically explained by nitrate, C/N ratio, and moisture content, factors which solely explained 29.6 % (F = 30.316, P = 0.002), 25.6 % (F = 26.191, P = 0.002) and 10.0 % (F = 10.249, P = 0.002) of the variation in the indigenous fungal community structure, respectively.

  1. Characterization of the fecal microbiota of pigs before and after inoculation with "Brachyspira hampsonii".

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    Matheus O Costa

    Full Text Available "Brachyspira hampsonii" causes disease indistinguishable from swine dysentery, and the structure of the intestinal microbiome likely plays a role in determining susceptibility of individual pigs to infection and development of clinical disease. The objectives of the current study were to determine if the pre-inoculation fecal microbiota differed between inoculated pigs that did (INOC MH or did not (INOC non-MH develop mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea following challenge with "B. hampsonii", and to quantify changes in the structure of the microbiome following development of clinical disease. Fecal microbiota profiles were generated based on amplification and sequencing of the cpn60 universal target sequence from 89 samples from 18 pigs collected at -8, -5, -3 and 0 days post-inoculation, and at termination. No significant differences in richness, diversity or taxonomic composition distinguished the pre-inoculation microbiomes of INOC MH and INOC non-MH pigs. However, the development of bloody diarrhea in inoculated pigs was associated with perturbation of the microbiota relative to INOC non-MH or sham-inoculated control pigs. Specifically, the fecal microbiota of INOC MH pigs was less dense (fewer total 16S rRNA copies per gram of feces, and had a lower Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio. Further investigation of the potential long-term effects of Brachyspira disease on intestinal health and performance is warranted.

  2. Combined inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum for enhancing plant growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandheep, A R; Asok, A K; Jisha, M S

    2013-06-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the plant growth promoting efficiency of combined inoculation of rhizobacteria on Vanilla plants. Based on the in vitro performance of indigenous Trichoderma spp. and Pseudomonas spp., four effective antagonists were selected and screened under greenhouse experiment for their growth enhancement potential. The maximum percentage of growth enhancement were observed in the combination of Trichoderma harzianum with Pseudomonas fluorescens treatment followed by Pseudomonas fluorescens, Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas putida and Trichoderma virens, respectively in decreasing order. Combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens registered the maximum length of vine (82.88 cm), highest number of leaves (26.67/plant), recorded the highest fresh weight of shoots (61.54 g plant(-1)), fresh weight of roots (4.46 g plant(-1)) and dry weight of shoot (4.56 g plant(-1)) where as the highest dry weight of roots (2.0806 g plant(-1)) were achieved with treatments of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Among the inoculated strains, combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens recorded the maximum nitrogen uptake (61.28 mg plant(-1)) followed by the combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum (std) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (std) (55.03 mg plant(-1)) and the highest phosphorus uptake (38.80 mg plant(-1)) was recorded in dual inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  3. Preempting performance challenges: the effects of inoculation messaging on attacks to task self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ben; Compton, Josh; Whiddett, Ryan; Anthony, David R; Dimmock, James A

    2015-01-01

    Although inoculation messages have been shown to be effective for inducing resistance to counter-attitudinal attacks, researchers have devoted relatively little attention toward studying the way in which inoculation theory principles might support challenges to psychological phenomena other than attitudes (e.g., self-efficacy). Prior to completing a physical (i.e., balance) task, undergraduates (N = 127, Mage = 19.20, SD = 2.16) were randomly assigned to receive either a control or inoculation message, and reported their confidence in their ability regarding the upcoming task. During the task, a confederate provided standardized negative feedback to all participants regarding their performance, and following the completion of the task, participants again reported their self-efficacy along with measures assessing in-task processes. Findings supported the viability of efficacy inoculation; controlling for pre-task self-efficacy, task performance, and relevant psycho-social variables (e.g., resilience, self-confidence robustness), participants in the inoculation condition reported greater confidence in their ability (i.e., task self-efficacy) than those in the control condition at post-task. Relative to those in the inoculation condition, participants in the control condition also experienced greater concentration disruption and self-presentation concerns during the task.

  4. Preempting performance challenges: the effects of inoculation messaging on attacks to task self-efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Jackson

    Full Text Available Although inoculation messages have been shown to be effective for inducing resistance to counter-attitudinal attacks, researchers have devoted relatively little attention toward studying the way in which inoculation theory principles might support challenges to psychological phenomena other than attitudes (e.g., self-efficacy. Prior to completing a physical (i.e., balance task, undergraduates (N = 127, Mage = 19.20, SD = 2.16 were randomly assigned to receive either a control or inoculation message, and reported their confidence in their ability regarding the upcoming task. During the task, a confederate provided standardized negative feedback to all participants regarding their performance, and following the completion of the task, participants again reported their self-efficacy along with measures assessing in-task processes. Findings supported the viability of efficacy inoculation; controlling for pre-task self-efficacy, task performance, and relevant psycho-social variables (e.g., resilience, self-confidence robustness, participants in the inoculation condition reported greater confidence in their ability (i.e., task self-efficacy than those in the control condition at post-task. Relative to those in the inoculation condition, participants in the control condition also experienced greater concentration disruption and self-presentation concerns during the task.

  5. Quantification and Gene Expression Analysis of Histone Deacetylases in Common Bean during Rust Fungal Inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melmaiee, Kalpalatha; Kalavacharla, Venu Kal; Brown, Adrianne; Todd, Antonette; Thurston, Yaqoob; Elavarthi, Sathya

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play an important role in plant growth, development, and defense processes and are one of the primary causes of epigenetic modifications in a genome. There was only one study reported on epigenetic modifications of the important legume crop, common bean, and its interaction with the fungal rust pathogen Uromyces appendiculatus prior to this project. We measured the total active HDACs levels in leaf tissues and observed expression patterns for the selected HDAC genes at 0, 12, and 84 hours after inoculation in mock inoculated and inoculated plants. Colorimetric analysis showed that the total amount of HDACs present in the leaf tissue decreased at 12 hours in inoculated plants compared to mock inoculated control plants. Gene expression analyses indicated that the expression pattern of gene PvSRT1 is similar to the trend of total active HDACs in this time course experiment. Gene PvHDA6 showed increased expression in the inoculated plants during the time points measured. This is one of the first attempts to study expression levels of HDACs in economically important legumes in the context of plant pathogen interactions. Findings from our study will be helpful to understand trends of total active HDACs and expression patterns of these genes under study during biotic stress.

  6. Quantification and Gene Expression Analysis of Histone Deacetylases in Common Bean during Rust Fungal Inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpalatha Melmaiee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs play an important role in plant growth, development, and defense processes and are one of the primary causes of epigenetic modifications in a genome. There was only one study reported on epigenetic modifications of the important legume crop, common bean, and its interaction with the fungal rust pathogen Uromyces appendiculatus prior to this project. We measured the total active HDACs levels in leaf tissues and observed expression patterns for the selected HDAC genes at 0, 12, and 84 hours after inoculation in mock inoculated and inoculated plants. Colorimetric analysis showed that the total amount of HDACs present in the leaf tissue decreased at 12 hours in inoculated plants compared to mock inoculated control plants. Gene expression analyses indicated that the expression pattern of gene PvSRT1 is similar to the trend of total active HDACs in this time course experiment. Gene PvHDA6 showed increased expression in the inoculated plants during the time points measured. This is one of the first attempts to study expression levels of HDACs in economically important legumes in the context of plant pathogen interactions. Findings from our study will be helpful to understand trends of total active HDACs and expression patterns of these genes under study during biotic stress.

  7. Soil Mesofauna Response to Cover Crops and Mycorrhizal Inoculated Plantation on Limestone Quarry Revegetation

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    Retno Prayudyaningsih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cover crops establishment followed by mycorrhizal inoculated tree plantation accelerate limestone quaryy restoration. Soil mesofauna is a useful indicator for assessing biodiversity recovery, as they are sensitive to human disturbance and involved in ecological processes. In this research, soil mesofauna presence used to evaluate limestone quarry restoration by cover crops and mycorrhizal inoculated tree esatblisment. Soil mesofauna are measured using individual density, species diversity, richness and important value. The study was conducted in four types of areas on limestone postmining lands are open areas/natural conditions without planting, cover crop area, non mycorrhizalinoculated plant area and mycorrhizal-inoculated plant area. The result showed The higher individual density, diversity and species richness of soil mesofauna on cover crops and mycorrhizal inoculated plant area than other areas are indicators of limestone quarry restoration rate. Furthermore the presence of Formicidae family that dominated on cover crops and mycorrhizal inoculated plant area, and emergence of Acari group only on mycorrhizal inoculated area also an indicator of limestone quarry restoration.

  8. Inoculation of the nonlegume Capsicum annuum (L.) with Rhizobium strains. 1. Effect on bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity, and fruit ripeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luís R; Azevedo, Jessica; Pereira, Maria J; Carro, Lorena; Velazquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2014-01-22

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is an economically important agricultural crop and an excellent dietary source of natural colors and antioxidant compounds. The levels of these compounds can vary according to agricultural practices, like inoculation with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria. In this work we evaluated for the first time the effect of the inoculation of two Rhizobium strains on C. annuum metabolites and bioactivity. The results revealed a decrease of organic acids and no effect on phenolics and capsaicinoids of leaves from inoculated plants. In the fruits from inoculated plants organic acids and phenolic compounds decreased, showing that fruits from inoculated plants present a higher ripeness stage than those from uninoculated ones. In general, the inoculation with Rhizobium did not improve the antioxidant activity of pepper fruits and leaves. Considering the positive effect on fruit ripening, the inoculation of C. annuum with Rhizobium is a beneficious agricultural practice for this nonlegume.

  9. Factors affecting the numbers of expected viable lactic acid bacteria in inoculant applicator tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windle, M C; Kung, L

    2016-11-01

    The application of correct numbers of viable microorganisms to forages at the time of ensiling is one of the most important factors affecting the probability of a beneficial effect from an inoculant. The objective of this study was to determine relationships between numbers of expected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from silage inoculants in application tanks and various factors that might affect their viability. The pH and temperature of inoculant-water mixes were measured in applicator tanks (n=53) on farms in Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, and California during the corn harvest season of 2012. Samples were collected on-farm and plated on de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe agar to enumerate LAB and establish the number of viable LAB (cfu/mL). Expected numbers of LAB were calculated from the minimum label guarantees for viable bacteria and mixing rates with water. In addition, the pH of the inoculant-water mixes at sampling, the ambient temperature at sampling, and the length of time that the samples had been in the tank were measured and obtained. The log difference between the measured and expected numbers of LAB was calculated and expressed as ΔM - E in log scale. Ambient temperature at sampling had no relationship with time in the tank or ΔM - E. Most (83%) of the inoculants had been mixed with water in the applicator tanks for <10h. For these samples, a negative linear correlation (R2=0.36) existed between time that the inoculant-water mixes were in the applicators tanks and ΔM - E. The pH of the inoculant-water mixes was also negatively correlated (R2=0.28) with time in the applicator tank, but pH was not related to ΔM - E. The temperatures of the inoculant-water mixtures were negatively correlated with ΔM - E (R2=0.39). Seven of 8 samples whose ΔM - E were at least -0.95 or more lower than expected (equivalent of about 1 or more log concentration less than expected) had water temperatures above 35°C. These data support our previous laboratory findings and

  10. Repeated inoculations with the lung and heartworm nematodeAngiostrongylus vasorumresult in increasing larval excretion and worm burden in the red fox (Vulpes vulpes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolsey, Ian David; Webster, P; Thamsborg, S; Schnyder, Manuela; Monrad, Jesper; Kapel, C M O

    2017-12-01

    The French heartworm Angiostongylus vasorum is found in European red fox ( Vulpes vulpes ) and dog populations, where it appears to be spreading geographically. Once introduced into new areas, it establishes in local fox populations, typically to over 50% prevalence in a few years. High susceptibility and constant excretion of first stage larvae (L1) by the definitive hosts are prerequisites for sustaining high parasite biomass in a particular habitat. The present study explores the hypothesis that repeated ingestion of gastropods in nature will result in accumulation of adult worms and elevated excretion of L1 in feces. Experimentally infected foxes were subsequently inoculated via stomach tube once (9 weeks post initial inoculation) or twice (9 and 13 weeks post inoculation (wpi)) with 100 third stage A. vasorum larvae (L3) previously isolated from aquatic snails infected with L1 from a naturally infected dog. Despite large variation in fecal larval excretion for the individual animals within the groups, excretion of L1 was significantly higher in foxes twice inoculated as compared to foxes inoculated only once. With an outlier in the once inoculated group removed, excretion became significantly higher in the three times inoculated group. Establishment of adult worms varied and only a trend to higher worm burdens was found in the group of foxes inoculated three times. However, this became significant with the same single outlier removed. Overall, it appears that protective immunity to A. vasorum does not appear to occur in V. vulpes with animals exhibiting high infection intensities without obvious clinical signs. The increasing larval excretion in foxes being repeatedly exposed to A. vasorum L3 support the hypothesis that foxes under natural conditions may repeatedly ingest infected gastropods and remain a source of environmental contamination for several months, potentially contributing to the establishment of endemic foci through increasing L1 excretion.

  11. Cacao (Theobroma cacao L. Resistance Evaluation Againts Black Pod Diseaseand Effectiveness of Inoculation Methods

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    Rubiyo Rubiyo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this experiment was to standardize method of resistance evaluation of cacao germplasm against Phytophthora palmivora, the pathogen causing black pod disease in cacao. The sepecific objectives were to evaluate (1 effects of inoculum type and pod injury, (2 effects of inoculum type and seedling injury, and (3 effects of genetic background of cacao seedlings on infection of P. palmivora. In this experiment, effectiveness of either zoospora or mycellia was evaluated as inoculation sources for pod, leaf and stem of cacao clone GC 7 and Sca 12. Part of the tested cacao pods, leaves, and stems were injured prior to P. palmivora inoculation while the others were not. Observations were conducted on diameter of the necrosed symptoms on inoculated cacao pods, number of necrosed spot on inoculated leaf, and the length of necrosed symptoms on stem of tested cacao seedlings. Results of the experiment indicated inoculation using mycelia of P. palmivora was more effective than zoospora and injuring the tested cacao pods and seedlings before P. palmivora inoculation can be used to prediction the resistance of tested cacao clones against P. Palmivora infection. Results of resistance prediction using detached pod assay was similar to that of using seedling assay; therefore, seedling assay could be used as an alternattive method of resistance evaluation. Cacao F1 hybrids derived from TSH 858 x Sca 12 showed some resistance against P. palmivora and they might potentially result in high yielding lines.Key words: Phytophthora palmivora, cacao breeding, germplasm evaluation, inoculation standardization, pod assay, seedling assay.

  12. Field Trials Reveal Ecotype-Specific Responses to Mycorrhizal Inoculation in Rice.

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    Abdala Gamby Diedhiou

    Full Text Available The overuse of agricultural chemicals such as fertilizer and pesticides aimed at increasing crop yield results in environmental damage, particularly in the Sahelian zone where soils are fragile. Crop inoculation with beneficial soil microbes appears as a good alternative for reducing agricultural chemical needs, especially for small farmers. This, however, requires selecting optimal combinations of crop varieties and beneficial microbes tested in field conditions. In this study, we investigated the response of rice plants to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB under screenhouse and field conditions in two consecutive seasons in Senegal. Evaluation of single and mixed inoculations with AMF and PGPB was conducted on rice (Oryza sativa variety Sahel 202, on sterile soil under screenhouse conditions. We observed that inoculated plants, especially plants treated with AMF, grew taller, matured earlier and had higher grain yield than the non-inoculated plants. Mixed inoculation trials with two AMF strains were then conducted under irrigated field conditions with four O. sativa varieties, two O. glaberrima varieties and two interspecific NERICA varieties, belonging to 3 ecotypes (upland, irrigated, and rainfed lowland. We observed that the upland varieties had the best responses to inoculation, especially with regards to grain yield, harvest index and spikelet fertility. These results show the potential of using AMF to improve rice production with less chemical fertilizers and present new opportunities for the genetic improvement in rice to transfer the ability of forming beneficial rice-microbe associations into high yielding varieties in order to increase further rice yield potentials.

  13. Effectivenes of inoculation in alfalfa breeding in ecological conditions of the Bjelovar and Bilogora county

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    Darko Uher

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Development and basic existence of animal production as well as production of high quality milk depends upon possibility of sufficient production of quality and protein sufficient forage. Forage crop that satisfies these demands is alfalfa which is one of the most important perennial forage crop legumes. The aim of this study was to enhance alfalfa production on acid soil by liming and alfalfa seed inoculation with efficient Sinorhizobium meliloti strains in order to reduce the use of mineral nitrogen fertilization and enable qualitative and cost effective production of forage on the dairy farms. Field trial was established at family farm in the area of Bjelovar and Bilogora county. During two years experimental period statistically significant influence of inoculation and liming on forage and dry matteryield was determined. Significantly the lowest yields were determined on untreated plots without liming material. In all untreated plots, significantly lower yields were determined, but significant differences in yields were also obtained by inoculation with different S. meliloti strains, emphasizing the importance of strains selection used for alfalfa inoculation. In both experimental years total forage yield were ranging from 34 t/ha (untreated plots without liming up to 60 t/ha on plots inoculated with strain 2011 and without liming. Values of total dry matter yield for both experimental years ranged from 6.5 t/ha (untreated plots without liming up to 15,7 t/ha on plots inoculated with strain 2011 without liming. Results of this study showed that application of liming materials for acidity removal had positive effect on alfalfa yields in both experimental years and significantly improved alfalfa production on acid soils. The results of this study clearly showed that inoculation with selected S. meliloti strains may improve alfalfa production on acid soils and may contribute to more efficient forage production for dairy farms under particular

  14. Performance of broilers experimentally inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium and fed diets with addition of lactulosis

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    Eliete Souza Santana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the influence of lactulose on performance as well as its ability to prevent colonization by Salmonella Typhimurium in broilers orally inoculated with this pathogen. The design adopted was completely randomized, with 630 one-day-old male chicks distributed into six treatments, with seven replications and 15 birds per experimental unit. The treatments comprised the following procedures: T1 (control group - no S. Typhimurium inoculation or supply of lactulosis; T2 - only inoculation of S. Typhimurium; T3 - only lactulosis supply; T4 supply of lactulosis and S. Typhimurium inoculation on the first day of life; T5 - supply of lactulosis 48 hours before S. Typhimurium inoculation; and T6 - supply of lactulosis 48 hours after inoculation of S. Typhimurium. Performance variables were evaluated on the seventh, 14th, 21st and 28th days of age; fragments of the duodenum and jejunum were collected and sent to histomorphometric assessment at 14 days of age, and S. Typhimurium excretion was verified in cloacal swabs on the 10th, 24th and 35th days of age. Performance data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5% and fecal excretion data were assessed by non-parametric chi-square test. Better weight gain and feed conversion were observed in groups fed lactulosis with or without challenge of S. Typhimurium up to 21 days of age. Reduced duodenum villous height was verified on the 14th day in groups challenged with the pathogen. Reduction of S. Typhimurium fecal excretion was verified in broilers fed lactulosis from the first day of life on and 48 hours before receiving S. Typhimurium directly into the crop. Lactulosis increases broiler performance up to one week after its inoculation, influences duodenum villous height and reduces the fecal excretion of Salmonella Typhimurium.

  15. Effect of Titanium Inoculation on Tribological Properties of High Chromium Cast Iron

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    Siekaniec D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation focuses on the study of the influence of titanium inoculation on tribological properties of High Chromium Cast Iron. Studies of tribological properties of High Chromium Cast Iron, in particularly the wear resistance are important because of the special application of this material. High Chromium Cast Iron is widely used for parts that require high wear resistance for example the slurry pumps, brick dies, several pieces of mine drilling equipment, rock machining equipment, and similar ones. Presented research described the effects of various amounts of Fe-Ti as an inoculant for wear resistance. The results of wear resistance were collated with microstructural analysis. The melts were conducted in industrial conditions. The inoculation was carried out on the stream of liquid metal. The following amount of inoculants have been used; 0.17% Fe-Ti, 0.33% Fe-Ti and 0.66% Fe-Ti. The tests were performed on the machine type MAN. The assessment of wear resistance was made on the basis of the weight loss. The experimental results indicate that inoculation improve the wear resistance. In every sample after inoculation the wear resistance was at least 20% higher than the reference sample. The best result, thus the smallest wear loss was achieved for inoculation by 0.66% Fe-Ti. There is the correlation between the changing in microstructure and wear resistance. With greater amount of titanium the microstructure is finer. More fine carbides do not crumbling so quickly from the matrix, improving the wear resistance.

  16. Experimental inoculation of porcine circoviruses type 1 (PCV1) and type 2 (PCV2) in rabbits and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Josefina; Balasch, Monica; Segalés, Joaquim; Calsamiglia, Maria; Rodríguez-Arrioja, Gabriela M; Plana-Durán, Juan; Domingo, Mariano

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the susceptibility of rabbits and mice experimentally inoculated with porcine circoviruses type 1 (PCV1) and type 2 (PCV2) to infection and development of disease and/or lesions. Forty six New Zealand rabbits and 50 ICR-CDI mice were both divided into two groups comprising PCVI and PCV2 inoculated animals, and a third group inoculated with non-infected cell culture medium. Rabbits were inoculated intranasally while mice were inoculated intraperitoneally. Clinical signs and body weights were recorded at the start of the experiment and at necropsy. Animals were bled, euthanised and necropsied at days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14 and 20 post-inoculation and samples were collected for histopathological, serological, in situ hybridisation and PCR analysis. No clinical signs or gross and microscopic lesions compatible with PCV2 infections such as those seen in pigs were observed. No presence of PCV2 nucleic acid was detected in rabbits and mice by in situ hybridisation. Only one mouse inoculated with PCV1 seroconverted on day 20 P1. PCV1 and PCV2 genome was detected in serum by PCR in mice inoculated with each porcine circovirus, while rabbits were negative for both viral types. These studies indicated that porcine circoviruses did not cause any disease or microscopic lesions in inoculated rabbits and mice during the experimental period. However, intraperitoneally inoculated mice might have harboured PCV2 in circulation without evidence of viral replication.

  17. Microbial Inoculants and Their Impact on Soil Microbial Communities: A Review

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    Darine Trabelsi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the survival of inoculated fungal and bacterial strains in field and the effects of their release on the indigenous microbial communities has been of great interest since the practical use of selected natural or genetically modified microorganisms has been developed. Soil inoculation or seed bacterization may lead to changes in the structure of the indigenous microbial communities, which is important with regard to the safety of introduction of microbes into the environment. Many reports indicate that application of microbial inoculants can influence, at least temporarily, the resident microbial communities. However, the major concern remains regarding how the impact on taxonomic groups can be related to effects on functional capabilities of the soil microbial communities. These changes could be the result of direct effects resulting from trophic competitions and antagonistic/synergic interactions with the resident microbial populations, or indirect effects mediated by enhanced root growth and exudation. Combination of inoculants will not necessarily produce an additive or synergic effect, but rather a competitive process. The extent of the inoculation impact on the subsequent crops in relation to the buffering capacity of the plant-soil-biota is still not well documented and should be the focus of future research.

  18. Experimental dermatophytosis in hamsters inoculated with Trichophyton mentagrophytes in the cheek pouch

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    ARRUDA Maria Sueli Parreira de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of T. mentagrophytes inoculation in the cheek pouch of the hamster, an immunologically privileged site. Forty two animals were used: 21 inoculated with 10(6 fungi in the cheek pouch (group 1 and 21 inoculated initially with 10(6 fungi in the foot pad and 15 days later in the cheek pouch, with the same amount of fungi (group 2. Animals were sacrificed at 20 hours, 3, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 120 days; samples from inoculated cheek pouch, and foot pads submitted to the foot pad test (FPT, were collected. Independent of group and time of evolution of infection, animals did not develop delayed hypersensitivity evaluated through the FPT. The pre-inoculation of fungi in the foot pad did not change the morphology of lesions induced in the cheek pouch. Therefore, in animals of group 1 and 2, the introduction of the fungus in the cheek pouch resulted in focal lesion composed of a sterile acute inflammatory infiltrate, with abscess formation that evolved to a macrophagic reaction, and later to resolution even in the absence of immune response detectable by FPT. Our results indicate that in spite of the important role of the immune response in the spontaneous regression of dermatophytosis, other factors are also an integral part in the defense against this fungal infection.

  19. Effects of an enzyme mixture, an inoculant, and their interaction on silage fermentation and dairy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, M R

    1992-03-01

    Second-crop, mixed grass-legume forage was ensiled in four bunker silos either untreated or after application at the forage harvester of an enzyme mixture containing cellulase, xylanase, cellobiase, and glucose oxidase, a commercial inoculant, or both additives combined. Sixteen multiparous midlactation Holstein cows in a 4 x 4 Latin square design received each silage in a 50:50 forage: concentrate diet to determine effects of silage additives on milk production and composition. Enzyme treatment reduced silage pH, concentrations of xylose and total sugars, and concentration and proportion of cell-wall arabinose. Titratable acidity, buffering capacity, concentration of residual water-soluble carbohydrate, and digestibility of DM in vitro were increased, and levels of silage structural carbohydrates were reduced. Inoculation, both alone and in the combined treatment, reduced silage pH compared with control, but inoculation alone was more effective than the combination. Enzyme treatment increased DMI and production of milk, FCM, SCM, milk protein, and milk SNF. The two silage additives were antagonistic when combined and did not improve silage fermentation, nutritional value, or animal performance, and enzyme degradation of forage structural carbohydrates was reduced. Inoculation also reduced silage aerobic stability. Combination of enzyme systems with inoculants requires careful evaluation to avoid antagonistic interactions.

  20. The dynamics of apoplast phenolics in tobacco leaves following inoculation with bacteria

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    Con Jacyn Baker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that the accumulation of apoplastic phenolics is stimulated in planta in response to bacterial inoculation. Past studies have shown that levels of extracellular phenolics are elicited in plant cell suspensions in response to bacteria, and that tomato plants infected with viroids showed changes in apoplastic phenolics. The method described here monitored changes in apoplastic phenolics in tobacco leaves following bacterial inoculation of the same tissue. Inoculation with a saprophyte, Pseudomonas fluorescens, which does not cause visible symptoms or physical damage, was used to elicit phenolics and examine the effects of variable parameters on phenolic composition. Location of the inoculation on the leaf, position or developmental age of the leaf on the plant, and inoculum concentration were standardized for further experiments. The patterns of phenolic change in the apoplast were compared for tobacco inoculated with P. syringae pathovars, pv. syringae, which causes a resistant HR reaction within 15 h, and pv. tabaci, which causes a susceptible reaction with delayed visible symptoms. Both pathogens elicited lower increased levels of acetosyringone compared to the saprophyte, P. fluorescens but had greatly increased levels of the chlorogenic acid derivatives. The latter metabolites appear to have come from the intracellular stores, which could

  1. Messenger RNA expression of chicken CLOCK gene in the response to Campylobacter jejuni inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Liu, Liying; Zhang, Maozhi; Yang, Ning; Qi, Yukai; Sun, Yu; Li, Xianyao

    2015-09-01

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Previous research has shown that circadian rhythm plays a critical role in host response to C. jejuni colonization. The CLOCK gene is one of the core genes regulating circadian rhythms and shows significant expression on 7 d post-C. jejuni inoculation. The objective of this study was to investigate temporal and spatial expression of chicken CLOCK gene post-C. jejuni inoculation. Cecal and splenic RNA were isolated from 2 distinct chicken breeds and used to compare the mRNA expression of CLOCK gene between inoculated and noninoculated chickens within each breed and between breeds within each of inoculated and noninoculated groups. Our results showed that the CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 20 h postinoculation (hpi) in cecum and spleen in Jiningbairi chicken. CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 4 and 16 hpi and up-regulated at 8 hpi in cecum and spleen in specific pathogen free white leghorn noninoculated chicken. The findings suggested that expression of CLOCK gene was significantly changed post C. jejuin inoculation. This change was affected by genetic background, tissue, and time points postinoculation. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. Lupinus albus plants acquire mercury tolerance when inoculated with an Hg-resistant Bradyrhizobium strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Miguel A; Ruiz-Díez, Beatriz; Fajardo, Susana; López-Berdonces, Miguel A; Higueras, Pablo L; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2013-12-01

    One strain of Bradyrhizobium canariense (L-7AH) was selected for its metal-resistance and ability to nodulate white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) plants, from a collection of rhizobial strains previously created from soils of the Almadén mining district (Spain) with varying levels of Hg contamination. Plants were inoculated with either strain L-7AH (Hg-tolerant) or L-3 (Hg-sensitive, used as control), and watered with nutrient solutions supplemented with various concentrations (0-200 μM) of HgCl2 in a growth chamber. L. albus inoculated with L-7AH were able to nodulate even at the highest concentration of Hg while those inoculated with L-3 had virtually no nodules at Hg concentrations above 25 μM. Plants inoculated with L-7AH, but not those with the control strain, were able to accumulate large amounts of Hg in their roots and nodules. Nodulation with L-7AH allowed plants to maintain constant levels of both chlorophylls and carotenoids in their leaves and a high photosynthetic efficiency, whereas in those inoculated with L-3 both pigment content and photosynthetic efficiency decreased significantly as Hg concentration increased. Nitrogenase activity of plants nodulated with L-7AH remained fairly constant at all concentrations of Hg used. Results suggest that this symbiotic pair may be used for rhizoremediation of Hg-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. [Effects of straw application and earthworm inoculation on soil labile organic carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian-Guang; Li, Hui Xin; Chen, Xiao-Yun; Hu, Feng

    2007-04-01

    A six-year field plot experiment of rice-wheat rotation was conducted to study the effects of straw application and earthworm inoculation on cropland soil organic carbon and labile organic carbon. Five treatments were installed, i.e., CK, straw mulch (M), straw mulch plus earthworm inoculation (ME), incorporated straw with soil (I), and incorporated straw with soil plus earthworm inoculation (IE). The results showed that soil organic carbon content increased significantly after six years straw application, and treatment I was more efficient than treatment M. Earthworm inoculation under straw application had no significant effects on soil organic carbon content. Straw application, whether straw mulch or incorporated straw with soil, increased the content of soil labile organic carbon, and incorporated straw with soil was more beneficial to the increase of the contents of hot water-extractable carbon, potentially mineralizable carbon, acid-extractable carbon, readily oxidizable carbon, particulate organic carbon, and light fraction organic carbon. There was a little relationship between the quantitative variations of soil dissoluble organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon and the patterns of straw application. Among the treatments, the activity of soil organic carbon was decreased in the order of IF > I > M > ME > CK. Straw application pattern was the main factor affecting soil organic carbon and labile organic carbon, while earthworm inoculation was not universally significanfly effective to all kinds of soil labile organic carbon.

  4. EFFECT OF MYCORRHIZAL INOCULANTS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF MEXICAN LANDRACE AVOCADO ROOTSTOCKS

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    Edgar Castro Alvarado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to assess the effect of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF inoculants in the development of avocado rootstocks. Seeds of Mexican landrace avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. drymifolia were used, with two commercial inoculants: T1 containing Glomus fasciculatum, G. constrictum, G. tortuosum, G. geosporum,and Acaulospora scrobiculata, and T2, containing G. mosseae and G. cubense.  The plants inoculated with AMF showed more rapid growth than the no inoculant control as measured by plant height (50% and 54%, stem diameter (35% and 36%, leaf number (48% and 37% and length (31% and 40%, and root fresh weight (85% and 59%; however, no significant differences were observed between T1 and T2. The chlorophyll concentration in the leaves from T1 was 16.4% and T2 was 19% higher than the control suggesting a higher photosynthetic capacity in T1 and T2. Finally the shoot/root ratio, as indicator of the potential development of plantations, was 79% and 50% higher in mycorrhizal plants than in the control. In conclusion both T1 and T2 inoculants improved growth rate and vigor of avocado nursery rootstocks producing higher quality plants.

  5. Study upon the Moment of Ovulation in Sows to Establish the Optimum Moment for Semen Inoculation

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    Mariana Sandu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of artificial insemination depends equaly by semen quality and time of inoculation. The optimal time for inoculation was calculated usually from the moment of detection of heat, for double insemination, so that one of the two inoculations to approach the time of ovulation. To increase the efficiency of boars exploitation is necesary to change the method to a single insemination. To ensure normal fertility parameters with only one inoculation it is necessary to chose with great precision the moment of insemination ,in order to ensure the time for sperm capacitation and penetration of viable oocytes. Starting from the fact that major events such as forrowing and death occur, according to the circadian rhythm, in the second half of the night, this study aims to detect from this point of view the moment of ovulation, to find a more reliable calculation for the time of semen inoculation. The experiments were conducted on puberal gilts, which were not treated for induction of ovulation; the control for detecting the follicular dehiscence was done only on physiological oestrus. Females having symptoms at heat control were subject to series of laparatomias, complete with collection and examination of oocytes.

  6. Economic analysis of corn inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense associated with nitrogen sources and doses

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    Fernando Shintate Galindo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Azospirillum brasilense is a bacterium known for its biological nitrogen fixation (BNF in corn crops. However, there is a lack of comprehensive research defining how much mineral N should be applied to maximize the efficiency of BNF and attain high, economically sustainable yields. Moreover, it would be interesting to investigate whether adding urea with NBPT urease inhibitor might increase BNF in grasses. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense associated with N sources and doses in a Cerrado biome soil by evaluating the grain yield of irrigated corn in economic terms. The experiment was conducted in Selvíria, MS, Brazil under a no-till system on a Latossolo Vermelho distrófico (Oxisol. The experiment was set up as a randomized block design with four replications in a 2 × 5 × 2 factorial arrangement consisting of two sources of N (urea and urea with NBPT urease enzyme inhibitor and five N doses applied as top-dressing (0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 kg ha-1, with and without the inoculation of seeds with A. brasilense. Inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense makes corn growth much more profitable, irrespective of the dose and source of N. Addition of 200 kg ha-1 N in the form of conventional urea coupled with inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense increases grain yield; however, the highest economic return is obtained with N applied at 100 kg ha-1 with conventional urea and inoculation.

  7. Pongamia pinnata inoculated with Bradyrhizobium liaoningense PZHK1 shows potential for phytoremediation of mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiumei; Li, Yangxin; Li, Yanmei; Xu, Chaohua; Cui, Yongliang; Xiang, Quanju; Gu, Yunfu; Zhao, Ke; Zhang, Xiaoping; Penttinen, Petri; Chen, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Mine tailings contain high concentrations of metal contaminants and only little nutrients, making the tailings barren for decades after the mining has been terminated. Effective phytoremediation of mine tailings calls for deep-rooted, metal accumulating, and soil fertility increasing plants with tolerance against harsh environmental conditions. We assessed the potential of the biofuel leguminous tree Pongamia pinnata inoculated with plant growth promoting rhizobia to remediate iron-vanadium-titanium oxide (V-Ti magnetite) mine tailing soil by pot experiment and in situ remediation test. A metal tolerant rhizobia strain PZHK1 was isolated from the tailing soil and identified as Bradyrhizobium liaoningense by phylogenetic analysis. Inoculation with PZHK1 increased the growth of P. pinnata both in V-Ti magnetite mine tailings and in Ni-contaminated soil. Furthermore, inoculation increased the metal accumulation capacity and superoxide dismutase activity of P. pinnata. The concentrations of Ni accumulated by inoculated plants were higher than the hyperaccumulator threshold. Inoculated P. pinnata accumulated high concentration of Fe, far exceeding the upper limit (1000 mg kg-1) of Fe in plant tissue. In summary, P. pinnata-B. liaoningense PZHK1 symbiosis showed potential to be applied as an effective phytoremediation technology for mine tailings and to produce biofuel feedstock on the marginal land.

  8. The dynamics of apoplast phenolics in tobacco leaves following inoculation with bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Con J; Mock, Norton M; Smith, Jodi M; Aver'yanov, Andrey A

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the accumulation of apoplastic phenolics is stimulated in planta in response to bacterial inoculation. Past studies have shown that levels of extracellular phenolics are elicited in plant cell suspensions in response to bacteria, and that tomato plants infected with viroids showed changes in apoplastic phenolics. The method described here monitored changes in apoplastic phenolics in tobacco leaves following bacterial inoculation of the same tissue. Inoculation with a saprophyte, Pseudomonas fluorescens, which does not cause visible symptoms or physical damage, was used to elicit phenolics and examine the effects of variable parameters on phenolic composition. Location of the inoculation on the leaf, position, or developmental age of the leaf on the plant, and inoculum concentration were standardized for further experiments. The patterns of phenolic change in the apoplast were compared for tobacco inoculated with P. syringae pathovars, pv. syringae, which causes a resistant HR reaction within 15 h, and pv. tabaci, which causes a susceptible reaction with delayed visible symptoms. Both pathogens elicited lower increased levels of acetosyringone compared to the saprophyte, P. fluorescens but had greatly increased levels of the chlorogenic acid derivatives. The latter metabolites appear to have come from the intracellular stores, which could indicate a weakening of the apoplast/symplast barrier. This unexpected aspect will require further study of intracellular phenolics.

  9. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Gossypium thurberi in Response to Verticillium dahliae Inoculation

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    Weiping Fang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Verticillium wilt is threatening cotton productivity globally. This disease is caused by soil-borne Verticillium dahliae which directly infects cotton roots, and exclusively colonizes and occludes xylem vessels, finally resulting in necrosis, defoliation, and most severely, plant death. For the first time, iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification was applied to screen the differentially expressed proteins of Gossypium thurberi inoculated with V. dahliae. A total of 6533 proteins were identified from the roots of G. thurberi after inoculation with V. dahliae, and 396 showed up- and 279 down-regulated in comparison to a mock-inoculated roots. Of these identified proteins, the main functional groups were those involved in cell wall organization and reinforcement, disease-resistant chemicals of secondary metabolism, phytohormone signaling, pathogenesis-related proteins, and disease-resistant proteins. Physiological and biochemical analysis showed that peroxidase activity, which promotes the biosynthesis and accumulation of lignin, was induced early in the hypocotyl after inoculation with V. dahliae. Similarly, salicylic acid also accumulated significantly in hypocotyl of the seedlings after inoculation. These findings provide an important knowledge of the molecular events and regulatory networks occurring during G. thurberi-V. dahliae interaction, which may provide a foundation for breeding disease-resistance in cotton.

  10. Using shared needles for subcutaneous inoculation can transmit bluetongue virus mechanically between ruminant hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darpel, Karin E; Barber, James; Hope, Andrew; Wilson, Anthony J; Gubbins, Simon; Henstock, Mark; Frost, Lorraine; Batten, Carrie; Veronesi, Eva; Moffat, Katy; Carpenter, Simon; Oura, Chris; Mellor, Philip S; Mertens, Peter P C

    2016-02-08

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important arbovirus of ruminants that is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV infection of ruminants results in a high viraemia, suggesting that repeated sharing of needles between animals could result in its iatrogenic transmission. Studies defining the risk of iatrogenic transmission of blood-borne pathogens by less invasive routes, such as subcutaneous or intradermal inoculations are rare, even though the sharing of needles is common practice for these inoculation routes in the veterinary sector. Here we demonstrate that BTV can be transmitted by needle sharing during subcutaneous inoculation, despite the absence of visible blood contamination of the needles. The incubation period, measured from sharing of needles, to detection of BTV in the recipient sheep or cattle, was substantially longer than has previously been reported after experimental infection of ruminants by either direct inoculation of virus, or through blood feeding by infected Culicoides. Although such mechanical transmission is most likely rare under field condition, these results are likely to influence future advice given in relation to sharing needles during veterinary vaccination campaigns and will also be of interest for the public health sector considering the risk of pathogen transmission during subcutaneous inoculations with re-used needles.

  11. Identification and use of actinomycetes for enhanced nodulation of soybean co-inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, A K; Klubek, B; Varsa, E C

    2003-08-01

    The utilization of actinomycetes as potential soybean (Glycine max (L.)) co-inoculants was evaluated. Soil samples from Carbondale and Belleville, Ill., were used to inoculate pre-germinated soybean plants to determine antibiotic sensitivity in the native Bradyrhizobium japonicum population. Sensitivity was in the order kanamycin > tetracycline > oxytetracycline > rifampicin > neomycin. Antagonism by five actinomycete cultures toward seven test strains of B. japonicum was also assessed. The ranking average inhibition (across all seven B. japonicum strains) by these actino mycetes was Streptomyces kanamyceticus = Streptomyces coeruleoprunus > Streptomyces rimosus > Streptomyces sp. > Amy colatopsis mediterranei. Ten antibiotic combinations were used to isolate antibiotic-resistant mutants of B. japonicum I-110 and 3I1B-110 via successive cycles of mutation. Eighty-one antibiotic-resistant strains were isolated and tested for symbiotic competency; nine of which were selected for further characterization in a greenhouse pot study. Few differences in nodule number were caused by these treatments. Nodule occupancy varied from 0% to 18.3% when antibiotic-resistant strains of B. japonicum were used as the sole inoculants. However, when three mutant strains of B. japonicum were co-inoculated with S. kanamyceticus, significant increases in nodule occupancy (up to 55%) occurred. Increases in shoot nitrogen composition (27.1%-40.9%) were also caused by co-inoculation with S. kanamyceticus.

  12. Phosphorus Availability in Wheat, in Volcanic Soils Inoculated with Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacillus thuringiensis

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    Jorge Delfim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB is an ecological strategy that allows for increasing the availability of phosphorus (P in soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate P availability in wheat, in soils derived from volcanic ash (Andisol and Ultisol, and inoculated with phosphate-solubilizing Bacillus thuringiensis, the experiment was conducted in pots under greenhouse conditions using a completely randomized design. Wheat plants were inoculated and re-inoculated at 20 and 46 days after sowing (DAS, respectively, with B. thuringiensis; and, soil and plant sampling was performed after 46, 66, and 87 days based on the Zadoks growth scale (Z. The inoculation resulted in an 11% increase in P of the rhizosphere at Z46 (Ultisol, P also increased 34% and 67% in aerial tissues at Z46 (Andisol and Ultisol, respectively, while an increase of 75% was observed in root tissues at Z87 (Ultisol. Similarly, the inoculation resulted in increases in acid phosphatase activity (Andisol, soil microbial biomass (Andisol and Ultisol, and root biomass in plants (Ultisol, without achieving increase of the aerial biomass of the plants. The phosphate solubilizing B. thuringiensis strain showed some positive, but also negative effects in soils and plants, depending on the soil.

  13. Intranasal inoculation of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus with lyophilized chronic wasting disease prion particulate complexed to montmorillonite clay.

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    Tracy A Nichols

    Full Text Available Chronic wasting disease (CWD, the only known prion disease endemic in wildlife, is a persistent problem in both wild and captive North American cervid populations. This disease continues to spread and cases are found in new areas each year. Indirect transmission can occur via the environment and is thought to occur by the oral and/or intranasal route. Oral transmission has been experimentally demonstrated and although intranasal transmission has been postulated, it has not been tested in a natural host until recently. Prions have been shown to adsorb strongly to clay particles and upon oral inoculation the prion/clay combination exhibits increased infectivity in rodent models. Deer and elk undoubtedly and chronically inhale dust particles routinely while living in the landscape while foraging and rutting. We therefore hypothesized that dust represents a viable vehicle for intranasal CWD prion exposure. To test this hypothesis, CWD-positive brain homogenate was mixed with montmorillonite clay (Mte, lyophilized, pulverized and inoculated intranasally into white-tailed deer once a week for 6 weeks. Deer were euthanized at 95, 105, 120 and 175 days post final inoculation and tissues examined for CWD-associated prion proteins by immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that CWD can be efficiently transmitted utilizing Mte particles as a prion carrier and intranasal exposure.

  14. Inoculants for ensiling low-dry matter corn crop: a midlactation cow perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkhah, A; Ghaempour, A; Khorvash, M; Ghorbani, G R

    2011-10-01

    In many regions, optimum dry matter (DM) content of corn crop pre-ensilage cannot be ensured for management, agronomical and climatic reasons. Under such conditions, corn crops are harvested at low DM, and are easily exposed to unfavourable fermentation pathways and plant spoilage and wastage. Thus, it is a major question for dairy agriculturists whether certain microbial inoculants application to low-DM corn crop pre-ensilage affects silage quality and cow performance. The objective was to determine effects of adding microbial inoculants to low-DM corn crop at ensiling on silage quality, rumen fermentation and milk production of eight Holstein cows fed the treated silages. Whole corn plant was harvested at milk stage of maturity with 204 g DM/kg of fresh crop, cut to a theoretical particle length of 2 cm, filled in 60 t bunker silos, and treated layer by layer with either no inoculant (control), inoculant 'E' (100 000 cfu/g of fresh crop) containing mainly Lactobacillus plantarum, inoculant 'B' (100 000 cfu) containing mainly Pediococcus pentosanus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Propionibacter freudenreichii or a mixture of inoculants 'E' and 'B' (200,000 cfu). Inoculants were mixed with water and sprayed on thin layers of corn chops layer by layer followed by rolling to ensure proper oxygen outage and even microbial distribution throughout the plants. Eight multiparous lactating Holstein cows at 100 ± 20.5 days in milk were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with four 20-day periods including 14 days of adaptation and 6 days of sampling. Dietary treatments were mixed rations containing corn silages with or without the inoculants. The basal diet contained 32.9% corn silage, 14.3% alfalfa hay and 52.8% concentrate on a DM basis. Inoculants did not affect silage pH or content of DM, CP, lactate, acetate, ash and total volatile fatty acids (VFA). Applying 'B' to corn crop resulted in higher water soluble carbohydrates (47.7 g/kg vs 29.8 g/kg) and lower

  15. Safety of inoculation of bovine parainfluenza virus 3 as potential vaccine vector in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Xue; Liu, Ying; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Liu, Xing; Yang, Yong; Sun, Na; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV3) is one of the most important respiratory pathogens in cattle. One BPIV3, named NM09, was isolated from cattle suffering from severe respiratory diseases in 2009. BPIV3 is a potential recombinant vaccine vector. To investigate whether NM09 can infect pigs and determine BPIV3 defense in these animals, BPIV3 antibody-free pigs were inoculated intramuscularly with the BPIV3 NM09 strain in a continuous passage. Clinical signs were observed each day after inoculation. Viral nucleic acid was detected in nasal and anal secretions. Results showed that virus-inoculated pigs displayed few observable clinical signs related to respiratory diseases. The antibody was identified, but the virus could not be detected in the second continuous passage in pigs. Thus, BPIV3 is a potential vaccine vector for genetic engineering.

  16. Bacterial Compatibility in Combined Inoculations Enhances the Growth of Potato Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Christine D; Yagi, Shogo; Ijima, Motoaki; Nashimoto, Tomoya; Sawada, Maki; Ikeda, Seishi; Asano, Kenji; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Ohwada, Takuji

    2017-03-31

    The compatibility of strains is crucial for formulating bioinoculants that promote plant growth. We herein assessed the compatibility of four potential bioinoculants isolated from potato roots and tubers (Sphingomonas sp. T168, Streptomyces sp. R170, Streptomyces sp. R181, and Methylibium sp. R182) that were co-inoculated in order to improve plant growth. We screened these strains using biochemical tests, and the results obtained showed that R170 had the highest potential as a bioinoculant, as indicated by its significant ability to produce plant growth-promoting substances, its higher tolerance against NaCl (2%) and AlCl3 (0.01%), and growth in a wider range of pH values (5.0-10.0) than the other three strains. Therefore, the compatibility of R170 with other strains was tested in combined inoculations, and the results showed that the co-inoculation of R170 with T168 or R182 synergistically increased plant weight over un-inoculated controls, indicating the compatibility of strains based on the increased production of plant growth promoters such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and siderophores as well as co-localization on roots. However, a parallel test using strain R181, which is the same Streptomyces genus as R170, showed incompatibility with T168 and R182, as revealed by weaker plant growth promotion and a lack of co-localization. Collectively, our results suggest that compatibility among bacterial inoculants is important for efficient plant growth promotion, and that R170 has potential as a useful bioinoculant, particularly in combined inoculations that contain compatible bacteria.

  17. Effect of Microbial inoculation in combating the aluminium toxicity effect on growth of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, P; Singh, G; Tiwari, A

    2017-07-31

    The present study is aimed at improving the aluminium tolerance in maize crop employing the potential of microbial inoculants in conferring resistance to these toxicities via production of certain chelating compounds like siderophores, exopolysachharides and organic acids. Acid soils have now-a-days become one of the key factors for limiting growth of many agriculturally important crops. Aluminium  is one of the major elements present in acid soils and is mainly responsible for toxicity in the soil. This aluminium is rapidly soluble in soil water and hence absorbed by plant roots under conditions where soil pH is below 5. This toxicity leads to severe root growth inhibition, thereby limiting the production of maize crops. It was observed that use of microbial inoculums can be helpful in elimination of these toxic compounds and prevent the inhibition of root growth . It was found that the soils contaminated with aluminium toxicity decreased the root length of maize plant significantly by 65% but Bacillus and Burkholderia inoculation increased this root length significantly by 1.4- folds and 2- folds respectively thereby combating the effect of aluminium toxicity. Aluminium concentration was found maximum in roots of plants which were grown under aluminium stress condition. But this aluminium accumulation decreased ̴ 2-folds when Burkholderia was used as seed inoculants under aluminium stress conditions. Also, at 60mM aluminium accumulation, phosphorus solubilisation in roots was found to be increased upto 30% on Burkholderia inoculation. However, Bacillus inoculation didn't show any significant difference in either of the case. Thus, the inoculation of seeds with Burkholderia isolates could prove to be a boon in sequestering aluminium toxicity in Zea mays.

  18. Host Active Defense Responses Occur within 24 Hours after Pathogen Inoculation in the Rice Blast System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-hua WANG

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypical, cytological and molecular responses of rice to the fungus Magnaporthe grisea were studied using rice cultivars and lesion mimic plants. The cultivar Katy was susceptible to several virulent M. grisea isolates, and a Sekiguchi like-lesion mimic mutant of Katy (LmmKaty showed enhanced resistance to these isolates. Lesion mimic phenotype of LmmKaty was rapidly induced by virulent M. grisea isolates or by avirulent ones only at high levels of inoculum. Autofluorescence (a sign of an active defense response was visible under ultraviolet light 24 h after localized inoculation in the incompatible interaction, whereas, not evident in the compatible interaction. Autofluorescence was also observed in LmmKaty 20 h after pathogen inoculation, indicating that rapid cell death is a mechanism of LmmKaty to restrict pathogen invasion. Rapid accumulations of defense related (DR gene transcripts, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and ß-glucanase, were observed beginning at 6 h and were obvious at 16 h and 24 h after inoculation in an incompatible interaction. Rapid transcript accumulations of PR-1 and chitinase had occurred by 24 h after inoculation in an incompatible interaction. Accumulations of these transcripts were delayed in the compatible interaction. These results indicate that host active defense responses occur 24 h after pathogen inoculation and that LmmKaty exhibits enhanced resistance to M. grisea. It is suggested that the autofluorescence and expression of the DR genes after heavy inoculation are important cytological and molecular markers respectively for early determination of the host response to M. grisea in the rice blast system.

  19. Root Proteomic Analysis of Grapevine Rootstocks Inoculated with Rhizophagus irregularis and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. herbemontis

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    Elisa Vilvert

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Grapevine decline and death caused by the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. herbemontis is among the main phytosanitary problem for viticulture in southern Brazil. The eradication of infected plants is presently the most common procedure for disease control in vineyards. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is an option to reduce or neutralize the negative impacts of soil pathogenic microorganisms, but the mechanisms of plant response involved in this process are not yet completely elucidated. In order to better understand these mechanisms, an experiment was carried out to identify proteins related to plant defence induced by the mycorrhizal fungus after infection with the pathogenic fungus. We used the grapevine rootstocks SO4 and R110 (susceptible and resistant to the pathogenic fungus, respectively inoculated or not inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, and inoculated or not inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. herbemontis. Growth of the rootstocks’ shoot and root and presence of pathogenic symptoms were evaluated. The protein profiles of roots were characterized by two-dimensional electrophoresis and proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. The grapevine rootstocks inoculated with R. irregularis had higher biomass production and lower level of pathogenic symptoms. The R110 rootstock differentially accumulated 73 proteins, while SO4 accumulated 59 proteins. Nine plant-defence proteins were expressed by SO4 rootstock, and six were expressed by R110 rootstock plants. The results confirm the effect of mycorrhizal fungi in plant growth promotion and their potential for biological control against soil pathogenic fungus. Protein expression is dependent on rootstock characteristics and on the combination of plant material with the fungi.

  20. Reaction of garden pea (Pisum sativum L. to inoculation and nitrogen fertilization in Eastern Croatia

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    Irena RAPČAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation represents the subject of numerous investigations of the scientific community. The advantages of this process, as already well known while scientific research trials attempts to clarify the interactions of symbionts in this type of nitrogen fixation as well as the influence of abiotic factors on its efficacy. A field experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of garden pea cultivars ('Alicia' and 'Miracle of America', seed inoculation with nodule bacteria (Rhizobium pisi DSM 30132, and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae OS–103, and nitrogen fertilization (0, 30 and 60 kg N*ha-1. The observed parameters are: stand density, number of pods, mass of 1,000 grains, mass of pods and grains and grain yield. It was established that all the investigated factors significantly influenced the traits. The seeds inoculated with the indigenous strain R. leguminosarum bv. viciae OS–103 had significantly increased numbers of pods per unit area, grain yield, and the weight of 1,000 grains, while a higher amount of applied nitrogen resulted only in an increase of grain yield. Cultivar 'Alicia' achieved a significantly higher grain yield compared to the 'Miracle of America' cultivars, while application of 60 kg N*ha-1 achieved statistically higher grain yield compared to control. Inoculation with R. leguminosarum bv. viciae OS-103 produced a significantly higher grain yield compared to inoculation with the reference strain R. pisi DSM 30132. The observed parameters were significantly influenced by the garden pea cultivar, seed inoculation with nodule bacteria, and nitrogen fertilization therefore further investigation are needed with new inoculant strains and new cultivars under different agroecological conditions.

  1. Impact of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria inoculation methods on phosphorus transformation and long-term utilization in composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuquan; Zhao, Yue; Fan, Yuying; Lu, Qian; Li, Mingxiao; Wei, Qingbin; Zhao, Yi; Cao, Zhenyu; Wei, Zimin

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) application and inoculation methods on rock phosphate (RP) solubilization and bacterial community during composting. The results showed that PSB inoculation in different stages of composting, especially both in the beginning and cooling stages, not only improved the diversity and abundance of PSB and bacterial community, but also distinctly increased the content of potential available phosphorus. Redundancy analysis indicated that the combined inoculation of PSB in the initial stage with higher inoculation amount and in the cooling stage with lower inoculation amount was the best way to improve the inoculation effect and increase the solubilization and utilization of RP during composting. Besides, we suggested three methods to improve phosphorus transformation and long-term utilization efficiency in composts based on biological fixation of phosphates by humic substance and phosphate-accumulating organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inoculation of the nonlegume Capsicum annuum L. with Rhizobium strains. 2. Changes in sterols, triterpenes, fatty acids, and volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luís R; Azevedo, Jessica; Pereira, Maria J; Carro, Lorena; Velazquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2014-01-22

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are consumed worldwide, imparting flavor, aroma, and color to foods, additionally containing high concentrations of biofunctional compounds. This is the first report about the effect of the inoculation of two Rhizobium strains on sterols, triterpenes, fatty acids, and volatile compounds of leaves and fruits of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants. Generally, inoculation with strain TVP08 led to the major changes, being observed a decrease of sterols and triterpenes and an increase of fatty acids, which are related to higher biomass, growth, and ripening of pepper fruits. The increase of volatile compounds may reflect the elicitation of plant defense after inoculation, since the content on methyl salicylate was significantly increased in inoculated material. The findings suggest that inoculation with Rhizobium strains may be employed to manipulate the content of interesting metabolites in pepper leaves and fruits, increasing potential health benefits and defense abilities of inoculated plants.

  3. Reproducible hairy root transformation and spot-inoculation methods to study root symbioses of pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemow Scott R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pea has lagged behind other model legumes in the molecular study of nodulation and mycorrhizae-formation because of the difficulty to transform its roots and its poor growth on agar plates. Here we describe for pea 1 a transformation technique which permits the complementation of two known non-nodulating pea mutants, 2 a rhizobial inoculation method which allows the study of early cellular events giving rise to nodule primordia, and 3 a targeted fungal inoculation method which allows us to study short segments of mycorrhizal roots assured to be infected. These tools are certain to advance our knowledge of pea root symbioses.

  4. Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) plants with chrysanthemum stunt viroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Tomoyuki; Doi, Motoaki; Hosokawa, Munetaka

    2016-08-01

    Agroinfiltration was tested as a method of inoculation of chrysanthemum plants with chrysanthemum stunt viroid (CSVd). Binary vectors harboring dimeric CSVd sequences in sense and antisense orientations were constructed, and Agrobacterium transfected with these binary vectors was infiltrated into chrysanthemum leaves. Northern blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that local infection was established within 7 days and systemic infection within 20 days. CSVd polarities showed no difference in infectivity. This study showed that agroinfiltration of chrysanthemum plants is an easy, rapid, and cost-effective method for CSVd inoculation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of peanut genotypes for resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus by mechanical and thrips inoculation.

    OpenAIRE

    NASCIMENTO, L.C. do; PENSUK, V.; COSTA, N.P. da; ASSIS FILHO, F.M. de; PIO-RIBEIRO, G.; DEOM, C.M.; Sherwood, J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the reactions of three peanut breeding lines (IC-10, IC-34, and ICGV 86388) to Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) by mechanical and thrips inoculation, under greenhouse conditions, and compare them to the reactions of cultivars SunOleic, Georgia Green, and the breeding line C11-2-39. TSWV infection by mechanical inoculation was visually assessed using an index ranging from 0 (no symptoms) to 4 (apical death). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used ...

  6. Effectivité comparée d\\'une inoculation endomycorhizienne à ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trois modalités de traitements, la dose recommandée de phosphore de 72 kg P2O5/ha), un inoculant artificiel à Glomus spp et un témoin sans inoculant et sans phosphore, sont testées selon un plan expérimental en bloc aléatoire à 3 et 4 répétitions respectivement en champ et sur sol stérilisé en pots. Les plantes ...

  7. Herpes simplex virus ophthalmic disease induced using two different methods of mice inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Regina Ferreira Gonçalves Pereira

    Full Text Available Two different procedures for inoculation of HSV on corneas of BALB/c mice were evaluated. The first was by the use of HSV suspensions directly on the corneas and the other was after corneal scarification. Animals by this later method presented greater morbidity and mortality than those of first group, suggesting that inoculation of HSV without scarification of the cornea should be the method of choice for the study of HSV ophthalmic infection. This model showed also be an efficient experimental system to testing antiviral drugs.

  8. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis of Electrogenic Microbial Communities in Differentially Inoculated Swine Wastewater-Fed Microbial Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Irina V. Khilyas; Sorokin, Anatoly A.; Larisa Kiseleva; Simpson, David J.W.; V. Fedorovich; Sharipova, Margarita R.; Mami Kainuma; Cohen, Michael F.; Igor Goryanin

    2017-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are promising new technologies for efficient removal of organic compounds from industrial wastewaters, including that generated from swine farming. We inoculated two pairs of laboratory-scale MFCs with sludge granules from a beer wastewater-treating anaerobic digester (IGBS) or from sludge taken from the bottom of a tank receiving swine wastewater (SS). The SS-inoculated MFC outperformed the IGBS-inoculated MFC with regard to COD ...

  9. Effectiveness of mycorrhizal inoculation in the nursery on root colonization, growth, and nutrient uptake of aspen and balsam poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quoreshi, A.M.; Khasa, D.P. [Symbiotech Research Inc. 201, 509-11 Avenue, Nisku, AB (Canada); Forest Biology Research Centre, University of Laval, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    Aspen and balsam poplar seedlings were inoculated with six species of ectomycorrhizal fungi (Hebeloma longicaudum, Laccaria bicolor, Paxillus involutus, Pisolithus tinctorius, Rhizopogon vinicolor, and Suillus tomentosus), one species of endomycorrhizal fungus (Glomus intraradices), two species of bacteria (Agrobacterium sp. and Burkholderia cepacia), treated with a growth hormone (SR3), and co-inoculated with a combination of Paxillus and Burkholderia. The seedlings were grown in a greenhouse under three different fertility regimes. Bacterial inoculation alone did not affect seedling growth and nutrition as observed when co-inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungus. The biomass and root collar diameter of aspen and balsam poplar were significantly increased when adequate mycorrhizas are formed and more prominent when co-inoculated with P. involutus and B. cepacia and grown at the 67% fertilizer level. Except for R. vinicolor and S. tomentosus, the other four species of ectomycorrhizal fungi and G. intraradices formed symbiotic associations with both plant species. Both ectomycorrhizal and endomycorrhizal colonization were observed at all fertilizer levels and fertilizer applications did not affect the colonization rates. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were significantly improved in both aspen and balsam poplar compared with control only when co-inoculated with P. involutus and B. cepacia. However, plant net nitrogen uptake (content) increased significantly in all successful inoculation treatments and co-inoculated treatment when compared with control. These results hold promise for incorporation of inoculation of Populus sp. with appropriate mycorrhizal fungi and selected bacteria into commercial nursery system to improve the establishment of Populus in various sites. (author)

  10. Effect of Inoculation of Acacia senegal mature trees with Mycorrhiza and Rhizobia on soil properties and microbial community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assigbetsé, K.; Ciss, I.; Bakhoum, N.; Dieng, L.

    2012-04-01

    Inoculation of legume plants with symbiotic microorganisms is widely used to improve their development and productivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of inoculation of Acacia senegal mature trees with rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (G. mosseae, G. fasciculatum, G. intraradices) either singly or in combination, on soil properties, activity and the genetic structure of soil microbial communities. The experiment set up in Southern Senegal consisted of 4 randomized blocks of A. senegal mature trees with 4 treatments including inoculated trees with Rhizobium (R), mycorrhizal fungus (M) and with Rhizobium+mycorhizal fungus (RM) and non-inoculated control (CON). Soil were sampled 2 years after the inoculation. Soil pH, C and N and available P contents were measured. The microbial abundance and activity were measured in terms of microbial biomass C (MBC) and basal soil respiration. The community structure of the total bacterial, diazotrophic and denitrifying communities was assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA, nifH and nirK genes respectively. Inoculations with symbiont under field conditions have increased soil pH. The C and N contents were enhanced in the dual-inoculated treatments (RM). The mycorrhized treatment have displayed the lowest available P contents while RM and R treatments exhibited higher contents rates. The microbial biomass C rates were higher in treatments co-inoculated with AM fungi and Rhizobium than in those inoculated singly with AM fungi or Rhizobium strains. The basal soil respiration were positively correlated to MBC, and the highest rates were found in the co-inoculated treatments. Fingerprints of 16S rDNA gene exhibited similar patterns between inoculated treatments and the control showing that the inoculation of mature trees have not impacted the total bacterial community structure. In contrast, the inoculated treatments have displayed individually different

  11. Variation in susceptibility of different breeds of sheep to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis following experimental inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, D J; Purdie, A C; de Silva, K; Dhand, N K; Plain, K M; Whittington, R J

    2017-06-17

    Exposure to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) does not always lead to Johne's disease. Understanding differences in disease susceptibility of individual animals is a key aspect to controlling mycobacterial diseases. This study was designed to examine the susceptibility or resistance of various breeds of sheep to MAP infection. Merino, Suffolk first cross Merino, Border Leicester, and Poll Dorset sheep were orally inoculated with MAP and monitored for 14 months. Clinical disease occurred more frequently in the Merino (42%) and Suffolk first cross Merino (36%) compared to the Border Leicester (12%) and Poll Dorset (11%) breeds. Infection risk, as determined by culture of gut and associated lymphoid tissues, ranged from 75% for the Suffolk first cross Merino to 47% for the Poll Dorset sheep. Significant differences were identified in the site in the intestines of the most severe histopathological lesions and the immune responses to infection between the breeds. However, there was no difference in faecal MAP shedding by clinical cases between breeds. All breeds tested were susceptible to MAP infection, as determined by infection and clinical disease development, although there were differences in the proportions of diseased animals between the breeds. Poll Dorset and Border Leicester sheep were more resilient to MAP infection but there was evidence that more animals could have developed disease if given more time. These findings provide evidence of potential differential disease susceptibility between breeds, further our understanding of disease pathogenesis and risks of disease spread, and may have an influence on control programs for paratuberculosis.

  12. Iron Deficiency Induced by Chrysobactin in Saintpaulia Leaves Inoculated with Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neema, C.; Laulhere, J. P.; Expert, D.

    1993-07-01

    In this communication, we examine the fate of iron during soft rot pathogenesis caused by Erwinia chrysanthemi on its host, Saintpaulia ionantha. The spread of soft rot caused by this enterobacterium was previously shown to depend on a functional genetic locus encoding a high-affinity iron assimilation system involving the catechol-type siderophore chrysobactin. Leaf intercellular fluid from healthy plants was analyzed with regard to the iron content and its availability for bacterial growth. It was compared to the fluid from diseased plants for the presence of strong iron ligands, using a new approach based on the iron-binding property of an ion-exchange resin. Further characterization allowed the identification of chrysobactin in diseased tissues, thus providing the first evidence for the external release of a microbial siderophore during pathogenesis. Competition for nutritional iron was also studied through a plant-bacterial cell system: iron incorporated into plant ferritin appeared to be considerably reduced in bacteria-treated suspension soybean cells. The same effect was visualized during treatment of soybean cells with axenic leaf intercellular fluid from E. chrysanthemi-inoculated saintpaulia leaves or with chrysobactin.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] Roots Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum Strain CPAC 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Adalgisa R; Rodrigues, Elisete P; Batista, Jesiane Ss; Gomes, Douglas F; Hungria, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    This research intended to analyze the expression pattern of proteins in roots of the Brazilian soybean cultivar Conquista when inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum CPAC 15, a strain broadly used in commercial inoculants in Brazil. At ten days after bacterial inoculation, whole-cell proteins were extracted from roots and separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Comparative analysis revealed significant changes in the intensity of 37 spots due to the inoculation (17 up-regulated and 20 down-regulated proteins), identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-TOF. Identified proteins were associated with COG functional categories of information storage and processing, cellular processes and signaling, metabolism, and also in the "poorly characterized" and "not in COG" categories. Among the up-regulated proteins, we identified sucrose synthase (nodulin-100), β-tubulin, rubisco activase, glutathione-S-transferase, a putative heat-shock 70-kDa protein, pyridine nucleotide-disulphideoxidoreductase and a putative transposase. Proteomic analysis allowed for the identification of some putative symbiotic functions and confirmed the main biological processes triggered in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with soybean.

  14. Soil inoculation method determines the strength of plant-soil interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorde, van de T.F.J.; Ruijten, M.; Putten, van der W.H.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that interactions between plants and biotic components of the soil influence plant productivity and plant community composition. Many plant–soil feedback experiments start from inoculating relatively small amounts of natural soil to sterilized bulk soil. These soil

  15. Effect of the inoculation with Glomus intraradices and nitrogen fertilization on growth of strawberry plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgado-Barreiro, C.S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of inoculation of AMF Glomus intraradices on the growth of strawberry plants (cultivar Camino Real, irrigated with nutrient solutions at 0, 1, 3 and 10 mM of N as NH4 + or NO3 - . An experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions in which the percentage of root colonization, the root dry weight (RDW and the shoot dry weight (SDW, were evaluated at 33 and 48 days after the plant establishment (dae. The percentage of root colonization was reduced by the increased concentration of NH4 + or NO3 - in the irrigation solution; at 33 dae, the inoculation of G. intraradices increased the RDW and the SDW in plants fertilized with NH4 + ; at 48 dae the same effect was observed in plants receiving NO3 - . In both cases, the highest values of shoot and root biomass were recorded in plants irrigated with low concentrations of N. These results demonstrated that the inoculation of AMF could reduce the Nfertilizer in strawberry crop. Furthermore, the excess of N-fertilizer inhibited the colonization of AMF and was not necessary for increase the plant growth. Also, the growth reaction of strawberry plants to the AMF inoculation, fertilizer form and dose varied in different growth stages.

  16. BIOMETRIC PARAMETERS OF FIELD GROWN SESAME INFLUENCED BY ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL INOCULATION, ROCK PHOSPHATE FERTILIZATION AND IRRIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Harikumar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and rock phosphate (RP fertilization on biometric parameters and mycorrhizal colonization of field grown sesame under rainfed and irrigated conditions. Inoculation of AMF Funneliformis dimorphicus improved the biometric parameters of the crop such as leaf area (LA, leaf area index (LAI, specific leaf weight (SLW, net assimilation rate (NAR, oil index (OI as well as mycorrhizal colonization (%F in roots. Mycorrhizal inoculation however, did not give any positive response on harvest index (HI. LA, LAI and OI and %F showed a general increment in treatments of no added P (P0, while the other parameters such as SLW and NAR were improved by the application of RP at half the recommended dose (P50. HI did not respond to RP fertilization. Most of the parameters (LA, LAI, NAR, %F showed higher values under rainfed condition than irrigated condition whereas, SLW, HI and OI improved significantly under irrigated condition. Results indicated that the inoculation of AMF to field grown sesame can compensate for 50% of the recommended P fertilizer under a need based irrigation schedule, without affecting the biometric parameters.

  17. Sensitivity of Pseudomonas fluorescens to gamma irradiation following surface inoculations on romaine lettuce and baby spinach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables is a post-harvest intervention measure often used to inactivate pathogenic food-borne microbes. We evaluated the sensitivity of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains (2-79, Q8R1, Q287) to gamma irradiation following surface inoculations on romaine lettuce and spi...

  18. Soil inoculation method determines the strength of plant–soil interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Voorde, T.F.J.; Van der Putten, W.H.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that interactions between plants and biotic components of the soil influence plant productivity and plant community composition. Many plant–soil feedback experiments start from inoculating relatively small amounts of natural soil to sterilized bulk soil. These soil

  19. Drought response of Mucuna pruriens (L. DC. inoculated with ACC deaminase and IAA producing rhizobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aansa Rukya Saleem

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the major constraints limiting agricultural production worldwide and is expected to increase in the future. Limited water availability causes significant effects to plant growth and physiology. Plants have evolved different traits to mitigate the stress imposed by drought. The presence of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR could play an important role in improving plant performances and productivity under drought. These beneficial microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere of plants and increase drought tolerance by lowering ethylene formation. In the present study, we demonstrate the potential to improve the growth of velvet bean under water deficit conditions of two different strains of PGPR with ACCd (1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate deaminase activity isolated from rainfed farming system. We compared uninoculated and inoculated plants with PGPR to assess: a photosynthetic performance and biomass; b ACC content and ethylene emission from leaves and roots; c leaf isoprene emission. Our results provided evidence that under drought conditions inoculation with PGPR containing the ACCd enzyme could improve plant growth compared to untreated plants. Ethylene emission from roots and leaves of inoculated velvet bean plants was significantly lower than uninoculated plants. Moreover, isoprene emission increased with drought stress progression and was higher in inoculated plants compared to uninoculated counterparts. These findings clearly illustrate that selected PGPR strains isolated from rainfed areas could be highly effective in promoting plant growth under drought conditions by decreasing ACC and ethylene levels in plants.

  20. Effects of Stress Inoculation Training on Athletes' Postsurgical Pain and Rehabilitation after Orthopedic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael J.; Berger, R. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Tested the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention (stress inoculation training; SIT) for postsurgical anxiety, pain and physical rehabilitation in injured athletes. Sixty male athletes who underwent arthroscopic surgery for miniscus injury in one knee were randomly assigned to either treatment (SIT and physical therapy) or control…

  1. Inoculation of starter cultures in a semi-dry coffee (Coffea arabica) fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Suzana Reis; Miguel, Maria Gabriela da Cruz Pedrozo; Cordeiro, Cecília de Souza; Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of yeasts as starter cultures in coffee semi-dry processing. Arabica coffee was inoculated with one of the following starter cultures: Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA YCN727, S. cerevisiae UFLA YCN724, Candida parapsilosis UFLA YCN448 and Pichia guilliermondii UFLA YCN731. The control was not inoculated with a starter culture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to assess the microbial population, and organic acids and volatile compounds were quantified by HPLC and HS-SPME/GC, respectively. Sensory analyses were evaluated using the Temporal Dominance of Sensations (TDS). DGGE analysis showed that the inoculated yeasts were present throughout the fermentation. Other yeast species were also detected, including Debaryomyces hansenii, Cystofilobasidium ferigula and Trichosporon cavernicola. The bacterial population was diverse and was composed of the following genera: Weissella, Leuconostoc, Gluconobacter, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Erwinia and Klebsiella. Butyric and propionic acids, were not detected in any treatment A total of 47 different volatiles compounds have been identified. The coffee inoculated with yeast had a caramel flavor that was not detected in the control, as assessed by TDS. The use of starter cultures during coffee fermentation is an interesting alternative for obtaining a beverage quality with distinctive flavor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparisons of electronic and visual ratings of strawberry leaves inoculated with two colletotrichum species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoculation of detached strawberry leaves with Colletotrichum species may provide a rapid and accurate method for identifying anthracnose resistant germplasm. The purpose of this study was to compare electronic and visual rating methods of screening for anthracnose resistance. Eight to 17 detached...

  3. Visual and electronic comparisons of detached strawberry leaves inoculated with two Colletotrichum species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoculation of detached strawberry leaves with Colletotrichum species may provide an accurate, rapid, non-destructive method of identifying anthracnose resistant germplasm. The purpose of this study was to compare two methods for screening anthracnose resistance. Detached leaves of 60 susceptible an...

  4. Maize response to inoculation with strains of plant growth-promoting bactéria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Dartora

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of maize to inoculation with strains of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB in two cultivation years. The experiment was set in a randomized block design with four replicates in two cultivation years (2012/13 and 2013/14. The treatments consisted of PGPB inoculation: control (without N and without inoculation; 30 kg of N ha-1 at sowing (N1; 160 kg of N ha-1 (N1 + 130 kg of N ha-1 as top-dressing; N1 + A. brasilense, Ab-V5; N1 + A. brasilense, HM053; N1 + Azospirillum sp. L26; N1 + Azospirillum sp. L27; N1 + Enhydrobacter sp. 4331; N1 + Rhizobium sp. 8121. Basal stem diameter, plant height, leaf area, shoot dry matter and yield were evaluated. The strain of Rhizobium sp. 8121and the isolate Azospirillum sp. L26 associated with 30 kg of N ha-1 at sowing promoted yields equivalent to that of the N fertilization of 160 kg ha-1, demonstrating the potential to be used in the inoculation of maize seeds.

  5. Artificial aging of Uva di Troia and Primitivo wines using oak chips inoculated with Penicillium purpurogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzi, Leonardo; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Ciccarone, Claudio; Gambacorta, Giuseppe; Irlante, Giuseppina; Lamacchia, Carmela; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2012-01-30

    Two red wines (Primitivo and Uva di Troia) treated with oak chips inoculated with Penicillium purpurogenum were analysed in order to assess their contents of furfural, cis-β-methyl-γ-octalactone, syringol, eugenol, vanillin and 4-vinylguaiacol. Two different sizes of oak chips (small and big, of length 2 and 8 mm respectively) and two different degrees of toasting (low and high) were used in the study. Aroma compounds were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine differences among samples after 15 days of chip contact time. Big oak chips inoculated with P. purpurogenum increased the level of 4-vinylguaiacol, while small oak chips inoculated with P. purpurogenum, in some conditions, increased the level of eugenol. Chip size and degree of toasting also played an important role in the content of eugenol. The use of oak chips inoculated with mould might be a promising alternative to barrel aging. Moreover, different fungal inocula could contribute to the enrichment of wine with specific compounds (e.g. 4-vinylguaiacol and eugenol). Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. shelf-life of legume inoculants in different carrier materials available ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Desiccation tolerance of rhizobia when protected by synthetic polymers. Soil. Biology. Biochemisty 39:573-580. Dieker, R., Laszlo, K.M., Rose, M.T., Amprayn,. K., Krishnen, G., Thi Kim, T.C., Nga, V., Thi. Cong, P., Thanh Hien, N. and Kennedy, I.R.. 2011. Practical methods for the quality control of inoculants and biofertilizers.

  7. Sequential Inoculation of Native Non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Wine Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; Zulian, Laura; Ferreres, Àngela; Pastor, Rosa; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeast for wine making is becoming a common trend in many innovative wineries. The application is normally aimed at increasing aromas, glycerol, reducing acidity, and other improvements. This manuscript focuses on the reproduction of the native microbiota from the vineyard in the inoculum. Thus, native selected yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Starmerella bacillaris species and three different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were inoculated sequentially, or only S. cerevisiae (three native strains together or one commercial) was used. Inoculations were performed both in laboratory conditions with synthetic must (400 mL) as well as in industrial conditions (2000 kg of grapes) in red winemaking in two different varieties, Grenache and Carignan. The results showed that all the inoculated S. cerevisiae strains were found at the end of the vinifications, and when non-Saccharomyces yeasts were inoculated, they were found in appreciable populations at mid-fermentation. The final wines produced could be clearly differentiated by sensory analysis and were of similar quality, in terms of sensory analysis panelists' appreciation.

  8. Sequential Inoculation of Native Non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Wine Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Padilla

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-Saccharomyces yeast for wine making is becoming a common trend in many innovative wineries. The application is normally aimed at increasing aromas, glycerol, reducing acidity, and other improvements. This manuscript focuses on the reproduction of the native microbiota from the vineyard in the inoculum. Thus, native selected yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Starmerella bacillaris species and three different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were inoculated sequentially, or only S. cerevisiae (three native strains together or one commercial was used. Inoculations were performed both in laboratory conditions with synthetic must (400 mL as well as in industrial conditions (2000 kg of grapes in red winemaking in two different varieties, Grenache and Carignan. The results showed that all the inoculated S. cerevisiae strains were found at the end of the vinifications, and when non-Saccharomyces yeasts were inoculated, they were found in appreciable populations at mid-fermentation. The final wines produced could be clearly differentiated by sensory analysis and were of similar quality, in terms of sensory analysis panelists’ appreciation.

  9. Potentially Deceptive Health Nutrition-Related Advertising Claims: The Role of Inoculation in Conferring Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alicia M.; Miller, Claude H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to examine the efficacy of inoculation message treatments to facilitate resistance to health nutrition-related (HNR) commercial food advertising claims. Design: Data were collected across three phases extending across a 5-week period conducted over two semesters at a Midwest US university. A 2 × 3 between-subjects…

  10. Fear of Flying in Airplanes: Effects of Minimal Therapist Guided Stress Inoculation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Jean C.; And Others

    Flight phobia is an area which has received little controlled investigation, even though between 10 and 20 percent of flight passengers report a fear of flying in airplanes. A study was conducted to examine the efectiveness of a minimal therapist guided form of stress inoculation training (SIT) for flight phobia. Flight phobic volunteers (N=28)…

  11. Inoculated fermentation of orange juice (Citrus sinensis L.) for production of a citric fruit spirit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santos, Claudia Cristina A. do A; Duarte, Whasley F; Carreiro, Solange Cristina; Schwan, Rosane F

    2013-01-01

    .... The sugar concentration of the orange juice was adjusted to 16ºBrix and the pH to 4.5. The orange juice was inoculated at approximately 7 log CFU/mL, and the fermentation was performed at room temperature until ºBrix stabilization...

  12. Peripherally Applied Aβ-Containing Inoculates Induce Cerebral β-Amyloidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisele, Yvonne S.; Obermüller, Ulrike; Heilbronner, Götz; Baumann, Frank; Kaeser, Stephan A.; Wolburg, Hartwig; Walker, Lary C.; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Jucker, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    The intracerebral injection of β-amyloid-containing brain extracts can induce cerebralβ-amyloidosis and associated pathologies in susceptible hosts. We found that intraperitoneal inoculation with β-amyloid-rich extracts inducesβ-amyloidosis in the brains of β-amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice after prolonged incubation times. PMID:20966215

  13. Microbiological and molecular biological methods for monitoring microbial inoculants and their effects in the soil environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsas, van J.D.; Duarte, G.F.; Rosado, A.S.; Smalla, K.

    1998-01-01

    As the use of biotechnology products, such as genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs), in the environment might bring about undesirable ecological effects, it is important that the environmental fate of inoculant organisms, as well as any effects of their release, are assessed. Ideally, pilot

  14. Réponse du fonio blanc ( Digitaria exilis Stapf) à l'inoculation avec ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Réponse du fonio blanc (Digitaria exilis Stapf) à l'inoculation avec des champignons mycorhiziens à arbuscules en conditions semi-contrôlées. Fatou Ndoye, Abdala G. Diedhiou, Moustapha Gueye, Dioumacor Fall, Adeline Barnaud, Mame O. Sy, Kandioura Noba, Diegane Diouf, Aboubacry Kane ...

  15. Secondary resin production increases with vigor of Abies grandis inoculated with Trichosporium symbioticum in northeastern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory M. Filip; Erik Christiansen; Catherine A. Parks

    1989-01-01

    Thirty grand fir (Abies grandis (Dougl. ex D. Don) Lindl.) trees were artificially inoculated with the fungal symbiont, Trichosporium symbioticum Wright, to simulate attack by the fir engraver beetle, Scolytus ventralis LeConte. Fifteen months after treatment, secondary resin production, necrotic lesion...

  16. Effects of bacterial silage inoculants on whole-crop maize silage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the effects of ensiling whole-crop maize with bacterial inoculants, Lactococcus lactis (LL) and Lactobacillus buchneri (LB), on the fermentation and nutrient digestibility in rams. Whole-crop maize (265 DM g/kg) was ensiled for 90 days in 210 L drums with no additive, or with LL or LB. After three months ...

  17. Experimental Inoculation of Spiroplasma mirum and Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) into Raccoons (Procyon lotor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine if Spiroplasma mirum would be capable of producing lesions of spongiform encephalopathy in raccoons (Procyon lotor), 5 groups (n = 5) of raccoon kits were inoculated intracerebrally with either S. mirum and/or transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME). Two other groups (n = 5) of raccoon...

  18. Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns as affected by inoculant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, W.E.; Heijnen, C.E.; Trevors, J.T.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns was measured as affected by the inoculant treatment. Bacterial cells were introduced into the topsoil of columns, either encapsulated in alginate beads of different types or mixed with bentonite clay in concentrations

  19. Reduction of Light-Induced Anthocyanin Accumulation in Inoculated Sorghum Mesocotyls1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Sze-Chung Clive; Nicholson, Ralph L.

    1998-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) accumulates the anthocyanin cyanidin 3-dimalonyl glucoside in etiolated mesocotyls in response to light. Inoculation with the nonpathogenic fungus Cochliobolus heterostrophus drastically reduced the light-induced accumulation of anthocyanin by repressing the transcription of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes encoding flavanone 3-hydroxylase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, and anthocyanidin synthase. In contrast to these repression effects, fungal inoculation resulted in the synthesis of the four known 3-deoxyanthocyanidin phytoalexins and a corresponding activation of genes encoding the key branch-point enzymes in the phenylpropanoid pathway, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and chalcone synthase. In addition, a gene encoding the pathogenesis-related protein PR-10 was strongly induced in response to inoculation. The accumulation of phytoalexins leveled off by 48 h after inoculation and was accompanied by a more rapid increase in the rate of anthocyanin accumulation. The results suggest that the plant represses less essential metabolic activities such as anthocyanin synthesis as a means of compensating for the immediate biochemical and physiological needs for the defense response. PMID:9501130

  20. Effects of inoculating Lachnum and Cadophora isolates on the growth of Vaccinium corymbosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizabani, Christine; Dames, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    The roots of ericaceous plants harbour a diversity of fungal taxa, which confer eco-physiological benefits to the host. Some of the fungi have been established to form ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM) associations and enhance plant growth in certain ericaceous genera. Although, Lachnum and Cadophora isolates have frequently been identified from the roots of this family, the status of their association and functional roles is still vague. The aims of this study were to identify Lachnum and Cadophora isolates; determine the root-fungal interactive structures formed in associations with Vaccinium corymbosum L. (blueberry) hosts and to examine inoculation effects of the fungal associates using several varieties of the blueberry. Lachnum and Cadophora were isolated and identified from Erica cerinthoides L. and Erica demmissa Klotzsch ex Benth using morphological and molecular techniques. Micropropagated blueberry varieties (Bluecrop, Elliott, Spartan, Chandler and Brightwell) were inoculated with respective fungi and plant growth evaluated. Both fungi colonised the roots and did not have any pathogenic effect. Lachnum isolate did not form any particular mycorrhizal structures whereas; Cadophora inoculated plants showed typical ericoid mycorrhizal coils. Inoculation with both fungi enhanced the shoot growth of Brightwell and Elliott varieties. However neutral effects were observed in the remaining varieties. In conclusion, Cadophora and Lachnum isolates have potential to promote growth of selected blueberry varieties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Bio-inoculants Applied to M 5 Mulberry Under Rain-fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present investigation was carried out at the department of sericulture, GKVK, UAS, Bangalore, India in 2007 with an objective to determine the effect of three bio-inoculants application to M5 mulberry plant on silkworm (PM x CSR2) growth, development and coocoon traits. The feeding experiment was laid-out in ...

  2. Artificially accelerating the reversal of desertification: cyanobacterial inoculation facilitates the succession of vegetation communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shubin; Zhang, Qingyi; Wu, Li; Liu, Yongding; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Desertification has been recognized as a global environmental problem, and one region experiencing ongoing desertification is the eastern edge of Qubqi Desert (Inner Mongolia). To investigate the facilitating effects of cyanobacterial inoculation technology on the desertification control along this steppe-desert transition region, artificial cyanobacterial crusts were constructed with two filamentous cyanobacteria 3 and 8 years ago combined with Salix planting. The results showed that no crusts formed after 3 years of fixation only with Salix planting, whereas after cyanobacterial inoculation, the crusts formed quickly and gradually succeed to moss crusts. During that course, topsoil environments were gradually improved, providing the necessary material basis for the regeneration of vascular plants. In this investigation, total 27 species of vascular plants had regenerated in the experimental region, mainly belonging to Asteraceae, Poaceae, Chenopodiaceae and Leguminosae. Using space time substitution, the dominant species along with the application of cyanobacterial inoculation technology succeeded from Agriophyllum squarrosum ultimately to Leymus chinensis. In addition, it was found that the shady side of the dunes is more conducive to crust development and succession of vegetation communities. Conclusively, our results indicate artificial cyanobacterial inoculation technology is an effective and desirable path for desertification control.

  3. Inoculation of susceptible and resistant potato plants with the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazebnik, Jenny; Tibboel, Marianne; Dicke, Marcel; Loon, van Joop J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Plants are exposed to microbial pathogens as well as herbivorous insects and their natural enemies. Here, we examined the effects of inoculation of potato plants, Solanum tuberosum L. (Solanaceae), with the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary (Peronosporales: Pythiaceae)

  4. Analysis of visual symptomatology in peach and plum inoculated with U.S. PPV isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum pox potyvirus (PPV) is an economically devastating potyvirus that affects Prunus species. Discovered in the United States, in 1999, the Pennsylvania PPV isolates were primarily found in peaches (Prunus persica). When several of these original Pennsylvania isolates were inoculated onto plums (...

  5. Evolution of earthworm burrow systems after inoculation of lumbricid earthworms in a pasture in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, T.N.; Peek, G.J.C.W.

    1997-01-01

    In 1983, an earthworm-free pasture was inoculated with four earthworm species. The earthworms dispersed with an average velocity of 6.3 my-1. In 1991, four burrow systems, ranging in age from 0.6 to 7.3 y, were mapped three-dimensionally to establish the development of these systems. Aporrectodea

  6. Effect of Rhizobium inoculation and phosphorus application on native Texas legumes grown in local soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osman, E.; Muir, J.P.; Elgersma, A.

    2002-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to determine the effects of Rhizobium inoculation and addition of phosphorus to soil on the productivity and quality of the Texas range legumes Desmanthus illinoiensis (Michx.) MacMill. ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald, Desmanthus velutinus Scheele, Desmanthus

  7. Effects of mass inoculation on induced oleoresin response in intensively managed loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier D. Klepzig; Daniel J. Robison; Glenn Fowler; Peter R. Minchin; Fred P. Hain; H. Lee Allen

    2005-01-01

    Oleoresin flow is an important factor in the resistance of pines to attack by southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm., and its associated fungi. Abiotic factors, such as nutrient supply and water relations, have the potential to modify this plant–insect–fungus interaction; however, little is known of the effects of inoculation with beetle-...

  8. Potential of Azotobacter vinelandii Khsr1 as bio-inoculant | Naz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study deals with the isolation and characterization of Azotobacter vinelandii Khsr1 from roots of the weed, Chrysopogon aucheri, commonly known as golden beard grass indigenous to Khewra salt range, Pakistan and its evaluation as bio-inoculant. The population of the isolate varied from 107 to 108 cfu/g fresh ...

  9. Nodulation ability of the common bean genotypes composing the BASE 120 trial after inoculation with Rhizobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the nodulation characteristics of the BASE 120 genotypes in a trial of 118 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and two tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) lines. Inoculation with Rhizobium tropici strain CIAT 899 and Rhizobium etli strain CIAT 632 was carried out in a screenhouse...

  10. Effect of different substrates on growth of Mimosa bimucronata seedlings inoculate with rhizobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Müller Freire

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth response of Mimosa bimucronata (DC O. Kuntze seedlings in nursery conditions to inoculation with rhizobium strains previously selected using different substrates. An experimental design of randomized blocks with split plots was used, testing three substrates (pure organic-containing clay, sand and manure in 1: 1: 1 v: v: v ratio; organomineral mixed with 30% straw and sand with vermiculite in 1: 1 v: v and four N sources (inoculation with strains BR 3461 and BR 3470, control with N fertilization and control without fertilization, totalizing 12 treatments. Height and stem diameter were evaluate after 90 days and shoot, root and nodules dry mass were evaluate after 120 days. Organomineral substrates provided better seedling growth. However, only organic-substrate with straw and sand with vermiculite showed positive responses of plants inoculated with BR3470 strain. The performance of the inoculated seedlings was not higher than that of seedlings fertilized with N. The rate of N applied stimulated nodulation rather than inhibit it.

  11. INOCULATION OF DIAZOTROPHIC BACTERIA AND NITROGEN FERTILIZATION IN TOPDRESSING IN IRRIGATED CORN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VANESSA ZIRONDI LONGHINI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corn is a nitrogen-intensive crop, and the use of management practices such as inoculation of the seed with diazotrophic bacteria, which can maximize crop productivity and reduce the need of nitrogen fertilizers, may result in lower production costs. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of inoculation of corn seed with Azospirillum brasilense and controlled addition of nitrogen to topdressing on the nutrition, production components, and productivity of crop grain. The experimental design was a randomized block design, with four replications in a 2 × 5 factorial scheme. The treatments consisted of inoculation or not of corn seed with A. brasilense (at 100 mL per 25 kg of seed and five nitrogen (N levels in topdressing (0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 kg N ha-1 from urea [45% N] were applied when the corn was in the phenological growth stage V6. Foliar macronutrients, foliar chlorophyll index (FCI, production components, and yield of corn grain were valuated. Inoculation of corn seeds with A. brasilense increased plant height and grain yield. Fertilization in topdressing, with N levels up to 120 kg ha-1, linearly increased the foliar nutrients and productivity of corn cultivated in the spring/summer in the low-altitude Cerrado region of Brazil.

  12. Sequential Inoculation of Native Non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Wine Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; Zulian, Laura; Ferreres, Àngela; Pastor, Rosa; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeast for wine making is becoming a common trend in many innovative wineries. The application is normally aimed at increasing aromas, glycerol, reducing acidity, and other improvements. This manuscript focuses on the reproduction of the native microbiota from the vineyard in the inoculum. Thus, native selected yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Starmerella bacillaris species and three different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were inoculated sequentially, or only S. cerevisiae (three native strains together or one commercial) was used. Inoculations were performed both in laboratory conditions with synthetic must (400 mL) as well as in industrial conditions (2000 kg of grapes) in red winemaking in two different varieties, Grenache and Carignan. The results showed that all the inoculated S. cerevisiae strains were found at the end of the vinifications, and when non-Saccharomyces yeasts were inoculated, they were found in appreciable populations at mid-fermentation. The final wines produced could be clearly differentiated by sensory analysis and were of similar quality, in terms of sensory analysis panelists’ appreciation. PMID:28769887

  13. Inoculation of cyclamen (Cyclamen persicum) and poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Trichoderma harzianum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubský, M.; Šrámek, F.; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 2 (2002), s. 63-68 ISSN 0370-663X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Cyclamen persicum * Euphorbia pulcherrima * inoculation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.333, year: 2002

  14. Inoculant of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus clarus increase yield of soybean and cotton under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Viviana Torres Cely

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient availability is an important factor in crop production, and regular addition of chemical fertilizers is the most common practice to improve yield in agrosystems for intensive crop production. The use of some groups of microorganisms that have specific activity providing nutrients to plants is a good alternative, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF enhance plant nutrition by providing especially phosphorus (P, improving plant growth and increasing crop production. Unfortunately, the use of AMF as an inoculant on a large scale is not yet widely used, because of several limitations in obtaining a large amount of inoculum due to several factors, such as low growth, the few species domesticated under in vitro conditions, and high competition with native AMF. The objective of this work was to test the infectivity of a Rhizophagus clarus inoculum and its effectiveness as an alternative for P supply in soybean (Glycine max L. and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.. The experiments were carried out in plots and the treatments were: Fertilizer; AMF, AMF + Fertilizer and AMF + ½ Fertilizer; non-inoculated and non-fertilized plants were considered the control. The parameters evaluated were AMF root colonization and effect of inoculation on plant growth and yield under a field conditions. The results showed that AMF inoculation increased the effect of fertilizer application in soybean, and that in cotton R. clarus was more effective than chemical fertilizer

  15. Effect of adding sour yoghurt and dough as bacterial inoculant on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    digiland

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... chemical composition at days 10, 30 and 70 of the experiment. Neither Yoghurt nor Dough had any effect on physical properties of ensiled materials. Inoculation of whole-crop corn with sourdough and sour yoghurt significantly decreased pH, ash content and ammonia nitrogen, while dry matter determined ...

  16. Yeast Population Dynamics in Spontaneous and Inoculated Alcoholic Fermentations of Zametovka Must

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc Cus

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inoculated fermentations, which are more rapid and more reliable than spontaneous fermentations, and assure predictable wine quality, are nowadays prevalent in Slovenia’s large-scale wine production. However, spontaneous fermentation strengthens local characteristics of wine and offers opportunities for technological innovation. In the 1999 vintage, spontaneous and inoculated fermentations of Zametovka (Vitis vinifera grape must were studied. Zametovka is the main red variety in production of traditional Slovene red blend wine, Cvicek. The diversity of yeast species and strains in both of the investigated fermentations was determined by molecular and traditional identification methods. The outset of alcoholic fermentation, yeast growth kinetics, and yeast population dynamics presents the main differences between the examined fermentations. Yeast population diversity was higher in the spontaneous process. Dominant yeast isolates from spontaneous fermentation were identified as Candida stellata, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae; whereas Saccharomyces bayanus, Pichia kluyveri, Pichia membranifaciens and Torulaspora delbrueckiim were found less frequently. Dominant species in the inoculated fermentation was Saccharomyces cerevisiae; other species found in smaller numbers were Candida stellata, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Debaryomyces hansenii var. hansenii. Using PFGE, we were able to distinguish among 15 different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and three different Saccharomyces bayanus strains isolated from spontaneous fermentation, whereas, in the case of inoculated fermentation, only two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were found. Their chromosomal patterns coincide with the chromosomal patterns of the starter culture strains.

  17. Effect of white mustard essential oil on inoculated Salmonella sp. in a sauce with particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Jairus R D; Ekanayake, Athula; Singh, Indarpal; Farina, Brian; Meyer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    White mustard essential oil (WMEO), from white mustard seed (Sinapis alba L.), is obtained by solvent extraction of defatted and wetted ground mustard; endogenous myrosinase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glucosinolate sinalbin to yield 4-hydroxybenzyl isothiocyanate (4-HBITC), the antimicrobial component of WMEO. Sauce with particulates was made by mixing sauce, which served as the carrier for WMEO, with frozen vegetable and chicken particulates inoculated with Salmonella sp. WMEO (at 250 to 750 ppm of 4-HBITC) was able to reduce inoculated Salmonella counts by 0.8 to 2.7 log (CFU/g) in a frozen sauce with particulates in a dose-dependent manner, starting from the point of formulating the sauce through the microwave cooking step. High-pressure liquid chromatography-based analytical data confirmed that 4-HBITC was present in all of the samples in the expected concentrations and was completely hydrolyzed after the recommended cooking time in microwave ovens. In another experiment simulating unintentional abuse conditions, where the WMEO containing sauce with particulates was kept at room temperature for 5 h, WMEO (at 250 to 750 ppm of 4-HBITC) was able to reduce inoculated Salmonella counts from the point of first contact and up to 5 h by 0.7 to 2.4 log (CFU/g). Despite the known hydrolytic instability of the active component 4-HBITC, particularly at close to neutral pH values, WMEO was effective in controlling deliberately inoculated Salmonella sp. in a frozen sauce with particulates.

  18. Nitrogen and molybdenum fertilization and inoculation of common bean with Rhizobium spp. in two oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marislaine Alves de Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of foliar application of molybdenum and small dose of nitrogen at planting on common bean production when using seed inoculation with rhizobia. Two field experiments were conducted, applying a randomized block design and a factorial arrangement (3x2x2 + 1, with three replicates. Treatments consisted of inoculation with Rhizobium spp. (strain CIAT 899T, strain UFLA 02–100, and uninoculated, foliar application of molybdenum (0 and 80 g ha-1, and fertilization with N-urea at planting (0 and 20 kg ha-1, with an additional N treatment of 40 applied at planting and 40 kg ha-1 applied as topdressing. The foliar application of molybdenum did not favor the nodulation, but its effect on yield was dependent on the chemical soil characteristics, providing highest yield in soil at Patos de Minas with pH more acid and with higher phosphorus and organic matter concentrations. Small dose of nitrogen applied at planting did not reduce nodulation of bean inoculated with rhizobia, but it can reduce the seeds emergence, thus negatively affecting yield. The native rhizobia promoted nodulation, the plant growth, shoot N accumulation and yield similar to the treatments that received inoculations of rhizobia strains.

  19. Combined Inoculation with Multiple Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Improves Growth, Nutrient Uptake and Photosynthesis in Cucumber Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangchen Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal inoculation stimulates growth, photosynthesis and nutrient uptake in a wide range of host plants. However, the ultimate effects of arbuscular mycorrhyzal (AM symbiosis vary with the plants and fungal species involved in the association. Therefore, identification of the appropriate combinations of AM fungi (AMF that interact synergistically to improve their benefits is of high significance. Here, three AM fungal compositions namely VT (Claroideoglomus sp., Funneliformis sp., Diversispora sp., Glomus sp., and Rhizophagus sp. and BF (Glomus intraradices, G. microageregatum BEG and G. Claroideum BEG 210, and Funneliformis mosseae (Fm were investigated with respect to the growth, gas exchange parameters, enzymes activities in Calvin cycles and related gene expression in cucumber seedlings. The results showed that VT, BF and Fm could successfully colonize cucumber root to a different degree with the colonization rates 82.38, 74.65, and 70.32% at 46 days post inoculation, respectively. The plant height, stem diameter, dry weight, root to shoot ratio of cucumber seedlings inoculated with AMF increased significantly compared with the non-inoculated control. Moreover, AMF colonization greatly increased the root activity, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, light saturated rate of the CO2 assimilation (Asat, maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax and maximum ribulose-1,5-bis-phosphate (RuBP regeneration rate (Jmax, which were increased by 52.81, 30.75, 58.76, 47.00, 69.15, and 65.53% when inoculated with VT, respectively. The activities of some key enzymes such RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO, D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase, D-fructose-6-phosphatase (F6P and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase (Ru5PK, and related gene expression involved in the Calvin cycle including RCA, FBPase, FBPA, SBPase, rbcS and rbcL were upregulated by AMF colonization. AMF inoculation also improved macro- and micro nutrient contents such as N, P, K, S, Ca, Cu

  20. Improvement of garri quality by the inoculation of microorganisms into cassava mash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, N; Umeh, C; Ibenegbu, C; Obizoba, I; Nnam, N

    1998-03-03

    Lactobacillus delbruckii, Lactobacillus coryneformis, and a Saccharomyces sp., previously found among 214 isolates to be the highest producers of linamarase, amylase, and lysine were inoculated separately or mixed into cassava mash and fermented with, or without dewatering, for 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h. At the end of the fermentation period, the mash was converted to garri by heating over a gas burner. The mash and the garri resulting from it were assessed for lysine and residual cyanide, while the garri was also studied for its organoleptic properties. The inoculation of the microorganisms into cassava mash produced a sharp drop in the cyanide content of the mash, particularly when the mixture of organisms was inoculated into undewatered cassava mash rather the single organisms. After 24 h, while the cyanide content of the control (uninoculated mash) mash was 3.06 microg/g in the dewatered mash, and 4.24 microg/g in the undewatered mash, the inoculation of a mixture of the three organisms caused the cyanide content in the inoculated mashes to drop by 150% to 1.96 microg/g (dewatered mash) and by 300% to 1.43 microg/g (undewatered mash). It also appears that the process of producing the garri from the mash by heating, caused a further reduction of the cyanide content: thus the garri always contained less cyanide than the mash from which it was made. The lysine content of the mash was also highest when all three organisms were mixed; it also tended to increase with increasing length of fermentation of the mash. Whereas the single organism most effective in reducing the cyanide content of mash was Lactobacillus delbruckii, in the case of lysine production, it was the yeast. The organoleptic properties of the garri which were assessed were flavour, texture, colour and general acceptability. In general these properties were superior at the P < 0.01 level in garri made from the undewatered mash in comparison with that from dewatered mash, especially when the mixture of

  1. Usage of humic materials for formulation of stable microbial inoculants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydralieva, K. A.; Khudaibergenova, B. M.; Elchin, A. A.; Gorbunova, N. V.; Muratov, V. S.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    Some microbes have been domesticated for environment service, for example in a variety of novel applications, including efforts to reduce environmental problems. For instance, antagonistic organisms can be used as biological control agents to reduce the use of chemical pesticides, or efficient degraders can be applied as bioprophylactics to minimise the spread of chemical pollutants. Microorganisms can also be used for the biological clean-up of polluted soil or as plant growth-promoting bacteria that stimulate nutrient uptake. Many microbial applications require large-scale cultivation of the organisms. The biomass production must then be followed by formulation steps to ensure long-term stability and convenient use. However, there remains a need to further develop knowledge on how to optimise fermentation of "non-conventional microorganisms" for environmental applications involving the intact living cells. The goal of presented study is to develop fermentation and formulation techniques for termolabile rhizobacteria isolates - Pseudomonas spp. with major biotechnical potential. Development of efficient and cost-effective media and process parameters giving high cell yields are important priorities. This also involves establishing fermentation parameters yielding cells well adapted to subsequent formulation procedures. Collectively, these strategies will deliver a high proportion of viable cells with good long-term survival. Our main efforts were focused on development of more efficient drying techniques for microorganisms, particularly spray drying and fluidised bed-drying. The advantages of dry formulations are that storage and delivery costs are much lower than for liquid formulations and that long-term survival can be very high if initial packaging is carefully optimised. In order to improve and optimise formulations various kinds of humics-based excipients have been added that have beneficial effects on the viability of the organisms and the storage stability

  2. Effects of lactic acid bacteria silage inoculation on methane emission and productivity of Holstein Friesian dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J L; Hindrichsen, I K; Klop, G; Kinley, R D; Milora, N; Bannink, A; Dijkstra, J

    2016-09-01

    Inoculants of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used to improve silage quality and prevent spoilage via increased production of lactic acid and other organic acids and a rapid decline in silage pH. The addition of LAB inoculants to silage has been associated with increases in silage digestibility, dry matter intake (DMI), and milk yield. Given the potential change in silage and rumen fermentation conditions accompanying these silage additives, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LAB silage inoculants on DMI, digestibility, milk yield, milk composition, and methane (CH4) production from dairy cows in vivo. Eight mid-lactation Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were grouped into 2 blocks of 4 cows (multiparous and primiparous) and used in a 4×4 double Latin square design with 21-d periods. Methane emissions were measured by indirect calorimetry. Treatments were grass silage (mainly ryegrass) with no inoculant (GS), with a long-term inoculant (applied at harvest; GS+L), with a short-term inoculant (applied 16h before feeding; GS+S), or with both long and short-term inoculants (GS+L+S). All diets consisted of grass silage and concentrate (75:25 on a dry matter basis). The long-term inoculant consisted of a 10:20:70 mixture of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis, and Lactobacillus buchneri, and the short-term inoculant was a preparation of Lc. lactis. Dry matter intake was not affected by long-term or short-term silage inoculation, nor was dietary neutral detergent fiber or fat digestibility, or N or energy balance. Milk composition (except milk urea) and fat and protein-corrected milk yield were not affected by long- or short-term silage inoculation, nor was milk microbial count. However, milk yield tended to be greater with long-term silage inoculation. Methane expressed in units of grams per day, grams per kilogram of DMI, grams per kilogram of milk, or grams per kilogram of fat and protein-corrected milk yield was not affected by long- or short

  3. Effect of seed inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense and nitrogen fertilization rates on maize plant yield and silage quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Reimann Skonieski

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Azospirillum brasilense inoculation and different nitrogen (N rates applied as topdressing on the productivity of a maize crop and the nutritional value of maize silage. Two experiments were conducted in the 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 harvests. Treatments were distributed in a randomized block design in a factorial arrangement, which consisted of two maize hybrids (AS 1572 and Defender coupled with nitrogen rates (0, 60, 120, 240, and 480 kg ha-1, inoculated or uninoculated with A. brasilense. Inoculated seeds were treated with the A. brasilense strains Ab-V5 and Ab-V6. Inoculation with A. brasilense showed interaction with the hybrids, agricultural years, and nitrogen rates for the maize plant yield. In the 2012/2013 agricultural year, inoculation increased the AS 1572 hybrid silage yield by 6.16% and, in the 2013/2014 harvest, A. brasilense inoculation produced an increase of 16.15% for the Defender hybrid. Nitrogen fertilization applied at 0, 60, and 120 kg ha-1 N benefited the plants inoculated with A. brasilense. The statistical equations revealed that N rates between 0 and 184 kg ha-1 in A. brasilense inoculated plants raised the plant productivity for silage when compared with the control plants. Regarding the nutritional value of the silage, inoculation with A. brasilense increased the ether extract levels and total digestible nutrients and reduced the amount of acid detergent fiber. For all this, positive results with inoculation for silage yield are dependent on nitrogen fertilization rate. Inoculation with A. brasilense can promote changes in the maize silage quality, but with obtained results it is not possible to definitely conclude upon nutritive value of maize silage.

  4. Improvement of Faba Bean Yield Using Rhizobium/Agrobacterium Inoculant in Low-Fertility Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh H. Youseif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil fertility is one of the major limiting factors for crop’s productivity in Egypt and the world in general. Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF has a great importance as a non-polluting and a cost-effective way to improve soil fertility through supplying N to different agricultural systems. Faba bean (Vicia faba L. is one of the most efficient nitrogen-fixing legumes that can meet all of their N needs through BNF. Therefore, understanding the impact of rhizobial inoculation and contrasting soil rhizobia on nodulation and N2 fixation in faba bean is crucial to optimize the crop yield, particularly under low fertility soil conditions. This study investigated the symbiotic effectiveness of 17 Rhizobium/Agrobacterium strains previously isolated from different Egyptian governorates in improving the nodulation and N2 fixation in faba bean cv. Giza 843 under controlled greenhouse conditions. Five strains that had a high nitrogen-fixing capacity under greenhouse conditions were subsequently tested in field trials as faba bean inoculants at Ismaillia Governorate in northeast Egypt in comparison with the chemical N-fertilization treatment (96 kg N·ha−1. A starter N-dose (48 kg N·ha−1 was applied in combination with different Rhizobium inoculants. The field experiments were established at sites without a background of inoculation under low fertility sandy soil conditions over two successive winter growing seasons, 2012/2013 and 2013/2014. Under greenhouse conditions, inoculated plants produced significantly higher nodules dry weight, plant biomass, and shoot N-uptake than non-inoculated ones. In the first season (2012/2013, inoculation of field-grown faba bean showed significant improvements in seed yield (3.73–4.36 ton·ha−1 and seed N-yield (138–153 Kg N·ha−1, which were higher than the uninoculated control (48 kg N·ha−1 that produced 2.97 Kg·ha−1 and 95 kg N·ha−1, respectively. Similarly, in the second season (2013

  5. Immune response of calves inoculated with proteins ofAnaplasma marginale bound to an immunostimulant complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Ribeiro Gasparini

    Full Text Available Despite our current knowledge of the immunology, pathology, and genetics of Anaplasma marginale, prevention in cattle is currently based on old standbys, including live attenuated vaccines, antibiotic treatment, and maintaining enzootic stability in cattle herds. In the present study, we evaluated the use of an immunostimulant complex (ISCOMATRIX adjuvant, associated with a pool of recombinant major surface proteins (rMSP1a, rMSP1b, rMSP4 and rMSP5 to improve the humoral immune response triggered in calves mainly by IgG2. Ten calves were divided in three groups: 4 calves were inoculated with the ISCOMATRIX/rMSPs (G1; 2 calves were inoculated with ISCOMATRIX adjuvant (G2; and 4 calves received saline (G3. Three inoculations were administered at 21-day intervals. In G1, the calves showed significant increases in total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 levels 21 days after the second inoculation, compared to the control group (p < 0.05, and G1 calves remained above the cut-off value 28 days after the third inoculation (p < 0.05. The post-immunized sera from calves in G1 reacted specifically for each of the rMSPs used. In conclusion, the ISCOMATRIX/rMSPs induced antigen-specific seroconversion in calves. Therefore, additional testing to explore the protection induced by rMSPs, both alone and in conjunction with proteins previously identified as subdominant epitopes, is warranted.

  6. PRODUCTION OF AUSTRALIAN CEDAR SEEDLINGS INOCULATED WITH ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF CONTAINERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élida Ribeiro do Carmo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study aimed to evaluate the growth and the levels of N, P, K, Ca and Mg in Australian cedar seedlings which had been inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF in different types of containers. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse and the experimental design was that of randomized complete blocks (RCB, with a 4 x 4 factorial design consisting of four inoculation treatments with AMF (Rhizophagus clarum, Gigaspora margarita, a mixed inoculation (R. clarum + G. margarita and the control (with no AMF inoculation; four types of containers (plastic bags measuring 250 cm3, tubes of 55 and 130 cm3 and pressed blocks 440 cm3. plant-1, with four repetitions. The height, the diameter of the stem base, the aerial part dry weight (APDW, the dry weight of the root (DWR and the total plant dry weight (DW were measured, along with the Dickson quality index, the percentage of mycorrhizal colonization and the levels of N, P, K, Ca and Mg in the aerial part dry weight. One hundred and thirty eight days (138 days after sowing, the greatest growth and/or the highest levels of P, K and Ca could be observed in the aerial part dry weight of the Australian cedar seedlings which had been planted in the pressed block container and inoculated with a mixture of the two AMF species (G. margarita + R. clarum or with just R. clarum. Thus it can be seen that AMF can make a significant contribution to the production of Australian cedar seedlings.

  7. Soybean Glycine Max L Merill Promiscuity Reaction To Indigenous Bradyrhizobia inoculation In Some Ghanaian Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phanuel Y. Klogo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT For many tropical countries particularly in Africa Biological Nitrogen Fixation BNF continues to be the most promising alternative or supplement to the use of chemical Nitrogen fertilizers for sustainable Agriculture. In contrast to cowpea that nodulate profusely in tropical soilswith the naturally occurring bradyrhizobia nodulation and nitrogen fixation in the American-type soybean in similar environments has largely depended on inoculating bradyrhizobia into the soil. The development of the Tropical Glycine Cross TGx soybean varieties by IITA has made it possible for these promiscuous varieties to nodulate with the naturally occurring strains belonging to the cowpea Bradyrhizobiumspp. The Most Probable Number MPN technique was used to determine the bradyrhizobial population in these soils. Eighty four Bradyrhizobium isolates obtained from randomly selected nodules on soybean were assessed for effectiveness in nitrogen fixation. Three of the most effective isolates were used in inoculation studies carried out in the greenhouse atthe University of Ghana-Legonon three promiscuous soybean varieties Anidaso TGx 813-6D TGx 1903-8F and TGx 1448-2E and a non- promiscuous genotype Davis in three Ghanaian soil series Toje Chromic cambisols Chichiwere Dystricfluvisol and Bekwai Ferric acrisols. There were tremendous inoculation responses in these soils for both the promiscuous and non-promiscuous cultivars with even the promiscuous ones responding better to inoculation than the non-promiscuous Davis. Inoculation gave rise to significant increases in nodule number nodule dry weight shoot dry weight and total nitrogen accumulation compared to the uninoculated control even intheChichiwere soil series which harboured the highestpopulation of indigenous bradyrhizobia suggesting that the populations of the naturally occurring bradyrhizobia in these soils were either not highly competitive or sufficient for optimum nodulation and nitrogen fixation. For

  8. Cryoprotective dehydration and the resistance to inoculative freezing in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Michael A; Hayward, Scott A L; Rinehart, Joseph P; Denlinger, David L; Lee, Richard E

    2008-02-01

    During winter, larvae of the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica (Diptera, Chironomidae), must endure 7-8 months of continuous subzero temperatures, encasement in a matrix of soil and ice, and severely desiccating conditions. This environment, along with the fact that larvae possess a high rate of water loss and are extremely tolerant of desiccation, may promote the use of cryoprotective dehydration as a strategy for winter survival. This study investigates the capacity of larvae to resist inoculative freezing and undergo cryoprotective dehydration at subzero temperatures. Slow cooling to -3 degrees C in an environment at equilibrium with the vapor pressure of ice reduced larval water content by approximately 40% and depressed the body fluid melting point more than threefold to -2.6 degrees C. This melting point depression was the result of the concentration of existing solutes (i.e. loss of body water) and the de novo synthesis of osmolytes. By day 14 of the subzero exposure, larval survival was still >95%, suggesting larvae have the capacity to undergo cryoprotective dehydration. However, under natural conditions the use of cryoprotective dehydration may be constrained by inoculative freezing as result of the insect's intimate contact with environmental ice. During slow cooling within a substrate of frozen soil, the ability of larvae to resist inoculative freezing and undergo cryoprotective dehydration was dependent upon the moisture content of the soil. As detected by a reduction of larval water content, the percentage of larvae that resisted inoculative freezing increased with decreasing soil moisture. These results suggest that larvae of the Antarctic midge have the capacity to resist inoculative freezing at relatively low soil moisture contents and likely undergo cryoprotective dehydration when exposed to subzero temperatures during the polar winter.

  9. Effect of inoculum size, bacterial species, type of surfaces and contact time to the transfer of foodborne pathogens from inoculated to non-inoculated beef fillets via food processing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkana, E; Chorianopoulos, N; Grounta, A; Koutsoumanis, K; Nychas, G-J E

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the factors affecting the transfer of foodborne pathogens from inoculated beef fillets to non-inoculated ones, through food processing surfaces. Three different levels of inoculation of beef fillets surface were prepared: a high one of approximately 10 7  CFU/cm 2 , a medium one of 10 5  CFU/cm 2 and a low one of 10 3  CFU/cm 2 , using mixed-strains of Listeria monocytogenes, or Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, or Escherichia coli O157:H7. The inoculated fillets were then placed on 3 different types of surfaces (stainless steel-SS, polyethylene-PE and wood-WD), for 1 or 15 min. Subsequently, these fillets were removed from the cutting boards and six sequential non-inoculated fillets were placed on the same surfaces for the same period of time. All non-inoculated fillets were contaminated with a progressive reduction trend of each pathogen's population level from the inoculated fillets to the sixth non-inoculated ones that got in contact with the surfaces, and regardless the initial inoculum, a reduction of approximately 2 log CFU/g between inoculated and 1st non-inoculated fillet was observed. S. Typhimurium was transferred at lower mean population (2.39 log CFU/g) to contaminated fillets than E. coli O157:H7 (2.93 log CFU/g), followed by L. monocytogenes (3.12 log CFU/g; P food establishments or households can provide a scientific basis for risk management of such products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inoculation of Scrapie with the Self-Assembling RADA-Peptide Disrupts Prion Accumulation and Extends Hamster Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercerebral inoculation of 263K Scrapie brain homogenate (PrPsc) with a self-assembling RADA-peptide (RADA) significantly delayed disease onset and increased hamster survival. Time of survival was dependent on the dose of RADA and pre-incubation with PrPsc prior to inoculation. RADA treatment resu...

  11. Effects of lactic acid bacteria silage inoculation on methane emission and productivity of Holstein Friesian dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, J.L.; Hindrichsen, I.K.; Klop, G.; Kinley, R.D.; Milora, N.; Bannink, A.; Dijkstra, J.

    2016-01-01

    Inoculants of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used to improve silage quality and prevent spoilage via increased production of lactic acid and other organic acids and a rapid decline in silage pH. The addition of LAB inoculants to silage has been associated with increases in silage digestibility,

  12. Effect of Microbial Inoculants on Uptake of Nutrient Elements in Two Cultivars of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. in Saline Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa SHIRMARDI

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A greenhouse experiment was conducted in order to evaluate the interactive effects of microbial inoculants on uptake of nutrient elements (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn in two cultivars of sunflower. The trials were carried out on saline (EC = 7.6 dS m-1 calcareous soils taken from Eshtehard (Karaj region of Iran. In a factorial trial and completely randomized design (CRD, three levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculants (non inoculation, inoculation withGlomus etunicatum and Glomus intradices and four levels of Pseudomonas fluorescensinoculants (non inoculation and inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescens strains 4, 9, 12 in two cultivars of sunflower with four replications per treatments were applied. Results revealed that all of the treatments increased the N uptake in Euroflor cultivar. Moreover, in Euroflor cultivar, inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescens strains 9 and co-inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains 4 and Glomus intradices made a significant different in phosphorous uptake, while did not make any significant change in the Master cultivar. However, bacterial and fungal treatments significantly (P < 0.05 increased uptake of micro nutrients such as Fe, Zn and Mn.

  13. Establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius (Arecaceae: effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Ramos-Zapata

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi has often promoted increased growth of plants but very little work has been done in the tropics to evaluate the effects of inoculation on the establishment and development of seedlings in forests. Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius is a scandent palm present both in early and late succession, and consequently can be used in restoration processes. A test was conducted to determine the effect of AM on the establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos in tropical forest in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Thirty inoculated and 30 non-inoculated seedlings were introduced in two sites of different successional age, a mature forest and an eight-year old abandoned cornfield (acahual.Survival and growth parameters were evaluated after 12 months. Leaf area and phosphorus, but not height, were greater in inoculated than non-inoculated plants in the forest but not in the acahual. However, mycorrhizae had a clear effect on plant survival in both sites, with a threefold increase in survival of inoculated compared with non-inoculated plants bassed on an odds ratio. The results suggest that inoculation will be important to increase the establishment of this commercially important palm. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(1: 65-72. Epub 2006 Mar 31.La inoculación con hongos micorrizógenos arbusculares (AMpromueve un incremento en el crecimiento de las plantas, sin embargo poco trabajo se ha realizado en los trópicos para evaluar el efecto de la inoculación en el proceso de establecimiento de plántulas. Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius es una palmera trepadora que se distribuye tanto en etapas tempranas y tardías de la sucesión, por lo tanto puede ser empleada en procesos de restauración. Se realizó una prueba de establecimiento de D. orthacanthos en una selva tropical de la península de Yucatán, México. Treinta plántulas inoculadas y 30 no inoculadas se establecieron en dos sitios con diferentes etapas sucesionales: selva madura

  14. Dual inoculation with an Aarbuscular Mycorrhizal fungus and Rhizobium to facilitate the growth of alfalfa on coal mine substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, F.Y.; Bi, Y.L.; Wong, M.H. [China University of Mining & Technology, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Glomus mosseae and Rhizobium on Medicago sativa grown on three types of coal mine substrates, namely a mixture of coal wastes and sands (CS), coal wastes and fly ash (CF), and fly ash (FA). Inoculation with Rhizobium alone did not result in any growth response but G. mosseae alone displayed a significant effect on plant growth. G. mosseae markedly increased the survival rate of M. sativa in CS substrate. In CF and FA substrates the respective oven dry weights of M. sativa inoculated with G. mosseae were 1.8 and 5.1 times higher than those without inoculation. Based on nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) uptake and legume growth, the results also show that dual inoculation in CS and CF substrates elicited a synergistic effect. This indicates that inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may be a promising approach for revegetation of coal mine substrates.

  15. Survival and recovery of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes on lettuce and parsley as affected by method of inoculation, time between inoculation and analysis, and treatment with chlorinated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Megan M; Harris, Linda J; Beuchat, Larry R

    2004-06-01

    The effects of method for applying inoculum and of drying time after inoculation on survival and recovery of foodborne pathogens on iceberg lettuce and parsley were studied. Five-strain mixtures of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, or Listeria monocytogenes were applied to lettuce and parsley by dip, spot, or spray inoculation methods. Inocula were dried for 2 h at 22 degrees C or for 2 h at 22 degrees C and then 22 h at 4 degrees C before being treated with water (control) or chlorine (200 microg/ml). Significantly higher populations (CFU per lettuce or parsley sample) of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella (alpha = 0.05) were recovered from dip-inoculated produce than from spot- or spray-inoculated produce. This difference was attributed to larger numbers of cells adhering to lettuce and parsley subjected to dip inoculation. Populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella recovered from lettuce inoculated by spot and spray methods were not significantly different, but populations recovered from spot-inoculated parsley were significantly higher than those recovered from spray-inoculated parsley, even though the number of cells applied was the same. Significantly different numbers of L. monocytogenes were recovered from inoculated lettuce (dip > spray > spot); populations recovered from dip-inoculated parsley were significantly higher than those recovered from spot- or spray-inoculated parsley, which were not significantly different from each other. Populations of pathogens recovered from lettuce and parsley after drying inoculum for 2 h at 22 degrees C were significantly higher than or equal to populations recovered after drying for 2 h at 22 degrees C and then for 22 h at 4 degrees C. Significant differences (water > chlorine) were observed in populations of all pathogens recovered from treated lettuce and parsley, regardless of inoculation method and drying time. It is recommended that spot inoculation with a drying time of 2 h at 22 degrees C followed by 22 h at 4

  16. Molecular markers detecting an ectomycorrhizal Suillus collinitus strain on Pinus halepensis roots suggest successful inoculation and persistence in Mediterranean nursery and plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Selosse, Marc-André; Mousain, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Survival of the ectomycorrhizal fungal strain Suillus collinitus Sc-32 on Pinus halepensis after inoculation and outplanting was monitored in a Mediterranean plantation. Three molecular fingerprints were developed: RFLP of the internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA, intersimple sequence repeat, and a specific sequence-characterized amplified region marker. The inoculant was demonstrated to survive on inoculated seedlings 4 years after outplanting (56 months after inoculation), although S. collinitus was not fruiting. The designed markers set allows reliable and inexpensive monitoring of inoculated seedlings and suggests that S. collinitus is suitable for inoculation of Mediterranean Pinus. These data are discussed in the framework of suilloid population ecology.

  17. Multistep introduction of bacteria to natural substrates at different initial inoculation doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanov, A. A.; Semenov, A. M.; Kunenkova, N. N.; van Bruggen, A. H. C.

    2009-09-01

    The population dynamics of the saprotrophic Pseudomonas fluorescens 32 gfp bacteria and two conventionally pathogenic enterobacteria ( Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium) were investigated in their inoculation at different doses into cattle excreta and their subsequent entering soil and plants and migration through the gastroenteric tract of invertebrates. All the introduced bacteria investigated are shown to be able to overcome ecological barriers as they migrate through the natural substrates and habitats. The introduce microorganisms maintain their high population density even at the lowest initial inoculation dose—105 CFU/g of dry matter. Plants were found to be a favorable substrate for the survival of the bacteria investigated (for enteropathogens, in particular). Enteropathogens are able to pass through the gastroenteric tract of invertebrates. Therefore, these organisms can function as incubators and carriers of enteroinfections in nature.

  18. Antibody response to equine coronavirus in horses inoculated with a bovine coronavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Manabu; Kanno, Toru; Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kokado, Hiroshi

    2017-11-17

    A vaccine for equine coronavirus (ECoV) is so far unavailable. Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is antigenically related to ECoV; it is therefore possible that BCoV vaccine will induce antibodies against ECoV in horses. This study investigated antibody response to ECoV in horses inoculated with BCoV vaccine. Virus neutralization tests showed that antibody titers against ECoV increased in all six horses tested at 14 days post inoculation, although the antibody titers were lower against ECoV than against BCoV. This study showed that BCoV vaccine provides horses with antibodies against ECoV to some extent. It is unclear whether antibodies provided by BCoV vaccine are effective against ECoV, and therefore ECoV challenge studies are needed to evaluate efficacy of the vaccine in the future.

  19. Baby bottle steam sterilizers disinfect home nebulizers inoculated with bacterial respiratory pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Dana; Callan, Deborah A; Farrel, Patricia A; Egan, Marie E; Murray, Thomas S

    2013-09-01

    Contaminated nebulizers are a potential source of bacterial infection but no single method is universally accepted for disinfection. We hypothesized that baby-bottle steam sterilizers effectively disinfect home nebulizers. Home nebulizers were inoculated with the common CF respiratory pathogens methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia, Haemophilus influenzae, mucoid and non mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The nebulizers were swabbed for bacterial growth, treated with either the AVENT (Philips), the NUK Quick & Ready (Gerber) or DRY-POD (Camera Baby) baby bottle steam sterilizer and reswabbed for bacterial growth. All steam sterilizers were effective at disinfecting all home nebulizers. Viable bacteria were not recovered from any inoculated site after steam treatment, under any conditions tested. Steam treatment is an effective disinfection method. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether these results are applicable to the clinical setting. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Syphilization and Its Discontents: Experimental Inoculation against Syphilis at the London Lock Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 1867 James Lane and George Gascoyen, surgeons to the London Lock Hospital, compiled a report on their experiments with a new and controversial treatment. The procedure, known as "syphilization," saw patients be inoculated with infective matter taken from a primary syphilitic ulcer or the artificial sores produced in another patient. Each patient received between 102 and 468 inoculations to determine whether syphilization could cure syphilis and produce immunity against reinfection. This article examines the theory and practice of this experimental treatment. Conducted against the backdrop of the Contagious Diseases Acts, the English syphilization experiments have been largely forgotten. Yet they constitute an important case study of how doctors thought about the etiology and pathology of syphilis, as well as their responsibilities to their patients, at a crucial moment before the advent of the bacteriological revolution.

  1. Plantago lanceolata growth and Cr uptake after mycorrhizal inoculation in a Cr amended substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Nogales

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from two chromium contaminated sites, one with 275 mg kg-1 of Cr (zone A and the other with 550 mg kg-1 Cr (zone B, were multiplied and tentatively identified. The effect of both fungal consortia on Plantago lanceolata plant growth in a substrate amended with 200 mg kg-1 of Cr and with 400 mg kg-1 Cr was assessed and compared with the growth of plants inoculated with Glomus intraradices BEG72. Only the plants inoculated with G. intraradices BEG72 and with the fungal consortia obtained from the area with a high Cr contamination (zone B grew in the soil with 400 mg kg-1 of Cr. The consortia of fungi from zone B, decreased the plant’s uptake/translocation of the heavy metal compared with G. intraradices BEG72. These results underscore the differential effect of AM fungi in conferring bioprotection in Cr contaminated soils.

  2. Experimental inoculation of calves with atypical Hobi-like pestivirus shows pattern similar to BVDV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larska, Magdalena; Polak, Mirosław P.; Uttenthal, Åse

    of experimental inoculation of European cattle with atypical pestivirus. The experiment included 4 groups of 5 calves each inoculated with: BVDV-1 (Ho916), Hobi-like pestivirus (Th/04_KhonKaen), a mixture of both viruses or EaglesMEM (control animals). Th/04_KhonKaen induced milder clinical signs than observed......Newly emerging pestiviruses, detected first as containment of cell culture fluids originated from Brazil and named Hobi-like are becoming a concern for diagnostic labs, vaccine producers and for BVDV control and eradication programs. The epidemiology of the virus is not known, however recent...... has shown that Hobi-like viruses share similar to BVDV-1clinical pattern inducing rather subclinical disease with apparent immunosuppression of the host....

  3. Improved fermentation performance in an expanded ectopic fermentation system inoculated with thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui; Zhu, Changxiong; Geng, Bing; Liu, Xue; Ye, Jing; Tian, Yunlong; Peng, Xiawei

    2015-12-01

    Previous research showed that ectopic fermentation system (EFS) inoculated with thermophilic bacteria is an excellent alternative for cow wastewater treatment. In this study, the effects of thermophilic bacterial consortium on the efficiency and quality of the fermentation process in EFS were evaluated by measuring physicochemical and environmental factors and the changes in organic matter composition. In parallel, the microbial communities correlated with fermentation performance were identified. Inoculation of EFS with thermophilic bacterial consortium led to higher temperatures, increased wastewater requirements for continuous fermentation, and improved quality of the litters in terms of physicochemical factors, security test, functional group analysis, and bacterial community composition. The relationship between the transformation of organic component and the dominant bacteria species indicated that environmental factors contributed to strain growth, which subsequently promoted the fermentation process. The results highlight the great potential of EFS model for wide application in cow wastewater treatment and re-utilization as bio-fertilizer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into raw tomatoes and processed tomato products.

    OpenAIRE

    Beuchat, L R; Brackett, R E

    1991-01-01

    Rates of death and growth of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto raw whole and into chopped tomatoes stored at 10 and 21 degrees C were not influenced by prior treatment of tomatoes with chlorine or packaging under an atmosphere of 3% O2 and 97% N2. Growth of the pathogen occurred in whole tomatoes held at 21 degrees C but not at 10 degrees C, while death occurred in chopped tomatoes stored at these temperatures. Likewise, growth patterns of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms, psychrotrophi...

  5. Inoculation of Lens culinaris with Pb-resistant bacteria shows potential for phytostabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebara, Salwa Harzalli; Saadani, Omar; Fatnassi, Imen Challougui; Chiboub, Manel; Abdelkrim, Souhir; Jebara, Moez

    2015-02-01

    Phytoremediation comprises a set of plant and microbe-based technologies for remediation of soil heavy metal contamination. In this work, four Pb-resistant bacteria (Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Rahnella aquatilis, and two Pseudomonas sp.) were selected among a collection of isolates from root nodule of Lens culinaris. They had a high degree of bioaccumulation ability in nutrient medium containing 2 mM Pb, and the maximum Pb accumulation of whole cell was found after 48-h incubation. These Pb-resistant bacteria synthesized plant growth promoting substances such as indole acetic acid and siderophore. The presence of the Pb resistance genes (pbrA) in these bacteria has been confirmed by PCR. L. culinaris cultivated in two experimental soils with different levels of contamination showed that Pb contamination affected plant growth; therefore, it's co-inoculation with the consortium of Pb-resistant bacteria improved plant biomass. The present study demonstrated that lentil accumulated Pb primarily in their roots and poorly in their shoots; in addition, it's co-inoculation in moderately Pb-contaminated soil induced a reduction in Pb accumulation in roots and shoots by 22 and 80 %, respectively. Whereas in highly Pb-contaminated soil, we registered a diminution in concentration of Pb in shoots (66 %) and an augmentation in roots (21 %). The contamination of soil by Pb caused an oxidative stress in lentil plant, inducing modulation in antioxidant enzymes activities, essentially in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (GPOX) activities which were more pronounced in lentil cultivated in highly Pb-contaminated soil, in addition, co-inoculation enhanced these activities, suggesting the protective role of enzymatic antioxidant against Pb-induced plant stress.Thus, the present study demonstrated that co-inoculation of lentil with A. tumefaciens, R. aquatilis, and Pseudomonas sp. formed a symbiotic system useful for phytostabilization of highly and moderately Pb

  6. Field performance of "marsh seedless" grapefruit on trifoliate orange inoculated with viroids in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Stuchi,Eduardo Sanches; Silva,Simone Rodrigues da; Donadio,Luiz Carlos; Sempionato,Otávio Ricardo; Reiff,Eduardo Toller

    2007-01-01

    Some viroids reduce citrus tree growth and may be used for tree size control aiming the establishment of orchards with close tree spacing that may provide higher productivity than conventional ones. To study the effects of citrus viroids inoculation on vegetative growth, yield and fruit quality of 'Marsh Seedless' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) grafted on trifoliate orange [Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.], an experiment was set up in January 1991, in Bebedouro, São Paulo State, Brazil. The...

  7. The Immune Response: Romanticism and the Radical Literary History of Smallpox Inoculation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fuson

    2014-01-01

    My dissertation untangles the oxymoron of Romantic medicine. The literary history of inoculation, I contend, reveals that smallpox eradication was as much a triumph of the literary imagination as it was an achievement of Enlightenment science. Underlying this argument is the larger disciplinary question: Who counts as a producer of scientific knowledge? My project uncovers a surprisingly literary history of medicine that includes poetry and imaginative fiction in the discovery, propagation, a...

  8. Experimentally induced lameness in turkeys inoculated with a newly emergent turkey reovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeldin, Tamer A; Mor, Sunil K; Bekele, Aschalew Z; Verma, Harsha; Noll, Sally L; Goyal, Sagar M; Porter, Robert E

    2015-02-24

    Newly emergent turkey arthritis reoviruses (TARVs) have been isolated from cases of lameness in male turkeys over 10 weeks of age. In a previous study, experimental inoculation of TARV in one-week-old turkey poults produced lymphocytic tenosynovitis at four weeks post inoculation but without causing clinical lameness. This study was undertaken to determine if TARV infection at an early age can lead to clinical lameness in birds as they age. One-week-old male turkeys were inoculated orally with a TARV (strain TARV-O'Neil) and monitored for the development of gait defects until 16 weeks of age. At 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age, a subset of birds was euthanized followed by the collection of gastrocnemius tendon, digital flexor tendon, and intestines for virus detection by rRT-PCR and for histologic inflammation scoring. Clinical lameness was first displayed in TARV-infected turkeys at 8 weeks of age and ruptured gastrocnemius tendons with progressive lameness were also seen at 12-16 weeks of age. The virus was detected in gastrocnemius tendon of 4- 8- and 12-week-old turkeys but not in 16-week-old turkeys. Histologic inflammation scores of tendons at each of the four time points were significantly higher in the virus-inoculated group than in the control group (p < 0.01). Lesions began as lymphocytic tenosynovitis with mild synoviocyte hyperplasia at four weeks of age and progressed to fibrosis as the birds aged. These results demonstrate the potential of TARV to infect young turkeys and to produce subclinical tenosynovitis that becomes clinically demonstrable as the turkeys age.

  9. EFFECT OF INOCULANT PIONEER 1188 IN MAIZE SILAGE ON COW MILKING CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zimmer

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available First investigation part, started on 1 September 2001 by feeding 473 cows (401 dairy and 72 dry and finished on 13 November by feeding 474 cows (409 dairy and 65 dry, was characterized by the main ration consisting of maize silage without inoculant. This period was known for a maximum number of housed cows being 490 (423 dairy and 67 dry and minimum 469 (395 dairy and 74 dry. Daily average of stable milk production was 17.06 l with 3.48% of lactic fat on the average. Second part of the investigation, started on 14 November 2001 by feeding 474 cows (411 dairy and 63 dry and finished on 31 March 2002 by feeding 464 cows (395 dairy and 69 dry, was known for the basic ration contained maize silage enriched by inoculant Pioneer 1188.This period was characterized by a maximum number of housed cows being 482 (404 dairy and 57 dry. Daily average of stable milk production was 18.67 l and 3.58% of lactic fat. The main ration was composed of silage maize, highly wet maize, pearl barley, stock meal, sunflower cake, hay, salt and VAM. Inoculant Pioneer contained 6 strains of lactic-sour fermentation selected bacteria whose viability is basis of a successful product. In fact, it is a micro-granulated product added, by Gandy doser, to amount of 0.5 kg per green mass/t. Inoculant Pioneer 1188 was in this research added in a dose of 0.436 kg t-1 silage maize. Daily average of stable milk production increased by 1.61l i.e. 9.4% and lactic fat from 3.48% to 3.58% i.e. 2.9%.

  10. Immunological and clinical response of coyotes (Canis latrans) to experimental inoculation with Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Laurie A; Pappert, Ryan; Young, John; Schriefer, Martin E; Gidlewski, Thomas; Kohler, Dennis; Bowen, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Multiple publications have reported the use of coyotes (Canis latrans) in animal-based surveillance efforts for the detection of Yersinia pestis. Coyotes are likely exposed via flea bite or oral routes and are presumed to be resistant to the development of clinical disease. These historic data have only been useful for the evaluation of the geographic distribution of Y. pestis in the landscape. Because the canid immunologic response to Y. pestis has not been thoroughly characterized, we conducted experimental inoculation of captive-reared, juvenile coyotes (n = 8) with Y. pestis CO92 via oral or intradermal routes. We measured the humoral response to Y. pestis fraction 1 capsular protein (anti-F1) and found a significant difference between inoculation groups in magnitude and duration of antibody production. The anti-F1 titers in animals exposed intradermally peaked at day 10 postinoculation (PI; range = 1∶32 to 1∶128) with titers remaining stable at 1∶32 through week 12. In contrast, orally inoculated animals developed higher titers (range = 1∶256 to 1∶1,024) that remained stable at 1∶256 to 1∶512 through week 6. No clinical signs of disease were observed, and minimal changes were noted in body temperature, white blood cell counts, and acute phase proteins during the 7 days PI. Gross pathology was unremarkable, and minimal changes were noted in histopathology at days 3 and 7 PI. Rechallenge at 14 wk PI via similar dosage and routes resulted in marked differences in antibody response between groups. Animals in the orally inoculated group produced a striking increase in anti-F1 titers (up to 1∶4,096) within 3 days, whereas there was minimal to no increase in antibody response in the intradermal group. Information gathered from this experimental trial may provide additional insight into the spatial and temporal evaluation of coyote plague serology.

  11. Paenibacillus lentimorbus Inoculation Enhances Tobacco Growth and Extenuates the Virulence of Cucumber mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susheel Kumar

    Full Text Available Previous studies with Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488" (hereafter referred as B-30488, a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR isolated from cow's milk, revealed its capabilities to improve plant quality under normal and stress conditions. Present study investigates its potential as a biocontrol agent against an economically important virus, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, in Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Burley plants and delineates the physical, biophysical, biochemical and molecular perturbations due to the trilateral interactions of PGPR-host-CMV. Soil inoculation of B-30488 enhanced the plant vigor while significantly decreased the virulence and virus RNA accumulation by ~12 fold (91% in systemic leaves of CMV infected tobacco plants as compared to the control ones. Histology of these leaves revealed the improved tissue's health and least aging signs in B-30488 inoculated tobacco plants, with or without CMV infection, and showed lesser intercellular spaces between collenchyma cells, reduced amount of xyloglucans and pectins in connecting primary cells, and higher polyphenol accumulation in hypodermis layer extending to collenchyma cells. B-30488 inoculation has favorably maneuvered the essential biophysical (ion leakage and photosynthetic efficiency and biochemical (sugar, proline, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase attributes of tobacco plants to positively regulate and release the virus stress. Moreover, activities of defense related enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase induced due to CMV-infection were ameliorated with inoculation of B-30488, suggesting systemic induced resistance mediated protection against CMV in tobacco. The quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the genes related to normal plant development, stress and pathogenesis also corroborate well with the biochemical data and revealed the regulation (either up or down of these genes in favor of

  12. Selection of suitable media and intervals of media inoculation for culturing Tubificid worms

    OpenAIRE

    Mollah, M.F.A; Mosharaf, K.; Mariom

    2012-01-01

    Tubificid worms are aquatic invertebrates, belonging to the class Oligochaeta and family Tubificidae, used as an important live food for fishes. The study was conducted to culture Tubificid worms under running water in order to develop a suitable culture media and an optimum duration of media inoculation for culturing Tubificid worms. The worms were cultured under two experiments in cemented culvert system (160×25×10 cm3 ) for 90 days. In the first experiment the worms were cultured in three ...

  13. Joint use of fungicides, insecticides and inoculants in the treatment of soybean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Cristiane Buhl Gomes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The interference of the joint application of pesticides with seed inoculation on the survival of Bradyrhizobium has been reported in the last years. So, the objective of this study was to evaluate the joint use of fungicides, insecticides and inoculant in the treatment of soybean seeds on various parameters of Bradyrhizobium nodulation in soybean as well as on crop productivity parameters. The experiment was conducted during the 2013/2014 crop in the experimental field of the Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia de Mato Grosso - Campo Novo do Parecis Campus. The seeds of TMG 133 RR variety were sown in pots. It was used a randomized block design in a 4 x 4 + 1 factorial, four fungicides (1: fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M, 2: carboxine + thiram, 3: difeconazole and 4: carbendazim + thiram, four insecticides (1: fipronil 250 SC, 2: thiamethoxam, 3: imidacloprid + thiodicarpe and 4: imodacloprid 600 FC and an inoculant (SEMIA 5079 and SEMIA 5080, common to all treatments, with three replications. The experiment was not repeated. The joint application of fungicide and insecticide with inoculant does not affect nodulation, foliar N content and vegetative growth of the plants as well as the masses of grains per plant and 100-grain mass. The use of the carbendazim + thiram mixed with fipronil and carbendazim + thiram mixed with imidacloprid provides less number of pods per plant and grains per plant, reflecting in reductions in the production of soybean grains. In this way, the fungicide carbendazim + thiram, regardless of the combined applied insecticide, is the most harmful to Bradyrhizobium spp.

  14. New Native Rhizobia Strains for Inoculation of Common Bean in the Brazilian Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Martins Mercante

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Maximization of biological nitrogen fixation in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. crop depends on the genetic characteristics related to the plant, the symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia, and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of rhizobia selected beforehand from Cerrado (Brazilian tropical savanna soils in Mato Grosso do Sul. The experiments were conducted in 2007 in the municipalities of Aquidauana, Anaurilândia, Campo Grande, and Dourados, all located in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. All procedures established followed the current recommendations of the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture (Ministério de Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento – MAPA, in accordance with the “official protocol for assessing the feasibility and agronomic efficiency of strains, and inoculant technologies linked to the process of biological nitrogen fixation in legumes”. The program for selection of rhizobia for inoculation in bean plants resulted in identification of different strains with high symbiotic efficiency, competitiveness, and genetic stability, based on the Embrapa Agropecuária Oeste collection of multifunctional microorganism cultures. In previous studies, 630 isolates of Rhizobium were evaluated. They were obtained from nodules of leucaena (380 or dry beans (250 from 87 locations, including 34 municipalities in Mato Grosso do Sul. Three of them stood out from the others: CPAO 12.5 L2, CPAO 17.5 L2, and CPAO 56.4 L2. Inoculation of these strains in bean plants demonstrated economic viability and high potential for obtaining a more effective inoculant suitable for trading purposes.

  15. The Physiological Response of Soybean Genotypes to VAM Inoculation on Selected Drought Stress Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAPSOH

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Present research was aimed to study physiological changes of soybean which were inoculated with vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (VAM. Glomus etunicatum was exposed to moderate and severe drought condition. Symbiotic association with VAM improved adaptability as it was shown by the increasing leaf proline content. The MLG 3474 and Sindoro are the more tolerant genotypes while the responses of plant to VAM on improving the adaptability to drought were larger on Lokon.

  16. Investigation of spoilage in saveloy samples inoculated with four potential spoilage bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Esben Skibsted; Schäfer, A.; Koch, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Sliced saveloy samples were inoculated with monocultures of four potential spoilage bacteria and studied during a four week storage period. The objective was to investigate the resulting changes in the composition of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the sensory quality of the product. Based......-methylpropanol found in the samples. These compounds are therefore potentially important for the shelf-life of sliced saveloy. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. Growth and nutrition of eucalyptus clones seedlings inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco de Sousa Lima; Carla da Silva Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Eucalyptus is one of the most planted forest species, in Brazil, due to its rapid growth and high economic yield. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve the seedlings nutritional and phytosanitary status, besides increasing their resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species on the growth and nutrition of different eucalyptus clones seedlings. The experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions, in ...

  18. Effet de la co-inoculation du rhizobium et de mycorhizes sur les ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    30 déc. 2013 ... RÉSUMÉ. Objectif : Les sols sahéliens se caractérisent par une faible fertilité dont l'amélioration se fait par la pratique de la jachère ou l'apport du fumier. La fixation de l'azote atmosphérique par certaines légumineuses est peu performante voir inefficace. De nos jours, l'inoculation de rhizobium et de ...

  19. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tran H.; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T.; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-11

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e., roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag 8-plex ITRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nRPLC-MS/MS analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1,625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1,659 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1,126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5 fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation.

  20. [Nutrient transfer and growth of Pinus greggii Engelm. inoculated with edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms in two substrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Chávez, María C; Pérez-Moreno, Jesús; Cetina-Alcalá, Víctor M; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    An ectomycorrhiza is a mutualistic symbiosis of paramount importance in forestry and tree production. One of the selection criteria of ectomycorrhizal fungi that has currently gained importance is their edibility due to the economic, ecological and cultural relevance of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms as a non-timber forest product. The effect of the inoculation with three edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms: Laccaria laccata, Laccaria bicolor y Hebeloma leucosarx, which are widely sold in Mexico, on the growth and nutrient contents of Pinus greggii grown in an experimental substrate and a commercial substrate enriched with a slow-release fertilizer, was evaluated. Two years after sowing, differences in terms of shoot and root biomass and macro and micronutrient contents between inoculated and non-inoculated plants, were recorded independently of the fungal species and the substrate. Despite the fact that plants grown in the commercial substrate had higher growth and nutrient contents, their ectomycorrhizal colonization percentages were smaller than those of the plants grown in the experimental substrate. The differences in the nutrient transfer to the inoculated plant shoots among the evaluated fungal species were recorded. Ca mobilization by L. laccata, Na by L. bicolor and Mn by H. leucosarx were observed in the plants growing in the experimental substrate. It has been demonstrated that the selection of substrates constitutes an important factor in the production of ectomycorrhizal plants and that the three evaluated species of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms have an enormous potential in the controlled mycorrhization of P. greggii. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. An Intradermal Inoculation Mouse Model for Immunological Investigations of Acute Scrub Typhus and Persistent Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Soong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a neglected tropical disease, caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, a Gram-negative bacterium that is transmitted to mammalian hosts during feeding by Leptotrombidium mites and replicates predominantly within endothelial cells. Most studies of scrub typhus in animal models have utilized either intraperitoneal or intravenous inoculation; however, there is limited information on infection by the natural route in murine model skin or its related early host responses. Here, we developed an intradermal (i.d. inoculation model of scrub typhus and focused on the kinetics of the host responses in the blood and major infected organs. Following ear inoculation with 6 x 104 O. tsutsugamushi, mice developed fever at 11-12 days post-infection (dpi, followed by marked hypothermia and body weight loss at 14-19 dpi. Bacteria in blood and tissues and histopathological changes were detected around 9 dpi and peaked around 14 dpi. Serum cytokine analyses revealed a mixed Th1/Th2 response, with marked elevations of MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and IL-10 at 9 dpi, followed by increased concentrations of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, G-CSF, RANTES/CCL5, KC/CCL11, IL-1α/β, IL-2, TNF-α, GM-CSF, as well as modulatory cytokines (IL-9, IL-13. Cytokine levels in lungs had similar elevation patterns, except for a marked reduction of IL-9. The Orientia 47-kDa gene and infectious bacteria were detected in several organs for up to 84 dpi, indicating persistent infection. This is the first comprehensive report of acute scrub typhus and persistent infection in i.d.-inoculated C57BL/6 mice. This is a significant improvement over current murine models for Orientia infection and will permit detailed studies of host immune responses and infection control interventions.

  2. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of LTR Training versus Simulation Training and Stress Inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    processes and purposeful actions. System dynamics modeling relies on both quantitative and qualitative data and allows us to run simulations on...Live tissue training Stress Inoculation Combat medic readiness Combat casualty care Military preparedness System Dynamics Modeling Return on...body (simulator). 4. Ride Along Supplement: one day of trainee ride-along as a paramedic’s shadow, with the Emergency Medical Service ( EMS ) agency

  3. The use of lacZ marker in enumeration of Azotobacter chroococcum in carrier based inoculants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Solanki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A transconjugant of Azotobacter chroococcum Mac 27 tagged with lac Z(A. chroococcum Mac27 L was found to possess high levels of β-galactosidase activity constitutively.Further, the lac Z marker was found to be stably integrated into the chromosome of the A. chroococcum Mac 27 and did not have any adverse effect on growth, nitrogen fixation and excretion of ammonia. A quick method to determine the viable cell number in broth culture and carrier based inoculants has been developed on the basis of β-galactosidase assay. It was found that there was a direct relationship between the number of cell as determined by standard plate count and intensity of colour that developed upon degradation of ONPG due to β-galactosidase activity .The method was found to be sensitive enough to determine 1.7 x 10(6 CFU mL-1 in broth culture as well as carrier based Azotobacter inoculants. Further, it was observed that when A. chroococcum Mac27 L was inoculated on Brassica campestris, it could be detected in the presence of other bacteria capable of growing on Burks agar medium containing X-gal on the basis of lac Z genetic marker.

  4. Loblolly pine seedling growth after inoculation with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and ozone exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, B.L.; Enebak, S.A.; Chappelka, A.H. [Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (United States). School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences

    2004-07-01

    The conifer tree species with the greatest economic importance in south eastern United States plantations is Loblolly pine. Plantations require intensive fertilization, pesticide application, and irrigation. In these cases growth-promoting rhizobacteria are useful in pest control. While it was once thought that ozone in the troposphere was limited to urban areas, it is now known that it is transported far from its place of origin. Ozone is known to impact plant growth negatively. There have been no previous studies on whether growth-promoting rhizobacteria can decrease the negative effects of ozone. In this study seedlings of Loblolly pine were inoculated with either Bacillus subtilis (Ehrenberg) Cohn or Paenibacillus macerans (Schardinger) Ash. These were exposed to controlled amounts of ozone for 8-12 weeks. All plants showed decreased biomass and increased foliar damage compared to plants that were not exposed to ozone. B. subtilis inoculated plants showed less foliar damage than un-inoculated ones and root dimensions were increased. The use of growth-promoting rhizobacteria is not ready for large-scale commercial application in forestry, but this demonstration of the possible beneficial effects on ozone exposure warrants further investigation. 44 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. Entamoeba histolytica: liver invasion and abscess production by intraperitoneal inoculation of trophozoites in hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Ramírez-Rosales, A; Flores-Romo, L; Espinosa-Cantellano, M; Martínez-Palomo, A; Tsutsumi, V

    1998-01-01

    Intraperitoneal inoculation of axenically cultured Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites constitutes an easy to perform, highly reproducible procedure for inducing amebic liver abscesses in hamsters. Efficiency in abscess production (95% of infected animals after 1 week) was similar to data reported using direct intrahepatic or intraportal inoculation. The morphological sequence of infection shows that amebas in the peritoneal cavity initially produce a large exudate constituted mainly of acute inflammatory cells. These cells form a rim of polymorphonuclear leukocytes surrounding the amebas, which adhere to the trophozoite and can sometimes be observed polarized to one end of the parasite, suggesting capping of surface receptors. Early stages are also characterized by the production of distant inflammatory reactions in the hepatic portal spaces. At 6 h postintraperitoneal inoculation, larger foci of inflammatory reactions surrounding amebas are developed in the peritoneum, extending to and damaging the liver surface membranes as well as the serosa of other internal organs. Thereafter, tissue damage progresses deeper into the liver parenchyma, and a few days later, coalescing granulomas and large necrotic areas are observed in the liver tissue. Based on the present morphological time-sequence study, we suggest that inflammatory cells associated with E. histolytica trophozoites play an important role in commencing the damage of liver sheaths and producing the subsequent parenchymal lesions. The simplicity and reliability of this model are important factors to consider when large numbers of experimentally induced amebic liver abscesses are needed.

  6. Can attentional bias modification inoculate people to withstand exposure to real-world food cues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika; Stewart-Davis, Ebony

    2018-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether attentional bias modification can inoculate people to withstand exposure to real-world appetitive food cues, namely television advertisements for chocolate products. Using a modified dot probe task, undergraduate women were trained to direct their attention toward (attend) or away from (avoid) chocolate pictures. Experiment 1 (N = 178) consisted of one training session; Experiment 2 (N = 161) included 5 weekly sessions. Following training, participants viewed television advertisements of chocolate or control products. They then took part in a so-called taste test as a measure of chocolate consumption. Attentional bias for chocolate was measured before training and after viewing the advertisements, and in Experiment 2 also at 24-h and 1-week follow-up. In Experiment 2, but not Experiment 1, participants in the avoid condition showed a significant reduction in attentional bias for chocolate, regardless of whether they had been exposed to advertisements for chocolate or control products. However, this inoculation effect on attentional bias did not generalise to chocolate intake. Future research involving more extensive attentional re-training may be needed to ascertain whether the inoculation effect on attentional bias can extend to consumption, and thus help people withstand exposure to real-world palatable food cues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inoculating plants with the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp to reduce phenanthrene contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yanzheng; Sheng, Yuehui; Kang, Fuxing; Waigi, Michael Gatheru

    2015-12-01

    Plant organic contamination poses a serious threat to the safety of agricultural products and human health worldwide, and the association of endophytic bacteria with host plants may decrease organic pollutants in planta. In this study, we firstly determined the growth response and biofilm formation of endophytic Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp, and then systematically evaluated the performance of different plant colonization methods (seed soaking (SS), root soaking (RS), leaf painting (LP)) for circumventing the risk of plant phenanthrene (PHE) contamination. After inoculation for 48 h, strain Ph6-gfp grew efficiently with PHE, oxalic acid, or malic acid as the sole sources of carbon and energy. Moreover, strain Ph6-gfp could form robust biofilms in LB medium. In greenhouse hydroponic experiments, strain Ph6-gfp could actively colonize inoculated plants internally, and plants colonized with Ph6-gfp showed a higher capacity for PHE removal. Compared with the Ph6-gfp-free treatment, the accumulations of PHE in Ph6-gfp-colonized plants via SS, RS, and LP were 20.1, 33.1, and 7.1 %, respectively, lower. Our results indicate that inoculating plants with Ph6-gfp could lower the risk of plant PHE contamination. RS was most efficient for improving PHE removal in whole plant bodies by increasing the cell numbers of Ph6-gfp in plant roots. The findings in this study provide an optimized method to strain Ph6-gfp reduce plant PAH residues, which may be applied to agricultural production in PAH-contaminated soil.

  8. Wasted cabbage (Brassica oleracea silages treated with different levels of ground corn andsilage inoculant

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    Adauton Vilela de Rezende

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to evaluate the chemical composition, fermentation profile, and aerobic stability of cabbage silages treated with ground corn and inoculant. The evaluated treatments were: addition of 200, 300, 400, 500, and 600 g of ground corn per kilogram of cabbage (fresh matter basis, with or without a bacterial inoculant composed of Lactobacillus plantarumand Pediococcus pentosaceus. As expected, ground corn additions increased the dry matter (DM content of cabbage silage, and high values were observed for the highest level of addition (540 g kg−1. Conversely, the crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and lignin contents decreased with ground corn additions. The in vitro dry matter digestibility coefficients increased slightly with ground corn additions, but all cabbage silages had digestibility higher than 740 g kg−1 of DM. In the fermentation process, the pH values of cabbage silages increased linearly because of the high levels of ground corn addition. Cabbage ensiled with 200 and 300 g kg−1 of ground corn had high ammonia N production and fermentative losses (effluent and gas. Cabbage silage treated with 600 g kg−1 of ground corn had lower maximum pH values during aerobic exposure, but all silages had constant temperature during aerobic exposure. The ensiling of wasted cabbage is possible and we recommend the application of 400 g kg−1ground corn to improve the silage quality, whereas the use of the inoculant is unnecessary.

  9. Microbial Inoculation Improves Growth of Oil Palm Plants (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Om, Azlin Che; Ghazali, Amir Hamzah Ahmad; Keng, Chan Lai; Ishak, Zamzuri

    2009-12-01

    Introduction of diazotrophic rhizobacteria to oil palm tissues during the in vitro micropropagation process establishes an early associative interaction between the plant cells and bacteria. In the association, the diazotrophs provide the host plants with phytohormones and fixed nitrogen. This study was conducted to observe growth of bacterised tissue cultured oil palm plants under ex vitro conditions after 280 days of growth. Root dry weight, shoot dry weight, root volume, bacterial colonisation, leaf protein and chlorophyll content of the host plants were observed. The results revealed that the inocula successfully colonised roots of the host plants. Plants inoculated with Acetobacter diazotrophicus (R12) had more root dry weight and volume than plants inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense (Sp7). Leaf protein and chlorophyll content were higher in the bacterised plants compared to Control 2 plants (inoculated with killed Sp7). These results suggest that the diazotrophs successfully improved the growth of the host plant (oil palm) and minimised the amount of N fertiliser necessary for growth.

  10. Stimulation of dragon's blood accumulation in Dracaena cambodiana via fungal inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin-Long; Wang, Chun-Lan; Guo, Shun-Xing; Xiao, Pei-Gen; Wang, Meng-Liang

    2013-06-01

    Dragon's blood is a rare and precious traditional medicine used by different cultures since ancient times. However, studies on enhancing the rapid accumulation of dragon's blood in Dracaena cambodiana and determining its formation mechanism are unavailable. In this study, the activities of two fungi, namely, BJDC01 and BJDC05, and their effect on promoting the accumulation of five main compositions of dragon's blood in D. cambodiana were investigated for the first time. Results of field tests conducted for ten months indicated that the contents of Loureirin D, 4,4'-dihydroxy-2'-dimethoxychalcone, Loureirin A and Loureirin B in two fungal-inoculated materials were 1.67 to 2.85 times greater than those of natural samples, and thus were significantly higher than those of the control groups. The content of 4,4'-dihydroxy-2'6'-dimethoxydihydrochalcone in each fungal-inoculated sample was close to that of the natural sample, and was more than twice of each of the control group. By combining the results of morphological characterizations, both BJDC01 and BJDC05 can stimulate the accumulation of the compositions of dragon's blood. This stimulation may be considered as a defense response of D. cambodiana tree against the invasion of foreign fungi. Thus, this study provides a potential way of producing dragon's blood via the inoculation of two fungal elicitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of bacterial inoculants on the indigenous microbiome and secondary metabolites of chamomile plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ruth; Köberl, Martina; Mostafa, Amr; Ramadan, Elshahat M; Monschein, Marlene; Jensen, Kenneth B; Bauer, Rudolf; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated bacteria fulfill important functions for plant growth and health. However, our knowledge about the impact of bacterial treatments on the host's microbiome and physiology is limited. The present study was conducted to assess the impact of bacterial inoculants on the microbiome of chamomile plants Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert grown in a field under organic management in Egypt. Chamomile seedlings were inoculated with three indigenous Gram-positive strains (Streptomyces subrutilus Wbn2-11, Bacillus subtilis Co1-6, Paenibacillus polymyxa Mc5Re-14) from Egypt and three European Gram-negative strains (Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila P69, Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18) already known for their beneficial plant-microbe interaction. Molecular fingerprints of 16S rRNA gene as well as real-time PCR analyses did not show statistically significant differences for all applied bacterial antagonists compared to the control. In contrast, a pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed significant differences in the community structure of bacteria between the treatments. These differences could be clearly shown by a shift within the community structure and corresponding beta-diversity indices. Moreover, B. subtilis Co1-6 and P. polymyxa Mc5Re-14 showed an enhancement of the bioactive secondary metabolite apigenin-7-O-glucoside. This indicates a possible new function of bacterial inoculants: to interact with the plant microbiome as well as to influence the plant metabolome.

  12. Multiplication and Viability of some Rhizobium Strains to be used as Inoculants for Agricultural Biomass Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simina Neo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobia are well known for their capacity to establish a symbiosis with legumes. They inhabit root nodules, where they reduce atmospheric nitrogen and make it available to the plant. Biological nitrogen fixation is an important component of sustainable agriculture, and rhizobial inoculants have been applied frequently as biofertilizers. In this review we approach the subject of legumes inoculation in order to improve the nitrogen fixing capacity. In the first part of the experiment, the Rhizobium strains were cultivated on media indicated in the literature as optimal for bacterial growing and development in laboratory conditions. Afterwards, the Rhizobium strains that have grown and accumulate biomass were tested in different conditions of pH and salinity. The biomass accumulation was determinate by spectrophotometer. The obtained values shown that the Rhizobium strains tested can be used to inoculate the legumes cultivated on acid, basic and alkaline soils. Finally, the stability in real time of two strains of Rhizobium (Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium japonicum mixed with different supports was evaluated during a 6- months period. The supports studied were: peat, peat and calcium carbonate, zeolite, and ceramic. The highest number of viable cells at the end of the experiment was obtained in ceramic with Rhizobium japonicum (8x105 cells/gram, and the lowest number of viable cells was obtained in zeolite with Rhizobium meliloti (1,1x103 cells/gram.

  13. Optimization of conditions for in vitro development of Trichoderma viride-based biofilms as potential inoculants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triveni, Sodimalla; Prasanna, Radha; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Biofilms represent mixed communities present in a diverse range of environments; however, their utility as inoculants is less investigated. Our investigation was aimed towards in vitro development of biofilms using fungal mycelia (Trichoderma viride) as matrices and nitrogen-fixing and P-solubilizing bacteria as partners, as a prelude to their use as biofertilizers (biofilmed biofertilizers, BBs) and biocontrol agents for different crops. The most suitable media in terms of population counts, fresh mass and dry biomass for Trichoderma and Bacillus subtilis/Pseudomonas fluorescens was found to be Pikovskaya broth ± 1 % CaCO(3), while for Trichoderma and Azotobacter chroococcum, Jensen's medium was most optimal. The respective media were then used for optimization of the inoculation rate of the partners in terms of sequence of addition of partners, fresh/dry mass of biofilms and population counts of partners for efficient film formation. Microscopic observations revealed significant differences in the progress of growth of biofilms and dual cultures. In the biofilms, the bacteria were observed growing intermingled within the fungal mycelia mat. Further, biofilm formation was compared under static and shaking conditions and the fresh mass of biofilms was higher in the former. Such biofilms are being further characterized under in vitro conditions, before using them as inoculants with crops.

  14. Effect of combined inoculations of Rhizobium-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Leucaena leucocephala CV: Perú

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    Lázaro Jesús Ojeda Quintana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The work was conducted at the Experimental Station of Soil and Fertilizer “Escambray” land of farmers and associated rural extension. The experimental design was randomized blocks, and treatments: Rizhobium loti V-4033 (Research Institute of Pastures and Forages, mycorrhizal fungi trainers, Rhizobium +mycorrhiza fungi trainers, nitrogen and total control. Inoculation with my corrhiza forming fungi was performed at 10 g/bag Certificate MicoFert Strain the Institute of Ecology and Systematics-3: Glomus spurcum, Topes de Collantes, 85 % colonization of rootlets, while the Rhizobium was inoculated in a dose of 50 g/kg of seed. Variant was nitrogen at 25 kg/ha of urea. The plots occupied 18m2 , with an area of 9 m2 evaluable. When the plants reached 7.5 months and an average height of 143.4 cm proceeded to make the Court of establishment and then four foliage cuts were made every 90 days. Each cut dry biomass yield, and phosphorus content was determined crude protein. The combined inoculation of Rhizobium and mycorrhiza fungi Makers increased the yield of dry biomass, and phosphorus content of crude protein. We conclude proposing the adoption of an alternative methodology using mycorrhiza formers Fungi and Rhizobium in Leucaena leucocephala as a way to increase the yield of dry biomass, decreasing mineral fertilization and contribute to environmental protection

  15. Production of autoantibodies against DNA and collagen after inoculation of rabbits with Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiepe, F; Jungnitz, S; Hiepe, T

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the induction of autoantibodies in rabbits after the inoculation with Trypanosoma equiperdum. Eight female rabbits were inoculated s.c. with 5 x 10(6) parasites of Trypanosoma equiperdum. Four of these animals were treated with Diminazen (Berenil) at a dosage of 28 mg per rabbit by intramuscular injection 35 days p. i. Two additional non-infected rabbits served as negative controls. 9 days p.i. all infected animals possessed serum antibodies against Typanosoma equiperdum. Titers peaked to 1:2048, measured between 14 and 30 days p.i. and were persistent until the end of examinations. In parallel, there was an increase of anti-dsDNA and anti-collagen autoantibodies, but not of autoantibodies against recombinant U1RNP and La antigens. In comparison to patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, the anti-DNA binding of rabbit's sera was reduced more strongly in presence of increasing salt concentrations. In addition, the sera of inoculated rabbits recognized several unknown bands of a cell extract in immunoblotting. The parallel increase of antibodies against Trypanosoma, control foreign antigens, DNA and collagen suggests a polyclonal stimulation of the immune system. It was concluded that this rabbit model seems to be sufficient to investigate the mechanisms which are able to induce autoimmune phenomena.

  16. A simple, novel and high efficiency sap inoculation method to screen for tobacco streak virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresha, S; Sreevathsa, Rohini; Balol, Gurupada B; Keshavareddy, G; Rangaswamy, K T; Udayakumar, M

    2012-10-01

    A rapid and efficient sap inoculation method for tobacco streak virus (TSV) was developed in sunflower. Sap from TSV-infected sunflower plants was freshly extracted in phosphate buffer and diluted serially from 10(-1) to 10(-8). Two-day old seedlings of sunflower were injured at the meristem and immersed in the sap for 10 min, maintained at 20 °C for 2-3 days and shifted to greenhouse. The surviving seedlings in the respective sap dilution were scored for symptoms of sunflower necrosis disease (SND). SND symptoms were seen in 80 % of the seedlings inoculated with a sap dilution of 10(-5). ELISA and RT-PCR analysis of coat protein and movement protein of TSV confirmed SND symptoms. The methodology was also found to be reproducible when the sap from the infected plants was inoculated onto healthy plants. The main aim of the study was to develop a primary screening strategy for the selection of transgenics developed for SND resistance. This methodology can also be extended for the analysis of resistance against other viruses.

  17. Bacteriostasis testing on allograft tissue inoculated in Wilkins-Chalgren broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegeman, V; Ectors, N; Lismont, D; Verduyckt, B; Verhaegen, J

    2008-11-01

    Tissue banks culture tissue specimens to confirm the absence of viable micro-organisms after decontamination with antibiotics. It is possible that antibiotic residues attached to decontaminated tissue are introduced into enrichment culture media. These could have an inhibitory effect on the culture results and generate false-negative results. Our aim was to detect bacteriostasis in Wilkins-Chalgren broth inoculated with bone and tendon remnants. These remnants had been soaked in a solution containing gentamicin as part of the tissue-processing procedure. We used the United States Pharmacopeia method for bacteriostasis testing with gentamicin-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 15442, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 as test strains, and gentamicin-resistant Candida albicans ATCC 90029 as control. The residual gentamicin concentration in the broths was determined and gentamicin-soaked tissue was placed on Mueller-Hinton agar inoculated with a staphylococcal suspension. Bacteriostasis was present in 53-75% of the reference test strains. Tendon remnants had a significantly higher rate of bacteriostasis (85%) than bone remnants (28%). Broths inoculated with tendon remnants had the highest residual gentamicin concentrations.

  18. NITROGEN, SULFUR, MICRONUTRIENTS AND INOCULANT IN THE CULTIVATION OF IRRIGATED BEANS IN MATO GROSSO

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    A. Lange

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study to evaluate the effects of nitrogen (sources and doses, sulfur, micronutrients and inoculant in the common bean BRS Valente cultivar on winter irrigated crop because in this situation the wrong dose of N at seeding may cause immobilization of the nutrient in the soil and temporary deficiency of N in bean. The experiment took place in 2011, in the city of Sinop – MT, JF farm in the experimental design was randomized blocks with four replications and twelve treatments combining N rates up to 160 kg ha-1, sulfur and inoculation. The following characteristics were evaluated: plant height, height of the first pod, number of seeds per pod, number of pods per plant, 100-seed weight, grain yield in kg ha-1, nitrogen sufficiency index and SPAD index, nitrogen contents in leaf, seeds and plant, nitrogen use efficiency and Pearson correlation. Most variables were influenced by N applications and the highest values were verified in the dose of 160 kg ha-1. The bean yield presented positive and significant correlation with most of the evaluated characteristics and was influenced by nitrogen addition in the system, being the best yield within the highest dose of nitrogen (3262 kg ha-1. Inoculation along with cobalt, molybdenum and 40 kg ha-1 of nitrogen increased yield in comparison with absence of N.

  19. RESPONSE OF TWO SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L. GENOTYPES TO VA-MYCORRHIZAL INOCULATION AND PHOSPHORUS LEVELS

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    C.P. CHANDRASHEKARA, V.C. PATIL

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of two sunflower genotypes (Morden and MSFH-8 with and without VA-mycorrhizal fungi at three P levels (38, 56 and 75 kg P2O5 ha-1 in vertisol of Dharwad was studied to determine the effect of mycorrhizal inoculation on plant growth, yield and P uptake. The results showed that the VAM inoculation increased sunflower yield (14%, total biomass (16%, oil content (3.1% and P uptake (30.5% over uninoculated control. The percent root colonization and chlamydo-spore count decreased with increasing P levels. The total biomass production, seed yield and P uptake of mycorrhizal plants at 38 kg P2O5 ha-1 more than the non-mycorrhizal plants at 75 kg P2O5 ha-1. The biomass and seed yield of mycorrhizal plants at same P level were more than the non-mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal plants of Morden at 38 kg P2O5 ha-1 and MSFH-8 at 56 kg P2O5 ha-1 produced higher seed yield, oil content and total biomass than non-mycorrhizal plants supplied with 75 kg P2O5 ha-1. The results indicated that, VA-mycorrhizal inoculation helps in saving 25 and 50 percent of recommended dose of phosphatic fertilizer (75 kg P2O5 ha-1 in MSFH-8 (single cross hybrid and Morden (open pollinated variety, respectively.

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing in Catharanthus roseus by biolistic inoculation of tobacco rattle virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carqueijeiro, I; Masini, E; Foureau, E; Sepúlveda, L J; Marais, E; Lanoue, A; Besseau, S; Papon, N; Clastre, M; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Glévarec, G; Atehortùa, L; Oudin, A; Courdavault, V

    2015-11-01

    Catharanthus roseus constitutes the unique source of several valuable monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the antineoplastics vinblastine and vincristine. These alkaloids result from a complex biosynthetic pathway encompassing between 30 and 50 enzymatic steps whose characterisation is still underway. The most recent identifications of genes from this pathway relied on a tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach, involving an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of plasmids encoding the two genomic components of the virus. As an alternative, we developed a biolistic-mediated approach of inoculation of virus-encoding plasmids that can be easily performed by a simple bombardment of young C. roseus plants. After optimisation of the transformation conditions, we showed that this approach efficiently silenced the phytoene desaturase gene, leading to strong and reproducible photobleaching of leaves. This biolistic transformation was also used to silence a previously characterised gene from the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, encoding iridoid oxidase. Plant bombardment caused down-regulation of the targeted gene (70%), accompanied by a correlated decreased in MIA biosynthesis (45-90%), similar to results obtained via agro-transformation. Thus, the biolistic-based VIGS approach developed for C. roseus appears suitable for gene function elucidation and can readily be used instead of the Agrobacterium-based approach, e.g. when difficulties arise with agro-inoculations or when Agrobacterium-free procedures are required to avoid plant defence responses. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  1. Effects of bacterial inoculants on the indigenous microbiome and secondary metabolites of chamomile plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ruth; Köberl, Martina; Mostafa, Amr; Ramadan, Elshahat M.; Monschein, Marlene; Jensen, Kenneth B.; Bauer, Rudolf; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated bacteria fulfill important functions for plant growth and health. However, our knowledge about the impact of bacterial treatments on the host's microbiome and physiology is limited. The present study was conducted to assess the impact of bacterial inoculants on the microbiome of chamomile plants Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert grown in a field under organic management in Egypt. Chamomile seedlings were inoculated with three indigenous Gram-positive strains (Streptomyces subrutilus Wbn2-11, Bacillus subtilis Co1-6, Paenibacillus polymyxa Mc5Re-14) from Egypt and three European Gram-negative strains (Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila P69, Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18) already known for their beneficial plant-microbe interaction. Molecular fingerprints of 16S rRNA gene as well as real-time PCR analyses did not show statistically significant differences for all applied bacterial antagonists compared to the control. In contrast, a pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed significant differences in the community structure of bacteria between the treatments. These differences could be clearly shown by a shift within the community structure and corresponding beta-diversity indices. Moreover, B. subtilis Co1-6 and P. polymyxa Mc5Re-14 showed an enhancement of the bioactive secondary metabolite apigenin-7-O-glucoside. This indicates a possible new function of bacterial inoculants: to interact with the plant microbiome as well as to influence the plant metabolome. PMID:24600444

  2. EFFECT OF DIESEL AND BIODIESEL ON THE GROWTH OF Brachiaria decumbens INOCULATED WITH ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

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    Dora Trejo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have been found to be associated with plants useful in soil phytoremediation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of diesel and biodiesel in soil and sand on the growth of Brachiaria decumbens inoculated with mycorrhizae. Two experiments were carried out: one experiment in soil and another in sand. A two-level- factorial design with three factors was used (one on sterile and another on non-sterile soil, with and without mycorrhizae; and one with diesel and another with biodiesel. In sand, a two-factor design with two levels was used (with and without mycorrhizae and with diesel and biodiesel, both with three replications. NOVADIESEL, biodiesel and PEMEX diesel were use as contaminants, both at 7%. The fresh and dry weight of the plants and percentage of mycorrhizal colonization, were assessed 30 days after planting. In soil, biodiesel was more toxic and reduced the fresh and dry weights of plants, especially in non-sterile soil. Biodiesel yielded greater mycorrhizal colonization values that doubled those of the control. In sand, diesel was found to reduce three times the fresh and dry weights of plants, compared to the biodiesel. In sand diesel presented high values of mycorrhizal colonization in comparison with biodiesel.  Plants inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi exhibited better development than non-inoculated plants, even in the presence of contaminants.

  3. Effects of Pseudomonas putida and Glomusintraradices Inoculations on Morphological and Biochemical Traitsin Trigonellafoenum-graecum L.

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    simin irankhah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fenugreek (Trigonellafoenum-graecum L. is a traditional medicinal plant belonging to the legume family Fabaceae. Diverse groups of microorganisms are symbiotic with Fenugreek roots system. This integration leads to significant increases in the development and production by increasing nitrogen fixation, phytohormones production, siderophores and phosphate solubilization. Plant growth-promoting bacteria increase plant growth byimproving nutrientuptake and phytohormones production. In addition, the beneficial effect of these bacteria could be due totheirinteractionwithArbuscularMycorrhizal fungi(VAM. Drought is one of the major limiting factors for crop production in many parts of the world including Iran. Symbiotic microorganisms can enhance plant tolerance to drought. This experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of Vesicular ArbuscularMycorrhiza (VAM and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR on morphological and biochemical characteristics of Fenugreek in drought stress conditions. Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out in completely random design with 3 replications.There were four treatments including inoculation with Pseudomonas putida, inoculation with Glomusintraradices, combined association of Pseudomonas putida and Glomusintraradices and untreated as a check under drought stress (40% of field capacity and non-stress conditions (80% of field capacity. In this experiment fiveseeds were sowninplastic pots. Before sowing, seeds were inoculated with microorganisms. In order to inoculation ofseed with Mycorrhizal fungi, for each kilogram of soil, 100 grams of powder containing 10 to 15 thousand spores of fungal soil (produced by the biotech company Toos was added to three centimeters of soil in the pot. For seed inoculation with Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria, the growth curve of the bacteria was drawn at first and then the best time for the growth of bacteria was determined. The bacteria at

  4. A Simple Method for the Assessment of Fusarium Head Blight Resistance in Korean Wheat Seedlings Inoculated with Fusarium graminearum

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    Sanghyun Shin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB; scab caused mainly by Fusarium graminearum is a devastating disease of wheat and barley around the world. FHB causes yield reductions and contamination of grain with trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON which are a major health concern for humans and animals. The objective of this research was to develop an easy seed or seedling inoculation assay, and to compare these assays with whole plant resistance of twenty-nine Korean winter wheat cultivars to FHB. The clip-dipping assay consists of cutting off the coleoptiles apex, dipping the coleoptiles apex in conidial suspension, covering in plastic bag for 3 days, and measuring the lengths of lesions 7 days after inoculation. There were significant cultivar differences after inoculation with F. graminearum in seedling relative to the controls. Correlation coefficients between the lesion lengths of clip-dipping inoculation and FHB Type II resistance from adult plants were significant (r=0.45; P<0.05. Results from two other seedling inoculation methods, spraying and pin-point inoculation, were not correlated with adult FHB resistance. Single linear correlation was not significant between seed germination assays (soaking and soak-dry and FHB resistance (Type I and Type II, respectively. These results showed that clip-dipping inoculation method using F. graminearum may offer a real possibility of simple, rapid, and reliable for the early screening of FHB resistance in wheat.

  5. Rhizostabilization of metals in soils using Lupinus luteus inoculated with the metal resistant rhizobacterium Serratia sp. MSMC541.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aafi, N; Brhada, F; Dary, M; Maltouf, A Filali; Pajuelo, E

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work was to test Lupinus luteus plants, inoculated with metal resistant rhizobacteria, in order to phytostabilise metals in contaminated soils. The resistance to heavy metals of strains isolated from nodules of Lupinus plants was evaluated. The strain MSMC541 showed multi-resistance to several metals (up to 13.3 mM As, 2.2 mM Cd, 2.3 mM Cu, 9 mM Pb and 30 mM Zn), and it was selected for further characterization. Furthermore, this strain was able to biosorb great amounts of metals in cell biomass. 16S rDNA sequencing positioned this strain within the genus Serratia. The presence of arsenic resistance genes was confirmed by southern blot and PCR amplification. A rhizoremediation pot experiment was conducted using Lupinus luteus grown on sand supplemented with heavy metals and inoculated with MSMC541. Plant growth parameters and metal accumulation were determined in inoculated vs. non-inoculated Lupinus luteus plants. The results showed that inoculation with MSMC541 improved the plant tolerance to metals. At the same time, metal translocation to the shoot was significantly reduced upon inoculation. These results suggest that Lupinus luteus plants, inoculated with the metal resistant strain Serratia sp. MSMC541, have a great potential for phytostabilization of metal contaminated soils.

  6. Motor behavioral abnormalities and histopathological findings of Wistar rats inoculated with HTLV-1-infected MT2 cells

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    C.C. Câmara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to describe motor behavioral changes in association with histopathological and hematological findings in Wistar rats inoculated intravenously with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1-infected MT2 cells. Twenty-five 4-month-old male rats were inoculated with HTLV-1-infected MT2 cells and 13 control rats were inoculated with normal human lymphocytes. The behavior of the rats was observed before and 5, 10, 15, and 20 months after inoculation during a 30-min/rat testing time for 5 consecutive days. During each of 4 periods, a subset of rats was randomly chosen to be sacrificed in order to harvest the spinal cord for histopathological analysis and to obtain blood for serological and molecular studies. Behavioral analyses of the HTLV-1-inoculated rats showed a significant decrease of climbing, walking and freezing, and an increase of scratching, sniffing, biting, licking, and resting/sleeping. Two of the 25 HTLV-1-inoculated rats (8% developed spastic paraparesis as a major behavioral change. The histopathological changes were few and mild, but in some cases there was diffuse lymphocyte infiltration. The minor and major behavioral changes occurred after 10-20 months of evolution. The long-term observation of Wistar rats inoculated with HTLV-1-infected MT2 cells showed major (spastic paraparesis and minor motor abnormalities in association with the degree of HTLV-1-induced myelopathy.

  7. The effect of Piriformospora indica inoculation on salt and drought stress tolerance in Stevia rebaudiana under in vitro conditions

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    Fahimeh Seraj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of Piriformospora indica under salt and drought stresses on some vegetative characteristics and physiological parameters of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni medicinal plant, an experiment was conducted in factorial arrangement based on completely randomized design with three replicates at Genetics and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute in Sari Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources University. Factors include three levels of osmatic potential (0, -5, and -10 bar and with three osmotic sources including NaCl (Na, Mannitol (M and NaCl+Mannitol (N+M and inoculation of mycorrhizae like fungi at two levels (non-inoculated and inoculation with fungi. The plantlets were treated for 30 days and then some morphological and physiological parameters were measured. Results of ANOVA showed that there was a significant interaction between osmatic source and levels with fungi inoculation for the most determined parameters. Inoculation of stevia plantlets with P. indica at osmatic level of -5 bar caused either by M or M+Na markedly improved dry weight of leaf (112 and 156%, respectively and aerial parts (49 and 144%, respectively as compared to the uninoculated control. Fungi inoculation positively improved vegetative parameters of stevia plant under most osmatic levels and sources. The most ameliorate effect, however, was observed where M as drought stress or M+Na were adjusted to -5 bar. Therefore, the results of this study represented a positive effect of P. indica inoculation in inproving osmotic tolerance of stevia medicinal plant.

  8. Analysis of a large dataset of mycorrhiza inoculation field trials on potato shows highly significant increases in yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    An increasing human population requires more food production in nutrient-efficient systems in order to simultaneously meet global food needs while reducing the environmental footprint of agriculture. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have the potential to enhance crop yield, but their efficiency has yet to be demonstrated in large-scale crop production systems. This study reports an analysis of a dataset consisting of 231 field trials in which the same AMF inoculant (Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM 197198) was applied to potato over a 4-year period in North America and Europe under authentic field conditions. The inoculation was performed using a liquid suspension of AMF spores that was sprayed onto potato seed pieces, yielding a calculated 71 spores per seed piece. Statistical analysis showed a highly significant increase in marketable potato yield (ANOVA, P < 0.0001) for inoculated fields (42.2 tons/ha) compared with non-inoculated controls (38.3 tons/ha), irrespective of trial year. The average yield increase was 3.9 tons/ha, representing 9.5 % of total crop yield. Inoculation was profitable with a 0.67-tons/ha increase in yield, a threshold reached in almost 79 % of all trials. This finding clearly demonstrates the benefits of mycorrhizal-based inoculation on crop yield, using potato as a case study. Further improvements of these beneficial inoculants will help compensate for crop production deficits, both now and in the future.

  9. Equination (inoculation of horsepox): An early alternative to vaccination (inoculation of cowpox) and the potential role of horsepox virus in the origin of the smallpox vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, José; Schrick, Livia; Damaso, Clarissa R; Nitsche, Andreas

    2017-12-19

    For almost 150 years after Edward Jenner had published the "Inquiry" in 1798, it was generally assumed that the cowpox virus was the vaccine against smallpox. It was not until 1939 when it was shown that vaccinia, the smallpox vaccine virus, was serologically related but different from the cowpox virus. In the absence of a known natural host, vaccinia has been considered to be a laboratory virus that may have originated from mutational or recombinational events involving cowpox virus, variola viruses or some unknown ancestral Orthopoxvirus. A favorite candidate for a vaccinia ancestor has been the horsepox virus. Edward Jenner himself suspected that cowpox derived from horsepox and he also believed that "matter" obtained from either disease could be used as preventative of smallpox. During the 19th century, inoculation with cowpox (vaccination) was used in Europe alongside with inoculation with horsepox (equination) to prevent smallpox. Vaccine-manufacturing practices during the 19th century may have resulted in the use of virus mixtures, leading to different genetic modifications that resulted in present-day vaccinia strains. Horsepox, a disease previously reported only in Europe, has been disappearing on that continent since the beginning of the 20th century and now seems to have become extinct, although the virus perhaps remains circulating in an unknown reservoir. Genomic sequencing of a horsepox virus isolated in Mongolia in 1976 indicated that, while closely related to vaccinia, this horsepox virus contained additional, potentially ancestral sequences absent in vaccinia. Recent genetic analyses of extant vaccinia viruses have revealed that some strains contain ancestral horsepox virus genes or are phylogenetically related to horsepox virus. We have recently reported that a commercially produced smallpox vaccine, manufactured in the United States in 1902, is genetically highly similar to horsepox virus, providing a missing link in this 200-year-old mystery

  10. Histopathological investigation in porcine infected with torque teno sus virus type 2 by inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Porcine torque teno sus virus (TTSuV) is a small icosahedral and non-enveloped virus which contains a single-stranded (ssDNA), circular and negative DNA genome and infects mainly vertebrates and is currently classified into the 'floating' genus Anellovirus of Circoviridae with two species. Viral DNA of both porcine TTSuV species has a high prevalence in both healthy and diseased pigs worldwide and multiple infections of TTSuV with distinct genotypes or subtypes of the same species has been documented in the United States, Europe and Asia. However, there exists no information about histopathological lesions caused by infection with porcine TTSuV2. Methods Porcine liver tissue homogenate with 1 ml of 6.91 × 107genomic copies viral loads of porcine TTSuV2 that had positive result for torque teno sus virus type 2 and negative result for torque teno sus virus type 1 and porcine pseudorabies virus type 2 were used to inoculate specific pathogen-free piglets by intramuscular route and humanely killed at 3,7,10,14,17,21 and 24 days post inoculation (dpi), the control pigs were injected intramuscularly with 1 ml of sterile DMEM and humanely killed the end of the study for histopathological examination routinely processed, respectively. Results All porcine TTSuV2 inoculated piglets were clinic asymptomatic but developed myocardial fibroklasts and endocardium, interstitial pneumonia, membranous glomerular nephropathy, and modest inflammatory cells infiltration in portal areas in the liver, foci of hemorrhage in some pancreas islet, a tiny amount red blood cells in venule of muscularis mucosae and outer longitudinal muscle, rarely red blood cells in the microvasculation and infiltration of inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and eosinophils) of tonsil and hilar lymph nodes, infiltration of inflammatory lymphocytes and necrosis or degeneration and focal gliosis of lymphocytes in the paracortical zone after inoculation with porcine TTSuV2-containing tissue homogenate

  11. Histopathological investigation in porcine infected with torque teno sus virus type 2 by inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Miao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine torque teno sus virus (TTSuV is a small icosahedral and non-enveloped virus which contains a single-stranded (ssDNA, circular and negative DNA genome and infects mainly vertebrates and is currently classified into the 'floating' genus Anellovirus of Circoviridae with two species. Viral DNA of both porcine TTSuV species has a high prevalence in both healthy and diseased pigs worldwide and multiple infections of TTSuV with distinct genotypes or subtypes of the same species has been documented in the United States, Europe and Asia. However, there exists no information about histopathological lesions caused by infection with porcine TTSuV2. Methods Porcine liver tissue homogenate with 1 ml of 6.91 × 107genomic copies viral loads of porcine TTSuV2 that had positive result for torque teno sus virus type 2 and negative result for torque teno sus virus type 1 and porcine pseudorabies virus type 2 were used to inoculate specific pathogen-free piglets by intramuscular route and humanely killed at 3,7,10,14,17,21 and 24 days post inoculation (dpi, the control pigs were injected intramuscularly with 1 ml of sterile DMEM and humanely killed the end of the study for histopathological examination routinely processed, respectively. Results All porcine TTSuV2 inoculated piglets were clinic asymptomatic but developed myocardial fibroklasts and endocardium, interstitial pneumonia, membranous glomerular nephropathy, and modest inflammatory cells infiltration in portal areas in the liver, foci of hemorrhage in some pancreas islet, a tiny amount red blood cells in venule of muscularis mucosae and outer longitudinal muscle, rarely red blood cells in the microvasculation and infiltration of inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and eosinophils of tonsil and hilar lymph nodes, infiltration of inflammatory lymphocytes and necrosis or degeneration and focal gliosis of lymphocytes in the paracortical zone after inoculation with porcine TTSuV2

  12. Effect of Microbial Inoculation on Phosphorus Efficiency (PE of Different Genotypes of Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mosavi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phosphorus (P is regarded as the most important soil nutrient after nitrogen (N for plant growth and development as it plays key roles in plant metabolism, structure and energy transformation. Also, although soil P is often abundant in both organic and inorganic forms, it is frequently a major or even the prime limiting factor for plant growth. Low phosphorus (P availability is a major global global constraint to crop production. In most soils, soil and fertilizer P are easily bound by either soil organic matter or chemicals, and thus are unavailable to plants unless hydrolyzed to release inorganic phosphate. Phosphorus efficient plants play a major role in increasing crop yields due to shortage of inorganic P fertilizer resources, limited land and water resources, and increasing environmental concerns. Therefore, the development of P-efficient crop varieties that can grow and yield better with low P supply is a key for improving crop production. Enhancing P efficiency in plants can be achieved through enhancing P acquisition, utilization, or both. Materials and Methods: In order to investigate the effect of microbial inoculation on phosphorus efficiency of different genotypes of barley, a glasshouse factorial experiment was conducted in a completely randomized block design with 10 barley genotypes and different phosphorus (P treatments including control (P0, phosphate rock (RP, RP inoculated with phosphate solubilizing fungi (RP+F, RP inoculated with phosphate solubilizing bacteria (RP+B, RP inoculated with both fungi and bacteria inoculums (RP+B+F, and soluble phosphate (PS in three replications. After sieving (2 mm sieve, and, air - drying of soil samples, basal nutrients mixed thoroughly at the following soil test results. Then, soils placed in plastic pots (3 kg. The P treatments as (KH2PO4 and Rock Phosphate 80 mg kg-1 soil added at the depth of 5-cm of soil. After 9 weeks the plants were harvested, grain dry weight (GDW and

  13. Effects of microbial inoculants on corn silage fermentation, microbial contents, aerobic stability, and milk production under field conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Bastian; Sloth, Karen Helle; Højberg, Ole

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of 2 corn silage inoculation strategies (homofermentative vs. heterofermentative inoculation) under field conditions and to monitor responses in silage variables over the feeding season from January to August. Thirty-nine commercial dairy farms...... sufficiently from the epiphytic flora on whole-crop corn to affect fermentation in standard qualities of corn silage. Heterofermentative inoculation increased aerobic stability and numerous fermentation variables. None of the treatments affected milk production, and more-stable corn silage seemed to have...

  14. Evaluation of Novel Inoculation Strategies for Solid State Anaerobic Digestion of Yam Peelings in Low-Tech Digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiske, Stefan; Jurgutis, Linas; Kádár, Zsófia

    2015-01-01

    (SSAD) can be operated with low process water demands, but the technology involves operational challenges, as e.g., risk of process acidification or low degradation rates. This study aimed at developing simple methods to perform SSAD of yam peelings in low-tech applications by testing different...... inoculation strategies and evaluating the necessity of dung addition as a supportive biomass. In initial lab scale trials 143 +/- 4 mL CH4/g VS (volatile solids) were obtained from a mixture of yam peelings and dung digested in a multi-layer-inoculated batch reactor. In a consecutive incubation cycle in which...... adapted inoculum was applied, bottom inoculated digesters loaded without dung reached a yield of 140 +/- 16 mL CH4/g VS. This indicates that SSAD of yam peelings is possible with simple inoculation methods and dung addition is unnecessary after microbial adaptation. A comparison with a conventional fixed...

  15. An optimized regulating method for composting phosphorus fractions transformation based on biochar addition and phosphate-solubilizing bacteria inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuquan; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Huan; Lu, Qian; Cao, Zhenyu; Cui, Hongyang; Zhu, Longji; Wei, Zimin

    2016-12-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the influence of biochar and/or phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) inoculants on microbial biomass, bacterial community composition and phosphorus (P) fractions during kitchen waste composting amended with rock phosphate (RP). There were distinct differences in the physic-chemical parameters, the proportion of P fractions and bacterial diversity in different treatments. The contribution of available P fractions increased during composting especially in the treatment with the addition of PSB and biochar. Redundancy analysis showed that bacterial compositions were significantly influenced by P content, inoculation and biochar. Variance partitioning further showed that synergy of inoculated PSB and indigenous bacterial communities and the joint effect between biochar and bacteria explained the largest two proportion of the variation in P fractions. Therefore, the combined application of PSB and biochar to improve the inoculation effect and an optimized regulating method were suggested based on the distribution of P fractions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dromedaries (Camelus dromedarius) are of Low Susceptibility to Inoculation with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Søren; Wernery, U.; Nagy, P.

    2008-01-01

    Two sheep and five dromedaries were inoculated with a highdose of a cattle-passaged type O strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). The sheep developed typical FMD. The inoculated camels, which were placed in contact with five further dromedaries and four sheep, showed no visible sign...... the contact-exposed camels and sheep and two of the inoculated camels were serologically negative for FMD when tested up to day 28. In contrast, the camel with viraemia became serologically positive front day 14, and the other two inoculated camels (which had been exposed to FMDV in an earlier experiment......) became serologically positive from day 10. The experiment suggested that dromedaries (1) are of low susceptibility to FMDV serotype O, (2) do not transmit infection, even by close contact, and (3) are Unlikely to play a significant epidemiological role in FMD....

  17. Effect of inoculation on strawberry fermentation and acetification processes using native strains of yeast and acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, C; Torija, M J; Mas, A; Mateo, E

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the microbiota involved in the traditional vinegar elaboration of strawberry fruit during a spontaneous and inoculated process. In the spontaneous processes, low biodiversity was detected in both alcoholic fermentation (AF) and acetification. Nevertheless, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of Acetobacter malorum were selected and tested as starter cultures in the inoculation study. The inoculated processes with these strains were compared with another spontaneous process, yielding a significant reduction in time for AF with a total imposition of the S. cerevisiae strain. The resulting strawberry wine was acetified in different containers (glass and wood) yielding an initial imposition of the A. malorum inoculated strain, although displacement by Gluconacetobacter species was observed in the wood barrels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Effects of inoculating AM fungi on physiological characters and nutritional components of Astragalus membranaceus under different N application levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xue-li; Liu, Ti; Zhao, Li-li

    2009-09-01

    A pot culture with unsterilized soil as growth substrate showed that AM fungi had significant effects on the growth of Astragalus membranaceus (Fabaceae) under different N application levels. Inoculation with AM fungi promoted the AM infection of A. membranaceus roots, but high N application level suppressed the infection. Inoculating AM fungi increased the growth rate, soluble protein and sugar contents, and SOD, POD and CAT activities of A. membranaceus. Under 50 and 100 mg x kg(-1) of N application, new bands of POD isozyme occurred in inoculated plants, and the contents of flavonoid, N, and P in A. membranaceus also had definite increase. The best inoculation effect was observed under the N application level of 50-100 mg N x kg(-1) soil.

  19. The beneficial effect of dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin, XG.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on the effect of phosphorus on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection, and dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover under field microplots and pot experiments was conducted on fluvo-aquic soils of semi-arid region in north China. The results showed that 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate was the most favorable phosphorus level for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection ; mycorrhizal infection, nodulation, dry weight of shoots and roots, total uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and other elements, the final yields and recovery of phosphorus of white clover were significantly increased by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation and dual inoculation with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobium. The highest response of inoculation was obtained by adding fertilizer phosphorus at the level of 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate.

  20. Simultaneous and successive inoculations of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria on the fermentation of an unsulfited Tannat grape must

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between yeasts and lactic acid bacteria are strain specific, and their outcome is expected to change in simultaneous alcoholic -malolactic fermentations from the pattern observed in successive fermentations. One Oenococcus oeni strain Lalvin VP41TM was inoculated with two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains either simultaneously, three days after the yeast inoculation, or when alcoholic fermentation was close to finish. Early bacterial inoculations with each yeast strain allowed for the growth of the bacterial populations, and the length of malolactic fermentation was reduced to six days. Alcoholic fermentation by Lalvin ICV D80® yeast strain left the highest residual sugar, suggesting a negative effect of the bacterial growth and malolactic activity on its performance. In sequential inoculations the bacterial populations did not show actual growth with either yeast strain. In this strategy, both yeast strains finished the alcoholic fermentations, and malolactic fermentations took longer to finish. Lalvin ICV D80® allowed for higher viability and activity of the bacterial strain than Fermicru UY4® under the three inoculation strategies. This was beneficial for the sequential completion of both fermentations, but negatively affected the completion of alcoholic fermentation by Lalvin ICV D80® in the early bacteria additions. Conversely, Fermicru UY4®, which was rather inhibitory towards the bacteria, favored the timely completion of both fermentations simultaneously. As bacteria in early inoculations with low or no SO2 addition can be expected to multiply and interact with fermenting yeasts, not only are the yeast-bacterium strains combination and time point of the inoculation to be considered, but also the amount of bacteria inoculated.

  1. An indirect ELISA to detect the serologic response of elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) inoculated with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Lesley A; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Elzer, Philip H

    2002-10-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to identify elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51)-specific antibodies using a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for bovine IgG1. This test was relatively easy to perform, accurate, and easily reproducible; therefore it could be standardized for use between laboratories. In addition, we attempted to compensate for inherent variabilities encountered when comparing ELISA readings from multiple samples taken from many animals over time. Optical density (OD) readings for each sample were converted into a percent positivity value for analysis. A negative cutoff value was determined above which a sample was considered to have a significantly elevated anti-RB51 antibody level. Pre- and postvaccination sera from 64 6-8 mo old elk, divided into four groups (females subcutaneously inoculated with saline (control animals), females ballistically inoculated with RB51, females subcutaneously inoculated with RB51, and males subcutaneously inoculated with RB51) were used. All serum samples were collected between 27 April and 15 November 1995. Values for all saline controls were appropriately below the negative cutoff value. All subcutaneously and ballistically inoculated elk were serologically positive to RB51 for at least two sampling periods during the study. The difference in percent positivity values for the ballistically compared to the subcutaneously inoculated groups was not statistically significant at 8, 10, 14, or 18 wk postvaccination. This suggests that processing RB51 into lactose based pellets and ballistically inoculating elk with these pellets does not alter the detectable elk antibody response. Also, inoculated and control animals can be accurately identified with ELISA at 4-8 weeks postvaccination.

  2. Effects of Thrips Density, Mode of Inoculation, and Plant Age on Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Transmission in Peanut Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Anita; Sundaraj, Sivamani; Culbreath, Albert K; Riley, David G; Abney, Mark R; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu

    2015-02-01

    Spotted wilt caused by tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV; family Bunyaviridae; genus Tospovirus) is a serious disease of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) in the southeastern United States. Peanut genotypes with field resistance to TSWV are effective in suppressing spotted wilt. All commercially available genotypes with field resistance to TSWV were developed through conventional breeding. As a part of the breeding process, peanut genotypes are regularly screened under field situations. Despite numerous advantages associated with field screening, it is often limited by inconsistent vector (thrips) and TSWV pressure. A greenhouse transmission protocol would aid in thorough screening of selected genotypes and conserve time. In this study, various parameters associated with TSWV transmission, including tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) density, mode of inoculation, and plant age, were evaluated. Greater incidences of TSWV infection were obtained with thrips-mediated inoculation when compared with mechanical inoculation. TSWV inoculation with three, five, and 10 thrips resulted in greater incidences of TSWV infection in plants than inoculation with one thrips. However, incidences of TSWV infection did not vary between plants inoculated with three, five, and 10 viruliferous thrips. With both thrips-mediated and mechanical inoculation methods, incidences of TSWV infection in 1-wk-old plants were greater than in 4-wk-old plants. TSWV copy numbers, as determined by qPCR, also decreased with plant age. Results suggest that using at least three thrips per plant and 1- to 2-wk-old plants would maximize TSWV infection in inoculated plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. AMF Inoculation Enhances Growth and Improves the Nutrient Uptake Rates of Transplanted, Salt-Stressed Tomato Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrit Balliu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate the effects of commercially available AMF inoculate (Glomus sp. mixture on the growth and the nutrient acquisition in tomato (Solanumlycopersicum L. plants directly after transplanting and under different levels of salinity. Inoculated (AMF+ and non-inoculated (AMF− tomato plants were subjected to three levels of NaCl salinity (0, 50, and 100 mM·NaCl. Seven days after transplanting, plants were analyzed for dry matter and RGR of whole plants and root systems. Leaf tissue was analyzed for mineral concentration before and after transplanting; leaf nutrient content and relative uptake rates (RUR were calculated. AMF inoculation did not affect plant dry matter or RGR under fresh water-irrigation. The growth rate of AMF−plants did significantly decline under both moderate (77% and severe (61% salt stress compared to the fresh water-irrigated controls, while the decline was much less (88% and 75%,respectivelyand statistically non-significant in salt-stressed AMF+ plants. Interestingly, root system dry matter of AMF+ plants (0.098 g plant–1 remained significantly greater under severe soil salinity compared to non-inoculated seedlings (0.082 g plant–1. The relative uptake rates of N, P, Mg, Ca, Mn, and Fe were enhanced in inoculated tomato seedlings and remained higher under (moderate salt stress compared to AMF− plants This study suggests that inoculation with commercial AMF during nursery establishment contributes to alleviation of salt stress by maintaining a favorable nutrient profile. Therefore, nursery inoculation seems to be a viable solution to attenuate the effects of increasing soil salinity levels, especially in greenhouses with low natural abundance of AMF spores.

  4. Different prion disease phenotypes result from inoculation of cattle with two temporally separated sources of sheep scrapie from Great Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkins Steve AC

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the theoretical proposal that bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE could have originated from sheep scrapie, this study investigated the pathogenicity for cattle, by intracerebral (i.c. inoculation, of two pools of scrapie agents sourced in Great Britain before and during the BSE epidemic. Two groups of ten cattle were each inoculated with pools of brain material from sheep scrapie cases collected prior to 1975 and after 1990. Control groups comprised five cattle inoculated with sheep brain free from scrapie, five cattle inoculated with saline, and for comparison with BSE, naturally infected cattle and cattle i.c. inoculated with BSE brainstem homogenate from a parallel study. Phenotypic characterisation of the disease forms transmitted to cattle was conducted by morphological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and biological methods. Results Disease occurred in 16 cattle, nine inoculated with the pre-1975 inoculum and seven inoculated with the post-1990 inoculum, with four cattle still alive at 83 months post challenge (as at June 2006. The different inocula produced predominantly two different disease phenotypes as determined by histopathological, immunohistochemical and Western immunoblotting methods and biological characterisation on transmission to mice, neither of which was identical to BSE. Whilst the disease presentation was uniform in all scrapie-affected cattle of the pre-1975 group, the post-1990 inoculum produced a more variable disease, with two animals sharing immunohistochemical and molecular profile characteristics with animals in the pre-1975 group. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that cattle inoculated with different pooled scrapie sources can develop different prion disease phenotypes, which were not consistent with the phenotype of BSE of cattle and whose isolates did not have the strain typing characteristics of the BSE agent on transmission to mice.

  5. Development of a greenhouse-based inoculation protocol for the fungus Colletotrichum cereale pathogenic to annual bluegrass (Poa annua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Beirn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Colletotrichum cereale incites anthracnose disease on Poa annua (annual bluegrass turfgrass. Anthracnose disease is geographically widespread throughout the world and highly destructive to cool-season turfgrasses, with infections by C. cereale resulting in extensive turf loss. Comprehensive research aimed at controlling turfgrass anthracnose has been performed in the field, but knowledge of the causal organism and its basic biology is still needed. In particular, the lack of a reliable greenhouse-based inoculation protocol performed under controlled environmental conditions is an obstacle to the study of C. cereale and anthracnose disease. Our objective was to develop a consistent and reproducible inoculation protocol for the two major genetic lineages of C. cereale. By adapting previously successful field-based protocols and combining with components of existing inoculation procedures, the method we developed consistently produced C. cereale infection on two susceptible P. annua biotypes. Approximately 7 to 10 days post-inoculation, plants exhibited chlorosis and thinning consistent with anthracnose disease symptomology. Morphological inspection of inoculated plants revealed visual signs of the fungus (appressoria and acervuli, although acervuli were not always present. After stringent surface sterilization of inoculated host tissue, C. cereale was consistently re-isolated from symptomatic tissue. Real-time PCR detection analysis based on the Apn2 marker confirmed the presence of the pathogen in host tissue, with both lineages of C. cereale detected from all inoculated plants. When a humidifier was not used, no infection developed for any biotypes or fungal isolates tested. The inoculation protocol described here marks significant progress for in planta studies of C. cereale, and will enable scientifically reproducible investigations of the biology, infectivity and lifestyle of this important grass pathogen.

  6. Simultaneous and successive inoculations of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria on the fermentation of an unsulfited Tannat grape must.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Viviana; Beccaria, Bruno; Abreo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between yeasts and lactic acid bacteria are strain specific, and their outcome is expected to change in simultaneous alcoholic--malolactic fermentations from the pattern observed in successive fermentations. One Oenococcus oeni strain Lalvin VP41™ was inoculated with two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains either simultaneously, three days after the yeast inoculation, or when alcoholic fermentation was close to finish. Early bacterial inoculations with each yeast strain allowed for the growth of the bacterial populations, and the length of malolactic fermentation was reduced to six days. Alcoholic fermentation by Lalvin ICV D80® yeast strain left the highest residual sugar, suggesting a negative effect of the bacterial growth and malolactic activity on its performance. In sequential inoculations the bacterial populations did not show actual growth with either yeast strain. In this strategy, both yeast strains finished the alcoholic fermentations, and malolactic fermentations took longer to finish. Lalvin ICV D80® allowed for higher viability and activity of the bacterial strain than Fermicru UY4® under the three inoculation strategies. This was beneficial for the sequential completion of both fermentations, but negatively affected the completion of alcoholic fermentation by Lalvin ICV D80® in the early bacteria additions. Conversely, Fermicru UY4®, which was rather inhibitory towards the bacteria, favored the timely completion of both fermentations simultaneously. As bacteria in early inoculations with low or no SO2 addition can be expected to multiply and interact with fermenting yeasts, not only are the yeast-bacterium strains combination and time point of the inoculation to be considered, but also the amount of bacteria inoculated.

  7. Development of a greenhouse-based inoculation protocol for the fungus Colletotrichum cereale pathogenic to annual bluegrass (Poa annua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirn, Lisa A; Wang, Ruying; Clarke, Bruce B; Crouch, Jo Anne

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Colletotrichum cereale incites anthracnose disease on Poa annua (annual bluegrass) turfgrass. Anthracnose disease is geographically widespread throughout the world and highly destructive to cool-season turfgrasses, with infections by C. cereale resulting in extensive turf loss. Comprehensive research aimed at controlling turfgrass anthracnose has been performed in the field, but knowledge of the causal organism and its basic biology is still needed. In particular, the lack of a reliable greenhouse-based inoculation protocol performed under controlled environmental conditions is an obstacle to the study of C. cereale and anthracnose disease. Our objective was to develop a consistent and reproducible inoculation protocol for the two major genetic lineages of C. cereale. By adapting previously successful field-based protocols and combining with components of existing inoculation procedures, the method we developed consistently produced C. cereale infection on two susceptible P. annua biotypes. Approximately 7 to 10 days post-inoculation, plants exhibited chlorosis and thinning consistent with anthracnose disease symptomology. Morphological inspection of inoculated plants revealed visual signs of the fungus (appressoria and acervuli), although acervuli were not always present. After stringent surface sterilization of inoculated host tissue, C. cereale was consistently re-isolated from symptomatic tissue. Real-time PCR detection analysis based on the Apn2 marker confirmed the presence of the pathogen in host tissue, with both lineages of C. cereale detected from all inoculated plants. When a humidifier was not used, no infection developed for any biotypes or fungal isolates tested. The inoculation protocol described here marks significant progress for in planta studies of C. cereale, and will enable scientifically reproducible investigations of the biology, infectivity and lifestyle of this important grass pathogen.

  8. Effect of Bacterial Inoculation and of Nitrogen Fertilisation on Fodder Quality in Some Grass and Fodder Legume Species

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu Ghiocel; Dragomir Neculai; Camen Dorin; Dragomir Carmen; Rechiţean Dorin; Toth Ilie; Sala Anca; Neciu Florin

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the biological nitrogen fixing capacity through inoculation with improved stems of nitrogen fixing bacteria is an important measure of increasing total nitrogen content in legumes due to the supply of fixed nitrogen. Research on perennial legume species sowed in pure culture or in mixture with perennial grass species showed that in the variants inoculated the content of total nitrogen was close to the content of total nitrogen in the variants fertilised with N100. Mean data for the...

  9. TNF- α expression on rats after Candida albicans inoculation and neem (Azadirachta indica extract feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Dewa Ayu Ratna Dewanti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neem is a known traditional medicine from trees which function as immunomodulator. Candidiasis found in mouth is 80% caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans. Immunity is important to limit C. albicans since medicine price is relatively traditional medicine may become a good choice. In the other side the medicine price may not be reached by the citizen, cause citizen choose the traditional medicine. Purpose: The research is aimed to explain of TNF-α expression on rats after inoculated by C. albicans and fed with neem extract (Azadirachta Indica. Methods: There were 5 groups, the first group which was called as control group (KO hadn’t been fed aqueous extract from neem leaves and was not inoculated by C. albicans, the other group (treatment was classified into 4 groups. The first group was inoculated by C. albicans only (KP1, second group was fed with 50 mg/day/kg body weight aqueous extracts from Neem leaves, then inoculated with C. albicans starting from day 8 until day 21 (KP2, third group was fed with 100 mg/day/kg body weight aqueous extract from Neem leaves, then inoculated with C. albicans start from day 8 until day 21 (KP3, fourth group was fed with 200 mg/day/kg body weight aqueous extract from Neem leaves, then inoculated by C. albicans start from day 8 until day 21 (KP4. The data was collected from by swabbing the rat’s tongue to calculate C. albicans colonies. The rats were acclimated and collected for immunohistochemistry measurement. Results: The study showed that there were different result on ANOVA, HSD test, and linier regression. ANOVA showed significant difference (p < 0.01 between groups. The HSD test showed significant difference (p < 0.05 between each groups. TNF-α was the stimuli sensor from environment, and used as parameter to see the effect from the change of innate immunity component to C. albicans. Conclusion: Aqueous extract from neem leaves increased the macrophage TNF-α expression on in rat in

  10. A novel method for contributing to composting start-up at low temperature by inoculating cold-adapted microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Yue; Sun, Qing-Hong; Wang, Xue-Qin; Cui, Hong-Yang; Zhang, Xu; Li, Yan-Jie; Wei, Zi-Min

    2017-08-01

    Low temperature climate presented a technical challenge to start-up composting in northern region of China. This study investigated if the cold-adapted microbial consortium (CAMC) could promote composting start-up at low temperature. In this work, the CAMC was inoculated when food waste was composted at 10°C. The results showed that inoculating CAMC accelerated the piles temperature effectively, the piles passed through the start-up period within 37h. Moreover, the inoculants could enhance the abundances of dominant strains related to organic matters degradation rate. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that the relationships among indigenous bacteria, organic substrates degradation and temperature evolution were influenced by the inoculants. Furthermore, the heat generation value and degradation rate of the hydrolysable carbohydrate, lipids and protein were significantly enhanced with CAMC inoculated. This work demonstrated that inoculating CAMC was beneficial to composting self-heating, it provided a novel biotechnology support to ensure the normal start-up of winter composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks.

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    Alexandre Lemos de Barros Moreira Filho

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C, continuous high temperature (38.7°C and continuous low temperature (36.7°C. After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control. At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry.

  12. Evaluation of yeast diversity during wine fermentations with direct inoculation and pied de cuve method at an industrial scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erhu; Liu, Chuanhe; Liu, Yanlin

    2012-07-01

    The diversity and composition of yeast populations may greatly impact wine quality. This study investigated the yeast microbiota in two different types of wine fermentations: direct inoculation of a commercial starter versus pied de cuve method at an industrial scale. The pied de cuve fermentation entailed growth of the commercial inoculum used in the direct inoculation fermentation for further inoculation of additional fermentations. Yeast isolates were collected from different stages of wine fermentation and identified to the species level using Wallersterin Laboratory nutrient (WLN) agar followed by analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain. Genetic characteristics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were assessed by a rapid PCR-based method, relying on the amplification of interdelta sequences. A total of 412 yeast colonies were obtained from all fermentations and eight different WL morphotypes were observed. Non-Saccharomyces yeast mainly appeared in the grape must and at the early stages of wine fermentation. S. cerevisiae was the dominant yeast species using both fermentation techniques. Seven distinguishing interdelta sequence patterns were found among S. cerevisiae strains, and the inoculated commercial starter, AWRI 796, dominated all stages in both direct inoculation and pied de cuve fermentations. This study revealed that S. cerevisiae was the dominant species and an inoculated starter could dominate fermentations with the pied de cuve method under controlled conditions.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation increases biomass of Euterpe edulis and Archontophoenix alexandrae after two years under field conditions

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    Andressa Franzoi Sgrott

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF of tree seedlings in the nursery is a biotechnological strategy to improve growth, survival after transplanting, biomass production and to reduce the use of fertilizers. Archontophoenix alexandrae and Euterpe edulis are palm species used in southern Brazil to produce the palm heart, the latter being included in the list of threatened species due to the overexploitation of its native population. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the effect of mycorrhizal inoculation on growth and physiological parameters of A. alexandrae and E. edulis. After germination, the seedlings were inoculated (AMF or not (CTL with AMF in the treatments. Values of chlorophyll content, biomass and shoot phosphorus were not statistically different between the AMF and CTL treatments, after five months in the greenhouse. Inoculation with AMF significantly increased the levels of starch and soluble carbohydrates in shoots and roots of both species. Under field conditions, AMF had no effect on stem diameter and height after 12 and 24 months, but total plant biomass and leaf, stem and root biomass were greater in AMF than in CTL plants. The data indicated that AMF inoculation in the nursery has a strong effect on biomass accumulation after growing for 24 months under field conditions. Therefore, AMF inoculation should be considered an important strategy to increase growth and production of these economically important tropical palm species.

  14. Interactive effect of inoculant and dried jujube powder on the fermentation quality and nitrogen fraction of alfalfa silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jipeng; Li, Zhenzhen; Yu, Zhu; Zhang, Qing; Li, Xujiao

    2017-04-01

    The interactive effect of inoculants and dried jujube powder (DJP) on the fermentation and nitrogen fraction (PA, PB1, PB2, PB3 and PC fractions) of alfalfa silage was investigated. Three of the Lactobacillus plantarum inoculants (LP1, LP2 or LP3) were used. The DJP was added at rates of 0, 3, 6, 9, 12 or 15% of the whole fresh forage. The combination of DJP and inoculants decreased the pH value and ammonia nitrogen content and increased the PC portion. As the DJP ratio increased, there was a peak in lactic acid : acetic acid ratio (12% of DJP ratio) and PB2 fraction (9% of DJP ratio) while the PA content decreased linearly. The LP1 and LP2 had the highest lactic acid content. Inoculants decreased the PB1 portion of true protein. The LP1 treated silage had the highest acetic acid content with the lowest lactic acid : acetic acid ratio and had lower PB3 and PC and higher PB2 than LP2 or LP3 treated silages. The result showed that the application of DJP or inoculants have positive effect on the fermentation, nutrition and N fraction value in the high moisture alfalfa silages, and the combination of DJP and inoculants preserves best. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Preferential accumulation of severe variants of Citrus tristeza virus in plants co-inoculated with mild and severe variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambade, A; Ambrós, S; López, C; Ruiz-Ruiz, S; Hermoso de Mendoza, A; Flores, R; Guerri, J; Moreno, P

    2007-01-01

    The viral population in sweet orange plants, either healthy or pre-inoculated with the asymptomatic isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) T32, and then graft- or aphid-inoculated with the stem-pitting isolate T318, was characterized with respect to symptom expression, reaction with monoclonal antibody MCA13, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of genes p18 and p20, bi-directional RT-PCR, and dot-blot hybridisation. All plants inoculated with T318, with or without pre-inoculation, showed stem pitting, reacted with MCA13, had the SSCP profile characteristic of this isolate, and in bi-directional RT-PCR yielded a 450-bp DNA product associated with severe isolates, indicating that T32 afforded no protection against T318. The latter isolate had two main sequence variants, the minor one of which was indistinguishable from the main T32 sequence, and both were detected in most plants that were graft-inoculated with T318. However, the T32 variant was not detected in plants that were aphid-inoculated only with T318 and also showed stem pitting. This suggested an association of symptoms with the major T318 sequence and preferential transmission of this variant by aphids. The T318-specific variant accumulated more than the T32 variant in plants in which both were replicating, suggesting a higher fitness of the former. Our results clearly emphasize the potential threat of severe CTV variants in areas where mild isolates are presently predominant.

  16. Resin flow responses to fertilization, wounding and fungal inoculation in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, Larissa; Robison, Daniel J; Wentworth, Thomas R; Klepzig, Kier D

    2008-06-01

    Resin flow is the primary means of natural defense against southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.), the most important insect pest of Pinus spp. in the southern United States. As a result, factors affecting resin flow are of interest to researchers and forest managers. We examined the influence of fertilization, artificial wounding and fungal inoculation on resin flow in 6- and 12-year-old stands of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and determined the extent of that influence within and above the wounded stem area and through time. Fertilization increased constitutive resin flow, but only the younger trees sustained increased resin flow after wounding and inoculation treatments. An induced resin flow response occurred between 1 and 30 days after wounding and inoculation treatments. Wounding with inoculation resulted in greater resin flow than wounding alone, but increasing amounts of inoculum did not increase resin flow. Increased resin flow (relative to controls) lasted for at least 90 days after wounding and inoculation. This increase appeared to be limited to the area of treatment, at least in younger trees. The long-lasting effects of fungal inoculation on resin flow, as well as the response to fertilization, suggest that acquired resistance through induced resin flow aids in decreasing susceptibility of loblolly pine to southern pine beetle.

  17. Prior Inoculation with Type B Strains of Francisella tularensis Provides Partial Protection against Virulent Type A Strains in Cottontail Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Vienna R.; Adney, Danielle R.; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Bowen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterium that is capable of causing severe disease (tularemia) in a wide range of species. This organism is characterized into two distinct subspecies: tularensis (type A) and holarctica (type B) which vary in several crucial ways, with some type A strains having been found to be considerably more virulent in humans and laboratory animals. Cottontail rabbits have been widely implicated as a reservoir species for this subspecies; however, experimental inoculation in our laboratory revealed type A organisms to be highly virulent, resulting in 100% mortality following challenge with 50–100 organisms. Inoculation of cottontail rabbits with the same number of organisms from type B strains of bacteria was found to be rarely lethal and to result in a robust humoral immune response. The objective of this study was to characterize the protection afforded by a prior challenge with type B strains against a later inoculation with a type A strain in North American cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus spp). Previous infection with a type B strain of organism was found to lengthen survival time and in some cases prevent death following inoculation with a type A2 strain of F. tularensis. In contrast, inoculation of a type A1b strain was uniformly lethal in cottontail rabbits irrespective of a prior type B inoculation. These findings provide important insight about the role cottontail rabbits may play in environmental maintenance and transmission of this organism. PMID:26474413

  18. Evaluation of different co-inoculation time of non-Saccharomyces/Saccharomyces yeasts in order to obtain reduced ethanol wines

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    Mestre María Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Decreasing ethanol content in wines has become one of the main objectives of winemakers in different areas of the world. The use of selected wine yeasts can be considered one of the most effective and simple tools. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of co-inoculation times of selected non-Saccharomyces/Saccharomyces yeasts on the reduction of ethanol levels in wines. Hanseniaspora uvarum BHu9, Starmerella bacillaris BSb55 and Candida membranaefasciens BCm71 were co-inoculate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermentative conditions. Treatments assayed were: pure fermentations of S. cerevisiae BSc203 and non-Saccharomyces yeasts BHu9, BSb55 and BCm71; -co-fermentations: A-BHu9/BSc203; B-BSb55/BSc203 and C-BCm71/BSc203. These co-inoculations were carried out under mixed (simultaneous inoculation, and sequential conditions (non-Saccharomyces yeasts inoculated at initial time and S. cerevisiae at 48, 96 and 144 h. Lower fermentative efficiencies were registered when BHu9 and BSb55 remained pure more time. Conversely, the conversion efficiency was reduced in co-inocula of BCm71/BSc203, when both yeasts interact more time. Metabolites produced during all vinification processes were within acceptable concentration ranges according to the current legislations. Conclusion Time interaction during fermentation processes of non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces yeasts showed influence on ethanol production, and this effect would be dependent on the co-inoculated species.

  19. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis of Electrogenic Microbial Communities in Differentially Inoculated Swine Wastewater-Fed Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilyas, Irina V; Sorokin, Anatoly A; Kiseleva, Larisa; Simpson, David J W; Fedorovich, V; Sharipova, Margarita R; Kainuma, Mami; Cohen, Michael F; Goryanin, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are promising new technologies for efficient removal of organic compounds from industrial wastewaters, including that generated from swine farming. We inoculated two pairs of laboratory-scale MFCs with sludge granules from a beer wastewater-treating anaerobic digester (IGBS) or from sludge taken from the bottom of a tank receiving swine wastewater (SS). The SS-inoculated MFC outperformed the IGBS-inoculated MFC with regard to COD and VFA removal and electricity production. Using a metagenomic approach, we describe the microbial diversity of the MFC planktonic and anodic communities derived from the different inocula. Proteobacteria (mostly Deltaproteobacteria) became the predominant phylum in both MFC anodic communities with amplification of the electrogenic genus Geobacter being the most pronounced. Eight dominant and three minor species of Geobacter were found in both MFC anodic communities. The anodic communities of the SS-inoculated MFCs had a higher proportion of Clostridium and Bacteroides relative to those of the IGBS-inoculated MFCs, which were enriched with Pelobacter. The archaeal populations of the SS- and IGBS-inoculated MFCs were dominated by Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, respectively. Our results show a long-term influence of inoculum type on the performance and microbial community composition of swine wastewater-treating MFCs.

  20. Efficacy of organic matter and some bio-inoculants for the management of root-knot nematode infesting tomato

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    Neha Khan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of an organic matter like Tagetes erecta and bioinoculants Azotobacter chroococcum and Glomus fasciculatum was investigated in tomato cultivar ‘Pusa Ruby’ when inoculated individually as well as concomitantly for the management of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita in terms of growth parameters such as plant length, fresh and dry weights, chlorophyll content, per cent pollen fertility and mycorrhization. Greatest reduction in the numbers of second-stage juveniles in soil, number of root-galls, egg-masses and nematode multiplication was recorded with combined application of T. erecta and bio-inoculants A. chroococcum and G. fasciculatum as compared to untreated control and other treatments. Similarly, the greatest improvement in the plant growth and biomass of tomato was noted in the same treatments. However, individual inoculation of these bio-inoculants and organic fertilizers also showed significant enhancement but was less as compared to combined treatment. A. chroococcum was found most effective against disease incidence followed by G. fasciculatum and T. erecta. Parameters like NP and K contents were significantly enhanced in those plants which received combined treatments of organic matter and bio-inoculants. Azotobacter was found more efficacious against nematodes than Glomus fasciculatum. Organic matter also influenced the activity of bio-inoculants, more with the Azotobacter than G. fasciculatum. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v4i2.12643 International Journal of Environment Vol.4(2 2015: 206-220

  1. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis of Electrogenic Microbial Communities in Differentially Inoculated Swine Wastewater-Fed Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Khilyas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs are promising new technologies for efficient removal of organic compounds from industrial wastewaters, including that generated from swine farming. We inoculated two pairs of laboratory-scale MFCs with sludge granules from a beer wastewater-treating anaerobic digester (IGBS or from sludge taken from the bottom of a tank receiving swine wastewater (SS. The SS-inoculated MFC outperformed the IGBS-inoculated MFC with regard to COD and VFA removal and electricity production. Using a metagenomic approach, we describe the microbial diversity of the MFC planktonic and anodic communities derived from the different inocula. Proteobacteria (mostly Deltaproteobacteria became the predominant phylum in both MFC anodic communities with amplification of the electrogenic genus Geobacter being the most pronounced. Eight dominant and three minor species of Geobacter were found in both MFC anodic communities. The anodic communities of the SS-inoculated MFCs had a higher proportion of Clostridium and Bacteroides relative to those of the IGBS-inoculated MFCs, which were enriched with Pelobacter. The archaeal populations of the SS- and IGBS-inoculated MFCs were dominated by Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, respectively. Our results show a long-term influence of inoculum type on the performance and microbial community composition of swine wastewater-treating MFCs.

  2. Rhizoctonia solani and Bacterial Inoculants Stimulate Root Exudation of Antifungal Compounds in Lettuce in a Soil-Type Specific Manner

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    Saskia Windisch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies conducted on a unique field site comprising three contrasting soils (diluvial sand DS, alluvial loam AL, loess loam LL under identical cropping history, demonstrated soil type-dependent differences in biocontrol efficiency against Rhizoctonia solani-induced bottom rot disease in lettuce by two bacterial inoculants (Pseudomonas jessenii RU47 and Serratia plymuthica 3Re-4-18. Disease severity declined in the order DS > AL > LL. These differences were confirmed under controlled conditions, using the same soils in minirhizotron experiments. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS profiling of rhizosphere soil solutions revealed benzoic and lauric acids as antifungal compounds; previously identified in root exudates of lettuce. Pathogen inoculation and pre-inoculation with bacterial inoculants significantly increased the release of antifungal root exudates in a soil type-specific manner; with the highest absolute levels detected on the least-affected LL soil. Soil type-dependent differences were also recorded for the biocontrol effects of the two bacterial inoculants; showing the highest efficiency after double-inoculation on the AL soil. However, this was associated with a reduction of shoot growth and root hair development and a limited micronutrient status of the host plants. Obviously, disease severity and the expression of biocontrol effects are influenced by soil properties with potential impact on reproducibility of practical applications.

  3. Accumulation and Distribution of Lead and Chromium in Laboratory-Scale Constructed Wetlands Inoculated with Metal-Tolerant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabilis-Sosa, Leonel E; Siebe, Christina; Moeller-Chávez, Gabriela; Durán-Domínguez-de-Bazúa, María del Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation and distribution of lead and chromium was tested in a laboratory-scale constructed wetland (CW) inoculated with metal-tolerant bacteria. Two non-inoculated systems also were evaluated, one planted and the other unplanted. Mass balances indicated that 57% of chromium input was accumulated into inoculated CW after 151 days of operation. The distribution was similar in support media and vegetation, in which 78% was transferred to aerial part. Similarly Pb was accumulated 29% in the support media and 39% in vegetation, which was distributed 52% in rhizome and 48% in aerial part. Significantly lower amounts of heavy metals were accumulated in non-inoculated systems than in the inoculated wetlands (p < 0.005). In addition, a markedly higher proportion of chromium in aerial vegetation and of lead in the suspended fraction of the effluent was exhibited, which raises a subsequent recovery of the metal by harvest and settling, respectively. Results indicate that CW inoculated with metal-tolerant bacteria might be a suitable option for treating wastewater with content of lead and chromium.

  4. Effects of bacterial inoculants on the indigenous microbiome and secondary metabolites of chamomile plants

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    Ruth eSchmidt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-associated bacteria fulfil important functions for plant growth and health of their host. However, our knowledge about the impact of bacterial treatments on the host’s microbiome and physiology is limited. The present study was conducted to assess the impact of bacterial inoculants on the microbiome of chamomile plants Chamomilla recutita (L. Rauschert grown in a field under organic management in Egypt. Chamomile seedlings were inoculated with three indigenous Gram-positive strains (Streptomyces subrutilus Wbn2-11, Bacillus subtilis Co1-6, Paenibacillus polymyxa Mc5Re-14 from Egypt and three European Gram-negative strains (Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila P69, Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18 already known for their beneficial plant-microbe interaction. Molecular fingerprints of 16S rRNA gene as well as real-time PCR analyses did not show statistically significant differences for all applied bacterial antagonists compared to the control. In contrast, a pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed significant differences in the community structure of bacteria between the treatments. These differences could be clearly shown by a shift within the community structure and corresponding beta-diversity indices. Moreover, B. subtilis Co1-6 and P. polymyxa Mc5Re-14 showed an enhancement of the bioactive secondary metabolite apigenin-7-O-glucoside. This indicates a possible new function of bacterial inoculants: to interact with the plant microbiome as well as with the plant metabolome.

  5. Modulation of killer cells activities in response to inoculation of irradiated tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amino, Kayoko (Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). School of Dentistry)

    1991-08-01

    There are two main radiation effects in therapy of malignant tumors, one is the direct cytotoxic effect of radiotherapy and another is the immunological response in the host. To investigate the state of the immunological response after radiation, the rise and fall of killer cell and cytokine activities were studied in an experimental tumor system using BALB/c mice and syngeneic Meth-A fibrosarcoma. The mice, inoculated with X-ray treated Meth-A (Rad-Meth-A-mice), acquired antitumor immunity as demonstrated by a Meth-A challenge test. Moreover, the mice inoculated with Mitomycin C treated Meth-A (MMC-Meth-A-mice) also acquired the same immunity. The effector cells in Rad-Meth-A-mice and in MMC-Meth-A-mice were mainly cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The maximum CTL activity was noted on Days 14 and 21 after inoculation in Rad-Meth-A-mice and MMC-Meth-A-mice. The spleen lymphocytes of Rad-Meth-A-mice produced Interleukin 2 (IL-2), Lymphotoxin (LT) and Interferon (IFN). On the other hand, the spleen lymphocytes of MMC-Meth-A-mice produced IL-2 and LT, but not IFN. Moreover, the responsiveness of spleen lymphocytes to IL-2 increased in quantity. Ia antigen positive ratio of spleen macrophages that were taken from Rad-Meth-A-mice and MMC-Meth-A-mice increased. Taken together, these results suggest that Meth-A treated with either X-ray or Mitomycin C can induce a specific antitumor immunological response in mice. (author).

  6. Inoculation of Transgenic Resistant Potato by Phytophthora infestans Affects Host Plant Choice of a Generalist Moth.

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    Kibrom B Abreha

    Full Text Available Pathogen attack and the plant's response to this attack affect herbivore oviposition preference and larval performance. Introduction of major resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans (Rpi-genes, the cause of the devastating late blight disease, from wild Solanum species into potato changes the plant-pathogen interaction dynamics completely, but little is known about the effects on non-target organisms. Thus, we examined the effect of P. infestans itself and introduction of an Rpi-gene into the crop on host plant preference of the generalist insect herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae. In two choice bioassays, S. littoralis preferred to oviposit on P. infestans-inoculated plants of both the susceptible potato (cv. Desiree and an isogenic resistant clone (A01-22: cv. Desiree transformed with Rpi-blb1, when compared to uninoculated plants of the same genotype. Both cv. Desiree and clone A01-22 were equally preferred for oviposition by S. littoralis when uninoculated plants were used, while cv. Desiree received more eggs compared to the resistant clone when both were inoculated with the pathogen. No significant difference in larval and pupal weight was found between S. littoralis larvae reared on leaves of the susceptible potato plants inoculated or uninoculated with P. infestans. Thus, the herbivore's host plant preference in this system was not directly associated with larval performance. The results indicate that the Rpi-blb1 based resistance in itself does not influence insect behavior, but that herbivore oviposition preference is affected by a change in the plant-microbe interaction.

  7. Effects of nursery preconditioning through mycorrhizal inoculation and drought in Arbutus unedo L. plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro García, Alejandra; Del Pilar Bañón Árias, Sebastián; Morte, Asunción; Sánchez-Blanco, María Jesús

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a water deficit treatment and mycorrhizal inoculation with Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker and Couch on the water relations, gas exchange, and plant growth in Arbutus unedo L. plants was studied in order to evaluate the hardening process during the nursery period. The ability to withstand the adverse conditions after transplantation was also studied. Mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal seedlings of A. unedo were pot-grown for 4 months in a greenhouse (nursery period), during which time two irrigation treatments, well watered (100% water holding capacity, leaching 20% of the applied water) and deficit irrigation (50% of the well watered), were applied. Subsequently, the plants were transplanted to the field and well irrigated (transplanting period), after which and until the end of the experiment they received no water (establishment period). At the end of the nursery period, both water deficit and mycorrhizae were seen to have altered the plant morphology. Mycorrhizal plants had lower leaf area and improved leaf color parameters, while the water deficit increased root dry weight and the root/shoot ratio. Mycorrhizal plants had higher leaf water potential values than non-inoculated plants. Mycorrhizae increased stomatal conductance and photosynthesis values, especially in stressed plants. Drought led to an osmotic adjustment and a decrease in the leaf water potential values at turgor loss point in the mycorrhizal plants. Cell wall rigidity, measured as increased bulk modulus of elasticity, was decreased by the mycorrhizae effect. After transplanting, no differences were found in the water relations or gas exchange values between treatments. During the establishment period, the plants that had been exposed to both drought and mycorrhizae showed a better water status (higher leaf water and turgor potential values) and higher gas exchange values. In conclusion, water deficit and mycorrhizal inoculation of A. unedo plants in nursery produced changes in

  8. Can corn plants inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi affect soil clay assemblage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, P.; Cozzolino, V.; Di Meo, V.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Plants can extract K from exchangeable and non-exchangeable sites in the soil clay mineral structures. The latter, known as fixed K, is usually seen as an illite layer, i.e. an anhydrous K layer that forms a 1.0 nm structural layer unit as seen by X-ray diffraction. Nutrient availability can be enhanced in the root zone by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi. In this study, the effects of non-inoculated and Glomus intraradices inoculated corn plant growth under different experimental conditions on soil K-bearing clay minerals were identified. The soil, a Vertic Xerofluvent, was planted in corn in a 2008-2010 randomized field experiment. Bulk and rhizosphere soil sampling was carried out from May to September 2010 from fertilized plots (N200P90K160 and N200P0K160) with and without plants. According to XRD analysis, three major K-bearing minerals were present in soil: smectite-rich mixed layer mineral, illite-rich mixed layer mineral and illite. Results at 40DAS indicate extraction of K from clay minerals by plant uptake, whereas at 130DAS much of the nutrient seems to be returned to the soil. There is an apparent difference between bulk and rhizophere clays. The XRD patterns are not unequivocally affected by Glomus inoculation. There are observable changes in clay mineralogy in fallow unfertilized compared with fertilized soil. In the studied soil, the illite rich mixed-layer minerals seem to be the source of K absorbed by plants, while illite acts as sink of K released from the plant-microorganisms system at the end of the growing season and as source for the following crop.

  9. Thalidomide promotes leukocytosis in mice inoculated with 4T1 mammary carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Carlos dos Reis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapy effect of thalidomide in the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma. 4T1 cell suspension was injected into the posterior left flank of all animals to obtain solid tumors. Five days after inoculation, the treatment group was orally administered 150 mg/kg of thalidomide for seven days. Tumors were measured every 48 hours until the end of treatment. Whole blood was collected for hematology analysis. Our results suggest that thalidomide therapy increase the number of circulating leukocytes in the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma, and this response is accompanied by a decrease in tumor growth.

  10. The effect of mycorrhizal inoculation on hybrid poplar fine root dynamics in hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, J.; Knight, J.D.; Van Rees, K.C.J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Soil Science

    2006-07-01

    The biological remediation of contaminated soils using plants was discussed. Hybrid poplars are good candidates for phytoremediation because they root deeply, cycle large amounts of water and grow quickly. Their fine root system is pivotal in nutrient and water acquisition. Therefore, in order to maximize the phytoremediation potential, it is important to understand the response of the fine root system. In addition to degrading organic chemicals, ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi provide the host with greater access to nutrients. This study determined the relationship between residual soil hydrocarbons and soil properties at a field site. The effects of residual contamination on hybrid poplar fine root dynamics was also examined along with the effect of ectomycorrhizal colonization on hybrid poplar fine root dynamics when grown in diesel contaminated soil under controlled conditions. A minirhizotron camera inside a growth chamber captured images of mycorrhizal inoculation on hybrid poplar fine root production. Walker hybrid poplar seedlings were grown for 12 weeks in a control soil and also in a diesel contaminated soil. Seedlings were also grown in control and diesel contaminated, ectomycorrhizal inoculated soils. The inoculum was a mycorrhizal mix containing Pisolithus tinctorius and Rhizopogon spp. The images showed that colonization by ECM fungi increased hybrid poplar fine root production and aboveground biomass in a diesel contaminated soil compared to non-colonized trees in the same soil. Root:shoot ratios were much higher in the diesel contaminated/non-inoculated treatment than in either of the control soil treatments. Results of phytoremediation in diesel contaminated soil were better in the non-colonized treatment than in the colonized treatment. Both treatments removed more contaminants from the soil than the unplanted control. Much higher quantities of hydrocarbons were found sequestered in the roots from the inoculated treatment than from the non

  11. Highly Efficient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Wheat Via In Planta Inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risacher, Thierry; Craze, Melanie; Bowden, Sarah; Paul, Wyatt; Barsby, Tina

    This chapter details a reproducible method for the transformation of spring wheat using Agrobacterium tumefaciens via the direct inoculation of bacteria into immature seeds in planta as described in patent WO 00/63398(1. Transformation efficiencies from 1 to 30% have been obtained and average efficiencies of at least 5% are routinely achieved. Regenerated plants are phenotypically normal with 30-50% of transformation events carrying introduced genes at single insertion sites, a higher rate than is typically reported for transgenic plants produced using biolistic transformation methods.

  12. Screening of multifunctional bacterial inoculants with lignocellulose degradation ability for agricultural applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara G.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We developed a flexible screening procedure for the selection of multifunctional bacterial agro-inoculant strains, with lignocellulose material degradation ability. Initial screening was done to select the bacteria isolates from ensilaged grass / legumes, able to growth on minimal media, with (carboxymethylcellulose, xylan or phytate as carbon source. On these isolates we tested the antagonism toward plant pathogens, ability to produce siderophores and compatibility with lactic acid bacteria. We selected a strain, SZE102A, able to growth on plant residues, with a highly antagonistic activity toward plant pathogens and compatible with lactic acid bacteria. We identified this strain as being Bacillus licheniformis, by a polyphasic taxonomic approach.

  13. Nutritive value, fermentation characteristics, and in situ disappearance kinetics of sorghum silage treated with inoculants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M E; Foster, J L; McCuistion, K C; Redmon, L A; Jessup, R W

    2013-01-01

    Fibrolytic enzymes and microbial inoculants have the potential to improve the value of sorghum feedstuff and feedstock. An experiment was conducted to determine nutritive value, ensiling characteristics, and in situ disappearance kinetics of 4 sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) silage varieties: Dairy Master BMR (DBMR; brown midrib; Richardson Seed, Vega, TX), PS 747 (PS; photoperiod sensitive; Pogue Seed, Kenedy, TX), Silo 700D (S700D; conventional forage type; Richardson Seed), and MMR 381/73 (MMR; conventional forage type; Richardson Seed) pretreated with fibrolytic enzyme (xylanase plus cellulase, XC; 50:50 mixture of Cellulase Plus and Xylanase Plus; Dyadic, Juniper, FL) or microbial [Promote ASB (Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus plantarum); Cargill Animal Nutrition, Indianapolis, IN; PRO] inoculants. The greatest yield was for cultivar PS and the least for MMR. Neutral detergent fiber (NDF) concentration was least for XC-treated silage, and acid detergent fiber (ADF) concentration was least for XC- and PRO-treated silage. When silage was treated with XC, concentrations of NDF concentrations decreased, on average, 4.81% across all cultivars and ADF concentrations decreased, on average, 3.23% in all cultivars except MMR. Inoculant PRO reduced the NDF concentration of DBMR by 6.47%. The ADF concentrations of DBMR and PS treated with PRO were decreased by 3.25%. Treating sorghum silage with XC or PRO reduced the NDF and ADF fractions, which increased cell wall degradability. In vitro true digestibility was greatest for PRO-treated DBMR, whereas acid detergent lignin was least for PRO-treated DBMR. Aerobic stability was not improved by PRO; however, aerobic stability of XC-treated MMR was 63 h greater than that of the control. Acetate concentrations were greatest for XC-treated MMR, which explains the 63-h improvement in aerobic stability due to the inhibition of fungi. However, inoculant PRO did not improve yeast and mold counts or aerobic stability of sorghum

  14. Evaluation de l'efficience de l'inoculation des semences chez 11 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dans le cadre de la relance de la sojaculture en Côte d'Ivoire, l'étude de la relation symbiotique (bactérie - plante) a été réalisée en vue d'optimiser la production. L'inoculation a été faite par enrobage des semences de soja juste avant leur semis avec un mélange de culture pure de la souche IRAT-FA3 de Bradyrhizobium ...

  15. Effets d'un herbicide et de l'inoculation sur les facteurs de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dans le cadre de la lutte contre l'enherbement excessif des terres et le maintien de la fertilité de cellesci, une expérimentation sur le soja a eu lieu en zone forestière de Côte d'Ivoire, à la station de recherche du C.N.R.A à Gagnoa pour évaluer l'incidence d'un herbicide et de l'inoculation sur les facteurs de rendement du ...

  16. Moxidectin steady state prior to inoculation protects cats from subsequent, repeated infection with Dirofilaria immitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan E; Hostetler, Joe A; Thomas, Jennifer E; Bailey, Keith L; Barrett, Anne W; Gruntmeir, Kaylynn; Gruntmeir, Jeff; Starkey, Lindsay A; Basel, Chris; Blagburn, Byron L

    2015-02-18

    Infection of cats with Dirofilaria immitis causes seroconversion on antibody tests and pulmonary pathology, often without subsequent development of adult heartworms. Consistent administration of topical 10% imidacloprid-1% moxidectin has been shown to result in sustained plasma levels of moxidectin in cats after three to five treatments, a pharmacokinetic behavior known as "steady state". To evaluate the ability of moxidectin at "steady state" to protect cats from subsequent infection with D. immitis, cats (n = 10) were treated with the labeled dose of topical 10% imidacloprid-1% moxidectin for four monthly treatments. Each cat was inoculated with 25 third-stage larvae of D. immitis 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after the last treatment; non-treated cats (n = 9) were inoculated on the same days, serving as infection controls. Blood samples were collected from each cat from 1 month prior to treatment until 7 months after the final inoculation and tested for antibody to, and antigen and microfilaria of, D. immitis. Measurement of serum levels of moxidectin confirmed steady state in treated cats. Cats treated with topical 10% imidacloprid-1% moxidectin prior to trickle inoculation of D. immitis L3 larvae throughout the 28 day post-treatment period remained negative on antibody and antigen tests throughout the study and did not develop gross or histologic lesions characteristic of heartworm infection. A majority of non-treated cats tested antibody positive by 3-4 months post infection (6/9) and, after heat treatment, tested antigen positive by 6-7 months post-infection (5/9). Histologic lesions characteristic of D. immitis infection, including intimal and medial thickening of the pulmonary artery, were present in every cat with D. immitis antibodies (6/6), although adult D. immitis were confirmed in only 5/6 antibody-positive cats at necropsy. Microfilariae were not detected at any time. Taken together, these data indicate that prior treatment with 10% imidacloprid-1

  17. Effect of Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 inoculation on nodulation, nitrogen fixation and yield of soybean (Glycine max) genotypes in gray terrace soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Faridul; Bhuiyan, M A H; Alam, Sadia Sabrina; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Kim, Pil Joo; Lee, Yong Bok

    2015-01-01

    Soybean plants require high amounts of nitrogen, which are mainly obtained from biological nitrogen fixation. A field experiment was conducted by soybean (Glycine max) genotypes, growing two varieties (Shohag and BARI Soybean6) and two advanced lines (MTD10 and BGM02026) of soybean with or without Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 inoculation. Soybean plants of all genotypes inoculated with Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 produced greater nodule numbers, nodule weight, shoot and root biomass, and plant height than non-inoculated plants. Similarly, inoculated plants showed enhanced activity of nitrogenase (NA) enzyme, contributing to higher nitrogen fixation and assimilation, compared to non-inoculated soybean plants in both years. Plants inoculated with Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 also showed higher pod, stover, and seed yield than non-inoculated plants. Therefore, Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 established an effective symbiotic relationship with a range of soybean genotypes and thus increased the nodulation, growth, and yield of soybean grown in gray terrace soils in Bangladesh.

  18. Neutralizing misinformation through inoculation: Exposing misleading argumentation techniques reduces their influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Ecker, Ullrich K H

    2017-01-01

    Misinformation can undermine a well-functioning democracy. For example, public misconceptions about climate change can lead to lowered acceptance of the reality of climate change and lowered support for mitigation policies. This study experimentally explored the impact of misinformation about climate change and tested several pre-emptive interventions designed to reduce the influence of misinformation. We found that false-balance media coverage (giving contrarian views equal voice with climate scientists) lowered perceived consensus overall, although the effect was greater among free-market supporters. Likewise, misinformation that confuses people about the level of scientific agreement regarding anthropogenic global warming (AGW) had a polarizing effect, with free-market supporters reducing their acceptance of AGW and those with low free-market support increasing their acceptance of AGW. However, we found that inoculating messages that (1) explain the flawed argumentation technique used in the misinformation or that (2) highlight the scientific consensus on climate change were effective in neutralizing those adverse effects of misinformation. We recommend that climate communication messages should take into account ways in which scientific content can be distorted, and include pre-emptive inoculation messages.

  19. Fermentation parameters, quality and losses in sugarcane silages treated with chemical additives and a bacterial inoculant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André de Faria Pedroso

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this trial was to evaluate chemical additives and a bacterial inoculant on the inhibition of alcoholic fermentation and reduction of losses in sugarcane silages. Treatments were (doses on a fresh forage basis: without additive (control; urea (10 g/kg; urea (5 g/kg + sodium benzoate (0.5 g/kg; sodium benzoate (1 g/kg; urea + ammonium sulfate in a 9:1 relation (10 g/kg; Lactobacillus buchneri (5 × 10(4 cfu/g. Silages were produced in 10.16- × 30-cm PVC tubes, provided with tight lids adapted with Bunsen valves for gas losses quantification. Minisilos were opened 139 days after ensiling. Ethanol content (227 g/kg dry matter - DM and total DM loss (30% were high in the control silage. All additives, except benzoate, decreased ethanol concentration in silages. Inoculation with L. buchneri increased acetic acid content in the silage, resulting in a 41% reduction in ethanol content and the lowest gas loss among treatments (15.2%. There was synergistic effect between additives for the combined use of urea and benzoate. Silage treated with urea + ammonium sulfate has higher content of total digestible nutrients than the silage treated with urea exclusively.

  20. Protection and consolidation of stone heritage by self-inoculation with indigenous carbonatogenic bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; Elert, Kerstin; Martín-Sánchez, Inés; González-Muñoz, María Teresa; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos

    2017-08-17

    Enhanced salt weathering resulting from global warming and increasing environmental pollution is endangering the survival of stone monuments and artworks. To mitigate the effects of these deleterious processes, numerous conservation treatments have been applied that, however, show limited efficacy. Here we present a novel, environmentally friendly, bacterial self-inoculation approach for the conservation of stone, based on the isolation of an indigenous community of carbonatogenic bacteria from salt damaged stone, followed by their culture and re-application back onto the same stone. This method results in an effective consolidation and protection due to the formation of an abundant and exceptionally strong hybrid cement consisting of nanostructured bacterial CaCO 3 and bacterially derived organics, and the passivating effect of bacterial exopolymeric substances (EPS) covering the substrate. The fact that the isolated and identified bacterial community is common to many stone artworks may enable worldwide application of this novel conservation methodology.Salt weathering enhanced by global warming and environmental pollution is increasingly threatening stone monuments and artworks. Here, the authors present a bacterial self-inoculation approach with indigenous carbonatogenic bacteria and find that this technique consolidates and protects salt damaged stone.

  1. Enhancement of wood waste decomposition by microbial inoculation prior to vermicomposting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Shweta

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of microbial pre-decomposition of timber wastes to quality production of vermicompost with higher agronomic value, timber wastes were inoculated with different combinations of the fungi Phanerochete chrysosporium, Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger and the bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum (MTCC 3853) and Bacillus cereus (MTCC 4079) and incubated at 28-30 °C in a mechanical composter. The inoculation enhanced the degradation of timber wastes, increased total nitrogen and improved the quality and enhanced production of vermicompost generated with the native earthworm Drawida willsi Michelsen. Total nitrogen increased from 0.16% to 1.52% and total organic carbon (TOC) decreased from 42% to 13%. Out of 10 microbial combinations tested for pre-decomposition, the combination of P. chrysosporium+T. reesei was found best in terms of ligno-cellulosic decomposition, and P. chrysosporium+A. niger+B. cereus with respect of cast output. The study shows that microbial pre-decomposition of timber wastes to produce quality vermicompost is a feasible technology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into raw tomatoes and processed tomato products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, L R; Brackett, R E

    1991-01-01

    Rates of death and growth of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto raw whole and into chopped tomatoes stored at 10 and 21 degrees C were not influenced by prior treatment of tomatoes with chlorine or packaging under an atmosphere of 3% O2 and 97% N2. Growth of the pathogen occurred in whole tomatoes held at 21 degrees C but not at 10 degrees C, while death occurred in chopped tomatoes stored at these temperatures. Likewise, growth patterns of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms, psychrotrophic microorganisms, and yeasts and molds on whole and chopped tomatoes were essentially unaffected by chlorine and modified atmosphere packaging treatments. Populations of L. monocytogenes inoculated into commercially processed tomato juice and sauce and held at 5 degrees C remained constant for 14 days. A gradual decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes cells was observed in juice and sauce held at 21 degrees C. In contrast, the organism died rapidly when suspended in commercial tomato ketchup at 5 and 21 degrees C. Unlike low-acid raw salad vegetables such as lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and cauliflower on which we have observed L. monocytogenes grow at refrigeration temperatures, tomatoes are not a good growth substrate for the organism. Nevertheless, L. monocytogens can remain viable on raw whole and chopped tomatoes and in commercial tomato juice and sauce for periods extending beyond their normal shelf-life expectancy. PMID:1906697

  3. Effects of enzyme-inoculant systems on preservation and nutritive value of haycrop and corn silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Stokes, M R; Wallace, C R

    1994-02-01

    Third-crop mixed grass-legume forage and corn were ensiled in 70-tonne bunker silos to evaluate the effects of a commercial carbohydrase enzyme-inoculant mixture (220 ml/tonne) and an experimental enzyme-inoculant mixture (264 ml/tonne) on silage fermentation and composition, ruminal degradation, and milk production. Twelve Jersey and 24 Holstein early lactation cows were fed one of four TMR at 32.5:32.5:35.0 haycrop silage:corn silage:concentrate (DM basis) containing a combination of treated and untreated silages from d 2 to 100 of lactation. Bunker silages were incubated twice in situ in fistulated cows in each dietary treatment to determine rates of DM and NDF degradation. Treatment of haycrop silage significantly reduced silage pH and acetic acid concentration and increased titratable acidity, lactic acid concentration, lactate: acetate ratio, and DM and NDF disappearances after 24 h of ruminal incubation. Treated haycrop silage increased DMI:BW ratio and daily production of milk, milk protein, and SNF of early lactation cows. Application of the experimental mixture to corn silage did not change silage fermentation or composition, except that the concentration of NH3 was reduced. Enxyme-treated corn silage did not improve DMI and slightly reduced daily milk production in early lactation cows.

  4. Dynamic Transcription profiles of Qinguan apple (Malus × domestica leaves in response to Marssonina coronaria inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junke eZhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Marssonina apple blotch, caused by the fungus Marssonina coronaria, is one of the most destructive apple diseases in China and East Asia. A better understanding of the plant’s response to fungi during pathogenesis is urgently needed to improve plant resistance and to breed resistant cultivars. To address this, the transcriptomes of ‘Qinguan’ (a cultivar with high resistance to M. coronaria apple leaves were sequenced at 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours post-inoculation (hpi with Marssonina coronaria. The comparative results showed that a total of 1956 genes were differentially expressed between the inoculated and control samples at the 4 time points. Gene ontology (GO term enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs revealed changes in cellular component, secondary metabolism including chalcone isomerase activity, phytoalexin biosynthetic process, anthocyanin-containing compound biosynthetic process, lignin biosynthetic process, positive regulation of flavonoid biosynthetic process; and molecular functions or biological processes related to the defense response, biotic stimulus response, wounding response and fungus response. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis showed that DEGs were significantly enriched in flavonoid biosynthesis, vitamin B6 metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and the stilbenoid, diarylheptanoid and gingerol biosynthesis pathways. Furthermore, the importance of changes in cellular components and partial polyphenol compounds when encountering M. coronaria are discussed.

  5. Microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants in lead contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattai, Graziella S.; Pereira, Sônia V.; Costa, Cynthia M. C.; Lima, Cláudia E. P.; Maia, Leonor C.

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants (Caesalpinia ferrea, Mimosa tenuiflora and Erythrina velutina) in lead contaminated soil from the semi-arid region of northeastern of Brazil (Belo Jardim, Pernambuco). Dilutions were prepared by adding lead contaminated soil (270 mg Kg-1) to uncontaminated soil (37 mg Pb Kg soil-1) in the proportions of 7.5%, 15%, and 30% (v:v). The increase of lead contamination in the soil negatively influenced the amount of carbon in the microbial biomass of the samples from both the dry and rainy seasons and the metabolic quotient only differed between the collection seasons in the 30% contaminated soil. The average value of the acid phosphatase activity in the dry season was 2.3 times higher than observed during the rainy season. There was no significant difference in the number of glomerospores observed between soils and periods studied. The most probable number of infective propagules was reduced for both seasons due to the excess lead in soil. The mycorrhizal colonization rate was reduced for the three plant species assayed. The inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi benefited the growth of Erythrina velutina in lead contaminated soil. PMID:24031701

  6. DNA Vaccines: Protective Immunizations by Parenteral, Mucosal, and Gene-Gun Inoculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynan, Ellen F.; Webster, Robert G.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Haynes, Joel R.; Santoro, Joseph C.; Robinson, Harriet L.

    1993-12-01

    Plasmid DNAs expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin glycoproteins have been tested for their ability to raise protective immunity against lethal influenza challenges of the same subtype. In trials using two inoculations of from 50 to 300 μg of purified DNA in saline, 67-95% of test mice and 25-63% of test chickens have been protected against a lethal influenza challenge. Parenteral routes of inoculation that achieved good protection included intramuscular and intravenous injections. Successful mucosal routes of vaccination included DNA drops administered to the nares or trachea. By far the most efficient DNA immunizations were achieved by using a gene gun to deliver DNA-coated gold beads to the epidermis. In mice, 95% protection was achieved by two immunizations with beads loaded with as little as 0.4 μg of DNA. The breadth of routes supporting successful DNA immunizations, coupled with the very small amounts of DNA required for gene-gun immunizations, highlight the potential of this remarkably simple technique for the development of subunit vaccines.

  7. Combined endophytic inoculants enhance nickel phytoextraction from serpentine soil in the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eVisioli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the effects of specific bacterial endophytes on the phytoextraction capacity of the Ni-hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens, spontaneously growing in a serpentine soil environment. Five metal-tolerant endophytes had already been selected for their high Ni tolerance (6 mM and plant growth promoting ability. Here we demonstrate that individual bacterial inoculation is ineffective in enhancing Ni translocation and growth of N. caerulescens in serpentine soil, except for specific strains Ncr-1 and Ncr-8, belonging to the Arthrobacter and Microbacterium genera, which showed the highest IAA production and ACC-deaminase activity. Ncr-1 and Ncr-8 co-inoculation was even more efficient in promoting plant growth, soil Ni removal and translocation of Ni, together with that of Fe, Co and Cu. Bacteria of both strains densely colonised the root surfaces and intercellular spaces of leaf epidermal tissue. These two bacterial strains also turned out to stimulate root length, shoot biomass and Ni uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in MS agar medium supplemented with Ni. It is concluded that adaptation of N. caerulescens in highly Ni-contaminated serpentine soil can be enhanced by an integrated community of bacterial endophytes rather than by single strains; of the former, Arthrobacter and Microbacterium may be useful candidates for future phytoremediation trials

  8. Protective action of camel milk in mice inoculated with Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Roberto R De Almeida; Ponte, Marina; Leite, Vanuza

    2013-01-01

    In some countries people believe that camel milk can protect against various aggressors, whether due to infections, diabetes, or even autism. Little has been scientifically demonstrated regarding the veracity of these beliefs. To study the anti-infectious action of camel milk. Fifty mice were divided into 5 groups of 10 animals each: 3 control groups and 2 test groups. Except for one of the control groups, all groups were intraperitoneally inoculated with a strain of Salmonella enterica. The rations in the test groups were supplemented with camel milk or cow milk. A statistically significant survival was observed in the mice supplemented with camel milk. The death rate after Salmonella inoculation was only 40% in the study group, as compared to 100% in the control groups where the mice were not protected, and 80% in the group supplemented with cow milk and injected with Salmonella. Camel milk is an excellent nutrient and because of its specific properties, particularly its anti-infectious action, should be used to replace other milks.

  9. Influence of red wine fermentation oenological additives on inoculated strain implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Filomena L; Alves, Ana Claudia; Alemão, Maria Filomena; Baleiras-Couto, M Margarida

    2013-06-01

    Pure selected cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae starters are regularly used in the wine industry. A survey of S. cerevisiae populations during red wine fermentations was performed in order to evaluate the influence of oenological additives on the implantation of the inoculated strain. Pilot scale fermentations (500 L) were conducted with active dry yeast (ADY) and other commercial oenological additives, namely two commercial fermentation activators and two commercial tannins. Six microsatellite markers were used to type S. cerevisiae strains. The methodology proved to be very discriminating as a great diversity of wild strains (48 genotypes) was detected. Statistical analysis confirmed a high detection of the inoculated commercial strain, and for half the samples an effective implantation of ADY (over 80 %) was achieved. At late fermentation time, ADY strain implantation in fermentations conducted with commercial additives was lower than in the control. These results question the efficacy of ADY addition in the presence of other additives, indicating that further studies are needed to improve knowledge on oenological additives' use.

  10. Inoculation of tannin-degrading bacteria into novel hosts increases performance on tannin-rich diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Kevin D; Stengel, Ashley; Dearing, M Denise

    2016-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that herbivores host tannin-degrading bacteria (TDB) to overcome the toxic challenges posed by plant tannins. While TDB have been isolated from the guts of numerous mammals, their functional significance to their hosts has never been explicitly tested. We introduced TDB into lab rats, which do not host TDB, and measured host performance on tannin-rich diets. We first isolated three species of TDB, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis, from the guts of the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida), which regularly feeds on tannin-rich plants. Then, we inoculated isolated TDB, as well as full woodrat microbial communities into laboratory rats. A control group was inoculated with sterilized woodrat faeces. Recipient lab rats were fed increasing concentrations of tannic acid, and we monitored tannic acid intake, body mass and liver damage as measured by serum alanine aminotransferase activity. Lab rats given TDB as isolates or full communities exhibited increased tannic acid intake, higher maintenance of body mass and lower indicators of liver damage compared with control animals. These differences were maintained when the trial was repeated after 6 weeks of feeding on tannin-free diets. Our results are the first to demonstrate that TDB significantly increase host performance on tannin-rich diets. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Comparative response of six grapevine rootstocks to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi based on root traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogiatzis, Antreas; Bowen, Pat; Hart, Miranda; Holland, Taylor; Klironomos, John

    2017-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has been proven to be essential in grapevines, sustaining plant growth especially under abiotic and biotic stressors. The mycorrhizal growth response of young grapevines varies among rootstock cultivars and the underlying mechanisms involved in this variation are unknown. We predicted that this variation in mycorrhizal response may be explained by differences in root traits among rootstocks. We analyzed the entire root system of six greenhouse-grown rootstocks (Salt Creek, 3309 Couderc, Riparia Gloire, 101-14 Millardet et de Grasset, Swarzmann, Teleki 5C), with and without AM fungal inoculation (Rhizophagus irregularis) and characterized their morphological and architectural responses. Twenty weeks after the inoculation, aboveground growth was enhanced by AM colonization. The rootstock varieties were distinctly different in their response to AM fungi, with Salt Creek receiving the highest growth benefit, while Schwarzmann and 5C Teleki receiving the lowest. Plant responsiveness to AM fungi was negatively correlated with branching intensity (fine roots per root length). Furthermore, there was evidence that mycorrhizas can influence the expression of root traits, inducing a higher branching intensity and a lower root to shoot ratio. The results of this study will help to elucidate how interactions between grapevine rootstocks and AM fungi may benefit the establishment of new vineyards.

  12. Dynamic transcription profiles of "Qinguan" apple (Malus × domestica) leaves in response to Marssonina coronaria inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Miaomiao; Jiao, Peng; Tao, Hongxia; Wei, Ningning; Ma, Fengwang; Zhang, Junke

    2015-01-01

    Marssonina apple blotch, caused by the fungus Marssonina coronaria, is one of the most destructive apple diseases in China and East Asia. A better understanding of the plant's response to fungi during pathogenesis is urgently needed to improve plant resistance and to breed resistant cultivars. To address this, the transcriptomes of "Qinguan" (a cultivar with high resistance to M. coronaria) apple leaves were sequenced at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post-inoculation (hpi) with Marssonina coronaria. The comparative results showed that a total of 1956 genes were differentially expressed between the inoculated and control samples at the 4 time points. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed changes in cellular component, secondary metabolism including chalcone isomerase activity, phytoalexin biosynthetic process, anthocyanin-containing compound biosynthetic process, lignin biosynthetic process, positive regulation of flavonoid biosynthetic process; and molecular functions or biological processes related to the defense response, biotic stimulus response, wounding response and fungus response. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that DEGs were significantly enriched in flavonoid biosynthesis, vitamin B6 metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and the stilbenoid, diarylheptanoid and gingerol biosynthesis pathways. Furthermore, the importance of changes in cellular components and partial polyphenol compounds when encountering M. coronaria are discussed.

  13. Secondary Solidification Behavior of A356 Aluminum Alloy Prepared by the Self-Inoculation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Semisolid slurry of A356 aluminum alloy was prepared by Self-Inoculation Method, and the secondary solidification behavior during rheo-diecasting forming process was researched. The results indicate that the component with non-dendritic and uniformly distributed microstructures can be produced by Rheo-Diecasting (RDC process (combining Self-inoculation Method (SIM with High Pressure Die Casting (HPDC. The isothermal holding time of the slurry has large effect on primary particles, but has little effect on secondary particles. Growth rate of the primary particles in the isothermal holding process conforms to the dynamic equation of Dt3 − D03 = Kt. The suitable holding time for rheo-diecasting of A356 aluminum alloy is 3 min. During filling process, the nucleation occurs throughout the entire remaining liquid, and nuclei grow stably into globular particles with the limited grain size of 6.5μm firstly, then both α1 and α2 particles appear unstable growth phenomenon due to the existence of constitutional undercooling. The average particle sizes and shape factors of both α1 and α2 are decreasing with the increase of filling distance due to different cooling rate in different positions. The growth rate of the eutectic in RDC is 4 times faster than HPDC, which is mainly due to the limitation of α2 particles in RDC process. The average eutectic spacings are decreasing with the increase of filling distance.

  14. Experimental inoculation study indicates swine as a potential host for Hendra virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyi; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Weingartl, Hana M.

    2010-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic virus from the family Paramyxoviridae causing fatal disease in humans and horses. Five-week-old Landrace pigs and 5-month-old Gottingen minipigs were inoculated with approximately 107 plaque forming units per animal. In addition to fever and depression exhibited in all infected pigs, one of the two Landrace pigs developed respiratory signs at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi) and one of the Gottingen minipigs developed respiratory signs at 5 dpi and mild neurological signs at 7 dpi. Virus was detected in all infected pigs at 2–5 dpi from oral, nasal, and rectal swabs and at 3–5 dpi from ocular swabs by real-time RT-PCR targeting the HeV M gene. Virus titers in nasal swab samples were as high as 104.6 TCID50/mL. The viral RNA was mainly distributed in tissues from respiratory and lymphoid systems at an early stage of infection and the presence of virus was confirmed by virus isolation. Pathological changes and immunohistochemical staining for viral antigen were consistent with the tissue distribution of the virus. This new finding indicates that pigs are susceptible to HeV infections and could potentially play a role as an intermediate host in transmission to humans. PMID:20167195

  15. SABIA (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth. SEEDLINGS GROWTH AND SURVIVAL INOCULATED WITH SYMBIOTIC MICROORGANISMS IN FIELD CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Malta Cavalcante Mendes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/198050989277Sabia (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth. has ecological characteristics and symbiotic associations with nitrogen fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. These associations are used as biological tool that could be used as an able alternative to minimize chemical fertilizer use and benefit plant development at environments under nutritional deficit. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth of Leguminosae Sabia (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth. like response to rhizobium and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation, to establish growth curves to height and stem based diameter, to determine the N and F contents in plants aerial parts and to evaluate plants survival at field. The strain used was BR3405, The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi used was Glomus clarum and Gigaspora margarita. The Glomus clarum + Gigaspora margarita + BR3405 and Gigaspora margarita inoculation provided better values for the studied variables (height, diameter, N and P , and this last one was the best choice to Sabia plantation. The plants showed 100% survival, regardless the treatment ued. There was not significant statistical difference for N and F content in Sabia aerial part., Nevertheless, it was noticed a faster growth in plants with symbiont.

  16. Improved Neural Regeneration with Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Inoculated PLGA Scaffolds in Spinal Cord Injury Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changxing Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Every year, around the world, between 250000 and 500000 people suffer from spinal cord injury (SCI. This study investigated the potential for poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA complex inoculated with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs to treat spinal cord injury in a rat model. Methods: OECs were identified by immunofluorescence based on the nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR p75. The Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB score, together with an inclined plane (IP test were used to detect functional recovery. Nissl staining along with the luxol fast blue (LFB staining were independently employed to illustrate morphological alterations. More so, immunofluorescence labeling of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and the microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2, representing astrocytes and neurons respectively, were investigated at time points of weeks 2 and 8 post-operation. Results: The findings showed enhanced locomotor recovery, axon myelination and better protected neurons post SCI when compared with either PLGA or untreated groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: PLGA complexes inoculated with OECs improve locomotor functional recovery in transected spinal cord injured rat models, which is most likely due to the fact it is conducive to a relatively benevolent microenvironment, has nerve protective effects, as well as the ability to enhance remyelination, via a promotion of cell differentiation and inhibition of astrocyte formation.

  17. Responses of Guava Plants to Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Soil Infested with Meloidogyne enterolobii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Maryluce Albuquerque da Silva; da Silva, Fábio Sérgio Barbosa; Yano-Melo, Adriana Mayumi; de Melo, Natoniel Franklin; Pedrosa, Elvira Maria Régis; Maia, Leonor Costa

    2013-01-01

    In the Northeast of Brazil, expansion of guava crops has been impaired by Meloidogyne enterolobii that causes root galls, leaf fall and plant death. Considering the fact that arbuscular mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) improve plant growth giving protection against damages by plant pathogens, this work was carried out to select AMF efficient to increase production of guava seedlings and their tolerance to M. enterolobii. Seedlings of guava were inoculated with 200 spores of Gigaspora albida, Glomus etunicatum or Acaulospora longula and 55 days later with 4,000 eggs of M. enterolobii. The interactions between the AMF and M. enterolobii were assessed by measuring leaf number, aerial dry biomass, CO2 evolution and arbuscular and total mycorrhizal colonization. In general, plant growth was improved by the treatments with A. longula or with G. albida. The presence of the nematode decreased arbuscular colonization and increased general enzymatic activity. Higher dehydrogenase activity occurred with the A. longula treatment and CO2 evolution was higher in the control with the nematode. More spores and higher production of glomalin-related soil proteins were observed in the treatment with G. albida. The numbers of galls, egg masses and eggs were reduced in the presence of A. longula. Inoculation with this fungus benefitted plant growth and decreased nematode reproduction. PMID:25288951

  18. Peroxidase Activity in Poplar Inoculated with Compatible and Incompetent Isolates of Paxillus involutus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDUL GAFUR

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase activity of the hybrid poplar Populus x canescens (Ait. Sm. (= P. tremula L. x P. alba L. inoculated with compatible and incompetent isolates of Paxillus involutus (Batsch Fr. was investigated. Screening of the ectomycorrhizal fungal isolates was initiated with exploration of mycelial growth characteristics and mycorrhizal ability in vitro with poplar. Both traits varied within the fungus although they did not seem to be genetically correlated. While isolates SCO1, NAU, and 031 grew faster than others, only isolates MAJ, SCO1, and 031 were able to form ectomycorrhiza with poplar. Isolates MAJ (compatible and NAU (incompetent were subsequently selected for further experiments. Activity of peroxidase, one of the defense-related enzymes, was examined in pure culture and short root components of compatible and incompetent interactions between poplar and P. involutus. Peroxidase activities increased significantly in poplar inoculated with incompetent isolate of the fungus compared to control, while induction of the same enzyme was not detected in compatible associations.

  19. Analysis of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) response to Verticillium dahliae inoculation by transcriptome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, B X; Zhao, Y L; Chen, W; Wang, H M; Guo, Z J; Gong, H Y; Sang, X H; Cui, Y L; Wang, C H

    2015-10-27

    Verticillium wilt is one of the main diseases in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), severely reduces yield and fiber quality, and is difficult to be con-trolled effectively. At present, the molecular mechanism that confers resistance to this disease is unclear. Transcriptome sequencing is an important method to detect resistance genes, explore metabolic pathways, and study resistance mechanisms. In this study, the transcriptome of a disease-resistant inbred cot-ton line inoculated with Verticillium dahliae was sequenced. A total of 126,402 unigenes were obtained using de novo assembly and data analysis, 99,712 (78.88%) of which were annotated into the Nr, Nt, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, and GO databases. The expression patterns of 16 candidate disease-resis-tance genes showed that some genes were upregulated soon after V. dahliae inoculation and others were upregulated later, which may indicate instanta-neous basal defense and lagged specific defense, respectively. We conducted a preliminary analysis of the transcriptome database, which will contribute to further research regarding the cloning of disease-resistance genes.

  20. Application of gamma irradiation for inactivation of three pathogenic bacteria inoculated into meatballs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumus, Tuncay [Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Namik Kemal University, 59030 Tekirdag (Turkey)], E-mail: tgumus@nku.edu.tr; Sukru Demirci, A.; Murat Velioglu, H.; Velioglu, Serap D.; Yilmaz, Ismail [Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Namik Kemal University, 59030 Tekirdag (Turkey); Sagdic, Osman [Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Erciyes University, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    In this research, the effect of gamma irradiation on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 33150), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 2392) and Salmonella typhimurium (NRRL 4463) inoculated into Tekirdag meatballs was investigated. The meatball samples were inoculated with pathogens and irradiated at the absorbed doses of 1, 2.2, 3.2, 4.5 and 5.2 kGy. E. coli O157:H7 count in 1 kGy irradiated meatballs stored in the refrigerator for 7 days was detected to be 4 log cfu/g lower than the count in nonirradiated samples (p<0.05). S. aureus counts were decreased to 4 log cfu/g after being exposed to irradiation at a dose of 1 kGy. Although it was ineffective on elimination of S. typhimurium, irradiation at a dose of 3.2 kGy reduced E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus counts under detectable values in the meatballs. However, none of the test organisms were detected in the samples after irradiation with 4.5 kGy doses.

  1. Gamma radiation in the reduction of Salmonella spp. inoculated on minimally processed watercress (Nasturtium officinalis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, C.G.; Behrens, J.H.; Destro, M.T.; Franco, B.D.G.M.; Vizeu, D.M.; Hutzler, B.; Landgraf, M. E-mail: landgraf@usp.br

    2004-10-01

    Consumer attitudes towards foods have changed in the last two decades increasing requirements for freshlike products. Consequently, less extreme treatments or additives are being required. Minimally processed foods have freshlike characteristics and satisfy this new consumer demand. Besides freshness, the minimally processing also provide convenience required by the market. Salad vegetables can be source of pathogen such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella spp. The minimal processing does not reduce the levels of pathogenic microorganisms to safe levels. Therefore, this study was carried out in order to improve the microbiological safety and the shelf-life of minimally processed vegetables using gamma radiation. Minimally processed watercress inoculated with a cocktail of Salmonella spp was exposed to 0.0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.2 and 1.5 kGy. Irradiated samples were diluted 1:10 in saline peptone water and plated onto tryptic soy agar that were incubated at 37 deg. C/24 h. D{sub 10} values for Salmonella spp. inoculated in watercress varied from 0.29 to 0.43 kGy. Therefore, a dose of 1.7 kGy will reduce Salmonella population in watercress by 4 log{sub 10}. The shelf-life was increased by 1 1/2 day when the product was exposed to 1 kGy.

  2. Effects of {gamma}-radiation on the fungus Alternaria alternata in artificially inoculated cereal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braghini, R. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas II, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 1374, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: raquelbraghini@yahoo.com.br; Pozzi, C.R. [Instituto de Zootecnia, Rua Heitor Penteado 56, CEP 13460-000, Nova Odessa, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Aquino, S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 355 , CEP 01246-902, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rocha, L.O.; Correa, B. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas II, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 1374, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different {gamma}-radiation doses on the growth of Alternaria alternata in artificially inoculated cereal samples. Seeds and grains were divided into four groups: Control Group (not irradiated), and Groups 1, 2 and 3, inoculated with an A. alternata spore suspension (1x10{sup 6} spores/mL) and exposed to 2, 5 and 10 kGy, respectively. Serial dilutions of the samples were prepared and seeded on DRBC (dichloran rose bengal chloramphenicol agar) and DCMA (dichloran chloramphenicol malt extract agar) media, after which the number of colony-forming units per gram was determined in each group. In addition, fungal morphology after irradiation was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that ionizing radiation at a dose of 5 kGy was effective in reducing the growth of A. alternata. However, a dose of 10 kGy was necessary to inhibit fungal growth completely. SEM made it possible to visualize structural alterations induced by the different {gamma}-radiation doses used.

  3. Influence of inoculation route on the course of infection of Trichomonas gallinae in nonimmune pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocan, R.M.

    1971-01-01

    The Jones' Barn strain of Trichomonas gallinae was given to nonimmune pigeons by five different routes: (I) oral; (2) pulmonary; (3) intravenous; (4) intramuscular; (5) subcutaneous. The birds infected by the oral and pulmonarv routes succumbed to typical trichomoniasis involving the liver and lungs respectively. The pulmonary route also produced air sac lesions resulting from trichomonads passing through the lungs via the mesobronchi. Intramuscular and subcutaneous introduction of the parasite resulted in transient infections involving small lesions which were resorbed in I to 2 weeks. The intravenous introductions resulted only in large lesions at the site of inoculation, presumably from perivascular leakage at the time of parasite entry. No other internal lesions were found and cultures made from liver and lung tissue were negative for T. gallinae. The results of infection by the oral and pulmonary routes were not surprising, since these are essentially normal routes of infection. The inhibition of parasite development at the intramuscular and subcutaneous sites of parasite introduction may have resulted from inhibition of the mobility of the parasite by connective tissue or these substrates may have been unsuitable for parasite development. The results of intravenous inoculation are surprising, since it has been stated that T. gallinae reaches the viscera via the circulation. If this were true, lesions should have occurred at least in the lungs where the parasites would have lodged following introduction into a vein. Recovery from infection at any site is apparently sufficient to produce an immunity to the parasite when subsequently introduced via the oral route.

  4. Growth and nutrition of eucalyptus clones seedlings inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Sousa Lima

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus is one of the most planted forest species, in Brazil, due to its rapid growth and high economic yield. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve the seedlings nutritional and phytosanitary status, besides increasing their resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species on the growth and nutrition of different eucalyptus clones seedlings. The experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions, in a randomized blocks design and a 5x5 factorial scheme (five fungal species and five eucalyptus clones, with five replications. In general, the mycorrhizal symbiosis significantly increased the growth and nutrition of eucalyptus seedlings, when compared to the non-inoculated seedlings. The most efficient interaction occured between the 2361 clone and the Entrophospora infrequens fungus, with increases of 107.3% and 120.6%, for the shoot and root dry biomass yield, and 107.7%, 94.1% and 103.3%, respectively for the accumulation of N, P and K in the seedlings shoots. All the fungal species studied showed a high absolute compatibility index with eucalyptus clones. The Glomus manihots and E. infrequens fungi presented a higher functional compatibility index with the clones tested. The 5204 clone showed 75% of compatibility with the fungi evaluated.

  5. Improvement of hydrogen fermentation of galactose by combined inoculation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Anburajan, Parthiban; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Arivalagan, Pugazhendhi; Bakonyi, Péter; Kim, Sang-Hyoun

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of anaerobic hydrogen fermentation of galactose, a red algal biomass sugar, using individual and combined mixed culture inocula. Heat-treated (90°C, 30 min) samples of granular sludge (GS) and suspended digester sludge (SDS) were used as inoculum sources. The type of mixed culture inoculum played an important role in hydrogen production from galactose. Between two inocula, granular sludge showed higher hydrogen production rate (HPR) and hydrogen yield (HY) of 2.2 L H2/L-d and 1.09 mol H2/mol galactoseadded, respectively. Combined inoculation (GS + SDS) led to an elevated HPR and HY of 3.1 L H2/L-d and 1.28 mol H2/mol galactoseadded, respectively. Acetic and butyric acids are the major organic acids during fermentation. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed that the mixed culture generated using the combined inoculation contained a higher cluster I Clostridium abundance than the culture produced using the single inoculum. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Polyomavirus-induced pilomatricomas in mice: from viral inoculation to tumour development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Símula, Silvina; Ozuna, Paola Villán; Otero, Javier; Casas, José; Sanjuan, Norberto

    2012-05-01

    Polyomavirus has been used extensively to study tumour induction in mice. Although most neoplasms are well characterized, those arising from hair follicles have been referred to by different names during the last four decades. The purpose of this research was to contribute to a more accurate histological characterization of these tumours as well as to study the viral progression from the onset of infection to the development of neoplasms. Polyomavirus A2 was inoculated into newborn C3H/BiDa mice, and at different time-points (from 5 to 70 days post-inoculation) the mice were sacrificed and studied using histological, immunocytochemical, ultrastructural and virological methods. The fully developed hair follicle tumours consisted of a proliferation of matrix cells that evolved into 'shadow' cells with empty nuclei and finally into amorphous keratin; the tumours were therefore diagnosed as pilomatricomas. Viral VP-1 was observed only in fully differentiated cells and not in proliferating-cell-nuclear-antigen (PCNA)-positive cells in the same tumour. In conclusion, Polyomavirus first replicated in the skin, and then disseminated through the blood and reached the outer sheath of the hair follicles and finally infected matrix cells, leading to the development of pilomatricomas from which infectious virus was isolated. © 2011 The Authors. APMIS © 2011 APMIS.

  7. Genome sequence of the Medicago-nodulating Ensifer meliloti commercial inoculant strain RRI128

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wayne; Ballard, Ross; Drew, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Tatiparthi, Reddy; Chen, Amy; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Ensifer meliloti strain RRI128 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod. RRI128 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) grown in the greenhouse and inoculated with soil collected from Victoria, Australia. The strain is used in commercial inoculants in Australia. RRI128 nodulates and forms an effective symbiosis with a diverse range of lucerne cultivars (Medicago sativa) and several species of annual medic (M. truncatula, Medicago littoralis and Medicago tornata), but forms an ineffective symbiosis with Medicago polymorpha. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti strain RRI128, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 6,900,273 bp draft genome is arranged into 156 scaffolds of 157 contigs, contains 6,683 protein-coding genes and 87 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197447

  8. Responses of Guava Plants to Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Soil Infested with Meloidogyne enterolobii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryluce Albuquerque da Silva Campos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Northeast of Brazil, expansion of guava crops has been impaired by Meloidogyne enterolobii that causes root galls, leaf fall and plant death. Considering the fact that arbuscular mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF improve plant growth giving protection against damages by plant pathogens, this work was carried out to select AMF efficient to increase production of guava seedlings and their tolerance to M. enterolobii. Seedlings of guava were inoculated with 200 spores of Gigaspora albida, Glomus etunicatum or Acaulospora longula and 55 days later with 4,000 eggs of M. enterolobii. The interactions between the AMF and M. enterolobii were assessed by measuring leaf number, aerial dry biomass, CO₂ evolution and arbuscular and total mycorrhizal colonization. In general, plant growth was improved by the treatments with A. longula or with G. albida. The presence of the nematode decreased arbuscular colonization and increased general enzymatic activity. Higher dehydrogenase activity occurred with the A. longula treatment and CO₂ evolution was higher in the control with the nematode. More spores and higher production of glomalin-related soil proteins were observed in the treatment with G. albida. The numbers of galls, egg masses and eggs were reduced in the presence of A. longula. Inoculation with this fungus benefitted plant growth and decreased nematode reproduction.

  9. Indigenous and inoculated yeast fermentation of gabiroba (Campomanesia pubescens) pulp for fruit wine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Whasley Ferreira; Dias, Disney Ribeiro; de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinicius; Gervásio, Ivani Maria; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2009-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the potential of gabiroba Campomanesia pubescens (DC) O. Berg in the production of a beverage fermented using selected and wild yeasts from indigenous fermentation, analyze the volatile compounds profile present during the process of fermentation, and evaluate the sensory quality of the final beverage produced. Throughout the process of fermentation, when Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA CA 1162 was inoculated, there were stable viable populations around 9 log cells ml(-1). During indigenous fermentation, yeast population increased from 3.7 log CFU ml(-1) to 8.1 log CFU ml(-1) after 14 days. The diversity and dynamics of the yeast population during indigenous fermentation observed by PFGE analysis showed five different karyotyping profiles in the first days of fermentation. After the seventh day, there was a higher frequency of a similar S. cerevisiae profile. The yeast non-Saccharomyces were identified by sequencing of the ITS region as Candida quercitrusa and Issatchenkia terricola. Inoculated fermentations yielded a higher amount of alcohol than indigenous ones, indicating the efficiency of selected strains. There was also a greater concentration of higher alcohols, which are usually responsible for the flavor found in alcoholic beverages. Based on the characteristics of the pulp and acceptance in the sensory analysis, gabiroba fruits showed good potential for use in the production of fermented beverage.

  10. Enhancement of clover growth by inoculation of P-solubilizing fungi and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchie, Edson L; Azcón, Rosario; Barea, Jose M; Silva, Eliane M R; Saggin-Júnior, Orivaldo J

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the synergism between several P-solubilizing fungi isolates and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to improve clover ( Trifolium pratense) growth in the presence of Araxá apatite. Clover was sown directly in plastic pots with 300g of sterilized washed sand, vermiculite and sepiolite 1:1:1 (v:v:v) as substrate, and grown in a controlled environment chamber. The substrate was fertilized with 3 g L(-1) of Araxá apatite. A completely randomized design, in 8×2 factorial scheme (eight P-solubilizing fungi treatments with or without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi)and four replicates were used. The P-solubilizing fungi treatments consisted of five Brazilian P-solubilizing fungi isolates (PSF 7, 9, 20, 21 and 22), two Spanish isolates ( Aspergillus niger and the yeast Yarowia lipolytica) and control (non-inoculated treatment). The greatest clover growth rate was recorded when Aspergillus niger and PSF 21 were co-inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Aspergillus niger, PSF 7 and PSF 21 were the most effective isolates on increasing clover growth in the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Greater mycorrhizal colonization resulted in greater clover growth rate in most PSF treatments. PSF 7 was the best isolate to improve the establishment of mycorrhizal and rhizobia symbiosis.

  11. Development of a new lactic acid bacterial inoculant for fresh rice straw silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Geun Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Effects of newly isolated Lactobacillus plantarum on the fermentation and chemical composition of fresh rice straw silage was evaluated in this study. Methods Lactic acid bacteria (LAB from good crop silage were screened by growing them in MRS broth and a minimal medium with low carbohydrate content. Selected LAB (LAB 1821 were Gram-positive, rods, catalase negative, and were identified to be Lactobacillus plantarum based on their biochemical characteristics and a 16S rRNA analysis. Fresh rice straw was ensiled with two isolated LAB (1821 and 1841, two commercial inoculants (HM/F and P1132 and no additive as a control. Results After 2 months of storage at ambient temperature, rice straw silages treated with additives were well-preserved, the pH values and butyric and acetic acid contents were lower, and the lactic acid content and lactic/acetic acid ratio were higher than those in the control (p0.05 effect on acid detergent fiber or neutral detergent fiber contents. Crude protein (CP content and in vitro DM digestibility (IVDMD increased after inoculation of LAB 1821 (p<0.05. Conclusion LAB 1821 increased the CP, IVDMD, lactic acid content and ratio of lactic acid to acetic acid in rice straw silage and decreased the pH, acetic acid, NH3-N, and butyric acid contents. Therefore, adding LAB 1821 improved the fermentation quality and feed value of rice straw silage.

  12. Organic waste vermicomposting through the addition of rock dust inoculated with domestic sewage wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Aline Sueli de Lima; Mesak, Carlos; Silva, Murilo Luiz Gomes; Silva, Geovanna Souza; Leandro, Wilson Mozena; Malafaia, Guilherme

    2017-07-01

    The aims of the present study are to assess the organic waste vermicomposting process (cattle manure mixed with tannery sludge) by using inorganic waste (rock dust) inoculated with treated domestic wastewater sewage, as well as the vermicompost application in Ruellia brittoniana seedling production. Different proportions of organic and inorganic waste moistened (or not) in wastewater were vermicomposted (by Eisenia foetida) for 120 days in the first stage of the experiment. Statistically significant earthworm density increase was observed between the 60th and 90th experimental vermicompositing days in all the assessed groups. There was decreased E. foetida population density after 90 days. The K, P, TOC, C/N ratio and Ca, Na and Mg concentrations significantly decreased at the end of the vermicompositing process in comparison to the initial concentrations identified in most treatments. On the other hand, there was pH and N, Fe, Zn and Mn concentration increase in most of the vermicomposts assessed at the end of the experiment. All plants grown in soil containing vermicomposts presented higher Dickson Quality Index (DQI) than the control group, which was cultivated in soil containing commercial topsoil. Plants grown in soil containing 100% cattle manure and tannery sludge, moistened in treated domestic wastewater sewage, showed the highest DQI. Thus, the vermicomposting waste used in the present study, which was inoculated with treated domestic wastewater sewage, is an interesting vermicompost production technology to be used in ornamental plant production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A rapid inoculation technique for assessing pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum and F. o. melonis on Cucurbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    A continuous-dip inoculation technique for rapid assessment of pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum and F. o. melonis was developed. The method, adapted from a similar procedure for determining pathogenicity of Colletotrichum magna (causal agent of anthracnose of cucurbits), involves constant exposure of seedlings and cuttings (seedlings with root systems excised) of watermelon and muskmelon to conidial suspensions contained in small scintillation vials. Disease development in intact seedlings corresponded well to disease responses observed with the standard root-dip inoculation/pot assay. The continuous-dip inoculation technique resulted in rapid disease development, with 50% of watermelon cuttings dying after 4–6 days of exposure to F. o. niveum. A mortality of 30% also was observed in watermelon cuttings exposed to conidia of F. o. melonis, as opposed to only a 0–2.5% mortality in seedlings with intact roots. Disease response was similar with muskmelon seedlings and cuttings continuously dip-inoculated with F. o. melonis isolates. However, no disease symptoms were observed in muskmelon seedlings or cuttings inoculated with F. o. niveum. Four nonpathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum did not cause disease symptoms in either watermelon or muskmelon cuttings and seedlings when assayed by this technique. The proposed method enables a rapid screening of pathogenicity and requires less time, labor, and greenhouse space than the standard root-dip inoculation/pot assay. The reliability of the continuous-dip inoculation technique is limited, however, to exposure of intact seedlings at a concentration of 1 × 106conidia per milliliter; the method is not accurate at this range for excised seedlings.

  14. Bacterial isolation with on-site inoculation of ascites fluid into hemoculture bottle in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenhirunyingyos, Sumittra; Dhiraputra, Chertsak; Leelarasamee, Amorn

    2004-05-01

    To compare the on-site bacterial inoculation of ascites fluid into hemoculture bottle with routine method in the patients who were preliminary diagnosed of SBP. A retrospective analysis of case records during January-December 2001. A total of 673 specimens from 325 patients were retrieved from the data records at the Department of Microbiology, Siriraj Hospital in 2001. The neutrocytic ascites were found in 163 specimens (94 patients). The routine method and on-site inoculation into the hemoculture bottle were employed in 107 and 56 specimens respectively. Culture-positive neutrocytic ascites was found in the routine method 16 (14.9%) specimens and in the on-site inoculation 26 (46.4%) specimens (p < 0.0001). Among these samples, the two methods were simultaneously performed in 42 specimens of which 18 paired specimens were eligible for analysis. Positive culture was found in 2 samples in which the routine method and in an additional 5 samples in which on-site inoculation into hemoculture bottle method. Using Kappa analysis (e score = 0.328, 95% CI = -0.172 to 0.829) that can be interpreted the on-site inoculation method had a higher yield than the routine technique. Moreover, 21 cases also had their blood and ascites samples simultaneously collected and cultured. 4 of ten (19%) and 5 of eleven (23.8%) cases were found in the routine and on-site and direct inoculation groups respectively. These finding suggested that the severity of infection in among two groups were similar and unlikely to be the cause of the difference of the positive isolation rate in both groups. The on-site and direct inoculation of ascites into hemoculture bottle method had a significantly higher isolation rate than routine method (i.e. 46.4% versus 14.9% p < 0.0001) either with separated or paired samples of ascites.

  15. Dose-response model of murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi: time post inoculation and host age dependency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamrakar Sushil B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rickettsia typhi (R. mooseri is the causative agent of murine typhus. It is one of the most widely distributed flea-borne diseases with a relatively mild febrile initial illness with six to 14 days of incubation period. The bacterium is gram negative and an obligate intracellular pathogen. The disease is transmitted to humans and vertebrate host through fleabites or via contact with infected feces. This paper develops dose-response models of different routes of exposure for typhus in rodents. Methods Data from published articles were analyzed using parametric dose-response relationship models. Dose-response relationships were fit to data using the method of maximum likelihood estimation (MLE. Results Dose-response models quantifying the effects of different ages of rats and time post inoculation in BALB/c mice were analyzed in the study. Both the adult rats (inoculated intradermally and newborn rats (inoculated subcutaneously were best fit by exponential models and both distributions could be described by a single dose-response relationship. The BALB/C mice inoculated subcutaneously were best fit by Beta-Poisson models. The time post inoculation analysis showed that there was a definite time and response relationship existed in this case. Conclusions Intradermally or subcutaneously inoculated rats (adult and newborn models suggest that less than 1 plaque-forming unit (PFU (1.33 to 0.38 in 95% confidence limits of the pathogen is enough to seroconvert 50% of the exposed population on average. For the BALB/c mouse time post inoculation model, an average dose of 0.28 plaque-forming units (PFU (0.75 to 0.11 in 95% confidence limits will seroconvert 50% of the exposed mice.

  16. Inoculation of hybrid poplar with the endophytic bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638 increases biomass but does not impact leaf level physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, A.; McDonald, K.; Muehlbauer, M. F.; Hoffman, A.; Koenig, K.; Newman, L.; Taghavi, S.; Van Der Lelie, D.

    2011-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria have been shown to provide several advantages to their host, including enhanced growth. Inoculating biofuel species with endophytic bacteria is therefore an attractive option to increase the productivity of biofuel feedstocks. Here, we investigated the effect of inoculating hard wood cuttings of Populus deltoides Bartr. x Populus. nigra L. clone OP367 with Enterobacter sp. 638. After 17 weeks, plants inoculated with Enterobacter sp. 638 had 55% greater total biomass than un-inoculated control plants. Study of gas exchange and fluorescence in developing and mature leaves over a diurnal cycle and over a 5 week measurement campaign revealed no effects of inoculation on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, photosynthetic water use efficiency or the maximum and operating efficiency of photosystem II. However, plants inoculated with Enterobacter sp. 638 had a canopy that was 39% larger than control plants indicating that the enhanced growth was fueled by increased leaf area, not by improved physiology. Leaf nitrogen content was determined at two stages over the 5 week measurement period. No effect of Enterobacter sp. 638 on leaf nitrogen content was found indicating that the larger plants were acquiring sufficient nitrogen. Enterobacter sp. 638 lacks the genes for N{sub 2} fixation, therefore the increased availability of nitrogen likely resulted from enhanced nitrogen acquisition by the 84% larger root system. These data show that Enterobacter sp. 638 has the potential to dramatically increase productivity in poplar. If fully realized in the production environment, these results indicate that an increase in the environmental and economic viability of poplar as a biofuel feedstock is possible when inoculated with endophytic bacteria like Enterobacter sp. 638.

  17. Impact of dual inoculation with Rhizobium and PGPR on growth and antioxidant status of Vicia faba L. under copper stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatnassi, Imen Challougui; Chiboub, Manel; Saadani, Omar; Jebara, Moez; Jebara, Salwa Harzalli

    2015-04-01

    Plant-growth-promoting bacteria (PGPR) may help reduce the toxicity of heavy metals in plants in polluted environments. In this work, the effects of dual inoculation with Rhizobium and PGPR strains on the growth of Vicia faba grown under copper stress were assessed during hydroponic culture. Growth parameters, copper (Cu) accumulation and antioxidant enzyme activities were studied. Copper concentrations above 1mM damaged plant growth, but co-inoculation reduced its harmful effect. Co-inoculation of plants treated with 1mM Cu and 2mM Cu increased the dry weights as compared with Cu-treated and uninoculated plants. However, it decreased copper uptake up to 80% in the roots of 1-mM-Cu-treated plants as compared to non-inoculated control. Copper tolerance in Vicia faba is linked to the activity of antioxidant systems that are modulated by metal concentrations: both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were higher in the presence of Cu; a lower Cu dose of 0.5mM stimulated ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and/or peroxidase (POX) activities in shoots and roots; however in nodules CAT appeared to be the main peroxidase in H2O2 scavenging. The 1mM Cu treatment enhanced SOD, CAT and APX activities in roots and only SOD and POX were activated in shoots. All enzyme activities were inhibited by inoculation of 2mM Cu. The effect of inoculation with copper-accumulating PGPRs and the status of the antioxidant enzyme system were linked to changes in the copper tolerance status of Vicia faba. Our results suggested that Vicia faba inoculation with Rhizobium and PGPR Enterobacter clocae and Pseudomonas sp. could help to alleviate copper stress under hydroponic conditions. This result should be tested under field conditions for soil fertilization and phytostabilisation purposes. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of microbial inoculants on corn silage fermentation, microbial contents, aerobic stability, and milk production under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, N B; Sloth, K H; Højberg, O; Spliid, N H; Jensen, C; Thøgersen, R

    2010-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of 2 corn silage inoculation strategies (homofermentative vs. heterofermentative inoculation) under field conditions and to monitor responses in silage variables over the feeding season from January to August. Thirty-nine commercial dairy farms participated in the study. Farms were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: control (nonactive carrier; Chr. Hansen A/S, Hørsholm, Denmark), Lactisil (inoculation with 1 x 10(5)Lactobacillus pentosus and 2.5 x 10(4)Pediococcus pentosaceus per gram of fresh matter; Chr. Hansen A/S), and Lalsil Fresh (inoculation with 3 x 10(5)Lactobacillus buchneri NCIMB 40788 per gram of fresh matter; Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Blagnac, France). Inoculation with Lactisil had no effects on fermentation variables and aerobic stability. On the contrary, inoculation with Lalsil Fresh doubled the aerobic stability: 37, 38, and 80+/-8h for control, Lactisil, and Lalsil Fresh, respectively. The effect of Lalsil Fresh on aerobic stability tended to differ between sampling times, indicating a reduced difference between treatments in samples collected in April. Lalsil Fresh inoculation increased silage pH and contents of acetic acid, propionic acid, propanol, propyl acetate, 2-butanol, propylene glycol, ammonia, and free AA. The contents and ratios of DL-lactic acid, L-lactic acid relative to DL-lactic acid, free glucose, and DL-lactic acid relative to acetic acid decreased with Lalsil Fresh inoculation. Lalsil Fresh inoculation increased the silage counts of total lactic acid bacteria and reduced yeast counts. The Fusarium toxins deoxynivalenol, nivalenol, and zearalenone were detected in all silages at all collections, but the contents were not affected by ensiling time or by inoculation treatment. The effect of inoculation treatments on milk production was assessed by collecting test-day results from the involved farms and comparing the actual milk production with predicted milk production

  19. Co-inoculation Effect of Rhizobia and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria on Common Bean Growth in a Low Phosphorus Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korir, Hezekiah; Mungai, Nancy W.; Thuita, Moses; Hamba, Yosef; Masso, Cargele

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation through legume-Rhizobium symbiosis is important for enhancing agricultural productivity and is therefore of great economic interest. Growing evidence indicates that other soil beneficial bacteria can positively affect symbiotic performance of rhizobia. Nodule endophytic plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were isolated from common bean nodules from Nakuru County in Kenya and characterized 16S rDNA partial gene sequencing. The effect of co-inoculation of rhizobium and PGPR, on nodulation and growth of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was also investigated using a low phosphorous soil under greenhouse conditions. Gram-positive nodule endophytic PGPR belonging to the genus Bacillus were successfully isolated and characterized. Two PGPR strains (Paenibacillus polymyxa and Bacillus megaterium), two rhizobia strains (IITA-PAU 987 and IITA-PAU 983) and one reference rhizobia strain (CIAT 899) were used in the co-inoculation study. Two common bean varieties were inoculated with Rhizobium strains singly or in a combination with PGPR to evaluate the effect on nodulation and growth parameters. Co-inoculation of IITA-PAU 987 + B. megaterium recorded the highest nodule weight (405.2 mg) compared to IITA-PAU 987 alone (324.8 mg), while CIAT 899 + B. megaterium (401.2 mg) compared to CIAT 899 alone (337.2 mg). CIAT 899 + B. megaterium recorded a significantly higher shoot dry weight (7.23 g) compared to CIAT 899 alone (5.80 g). However, there was no significant difference between CIAT 899 + P. polymyxa and CIAT 899 alone. Combination of IITA-PAU 987 and B. megaterium led to significantly higher shoot dry weight (6.84 g) compared to IITA-PAU 987 alone (5.32 g) but no significant difference was observed when co-inoculated with P. polymyxa. IITA-PAU 983 in combination with P. polymyxa led to significantly higher shoot dry weight (7.15 g) compared to IITA-PAU 983 alone (5.14 g). Plants inoculated with IITA-PAU 987 and B. megaterium received 24.0 % of

  20. Co-inoculation Effect of Rhizobia and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria on Common Bean Growth in a Low Phosphorus Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korir, Hezekiah; Mungai, Nancy W; Thuita, Moses; Hamba, Yosef; Masso, Cargele

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation through legume- Rhizobium symbiosis is important for enhancing agricultural productivity and is therefore of great economic interest. Growing evidence indicates that other soil beneficial bacteria can positively affect symbiotic performance of rhizobia. Nodule endophytic plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were isolated from common bean nodules from Nakuru County in Kenya and characterized 16S rDNA partial gene sequencing. The effect of co-inoculation of rhizobium and PGPR, on nodulation and growth of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was also investigated using a low phosphorous soil under greenhouse conditions. Gram-positive nodule endophytic PGPR belonging to the genus Bacillus were successfully isolated and characterized. Two PGPR strains ( Paenibacillus polymyxa and Bacillus megaterium ), two rhizobia strains (IITA-PAU 987 and IITA-PAU 983) and one reference rhizobia strain (CIAT 899) were used in the co-inoculation study. Two common bean varieties were inoculated with Rhizobium strains singly or in a combination with PGPR to evaluate the effect on nodulation and growth parameters. Co-inoculation of IITA-PAU 987 + B. megaterium recorded the highest nodule weight (405.2 mg) compared to IITA-PAU 987 alone (324.8 mg), while CIAT 899 + B. megaterium (401.2 mg) compared to CIAT 899 alone (337.2 mg). CIAT 899 + B. megaterium recorded a significantly higher shoot dry weight (7.23 g) compared to CIAT 899 alone (5.80 g). However, there was no significant difference between CIAT 899 + P. polymyxa and CIAT 899 alone. Combination of IITA-PAU 987 and B. megaterium led to significantly higher shoot dry weight (6.84 g) compared to IITA-PAU 987 alone (5.32 g) but no significant difference was observed when co-inoculated with P. polymyxa . IITA-PAU 983 in combination with P. polymyxa led to significantly higher shoot dry weight (7.15 g) compared to IITA-PAU 983 alone (5.14 g). Plants inoculated with IITA-PAU 987 and B. megaterium received 24

  1. Inoculation Preparation Affects Survival of Salmonella enterica on Whole Black Peppercorns and Cumin Seeds Stored at Low Water Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lauren S; Waterman, Kim M; Williams, Robert C; Ponder, Monica A

    2015-07-01

    Salmonellosis has been increasingly associated with contaminated spices. Identifying inoculation and stabilization methods for Salmonella on whole spices is important for development of validated inactivation processes. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of inoculation preparation on the recoverability of Salmonella enterica from dried whole peppercorns and cumin seeds. Whole black peppercorns and cumin seeds were inoculated with S. enterica using one dry transfer method and various wet inoculation methods: immersion of spice seeds in tryptic soy broth (TSB) plus Salmonella for 24 h (likely leading to inclusion of Salmonella in native microbiota biofilms formed around the seeds), application of cells grown in TSB, and/or application of cells scraped from tryptic soy agar (TSA). Postinoculation seeds were dried to a water activity of 0.3 within 24 h and held for 28 days. Seeds were sampled after drying (time 0) and periodically during the 28 days of storage. Salmonella cells were enumerated by serial dilution and plated onto xylose lysine Tergitol (XLT4) agar and TSA. Recovery of Salmonella was high after 28 days of storage but was dependent on inoculation method, with 4.05 to 6.22 and 3.75 to 8.38 log CFU/g recovered from peppercorns and cumin seeds, respectively, on XLT4 agar. The changes in surviving Salmonella (log CFU per gram) from initial inoculation levels after 28 days were significantly smaller for the biofilm inclusion method (+0.142pepper, +0.186cumin) than for the other inoculation methods (-0.425pepper, -2.029cumin for cells grown on TSA; -0.641pepper, -0.718cumin for dry transfer; -1.998pepper for cells grown in TSB). In most cases, trends for reductions of total aerobic bacteria were similar to those of Salmonella. The inoculation method influenced the recoverability of Salmonella from whole peppercorns and cumin seeds after drying. The most stable inoculum strategies were dry transfer, 24-h incubation of Salmonella and spices in

  2. Transcriptional analysis of genes involved in nodulation in soybean roots inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain CPAC 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Gesiele Almeida Barros de; Batista, Jesiane Stefânia Silva; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar Corrêa; Nascimento, Leandro Costa do; Hungria, Mariangela

    2013-03-06

    Biological nitrogen fixation in root nodules is a process of great importance to crops of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], as it may provide the bulk of the plant's needs for nitrogen. Legume nodulation involves several complex steps and, although studied for many decades, much remains to be understood. This research aimed at analyzing the global expression of genes in soybean roots of a Brazilian cultivar (Conquista) inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum CPAC 15, a strain broadly used in commercial inoculants in Brazil. To achieve this, we used the suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique combined with Illumina sequencing. The subtractive library (non-inoculated x inoculated) of soybean roots resulted in 3,210 differentially expressed transcripts at 10 days after inoculation were studied. The data were grouped according to the ontologies of the molecular functions and biological processes. Several classes of genes were confirmed as related to N2 fixation and others were reported for the first time. During nodule formation, a higher percentage of genes were related to primary metabolism, cell-wall modifications and the antioxidant defense system. Putative symbiotic functions were attributed to some of these genes for the first time.

  3. Effect of inoculation with white-rot fungi and fungal consortium on the composting efficiency of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voběrková, Stanislava; Vaverková, Magdalena D; Burešová, Alena; Adamcová, Dana; Vršanská, Martina; Kynický, Jindřich; Brtnický, Martin; Adam, Vojtěch

    2017-03-01

    An investigation was carried out on the effect of inoculation methods on the compost of an organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Three types of white-rot fungi (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor and Fomes fomentarius), and a consortium of these fungi, were used. The study assessed their influence on microbial enzymatic activities and the quality of the finished compost. It was found that the addition of white-rot fungi to municipal solid waste (after 37days of composting) could be a useful strategy for enhancing the properties of the final compost product. In comparison with the control sample (compost without inoculation), it accelerates degradation of solid waste as indicated by changes in C/N, electrical conductivity and pH. However, the effectiveness of waste degradation and compost maturation depends on the type of microorganism used for inoculation. The presence of inoculants, such as Trametes versicolor and Fomes fomentarius, led to a higher degrading ratio and a better degree of maturity. This resulted in an increase of enzymatic activities (especially dehydrogenase and protease) and a germination index in comparison with inoculation using Phanerochaete chrysosporium or a consortium of fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sarcocyst Development in Raccoons (Procyon lotor) Inoculated with Different Strains of Sarcocystis neurona Culture-Derived Merozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryburgh, E L; Marsh, A E; Dubey, J P; Howe, D K; Reed, S M; Bolten, K E; Pei, W; Saville, W J A

    2015-08-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is considered the major etiologic agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a neurological disease in horses. Raccoon ( Procyon lotor ) is considered the most important intermediate host in the life cycle of S. neurona in the United States; S. neurona sarcocysts do mature in raccoon muscles, and raccoons also develop clinical signs simulating EPM. The focus of this study was to determine if sarcocysts would develop in raccoons experimentally inoculated with different host-derived strains of in vitro-cultivated S. neurona merozoites. Four raccoons were inoculated with strains derived from a raccoon, a sea otter, a cat, and a horse. Raccoon tissues were fed to laboratory-raised opossums ( Didelphis virginiana ), the definitive host of S. neurona . Intestinal scraping revealed sporocysts in opossums who received muscle tissue from raccoons inoculated with the raccoon-derived or the sea otter-derived isolates. These results demonstrate that sarcocysts can mature in raccoons inoculated with in vitro-derived S. neurona merozoites. In contrast, the horse and cat-derived isolates did not produce microscopically or biologically detected sarcocysts. Immunoblot analysis revealed both antigenic and antibody differences when testing the inoculated raccoons. Immunohistochemical staining indicated differences in staining between the merozoite and sarcocyst stages. The successful infections achieved in this study indicates that the life cycle can be manipulated in the laboratory without affecting subsequent stage development, thereby allowing further purification of strains and artificial maintenance of the life cycle.

  5. Effects of inoculation with organic-phosphorus-mineralizing bacteria on soybean (Glycine max) growth and indigenous bacterial community diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Xun; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Li, Yang; Duan, Man-Li

    2017-05-01

    Three different organic-phosphorus-mineralizing bacteria (OPMB) strains were inoculated to soil planted with soybean (Glycine max), and their effects on soybean growth and indigenous bacterial community diversity were investigated. Inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescens Z4-1 and Brevibacillus agri L7-1 increased organic phosphorus degradation by 22% and 30%, respectively, compared with the control at the mature stage. Strains P. fluorescens Z4-1 and B. agri L7-1 significantly improved the soil alkaline phosphatase activity, average well color development, and the soybean root activity. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis demonstrated that P. fluorescens Z4-1 and B. agri L7-1 could persist in the soil at relative abundances of 2.0%-6.4% throughout soybean growth. Thus, P. fluorescens Z4-1 and B. agri L7-1 could potentially be used in organic-phosphorus-mineralizing biofertilizers. OPMB inoculation altered the genetic structure of the soil bacterial communities but had no apparent influence on the carbon source utilization profiles of the soil bacterial communities. Principal components analysis showed that the changes in the carbon source utilization profiles of bacterial community depended mainly on the plant growth stages rather than inoculation with OPMB. The results help to understand the evolution of the soil bacterial community after OPMB inoculation.

  6. Impact of Faba Bean-Seed Rhizobial Inoculation on Microbial Activity in the Rhizosphere Soil during Growing Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siczek, Anna; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2016-05-20

    Inoculation of legume seeds with Rhizobium affects soil microbial community and processes, especially in the rhizosphere. This study aimed at assessing the effect of Rhizobium inoculation on microbial activity in the faba bean rhizosphere during the growing season in a field experiment on a Haplic Luvisol derived from loess. Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) seeds were non-inoculated (NI) or inoculated (I) with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae and sown. The rhizosphere soil was analyzed for the enzymatic activities of dehydrogenases, urease, protease and acid phosphomonoesterase, and functional diversity (catabolic potential) using the Average Well Color Development, Shannon-Weaver, and Richness indices following the community level physiological profiling from Biolog EcoPlate™. The analyses were done on three occasions corresponding to the growth stages of: 5-6 leaf, flowering, and pod formation. The enzymatic activities were higher in I than NI (p < 0.05) throughout the growing season. However, none of the functional diversity indices differed significantly under both treatments, regardless of the growth stage. This work showed that the functional diversity of the microbial communities was a less sensitive tool than enzyme activities in assessment of rhizobial inoculation effects on rhizosphere microbial activity.

  7. Infection Dynamics of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Cattle Following Intranasopharyngeal Inoculation or Contact Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, J M; Stenfeldt, C; Rodriguez, L L; Arzt, J

    2016-11-01

    For the purpose of developing an improved experimental model for studies of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle, three different experimental systems based on natural or simulated natural virus exposure were compared under standardized experimental conditions. Ante-mortem infection dynamics were characterized in cattle exposed to FMDV through a novel, simulated natural intranasopharyngeal (INP) inoculation system or through standardized and controlled systems of within- or between-species direct contact exposure (cattle-to-cattle or pig-to-cattle). All three systems were efficient in causing synchronous, generalized foot-and-mouth disease in cattle exposed to one of three different strains of FMDV representing serotypes O, A and Asia1. There was more within-group variation in the timing of clinical infection following natural and simulated natural virus exposure systems when compared with the conventionally used system of needle inoculation (intraepithelial lingual inoculation). However, the three optimized exposure systems described herein have the advantage of closely simulating field conditions by utilizing natural routes of primary infection, thereby facilitating engagement of mucosal host defence mechanisms. Overall, it is concluded that INP inoculation and standardized systems of direct contact exposure provide effective alternatives to conventional (needle) inoculation systems for studies in which it is desirable to simulate the natural biology of FMDV infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Strengthening detoxication impacts of Coprinus comatus on nickel and fluoranthene co-contaminated soil by bacterial inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xia; Liu, Bingxin; Deng, Qiusui; Zhang, Ruitao; Li, Xue; Xu, Heng

    2017-11-10

    To develop an efficient and environmental-friendly approach to detoxicate nickel (Ni) and fluoranthene co-contaminated soil, the combined application of Coprinus comatus (C. comatus) with Serratia sp. FFC5 and/or Enterobacter sp. E2 was investigated. The pot experiment tested the influences of bacterial inoculation on the growth of C. comatus, content of Ni in C. comatus, Ni speciation in soil, fluoranthene dissipation, soil enzymatic activities, bacterial population and community structure. With the inoculation of bacteria, the fresh weights of C. comatus, concentration of Ni in C. comatus and the dissipation rates of fluoranthene were increased by 17.73-29.38%, 68.97-204.97% and 34.84-60.90%, respectively. Notably, results illustrated that the co-inoculation of FFC5 and E2 showed better effect in biomass enhancement, Ni accumulation and fluoranthene dissipation than solitary inoculation. Simultaneously, higher soil enzymatic and microbiological activities suggested that the integrated detoxication method of bacteria and C. comatus could improve soil quality. Therefore, we can infer that bacterial inoculation strengthened detoxication effect of C. comatus in Ni-fluoranthene co-contaminated soil, indicating that the combined application of C. comatus and bacteria can be an efficient alternative for detoxicating Ni and fluoranthene co-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. [Effects of mycorrhizal colonization and medicine quality of Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis inoculated by different foreign AM fungi species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou Nong; Ding, Bo; Feng, Yuan; Qi, Wen-hua; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Dong-qin; Xiang, Jun

    2015-08-01

    After 28 foreign species of AM fungi were inoculated in sterilized soil, the effects of the AM mycorrhizal colonization and the medicine quality of Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis were observed by combination of inoculation test in pot at room temperature and instrumental analysis. The results showed that, compared with control group (CK), the inoculation of foreign AM fungi in the soil influenced the spore density, mycorrhizal infection rate, and colonization intensity of AM fungi in root system of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis. The inoculation of foreign AM fungi enhanced the mycorrhiza viability of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis by increasing the activity of succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in intraradical hyphae. The content of single steroid saponin in rhizome of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis showed variation after P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis was inoculated by different foreign species of AM fungi, which was beneficial for increasing the medicine quality; however, the kinds of steroid saponin showed no difference. In a degree, there was a selectivity of symbiosis between P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis and foreign AM fungi. And we found that the Claroideoglomus claroideum and Racocetra coralloidea were best foreign AM fungi species for cultivating P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis under field condition.

  10. Possible roles of nitrogen fixation and mineral uptake induced by rhizobacterial inoculation on salt tolerance of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Komy, Hesham M A; Abdel-Samad, Hamdia M; Hetta, Ahmed M A; Barakat, Nasser A

    2004-01-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the possible roles of nitrogen fixation and/or enhanced mineral uptake by Azospirillum lipoferum and Bacillus polymexa inoculation in improving salt tolerance of maize plants. Plants were inoculated and grown under salt stress (osmotic potential: -0.3, -0.6, -0.9 and -1.2 Mpa). Both microorganisms were able to fix nitrogen up to -0.9 Mpa salinity level accompanied with increased total N-yield compared with the control plants. In order to investigate the role of bacterial inoculation on enhanced mineral uptake, the growth and some physiological parameters of inoculated plants were compared with plants fertilized by K and P foliar application. Plant inoculation with the N2-fixers or plant spraying with KH2PO4 resulted in an increase in fresh and dry matter as well as water content of plants. Treated plants exhibited changed plant mineral content which was associated with increased Mg/K and decreased P/K, Ca/K and Na/K ratios. This was accompanied by accumulation of soluble sugars, amino acids in shoots and roots of plants resulting in a concomitant increase in the osmotic potential of the cell sap as a possible mechanism of adaptation to salinity.

  11. [MEDICAGO SATIVA L: IMPROVEMENT AND NEW APPROACHES OF ITS NUTRITIONAL AND FUNCTIONAL VALUE BY BACTERIAL CO-INOCULATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Rosario; Nebot, Elena; Porres, Jesús María; Kapravelou, Garyfallia; Del Moral, Ana; Talbi, Chouhra; Bedmar, Eulogio Jose; López-Jurado, María

    2015-12-01

    to study the effect of co-inoculation with Ensifer meliloti and Halomonas maura of the leguminous Medicago sativa L., on growth, nutritional and functional value, grown under salinity conditions. plants of M. sativa were grown in a solution with a mixture of salts (CaSO4, MgCl, NaCl and NaHCO 3) and were co-inoculated with its specific rhizobium and the halophilic moderated bacterium H. maura. Different physiologic parameters were determined, as well as, nitrogen and minerals content. Furthermore, an assay of in vitro digestibility was carried out. salinity had a negative effect on the plants; however, co-inoculation increased yield, nitrogen content, total minerals, Ca and Mg. Moreover, physiologic parameters as water potential and leghemoglobin content in fresh nodules were higher compared to those of plants inoculated only with E. meliloti. Both, salinity and bacterial treatment with E. meliloti and H. maura increased the antioxidant capacity of the legume, in dialyzates and retentates collected after an in vitro digestibility assay. co-inoculation of plants with E. meliloti and H. maura could improve the alfalfa yield under specific salinity conditions, increasing the nutritional and functional value of the plants. M. sativa could be considered in the formulations of nutritional supplements for the human diet. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Survival of Salmonella in Cookie and Cracker Sandwiches Containing Inoculated, Low-Water Activity Fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, Larry R; Mann, David A

    2015-10-01

    A study was done to determine the rate of inactivation of Salmonella in cookie and cracker snack sandwiches. Two cookie bases (chocolate and vanilla) and cheese crackers, along with high-sugar chocolate and peanut butter-based crème cookie fillings and peanut butter- and cheese-based cracker fillings, were obtained from commercial sources. Fillings and sandwiches containing fillings that had been dry- or wet-inoculated with Salmonella were stored at 25°C for 1, 6, 21, 35, 70, 112, and 182 days (6 months). At initial populations of 3.4 and 3.6 log CFU/g of cookie sandwiches containing chocolate crème and peanut butter crème fillings, respectively, Salmonella survived for at least 182 days; initially at 0.36 log CFU/g, the pathogen survived for at least 35 and 70 days. Initially at 2.9 and 3.4 log CFU/g of cracker sandwiches containing peanut butter- and cheese-based fillings, respectively, Salmonella survived for at least 182 and 112 days; initially at 0.53 log CFU/g, the pathogen survived for at least 6 and 35 days. Inactivation of Salmonella was more rapid in wet-inoculated peanut butter crème cookie filling than in dry-inoculated filling but was less affected by type of inoculum in peanut butter-based cracker filling. Chocolate cookie base (water activity [aw] 0.39) and chocolate crème filling (aw 0.30) components of sandwiches equilibrated to aw 0.38 within 15 days at 25°C; vanilla cookie base (aw 0.21) and peanut butter-based crème filling (aw 0.27) equilibrated to aw 0.24 between 50 and 80 days. Cheese cracker (aw 0.14) and peanut butter-based filling (aw 0.31) or cheese-based filling (aw 0.33) components of sandwiches equilibrated to aw 0.33 in 80 days. The ability of Salmonella to survive for at least 182 days in fillings of cookie and cracker sandwiches demonstrates a need to assure that filling ingredients do not contain the pathogen and that contamination does not occur during manufacture.

  13. Survival and growth of food poisoning bacteria following inoculation into cottage cheese varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, G R; Glenister, D A; Brocklehurst, T F; Lund, B M

    1989-11-01

    Following inoculation into cottage cheese varieties with and without sorbic acid, obtained directly from the manufacturer, strains of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and other E. coli survived but failed to multiply during storage at 7, 10 or 25 degrees C. In the absence of sorbic acid spoilage due to Pseudomonas fluorescens occurred after storage for 5-13 days at 7 or 10 degrees C and 1-2 days at 25 degrees C. Salmonella enteritidis, S. hadar, S. saint-paul, S. typhimurium and S. virchow survived but failed to multiply at 10 degrees C and, in the case of most strains, at 20 or 25 degrees C. S. typhimurium multiplied 100-fold in one batch of cottage cheese with peppers and onion in the absence of sorbic acid during storage at 25 degrees C for 2 days; spoilage of this batch occurred due to yeasts or yeasts and moulds after storage for 4-8 days at 10 degrees C and 0-2 days at 20 or 25 degrees C. Following inoculation into cottage cheese varieties, prepared in the laboratory and which did not contain sorbic acid, as contaminants of the added protein or vegetable ingredients the numbers of Staphylococcus aureus declined during storage at 10 and 20 degrees C, the numbers of Bacillus cereus and S. typhimurium increased at both temperatures, and the numbers of Yersinia enterocolitica increased at 10 degrees C, but declined at 20 degrees C. Spoilage occurred due to the growth of moulds and P. fluorescens after storage for 5-14 days at 10 degrees C, and due to P. fluorescens after storage for up to 2 days at 20 degrees C. In products inoculated in a similar way but which contained sorbic acid (500-530 mg/kg), the numbers of S. aureus and B. cereus declined and in most products the numbers of S. typhimurium and Y. enterocolitica remained constant. In cottage cheese with chicken, however, the numbers of Y. enterocolitica increased 100-fold during storage of the product for 14 days at 10 degrees and the numbers of S. typhimurium increased 100-fold during storage for 2 days

  14. Tuberculosis cutánea por inoculación accidental Cutaneous tuberculosis accidental inoculation

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    María Ascensión Maestre Naranjo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Caso clínico de una microbióloga con amplia experiencia, que sufre una inoculación accidental al manipular una cepa pura de Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Se pincha en la cara lateral externa de la falange distal del dedo índice, atravesando el guante con la aguja contaminada. (Imagen 1. La trabajadora procede de forma inmediata a la limpieza de la herida. El Servicio de Prevención, registra la inoculación como accidente de trabajo. A las tres semanas del accidente, aparece en el lugar de la inoculación una pápula eritematosa levemente dolorosa a la presión que va creciendo hasta alcanzar un tamaño de 1,5-2 cm., sin adenopatías axilares, ni clínica general. (Imagen 2 Se procede a la exéresis y biopsia de la lesión. Informe anatomopatológico: Inflamación crónica granulomatosa tuberculoide muy sugestiva de tuberculosis cutánea. Microbiología: dudosos bacilos ácido alcohol resistentes (BAAR Cultivo: positivo a Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Ambas cepas presentan la misma identidad. Diagnóstico: tuberculosis cutánea. El SPRL realiza la comunicación de Enfermedad Profesional según el RD 1299/2006, de 10 de diciembre. Se realiza valoración y seguimiento en el Servicio de Medicina Interna, iniciando tratamiento de tuberculosis.Clinical case of a microbiologist with wide experience, which is inoculated accidental when Mycobacterium's pure strain manipulates tuberculosis; it (she pricks itself in the lateral external face of the phalanx distal of the forefinger, crossing the glove with the contaminated needle. Immediate treatment of the wound. The Service of Prevention, he registers the inoculation as accident of work. To three weeks a slightly painful pápula eritematosa appears in the place of the inoculation to the pressure that is growing until a size reaches 1,5-2 cm., without adenopatías axyllaris, not general clinic. Exéresis and biopsy of the same one, pathological anatomy: chronic inflammation very suggestive granulomatosa

  15. Oral inoculation of young dairy calves with Mycoplasma bovis results in colonization of tonsils, development of otitis media and local immunity.

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    Fiona Maunsell

    Full Text Available Because M. bovis otitis media is an economically important problem, there is a need to understand the pathogenesis of disease, not only to improve our understanding of the factors contributing to the development of this disease but also to inform the development of improved diagnostic tests and therapy. Oral ingestion of M. bovis-contaminated milk is linked, but not definitively proven, to development of otitis media. In the current study, we demonstrate that oral ingestion of M. bovis infected colostrum can result in an ascending infection and development of otitis media. Importantly, M. bovis was found to have a previously unrecognized tendency for colonization of the tonsils of calves, which most likely contributed to the subsequent development of otitis media. In contrast, transtracheal inoculation failed to produce clinically significant upper respiratory tract disease, although did induce lower respiratory tract disease. The upper respiratory tract was the major site of M. bovis-specific B cell and mucosal IgA responses in calves inoculated by the oral route. The oral inoculation route of infection presented here is particularly suited to the study of host-pathogen interactions during initial colonization of the tonsils, expansion of infection and dissemination to the lower respiratory tract and middle ear. In addition, it could be used to investigate potential new preventative or control strategies, especially those aimed at limiting colonization of the tonsils and/or spread to the middle ear.

  16. Oral inoculation of young dairy calves with Mycoplasma bovis results in colonization of tonsils, development of otitis media and local immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunsell, Fiona; Brown, Mary B; Powe, Joshua; Ivey, James; Woolard, Matthew; Love, Wees; Simecka, Jerry W

    2012-01-01

    Because M. bovis otitis media is an economically important problem, there is a need to understand the pathogenesis of disease, not only to improve our understanding of the factors contributing to the development of this disease but also to inform the development of improved diagnostic tests and therapy. Oral ingestion of M. bovis-contaminated milk is linked, but not definitively proven, to development of otitis media. In the current study, we demonstrate that oral ingestion of M. bovis infected colostrum can result in an ascending infection and development of otitis media. Importantly, M. bovis was found to have a previously unrecognized tendency for colonization of the tonsils of calves, which most likely contributed to the subsequent development of otitis media. In contrast, transtracheal inoculation failed to produce clinically significant upper respiratory tract disease, although did induce lower respiratory tract disease. The upper respiratory tract was the major site of M. bovis-specific B cell and mucosal IgA responses in calves inoculated by the oral route. The oral inoculation route of infection presented here is particularly suited to the study of host-pathogen interactions during initial colonization of the tonsils, expansion of infection and dissemination to the lower respiratory tract and middle ear. In addition, it could be used to investigate potential new preventative or control strategies, especially those aimed at limiting colonization of the tonsils and/or spread to the middle ear.

  17. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE ELECTRIC CURRENT GENERATION IN A MICROBIAL FUEL CELL INOCULATED WITH MARINE SEDIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Teleken

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFC are electrochemical devices that utilize the ability of some microorganisms to oxidize organic matter and transfer electrons resulting from their metabolism to an insoluble acceptor. The goal of the present study was to model the kinetics of electrical current generation from an MFC inoculated with marine sediment. For this purpose, a differential equation system was used, including the Nernst-Monod relationship and Ohm's Law, to describe the microbial metabolism and the mechanism of extracellular electron transfer (EET, respectively. The experimental data obtained by cyclic voltammetry analysis were properly described by the model. It was concluded that marine microorganisms preferably use a direct mechanism of EET by means of nanowires to establish the electrochemical contact with the anode. The mathematical modeling could help understand MFC operation and, consequently, contribute to improving power generation from this source.

  18. Granulomatous sub-dermal lesions in sheep inoculated with Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momotani, E; Inui, S; Ishikawa, Y; Azuma, R

    1984-01-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis was inoculated subcutaneously into 6 ewes and the resulting lesions were examined by light and electron microscopy. The organism was recovered from the subcutaneous lesions. The lesions were suppurative in the early stages and granulomatous in the advanced stage, but abscesses were the usual lesion observed. The granulomas were composed of several layers; central bacterial colony, neutrophil layer, layer of macrophages, epithelioid cells and Langhans and foreign body type giant cells with a periphery of connective tissue. Multiloculated granulomas were observed. Electron microscopic examination confirmed the cell types of the lesions. Epithelioid and giant cells were characterized by the shape and number of the nuclei and complex and abundant organelles. Interdigitations of the blunt pseudopodia of adjacent cells were also found. It is concluded that the organism can produce both granulomatous lesions and abscesses which differ from those of orthodox dermatophilosis but are similar to those described in "atypical dermatophilosis".

  19. Comparison between Solanum torvum Sw. and S. melongena L. after Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribaud, M; Noirot, M; Fock-Bastide, I; Vaniet, S; Kodja, H

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, is one of the most devastating plant diseases, affecting some economically important Solanaceae crops. In contrast, Solanum torvum, also known as wild eggplant, does not wilt when infested with R. solanacearum. In order to describe the mechanism underlying the response of S. torvum, it was compared with the cultivated eggplant, S. melongena, when both were infected with the same R. solanacearum strain. No wilting occurred in S. torvum, although the bacteria colonised roots and stems in both species within the first 24 h. There were marked differences beyond 24 h, consisting of high bacterial mortality in S. torvum. Using the calli model, our investigations revealed an increase in cell wall monoamine oxidase activity in S. torvum after R. solanacearum inoculation, which did not occur in S. melongena. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Validation of cooking methods using shell eggs inoculated with Salmonella serotypes Enteritidis and Heidelberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A L; Curtis, P A; Conner, D E; McKee, S R; Kerth, L K

    2008-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis has long been associated with eggs, and more recently, Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg has also become associated with eggs. This study was undertaken to determine whether Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Heidelberg are effectively eliminated from eggs by various cooking methods. Seven cooking methods were chosen--hard and soft cooked, scrambled, over easy, sunny-side up, poached, and free poached--and a pan insert and the free-flowing method were used. Shell eggs, purchased from a grocery store, were inoculated with Salmonella and cooked. The cooked eggs were analyzed by USDA-approved methods for Salmonella recovery. Findings indicated that existing cooking methods for the hard-cooked, soft-cooked, and poaching methods were safe. However, the same was not true for the current sunny-side-up, over-easy, and scrambled egg cooking methods.

  1. Producing kombucha beverage from winter savory (Satureja montana L. tea inoculated by pellicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Dragoljub D.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is concerned with the possibility of preparing kombucha beverage from sweetened winter savory (local name Rtanj tea inoculated with the pellicle in a quantity of 2 -51 in the vessels (glass containers volume of 2 - 6 l. It was found that the process lasts a few days (2 - 5 longer than the traditional process of biotransformation of black tea into kombucha. It was also concluded that the rate of the process depends mostly on the volume container: medium ratio. In the subsequent kombucha fermentations the metabolic activity of the yeast and acetic fermentation cells did not change. The rate of the process was not influenced by the physiological state of the cells in the pellicle with the capacities larger than 31.

  2. Effectiveness of automated ultraviolet-C light for decontamination of textiles inoculated with Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolle, C; Huss, F; Lindblad, M; Reischies, F; Tano, E

    2018-01-01

    Healthcare textiles are increasingly recognized as potential vehicles for transmission of hospital-acquired infections. This study tested the ability of an automated ultraviolet-C (UV-C) room disinfection device (Tru-D Smart UV-C) to decontaminate textiles inoculated with Enterococcus faecium in a clinical setting. Contaminated polycotton (50/50 polyester/cotton) swatches were distributed to predefined locations in a ward room and exposed to UV-C light. UV-C decontamination reduced E. faecium counts by a mean log10 reduction factor of 1.37 (all P = 0.005, Wilcoxon signed rank test). UV-C decontamination may be a feasible adjunctive measure to conventional laundering to preserve the cleanliness of healthcare textiles in ward rooms. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Production of conidia by entomopathogenic fungi: from inoculants to final quality tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz-Paredes, Facundo; Miranda-Hernández, Francisco; Loera, Octavio

    2017-03-01

    Demand for biopesticides is growing due to the increase of areas under integrated pest management worldwide. Conidia from entomopathogenic fungi play a major role as infective units in the current market of biopesticides. Success in a massive production of fungal conidia include the use of proper long-term conservation microbial methods, aimed at preserving the phenotypic traits of the strains. The development of suitable inoculants should also be considered since that favours a rapid germination and invasiveness of the substrate in solid state cultures (SSC). After the selection of a suitable fungal strain, proven optimization approaches for SSC mainly include the combination of substrates, moisture, texturizers, aeration and moderate stress to induce conidiation. Nonetheless, during storage and upon application in open fields, conidia either as free propagules or imbibed in formulations are subjected to stress due to abiotic factors, then quality should be preserved to resist such harsh conditions. All of these topics are analysed in this report.

  4. Preparation of Mosquito Salivary Gland Extract and Intradermal Inoculation of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael A; Kauffman, Elizabeth; Payne, Anne; Harris, Eva; Kramer, Laura D

    2017-07-20

    Mosquito-transmitted pathogens are among the leading causes of severe disease and death in humans. Components within the saliva of mosquito vectors facilitate blood feeding, modulate host responses, and allow efficient transmission of pathogens, such as Dengue, Zika, yellow fever, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis, and chikungunya viruses, as well as Plasmodium parasites, among others. Here, we describe standardized methods to assess the impact of mosquito-derived factors on immune responses and pathogenesis in mouse models of infection. This protocol includes the generation of mosquito salivary gland extracts and intradermal inoculation of mouse ears. Ultimately, the information obtained from using these techniques can help reveal fundamental mechanisms of interaction between pathogens, mosquito vectors, and the mammalian host. In addition, this protocol can help establish improved infection challenge models for pre-clinical testing of vaccines or therapeutics that take into account the natural route of transmission via mosquitoes.

  5. Production of volatile and sulfur compounds by ten Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains inoculated in Trebbiano must

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca ePatrignani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In wines, the presence of sulphur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulphur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the ten strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulphur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated.

  6. Stress inoculation training supported by physiology-driven adaptive virtual reality stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Sinisa; Horvat, Marko; Kukolja, Davor; Dropuljić, Branimir; Cosić, Kresimir

    2009-01-01

    Significant proportion of psychological problems related to combat stress in recent large peacekeeping operations underscores importance of effective methods for strengthening the stress resistance of military personnel. Adaptive control of virtual reality (VR) stimulation, based on estimation of the subject's emotional state from physiological signals, may enhance existing stress inoculation training (SIT). Physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation can tailor the progress of stressful stimuli delivery to the physiological characteristics of each individual, which is indicated for improvement in stress resistance. Therefore, following an overview of SIT and its applications in the military setting, generic concept of physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation is presented in the paper. Toward the end of the paper, closed-loop adaptive control strategy applicable to SIT is outlined.

  7. Aerobic granular sludge inoculated microbial fuel cells for enhanced epoxy reactive diluent wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai; Hu, Jingping; Hou, Huijie; Liu, Bingchuan; Chen, Qin; Pan, Keliang; Pu, Wenhong; Yang, Jiakuan; Wu, Xu; Yang, Changzhu

    2017-04-01

    Microbial consortiums aggregated on the anode surface of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are critical factors for electricity generation as well as biodegradation efficiencies of organic compounds. Here in this study, aerobic granular sludge (AGS) was assembled on the surface of the MFC anode to form an AGS-MFC system with superior performance on epoxy reactive diluent (ERD) wastewater treatment. AGS-MFCs successfully shortened the startup time from 13d to 7d compared to the ones inoculated with domestic wastewater. Enhanced toxicity tolerance as well as higher COD removal (77.8% vs. 63.6%) were achieved. The higher ERD wastewater treatment efficiency of AGS-MFC is possibly attributed to the diverse microbial population on MFC biofilm, as well as the synergic degradation of contaminants by both the MFC anode biofilm and AGS granules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inoculation of Pichia kudriavzevii RB1 degrades the organic acids present in raw compost material and accelerates composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasaki, Kiyohiko; Araya, Shogo; Mimoto, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the yeast strain Pichia kudriavzevii RB1 was used as an inoculum to accelerate organic matter degradation of rabbit food with added organic acids, which was used as a model food waste for composting. The RB1 strain rapidly degraded the organic acids present in the raw compost material, leading to an increase in pH beyond the neutral level, within 2 days. Both mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria proliferated faster in the compost with RB1 inoculation than in that without inoculation. Although the yeast died with the increase in compost temperature, it affected the early stages of composting prior to the thermophilic stage and accelerated the composting process by 2 days by eliminating the initial lag phase seen in the growth of other microorganisms. Moreover, populations of Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Bacillus foraminis, and Bacillus coagulans became dominant during the thermophilic stages of both composting with and without RB1 inoculation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. IMPROVEMENT OF RESPONSE TO LOW WATER AVAILABILITY IN MAIZE PLANTS INOCULATED WITH SELECTED RHIZOSPHERIC MICROBIAL CONSORTIA UNDER DIFFERENT IRRIGATION REGIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eligio Malusà

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low water availability for agriculture is a rising problem in temperate countries. The effect of two different rhizospheric microbial consortia on the tolerance to water deficiency of maize was evaluated under controlled watering regimes. One consortium was a mixture of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizospheric bacteria isolated under osmotic stress selective pressure; the other consortium was a commercial product. A higher tolerance of plants to water deficiency was observed when roots were inoculated with microbial consortia. Plant gas exchange parameters were positively affected by inoculation, and a improvements of the leaves mineral nutrients content and of the biomass yield were also recorded. The positive effect should be ascribed to an increased roots development more than to an increased uptake from extraradical mycorrhizal hyphae. The use of microbial inoculants appears to be a suitable practice to improve the crop performances under low water availability.

  10. Effects of stage of maturity at harvest, wilting and LAB inoculant on aerobic stability of wheat silages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinberg, Z.G.; Khanal, Prabhat; Chen, Y.

    2010-01-01

    spoilage indicators. The inoculant enhanced CO production in the silages prepared from the DC wheat of the flowering and milk stages, as compared with the respective non-inoculated control silages which contained high concentrations of VFA. However, in the wilted silages which contained less VFA, both......The objective was to study effects of cultivar, stage of maturity at harvest, wilting, and addition of lactic acid bacterial (LAB) inoculant at ensiling, and their interactions, on the aerobic stability of wheat silages. Wheat of two cultivars, harvested at the flowering or the milk stage...... of maturity were ensiled in mini-silos, either directly after cutting (DC) or after wilting (W). After 2-7 months of storage, silages were subjected to a 7-day aerobic stability test during which changes in chemical composition, dry matter (DM) and neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) digestibility, and temperature...

  11. Proline and Abscisic Acid Content in Droughted Corn Plant Inoculated with Azospirillum sp. and Arbuscular Mycorrhizae Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOVRI YOULA KANDOWANGKO

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants that undergo drought stress perform a physiological response such as accumulation of proline in the leaves and increased content abscisic acid. A research was conducted to study proline and abscisic acid (ABA content on drought-stressed corn plant with Azospirillum sp. and arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF inoculated at inceptisol soil from Bogor, West Java. The experiments were carried out in a green house from June up to September 2003, using a factorial randomized block design. In pot experiments, two factors were assigned, i.e. inoculation with Azospirillum (0, 0.50, 1.00, 1.50 ml/pot and inoculation with AMF Glomus manihotis (0, 12.50, 25.00, 37.50 g/pot. The plants were observed during tasseling up to seed filling periods. Results of experiments showed that the interaction between Azospirillum sp. and AMF was synergistically increased proline, however it decreased ABA.

  12. Effect of Inoculation with Glomus versiforme on Cadmium Accumulation, Antioxidant Activities and Phytochelatins of Solanum photeinocarpum.

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    Shi-Yun Tan

    Full Text Available The plant growth, phosphate acquisition, Cd translocation, phytochelatins (PCs production and antioxidant parameters [superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, guaiacol peroxidase (POD, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione (GSH, ascorbate (ASA and malonaldehyde (MDA] were investigated in Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum photeinocarpum inoculated with Glomus versiforme BGC GD01C (Gv in Cd-added soils (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 mg Cd kg-1 soil. Mycorrhizal colonization rates were generally high (from 77% to 94%, and hardly affected by Cd. Gv colonization significantly enhanced P acquisition, growth and total Cd uptakes in both shoots and roots of S. photeinocarpum at all Cd levels. Meanwhile, Gv symbiosis significantly increased Cd concentration in the roots, and decreased Cd concentration in the shoots at all Cd levels, which indicates that Gv could promote phytostabilization by enhancing Cd accumulation in the roots to inhibit its translocation to shoots and the "dilution effects" linked to an increase in plant dry matter yield and a reduced Cd partitioning to shoots. Moreover, the improvement of CAT, POD and APX activities in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants infers that Gv symbiosis helped S. photeinocarpum to relieve oxidative damage to biomolecules in Cd-contaminated soil. The evident decline of MDA content in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants indicates that Gv symbiosis evidently improved antioxidant activities, and the enhancement of PCs production in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants suggests that Gv-inoculated plant may be more efficient to relieve Cd phytotoxicity. Therefore, the possible mechanisms of Cd phytotoxicity alleviation by Gv can be concluded as the decline of Cd concentration in the shoots and the improvement of P acquisition, PCs production and activities of CAT, POD, APX in mycorrhizal plants.

  13. Effect of Rhizobium inoculation of seeds and foliar fertilization on productivity of Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Zając

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is the second most important grain legume crop in the world which has a wide array of uses for human food and fodder. One of the major factors that determines the use of field pea is the yield potential of cultivars. Presently, pre-sowing inoculation of pea seeds and foliar application of microelement fertilizers are prospective solutions and may be reasonable agrotechnical options. This research was undertaken because of the potentially high productivity of the 'afila' morphotype in good wheat complex soils. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of vaccination with Rhizobium and foliar micronutrient fertilization on yield of the afila pea variety. The research was based on a two-year (2009–2010 controlled field experiment, conducted in four replicates and carried out on the experimental field of the Bayer company located in Modzurów, Silesian region. experimental field soil was Umbrisol – slightly degraded chernozem, formed from loess. Nitragina inoculant, as a source of symbiotic bacteria, was applied before sowing seeds. Green area index (GAI of the canopy, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI were determined at characteristic growth stages. The presented results of this study on symbiotic nitrogen fixation by leguminous plants show that the combined application of Nitragina and Photrel was the best combination for productivity. Remote measurements of the pea canopy indexes indicated the formation of the optimum leaf area which effectively used photosynthetically active radiation. The use of Nitragina as a donor of effective Rhizobium for pea plants resulted in slightly higher GAI values and the optimization of PAR and NDVI. It is not recommended to use foliar fertilizers or Nitragina separately due to the slowing of pea productivity.

  14. Development of a new lactic acid bacterial inoculant for fresh rice straw silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Geun; Ham, Jun Sang; Li, Yu Wei; Park, Hyung Soo; Huh, Chul-Sung; Park, Byung-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Objective Effects of newly isolated Lactobacillus plantarum on the fermentation and chemical composition of fresh rice straw silage was evaluated in this study. Methods Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from good crop silage were screened by growing them in MRS broth and a minimal medium with low carbohydrate content. Selected LAB (LAB 1821) were Gram-positive, rods, catalase negative, and were identified to be Lactobacillus plantarum based on their biochemical characteristics and a 16S rRNA analysis. Fresh rice straw was ensiled with two isolated LAB (1821 and 1841), two commercial inoculants (HM/F and P1132) and no additive as a control. Results After 2 months of storage at ambient temperature, rice straw silages treated with additives were well-preserved, the pH values and butyric and acetic acid contents were lower, and the lactic acid content and lactic/acetic acid ratio were higher than those in the control (psilage (psilage (psilage was lowest among the treatments. The dry matter (DM) content of the control silage was lower than that of fresh rice straw (psilages was significantly higher than that of HM/F-treated silage. Microbial additives did not have any significant (p>0.05) effect on acid detergent fiber or neutral detergent fiber contents. Crude protein (CP) content and in vitro DM digestibility (IVDMD) increased after inoculation of LAB 1821 (psilage and decreased the pH, acetic acid, NH3-N, and butyric acid contents. Therefore, adding LAB 1821 improved the fermentation quality and feed value of rice straw silage. PMID:28669141

  15. Host selenium deficiency increases the severity of chronic inflammatory myopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi-inoculated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Ricardo M; Solana, Maria E; Levander, Orville A

    2002-06-01

    Weanling C3H/HeN mice were fed either a torula yeast-based diet deficient in selenium (Se) or the same diet supplemented with 0.2 ppm Se as sodium selenite. After 4 wk of feeding, the mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with the CA-I strain (clone K98) of Trypanosoma cruzi (TC). Before inoculation, mean serum Se levels were 430 versus 61 ng/ml in adequate and deficient mice, respectively. During the ascending phase of parasitemia, the Se-deficient mice exhibited significantly higher levels of parasites at 22-34 days postinfection (PI). However, no difference was found in the subsequent descending phase. As judged by visual examination at 2-mo-PI, some Se-deficient infected mice presented clinical signs of motor dysfunction. At 3-mo-PI, the end of the observation period, this chronic disease developed into a hind limb flaccid paralysis affecting 5 of 8 infected deficient mice. No signs of paralysis were seen in noninfected mice fed either diet or in infected mice fed the Se-adequate diet. At the histological level, both Se-adequate and Se-deficient infected mice showed mild myocarditis and moderate to severe myositis, with increasing intensity from 1- to 3-mo-PI in both groups. However, the severity of myositis was always more intense in the Se-deficient mice so that prominent areas of skeletal muscle replaced by fibrotic tissue were frequently observed. Thus, it can be concluded that Se deficiency in the murine host increases the severity of TC-induced myositis.

  16. PR genes of apple: identification and expression in response to elicitors and inoculation with Erwinia amylovora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jihyun F

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decade, much work has been done to dissect the molecular basis of the defence signalling pathway in plants known as Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR. Most of the work has been carried out in model species such as Arabidopsis, with little attention paid to woody plants. However within the range of species examined, components of the pathway seem to be highly conserved. In this study, we attempted to identify downstream components of the SAR pathway in apple to serve as markers for its activation. Results We identified three pathogenesis related (PR genes from apple, PR-2, PR-5 and PR-8, which are induced in response to inoculation with the apple pathogen, Erwinia amylovora, but they are not induced in young apple shoots by treatment with known elicitors of SAR in herbaceous plants. We also identified three PR-1-like genes from apple, PR-1a, PR-1b and PR-1c, based solely on sequence similarity to known PR-1 genes of model (intensively researched herbaceous plants. The PR-1-like genes were not induced in response to inoculation with E. amylovora or by treatment with elicitors; however, each showed a distinct pattern of expression. Conclusion Four PR genes from apple were partially characterized. PR-1a, PR-2, PR-5 and PR-8 from apple are not markers for SAR in young apple shoots. Two additional PR-1-like genes were identified through in-silico analysis of apple ESTs deposited in GenBank. PR-1a, PR-1b and PR-1c are not involved in defence response or SAR in young apple shoots; this conclusion differs from that reported previously for young apple seedlings.

  17. Direct plantlet inoculation with soil or insect-associated fungi may control cabbage root fly maggots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razinger, Jaka; Lutz, Matthias; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Palmisano, Marilena; Wohler, Christian; Urek, Gregor; Grunder, Jürg

    2014-07-01

    A potential Delia radicum biological control strategy involving cauliflower plantlet inoculation with various fungi was investigated in a series of laboratory and glasshouse experiments. In addition to entomopathogenic fungi, fungi with a high rhizosphere competence and fungi with the ability to survive as saprotrophs in soil were tested. The following fungal species were evaluated in the experiments: Trichoderma atroviride, T. koningiopsis, T. gamsii, Beauveria bassiana, Metharhizium anisopliae, M. brunneum and Clonostachys solani. A commercial carbosulfan-based insecticide was used as a positive control. Additionally, two commercial products, one based on B. bassiana (Naturalis) and one on Bacillus thuringiensis (Delfin) were used as reference biocontrol agents. The aims were (i) to assess the pathogenicity of the selected fungal isolates to Delia radicum, (ii) to evaluate the fungal isolates' rhizosphere competence, with the emphasis on the persistence of the original inoculum on the growing roots, (iii) to assess possible endophytic plant tissue colonization, and (iv) to evaluate potential plant growth stimulating effects of the added inoculi. Significant pathogenicity of tested fungi against Delia radicum was confirmed in in vitro and glasshouse experiments. All tested fungi persisted on cauliflower rhizoplane. More importantly, the added fungi were found on thoroughly washed roots outside the original point of inoculation. This provided us with evidence that our tested fungi could be transferred via or grow with the elongating roots. In addition to colonizing the rhizoplane, some fungi were found inside the plant root or stem tissue, thus exhibiting endophytic characteristics. The importance of fungal ecology as a criterion in appropriate biological control agent selection is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Designing a treatment protocol with voriconazole to eliminate Aspergillus fumigatus from experimentally inoculated pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernaert, Lies A; Pasmans, Frank; Baert, Kris; Van Waeyenberghe, Lieven; Chiers, Koen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Martel, An

    2009-11-18

    To investigate the efficacy of voriconazole for the treatment of aspergillosis, three groups of six racing pigeons (Columba livia domestica) were inoculated in the apical part of the right lung with 2x10(7) conidia of an avian derived Aspergillus fumigatus strain. The minimal inhibitory concentration of voriconazole for this strain was 0.25 microg/ml. In two groups, voriconazole treatment was started upon appearance of the first clinical signs and continued for fourteen days. The third group was sham treated. The voriconazole-treated pigeons received voriconazole orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight (BW) q12h (group 1) or 20 mg/kg BW q24h (group 2). Sixteen days post-inoculation all surviving pigeons were euthanized. Weight loss, clinical scores, daily mortality, lesions at necropsy and isolation of A. fumigatus were compared between all groups. In both voriconazole-treated groups, a significant reduction in clinical signs and lesions was observed. Administering voriconazole at 10 mg/kg BW q12h eliminated A. fumigatus and administering voriconazole at 20 mg/kg BW q24h reduced A. fumigatus isolation rates. Mild histological liver abnormalities were found in group 1 (10 mg/kg BW q12h), while mild histological as well as macroscopic liver abnormalities were found in group 2 (20 mg/kg BW q24h). In conclusion, voriconazole at 10 mg/kg BW q12h in pigeons reduces clinical signs and eliminates A. fumigatus in racing pigeons experimentally infected with A. fumigatus.

  19. Welfare Assessment following Heterotopic or Orthotopic Inoculation of Bladder Cancer in C57BL/6 Mice.

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    Amy Miller

    Full Text Available Few studies have assessed whether mice used as cancer models experience pain. Despite this possibility, the usual practice is to withhold analgesics as these are generally viewed as confounding. However, pain also alters cancer progression, so preventing it might not only be beneficial to welfare but also to study validity. Establishing the extent to which different cancer models result in pain is an important first step towards their refinement. We used conditioned place preference (CPP testing and body-weight and behaviour analyses to evaluate the assumption that heterotopically implanted tumours result in less pain and fewer welfare concerns than those implanted orthotopically. C57Bl/6 mice received MB49Luc luciferase expressing bladder cancer cells or saline implanted subcutaneously or into the bladder. These tumour-bearing or control groups underwent 2 daily 45 minute conditioning trials to saline or morphine (2mg/kg and then a 15 minute drug-free preference test on day 3 of a 3 day cycle, continuing until the study ended. Tumours were imaged and behaviour data obtained following preference tests. Development of preference for the morphine-paired chamber (morphine-seeking was determined over time. Heterotopic tumour development had no effect on morphine-seeking, and although the restraint used for heterotopic inoculation caused greater initial weight losses than anaesthesia, these mice steadily gained weight and behaved comparatively normally throughout the study. Orthotopic tumour inoculation caused no initial weight losses, but over the final 7 days these mice became less active and lost more body weight than cancer-free controls. This indicated orthotopic implantation probably caused a more negative impact on welfare or conceivably pain; but only according to the current test methods. Pain could not be confirmed because morphine-seeking in the tumour-bearing groups was similar to that seen in controls. Imaging was not found to be an

  20. Plant growth promotion by inoculation with selected bacterial strains versus mineral soil supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernitznig, S; Adlassnig, W; Sprocati, A R; Turnau, K; Neagoe, A; Alisi, C; Sassmann, S; Nicoara, A; Pinto, V; Cremisini, C; Lichtscheidl, I

    2014-01-01

    In the process of remediation of mine sites, the establishment of a vegetation cover is one of the most important tasks. This study tests two different approaches to manipulate soil properties in order to facilitate plant growth. Mine waste from Ingurtosu, Sardinia, Italy rich in silt, clay, and heavy metals like Cd, Cu, and Zn was used in a series of greenhouse experiments. Bacteria with putative beneficial properties for plant growth were isolated from this substrate, propagated and consortia of ten strains were used to inoculate the substrate. Alternatively, sand and volcanic clay were added. On these treated and untreated soils, seeds of Helianthus annuus, of the native Euphorbia pithyusa, and of the grasses Agrostis capillaris, Deschampsia flexuosa and Festuca rubra were germinated, and the growth of the seedlings was monitored. The added bacteria established well under all experimental conditions and reduced the extractability of most metals. In association with H. annuus, E. pithyusa and D. flexuosa bacteria improved microbial activity and functional diversity of the original soil. Their effect on plant growth, however, was ambiguous and usually negative. The addition of sand and volcanic clay, on the other hand, had a positive effect on all plant species except E. pithyusa. Especially the grasses experienced a significant benefit. The effects of a double treatment with both bacteria and sand and volcanic clay were rather negative. It is concluded that the addition of mechanical support has great potential to boost revegetation of mining sites though it is comparatively expensive. The possibilities offered by the inoculation of bacteria, on the other hand, appear rather limited.

  1. Response of Groundnut (�JL-24� Cultivar to Mycorrhiza Inoculation and Phosphorous Application

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    Khirood DOLEY

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted on peanut Arachis hypogaea L. during 2007 growing season to determine their growth characteristics due to mycorrhizal inoculation and two different levels of soluble phosphorous application. Due to inoculation by AM fungi the growth parameters such as leaf number, shoot length, root length, fresh weight, dry weight, pod number and nodule number were significantly increased but two different level of phosphate also showed growth. However, growth parameters showed variable results when two different level of phosphate was applied along with AM fungi. Without phosphorous the mycorrhizal groundnut showed significant growth but when first low level of phosphorous was applied it showed more significant growth, however most significant result was observed with second high level of phosphorous application to the groundnut plant. Total chlorophyll content and acid and alkaline phosphatase activity was also significantly higher but most significant were observed when first level of phosphorous was applied followed by second level of phosphorous. The percent root colonization by mycorrhizal fungus Glomus fasciculatum was higher due to application of phosphorous but mycorrhizal dependency went on decreasing due to increase in the level of phosphorous. The different level of phosphorous had significant effect on growth and physiological parameters of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Arachis plants after 30, 60 and 90 days of growth period. However, the obtained results proved the improvement in plant growth with application of phosphorous. Thus, for increase in production of groundnut in the state of Maharashtra seems to be feasible option for increasing the overall production and yield.

  2. In vitro inoculation of Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas fluorescens in cryopreserved silver barb (Barbodes gonionotus) milt: Effect on fertilization capacity and transmission potential to embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonthai, Traimat; Khaopong, Weerasith; Sangsong, Jumlong; Vuthiphandchai, Verapong; Nimrat, Subuntith

    2017-11-16

    Purposive use of cryopreserved sperm contaminated with pathogenic agents has increased the risk of spreading of fish diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila and P. fluorescens inoculations into cryostored milt on fertilization capacity and transmission potential to embryos of silver barb (Barbodes gonionotus) with or without 0.25% penicillin-streptomycin (PS) administration. The experiment comprised six treatments: addition of milt into T1) extender only, T2) extender with 0.25% PS, T3) extender with A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila (BG19), T4) extender with A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila (BG19) and 0.25% PS, T5) extender with P. fluorescens (BG20) and T6) extender with P. fluorescens (BG20) and 0.25% PS. Milt were loaded into 0.25-mL straws and cryostored in the controlled-rate programmable freezer. After a cryostorage for 28 d, post-thawed sperm were evaluated for the fertilization capacity and risk of pathogen transmission to embryos. Inoculation of A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila and P. fluorescens into extended milt (T3 and T5) caused a reduction (P fertilization capacity of cryopreserved sperm. Cryopreserved sperm inoculated with the two pathogenic bacteria and 0.25% PS (T4 and T6) did not fertilize the eggs. The two pathogenic bacteria could be transmitted into embryos after artificial insemination of eggs with bacterial-inoculated cryopreserved sperm, suggesting that the risks of disease transmission via cryopreserved fish sperm would exist. This is the first study reporting pathogenic bacterial transmission on in vitro fish embryos through artificial insemination of cryopreserved sperm. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Changes in Nutrient Content of Root and Grain of Wheat Cultivars Inoculated by Azospirillum and Mycorrhiza

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    M. Jiriaie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Providing the nutritional requirements of agricultural crops by non-chemical resources is a new approach in the organic farming that has attracted the attention of both the researchers and the consumers in recent years. Therefore, it is highly important to find new fertilizer resources that are both economically able to provide the nutritional needs of the crop plants and have no adverse effects on the consumers and the environment. Materials and Methods: With this approach, an experiment was conducted in the research station of Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran in 2012-13. The experimental design was factorial based on randomized complete blocks design with three replications. The treatments including Mycorrhizal fungi in three levels (i.e. no use of strain; use of Glomus intraradices strain; and use of Glomus mosseae strain, bacteria Azospirillum lipoferum in two-levels (i.e. non-inoculated and inoculated and wheat cultivars in three levels (i.e. Chamran; Dena; and Behrang. The measured parameters include the concentration of macronutrients (i.e. nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and some micronutrients (i.e. zinc, iron and manganese in two part seed and the root of wheat. Results and Discussion: Surveying the elements content in the root and the grain indicated a significant and positive effect of the use the Azospirillum and Mycorrhiza to improve the concentration of the elements in wheat cultivars. However, the simultaneous use of these microorganisms led to an increase of the effects of their application on their assessed traits.Finally the highest concentration of N (2.21 present, P (0.50 present and Fe (33.88 mg.kg-1 were observed in the grain; the highest concentration of K (0.93 present and 0.54 present and Mn (43.11 and 23.63 mg.kg-1 were observed in the grain and root, respectively. Moreover, the highest concentration of Zn in the root (19.70 mg.kg-1 was obtained from inoculation of C.V Dena seeds with

  4. Experimental infection of specific pathogen-free pigs with Campylobacter: excretion in faeces and transmission to non-inoculated pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc Maridor, Mily; Denis, Martine; Lalande, Françoise; Beaurepaire, Bernard; Cariolet, Roland; Fravalo, Philippe; Federighi, Michel; Seegers, Henri; Belloc, Catherine

    2008-10-15

    Campylobacter species are leading agents of human bacterial gastroenteritis and consumption of food of animal origin is a major source of infection. Although pigs are known to frequently exhibit high counts of Campylobacter in their faeces, more information is needed about the dynamics of this excretion. An experimental trial was conducted to evaluate the faecal excretion of Campylobacter by 7-week-old specific pathogen-free piglets inoculated per os with three Campylobacter strains (one C. coli isolated from a pig, one C. coli and one C. jejuni from chickens) alone or simultaneously (5x10(7)CFU/strain). Non-inoculated pigs were housed in adjacent pens. Pigs were monitored for 80 days for clinical signs and by bacteriological analysis of faeces. Pigs inoculated with porcine C. coli or with a mix of the three strains excreted from 10(3) to 10(6)CFU/g of faeces with a slight decrease at the end of the trial. Animals inoculated with poultry C. coli or C. jejuni strain excreted a lower quantity and some of them stopped excreting. At the end of the trial, only C. coli was detected in the faeces of pigs inoculated simultaneously with the three bacteria. Moreover, the transmission of Campylobacter was noticed between pens for the two C. coli strains and all the neighbouring animals became shedders with a level of excretion similar to the inoculated pigs. Intermittence in the Campylobacter excretion was also observed. Finally, our study highlighted a host preference of Campylobacter, namely C. coli seems to have a higher colonization potential for pigs than C. jejuni.

  5. Evaluation of a Probiotic and a Competitive Exclusion Product Inoculated In Ovo on Broiler Chickens Challenged with Salmonella Heidelberg

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    IGO Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study evaluated a probiotic and a competitive exclusion product injected in ovo on day 18 of incubation together with Marek's disease vaccine in eggs of 56-week-old broiler breeders. Three experiments were carried out. The first trial evaluated the effect of treatments on hatchability, cecal colonization of Salmonella Heidelberg (SH, and intestinal mucosa immunity (immunoglobulin A levels in the intestinal fluid. The second trial evaluated the viability of the microorganisms in the products inoculated in a solution containing diluent and Marek's disease vaccine. The third trial evaluated the colonization of the cecal microbiota in non-challenged chickens during first four days of life by culturing cecal samples under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Hatchability was not affected by the treatments. SH cecal counts were reduced in three-day-old broilers inoculated in ovo with the competitive exclusion product. Liver and spleen pool SH counts were not different among treatments. Broilers inoculated in ovo presented higher intestinal IgA titers 24 hours after SH challenge compared with the controls. When birds were not challenged, lower cecal microbial counts in aerobic culture were determined in the control group than in the probiotic group on day 3, and in the competitive exclusion group on day 2 when cultured in anaerobiosis. The products inoculated and diluted in the vaccine solution were viable at all analyzed periods when cultured in anaerobiosis. The results of this study suggest in-ovo inoculation is an effective route for the administration of the evaluated products, which effectively enhanced the broilers' immune response to a SH challenge, as shown by the increase in IgA titers, and the reduction in cecal Salmonella Heidelberg colonization with the in-ovo inoculation with the competitive exclusion product.

  6. Plasma corticosterone concentrations in turkeys inoculated with Pasteurella multocida and maintained at high and low environmental temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simensen, E.; Olson, L.D.; Ryan, M.P.; Vanjonack, W.J.; Johnson, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay was used to determine plasma corticosterone concentration (PCC) in turkeys inoculated with Pasteurella multocida via either the palatine air spaces or the drinking water and maintained at high (33.4-37.4 C), low (2.6-5.3 C) and moderate )19.8-22.4 C) temperatures in temperature-controlled chambers. In uninoculated turkeys maintained at high temperatures, the PCC was generally lower than in turkeys maintained at moderate temperatures, whereas the opposite occurred in turkeys maintained at low temperatures. After inoculation with P. multocida, all groups of inoculated turkeys showed an increase in the average PCC, which attained a level in some turkeys of over 40 ng/ml, in relation to the average in the uninoculated turkeys, which ranged from 1.8 to 27.3 ng/ml. This increase was proportional to the severity of the infection that developed. The PCC was found to be a sensitive indicator of an incubating infection of P. multocida, since it was markedly increased in turkeys that were bled one day before the onset of depression. In turkeys that were inoculated via the palatine air spaces and maintained at 20 C, the PCC on the day of inoculation was significantly (P less than 0.05) lower in the turkeys that later died than in those that survived. Generally, the PCC was higher in the turkeys that either died between 5 and 10 days after inoculation or were depressed aa the end of the experiment on day 10, relative to the turkeys that were alert at the end of the experiment.

  7. Reproduction of mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea and colitis indistinguishable from swine dysentery following experimental inoculation with "Brachyspira hampsonii" strain 30446.

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    Joseph E Rubin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, swine dysentery, is a severe production limiting disease of swine. Recently, pigs in western Canada with clinical signs indistinguishable from swine dysentery were observed. Despite the presence of spirochetes on fecal smears, recognized Brachyspira spp. including B. hyodysenteriae could not be identified. A phylogenetically distinct Brachyspira, called "B. hampsonii" strain 30446, however was isolated. The purpose of this study was to experimentally reproduce mucohaemorrhagic colitis and characterize strain 30446 shedding following inoculation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Eighteen 13-week-old pigs were randomly assigned to inoculation (n = 12 or control (n = 6 groups in each of two trials. In trial 1, pigs were inoculated with a tissue homogenate collected from clinically affected field cases. In trial 2, pigs were inoculated with a pure broth culture of strain 30446. In both trials, mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea was significantly more common in inoculated pigs than controls, all of which remained healthy. In animals with mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea, significantly more spirochetes were observed on Gram stained fecal smears, and higher numbers of strain 30446 genome equivalents were detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR. Strain 30446 was cultured from colon and/or feces of all affected but no control animals at necropsy. CONCLUSIONS: "Brachyspira hampsonii" strain 30446 causes mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea in pigs following a 4-9 day incubation period. Fecal shedding was detectable by day 4 post inoculation, and rarely preceded the onset of mucoid or haemorrhagic diarrhea by more than 2 days. Culture and 30446-specific qPCR are reliable methods of detection of this organism in feces and tissues of diarrheic pigs. The emergence of a novel Brachyspira spp., such as "B. hampsonii", creates diagnostic challenges including higher risk of false negative diagnostic tests. We therefore

  8. Reproduction of Mucohaemorrhagic Diarrhea and Colitis Indistinguishable from Swine Dysentery following Experimental Inoculation with “Brachyspira hampsonii” Strain 30446

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Joseph E.; Costa, Matheus O.; Hill, Janet E.; Kittrell, Heather E.; Fernando, Champika; Huang, Yanyun; O’Connor, Brendan; Harding, John C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, swine dysentery, is a severe production limiting disease of swine. Recently, pigs in western Canada with clinical signs indistinguishable from swine dysentery were observed. Despite the presence of spirochetes on fecal smears, recognized Brachyspira spp. including B. hyodysenteriae could not be identified. A phylogenetically distinct Brachyspira, called “B. hampsonii” strain 30446, however was isolated. The purpose of this study was to experimentally reproduce mucohaemorrhagic colitis and characterize strain 30446 shedding following inoculation. Methods and Findings Eighteen 13-week-old pigs were randomly assigned to inoculation (n = 12) or control (n = 6) groups in each of two trials. In trial 1, pigs were inoculated with a tissue homogenate collected from clinically affected field cases. In trial 2, pigs were inoculated with a pure broth culture of strain 30446. In both trials, mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea was significantly more common in inoculated pigs than controls, all of which remained healthy. In animals with mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea, significantly more spirochetes were observed on Gram stained fecal smears, and higher numbers of strain 30446 genome equivalents were detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Strain 30446 was cultured from colon and/or feces of all affected but no control animals at necropsy. Conclusions “Brachyspira hampsonii” strain 30446 causes mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea in pigs following a 4–9 day incubation period. Fecal shedding was detectable by day 4 post inoculation, and rarely preceded the onset of mucoid or haemorrhagic diarrhea by more than 2 days. Culture and 30446-specific qPCR are reliable methods of detection of this organism in feces and tissues of diarrheic pigs. The emergence of a novel Brachyspira spp., such as “B. hampsonii”, creates diagnostic challenges including higher risk of false negative diagnostic tests. We therefore recommend

  9. Reproduction of mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea and colitis indistinguishable from swine dysentery following experimental inoculation with "Brachyspira hampsonii" strain 30446.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Joseph E; Costa, Matheus O; Hill, Janet E; Kittrell, Heather E; Fernando, Champika; Huang, Yanyun; O'Connor, Brendan; Harding, John C S

    2013-01-01

    Mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, swine dysentery, is a severe production limiting disease of swine. Recently, pigs in western Canada with clinical signs indistinguishable from swine dysentery were observed. Despite the presence of spirochetes on fecal smears, recognized Brachyspira spp. including B. hyodysenteriae could not be identified. A phylogenetically distinct Brachyspira, called "B. hampsonii" strain 30446, however was isolated. The purpose of this study was to experimentally reproduce mucohaemorrhagic colitis and characterize strain 30446 shedding following inoculation. Eighteen 13-week-old pigs were randomly assigned to inoculation (n = 12) or control (n = 6) groups in each of two trials. In trial 1, pigs were inoculated with a tissue homogenate collected from clinically affected field cases. In trial 2, pigs were inoculated with a pure broth culture of strain 30446. In both trials, mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea was significantly more common in inoculated pigs than controls, all of which remained healthy. In animals with mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea, significantly more spirochetes were observed on Gram stained fecal smears, and higher numbers of strain 30446 genome equivalents were detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Strain 30446 was cultured from colon and/or feces of all affected but no control animals at necropsy. "Brachyspira hampsonii" strain 30446 causes mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea in pigs following a 4-9 day incubation period. Fecal shedding was detectable by day 4 post inoculation, and rarely preceded the onset of mucoid or haemorrhagic diarrhea by more than 2 days. Culture and 30446-specific qPCR are reliable methods of detection of this organism in feces and tissues of diarrheic pigs. The emergence of a novel Brachyspira spp., such as "B. hampsonii", creates diagnostic challenges including higher risk of false negative diagnostic tests. We therefore recommend diagnostic laboratories routinely use Brachyspira culture

  10. Effect of endophytic Bacillus cereus ERBP inoculation into non-native host: Potentials and challenges for airborne formaldehyde removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaksar, Gholamreza; Treesubsuntorn, Chairat; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2016-10-01

    Phytoremediation could be a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach for the treatment of indoor air. However, some drawbacks still dispute the expediency of phytotechnology. Our objectives were to investigate the competency of plant growth-promoting (PGP) endophytic Bacillus cereus ERBP (endophyte root blue pea), isolated from the root of Clitoria ternatea, to colonize and stabilize within Zamioculcas zamiifolia and Euphorbia milii as non-native hosts without causing any disease or stress symptoms. Moreover, the impact of B. cereus ERBP on the natural shoot endophytic community and for the airborne formaldehyde removal capability of non-native hosts was assessed. Non-native Z. zamiifolia was effectively inoculated with B. cereus ERBP through soil as the most efficient method of endophyte inoculation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling of the shoot endophytic community verified the colonization and stability of B. cereus ERBP within its non-native host during a 20-d fumigation period without interfering with the natural shoot endophytic diversity of Z. zamiifolia. B. cereus ERBP conferred full protection to its non-native host against formaldehyde phytotoxicity and enhanced airborne formaldehyde removal of Z. zamiifolia whereas non-inoculated plants suffered from formaldehyde phytotoxicity because their natural shoot endophytic community was detrimentally affected by formaldehyde. In contrast, B. cereus ERBP inoculation into non-native E. milii deteriorated airborne formaldehyde removal of the non-native host (compared to a non-inoculated one) as B. cereus ERBP interfered with natural shoot endophytic community of E. milii, which caused stress symptoms and stimulated ethylene biosynthesis. Non-native host inoculation with PGP B. cereus ERBP could bear potentials and challenges for airborne formaldehyde removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of inoculation and nitrogen top-dressing on yield and fodder value of winter pea in wheat mixture

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    Darko Uher

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Two year field trials (1999-2001 were carried out to determin the effect of seed winter pea inoculation and nitrogen top-dressing on number and activity of pea root nodules and also on the green mass and dry matter yield of winter pea cv. Maksimirski ozimi and wheat cv. Sana mixture. Just before sowing the inoculation of pea seeds was performed by the indigenous variety of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae which is part of the microbial collection of the Department of Microbiology at the Faculty of Agriculture University of Zagreb. In the investigation period (25th April, 2000 and 2001 the highest total nodule number on pea root was determined on the inoculated variant (154 as well as active nodule 144. Average mixture green mass yield were ranging from 46,3 t ha-1 (control up to 54,7 t ha-1 (inoculation. Pea mass content in total green mass yield was from 28 % (nitrogen top-dressing up to 34 % (control. Total dry matter yields were ranging from 11,65 t ha-1 (control up to 13,25 t ha-1 (nitrogen top-dressing. Inoculated mass variant 2 and control variant 1 had (29,6 % and 28 % a higher pea mass content in respect to nitrogen top-dressing variants 3 and 4 (23,8 and 22,5 %. Pea crude proteins yields in 2001 were ranging from 196 kg ha-1 (control up to 300 kg ha-1 (inoculation and for wheat, those values ranged from 1 707 kg ha-1 (control up to 2 111 kg ha-1 (nitrogen top-dressing. Total crude proteins mixture yield were from 1 903 kg ha-1 (control up to 2 407 kg ha-1 (nitrogen top-dressing.

  12. Alleviation of salt stress in citrus seedlings inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi depends on the rootstock salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Josefa M; Pérez-Tornero, Olaya; Morte, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    Seedlings of Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan.) and Alemow (Citrus macrophylla Wester) were inoculated with a mixture of AM fungi (Rhizophagus irregularis and Funneliformis mosseae) (+AM), or left non-inoculated (-AM). From forty-five days after fungal inoculation onwards, half of +AM or -AM plants were irrigated with nutrient solution containing 50 mM NaCl. Three months later, AM significantly increased plant growth in both Cleopatra mandarin and Alemow rootstocks. Plant growth was higher in salinized +AM plants than in non-salinized -AM plants, demonstrating that AM compensates the growth limitations imposed by salinity. Whereas AM-inoculated Cleopatra mandarin seedlings had a very good response under saline treatment, inoculation in Alemow did not alleviate the negative effect of salinity. The beneficial effect of mycorrhization is unrelated with protection against the uptake of Na or Cl and the effect of AM on these ions did not explain the different response of rootstocks. This response was related with the nutritional status since our findings confirm that AM fungi can alter host responses to salinity stress, improving more the P, K, Fe and Cu plant nutrition in Cleopatra mandarin than in Alemow plants. AM inoculation under saline treatments also increased root Mg concentration but it was higher in Cleopatra mandarin than in Alemow. This could explain why AM fungus did not completely recovered chlorophyll concentrations in Alemow and consequently it had lower photosynthesis rate than control plants. AM fungi play an essential role in citrus rootstock growth and biomass production although the intensity of this response depends on the rootstock salinity tolerance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of pre- and post-transplant inoculation with commercial arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi on pelargonium (Pelargonium hortorum and its microorganism community

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    Gergely Csima

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rooted cuttings of geranium were grown with and without a slow release fertilizer and inoculated or not with a commercial inoculum containing AM fungi. After six weeks plants were transplanted into larger containers and one-half of the plants were inoculated with AM. Inoculation increased pelargonium growth along with nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium concentrations in shoot than caused a slight decrease in shoot growth and enhanced N concentration. Colony forming units of total fungi and bacteria in the rhizosphere were not influenced by AM;  although RFLP profiles of DNA isolated from bacteria living in rhizosphere showed a more diverse community in AM-inoculated than non-inoculated plants at low nutrient supply. Our results suggest that mycorrhizal inoculation not only has an effect on plant growth and uptake of elements but it also influences directly or indirectly the bacterial community of the rhizosphere.

  14. Effects of straw incorporation along with microbial inoculant on methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gang; Yu, Haiyang [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 71 East Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 71 East Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Xu, Hua, E-mail: hxu@issas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 71 East Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wu, Qinyan; Yang, Jinghui; Zhuang, Yiqing [Zhenjiang Institute of Agricultural Science of Hilly Regions in Jiangsu, Jurong 212400 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Incorporation of straw together with microbial inoculant (a microorganism agent, accelerating straw decomposition) is being increasingly adopted in rice cultivation, thus its effect on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions merits serious attention. A 3-year field experiment was conducted from 2010 to 2012 to investigate combined effect of straw and microbial inoculant on methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) in a rice field in Jurong, Jiangsu Province, China. The experiment was designed to have treatment NPK (N, P and K fertilizers only), treatment NPKS (NPK plus wheat straw), treatment NPKSR (NPKS plus Ruilaite microbial inoculant) and treatment NPKSJ (NPKS plus Jinkuizi microbial inoculant). Results show that compared to NPK, NPKS increased seasonal CH{sub 4} emission by 280–1370%, while decreasing N{sub 2}O emission by 7–13%. When compared with NPKS, NPKSR and NPKSJ increased seasonal CH{sub 4} emission by 7–13% and 6–12%, respectively, whereas reduced N{sub 2}O emission by 10–27% and 9–24%, respectively. The higher CH{sub 4} emission could be attributed to the higher soil CH{sub 4} production potential triggered by the combined application of straw and microbial inoculant, and the lower N{sub 2}O emission to the decreased inorganic N content. As a whole, the benefit of lower N{sub 2}O emission was completely offset by increased CH{sub 4} emission, resulting in a higher GWP for NPKSR (5–12%) and NPKSJ (5–11%) relative to NPKS. Due to NPKSR and NPKSJ increased rice grain yield by 3–6% and 2–4% compared to NPKS, the GHGI values for NPKS, NPKSR and NPKSJ were comparable. These findings suggest that incorporating straw together with microbial inoculant would not influence the radiative forcing of rice production in the terms of per unit of rice grain yield relative to the incorporation of straw alone. - Highlights: • This paper presents 3-year measurements of CH

  15. Effects of wilting and lactic acid bacteria inoculation on fermentation quality of white lupin and fababean silages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Borreani

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Fababeans and lupins are short-term catch crops with a high crude protein content, which provide a high forage yield in a short growing period. Legumes are difficult to conserve as silages because of their low water soluble carbohydrates content (WSC and high buffer capacity. To our knowledge, little information is available on the ensiling of fababeans and lupins in Southern Europe. The research was carried out in Lodi (Italy in order to evaluate the effects of wilting and inoculation with lactic acid bacteria (LAB on fermentation characteristics of the resulting silages. The data show that both wilting and LAB inoculant significantly improved fermentation quality of the legumes silages.

  16. Differential induction of chitinase in Piper colubrinum in response to inoculation with Phytophthora capsici, the cause of foot rot in black pepper

    OpenAIRE

    R.Sandeep Varma; Johnson George, K.; Balaji, S.; Parthasarathy, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant chitinases have been of particular interest since they are known to be induced upon pathogen invasion. Inoculation of Piper colubrinum leaves with the foot rot fungus, Phytophthora capsici leads to increase in chitinase activity. A marked increase in chitinase activity in the inoculated leaves was observed, with the maximum activity after 60 h of inoculation and gradually decreased thereafter. Older leaves showed more chitinase activity than young leaves. The level of chitinase in black...

  17. To compare the incubation period following intratracheal and subcutaneous inoculation of bovine leukosis virus infected lymphocytes and to study their clearance from the circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D H; Lucas, M H; Wibberley, G

    1986-04-01

    The migration of fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled lymphocytes through the tracheobronchial mucosa has been studied in cattle. Following intratracheal inoculation of labelled non-infected autologous lymphocytes and bovine leukosis virus (BLV) infected heterologous (presumed allogeneic) lymphocytes, the labelled lymphocytes appeared in the blood circulation between 4 and 7 days post inoculation. Following intravenous inoculation of labelled autologous lymphocytes, the cells could be detected in the circulation for 10 days post inoculation whereas BLV infected and non-infected heterologous lymphocytes could be detected for only 2 days. The migration of BLV-infected heterologous lymphocytes through the tracheobronchial mucosa caused a delay in the appearance of labelled lymphocytes in the circulation and a corresponding delay in the appearance of BLV antibodies. Comparison was made of the effect of two different routes of inoculation, subcutaneous and intratracheal on the incubation period as indicated by the detection of antibody. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1 X 10(4), 5 X 10(3), 1 X 10(3) of lymphocytes from a BLV infected cow caused seroconversion whereas 5 X 10(2) cells did not. Intratracheal inoculation of 5 X 10(3) cells caused sero-conversion. One animal did not develop BLV antibody until 30 weeks after inoculation although BLV could be isolated from the blood at 24 and 26 weeks post inoculation.

  18. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Thymus capitata Essential Oil with Its Preservative Effect against Listeria monocytogenes Inoculated in Minced Beef Meat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El Abed, Nariman; Kaabi, Belhassen; Smaali, Mohamed Issam; Chabbouh, Meriem; Habibi, Kamel; Mejri, Mondher; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib; Ben Hadj Ahmed, Sami

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, and the preservative effect of Thymus capitata essential oil against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in minced beef meat were evaluated...

  19. Phytostabilization of moderate copper contaminated soils using co-inoculation of Vicia faba with plant growth promoting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatnassi, Imen Challougui; Chiboub, Manel; Saadani, Omar; Jebara, Moez; Jebara, Salwa Harzalli

    2015-03-01

    There is a need to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from rhizosphere of plants growing on heavy metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programs. This article suggest a consortium of bacteria combining Rhizobium sp. CCNWSX0481, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas sp. 2(2010) that was examined for the ability to promote Vicia faba.L. growth when cultivated on the vineyard of soil moderately contaminated with copper. Data showed that inoculation was significant in nodulation; it increases the number and the weight of nodules of 50%. Co-inoculation was also found to positively influence growth and seed yield, through increasing fresh shoot and fresh root weights by 33 and 26%, respectively, and through rising numbers of seed per pod and pods per plant. In contrast, co-inoculation produced a significant reduction of accumulated copper in roots attending 35%, however, the treatment revealed no significant effects on the copper contents in pods and seeds. The tested inoculum could be an option to promote V. faba growth and to enhance soil fertilization in moderate copper contaminated soils. Further studies on the influence of co-inoculation practices on copper migration in soil-plant systems are recommended to acquire more information for evaluation of this legume safety. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Inoculation of tomato plants with rhizobacteria enhances the performance of the phloem-feeding insect Bemisia tabaci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Roee; Ofek-Lalzar, Maya; Burdman, Saul; Morin, Shai

    2013-01-01

    In their natural environment, plants experience multiple biotic interactions and respond to this complexity in an integrated manner. Therefore, plant responses to herbivory are flexible and depend on the context and complexity in which they occur. For example, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) can enhance plant growth and induce resistance against microbial pathogens and herbivorous insects by a phenomenon termed induced systemic resistance (ISR). In the present study, we investigated the effect of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) pre-inoculation with the PGPR Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r, on the performance of the generalist phloem-feeding insect Bemisia tabaci. Based on the ability of P. fluorescens WCS417r to prime for ISR against generalists chewing insects and necrotrophic pathogens, we hypothesized that pre-inoculated plants will strongly resist B. tabaci infestation. In contrast, we discovered that the pre-inoculation treatment increased the tomato plant suitability for B. tabaci which was emphasized both by faster developmental rate and higher survivability of nymph stages on pre-inoculated plants. Our molecular and chemical analyses suggested that the phenomenon is likely to be related to: (I) the ability of the bacteria to reduce the activity of the plant induced defense systems; (II) a possible manipulation by P. fluorescens of the plant quality (in terms of suitability for B. tabaci) through an indirect effect on the rhizosphere bacterial community. The contribution of our study to the pattern proposed for other belowground rhizobacteria and mycorrhizal fungi and aboveground generalist phloem-feeders is discussed. PMID:23964283