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Sample records for spray casting project

  1. Spray casting project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step

  2. Hair casts due to a deodorant spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ena, Pasquale; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Chiarolini, Fausto

    2005-11-01

    A 7-year-old girl presented with itching and greyish-white sleeve-like structures in her hair. After ruling out other possible causes for the symptoms, such as nits and dandruff, it was determined that the patient was affected by hair casts. These are small cylindrical structures resembling louse eggs that encircle individual scalp hairs and are easily movable along the hair shafts. It was concluded that she had induced the condition through misuse of a deodorant body spray. Scanning electron microscopy combined with electron dispersive X-ray analysis (X-ray microanalysis) of the hair casts showed the chemical nature of the structures. Some elements present in the composition of the ingredients of the deodorant spray, such as aluminium, chlorine, silicon, magnesium and carbon, were also present in this uncommon type of hair casts.

  3. The CAST Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Autiero, D.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Chesi, E.; Davenport, M.; Delattre, M.; Di Lella, L.; Formenti, F.; Irastorza, I.G.; Gomez, H.; Hasinoff, M.; Lakic, B.; Luzon, G.; Morales, J.; Musa, L.; Ortiz, A.; Placci, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J.A.; Zioutas, K.

    2007-01-01

    One of the three X-ray detectors of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity X-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is safely set during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62 %. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 x 10^-5 counts/cm^2/s/keV between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion-photon coupling and mass.

  4. Sprays and Cartan projective connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D. J.

    2004-10-01

    Around 80 years ago, several authors (for instance H. Weyl, T.Y. Thomas, J. Douglas and J.H.C. Whitehead) studied the projective geometry of paths, using the methods of tensor calculus. The principal object of study was a spray, namely a homogeneous second-order differential equation, or more generally a projective equivalence class of sprays. At around the same time, E. Cartan studied the same topic from a different point of view, by imagining a projective space attached to a manifold, or, more generally, attached to a `manifold of elements'; the infinitesimal `glue' may be interpreted in modern language as a Cartan projective connection on a principal bundle. This paper describes the geometrical relationship between these two points of view.

  5. Simultaneous oxidation and decarburization of cast iron powder during plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voleník, Karel; Schneeweiss, Oldřich; Chráska, Tomáš; Dubský, Jiří; Písačka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2009), s. 19-24 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1041404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : cast iron powder * plasma spraying * oxidation * decarburization Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.345, year: 2007 http://kovmat.sav.sk/abstract.php?rr=47&cc=1&ss=19

  6. Salt Spray Corrosion of Mechanical Junctions of Magnesium Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassini, Sabrina; Matteis, Paolo; Scavino, Giorgio; Rossetto, Marco; Firrao, Donato

    The corrosion of cast, 3 mm thick, AE44 magnesium-alloy plates fastened to aluminum-alloy threaded counterparts, either constituting the screw or the nut, were tested in neutral salt spray for 48 hours, with or without interposed AA5051 spacers (washers). Steel nuts or screws were used, always insulating from corrosion the steel sides. Couplings between magnesium alloy plates and coated steel counterparts (screw heads) with interposed AA5051 washers were also tested, while insulating the nut side. Every 4 or 8 hours the test was halted and the samples were rinsed and photographed for manual image analysis. Then the plates were unmounted, slightly polished (highlighting the deep corrosion pits), and scanned for automatic image analysis. Different image analysis methods were compared. The least corrosion occurs, in couplings with aluminum alloy counterparts, when AA5051 washers are interposed; whereas the most effective coupling with steel counterparts is the one with nylon coated steel heads.

  7. Flame Sprayed Al-12Si Coatings for the Improvement of the Adhesion of Composite Casting Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyer, Joël; Peterlechner, Christian; Noster, Ulf

    2008-12-01

    In this study, flame sprayed Al-12Si coatings were produced on the surface of inlays (aluminum profiles) of composite castings parts. The aim was to enhance the strength between the joining partners inlay and cast. Due to the high surface roughness and the presence of pores in the coatings, combined with the formation of an intermetallic phase at the interface, the adhesion of flame sprayed inlays could be enhanced by a factor of 2 compared to blank inlays and by a factor of 1.3 when compared to sand-blasted inlays. However, results also show that gaps are present, mostly at the interface between the inlays and the flame sprayed coatings, and these gaps have a negative effect on the joining strength of the composite casting parts. Therefore, optimizing the adhesion of the coating on the Al profiles via an improvement in both the sand-blasting and the flame spraying parameters would be beneficial for further enhancement of the adhesion of composite casting parts.

  8. Plasma sprayed coatings on mild steel split moulds for uranium casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, K.P.; Padmanaban, P.V.A.; Venkatramani, N.; Singh, S.P.; Saha, D.P.; Date, V.G.

    2002-01-01

    High velocity high temperature plasma jets are used to deposit metals and ceramics on metallic substrates for oxidation and corrosion protection applications. Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings on metallic substrates are also used to prevent its reaction with molten metals. Metal-alumina duplex coatings on mild steel split moulds have been developed and successfully used for casting of uranium. Techno-economics of the coated moulds against the conventional graphite moulds are a major advantage. Mild steel moulds of 600 mm long and 75 mm in diameter have been plasma spray coated with alumina over a bond coat of molybdenum. In-plant tests showed an increase in number of castings per mould compared to the commonly used graphite moulds. (author)

  9. Spray cast Al-Si base alloys for stiffness and fatigue strength requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courbiere, M.; Mocellin, A.

    1993-01-01

    Hypereutectic AlSiFe spray-cast alloys exhibit properties similar to those of metal-matrix composite (MMC's) : high Young's modulus and a low coefficient of thermal expansion. These physical properties can be adjusted by changing the Si content of the alloy. The refinement of the microstructure is produced by formation of a large amount of nuclei in the spray. Consolidation done by extrusion (bars, tubes or profiles) and/or forging leads to high mechanical properties, especially very good dynamic properties. High fatigue properties coupled with high modulus, good high temperature behaviour and low thermal expansion, allow their use for applications in the automotive industry. In opposition to MMC's, these materials present the advantage of easy recycling and easy machinability as it is the case for the conventional AlSi alloys. The low oxygen content allows quality joining with conventional arc welding techniques. (orig.)

  10. Modular Spray-Cooled Assemblies for High Heat Fluxes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II project will produce a flight suitable test bench based on a modular spray-cooled assembly that considers NASA power and mass budgets and can...

  11. Water Reclamation using Spray Drying Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a new spray drying technology for the recovery and recycle of water while stabilizing the solid wastes or residues as found in advanced life support...

  12. Analysis of powder particles of high carbon cast iron after air plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneeweiss, Oldřich; Voleník, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 189, č. 2 (2009), s. 39-44 ISSN 0304-3843. [ISIAME´08. International Symposium on the Industrial Applications of the Mössbauer Effect. Budapest, 17.08.2008-22.08.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1041404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma spraying * oxidation * Mössbauer spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.209, year: 2007

  13. Measurement of the thickness of the sprayed nickel coatings on large-sized cast iron products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. А. Сясько

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern industries increasingly use automatic spraying of heat-resistant Nickel  coating with a thickness  of      T = 1-3 mm for large-size parts made of cast iron with nodular graphite. The process of coating application is characterized by time-dependent behavior of its relative magnetic permeability, μс , that is a function of relaxation time, which can be as long as 24 hours, and by μс deviation from point to point on the surface. Aspects of eddy-current phase method for measuring the T value are considered. The structure of four- winding eddy current transformer transducers is described and results of calculation and optimization of their parameters are presented. The influence of controlled and interfering parameters is considered. Based  on the above results, a two-channel combined transducer is developed  providing measurement  error  of ΔТ ≤ ±(0.03T + 0.02 mm  in the shop environment in the process of coating application and in the final product check. Results of tests on reference specimens and of application in production processes are presented.

  14. Real-Time, Model-Based Spray-Cooling Control System for Steel Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrus, Bryan; Zheng, Kai; Zhou, X.; Thomas, Brian G.; Bentsman, Joseph

    2011-02-01

    This article presents a new system to control secondary cooling water sprays in continuous casting of thin steel slabs (CONONLINE). It uses real-time numerical simulation of heat transfer and solidification within the strand as a software sensor in place of unreliable temperature measurements. The one-dimensional finite-difference model, CON1D, is adapted to create the real-time predictor of the slab temperature and solidification state. During operation, the model is updated with data collected by the caster automation systems. A decentralized controller configuration based on a bank of proportional-integral controllers with antiwindup is developed to maintain the shell surface-temperature profile at a desired set point. A new method of set-point generation is proposed to account for measured mold heat flux variations. A user-friendly monitor visualizes the results and accepts set-point changes from the caster operator. Example simulations demonstrate how a significantly better shell surface-temperature control is achieved.

  15. Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration Project Management. Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2011-01-01

    The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates in atmospheric environments is the use of an applied coating system. Current coating systems used across AFSPC and NASA contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). These coatings are sUbject to environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their usage. In addition, these coatings often cannot withstand the high temperatures and exhaust that may be experienced by Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA structures. In response to these concerns, AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of thermal spray coatings (TSCs). Thermal spray coatings are extremely durable and environmentally friendly coating alternatives, but utilize large cumbersome equipment for application that make the coatings difficult and time consuming to repair. Other concerns include difficulties coating complex geometries and the cost of equipment, training, and materials. Gas Dynamic Spray (GOS) technology (also known as Cold Spray) was evaluated as a smaller, more maneuverable repair method as well as for areas where thermal spray techniques are not as effective. The technology can result in reduced maintenance and thus reduced hazardous materials/wastes associated with current processes. Thermal spray and GOS coatings also have no VOCs and are environmentally preferable coatings. The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs. The aim was that successful completion of this project would result in approval of GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs at AFSPC and NASA installations to improve corrosion protection at critical systems, facilitate easier maintenance activity, extend maintenance cycles, eliminate flight hardware contamination, and reduce the amount of hazardous waste generated.

  16. The EC CAST project (carbon-14 source term)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-14 is a key radionuclide in the assessment of the safety of underground geological disposal facilities for radioactive wastes. It is possible for carbon-14 to be released from waste packages in a variety of chemical forms, both organic and inorganic, and as dissolved or gaseous species The EC CAST (CArbon-14 Source Term) project aims to develop understanding of the generation and release of carbon-14 from radioactive waste materials under conditions relevant to packaging and disposal. It focuses on the release of carbon-14 from irradiated metals (steels and zirconium alloys), from irradiated graphite and from spent ion-exchange resins. The CAST consortium brings together 33 partners. CAST commenced in October 2013 and this paper describes progress to March 2015. The main activities during this period were reviews of the current status of knowledge, the identification and acquisition of suitable samples and the design of experiments and analytical procedures. (authors)

  17. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  18. EPA Project Updates: DSSTox and ToxCast Generating New ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPAs National Center for Computational Toxicology is building capabilities to support a new paradigm for toxicity screening and prediction. The DSSTox project is improving public access to quality structure-annotated chemical toxicity information in less summarized forms than traditionally employed in SAR modeling, and in ways that facilitate data-mining, and data read-across. The DSSTox Structure-Browser, launched in September 2007, provides structure searchability across all published DSSTox toxicity-related inventory, and is enabling linkages between previously isolated toxicity data resources. As of early March 2008, the public DSSTox inventory as been integrated into PubChem, allowing a user to take full advantage of PubChem structure-activity and bioassay clustering features. The most recent DSSTox version of Carcinogenic Potency Database file (CPDBAS) illustrates ways in which various summary definitions of carcinogenic activity can be employed in modeling and data mining. Phase I of the ToxCast project is generating high-throughput screening data from several hundred biochemical and cell-based assays for a set of 320 chemicals, mostly pesticide actives, with rich toxicology profiles. Incorporating and expanding traditional SAR Concepts into this new high-throughput and data-rich would pose conceptual and practical challenges, but also holds great promise for improving predictive capabilities. EPA's National Center for Computational Toxicology is bu

  19. Wear and Corrosion Resistance of Fe Based Coatings by HVOF Sprayed on Gray Cast-Iron for Automotive Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Priyan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, commercially available FeSiNiCr and FeBCr alloy powders were designed with suitable compositions, gas atomized and then coated on gray cast-iron substrate. The microstructures of the feed stock Fe based alloy powders and the coatings were investigated by means of optical microscopy (OM, X-Ray diffraction (XRD, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In the present study, both the coating materials experienced two-body wear mechanisms. The results showed that for loads of 0.05 N, 0.1 N and 0.2 N, the wear resistance of FeBCr coating was less than FeSiNiCr by 44 %, 40 % and 31 %, respectively. The results indicated that the coated substrates exhibited lower corrosion current densities and lower corrosion rates, when placed in 20 wt.% H2SO4 solutions. In addition, the use of optimal spraying parameters/conditions gave improvements to the corrosion resistance of the substrates that had been treated with the crystalline coating.

  20. Anode-supported BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ membranes by tape casting and suspension spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jin; Yuan, Hongchun; Chen, Lei; Xiong, Chao; Ma, Jinxiang; Zhao, Yu; Chai, Jimin; Du, Wenhan; Zhu, Xifang

    2017-07-01

    Dense BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BZY) proton-conducting electrolyte membranes are successfully fabricated on NiO-BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.2O3-δ(NiO-BZCY) using tape casting combined with suspension spraying technique. The NiO-BZCY anode substrates were prepared by the tape-casting method and the BZY electrolyte membranes were prepared on the NiO-BZCY anodes by suspension spraying. The thermal decomposition of the anode green tape prepared by tape casting was investigated by thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis while the phase structure and the morphology of the anode/electrolyte bi-layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). No obvious reaction was found between NiO and BZCY in anode substrates and gas-tight BZY membranes were achieved after co-sintering at 1450∘C. With Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ-Ce0.8Sm0.2O2-δ(SSC-SDC) as the composite cathode, a maximum power density of 121 mW cm-2 was obtained at 650∘C for the single cell with 23 μm thick BZY electrolyte. Resistances of the tested cell were investigated under open circuit conditions at different operating temperatures by impedance spectroscopy.

  1. Planning calculations of spray tests for the ERCOSAM-SAMARA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Z. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Andreani, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Within the framework of the ERCOSAM-SAMARA project, co-funded by the European Union and the Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation, planning and pre-test calculations are performed to examine sensitivity parameters that can affect the break-up (erosion) of a helium (substitute for hydrogen) layer by mitigation devices (i.e., cooler, spray, or Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner - PAR). This paper reports the GOTHIC analysis results for the spray tests to be performed in the PANDA facility. The effects of spray flow rate, temperature and injection height on depressurization, erosion of helium cloud and gas transport behavior are studied. This analysis is valuable because only a limited number of conditions will be examined in the planned experiments. The study provides a useful understanding of the interaction of spray with a stratified atmosphere. (author)

  2. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehlke, R. D.; Cookson, John M.; Shouwei Hao; Prasad Krishna; Bilkey, Kevin T.

    2001-01-01

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive

  3. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of HVOF-Sprayed (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) Composite Coating on Ductile Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Boron, Lukasz; Radecka, Marta; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the investigations was to compare the microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni and Cr3C2-NiCr coatings deposited by HVOF technique (the high-velocity oxygen fuel spray process) on ductile cast iron. The effect of nickel particles added to the chromium carbide coating on mechanical and wear behavior in the system of Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni/ductile cast iron was analyzed in order to improve the lifetime of coated materials. The structure with particular emphasis of characteristic of the interface in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron was studied using the optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopes, as well as the analysis of chemical and phase composition in microareas. Experimental results show that HVOF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni composite coating exhibits low porosity, high hardness, dense structure with large, partially molten Ni particles and very fine Cr3C2 and Cr7C3 particles embedded in NiCr alloy matrix, coming to the size of nanocrystalline. The results were discussed in reference to examination of bending strength considering cracking and delamination in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron as well as hardness and wear resistance of the coating. The composite structure of the coating provides the relatively good plasticity of the coating, which in turn has a positive effect on the adhesion of coating to the substrate and cohesion of the composite coating (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) in wear conditions.

  4. Axial oblique projections - volumetric studies into left ventricular cast specimens of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duebel, H.P.; Tschapek, A.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Molekularbiologie)

    1984-01-01

    Single-plane and biplane cineradiography was applied in various axial oblique projections to 15 cast specimens of the left ventricle. Their volumes were calculated by the area-length method. In these model studies, sufficiently accurate volume calculation proved to be practicable by sitting-up projection (SUP), hepatoclavicular representation (HCP), and long-axis representation with 40 0 angulation in the anterior-posterior plane (SLP 2 C 2 ). The latter representation gave the smallest deviations from true volume. (orig.)

  5. The Structure and Bond Strength of Composite Carbide Coatings (WC-Co + Ni) Deposited on Ductile Cast Iron by Thermal Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Boron, Lukasz; Radecka, Marta; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Adam

    2016-02-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the role of Ni particles in the WC-Co coating produced with the supersonic method on microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties in a system of type: WC-Co coating/ductile cast iron. The microstructure of the thermal-sprayed WC-Co + Ni coating was characterized by scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes as well as the analysis of chemical and phase composition in microareas (EDS, XRD). The microstructure of the WC-Co + Ni coating consisted of large, partially molten Ni particles and very fine grains of WC embedded in cobalt matrix, coming to the size of nanocrystalline. Moreover, the results were discussed in reference to examination of bending strength considering cracking and delamination in the system of (WC-Co + Ni)/ductile cast iron as well as hardness and wear resistance of the coating. It was found that the addition of Ni particles was significantly increase resistance to cracking and wear behavior in the studied system.

  6. Environmental compatibility investigation of the Garzweiler II open cast mine project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, A.; Gaertner, D.

    1994-01-01

    Based on an EEC directive, the law on the investigation of ecological compatibility came into force in 1990. With the application of these European directives in national law, investigations to determine the ecological compatibility must now be carried out for projects to exploit brown coal. In this connection and in conjunction with the licensing procedure for Garzweiler II, Rheinbraun in 1992 for the first time compiled data on the investigations carried out to determine the ecological compatibility of an open cast mine. The data on these investigations include information on the necessity of the open cast mine and on alternative projects that have been examined, as well as a description of the project in question as regards its nature and extent. As far as the legally specified protected objects are concerned, i.e. people, water, air, nature (animals and plants, soil, climate and landscape) as well as cultural and other material objects, itemized data are furnished on the development and effects of the project and on countermeasures and the planned traffic and transport concept. (orig.) [de

  7. Control of cost heftiness of castings production with improvement of PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kafka

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Specialized Commission for Economy of Czech Foundrymen Society in the Czech Republic systematically follows a solution of particular phases of castings production from iron and non-ferrous metals already for eighth years. These separate studies are uniformly aimed at cost analysis of chosen phases of castings production. The analysis of cost heftiness and recommendations for concrete remedies for particular foundries are the results. The contribution is aimed at transparent description of topics of the PROJECTS I – VII. Further on it describes in more details the PROJECT VIII, especially the costs of preparation of moulding mixtures. The team solving this problem gathers the results of costs comparison of preparation of fifteen moulding mixtures in five Czech foundries in this project. The inquiry topics are bentonite moulding mixtures (unit, pattern, and heap, further on the self-setting mixtures (with waterglass and furane. The inquiry is closed with Cold-Box-Amine core mixture. The evaluation is aimed both at own cost comparison, and at prediction of moulding mixture costs resulting from knowledge of their structure. Further on it deals with the future growth of waste costs. Subsequently, the possibilities of costs specification concerning to power consumption are viewed. Very interesting results are described for studying the relations of costs of moulding mixtures and particular castings. Questions of determining the price of used return moulding mixture are remarkable too. The way to achieve another costs reduction is also the investigation of costs changeableness for mixing the mixtures.The work ends with summary suggestion of next progress.

  8. Economic evaluation of environmental impacts of open cast mining project - an approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, S.K.; Pathak, K.

    1998-01-01

    Economic valuation of environmental attributes are pragmatic approach to evaluating the impacts and it helps decision makers to arrive at objective decisions on the basis of cost benefit ratio. For determining the physical impact and its quantification, four evaluation methods, namely-market price method, surrogate market price, survey based and cost based approaches are generally used. The present paper reviews the importance of environmental evaluation of impacts of mining and also reviews a few suitable methodologies that could be effectively used for economic evaluation of environmental impacts in open cast mining projects. (author)

  9. UK's Brexit battle casts shadow over funding for international fusion projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear 24, Redditch (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    The ramifications of Brexit - the UK's decision to leave the European Union - have continued to send shockwaves through the nuclear energy community, since I explained in this column recently that the move also means withdrawing from the Euratom Treaty. Now the UK's divorce from the EU is posing a threat that could deal a major blow to international efforts in fusion research. In fact, confusing signals from the UK have cast doubt on future funding and support for two key areas of world fusion cooperation: the Oxfordshire-based Joint European Torus (Jet) programme and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Iter) project at Cadarache in France.

  10. UK's Brexit battle casts shadow over funding for international fusion projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, John

    2017-01-01

    The ramifications of Brexit - the UK's decision to leave the European Union - have continued to send shockwaves through the nuclear energy community, since I explained in this column recently that the move also means withdrawing from the Euratom Treaty. Now the UK's divorce from the EU is posing a threat that could deal a major blow to international efforts in fusion research. In fact, confusing signals from the UK have cast doubt on future funding and support for two key areas of world fusion cooperation: the Oxfordshire-based Joint European Torus (Jet) programme and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Iter) project at Cadarache in France.

  11. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor R. D. Pehlke, Principal Investigator, Dr. John M. Cookson, Dr. Shouwei Hao, Dr. Prasad Krishna, Kevin T. Bilkey

    2001-12-14

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive.

  12. Protection by high velocity thermal spraying coatings on thick walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs 'SHARK'. Overview at the end of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, Sabine; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion protection of the internal space of thick-walled interim and permanent storage facility components, such as Castor copyright containers, are ensured nowadays by a galvanic nickel layer. The method has proved itself and protects the base material of the containers at the underwater loading in the Nuclear power station from a corrosive attack. Although, the galvanic nickel plating is a relatively time consuming method, it lasts for several days for each container, and is with a layer thickness of 1,000 μm also expensive. To develop an alternative, faster and more economical method, a BMBF research project named - 'SHARK - protection by high velocity thermal spraying layers on thick-walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs' in cooperation between Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH and the Institute of Materials Science of the Leibniz University of Hanover was established to investigate the suitability of the high velocity oxy fuel spraying technology (HVOF) for the corrosion protective coating of thickwalled interim and permanent storage facility components. Since the permanent storage depot components are manufactured from cast iron with globular graphite, this material was exclusively used as a base material in this project. The evaluation of the economical features of the application of different nickel base spraying materials on cast iron substratum was in focus, as well as the scientific characterization of the coating systems with regard to the corrosion protective properties. Furthermore, the feasibility of the transfer of the laboratory results on a large industrial setup as well as a general suitability of the coating process for a required repair procedure was to be investigated. The preliminary examination program identified chromium containing spraying materials as successful. Results of the preliminary examination program have been used for investigations with the CASOIK demonstration

  13. Equal Opportunity, Equal Work: Increasing Women's Participation in the U.S. President's Malaria Initiative Africa Indoor Residual Spraying Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Abigail; Belemvire, Allison; Johns, Ben; Mangam, Keith; Fiekowsky, Elana; Gunn, Jayleen; Hayden, Mary; Ernst, Kacey

    2017-12-28

    One of the primary control measures for malaria transmission is indoor residual spraying (IRS). Historically, few women have worked in IRS programs, despite the income-generating potential. Increasing women's roles in IRS requires understanding the barriers to women's participation and implementing measures to address them. The U.S. President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) Africa Indoor Residual Spraying (AIRS) Project is the largest implementer of IRS globally. To address gender inequity in IRS operations, PMI AIRS assessed the barriers to the participation of women and developed and implemented policies to address these barriers. The PMI AIRS Project initially identified barriers through a series of informal assessments with key stakeholders. PMI AIRS then implemented a series of gender-guided policies, starting in 2015, in Benin, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Madagascar, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The policies included adapting physical work environments to ensure privacy for women; ensuring the safety of women in the workplace; guaranteeing safety and job security of women during pregnancy; and encouraging qualified women to apply for supervisory positions. The project collected routine programmatic data on staff, spray quality, and spray efficiency; data from 2012 through the end of 2015 were analyzed (up through 1 year after implementation of the gender policies). In addition, PMI AIRS conducted surveys in 2015, 2016, and 2017 before and after the spray campaigns in 4 countries to determine changes in gender norms among spray operators through questions about decision making and agency. The PMI AIRS Project increased women's employment with the program. Specifically, women's employment increased overall from 23% in 2012 to 29% in 2015, with a 2015 range from 16% (Mali) to 40% (Madagascar). Growth among supervisor roles was even stronger, with the percentage of women in supervisory roles increasing from 17% in 2012 to 46% in 2015, with a 2015

  14. Fixed automated spray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    This research project evaluated the construction and performance of Boschungs Fixed Automated : Spray Technology (FAST) system. The FAST system automatically sprays de-icing material on : the bridge when icing conditions are about to occur. The FA...

  15. Effect of heat treatment on the wear and corrosion behaviors of a gray cast iron coated with a COLMONOY 88 alloy deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF thermal spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Öz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present work has been conducted in order to determine the influence of heat treatment on the wear and corrosion behaviours of a gray cast iron substrate coated with a Ni base coating deposited by HVOF thermal spray. The wear resistance of the coatings was obtained using a reciprocating wear tester by rubbing a 10 mm diameter steel ball on the coatings at normal atmospheric conditions. Corrosion tests were performed using potentiodynamic polarization measurements in a 3,5 % NaCl solution. It was observed that the corrosion and wear resistance of the coatings increased along with the reduction of porosity and roughness by the heat treatment.

  16. Estimation and control of droplet size and frequency in projected spray mode of a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzehaee, Mohammad Mousavi; Haeri, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    New estimators are designed based on the modified force balance model to estimate the detaching droplet size, detached droplet size, and mean value of droplet detachment frequency in a gas metal arc welding process. The proper droplet size for the process to be in the projected spray transfer mode is determined based on the modified force balance model and the designed estimators. Finally, the droplet size and the melting rate are controlled using two proportional-integral (PI) controllers to achieve high weld quality by retaining the transfer mode and generating appropriate signals as inputs of the weld geometry control loop. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High Fidelity Tool for Turbulent Combustion in Liquid Launch Propulsion Systems Based on Spray-Flamelet Methodology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed here is a high-performance, high-fidelity simulation capability for simulating liquid rocket spray combustion based on a novel spray-flamelet...

  18. Protection by high velocity thermal spraying coatings on thick walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs 'SHARK'. Overview at the end of the project; Schutz durch Hochgeschwindigkeitsflammspritzschichten auf dickwandigen End- und Zwischenlagerbauteilen zur Reduktion von Reparaturen, Korrosion und Kosten 'SHARK'. Ein Ueberblick zum Abschluss des Projektes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Sabine; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm [Unterwassertechnikum Hannover, Garbsen (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde; Steinwarz, Wolfgang; Dyllong, Nobert; Tragsdorf, Inga Maren [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Krefeld (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    The corrosion protection of the internal space of thick-walled interim and permanent storage facility components, such as Castor {sup copyright} containers, are ensured nowadays by a galvanic nickel layer. The method has proved itself and protects the base material of the containers at the underwater loading in the Nuclear power station from a corrosive attack. Although, the galvanic nickel plating is a relatively time consuming method, it lasts for several days for each container, and is with a layer thickness of 1,000 {mu}m also expensive. To develop an alternative, faster and more economical method, a BMBF research project named - 'SHARK - protection by high velocity thermal spraying layers on thick-walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs' in cooperation between Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH and the Institute of Materials Science of the Leibniz University of Hanover was established to investigate the suitability of the high velocity oxy fuel spraying technology (HVOF) for the corrosion protective coating of thickwalled interim and permanent storage facility components. Since the permanent storage depot components are manufactured from cast iron with globular graphite, this material was exclusively used as a base material in this project. The evaluation of the economical features of the application of different nickel base spraying materials on cast iron substratum was in focus, as well as the scientific characterization of the coating systems with regard to the corrosion protective properties. Furthermore, the feasibility of the transfer of the laboratory results on a large industrial setup as well as a general suitability of the coating process for a required repair procedure was to be investigated. The preliminary examination program identified chromium containing spraying materials as successful. Results of the preliminary examination program have been used for investigations with the CASOIK

  19. An update on the Axion Helioscopes front: current activities at CAST and the IAXO project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafni, T.; Arik, M.; Armengaud, E.; Aune, S.; Avignone, F. T.; Barth, K.; Belov, A.; Betz, M.; Bräuninger, H.; Brax, P.; Breijnholt, N.; Brun, P.; Cantatore, G.; Carmona, J. M.; Carosi, G. P.; Caspers, F.; Caspi, S.; Cetin, S. A.; Chelouche, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Collar, J. I.; Dael, A.; Davenport, M.; Derbin, A. V.; Desch, K.; Diago, A.; Döbrich, B.; Dratchnev, I.; Dudarev, A.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Friedrich, P.; Galán, J.; García, J. A.; Gardikiotis, A.; Garza, J. G.; Gazis, E. N.; Georgiopoulou, E.; Geralis, T.; Gimeno, B.; Giomataris, I.; Gninenko, S.; Gómez, H.; González-Díaz, D.; Gruber, E.; Guendelman, E.; Guthörl, T.; Hailey, C. J.; Hartmann, R.; Hauf, S.; Haug, F.; Hasinoff, M. D.; Hiramatsu, T.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Horns, D.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Isern, J.; Imai, K.; Jacoby, J.; Jaeckel, J.; Jakobsen, A. C.; Jakovčić, K.; Kaminski, J.; Kawasaki, M.; Karuza, M.; Königsmann, K.; Kotthaus, R.; Krčmar, M.; Kousouris, K.; Krieger, C.; Kuster, M.; Lakić, B.; Laurent, J. M.; Limousin, O.; Lindner, A.; Liolios, A.; Ljubičić, A.; Luzón, G.; Matsuki, S.; Muratova, V. N.; Neff, S.; Niinikoski, T.; Nones, C.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Raffelt, G.; Redondo, J.; Riege, H.; Ringwald, A.; Rodríguez, A.; Rosu, M.; Russenschuck, S.; Ruz, J.; Saikawa, K.; Savvidis, I.; Sekiguchi, T.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Shilon, I.; Sikivie, P.; Silva, H.; Solanki, S. K.; Stewart, L.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Tomas, A.; Troitsky, S.; Vafeiadis, T.; van Bibber, K.; Vedrine, P.; Villar, J. A.; Vogel, J. K.; Walckiers, L.; Weltman, A.; Wester, W.; Yildiz, S. C.; Zioutas, K.

    2016-04-01

    Although they have not yet been detected, axions and axion-like particles (ALPs) continue to maintain the interest (even increasingly so) of the rare-event searches community as viable candidates for the Dark Matter of the Universe but also as a solution for several other puzzles of astrophysics. Their property of coupling to photons has inspired different experimental methods for their detection, one of which is the helioscope technique. The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is the most sensitive helioscope built up to date and has recently published part of the latest data taken with the magnet bores gradually filled with 3He, probing the mass range up to 1.17 eV. The International AXion Observatory (IAXO) is being proposed as a facility where different axion studies can be performed, with the primary goal to study axions coming from the Sun. Designed to maximize sensitivity, it will improve the levels reached by CAST by almost 5 orders of magnitude in signal detection, that is more than one order of magnitude in terms of gaγ. Here we will summarize the most important aspects of the helioscopes, and focus mainly on IAXO, based on the recent papers [1, 2].

  20. Experimental and Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow Processes in Continuous Casting: Results from the LIMMCAST-Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmel, K.; Kratzsch, C.; Asad, A.; Schurmann, D.; Schwarze, R.; Eckert, S.

    2017-07-01

    The present paper reports about numerical simulations and model experiments concerned with the fluid flow in the continuous casting process of steel. This work was carried out in the LIMMCAST project in the framework of the Helmholtz alliance LIMTECH. A brief description of the LIMMCAST facilities used for the experimental modeling at HZDR is given here. Ultrasonic and inductive techniques and the X-ray radioscopy were employed for flow measurements or visualizations of two-phase flow regimes occurring in the submerged entry nozzle and the mold. Corresponding numerical simulations were performed at TUBAF taking into account the dimensions and properties of the model experiments. Numerical models were successfully validated using the experimental data base. The reasonable and in many cases excellent agreement of numerical with experimental data allows to extrapolate the models to real casting configurations. Exemplary results will be presented here showing the effect of electromagnetic brakes or electromagnetic stirrers on the flow in the mold or illustrating the properties of two-phase flows resulting from an Ar injection through the stopper rod.

  1. Innovative casting process of lighter steel components for the transport industry (Brite/Euram III ''ICARO'' project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuganti, A.; Corazzola, M. [Fiat SpA, Orbassano (Italy). Centro Ricerche

    2000-07-01

    The paper presents the main objectives and the technical approach of the ''ICARO'' European Brite project; the up-to-date results and the reached and expected deliverables are reviewed. The overall object of this project is to develop an innovative casting technology for manufacture near net shape steel components, compatible with the mass production requirements of transport industry. The proposed approach for reaching this target is to advance the lost foam technology for its application to steel. The overall objective of this project is to develop an advanced lost foam casting technology to manufacture near net shape steel components for the transport industry. Aiming at this target in the first 12-months of the project the work program was focused on the following main topics: definition of strategies to advance the L.F. process for steel casting, assessment of requirements and specifications for the automotive and aeronautical application that were selected as demonstrators to validate the technological innovation, component selection, first mechanical and microstructural characterisations. The purpose for the next two years is also to develop a numerical model for simulation. The developed software will be exploited for the industrial application design. In conclusion the success of the project will permit to develop casting procedure for lost foam process of steel parts, simulation software for LF-casting of steel and 2 different industrial application (one automotive and one aeronautical). These will be representative for comparing the developed innovative solution (material/process) with the traditional one in terms of components performance improvement, production costs saving, environmental impact benefit. (orig.)

  2. Projects at the component development and integration facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the third quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; and Spray Casting Project

  3. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-09-30

    In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

  4. Spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, Philippe.

    1975-01-01

    Spray cooling - using water spraying in air - is surveyed as a possible system for make-up (peak clipping in open circuit) or major cooling (in closed circuit) of the cooling water of the condensers in thermal power plants. Indications are given on the experiments made in France and the systems recently developed in USA, questions relating to performance, cost and environmental effects of spray devices are then dealt with [fr

  5. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  6. HFIR Fuel Casting Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gibbs, Paul Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Solis, Eunice Martinez [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Process exploration for fuel production for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using cast LEU-10wt.%Mo as an initial processing step has just begun. This project represents the first trials concerned with casting design and quality. The studies carried out over the course of this year and information contained in this report address the initial mold development to be used as a starting point for future operations. In broad terms, the final billet design is that of a solid rolling blank with an irregular octagonal cross section. The work covered here is a comprehensive view of the initial attempts to produce a sound casting. This report covers the efforts to simulate, predict, cast, inspect, and revise the initial mold design.

  7. Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Karla

    2016-01-01

    In standard economics, individuals are rational actors and economic forces undermine institutions that impose large inefficiencies. The persistence of the caste system is evidence of the need for psychologically more realistic models of decision-making in economics. The caste system divides South Asian society into hereditary groups whose lowest ranks are represented as innately polluted. ...

  8. Hair casts

    OpenAIRE

    Sweta S Parmar; Kirti S Parmar; Bela J Shah

    2014-01-01

    Hair casts or pseudonits are circumferential concretions, which cover the hair shaft in such a way that, it could be easily removed. They are thin, cylindrical, and elongated in length. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with hair casts. Occurrence of these is unusual, and they may have varied associations. This patient was suffering from developmental delay. It is commonly misdiagnosed as and very important to differentiate from pediculosis capitis.

  9. Reduction of SO{sub 2} Emissions in Coal Power Plants by means of Spray-Drying RESOX Research Project; Acondicionamiento de Gases de Combustion para la Reduccion de Emisiones de Particulas en Centrales Termicas de Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    In this experimental study, two important matters concerning the spray-drying technology for the desulphurisation of combustion gases, from pulverized coal boilers, have been analyzed: (1) the behaviour of the spray-dryer absorber under different operating conditions and (2) the behaviour of an electrostatic precipitator that operates downstream form a spray-dryer. The results of this project are of great interest for evaluating the application of this semi-dry desulphurisation technology in existing power plants that already have electrostatic precipitators. Additionally, the conclusions drawn are useful for establishing the optimum design and operating conditions for an integrated SD-ESP flue gas treatment facility. More than 45 experimental tests have been conducted on a 10,000 Nm``3/h spray-drying desulphurisation pilot plant. The effects of SO{sub 2} and fly ash concentration, Ca/S ratio, approach to saturation temperature, density of the slurry and unit load changes on both spray dryer behaviour and treated flue gas properties have been analyzed. In two additional specific tests, the effect of injecting calcium chloride and of preparing the slurry with seawater has also been studied. The impact of spray-dryer desulphurization on the behaviour of the electrostatic precipitators ha been evaluated comparing experimental data (efficiency, emission level, electrical consumption) for the behaviour of the electrostatic precipitator, obtained in two different experimental conditions: with and without desulphurization. Additionally, the possibility of reducing the power consumption of the precipitator by means of intermittent energization has been analyzed. (Author)

  10. Fan Fuel Casting Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    LANL was approached to provide material and design guidance for a fan-shaped fuel element. A total of at least three castings were planned. The first casting is a simple billet mold to be made from high carbon DU-10Mo charge material. The second and third castings are for optimization of the actual fuel plate mold. The experimental scope for optimization is only broad enough for a second iteration of the mold design. It is important to note that partway through FY17, this project was cancelled by the sponsor. This report is being written in order to capture the knowledge gained should this project resume at a later date.

  11. Solidification and casting

    CERN Document Server

    Cantor, Brian

    2002-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVEDirect chillcasting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of steelsCastings in the automotive industryCast aluminium-silicon piston alloysMODELLING AND SIMULATIONModelling direct chill castingMold filling simulation of die castingThe ten casting rulesGrain selection in single crystal superalloy castingsDefects in aluminium shape castingPattern formation during solidificationPeritectic solidificationSTRUCTURE AND DEFECTSHetergeneous nucleation in aluminium alloysCo

  12. A general approach to flaw simulation in castings by superimposing projections of 3D models onto real X-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, D.; Mery, D.

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate the sensitivity of defect inspection systems, it is convenient to examine simulated data. This gives the possibility to tune the parameters of the inspection method and to test the performance of the system in critical cases. In this paper, a practical method for the simulation of defects in radioscopic images of aluminium castings is presented. The approach simulates only the flaws and not the whole radioscopic image of the object under test. A 3D mesh is used to model a flaw with complex geometry, which is projected and superimposed onto real radioscopic images of a homogeneous object according to the exponential attenuation law for X- rays. The new grey value of a pixel, where the 3D flaw is projected, depends only on four parameters: (a) the grey value of the original X-ray image without flaw; (b) the linear absorption coefficient of the examined material; (c) the maximal thickness observable in the radioscopic image; and (d) the length of the intersection of the 3D flaw with the modelled X-ray beam, that is projected into the pixel. A simulation of a complex flaw modelled as a 3D mesh can be performed in any position of the castings by using the algorithm described in this paper. This allows the evaluation of the performance of defect inspection systems in cases where the detection is known to be difficult. In this paper, we show experimental results on real X-ray images of aluminium wheels, in which 3D flaws like blowholes, cracks and inclusions are simulated

  13. Reducing the Incidence of Cast-related Skin Complications in Children Treated With Cast Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difazio, Rachel L; Harris, Marie; Feldman, Lanna; Mahan, Susan T

    2017-12-01

    Cast immobilization remains the mainstay of pediatric orthopaedic care, yet little is known about the incidence of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization. The purposes of this quality improvement project were to: (1) establish a baseline rate of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization, (2) identify trends in children who experienced cast-related skin complications, (3) design an intervention aimed at decreasing the rate of cast-related skin complications, and (4) determine the effectiveness of the intervention. A prospective interrupted time-series design was used to determine the incidence of cast-related skin complications overtime and compare the rates of skin complications before and after an intervention designed to decrease the incidence of cast-related heel complications. All consecutive patients who were treated with cast immobilization from September 2012 to September 2014 were included. A cast-related skin complications data collection tool was used to capture all cast-related skin complications. A high rate of heel events was noted in our preliminary analysis and an intervention was designed to decrease the rate of cast-related skin complications, including the addition of padding during casting and respective provider education. The estimated cast-related skin events rate for all patients was 8.9 per 1000 casts applied. The rate for the total preintervention sample was 13.6 per 1000 casts which decreased to 6.6 in the postintervention sample. When examining the heel-only group, the rate was 17.1 per 1000 lower extremity casts applied in the preintervention group and 6.8 in the postintervention group. Incorporating padding to the heel of lower extremity cast was an effective intervention in decreasing the incidence of cast-related skin complications in patients treated with cast immobilization. Level II.

  14. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  15. Project Based Learning on Casting of Aluminium Tensile Test Specimen for Mechanical Engineering Students, State Polytechnic of Malang on Odd Semester of Academic Year 2016/2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem faced by students is the difficulty of understanding on metal casting topic in the lesson of Materials Technology which is conducted by lectures only. The research objective is to find out the improvement of score on metal casting topic for 1G students from Mechanical Engineering Department, State Polytechnic of Malang (Polinema in odd Semester, Academic Year 2016/2017. Research method were facilitation of applied metal casting through pretest of metal casting, added a description of the design and modification of metal mould for Aluminium, visit to a home industry of Aluminium casting, students practice of Aluminium casting in a home industry, student groups presentation and discussion in the subtopics of (1 design and mould manufacture, (2 Aluminium casting practice, and (3 tensile testing with cast Aluminium specimen, as well as posttest on metal casting. The research result is an increasing in average score from 46.56 to 53.6 (22% that means by adding the practice to the theory involved is increase a significant impact on understanding of Aluminium casting for students.

  16. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on several different projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept Project; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Furnace Projects for waste destruction; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; Soil Washing Project for removal of radioactive materials; and Spray Casting Project.

  17. Nicotine Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine nasal spray is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine nasal spray should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavior change techniques. Nicotine nasal spray is in a class of medications ...

  18. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin M. McHugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; J.-P. Delplanque; S. B. Johnson

    2005-02-01

    Spray rolling is a novel strip casting technology in which molten aluminum alloy is atomized and deposited into the roll gap of mill rolls to produce aluminum strip. A combined experimental/modeling approach has been followed in developing this technology with active participation from industry. The feasibility of this technology has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale and it is currently being scaled-up. This paper provides an overview of the process and compares the microstructure and properties of spray-rolled 2124 aluminum alloy with commercial ingot-processed material

  19. Transferences of Teacher-Casting and Projections of Redemption: Teacher Education, Young Adult Literature and the Psychic Life of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowich, David

    2015-01-01

    As the psychic life of reading is imbued with desire, transferences and other forms of emotional turbulence, readers invariably and often unconsciously project their anxieties, hopes and worries onto the lives of fictional characters. Using the lens of psychoanalytic theory, this article explores the meanings produced in the convergence of teacher…

  20. Casting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R [Xenia, OH; Dzugan, Robert [Cincinnati, OH; Harrington, Richard M [Cincinnati, OH; Neece, Faurice D [Lyndurst, OH; Singh, Nipendra P [Pepper Pike, OH

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  1. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Quarterly project status report, October 1--December 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-12-31

    The first series of experiments at the CMI-Tech Center was successfully conducted on October 14 and 15 with the participation of the University of Michigan team. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the die surface temperatures (or near the surface) have a close correlation with the metal pressure profiles. Considering the difference in timing of the peak die temperatures, the high melt temperature and hotter die temperature for Inter 54 might cause a longer solidification time, and the pressure would decrease more slowly than for Inter 12. The slopes of the metal pressure profiles at the low pressure setting are almost linear. This may mean that the low metal pressure couldn`t effectively keep a pressure channel opened. In other words, as temperature decreased, the solid fraction increased and the solidified shell strengthened, and the pressure, which couldn`t overcome the resistance, would drop linearly. However, at the high pressure, there are inflection points in the pressure profiles. The inflection points are at about 8,500 psi for both the low and the high melt temperature settings. This suggests that the metal pressure was sufficient enough to overcome the resistance of the solidified shell before the inflection point was reached. A preliminary microstructure analysis shows that the dendrite arms at the location near the gate are much coarser than that at the top of the casting. The influence of intensification pressure on microstructure needs further verification and study.

  2. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser; Frank W. Zok; Carlos G. Levi; Jeffrey Hawk

    2004-02-01

    In an effort to realize minimum of a 2x increase in wear life of ground engaging components used on mining machines, two potentially cost effective processes were explored for the production of tailored, highly abrasion resistant materials: (1) hybrid pressure casting of steel composites, and (2) arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings. Steel composites comprised of cermet or oxide hard particles were successfully produced using pressure casting processes, although a cost effective process has not yet been identified for oxide particles. Both composites achieved project wear targets in high stress gouging wear, but the cermet composites did not meet the targets in impact wear, due to poor matrix toughness resulting from particle dissolution. Oxide composites had superior toughness and are expected to meet impact wear goals. Arc lamp processing of thermal spray coatings was successfully demonstrated to produce a metallurgical bond at the coating interface. Functionally graded materials were developed and successfully fused to allow for the accommodation of thermal process stresses in an intermediate layer. Ultimately, three functionally graded materials were identified as having high stress, three-body abrasion resistance sufficient to exceed project goals.

  3. Water Reclamation using Spray Drying, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This purpose of this project is to develop a spray drying prototype to for the recovery and recycle of water from concentrated waste water recovery system brine....

  4. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  5. Modelagem empírica da transferência goticular projetada em processos de soldagem GMAW Empirical modeling of projected spray transfer in GMAW processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Emilio Pinto Lopera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta uma metodologia para modelar empiricamente o modo de transferência goticular projetada em processos de soldagem GMAW utilizando algoritmos de processamento de imagens digitais e a metodologia de superfície de resposta. Modelos correspondentes ao tamanho e à frequência de destacamento das gotas são obtidos em relação às entradas de tensão e velocidade de alimentação do arame. Os dados experimentais de tamanho e frequência de destacamento das gotas, com os quais foram desenvolvidos os modelos, foram calculados a partir de imagens de transferência metálica adquiridas com uma câmera de alta velocidade e a técnica de iluminação conhecida como perfilografia. As técnicas utilizadas na coleta dos dados e os modelos encontrados validaram a metodologia proposta por apresentar uma correta representação do modo de transferência. O empescoçamento produzido pelo efeito pinch se apresentou como um parâmetro adequado para rastrear a formação das gotas e calcular a sua frequência de destacamento.This paper presents a methodology to get empirical models of projected spray transfer mode in GMAW processes. Digital image processing algorithms were used together with the surface response methodology. Droplet size and transfer rate models were obtained in relation to voltage and wire feed rate. To develop the models, experimental data collection of droplet size and transfer rate were calculated from metal transfer images acquired with a high-speed camera and backlighting illumination. The techniques for data collecting and the models constructed validated the proposed methodology presenting a correct transfer mode representation. The "neck-shrink" produced by the pinch effect proved to be an appropriate parameter to track and for calculating the droplets transfer rate.

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1976-04-20 (NODC Accession 7601066)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 20 April 1976. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-08-17 (NODC Accession 7700691)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 17 August 1977. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-06-14 (NODC Accession 7700521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 14 June 1977. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1976-10-19 (NODC Accession 7700137)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 19 October 1976. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1976-03-25 (NODC Accession 7600884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 25 March 1976. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  11. Clean Cast Steel Technology, Phase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates

    2003-02-24

    The objective of the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program was to improve casting product quality by removing or minimizing oxide defects and to allow the production of higher integrity castings for high speed machining lines. Previous research has concentrated on macro-inclusions that break, chip, or crack machine tool cutters and drills and cause immediate shutdown of the machining lines. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the amount of surface macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions have been identified by industrial sponsors as a major barrier to improving the quality and marketability of steel castings.

  12. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Derui; Lian Haiping

    2011-01-01

    In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast ir...

  13. Evaluation of permanent die coatings to improve the wear resistance of die casting dies. Final project report, January 1, 1995--April 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivpuri, R.

    1997-09-18

    Die Casting dies are subject to severe service conditions during the die casting operation. While these severe conditions are necessary to achieve high production rates, they cause the dies which are commonly made of H13 die steel, to suffer frequent failures. The major die failure mechanisms are erosion or washout, Heat checking, soldering and corrosion. Due to their geometrical complexity, die casting dies are very expensive (some dies cost over a million dollars), and thus a large number of parts have to be produced by a die, to justify this cost and leverage the advantages of the die casting process (high production rates, low manpower costs). A potential increase in the die service life, thus has a significant impact on the economics of the die; casting operation. There are many ways to extend die life: developing new wear resistant die materials, developing new surface treatments including coatings, improving heat treatment of existing H13 dies, using better lubricants that can protect the die material, or modifying the die geometry and process parameters to reduce the intensity of wear. Of these the use of coatings to improve the wear resistance of the die surface has shown a lot of promise. Consequently, use of coatings in the die casting industry and their wide use to decrease die wear can improve significantly the productivity of shop operations resulting in large savings in material and energy usage.

  14. Special thermite cast irons

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. Zhiguts; I. Kurytnik

    2008-01-01

    The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  15. Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. E. Bates; J. A. Griffin

    2000-05-01

    There were two main tasks in the Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer Project. These were (1) determine the processing facts that control the machinability of cast steel and (2) determine the ability of ladle stirring to homogenize ladle temperature, reduce the tap and pouring temperatures, and reduce casting scrap.

  16. Understanding the role of plasticisers in spray-dried starch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad Bilal Khan; Zijlstra, Mark; Broekhuis, Antonius A.

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous thermoplastic starch (TPS) films were produced by compression moulding of solution spray-dried TPS powder and by direct solution casting. Oxidised potato starch was used as a feedstock for production of plasticised formulations containing glycerol or urea, or their combinations with

  17. Hair spray poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002705.htm Hair spray poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair spray poisoning occurs when someone breathes in (inhales) ...

  18. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxymetazoline nasal spray is used to relieve nasal discomfort caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever. It ... also used to relieve sinus congestion and pressure. Oxymetazoline nasal spray should not be used to treat ...

  19. Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 6/15/2012 – 9/15/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline ” 5a. CONTRACT...this project. The paper, “Sea Spray Generation at Rocky Shoreline ” by Ed Andreas was accepted for publication and as of July 2016 was being...13 Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline 14 15 16 17 Edgar L Andreas 18 19 NorthWest Research Associates, Inc. 20 Lebanon, New

  20. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  1. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  2. INDIAN CASTE SYSTEM: HISTORICAL AND PSYCHOANALYTIC VIEWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhaneni, Madhusudana Rao

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the historical origins and transformations of India's caste system. Surveying the complex developments over many centuries, it points out that three positions have been taken in this regard. One suggests that the caste one is born into can be transcended within one's lifetime by performing good deeds. The other declares caste to be immutable forever. And, the third says that one can be reborn into a higher caste if one lives a virtuous life. Moving on to the sociopolitical realm, the paper notes how these positions have been used and exploited. The paper then attempts to anchor the existence and purpose of the Hindu caste system in Freud's ideas about group psychology and Klein's proposals of splitting and projective identification. The paper also deploys the large group psychology concepts of Volkan and the culturally nuanced psychoanalytic anthropology of Roland and Kakar. It concludes with delineating some ameliorative strategies for this tragic problem in the otherwise robust democratic society of India.

  3. The effect of particles in different sizes on the mechanical properties of spray formed steel composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kenneth; Pedersen, A. S.; Pryds, N.

    2000-01-01

    National Laboratory, Denmark, where composites with a low alloyed boron steel (0.2 wt.% carbon) matrix containing alumina particles were produced. A comparison between cast hot-rolled material without particles, spray formed material without particles and the spray formed composites with an average ceramic......The main objective of the work was to investigate the effect of addition of ceramic particles with different size distributions on the mechanical properties, e.g. wear resistance and tensile strength, of spray formed materials. The experiments were carried out in a spray-forming unit at Risø...

  4. Manufacturing of thin walled near net shape iron castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Per Leif

    2003-01-01

    to be substituting iron casings with aluminum castings. Substituting iron castings with aluminum castings is not as easy as first believed, and hence the substitution is very slow. This combined with the lack of fully exploiting the potential in iron castings, makes research in iron castings interesting. The 60......The demand for near net shape thin walled iron castings is growing. This has several reasons, the main one is the need for lowering the fuel consumption of cars; the easiest way to do that is to lower the weight of the cars. The best way to do this was for a period of time believed.......000.000 cars produced world wide each year consumes enormous amounts of cast parts ! The aim of the project is to develop the green sand molding method on DISAMATIC to be able to deal with the new demands for thin walled near net shape castings in iron....

  5. Casting and Splinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-21

    article /80165-technigue Self Evaluation Is injured extremity in desired position? »- Empty can position »- Wrist extension 20° );;>- MCP Oexion...periodically throughout the day If cast feels tight despite elevation seek medical assistance Do not scratch under cast; do not get cast wet Get

  6. Advanced lost foam from casting technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C. E.; Littleton, H. E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B. A.; Sheldon, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects Task 4: Pattern Gating Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas in the period of October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers.

  7. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  8. Reinforcement of Aluminum Castings with Dissimilar Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q

    2004-01-07

    The project ''Reinforcement of Aluminum Casting with Dissimilar Metal'' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Cummins Inc. This project, technologies have been developed to reinforce aluminum castings with steel insert. Defect-free bond between the steel insert and the aluminum casting has been consistently obtained. The push-out experiment indicated that the bond strength is higher than that of the Al-Fin method. Two patents have been granted to the project team that is comprised of Cummins Inc. and ORNL. This report contains four sections: the coating of the steel pins, the cast-in method, microstructure characterization, and the bond strength. The section of the coating of the steel pins contains coating material selection, electro-plating technique for plating Cu and Ni on steel, and diffusion bonding of the coatings to the steel. The section of cast-in method deals with factors that affecting the quality of the metallurgical bond between the coated steel and the aluminum castings. The results of microstructure characteristics of the bonding are presented in the microstructure characterization section. A push-out experiment and the results obtained using this method is described in the section of bond strength/mechanical property.

  9. Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Charles D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Wood, J. F. Barry

    1990-02-20

    In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

  10. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D [Stuart, FL; Sanders, Stuart A [Palm Beach Gardens, FL

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  11. Physical, biological, current, and other data from CTD, XBT, ADCP, bottle casts, net casts, and other instruments from the N. E. Atlantic Ocean in support of the OMEX 1 project from 01 April 1993 to 01 December 1995 (NODC Accession 0000172)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, biological, current, and other data were collected from CTD, XBT, ADCP, bottle casts, net casts, and other instruments from the N. E. Atlantic Ocean in...

  12. Expandable pattern casting research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001-0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  13. Caste and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Dayabati

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the institution of caste and its operation in a micro-level village setting of West Bengal, an Indian state, where state politics at grass roots level is vibrant with functioning local self-government and entrenched political parties. This ethnographic study reveals that caste......–ideological field, the concept of caste-hierarchy seems to continue as an influencing factor, even in the operation of leftist politics....

  14. Hazard Analysis for In Tank Spray Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRAMS, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    The River Protection Project (RPP) Authorization Basis (AB) contains controls that address spray leaks in tanks. However, there are no hazardous conditions in the Hazards Database that specifically identify in-tank spray leak scenarios. The purpose of this Hazards Evaluation is to develop hazardous conditions related to in-tank spray leaks for the Hazards Database and to provide more complete coverage of Tank Farm facilities. Currently, the in-tank spray leak is part of the ''Spray Leak in Structures or From Waste Transfer Lines'' accidents in Section 3.4.2.9 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG, 2000a). The accident analysis for the ''Spray Leak in Structure or From Waste Transfer Lines'' states the following regarding the location of a possible spray leak: Inside ventilated waste storage tanks (DSTs, DCRTs, and some SSTs). Aerosols could be generated inside a storage tank during a transfer because of a leak from the portion of the transfer pipe inside the tank. The tank ventilation system could help disperse the aerosols to the atmosphere should the vent system HEPA filters fail. This Hazards Evaluation also evaluates the controls currently assigned to the spray leak in structure accident and determines the applicability of the controls to the new hazardous conditions. This comparison reviews both the analysis in the FSAR and the controls found in the Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) (CHG, 2000h). If the new hazardous conditions do not match the analyzed accident conditions and controls, then additional analysis may be required. This document is not intended to authorize the activity or determine the adequacy of controls; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The Control decision process as defined in the AB will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis

  15. Evolution of halictine castes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knerer, Gerd

    1980-03-01

    Social halictine bees have female castes that range from species with no size differences to those with a discrete bimodality. Female caste differences are inversely correlated with the number of males produced in the first brood. It is proposed that the sexual dimorphism of solitary forms is being usurped by the female caste system of species in the process of turning social. Thus, caste differences and summer male suppression are greatest in the social species originating from solitary precursors with distinct sexual dimorphism, and are least in species evolving from solitary ancestors with a continuous sexual polymorphism.

  16. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    OpenAIRE

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1) the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc.), and (2) the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  17. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  18. Effects of disinfection of combined agar/alginate impressions on the dimensional accuracy of stone casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraguchi, Hisako; Nakagawa, Hisami; Kaketani, Masahiro; Hirose, Hideharu; Nishiyama, Minoru

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of disinfection of combined agar/alginate impressions on the dimensional accuracy of resultant stone casts. Impressions of a master cast designed to simulate an abutment tooth were prepared by combining each of two brands of cartridge-form agar impression materials with an alginate impression material. The impressions were immersed in 1% sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes or 2% glutaraldehyde for 30 minutes. The remaining impressions were sprayed with these two disinfectants and then stored in sealed bags for 10, 30, 60, and 120 minutes. Stone casts obtained from the non-disinfected impressions were also prepared as control. Changes in diameter of the stone casts were then measured. Results indicated that storage for 10 minutes after spraying with 1% sodium hypochlorite was an appropriate disinfection method for combined agar/alginate impressions, as well as immersion in 1% sodium hypochlorite for 10 minutes.

  19. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  20. Higher Education's Caste System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the history of the present caste system in higher education. He shows how the public's perception of this caste system is based on image and not usually on the quality of teaching and curriculum in colleges and universities. Finally, he discusses a model for accessibility to higher education and how higher…

  1. Cool Cast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleeve to protect it in the bath or shower. A splint does the same thing as a cast: It keeps the broken or injured bone from moving so it can heal. It also usually has a soft layer of cotton inside. A splint can be made from the same materials as a cast or may be a pre- ...

  2. Dielectric properties of plasma sprayed silicates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Neufuss, Karel; Dubský, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel

    -, č. 31 (2005), s. 315-321 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0708 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Optical microscopy * electrical properties * silicates * insulators * plasma spraying Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.702, year: 2005

  3. Consolidation of tungsten disilicide by plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Matějíček, Jiří; Rohan, Pavel; Janča, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2007), s. 311-320 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Water stabilized plasma * tungsten disilicide * plasma deposition * thermal spray coatings Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  4. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  5. Reengineering of Permanent Mould Casting with Lean Manufacturing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Władysiak

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available At the work were introduced main areas of production system project of casts produced in permanent moulds, that constitutes reengineering of conventional production system according to Lean Manufacturing (LM methods. New resolution of cooling of dies with water mist was shown to casting of car wheels made from aluminium alloys in low pressure casting process. It was implemented as a part of goal-oriented project in R.H. Alurad Sp.z o.o. in Gorzyce. Its using intensifies solidification and self-cooling of casts shortening the time of casting cycle by the 30%. It was described reorganizing casting stations into multi-machines cells production and the process of their fast tool’s exchange with applying the SMED method. A project of the system was described controlling the production of the foundry with the computer aided light Kanban system. A visualization of the process was shown the production of casts with use the value stream mapping method. They proved that applying casting new method in the technology and LM methods allowed to eliminate down-times, to reduce the level of stocks, to increase the productivity and the flow of the castings production.

  6. Plasma Spray Synthesis of High Purity Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is the efficient synthesis of high quality boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT’s) using the LaRC radio frequency plasma spray (RFPS)...

  7. Fentanyl Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fentanyl nasal spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  8. Fentanyl Sublingual Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fentanyl sublingual spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  9. Dynamics of flare sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hansen, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable pass-band filters, multi-slit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronographs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occured between 1969-1974 we conclude that (i) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (ii) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumably magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the material draining back down along one or both legs of the loop. (orig.)

  10. Butorphanol Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Butorphanol is in a class of medications called opioid agonist-antagonists. It works by changing the way ... stop using butorphanol nasal spray, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as nervousness, agitation, shakiness, diarrhea, chills, ...

  11. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1 the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc., and (2 the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  12. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2005-09-01

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to

  13. Casting of microstructured shark skin surfaces and possible applications on aluminum casting parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Ivanov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the project Functional Surfaces via Micro- and Nanoscaled Structures?which is part of the Cluster of Excellence 揑ntegrative Production Technology?established and financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG, an investment casting process to produce 3-dimensional functional surfaces down to a structural size of 1 μm on near-net-shape-casting parts has been developed. The common way to realize functional microstructures on metallic surfaces is to use laser ablation, electro discharge machining or micro milling. The handicap of these processes is their limited productivity. The approach of this project to raise the efficiency is to use the investment casting process to replicate microstructured surfaces by moulding from a laser-microstructured grand master pattern. The main research objective deals with the investigation of the single process steps of the investment casting process with regard to the moulding accuracy. Actual results concerning making of the wax pattern, suitability of ceramic mould and core materials for casting of an AlSi7Mg0.3 alloy as well as the knock-out behavior of the shells are presented. By using of the example of an intake manifold of a gasoline race car engine, a technical shark skin surface has been realized to reduce the drag of the intake air. The intake manifold consists of an air-restrictor with a defined inner diameter which is microstructured with technical shark skin riblets. For this reason the inner diameter cannot be drilled after casting and demands a very high accuracy of the casting part. A technology for the fabrication and demoulding of accurate microstructured castings are shown. Shrinkage factors of different moulding steps of the macroscopic casting part as well as the microscopic riblet structure have been examined as well.

  14. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Derui

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast iron, ductile cast iron, brass, cupronickel alloy (Packtong, etc. According to their surface decorative techniques they can be devided into gem inlay, gilding, gold and silver inlay, copper inlay, engraved decoration, surface tin-enrichment, mother-of-pearl inlay, burnished works with gold or silver inlay, surface coloring and cloisonné enamel, etc.

  15. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwam, David [Case Western Reserve University

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings. 

  16. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  17. Infant Perception of Incongruent Shapes in Cast Shadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Sato

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A cast shadow occurs when an object blocks the light from an illumination and projects a dark region onto a surface. Previous studies have reported that adults are slower to identify an object when the object has an incongruent cast shadow than when it has a congruent cast shadow (Castiello, 2001. Here, we used the familiarization-novelty preference procedure to examine whether 5- to 8-month-old infants could detect the relationship between object shapes and cast shadows. In Experiment 1, we examined the infants' ability to detect incongruency between objects and cast shadows. Results showed that 7- to 8-month olds could detect incongruence between the object shapes and the cast shadows, whereas 5- to 6-month olds did not. Yet, our control experiment showed that infants could not detect this incongruence from stimuli in which a white outline had been added to the original cast shadow to decrease the possibility of it being perceived as a cast shadow (Experiment 2. The results of these experiments demonstrate that 7- to 8-month olds responded to the congruence of cast shadows and to consistent contrast polarity between the cast shadow and its background.

  18. Gas entrainment by one single French PWR spray, SARNET-2 spray benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.; Mimouni, S.; Manzini, G.; Xiao, J.; Vyskocil, L.; Siccama, N.B.; Huhtanen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper presents a benchmark performed in the frame of the SARNET-2 EU project. • It concerns momentum transfer between a PWR spray and the surrounding gas. • The entrained gas velocities can vary up to 100% from one code to another. • Simplified boundary conditions for sprays are generally used by the code users. • It is shown how these simplified conditions impact the gas entrainment. - Abstract: This paper presents a benchmark performed in the frame of the SARNET-2 EU project, dealing with momentum transfer between a real-scale PWR spray and the surrounding gas. It presents a description of the IRSN tests on the CALIST facility, the participating codes (8 contributions), code-experiment and code-to-code comparisons. It is found that droplet velocities are almost well calculated one meter below the spray nozzle, even if the spread of the spray is not recovered and the values of the entrained gas velocity vary up to 100% from one code to another. Concerning sensitivity analysis, several ‘simplifications’ have been made by the contributors, especially based on the boundary conditions applied at the location where droplets are injected. It is shown here that such simplifications influence droplet and entrained gas characteristics. The next step will be to translate these conclusions in terms of variables representative of interesting parameters for nuclear safety

  19. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    entrainment may account for the large discrepancy in energy input for the two systems. In the third study, the temperature dependence of sea spray aerosol production is probed with the use of a highly stable temperature controlled plunging jet. Similar to previous studies, particle production increases...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  20. Droplets and sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Sazhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Providing a clear and systematic description of droplets and spray dynamic models, this book maximises reader insight into the underlying physics of the processes involved, outlines the development of new physical and mathematical models, and broadens understanding of interactions between the complex physical processes which take place in sprays. Complementing approaches based on the direct application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Droplets and Sprays treats both theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engine process such as the direct injection of liquid fuel, subcritical heating and evaporation. Includes case studies that illustrate the approaches relevance to automotive applications,  it is also anticipated that the described models can find use in other areas such as in medicine and environmental science.

  1. Screening methodologies for the development of spray-dried amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Íris; Santos, José Luís; Pinto, João F; Temtem, Márcio

    2015-01-01

    To present a new screening methodology intended to be used in the early development of spray-dried amorphous solid dispersions. A model that combines thermodynamic, kinetic and manufacturing considerations was implemented to obtain estimates of the miscibility and phase behavior of different itraconazole-based solid dispersions. Additionally, a small-scale solvent casting protocol was developed to enable a fast assessment on the amorphous stability of the different drug-polymer systems. Then, solid dispersions at predefined drug loads were produced in a lab-scale spray dryer for powder characterization and comparison of the results generated by the model and solvent cast samples. The results obtained with the model enabled the ranking of the polymers from a miscibility standpoint. Such ranking was consistent with the experimental data obtained by solvent casting and spray drying. Moreover, the range of optimal drug load determined by the model was as well consistent with the experimental results. The screening methodology presented in this work showed that a set of amorphous formulation candidates can be assessed in a computer model, enabling not only the determination of the most suitable polymers, but also of the optimal drug load range to be tested in laboratory experiments. The set of formulation candidates can then be further fine-tuned with solvent casting experiments using a small amount of API, which will then provide the decision for the final candidate formulations to be assessed in spray drying experiments.

  2. Alloying and Casting Furnace for Shape Memory Alloys, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The concept in the proposed project is to create a melting, alloying and casting furnace for the processing titanium based SMA using cold crucible techniques. The...

  3. Mechanical Performance of Cold-Sprayed A357 Aluminum Alloy Coatings for Repair and Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petráčková, K.; Kondás, J.; Guagliano, M.

    2017-12-01

    Cold-sprayed coatings made of A357 aluminum alloy, a casting alloy widely used in aerospace, underwent set of standard tests as well as newly developed fatigue test to gain an information about potential of cold spray for repair and additive manufacturing of loaded parts. With optimal spray parameters, coating deposition on substrate with smooth surface resulted in relatively good bonding, which can be further improved by application of grit blasting on substrate's surface. However, no enhancement of adhesion was obtained for shot-peened surface. Process temperature, which was set either to 450 or 550 °C, was shown to have an effect on adhesion and cohesion strength, but it does not influence residual stress in the coating. To assess cold spray perspectives for additive manufacturing, flat tensile specimens were machined from coating and tested in as-sprayed and heat-treated (solution treatment and aging) condition. Tensile properties of the coating after the treatment correspond to properties of the cast A357-T61 aluminum alloy. Finally, fatigue specimen was proposed to test overall performance of the coating and coating's fatigue limit is compared to the results obtained on cast A357-T61 aluminum alloy.

  4. Sprayed concrete linings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, D.

    1999-12-01

    Sprayed concrete, or shotcrete, was invented in the 1920s for preserving dinosaur skeletons and was used underground initially in coalmines for the preservation and fine proofing of timber supports. Its use as a support lining in rock tunnelling was developed in the 1950s and 60s. The article surveys equipment available from major manufacturers and suppliers of concrete spraying equipment (Aliva, Cifa, GIA, Industri, Ingersoll Rand, etc.), specialist cement and additive manufacturers (Castle, Cement, Moria Carbotech). manufacturers of lattice girders and fibre reinforcement, and manufacturers of instrumentation for tunnel linings. 5 tabs., 9 photos.

  5. Cast Metal Coalition Research and Development Closeout Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.

    2000-08-01

    The Cast Metal Coalition, composed of more than 22 research providers and universities and 149 industrial partners, has completed a four-year research and development partnership with the Department of Energy. This report provides brief summaries of the 29 projects performed by the Coalition. These projects generated valuable information in such aspects of the metals industry as process prediction technologies, quality control, improved alloys, product machinability, and casting process improvements.

  6. Precision Casting via Advanced Simulation and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program was conducted to develop and commercially implement selected casting manufacturing technologies to enable significant reductions in the costs of castings, increase the complexity and dimensional accuracy of castings, and reduce the development times for delivery of high quality castings. The industry-led R&D project was cost shared with NASA's Aerospace Industry Technology Program (AITP). The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American, Inc. served as the team lead with participation from Lockheed Martin, Ford Motor Company, Howmet Corporation, PCC Airfoils, General Electric, UES, Inc., University of Alabama, Auburn University, Robinson, Inc., Aracor, and NASA-LeRC. The technical effort was organized into four distinct tasks. The accomplishments reported herein. Task 1.0 developed advanced simulation technology for core molding. Ford headed up this task. On this program, a specialized core machine was designed and built. Task 2.0 focused on intelligent process control for precision core molding. Howmet led this effort. The primary focus of these experimental efforts was to characterize the process parameters that have a strong impact on dimensional control issues of injection molded cores during their fabrication. Task 3.0 developed and applied rapid prototyping to produce near net shape castings. Rocketdyne was responsible for this task. CAD files were generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototype patterns were fabricated using SLS and SLA, and castings produced and evaluated. Task 4.0 was aimed at developing technology transfer. Rocketdyne coordinated this task. Casting related technology, explored and evaluated in the first three tasks of this program, was implemented into manufacturing processes.

  7. Melt Cast High Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Cudziło

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper reviews the current state and future developments of melt-cast high explosives. First the compositions, properties and methods of preparation of trinitrotoluene based (TNT conventional mixtures with aluminum, hexogen (RDX or octogen (HMX are described. In the newer, less sensitive explosive formulations, TNT is replaced with dinitroanisole (DNANDNANDNAN and nitrotriazolone (NTONTONTO, nitroguanidine (NG or ammonium perchlorate (AP are the replacement for RDRDX and HMX. Plasticized wax or polymer-based binder systems for melt castable explosives are also included. Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HPTB is the binder of choice, but polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone with energetic plasticizers are also used. The most advanced melt-cast explosives are compositions containing energetic thermoplastic elastomers and novel highly energetic compounds (including nitrogen rich molecules in whose particles are nanosized and practically defect-less.[b]Keywords[/b]: melt-cast explosives, detonation parameters

  8. Thermal analysis simulation for a spin-motor used in the advanced main combustion chamber vacuum plasma spray project using the SINDA computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Gary H.

    1990-01-01

    One of the many design challenges of this project is predicting the thermal effects due to the environment inside the vacuum chamber on the turntable and spin motor spindle assembly. The objective of the study is to model the spin motor using the computer program System Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA). By formulating the appropriate input information concerning the motor's geometry, coolant flow path, material composition, and bearing and motor winding characteristics, SINDA should predict temperatures at various predefined nodes. From these temperatures, hopefully, one can predict if the coolant flow rate is sufficient or if certain mechanical elements such as bearings, O ring seals, or motor windings will exceed maximum design temperatures.

  9. Thermal spray for commercial shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, F. S.

    1997-09-01

    Thermal spraying of steel with aluminum to protect it from corrosion is a technology that has been proven to work in the marine environment. The thermal spray coating system includes a paint sealer that is applied over the thermally sprayed aluminum. This extends the service life of the coating and provides color to the end product. The thermal spray system protects steel both through the principle of isolation (as in painting) and galvanizing. With this dual protection mechanism, steel is protected from corrosion even when the coating is damaged. The thermal- sprayed aluminum coating system has proved the most cost- effective corrosion protection system for the marine environment. Until recently, however, the initial cost of application has limited its use for general application. Arc spray technology has reduced the application cost of thermal spraying of aluminum to below that of painting. Commercial shipbuilders could use this technology to enhance their market position in the marine industry.

  10. Comparison of marginal accuracy of castings fabricated by conventional casting technique and accelerated casting technique: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Srikanth; Revathi, Kakkirala; Reddy, S Kranthikumar

    2013-01-01

    Conventional casting technique is time consuming when compared to accelerated casting technique. In this study, marginal accuracy of castings fabricated using accelerated and conventional casting technique was compared. 20 wax patterns were fabricated and the marginal discrepancy between the die and patterns were measured using Optical stereomicroscope. Ten wax patterns were used for Conventional casting and the rest for Accelerated casting. A Nickel-Chromium alloy was used for the casting. The castings were measured for marginal discrepancies and compared. Castings fabricated using Conventional casting technique showed less vertical marginal discrepancy than the castings fabricated by Accelerated casting technique. The values were statistically highly significant. Conventional casting technique produced better marginal accuracy when compared to Accelerated casting. The vertical marginal discrepancy produced by the Accelerated casting technique was well within the maximum clinical tolerance limits. Accelerated casting technique can be used to save lab time to fabricate clinical crowns with acceptable vertical marginal discrepancy.

  11. Plasma spraying of cerium-doped YAG

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Kubát, J.; Pala, Zdeněk; Nevrlá, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 19 (2014), s. 2344-2351 ISSN 0884-2914 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma spraying * water-stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.647, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1557/jmr.2014.251

  12. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  13. Development of process data capturing, analysis and controlling for thermal spray techniques - SprayTracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelber, C.; Marke, S.; Trommler, U.; Rupprecht, C.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal spraying processes are becoming increasingly important in high-technology areas, such as automotive engineering and medical technology. The method offers the advantage of a local layer application with different materials and high deposition rates. Challenges in the application of thermal spraying result from the complex interaction of different influencing variables, which can be attributed to the properties of different materials, operating equipment supply, electrical parameters, flow mechanics, plasma physics and automation. In addition, spraying systems are subject to constant wear. Due to the process specification and the high demands on the produced coatings, innovative quality assurance tools are necessary. A central aspect, which has not yet been considered, is the data management in relation to the present measured variables, in particular the spraying system, the handling system, working safety devices and additional measuring sensors. Both the recording of all process-characterizing variables, their linking and evaluation as well as the use of the data for the active process control presuppose a novel, innovative control system (hardware and software) that was to be developed within the scope of the research project. In addition, new measurement methods and sensors are to be developed and qualified in order to improve the process reliability of thermal spraying.

  14. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  15. An Investigation of Mechanisms in Bonding and Failure of Thermal Spray Coatings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project is an investigation of the mechanisms in bonding and failure of thermal spray coatings. The objectives for this project are as follows:...

  16. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    Figure 55 Die casting machine. Shot sleeve at S, melt furnace at M, ladle preheat at L. Figure 56 Aluminum die casting top surface. Risers removed... ladle and transferred to the shot sleeve. Upon pouring the metal, the ram is actuated and the casting made. To test the mechanical operation of...mnui i .MI iiiiiuH ’ -84- Figure 55. Die casting machine. Shot sleeve at S, melt furnace at M, ladle preheat at L. ■ ■ wmmm*mm

  17. Segregation in cast products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    are also available (Moore 1984; Ohnaka 1988; Flemings 1990; Roy et al 1992; Ghosh. 1997). In addition, some recent research papers will also be referred to as required. Original references of earlier studies are omitted for the sake of brevity. The basic principles of formation of microsegregation in castings and ingots were.

  18. ToxCast Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  19. Wear resistance of cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    S. Pietrowski; G. Gumienny

    2008-01-01

    In this paper investigations of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of different cast iron grades have been presented. Examinations showed, that the most advantageous pair of materials is the cast iron – the hardened steel with low-tempered martensite. It was found, that martensitic nodular cast iron with carbides is the most resistant material.

  20. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  1. Flame spraying of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Zeek, D.P.; Couch, K.W.; Benson, D.M.; Kirk, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Statistical design-of-experiment studies of the thermal spraying of polymer powders are presented. Studies of the subsonic combustion (i.e., Flame) process were conducted in order to determine the quality and economics of polyester and urethane coatings. Thermally sprayed polymer coatings are of interest to several industries for anticorrosion applications, including the chemical, automotive, and aircraft industries. In this study, the coating design has been optimized for a site-specific application using Taguchi-type fractional-factorial experiments. Optimized coating designs are presented for the two powder systems. A substantial range of thermal processing conditions and their effect on the resultant polymer coatings is presented. The coatings were characterized by optical metallography, hardness testing, tensile testing, and compositional analysis. Characterization of the coatings yielded the thickness, bond strength, Knoop microhardness, roughness, deposition efficiency, and porosity. Confirmation testing was accomplished to verify the coating designs

  2. Numerical modelling of fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, C.

    1999-06-01

    The way the fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber is one of the most important parameters for the power output and the generation of emissions in the combustion of liquid fuels. The interaction between the turbulent gas flow field and the liquid fuel droplets, the vaporisation of them and the mixing of the gaseous fuel with the ambient air that are vital parameters in the combustion process. The use of numerical calculations is an important tool to better understand these complex interacting phenomena. This thesis reports on the numerical modelling of fuel sprays in non-reacting cases using an own developed spray module. The spray module uses the stochastic parcel method to represent the spray. The module was made in such manner that it could by coupled with different gas flow solver. Results obtained from four different gas flow solvers are presented in the thesis, including the use of two different kinds of turbulence models. In the first part the spray module is coupled with a k-{eta} based 2-D cylindrical gas flow solver. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed on the spray and gas flow solver parameters, such as grid size dependence and sensitivity to initial values of k-{eta}. The results of the spray module were also compared to results from other spray codes, e.g. the well known KIVA code. In the second part of this thesis the spray was injected into a turbulent and fully developed crossflow studied. The spray module was attached to a LES (Large Eddy Simulation) based flow solvers enabling the study of the complex structures and time dependent phenomena involved in spray in crossflows. It was found that the spray performs an oscillatory motion and that the Strouhal number in the wake was about 0.1. Different spray breakup models were evaluated by comparing with experimental results 66 refs, 56 figs

  3. Kelvin spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Abdil; Lin, Jung-Lee; Gillig, Kent J; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2013-11-21

    A novel self-powered dual spray ionization source has been developed for applications in mass spectrometry. This new source does not use any power supply and produces both positive and negative ions simultaneously. The idea behind this ionization source comes from the Kelvin water dropper. The source employs one or two syringes, two pneumatic sprays operated over a range of flow rates (0.15-15 μL min(-1)) and gas pressures (0-150 psi), and two double layered metal screens for ion formation. A variable electrostatic potential from 0 to 4 kV can be produced depending on solvent and gas flow rates that allow gentle ionization of compounds. There are several parameters that affect the performance during ionization of molecules including the flow rate of solvent, gas pressure, solvent acidity, position of spray and metal screens with respect to each other and distance between metal screens and the counter electrode. This ionization method has been successfully applied to solutions of peptides, proteins and non-covalent complexes. In comparison with ESI, the charge number of the most populated state is lower than that from ESI. It indicates that this is a softer ionization technique and it produces more protein ions with folded structures. The unique features of Kelvin spray ionization (KeSI) are that the method is self-powered and ionization occurs at very low potentials by providing very low internal energy to the ions. This advantage can be used for the ionization of very fragile molecules and investigation of non-covalent interactions.

  4. Study of the mechanical stability of superconducting cavities and stiffening of these cavities by copper coating performed with thermal spray techniques; Etudes de la stabilite mecanique des cavites supraconductrices et de la methode de rigidification par projection thermique de cuivre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassot, H

    2001-12-01

    Today's research in nuclear physics and in particle physics needs high energy or high intensity accelerators; the use of superconducting cavities constitutes a very important technological advance for the design of such facilities, allowing high accelerating gradient with few dissipation. One of the major problems is the frequency shift under Lorentz forces: since the quality factor of the superconducting cavities is much higher than the external factor depending on the beam charge, their bandwidths are very narrow (several Hertz). Even very small mechanical deformations under Lorentz forces could induce a frequency shift which exceeds the bandwidth when the accelerating gradient becomes very high. The contribution of this thesis consists at first in a numerical analysis of this problem, then in a mechanical study of a new method for stiffening superconducting cavities: a copper coating over their external surface by thermal spray techniques. As it was a new experiment, the choice of the process and the optimization of the parameters have been carried out. An important part of this thesis has been dedicated to the systematic mechanical characterizations of the copper coatings since they are indispensable for the evaluation of the stiffening efficiency, some links between copper coating properties and thermal projection parameters have been established. The mechanical calculations are a prerequisite to obtain an effective reduction of mechanical deformations under Lorentz forces: they permit to localize the maximum deformations, to find the ideal position and the optimised shape of the stiffener. The methods implemented in this thesis allow to compare the different kinds of coating design and then to propose an interesting solution. Finally, an original approach concerning the frequency shift in pulsed mode has been developed recently, allowing to interpret some experimental observations. (author)

  5. Temperature profile and sound velocity data using CTD casts from the US Naval Oceanographic Office as part of the Master Oceanographic Observation Data Set (MOODS) project, from 1975-04-11 to 1998-08-31 (NODC Accession 9900220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and sound velocity data were collected using CTD, XCTD, and XBT casts in the Arctic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea - Eastern Basin, North Pacific...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-04-09 to 1975-04-10 (NODC Accession 7500518)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ from 09 April 1975 to 10 April 1975. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as part of...

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-06-01 to 1972-07-18 (NODC Accession 7201150)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ from 01 June 1972 to 18 July 1972. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as part of...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-10-17 to 1975-12-28 (NODC Accession 7600103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 17 October 1975 to 28 December 1975. Data were collected by Grace...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-08-01 to 1972-09-13 (NODC Accession 7201275)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ from 01 August 1972 to 13 September 1972. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-11-04 to 1973-12-31 (NODC Accession 7400278)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ from 04 November 1973 to 31 December 1973. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as...

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the LASH ATLANTICO as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-03-22 (NODC Accession 7800644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the LASH ATLANTICO from 22 March 1978. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as part of the Marine...

  12. Current direction, wind wave spectra, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-10-11 to 1980-03-19 (NODC Accession 8000368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments from the CAPT JACK and EXCELLENCE in the...

  13. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 1980-08-26 to 1981-03-01 (NODC Accession 8100540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from August 26, 1980 to March 1, 1980. Data were submitted by Science...

  14. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of S. Alaska as part of the Fisheries-Oceanography Cooperative Investigations (FOCI) project from 1984-08-21 to 1985-07-01 (NODC Accession 8700053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of S. Alaska from August 21, 1984 to July 1, 1985. Data were submitted by...

  15. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 1981-03-15 to 1981-10-01 (NODC Accession 8100718)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from March 15, 1981 to October 1, 1981. Data were submitted by Science...

  16. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 1981-06-02 to 1981-10-01 (NODC Accession 8200061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from June 2, 1981 to October 1, 1981. Data were submitted by Science...

  17. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 1979-03-21 to 1979-11-02 (NODC Accession 8000032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from March 21, 1979 to November 2, 1979. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  18. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 1981-05-11 to 1981-11-01 (NODC Accession 8200003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from May 11, 1981 to November 1, 1981. Data were submitted by Science...

  19. Temperature profile data collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts in part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / North Pacific Experiment (IDOE/NORPAX) project from 01 November 1977 to 28 February 1978 (NODC Accession 8100400)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from the KANA KEOKI from November 1, 1977 to February 28, 1978. Data were submitted by...

  20. Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 December 1980 - 01 December 1980 (NODC Accession 8100457)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 1, 1980 to December 1, 1980. Data...

  1. Physical and chemical data from bottle casts and visual observations in the North and South Atlantic Ocean as part of the Data Archaeology and Rescue project, from 1970-08-27 to 1976-11-19 (NODC Accession 9900036)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using bottle casts and visual observation from the ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT in the North and South Atlantic Ocean from August...

  2. Temperature and chemical data from CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint EXperiment (AIDJEX) project, from 11 November 1980 to 21 November 1980 (NODC Accession 0000212)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and chemical data were collected using CTD casts from the R/V ALPHA HELIX in the Gulf of Alaska from 11 November 1980 to 21 November 1980. Data...

  3. Current direction, chemical, and marine toxic substances data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-09-09 to 1979-11-19 (NODC Accession 8000043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, marine toxic substances, and chemical data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  4. Chemical, benthic organisms, zooplankton, marine toxic substances, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1979-08-30 to 1981-09-21 (NODC Accession 8200012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, marine toxic substances, benthic organisms, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf...

  5. Water physical and chemical data from current meter and bottle casts from the GILLISS as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf - Mid Atlantic (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 1976-02-04 to 1976-09-14 (NODC Accession 7700477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physical and chemical data were collected using current meter and bottle casts from the GILLISS and other platforms from February 4, 1976 to September 14,...

  6. Physical, chemical, and other data from bottle and XBT casts from the DIAMOND SHOALS and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic project from 1958-01-01 to 1975-10-18 (NODC Accession 7700635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, and other data from CTD and XBT casts from the DIAMOND SHOALS and other platforms. Data were collected by the United States Coast Guard and other...

  7. Current direction, phytoplankton, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1981-02-07 to 1982-11-01 (NODC Accession 8300055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, phytoplankton, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of...

  8. Bacteriology data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean during the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS-Mid Atlantic Ocean) project, 1976-11-05 to 1977-08-16 (NODC Accession 7800207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 5, 1976 to August 16, 1977....

  9. Chemical, physical, and other data collected using bottle casts from the North Pacific Ocean as a part of the California Cooperative Fisheries Investigation (CALCOFI) project, from 06 January 1951 to 31 October 1960 (NODC Accession 7100165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, and other data were collected using bottle casts in the North Pacific Ocean from January 6, 1951 to October 31, 1960. Data were submitted by...

  10. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 1984-04-10 to 1984-10-31 (NODC Accession 8500225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight from April 10, 1984 to October 31, 1984. Data were...

  11. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 1975-09-16 to 1976-04-01 (NODC Accession 7601229)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from September 16, 1975 to April 1, 1976. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  12. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 November 1980 - 01 November 1980 (NODC Accession 8100222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from November 1, 1980 to November 1, 1980. Data...

  13. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 1977-12-14 to 1978-04-19 (NODC Accession 8000053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from December 14, 1977 to April 19, 1978. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  14. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 1976-02-25 to 1976-12-01 (NODC Accession 7800052)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from February 25, 1976 to December 1, 1976. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  15. Current direction, chemical, zooplankton, phytoplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Buccaneer Oil Field project, 1975-12-12 to 1980-05-20 (NODC Accession 8000461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from December 12, 1975 to...

  16. Chemical, benthic organisms, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Gulf of Mexico North Continental Slope Study (MNCSS) project, 11 November 1983 - 13 November 1984 (NODC Accession 8400119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, benthic organisms, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from November 11, 1983 to...

  17. Temperature and salinity data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1977-09-15 to 1977-12-19 (NODC Accession 7800318)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 15, 1977 to January 19, 1977. Data were...

  18. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 1980-09-02 to 1980-09-06 (NODC Accession 8100628)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from September 2, 1980 to September 6,...

  19. Current direction, benthic organisms, temperature, and wind direction data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 22 September 1977 - 30 November 1978 (NODC Accession 7900110)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, benthic organisms, temperature, and wind direction data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 22,...

  20. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 1980-04-21 to 1980-07-18 (NODC Accession 8100501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from April 21, 1980 to July 18, 1980....

  1. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the GERDA as part of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) project from 20 July 1955 to 29 May 1957 (NODC Accession 7000057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the GERDA from 20 July 1955 to 29 May 1957. Data were collected as part of the Rosenstiel...

  2. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 1982-07-27 to 1982-08-02 (NODC Accession 8400002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from July 27, 1982 to August 2, 1982....

  3. Water physical and chemical data from current meter and bottle casts from the COLUMBUS ISELIN as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf - Mid Atlantic (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 1975-10-27 to 1975-11-06 (NODC Accession 7700454)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physical and chemical data were collected using current meter and bottle casts from the COLUMBUS ISELIN from October 27, 1975 to November 6, 1975. Data were...

  4. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 1981-04-15 to 1981-04-20 (NODC Accession 8100656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from April 15, 1981 to April 20, 1981....

  5. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-01-25 to 1975-03-15 (NODC Accession 7500203)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms from 25 January 1975 to 15 March 1975. Data were collected by the...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-05-25 to 1980-07-12 (NODC Accession 8000439)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms from 25 May 1980 to 12 July 1980. Data were collected by...

  7. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of Florida as part of the Florida Straits Physical Oceanography (FSPO) project from 23 November 1990 - 19 August 1991 (NODC Accession 9200237)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of Florida from November 23, 1990 to August 19, 1991. Data were submitted by...

  8. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit -40 W) as part of the Ocean Dumping project, 1990-05-24 to 1991-06-17 (NODC Accession 9300112)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit -40 W) from May 24, 1990 to June 17, 1991. Data were...

  9. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 1977-09-02 to 1977-11-02 (NODC Accession 7900074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from September 2, 1977 to November 2, 1977. Data were submitted by...

  10. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 1978-08-01 to 1979-03-20 (NODC Accession 7900312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from August 1, 1978 to March 20, 1979. Data were submitted by Science...

  11. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1977-02-02 to 1979-01-31 (NODC Accession 7900144)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, salinity, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from February 2, 1978 to January 31,...

  12. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 09 April 1979 - 23 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8100440)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 9, 1979 to August 23,...

  13. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as part of the Flow Over Abrupt Topography project from 1990-01-06 to 1991-12-03 (NODC Accession 9500077)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from January 6, 1990 to December 3, 1991. Data were submitted by...

  14. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the UNIMAK and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-03-19 to 1981-04-07 (NODC Accession 8100521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the UNIMAK and other platforms from 19 March 1981 to 07 April 1981. Data were collected by the National...

  15. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1984-04-17 to 1984-06-02 (NODC Accession 8400111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 17 April 1984 to 02 June 1984. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  16. Temperature and salinity profiles from CTD casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1994-06-01 to 1998-09-10 (NODC Accession 9900023)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from CTD casts from the ALABATROSS IV and other platforms from 01 June 1994 to 10 September 1998. Data were...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1983-09-14 to 1983-11-09 (NODC Accession 8400160)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 14 September 1983 to 09 November 1983. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1984-10-16 to 1984-12-04 (NODC Accession 8500016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV and other platforms from 16 October 1984 to 04 December 1984. Data were collected by...

  19. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-07-13 to 1972-08-20 (NODC Accession 7300790)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 13 July 1972 to 20 August 1972. Data were collected by the Wood Hole...

  20. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1984-09-11 to 1984-10-11 (NODC Accession 8400249)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 11 September 1984 to 11 October 1984. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  1. Physical data from CTD casts in the North Pacific Ocean from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON and the THOMAS WASHINGTON in support of the Marathon 2 Project from 05 May 1985 to 07 September 1987 (NODC Accession 9400131)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from CTD casts in the North Pacific Ocean from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON and the THOMAS WASHINGTON. Data were collected...

  2. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-07-01 to 1972-08-14 (NODC Accession 7201255)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ from 01 July 1972 to 14 August 1972. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as part of...

  3. Current direction, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 25 March 1977 - 01 February 1980 (NODC Accession 8000320)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from March 25, 1977 to...

  4. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1982-10-18 to 1983-08-01 (NODC Accession 8400010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from October 18, 1982 to August 1, 1983. Data...

  5. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1981-02-07 to 1982-06-01 (NODC Accession 8300040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from February 7, 1981 to June 1, 1982. Data...

  6. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1979-08-17 to 1980-05-01 (NODC Accession 8100541)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from August 17, 1979 to May 1, 1980. Data...

  7. Current direction, temperature, and other data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1979-05-15 to 1980-03-22 (NODC Accession 8000457)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, current direction, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts from the EXCELLENCE in the Gulf of Mexico from May 15, 1979...

  8. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1977-12-22 to 1978-10-31 (NODC Accession 7900023)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 22, 1977 to October...

  9. Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 January 1981 - 01 January 1981 (NODC Accession 8100474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from January 1, 1981 to January 1, 1981. Data...

  10. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1979-09-10 to 1981-03-31 (NODC Accession 8100554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 10, 1979 to March 31, 1981....

  11. Temperature, salinity, and current direction data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-05-01 to 1979-06-01 (NODC Accession 8000245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and current direction data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from June 1, 1978 to June 1, 1979. Data were...

  12. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1977-12-22 to 1978-07-01 (NODC Accession 7900123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 22, 1977 to October...

  13. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1980-09-18 to 1981-03-01 (NODC Accession 8100555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 18, 1980 to March 1, 1981....

  14. Current direction data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1979-07-16 to 1979-08-02 (NODC Accession 8000501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from July 16, 1979 to August 2, 1979. Data were submitted by Texas A...

  15. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1983-08-31 to 1984-10-01 (NODC Accession 8500021)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from August 31, 1983 to October 1, 1984. Data...

  16. Current direction, chemical, zooplankton, phytoplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1980-01-24 to 1981-06-22 (NODC Accession 8100704)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  17. Chemical, zooplankton, phytoplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1981-02-17 to 1982-05-27 (NODC Accession 8200183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from February 17,...

  18. Current direction, fish shellfish resource, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-06-21 to 1981-06-24 (NODC Accession 8200027)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, fish shellfish resource, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from June 18,...

  19. Wind wave spectra and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1979-09-22 to 1980-05-01 (NODC Accession 8000462)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind wave spectra and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from September 22, 1979 to May 1, 1980....

  20. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as part of the Ocean Prediction Through Observation Modeling and Analysis (OPTOMA) project, 1984-09-26 to 1985-07-16 (NODC Accession 9600075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from September 26, 1984 to July 16, 1985. Data were submitted by...

  1. Physical and other data from CTD casts from the ALPHA HELIX from the Gulf of Alaska in support of the Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC) project from 26 August 1999 to 07 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000109)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data from were collected from CTD casts from the ALPHA HELIX in the Gulf of Alaska. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks;...

  2. Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-02-01 to 1979-05-03 (NODC Accession 7900247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from February 1, 1978...

  3. Pressure, temperature, and current velocity data from speed meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the SYNoptic Ocean Prediction (SYNOP) project from 1988-05-01 to 1990-08-31 (NODC Accession 9700183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure, temperature, and current velocity data were collected using speed meter casts from the R/V ENDEAVOR and OCEANUS in the Gulf of Mexico from May 1, 1988 to...

  4. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-11-08 to 1974-11-14 (NODC Accession 7500079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 08 November 1974 to 14 November 1974. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  5. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the High Energy Benthic Boundary Exp. (HEBBLE) project from 1983-03-19 to 1984-08-01 (NODC Accession 8900107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from March 19, 1983 to August 1, 1984. Data were submitted by Woods...

  6. Current direction, zooplankton, phytoplankton, benthic organisms, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 17 February 1981 - 22 June 1982 (NODC Accession 8200230)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthic organisms, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of...

  7. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Topographic Features project, 1979-01-16 to 1982-05-01 (NODC Accession 8400120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from January 16, 1979 to May 1, 1982. Data...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA ECUADOR and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-09-30 to 1978-10-05 (NODC Accession 7800858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA ECUADOR and other platforms from 30 September 1978 to 05 October 1978. Data were collected by the...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-03-08 to 1977-04-22 (NODC Accession 7700321)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 08 March 1977 to 22 April 1977. Data were collected by the National...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DECATUR and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1969-08-30 to 1983-03-31 (NODC Accession 8300047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DECATUR and other platforms from 30 August 1969 to 31 March 1983. Data were collected by the National...

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE CRUISER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-03-16 to 1978-03-17 (NODC Accession 7800292)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE CRUISER from 16 March 1978 to 17 March 1978. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  12. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-06-22 to 1975-09-17 (NODC Accession 7500932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 22 June 1975 to 17 September 1975. Data were collected by Grace...

  13. Physical, biological, and chemical data from radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution as part of the SeaWiFS/SIMBIOS project from 13 September 1981 to 16 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, biological, and chemical data were collected using radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution from 13...

  14. Temperature profile data from STD/CTDs casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from the Atlantic Ocean during the California Cooperative Fisheries Investigation (CALCOFI) project, 1938-02-15 to 1985-03-27 (NODC Accession 8800121)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity were collected using SDT/CDTs casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms in the Coastal Waters of California from February 15, 1938...

  15. Current direction, chemical, benthic organisms, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1981-01-21 to 1982-07-27 (NODC Accession 8200207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, benthic organisms, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  16. Current direction, benthic organisms, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-09-01 to 1982-05-19 (NODC Accession 8200154)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, benthic organisms, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from July 15, 1980 to March 20, 1981. Data...

  17. Chemical, zooplankton, and marine toxic substances data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-06-02 to 1979-06-02 (NODC Accession 8000002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, zooplankton, and marine toxic substances data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from June 2, 1978...

  18. Chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthic organisms, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1981-02-12 to 1982-01-05 (NODC Accession 8200064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, phytoplankton, benthic organisms, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  19. Chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1980-04-17 to 1981-07-17 (NODC Accession 8100731)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  20. Zooplankton data from zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 03 November 1976 - 18 November 1977 (NODC Accession 7800340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 3, 1976 to November 18,...

  1. Current direction, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, benthic organisms, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 18 October 1977 to 01 May 1979 (NODC Accession 7900270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, zooplankton, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the...

  2. Current direction, chemical, zooplankton, phytoplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1982-02-19 to 1983-03-23 (NODC Accession 8300099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  3. Current direction, chemical, zooplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-09-22 to 1979-01-22 (NODC Accession 7900212)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from September...

  4. Current direction, temperature, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1977-09-14 to 1981-04-20 (NODC Accession 8100585)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from September...

  5. Current direction, chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1977-09-15 to 1981-05-27 (NODC Accession 8100657)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  6. Chemical, zooplankton, phytoplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1982-09-07 to 1982-11-30 (NODC Accession 8300075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from September 7,...

  7. Temperature profile data from STD/CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE from the Pacific Ocean during the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / North Pacific Experiment (IDOE/NORPAX) project, 22 February to 1975-05-27 (NODC Accession 7800703)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data were collected using STD/CTD casts from MOANA WAVE in the Pacific Ocean from February 22, 1975 to May 27, 1975. Data were...

  8. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea as part of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) project from 1979-09-27 to 1979-12-01 (NODC Accession 8100607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea from September 27, 1979 to December 1, 1979. Data were submitted by...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-07-21 to 1980-09-03 (NODC Accession 8000469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 21 July 1980 to 03 September 1980. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  10. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 1979-01-20 to 1984-04-01 (NODC Accession 8700077)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean from January 20, 1979 to April 1, 1984. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  11. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the South Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 1981-11-21 to 1983-11-20 (NODC Accession 8500258)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the South Pacific Ocean from November 21, 1981 to November 20, 1983. Data were submitted by...

  12. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 1990-04-30 to 1991-05-15 (NODC Accession 9400005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean from April 30, 1990 to May 15, 1991. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  13. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 1979-01-20 to 1984-04-26 (NODC Accession 8500007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean from January 20, 1979 to April 26, 1984. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  14. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 1986-05-28 to 1987-05-11 (NODC Accession 8900168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean from 28 May 1986 to 01 May 1983. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  15. Temperature data from XBT casts in a world-wide distribution as part of the Gulf of Mexico NOAA/NMFS Ship of Opportunity (SOOP) project from 07 July 2002 to 17 September 2002 (NODC Accession 0000790)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature data were collected using XBT casts in a world-wide distribution from 07 July 2002 to 17 September 2002. Data were submitted by Atlantic Oceanographic...

  16. Current direction, chemical, benthic organisms, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1980-03-10 to 1981-07-29 (NODC Accession 8100727)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, benthic organisms, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from March...

  17. Current direction, temperature, zooplankton, phytoplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1980-07-15 to 1981-03-20 (NODC Accession 8100610)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from July 15, 1980 to March 20, 1981....

  18. Current direction, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-01-12 to 1980-06-01 (NODC Accession 8000465)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments from the CAPT JACK and...

  19. Current direction, temperature, salinity, and taxonomic code data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1979-08-18 to 1981-01-21 (NODC Accession 8100502)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, current direction, and taxonomic data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from August 18, 1979 to January...

  20. Chemical data from moored current meter, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-06-23 to 1978-06-30 (NODC Accession 7900006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical data were collected using moored current meter, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from June 18, 1978 to June 24, 1981. Data were...

  1. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-09-06 to 1977-11-16 (NODC Accession 7700860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE and other platforms from 06 September 1977 to 16 November 1977. Data were collected by the...

  2. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-04-01 to 1977-05-19 (NODC Accession 7700426)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE and other platforms from 01 April 1977 to 19 May 1977. Data were collected by the National...

  3. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon as part of the Land-Margin Ecosystem Research (LEML) project, 06 May 1997 - 19 October 1997 (NODC Accession 9800193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from May 6, 1997 to October 19, 1997. Data were...

  4. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-02-09 to 1975-03-16 (NODC Accession 7500643)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD from 09 February 1975 to 16 March 1975. Data were collected by the Delta Steamship Co. as part...

  5. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-11-14 to 1973-01-02 (NODC Accession 7300035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA and other platforms from 14 November 1972 to 02 January 1973. Data were collected by the...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN TRADE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-01-27 to 1972-02-10 (NODC Accession 7300788)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN TRADE from 27 January 1972 to 10 Februay 1972. Data were collected by Moore McCormack Lines Inc....

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-11-18 to 1974-12-23 (NODC Accession 7500059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD and other platforms from 18 November 1974 to 23 December 1974. Data were collected by the Delta...

  8. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the AMIGO as part of the SEAGRANT project from 1972-01-19 to 1973-04-20 (NODC Accession 7400540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the AMIGO from 19 January 1972 to 20 April 1973. Data were submitted by the Moss Landing...

  9. Current direction, wind wave spectra, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1977-09-24 to 1981-08-31 (NODC Accession 8100681)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in...

  10. Current direction, chemical, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1980-12-13 to 1982-03-01 (NODC Accession 8200097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from December 13, 1980 to...

  11. Current direction, chemical, zooplankton, phytoplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1981-03-24 to 1981-11-03 (NODC Accession 8200042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from March 24,...

  12. Advanced lost foam casting technology. 1995 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Littleton, H.E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B.A.; Sheldon, D.S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production; Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency; Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects; Task 4: Pattern Gating; and Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers. This report summarizes the work done in the past two years and the conclusions drawn from the work.

  13. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process simulation has developed from predicting hot spots and solidification to an integral assessment tool for foundries for the entire manufacturing route of castings. The support of the feeding related layout of the casting is still one of the most important duties for casting process simulation. Depending on the alloy poured, different feeding behaviors and self-feeding capabilities need to be considered to provide a defect free casting. Therefore, it is not enough to base the prediction of shrinkage defects solely on hot spots derived from temperature fields. To be able to quantitatively predict these defects, solidification simulation had to be combined with density and mass transport calculations, in order to evaluate the impact of the solidification morphology on the feeding behavior as well as to consider alloy dependent feeding ranges. For cast iron foundries, the use of casting process simulation has become an important instrument to predict the robustness and reliability of their processes, especially since the influence of alloying elements, melting practice and metallurgy need to be considered to quantify the special shrinkage and solidification behavior of cast iron. This allows the prediction of local structures, phases and ultimately the local mechanical properties of cast irons, to asses casting quality in the foundry but also to make use of this quantitative information during design of the casting. Casting quality issues related to thermally driven

  14. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  15. Shrinkages in heavy-sized cast components of nodular cast iron – NDT and fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleicher Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Material defects like shrinkages, dross, pores and chunky graphite are likely to occur in thick-walled castings and are a challenge for the foundries and their customers. These defects are mostly detected with handheld ultrasonic testing (UT or X-ray analysis. Within a research project done at the Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability LBF, the fatigue of Dross, shrinkages and chunky graphite in thick-walled cast material GGG-40 was estimated based on X-ray and fatigue tests on bending specimens. High fatigue reductions were received for the different material imperfections. Based on these impressions a further research project was executed at the Fraunhofer LBF to get an estimation of the informational value of UT in relation to fatigue of shrinkages in thick-walled castings of the material EN-GJS-400-18U-LT, EN-GJS-450-18 and EN-GJS-700-2. With the help of X-ray analysis and the UT technique Sampling Phased Array (SPA information about geometry and density were derived for a numerical analysis of shrinkages in thick-walled castings concerning fatigue. The following text summarizes the fatigue results achieved in the two research projects with the help of the X-ray and UT analysis.

  16. Microplasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    ""This unique book on development of microplasma sprayed HAp coating has been organized in a very compact yet comprehensive manner. This book also highlights the horizons of future research that invites the attention of global community, particularly those in bio-medical materials and bio-medical engineering field. This book will surely act as a very useful reference material for both graduate/post-graduate students and researchers in the field of biomedical, orthopedic and manufacturing engineering and research. I truly believ that this is the first ever effort which covers almost all the

  17. Cast Aluminum Structures Technology (CAST) Phase VI. Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    o Metal preparation o Ladle fill o Pouring 0 Mold shakeout o Casting cleanup o Inspection o Weld correction o Heat treatment and straightening o...presents a summary of foundry data for the 10 Hitchcock cast - ings. Included are the ladle chemistry and the pouring date, temperature, and time for each...properties, and full range stress- strain curves to failure for each specimen d. Chemistry of molten metal in ladle for each casting 3.4.3.2 The foundry

  18. An electron microscopy study of the effect of Ce on plasma sprayed bronze coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensheng, Li; Wang, S. C.; Ma, Chao; Zhiping, Wang

    2012-07-01

    The Cu-Al eutectoid alloy is an excellent material for mould due to its superior low friction. The conventional sand casting technique, however, is not feasible to fabricate high Al bronze because of high hardness and brittleness. Plasma arc spray has been used to produce high Al/Fe bronze coatings for mould. The inherent impurities such as H, O, N, S during the spray, however, may affect the coating's mechanical strength. One approach is to utilise the active rare earth Ce to clean up these impurities. The study is to investigate the effect of Ce on the microstructure, which has few reported in the literature.

  19. Demonstration of the Impact of Thermomagnetic Processing on Cast Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Murphy, Bart L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rios, Orlando [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kesler, Michael S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Henderson, Hunter B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This project builds on an earlier Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technical Collaboration phase 1 project to investigate application of high magnetic fields during solution heat treating and aging of three different cast aluminum alloys.

  20. Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Cast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    2012-03-31

    This Final Technical Report describes progress made on the sub-projects awarded in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42457: Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST). The final reports for each sub-project are attached in the appendix. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: a) Solid-solid separation b) Solid-liquid separation c) Chemical/Biological Extraction d) Modeling and Control, and e) Environmental Control.

  1. A pdpa laser-based measuring set-up for the characterisation of spray nozzles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyttens, D; Sonck, B; de Schampheleire, M; Steurbaut, W; Baetens, K; Verboven, P; Nicolaï, B; Ramon, H

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of agricultural sprays belong to the most critical factors affecting spray drift, deposition on plants, spray coverage and biological efficacy. Hence, within the framework of a research project about agricultural spray drift, a measuring set-up for the characterisation of spray nozzles using a Phase Doppler Particle Analyser (PDPA) was developed. This set-up is able to measure droplet sizes and velocities based on light-scattering principles. It is composed of different parts i.e.: a climate room, a spray unit, a three-dimensional automated positioning system and an Aerometrics PDPA 1D system. This paper presents a detailed description of this measuring set-up along with some first measuring results. These measurements will be used as an input for a Computational Fluid Dynamics drift-prediction model and to classify nozzles based on their driftability.

  2. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  3. Fiscal 2000 R and D project of new industry-creating industrial science technology. Report on results concerning 'innovative casting simulation technology'; 2000 nendo kakushinteki chuzo simulation gijutsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    R and D was conducted on the simulation technology of casting process, for the purpose of enhancing productivity, reducing cost and shortening development period in casting, for which the fiscal 2000 results were reported. In the development of a simulation program for molten metal flow and solidification, the development operation of a three-dimensional solver with gas generation considered was nearly completed, proving a success in the improvement of estimated accuracy of free surface patterns and mold filling time, in the improvement of stability of gas flow analysis, in the reduction of calculation time, etc. In the development of the simulation program for casting structure and defect formation, a new grain growth algorithm was developed for the use of the CA method in predicting the structure of a unidirectional coagulant. As a result, two-dimensional structure prediction was found feasible for turbine blade type casting products. In the development of related instrumental technology, the research was conducted on the technology for measuring the melting point of Al-Cu binary alloy as a casting aluminum alloy as well as its density, specific heat, heat content and heat conductivity in a solidified state, and for measuring density and surface tension by means of microgravity. (NEDO)

  4. Characteristics of intermittent fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, B.; Gulari, E.; Henein, N. A.

    1992-03-01

    The spray-tip penetrations and the drop sizes of intermittent fuel sprays were measured by using a modified pulsed optical spray sizer. The average spray tip speeds were determined from simultaneously recorded needle lift signals and obscuration traces. The speeds of a sequence of fuel pulses injected at about 1000 Hz were analyzed to elucidate penetration mechanisms. A correlation that relates penetration distance to time, pressure drop across the nozzle, fuel density, and ambient gas density was obtained. The temporal variations of drop size in penetrating pulses of sprays were measured. The concentration of drops were calculated by combining drop size and obscuration data. The Sauter mean diameter of penetrating fuel drops increased with an increase of the chamber pressure and decreased with an increase of the injection pressure.

  5. Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

  6. Last cast for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first major contract signed for the LHC is drawing to a close. Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre (a member of the Arcelor Group) has just completed production of 50,000 tonnes of steel sheets for the accelerator's superconducting magnet yokes, in what has proved to be an exemplary partnership with CERN. Philippe Lebrun, Head of the AT Department, Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader, and Lucio Rossi, Head of the AT-MAS Group, in front of the last batch of steel for the LHC at Cockerill Sambre. It was a bright red-letter day at the end of May, when Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre of the Arcelor Group marked the completion of one of the largest contracts for the LHC machine by casting the last batch of steel sheets for the LHC superconducting magnet yokes in the presence of LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans, AT Department Head Philippe Lebrun, Magnets and Superconductors (AT-MAS) Group Leader Lucio Rossi and Head of the AT-MAS Group's components centre Francesco Bertinelli. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the acc...

  7. Improved Casting Furnace Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tolman, David Donald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In an attempt to ensure more consistent casting results and remove some schedule variance associated with casting, an improved casting furnace concept has been developed. The improved furnace uses the existing arc melter hardware and glovebox utilities. The furnace concept was designed around physical and operational requirements such as; a charge sized of less than 30 grams, high heating rates and minimal additional footprint. The conceptual model is shown in the report as well as a summary of how the requirements were met.

  8. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  9. Steel Casting Requirements for Ordnance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel , *Castings, *Nondestructive testing , * Charpy impact tests , Tensile properties, Loads(Forces), Toughness, Hardness, Etching, Heat treatment, Microstructure, Shells(Structural forms), Economic analysis

  10. New Possibilities of Shaping the Surface Properties in Austempered Ductile Iron Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myszka D.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents recent developments concerning the formation of surface layer in austempered ductile iron castings. It was found that the traditional methods used to change the properties of the surface layer, i.e. the effect of protective atmosphere during austenitising or shot peening, are not fully satisfactory to meet the demands of commercial applications. Therefore, new ways to shape the surface layer and the surface properties of austempered ductile iron castings are searched for, to mention only detonation spraying, carbonitriding, CVD methods, etc.

  11. New Possibilities of Shaping the Surface Properties in Austempered Ductile Iron Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents recent developments concerning the formation of surface layer in austempered ductile iron castings. It was found thatthe traditional methods used to change the properties of the surface layer, i.e. the effect of protective atmosphere during austenitising or shot peening, are not fully satisfactory to meet the demands of commercial applications. Therefore, new ways to shape the surface layer and the surface properties of austempered ductile iron castings are searched for, to mention only detonation spraying, carbonitriding, CVD methods, etc.

  12. Effect of alginate chemical disinfection on bacterial count over gypsum cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Al-Dowah, Omir S; Gana, Naif S; Al-Hytham, Abdullah

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) and iodophor disinfectants on alginate impressions along with their effect on the survived bacterium count on the gypsum cast. Four alginate impression on each dentate patients were made, of which Group I were not washed or disinfected, Group II impressions were merely washed with water, Group III were disinfected by spraying with sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10), Group IV were disinfected with iodophor (1 : 213). Gypsum cast (type III) were made from all the impression. Impressions and gypsum cast were swabbed in mid palatal region for bacterial culture. Bacterial colony counting done after 3 days of incubation at 37℃ in blood agar media. The data obtained was analyzed by one way ANOVA test at a significant difference level of 0.05. Group I and Group II showed significantly more bacteria compared to Group III and Group IV. Bacterial colonies on the alginate impression and gypsum cast in group disinfected with Sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) were 0.18, 0.82 respectively compared to group treated with iodophor (1 : 213). There was an increase in bacterial count on dental cast compared to source alginate impressions. Sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) was found to be better disinfectant for alginate impression. There was an indication of increase in number of bacteria from alginate impression to making of dental cast. Additional gypsum cast disinfectant procedures need to be encouraged to completely eliminate cross infection to dental laboratory.

  13. Experiments on aerosol removal by high-pressure water spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corno, Ada del; Morandi, Sonia; Parozzi, Flavio; Araneo, Lucio; Casella, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental research to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols if applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. • Cloud of monodispersed SiO 2 particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration in the range 2–90 mg/m 3 . • Carried out in a chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls equipped with a high pressure water spray with single nozzle. • Respect to low-pressure sprays, removal efficiency turned out significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure sprays system. - Abstract: An experimental research was managed in the framework of the PASSAM European Project to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols when applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. The campaign was carried out in a purposely built facility composed by a scrubbing chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls to permit the complete view of the aerosol removal process, where the aerosol was injected to form a cloud of specific particle concentration. The chamber was equipped with a high pressure water spray system with a single nozzle placed on its top. The test matrix consisted in the combination of water pressure injections, in the range 50–130 bar, on a cloud of monodispersed SiO 2 particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration ranging between 2 and 99 mg/m 3 . The spray was kept running for 2 min and the efficiency of the removal was evaluated, along the test time, using an optical particle sizer. With respect to low-pressure sprays, the removal efficiency turned out much more significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure spray system. The highest removal rate was detected with 1

  14. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - White Cast Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  15. The Effects of Externally Solidified Product on Wave Celerity and Quality of Die Cast Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll Mobley; Yogeshwar Sahai; Jerry Brevick

    2003-10-10

    The cold chamber die casting process is used to produce essentially all the die cast aluminum products and about 50% of the die cast magnesium products made today. Modeling of the cold chamber die casting process and metallographic observations of cold chamber die cast products indicate that typically 5 to 20% of the shot weight is solidified in the shot sleeve before or during cavity filling. The protion of the resulting die casting which is solidified in the shot sleeve is referred to as externally solidified product, or, when identified as a casting defect, as cold flakes. This project was directed to extending the understanding of the effects of externally solidified product on the cold chamber die casting process and products to enable the production of defect-free die castings and reduce the energy associated with these products. The projected energy savings from controlling the fraction of externally solidified product in die cast components is 40 x 10 Btu through the year 2025.

  16. Developing a dispersant spraying capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    In developing a national dispersant spraying capability, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has undertaken a modification program to enable the conventional offshore spraying gear to be mounted on almost any vessel of convenience. Smaller, more versatile inshore spraying vessels and pumps have been designed and built. With the popularization of concentrated dispersants, the inshore pumping equipment can be used aboard hovercraft for special application situations. A program of acquiring mobile dispersant storage tanks has been undertaken with auxiliary equipment that will facilitate the shipment of dispersants in bulk by air freight. Work also has commenced on extending the dispersant application program to include the CCG fleet of helicopters.

  17. Education and Caste in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  18. Abrasion resistance of alloy coatings deposited by plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Lescoffit, A.-E.; Teboul, B.; Neufuss, Karel; Voleník, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2009), s. 113-126 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200430560 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * alloy coatings * slurry abrasion * hardness and microhardness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  19. PLASMA SPRAYING AND DIELECTRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ZIRCONIUM SILICATE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Neufuss, Karel

    online, č. 2 (2007), s. 4-9 ISSN 1335-9053 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200430560 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * Electrical properties * Zircon * Silicates * Insulators Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass http://web.mtf.stuba.sk/sk/casopis/index.htm

  20. Bond strength of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings on phosphate steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, P.; Mastný, L.; Sýkora, V.; Pala, Zdeněk; Brožek, Vlastimil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2015), s. 411-414 ISSN 0543-5846 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : phosphating * plasma spraying * ceramic coatings * corrosion * bond strength Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.959, year: 2014

  1. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron.Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron , uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditionalmaterials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  2. Effect of alginate chemical disinfection on bacterial count over gypsum cast

    OpenAIRE

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Al-Dowah, Omir S.; Gana, Naif S.; Al-Hytham, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10) and iodophor disinfectants on alginate impressions along with their effect on the survived bacterium count on the gypsum cast. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four alginate impression on each dentate patients were made, of which Group I were not washed or disinfected, Group II impressions were merely washed with water, Group III were disinfected by spraying with sodium hypochlorite (1 : 10), Group IV were disinfected with iodophor (1 : 21...

  3. Caste, social stigma and identity processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspal, Rusi

    2011-01-01

    Caste persists as an important socio-psychological phenomenon in many spheres of Indian social life and particularly within village contexts. It is argued that socio-psychological insights into caste identity and caste- based stigma may complement ongoing sociological and anthropological research into caste. Drawing upon identity process theory, this article explores the possible functions performed by caste-based stigma both for the higher caste groups (HCGs) and the ‘Scheduled Caste’ (SC) g...

  4. Development of Modular Spray-Cooled Assemblies for High Heat Fluxes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR project will develop modular spray-cooled assemblies that satisfy NASA power and mass budgets and can be scaled to cool multiple heat sources...

  5. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Gas Turbine Engine Components Using Thermal Spray Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce D; Legg, Keith O; Schell, Jerry; Bondaruk, Bob; Alford, Charles; Natishan, Paul; Lawrence, Steven; Shubert, Gary; Bretz, Philip; Kaltenhauser, Anne

    2005-01-01

    .... This document constitutes the final report on a project to qualify high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) and plasma thermal spray coatings as a replacement for hard chrome plating on gas turbine engine components...

  6. Energy and Technolgy Assessment of Zinc and Magnesium Casting Plants, Technical Report Close-out, August 25,2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twin City Die Castings Company; Tom Heider; North American Die Castings Association

    2006-08-25

    Twin City Die Castings Company of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Twin City Die Castings Company was awarded project No. DE-FG36-05GO15097 to perform plant wide assessments of ten (10) die casting facilities that produce zinc and magnesium alloy castings in order to determine improvements and potential cost savings in energy use. Mr. Heider filled the role of team leader for the project and utilized the North American Die Casting Association (NADCA) to conduct audits at team participant plants so as to hold findings specific to each plant proprietary. The intended benefits of the project were to improve energy use through higher operational and process efficiency for the plants assessed. An improvement in energy efficiency of 5 – 15% was targeted. The primary objectives of the project was to: 1) Expand an energy and technology tool developed by the NADCA under a previous DOE project titled, “Energy and Technology Assessment for Die Casting Plants” for assessing aluminum die casting plants to be more specifically applicable to zinc and magnesium die casting facilities. 2) Conduct ten (10) assessments of zinc and magnesium die casting plants, within eight (8) companies, utilizing the assessment tool to identify, evaluate and recommend opportunities to enhance energy efficiency, minimize waste, and improve productivity. 3) Transfer the assessment tool to the die casting industry at large.

  7. Absorption/desorption in sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimpally, A.

    1987-01-01

    This survey paper shall seek to present the present state of knowledge concerning absorption and desorption in spray chambers. The first part of the paper presents the theories and formulas for the atomization and break-up of sprays in nozzles. Formulas for the average (sauter-mean) diameters are then presented. For the case of absorption processes, the formulas for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients is in drops. The total; mass transfer is the total of the transfer in individual drops. For the case of desorption of sparingly soluble gases from liquids in a spray chamber, the mass transfer occurs in the spray just at the point of break-up of the jet. Formulas for the desorption of gases are presented

  8. Application of optical scanning for measurements of castings and cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wieczorowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper application of non destructive method for dimensional control of elements in initial phase of car manufacturing, at Volks-wagen Poznań foundry was presented. VW foundry in Poznań is responsible of series production of chill and dies castings made of light alloys using contemporary technologies. Castings have a complex shape: they are die castings of housings for steering columns and gravity chill castings of cylinder heads, for which cores are manufactured using both hot box and cold box method. Manufacturing capabilities of VW foundry in Poznań reach 26.000 tons of aluminum castings per year. Optical system ATOS at Volkswagen Poznań foundry is used to digitize object and determination of all dimensions and shapes of inspected object. This technology is applied in car industry, reverse engineering, quality analysis and control and to solve many similar tasks. System is based on triangulation: sensor head projects different fringes patterns onto a measured object while scanner observes their trajectories using two cameras. Basing on optical transform equations a processing unit automatically and with a great accuracy calculates 3D coordinates for every pixel of camera. Depending on camera reso-lution as an effect of such a scan we obtain a cloud of up to 4 million points for every single measurement. In the paper examples of di-mensional analysis regarding castings and cores were presented.

  9. Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--pyrolysis defects and sand distortion; Task 2--bronze casting technology; Task 3--steel casting technology; Task 4--sand filling and compaction; Task 5--coating technology; Task 6--precision pattern production; Task 7--computational modeling; and Task 8--project management and technology transfer. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all eight tasks in the period of October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1997.

  10. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important

  11. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.; Giese, S.R.; Lane, A.M. [and others

    1996-01-31

    This is the final report covering work performed on research into methods of attaining clean ferrous castings. In this program methods were developed to minimize the formation of inclusions in steel castings by using a variety of techniques which decreased the tendency for inclusions to form during melting, casting and solidification. In a second project, a reaction chamber was built to remove inclusions from molten steel using electromagnetic force. Finally, a thorough investigation of the causes of sand penetration defects in iron castings was completed, and a program developed which predicts the probability of penetration formation and indicates methods for avoiding it.

  12. Quantitative NDT structuroscopy of cast iron castings for vehicles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skrbek, B.; Tomáš, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, 3-4 (2011), s. 293-305 ISSN 1741-8410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic method * structuroscopy * cast iron * clutch disks Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  13. A sea spray aerosol flux parameterization encapsulating wave state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadnevaite, J.; Manders, A.; de Leeuw, G.; Ceburnis, D.; Monahan, C.; Partanen, A.-I.; Korhonen, H.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2014-02-01

    A new sea spray source function (SSSF), termed Oceanflux Sea Spray Aerosol or OSSA, was derived based on in-situ sea spray aerosol measurements along with meteorological/physical parameters. Submicron sea spray aerosol fluxes derived from particle number concentration measurements at the Mace Head coastal station, on the west coast of Ireland, were used together with open-ocean eddy correlation flux measurements from the Eastern Atlantic Sea Spray, Gas Flux, and Whitecap (SEASAW) project cruise. In the overlapping size range, the data for Mace Head and SEASAW were found to be in a good agreement, which allowed deriving the new SSSF from the combined dataset spanning the dry diameter range from 15 nm to 6 μm. The OSSA source function has been parameterized in terms of five lognormal modes and the Reynolds number instead of the more commonly used wind speed, thereby encapsulating important influences of wave height, wind history, friction velocity, and viscosity. This formulation accounts for the different flux relationships associated with rising and waning wind speeds since these are included in the Reynolds number. Furthermore, the Reynolds number incorporates the kinematic viscosity of water, thus the SSSF inherently includes dependences on sea surface temperature and salinity. The temperature dependence of the resulting SSSF is similar to that of other in-situ derived source functions and results in lower production fluxes for cold waters and enhanced fluxes from warm waters as compared with SSSF formulations that do not include temperature effects.

  14. Magneto-mechanical damping in plasma sprayed Fe-Cr-X alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimi, A.; Giauque, P.H.; Martin, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The damping capacity of ferromagnetic Fe-Cr based alloys related to the mobility of magnetic domains has been investigated using free and forced vibration techniques. The materials tested were coatings of 2-3 mm thickness deposited using vacuum plasma spraying and cast alloys prepared in a high frequency furnace under argon atmosphere. Three laboratory devices including torsion pendulum, resonant bar and cantilever were used to cover a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes varying between f = 1Hz to 10kHz, and ε 10 -6 to 10 -3 . The damping capacity of the plasma sprayed coatings was found to be comparable to the cast alloys, in spite of drastically different microstructures. The appropriate heat treatments improved damping capacity of both coatings and cast alloys by several times. The variation of the loss factor as function of vibration amplitude showed a maximum, but versus frequency exhibited slightly monotonous character. The magnetic domains were observed using the magneto-optical Kerr effect and their modification under heat treatments was associated with different values of the damping capacities. The coatings showed a higher 0.2% offset stress (600-650 Mpa) as compared to cast alloys with only 350-400 Mpa. (orig.)

  15. NUMERICAL MODELING OF HARDENING OF UNINTERRUPTEDLY-CASTED BRONZE CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional numerical model for calculation of thermal fields during solidification of continuously casted bronze casting is developed. Coefficients of heat transfer on borders of calculation areas on the basis of the solution of inverse heat transfer conduction problem are determined. The analysis of thermal fields, depending on loop variables of drawing and the sizes of not cooled zone of crystallizer is curried out.

  16. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an

  17. Preventing cracks when casting steel slag ladles

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, M.; Shvetsov, V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the improvement of large steel casting technology where slag ladle casting is taken as an example. The temperature measurement of the crystallization process of casting is held. The causes of the formation of cracks are reviewed. To prevent the formation of cracks the recommendations are developed to improve the casting technology.

  18. Some Theoretical Considerations on Caste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Subedi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Caste as a system of social stratification was an encompassing system in the past. There was reciprocal system of exchange goods and services. With time, occupation and mode of generation of livelihood of various caste groups changed, and the traditional form of jajmani system fizzled out. This paper provides an account of changing perspectives of caste relations in social science writing and political discourse. The discourse of caste has been shifted from ritual hierarchy and social discrimination to an instrument to mobilize people for economic and political gain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v7i0.10437 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 7, 2013; 51-86

  19. Powder/processing/structure relationships in WC-Co thermal spray coatings: A review of the published literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers Lovelock, H. L.

    1998-09-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings based on tungsten carbide are widely used but not yet fully understood, particularly with regard to the chemical, microstructural, and phase changes that occur during spraying and their influence on properties such as wear resistance. The available literature on thermally sprayed WC-Co coatings is considerable, but it is generally difficult to synthesize all of the findings to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the subject. This is due to the many different starting powders, spray system types, spray parameters, and other variables that influence the coating structures and cause difficulties when comparing results from different workers. The purpose of this review is to identify broad trends in the powder/processing/structure relationships of WC-Co coatings, classified according to powder type and spray method. Detailed comparisons of coating microstructures, powder phase compositions and coating phase compositions as reported by different researchers are given in tabular form and discussed. The emphasis is on the phase changes that occur during spraying. This review concerns only WC-12% Co and WC-17% Co coatings, and contrasts the coatings obtained from the cast and crushed, sintered and crushed, and agglomerated and densified powder types. Properties such as hardness, wear, or corrosion resistance are not reviewed here.

  20. SPRAY CALCINATION REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1963-08-20

    A spray calcination reactor for calcining reprocessin- g waste solutions is described. Coaxial within the outer shell of the reactor is a shorter inner shell having heated walls and with open regions above and below. When the solution is sprayed into the irner shell droplets are entrained by a current of gas that moves downwardly within the inner shell and upwardly between it and the outer shell, and while thus being circulated the droplets are calcined to solids, whlch drop to the bottom without being deposited on the walls. (AEC) H03 H0233412 The average molecular weights of four diallyl phthalate polymer samples extruded from the experimental rheometer were redetermined using the vapor phase osmometer. An amine curing agent is required for obtaining suitable silver- filled epoxy-bonded conductive adhesives. When the curing agent was modified with a 47% polyurethane resin, its effectiveness was hampered. Neither silver nor nickel filler impart a high electrical conductivity to Adiprenebased adhesives. Silver filler was found to perform well in Dow-Corning A-4000 adhesive. Two cascaded hot-wire columns are being used to remove heavy gaseous impurities from methane. This purified gas is being enriched in the concentric tube unit to approximately 20% carbon-13. Studies to count low-level krypton-85 in xenon are continuing. The parameters of the counting technique are being determined. The bismuth isotopes produced in bismuth irradiated for polonium production are being determined. Preliminary data indicate the presence of bismuth207 and bismuth-210m. The light bismuth isotopes are probably produced by (n,xn) reactions bismuth-209. The separation of uranium-234 from plutonium-238 solutions was demonstrated. The bulk of the plutonium is removed by anion exchange, and the remainder is extracted from the uranium by solvent extraction techniques. About 99% of the plutonium can be removed in each thenoyltrifluoroacetone extraction. The viscosity, liquid density, and

  1. Application of magnetic adaptive testing to cast iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomáš, Ivan; Skrbek, B.; Uchimoto, T.; Kadlecová, Jana; Stupakov, Oleksandr; Perevertov, Oleksiy; Dočekal, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2007), 129-132 ISSN 1335-1532 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS100100508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nondestructive testing * ferromagnetic materials * cast iron * metallic matrix * graphite inclusions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  2. Investigation of Reusable Crucibles on Uranium Casting by Injection Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Ko, Young-Mo; Woo, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2014-01-01

    Slurry applied coatings must be recoated after every batch. Thermal plasma-sprayed coatings of refractory materials can be applied to develop a re-usable crucible coating for metallic fuel. Plasma-sprayed coating can provide a crucible with a denser, more durable, coating layer, compared with the more friable coating layer formed by slurry-coating. Plasma-sprayed coatings are consolidated by mechanical interlocking of the molten particles impacting on the substrate and are dense from the heat applied by the plasma. Although the protective layer is more difficult in a dense coating than in a porous coating, the increased coating density is advantageous because it should not require frequent recoating or U-Zr melt penetration. In this study, we used a Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) method, which is suitable to prevent oxidization and has a number of advantages such as low defect density and excellent adhesion of the coating layer, to investigate permanent coatings for re-usable crucibles for melting and casting of metallic fuel. After coatings, interaction studies between molten U-Zr alloys and the plasma sprayed coatings were also carried out. We summarized the results of the coating methods. All coated samples maintained good coating integrity in a U-Zr melt, but most of the coating method samples did not maintain integrity in the U-Zr-RE melt because of the cracks or microcracks of the coating layer, presumably formed from the thermal expansion difference. Only the TaC(100)-Y 2 O 3 (100) DL VPS coated rod survived the 2 cycles dipping test of U-Zr-RE melt. This is likely caused by good adhesion of the TaC coating onto the niobium rod and the chemical inertness of Y 2 O 3 coating material in the U-Zr-RE melt. Based on the results from the interactions with U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5RE melt, TaC(100)-Y 2 O 3 (100) plasma-sprayed coating methods have been applied to real graphite crucibles

  3. Development of High-Performance Cast Crankshafts. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Mark E [General Motors, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop technologies that would enable the production of cast crankshafts that can replace high performance forged steel crankshafts. To achieve this, the Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the new material needs to be 850 MPa with a desired minimum Yield Strength (YS; 0.2% offset) of 615 MPa and at least 10% elongation. Perhaps more challenging, the cast material needs to be able to achieve sufficient local fatigue properties to satisfy the durability requirements in today’s high performance gasoline and diesel engine applications. The project team focused on the development of cast steel alloys for application in crankshafts to take advantage of the higher stiffness over other potential material choices. The material and process developed should be able to produce high-performance crankshafts at no more than 110% of the cost of current production cast units, perhaps the most difficult objective to achieve. To minimize costs, the primary alloy design strategy was to design compositions that can achieve the required properties with minimal alloying and post-casting heat treatments. An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) based approach was utilized, rather than relying only on traditional trial-and-error methods, which has been proven to accelerate alloy development time. Prototype melt chemistries designed using ICME were cast as test specimens and characterized iteratively to develop an alloy design within a stage-gate process. Standard characterization and material testing was done to validate the alloy performance against design targets and provide feedback to material design and manufacturing process models. Finally, the project called for Caterpillar and General Motors (GM) to develop optimized crankshaft designs using the final material and manufacturing processing path developed. A multi-disciplinary effort was to integrate finite element analyses by engine designers and geometry-specific casting

  4. Comparison of the dimensional stability of alginate impressions disinfected with 1% sodium hypochlorite using the spray or immersion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderinu, O H; Adegbulugbe, I C; Shaba, O P

    2007-01-01

    To determine and compare the dimensional stability of alginate impressions disinfected with Sodium hypochlorite using the spray and immersion methods. Alginate impressions of a master model of truncated metal cones were made and disinfected with 1% sodium hypochlorite constituted from 3.5% household bleach using the spray and immersion technique for 10; 20 and 30 minutes. Impressions were cast in dental stone and the linear dimensional differences between the inter-abutment distances were measured with an electronic caliper. One sample T test and percentage differences were calculated. There were no statistically significant differences in dimensions of alginate impressions of the control and those disinfected by either spraying or immersion methods when compared with the master model at 10 minutes. However, there was a statistically significant difference at 20 and 30 minutes. The spray technique showed the least percentage difference from the master model. Disinfection of alginate impressions with 1% sodium hypochlorite constituted from commercially available household bleach by the spray or immersion techniques for ten minutes will produce casts with minimal dimensional changes.

  5. Miniature paint-spray gun for recessed areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanasse, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Miniature spray gun regulates paints and other liquids to spray at close range, facilitating spraying of remote or recessed areas. Individual valves for regulating air pressure and paint maximizes atomization for low pressure spraying.

  6. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  7. Spray coated nanosilver functional layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemiński, J.; Szałapak, J.; Dybowska-Sarapuk, L.; Jakubowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    Silver coatings are highly conductive functional layers. There are many different ways to product the silver coating but most of them need vacuum or high temperature. Spray coating is a technique that is free of this disadvantages - it doesn't need a cleanroom or high temperature. What's more the layer thickness is about 10 μm. In this article the spray coating process of silver nanolayer is described. Four different inks were tested and measured. The layer resistance was measured and show as a graph. After the layer resistance was measured the adhesion test was performed. The pull-off test was performed on testing machine with special self made module. To conclude the article include the test and measurements of spray coated nanosilver functional layers. The layers was examined for the current conductivity and adhesion force.

  8. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure

  9. Warm Spraying of High-Strength Ni-Al-Bronze: Cavitation Characteristics and Property Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Sebastian; Kuroda, Seiji; Katanoda, Hiroshi; Gaertner, Frank; Klassen, Thomas; Araki, Hiroshi; Frede, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Bronze materials such as Ni-Al-bronze show exceptional performances against cavitation erosion, due to their high fatigue strength and high strength. These materials are used for ship propellers, pump systems or for applications with alternating stresses. Usually, the respective parts are cast. With the aim to use resources more efficiently and to reduce costs, this study aimed to evaluate opportunities to apply bronze as a coating to critical areas of respective parts. The coatings should have least amounts of pores and non-bonded areas and any contaminations that might act as crack nuclei and contribute to material damages. Processes with low oxidation and high kinetic impacts fulfill these criteria. Especially warm spraying, a nitrogen-cooled HVOF process, with similar impact velocities as cold gas spraying but enhanced process temperature, allows for depositing high-strength Ni-Al-bronze. This study systematically simulates and evaluates the formation and performance of warm-sprayed Ni-Al-bronze coatings for different combustion pressures and nitrogen flow rates. Substrate preheating was used to improve coating adhesion for lower spray parameter sets. Furthermore, this study introduces an energy-based concept to compare spray parameter sets and to predict coating properties. Coatings with low porosities and high mechanical strengths are obtained, allowing for a cavitation resistance similar to bulk material.

  10. Nasal Sprays: How to Use Them Correctly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sprays the correct way can take some practice. Path to improved health Prescription nasal sprays come in ... thumb at the bottom and your index and middle fingers on top. Insert the canister tip in ...

  11. Center for Cold Spray Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the only DoD facility capable of cold spray research and development, production, and field-repair. It features three stationary cold spray systems used for...

  12. An experimental study of injection and spray characteristics of diesel and gasoline blends on a common rail injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dong; Wang, Chunhai; Duan, Yaozong; Tian, Zhisong; Huang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    The injection and spray characteristics of diesel and gasoline blends are investigated on a common rail injection system. The injection rate, fuel spray evolution process (tip penetration distance, spray cone angle, projected spray area and relative brightness intensity contour) and microscopic droplet features are analyzed. The results show that diesel and gasoline blends have higher volumetric injection rates, earlier starts of injection and shorter injection delays, but little variances are observed in the mass injection rates for different test fuels. Increased gasoline proportion in the test blends causes slightly decreased spray tip penetration distance but increased spray cone angle. Also, more smaller-size droplets are observed in the fuel jet of the diesel and gasoline blends, indicating that the spray breakup and atomization processes are promoted. - Highlights: • Injection rate and spray characteristics of diesel and gasoline blends are studied. • Diesel and gasoline blends have higher volumetric injection rates. • Earlier starts of injection are found when using diesel and gasoline blends. • Diesel and gasoline blends produce shorter spray penetration but higher cone angle. • The number of small droplets increases in the spray of diesel and gasoline blends

  13. Temperature profile data from STD/CTD casts from the KNORR from the Atlantic Ocean during the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE (IDOE/POLYMODE) project, 1976-10-03 to 1976-10-19 (NODC Accession 7800010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and conductivity profile data were collected using STD/CTD casts from KNORR in the Atlantic Ocean from October 3, 1976 to October 19, 1976. Data were...

  14. Temperature profile data from STD/CTD casts from the GYRE and other platforms from the NW Atlantic Ocean during the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE (IDOE/POLYMODE) project, 1978-05-20 to 1978-07-14 (NODC Accession 8600032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data were collected using STD/CTD casts from GYRE and other platforms in the NW Atlantic Ocean from May 20, 1978 to July 14, 1978....

  15. Temperature profile data from STD/CTD casts from the KNORR and other platforms from the Atlantic Ocean during the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE (IDOE/POLYMODE) project, 1972-02-08 to 1975-12-20 (NODC Accession 7700831)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, conductivity, and salinity data were collected using STD/CTDs casts from KNORR and other platforms in the Atlantic Ocean from February 8, 1972 to...

  16. Heat exchanger-ingot casting/slicing process, phase 1: Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1977-01-01

    A controlled growth, heat-flow and cool-down process is described that yielded silicon with a high degree of single crystallinity. Even when the seed melted out, very large grains formed. Solar cell samples made from cast material yielded conversion efficiency of over 9%. Representative characterizations of grown silicon demonstrated a dislocation density of less than 100/sq cm and a minority carrier diffusion length of 31 micron. The source of silicon carbide in silicon ingots was identified to be from graphite retainers in contact with silica crucibles. Higher growth rates were achieved with the use of a graphite plug at the bottom of the silica crucible.

  17. Untouchable castes of Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharinin Artem Igorevich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Untouchable Castes of Uttar Pradesh are examined in this article. This region is one of the most populated in India. Also it is one of the most social mixed-composed in whole State. That’s why main conclusions which were made on this material can be extrapolated to all social space of country. The authors choose four ethno-caste groups, which represent the majority in untouchables and the three smallest in jaties. Their positions in regional hierarchy and economic specialization are analyzed in detail. There are a lot of information about their number, social structure, literacy rating, endogamy, day-to-day practices, customs and other features. Special accents were pointed on mind orientation of their elites toward integration in modern society or, conversely, toward the conservation of traditional forms of existence. The issues of origin and social evolution of untouchable castes of Uttar Pradesh are examined. There is assessment of castes’ sanskritization or other forms of social selfdevelopment. The quality of “scheduled” castes social environment is analyzed. As a marks of its positiveness the data about discrimination untouchables from other social groups and degree of political representativeness of “scheduled” castes, accessibility of education and labour were chosen. The conclusions were made about development degree of some castes. The factors that play role in positive changes in contemporary conditions were determined. The authors put forward their own hypothesis of future development of untouchable castes in Uttar Pradesh. Empiric base of this article was established on sources that have Indian origin and historical and social research of outstanding western indologies.

  18. Diesel spray characterization; Dieselmoottorin polttoainesuihkujen ominaisuudet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.; Turunen, R.; Paloposki, T.; Rantanen, P.; Virolainen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Internal Combustion Engine Lab.

    1997-10-01

    Fuel injection of diesel engines will be studied using large-scale models of fuel injectors. The advantage of large-scale models is that the measurement of large-scale diesel sprays will be easier than the measurement of actual sprays. The objective is to study the break-up mechanism of diesel sprays and to measure drop size distributions in the inner part of the spray. The results will be used in the development of diesel engines and diesel fuels. (orig.)

  19. "Teaching" an Industrial Robot To Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A. R.; Sweet, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Teaching device, consisting of spacer rod or tube with three-pointed tip and line level, is used during pattern "teach-in" to make sure that robot manipulator holds spray gun perpendicular to surface to be sprayed and at right distance from it. For slanted surfaces angle adapter is added between spacer rod and line-level indicator. Angle is determined by slope of surface to be sprayed, thus allowing a perpendicular spray pattern against even slanted surfaces.

  20. Influence of the spray velocity on arc-sprayed coating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, H.-D.; Nassenstein, K.

    1999-09-01

    Thermal spray processes such as plasma spraying and HVOF have gained markets due to a steady process of development of materials and equipment. One disadvantage of thermal spray processes is that costs must be competitive compared to techniques such as PTA and electroplating. In order to reduce costs, the more economical spray processes like conventional wire flame spraying, as well as arc spraying, are becoming more popular. There are modern arc spray gun designs on the market that meet the requirements of modern coating properties, for example aviation overhaul applications as well as the processing of cored wires. Nevertheless, the physical basis of arc spraying is well known. The aim of the present investigation is to show how the influence of spray velocity (not particle velocity) affects coating structure with respect to arc spray parameters.

  1. 14 CFR 23.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 23.239 Section 23.239 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Handling Characteristics § 23.239 Spray characteristics. Spray may not dangerously obscure the vision of...

  2. 14 CFR 29.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 29.239 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Ground and Water Handling Characteristics § 29.239 Spray characteristics. If certification for water operation is requested, no spray characteristics...

  3. 14 CFR 27.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 27.239 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Ground and Water Handling Characteristics § 27.239 Spray characteristics. If certification for water operation is requested, no spray characteristics...

  4. Albendazole Microparticles Prepared by Spray Drying Technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To enhance the dissolution of albendazole (ABZ) using spray-drying technique. Method: ABZ binary mixtures with Kollicoat IR® (KL) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in various drug to polymer ratios (1: 1, 1: 2 and 1; 4) were prepared by spray-drying. The spray-dried particles were characterized for particle shape, ...

  5. Instant Casting Movie Theater: The Future Cast System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Akinobu; Wemler, Shuhei; Machida, Tamotsu; Takebayashi, Masao; Morishima, Shigeo

    We have developed a visual entertainment system called “Future Cast” which enables anyone to easily participate in a pre-recorded or pre-created film as an instant CG movie star. This system provides audiences with the amazing opportunity to join the cast of a movie in real-time. The Future Cast System can automatically perform all the processes required to make this possible, from capturing participants' facial characteristics to rendering them into the movie. Our system can also be applied to any movie created using the same production process. We conducted our first experimental trial demonstration of the Future Cast System at the Mitsui-Toshiba pavilion at the 2005 World Exposition in Aichi Japan.

  6. The ToxCast Chemical Landscape - Paving the Road to 21st ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) program within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was launched in 2007. Phase I of the program screened 310 chemicals, mostly pesticides, across hundreds of ToxCast assay endpoints. In Phase II, the ToxCast library was expanded to 1878 chemicals, culminating in public release of screening data at the end of 2013. Concurrently, a larger EPA library of 3726 chemicals (including the Phase II chemicals) was undergoing screening in the cross-federal agency Tox21 HTS project. Four years later, Phase III of EPA’s ToxCast program is actively screening a diverse library consisting of more than 3800 chemicals, 96% of which are also undergoing Tox21 screening. The majority of ToxCast studies, to date, have focused on using HTS results to build biologically based models for predicting in vivo toxicity endpoints. The focus of the present article, in contrast, is on the EPA chemical library underpinning these efforts. A history of the phased construction of EPA’s ToxCast library is presented, considering factors influencing chemical selection as well as the various quality measures implemented. Next, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CASRN), which were used to compile initial chemical nominations for ToxCast testing, are used to assess overlaps of the current ToxCast library with important toxicity, regulatory, and exposure inventories. Lastly, ToxCast chemicals are described in terms of generaliz

  7. Study of thermal phenomena in niobium superconducting cavities when stiffened by thermal spray coating; Etude des phenomenes thermiques dans les cavites acceleratrices supraconductrices en niobium rigidifiees par projection thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousson, S

    2000-02-01

    The first objective of this thesis is to study a new superconducting cavity stiffening method based on thermal spraying. The principle is to add on the cavity external walls a copper layer using the thermal spraying process. Several tests on samples allowed to measure the thermal and mechanical properties of the layers deposited by several different processes. Measurements performed on 3 and 1.3 GHz niobium cavities, before and after copper deposition, proved the interest and feasibility of the method. The study showed the need to have very dense layers (porosity reduced to the minimum in order to have good mechanical characteristics), and not oxidised (to reduce the coating thermal resistance). As a conclusion, the spraying process performed under controlled atmosphere seems to be the most suited for superconducting cavity stiffening. The tools and analysing methods which have been developed for this study allowed to investigate other phenomena involved in the cavity thermal stability, and particularly the quench, a phenomenon often studied but not in its dynamic. A model is proposed in this thesis to analyse the quench dynamic behaviour using only the fast RF signal measurement during a quench. It has been shown that the quench propagation velocity depends essentially on the accelerating field and the niobium thermal conductivity. A study on the thermometer response time used as diagnostics on cavities proved that the transients during a quench are not efficiently measured with Allen-Bradley sensors: for this application Cernox thermometers are to be preferred due to their lower time response. The development of a thermometer acquisition device for the 3 GHz cavities, used for the study on cavity stiffening, has been adapted for anomalous heating measurements on high gradient 1.3 GHz cavities. It has been possible to prove that anomalous RF losses are responsible of the quality factor degradation, that they are not localised in a small of the cavity, but

  8. Structural and photocatalytic characteristics of TiO2 coatings produced by various thermal spray techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Štengl, Václav; Pala, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2013), s. 218-226 ISSN 2226-4108 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : plasma spraying * high velocity oxy–fuel (HVOF) spraying * flame spraying * titanium dioxide (TiO2) * photocatalysis * band gap Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s40145-013-0063-z

  9. Cooling nozzles characteristics for numerical models of continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pyszko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Modelling the temperature field of a continuously cast strand is an important tool for the process diagnostics. The main preconditions for numerical simulation of the temperature field of the solidifying strand are correct boundary conditions, especially the surface condition in the secondary zone of the caster. The paper deals with techniques of determining the surface condition under cooling nozzles as well as their approximation and implementation into the model algorithm. Techniques used for laboratory measurements of both cold and hot spraying characteristics of water or water-air cooling nozzles are described. The relationship between the cold and hot characteristics was found. Implementation of such a dependence into the model algorithm reduces the duration and cost of laboratory measurements.

  10. Spray solidification of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.F.; Blair, H.T.; Romero, L.S.

    1976-08-01

    The spray calciner is a relatively simple machine. Operation is simple and is easily automated. Startup and shutdown can be performed in less than an hour. A wide variety of waste compositions and concentrations can be calcined under easily maintainable conditions. Spray calcination of high-level and mixed high- and intermediate-level liquid wastes has been demonstrated. Waste concentrations of from near infinite dilution to less than 225 liters per tonne of fuel are calcinable. Wastes have been calcined containing over 2M sodium. Feed concentration, composition, and flowrate can vary rapidly by over a factor of two without requiring operator action. Wastes containing mainly sodium cations can be spray calcined by addition of finely divided silica to the feedstock. A remotely replaceable atomizing nozzle has been developed for use in plant-scale equipment. Calciner capacity of over 75 l/h has been demonstrated in pilot-scale equipment. Sintered stainless steel filters are effective in deentraining over 99.9 percent of the solids that result from calcining the feedstock. The volume of recycle required from the effluent treatment system is very small. Vibrator action maintains the calcine holdup in the calciner at less than 1 kg. Successful remote operation and maintenance of a heated-wall spray calciner have been demonstrated while processing high-level waste. Radionuclide volatilization was acceptably low

  11. Transdermal Spray in Hormone Delivery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and adverse effects and maximum efficacy as well as patients' compliance [1]. Transdermal dosage forms are .... learning and memory in healthy postmenopausal women stabilized on estrogen, over 26 weeks. When the ... forearm instead until the areolae were the same color again and then applied 1 spray to each forearm ...

  12. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beetz, Charles [ZoomEssence, Inc., Hebron, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. In short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.

  13. Development of vacuum die-casting process

    OpenAIRE

    Masashi Uchida

    2009-01-01

    The vacuum die-casting process, started 25 years ago in Japan, has been widely applied. This technology contributes very much to improvement of castings quality. The main factor causing the defects of die castings is the trapped air in the mold cavity, while the key technology of vacuum die-casting process is to avoid the trapped air effectively by evacuating the cavity before casting. At the same time, due to the shot speed and the casting pressure reduced in half, the service life of the di...

  14. Evaluation of dimensional stability of Iralgin and Alginoplast alginates after disinfection by sodium hypochlorite (5.2% with immersion and spraying methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojdani M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Infection control is an integral part of dentistry and dental impressions are considered an important issue in cross contamination. The aim of this study was to investigate the dimensional stability of two irreversible hydrocolloid materials, Alginoplast and Iralgin after disinfection with 5.2% sodium hypochlorite, used with immersion and spraying methods. Material and Methods: In this experimental study, impressions were made of a master mandibular arch (Typodont containing three stainless steel inserts on the occlucal surface of both mandibular first molars and in the lingual surface of the mandibular central incisors, which served as reference marks for making measurements. Two types of irreversible hydrocolloid (Iralgin and Alginoplast were tested. 5.2% sodium hypochlorite was used in two methods of spraying and immersion to disinfect the samples. The control group was not disinfected. Casts were made of type III gypsum. Stone casts were measured with a Nikon profile projector.Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Witney test were used for statistical analysis using p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Casts prepared from Alginoplast disinfected by spraying method, were 0.38 % larger in anteroposterior and 0.06% smaller in cross arch dimensions, whereas those prepared from Alginoplast immersed in hypochlorite were 0.47% larger in anteroposterior and 0.11% smaller in cross arch dimensions. Casts made from Iralgin were smaller after both methods of disinfecting, (0.01% smaller in anteroposterior and 0.001% smaller in cross-arch dimensions after spraying and 0.04% smaller in anteroposterior and 0.03% smaller in cross-arch dimensions after immersing in sodium hypochlorite. Conclusion: Alginoplast and Iralgin impressions can be immersed or sprayed for disinfection without compromising the accuracy needed for diagnostic and opposing casts, as well as removable partial denture construction.

  15. CAST Physics Proposal to SPSC

    CERN Document Server

    CAST, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The CAST experiment has the potential to search for solar axions (dark matter particle candidates) or other particles with similar coupling. E.g., paraphtons (Hidden Sector), chameleons (dark energy), while considering the possibility whether CAST could be transformed to an antenna for relic axions with rest mass up to 0.1 to 1meV. While axion searches suggest detectors with lower background, paraphoton and chameleon searches require detectors with sub-keV threshold energy and the use of transparent windows in front of the Micromegas detectors, which cover 3 out of the 4 CAST magnet exits. Ongoing theoretical estimates and experimental investigations will define the priorities of the suggested 4 physics items of this proposal for the period 2012-2014.

  16. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  17. Demonstration of Thermally Sprayed Metal and Polymer Coatings for Steel Structures at Fort Bragg, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    demonstrated, the flame-sprayed polyole- fin coating is too costly for use on large steel structures. Guidance docu- ments are identified to help make...the feedstock material, the thermal-spray process and application parameters, and the post-treat- ment of the applied coating. An 85% zinc and 15...thickness (85/15 plus topcoat) was measured by gauge for compliance with project requirements. Total thickness measure- ments indicated that the

  18. Microstructure and performance of titanium oxide coatings sprayed by oxygen-acetylene flame

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Štengl, Václav; Zahálka, F.; Murafa, Nataliya

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2011), s. 403-407 ISSN 1474-905X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Plasma spraying * flame spraying * photocatalysis * TiO2 Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.584, year: 2011

  19. Cast iron promises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hawker

    2007-09-01

    Events in the ten years prior to this disaster still have some resonance today. Ambitions to exploit new technology are not always matched by foresight in the planning, financing or management of projects. Contracts may be based on wrong assumptions, and prove difficult to enforce. Once a project has gathered momentum, those working on it may fear that any attempt to draw attention to risks or defects will be seen as disloyal. When work is completed, it cannot be assumed that formal inspections will reveal potential flaws, or that those using the technology will appreciate the need to follow the procedures laid down for them. Some possible parallels with recent experiences in NHS computing are noted.

  20. The Effect of Disinfection by Spray Atomization on Dimensional Accuracy of Condensation Silicone Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Saleh Saber

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The condensation silicone impression materials are available, but there is little knowledge of their accuracy after disinfection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the disinfection by spray atomization on dimensional accuracy of condensation silicone impressions. Materials and methods. Impressions were made on a stainless steel master model containing a simulated two complete crown preparation with an edentulous space interposed using Spidex® and Rapid® impression materials. 44 impressions were made with each material, of which 16 were disinfected with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 16 were disinfected with 10% iodophor and 12 were not disinfected. Three dimensional measurements of working casts, including interpreparation distance, height, and diameter, were calculated using a measuring microscope graduated at 0.001 mm. Dimensional changes (mm between the disinfected and non-disinfected working casts were compared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was employed to analyze the data (α=0.05. Results. Disinfection of each condensation silicone material by spraying atomization with two different disinfectant material resulted in significant change in interpreparation distance (p<0.05. Changes in height and diameter were only significant in Spidex® impressions (p<0.05. Conclusion. Significant changes in the mean dimensions were seen as a result of disinfection by spraying; however, the dimensional changes do not seem great enough to cause critical positional distortion of teeth when fixed partial denture restorations are made.

  1. The nano spray dryer B-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Desmond; Lee, Sie Huey; Ng, Wai Kiong; Tan, Reginald B H

    2011-07-01

    Spray drying is an extremely well-established technology for the production of micro-particulate powders suited for a variety of drug delivery applications. In recent years, the rise in nanomedicine has placed increased pressure on the existing systems to produce nanoparticles in good yield and with a narrow size distribution. However, the separation and collection of nanoparticles with conventional spray dryer set ups is extremely challenging due to their typical low collection efficiency for fine particles spray drying technology is provided in this review with particular emphasis on the novel Buchi® Nano Spray Dryer B-90. Readers will appreciate the limitations of conventional spray drying technology, understand the mechanisms of the Buchi® Nano Spray Dryer B-90, and also learn about the strengths and shortcomings of the system. The Buchi® Nano Spray Dryer B-90 offers a new, simple and alternative approach for the production of nanoparticles suited for a variety of drug delivery applications.

  2. Plasma spraying of Fe-Cr-Al alloy powder

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voleník, Karel; Leitner, J.; Kolman, Blahoslav Jan; Písačka, Jan; Schneeweiss, Oldřich

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2008), s. 17-25 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1041404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Fe-Cr-Al alloy powder * plasma spraying * oxidation * vaporization * composition changes Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.345, year: 2007

  3. On reactive suspension plasma spraying of calcium titanate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotlan, Jiří; Pala, Zdeněk; Mušálek, Radek; Ctibor, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2016), s. 4607-4615 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12145S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Suspensions * X-raymethods * Perovskite s * Substrates * Suspension plasma spraying Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272884215022646

  4. On reactive suspension plasma spraying of calcium titanate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotlan, Jiří; Pala, Zdeněk; Mušálek, Radek; Ctibor, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2016), s. 4607-4615 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12145S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Suspensions * X-raymethods * Perovskites * Substrates * Suspension plasma spraying Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272884215022646

  5. Phase Formation Control in Plasma Sprayed Alumina–Chromia Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubský, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel; Kolman, Blahoslav Jan; Stahr, C.Ch.; Berger, L.-M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2011), s. 294-300 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/08/1240 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Alumina * Chromia * Plasma spraying * Phase stabilization Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.382, year: 2011 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2011/2011_03_294.htm

  6. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology - Phase V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanliang Sun; Harry E. Littleton; Charles E. Bates

    2004-04-29

    Previous research, conducted under DOE Contracts DE-FC07-89ID12869, DE-FC07-93ID12230 and DE-FC07-95ID113358 made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional developments were needed to improve the process and make it more functional in industrial environments. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--Computational Model for the Process and Data Base to Support the Model; Task 2--Casting Dimensional Accuracy; Task 3--Pattern Production; Task 4--Improved Pattern Materials; Task 5--Coating Control; Task 6--In-Plant Case Studies; Task 7--Energy and the Environmental Data; and Task 8--Technology Transfer. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2004. The results obtained in each task and subtask are summarized in this Executive Summary and details are provided in subsequent sections of the report.

  7. Metal Casting--Industry of the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-23

    This 8-page brochure describes the Office of Industrial Technologies Metal Casting Industry of The Future; a partnership between the Department of Energy and the metal casting industry established to increase industrial energy and cost efficiency.

  8. CAST-IRONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Krutilin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of physical-mechanical characteristics of cast iron slugs, received by semicontinuos way of casting, at temperatures from 850 up to 1100^ С are given. 

  9. Cast Care: Do's and Don'ts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... al. Cast care. In: Instructions for Sports Medicine Patients. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2012. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 25, 2018. Pfenninger JL, et al. Casts immobilization and upper extremity splinting. In: Pfenninger and Fowler's ...

  10. Modeling of Dendritic Evolution of Continuously Cast Steel Billet with Cellular Automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiling; Ji, Cheng; Luo, Sen; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2018-02-01

    In order to predict the dendritic evolution during the continuous steel casting process, a simple mechanism to connect the heat transfer at the macroscopic scale and the dendritic growth at the microscopic scale was proposed in the present work. As the core of the across-scale simulation, a two-dimensional cell automaton (CA) model with a decentered square algorithm was developed and parallelized. Apart from nucleation undercooling and probability, a temperature gradient was introduced to deal with the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) by considering its variation during continuous casting. Based on the thermal history, the dendritic evolution in a 4 mm × 40 mm region near the centerline of a SWRH82B steel billet was predicted. The influences of the secondary cooling intensity, superheat, and casting speed on the dendritic structure of the billet were investigated in detail. The results show that the predicted equiaxed dendritic solidification of Fe-5.3Si alloy and columnar dendritic solidification of Fe-0.45C alloy are consistent with in situ experimental results [Yasuda et al. Int J Cast Metals Res 22:15-21 (2009); Yasuda et al. ISIJ Int 51:402-408 (2011)]. Moreover, the predicted dendritic arm spacing and CET location agree well with the actual results in the billet. The primary dendrite arm spacing of columnar dendrites decreases with increasing secondary cooling intensity, or decreasing superheat and casting speed. Meanwhile, the CET is promoted as the secondary cooling intensity and superheat decrease. However, the CET is not influenced by the casting speed, owing to the adjusting of the flow rate of secondary spray water. Compared with the superheat and casting speed, the secondary cooling intensity can influence the cooling rate and temperature gradient in deeper locations, and accordingly exerts a more significant influence on the equiaxed dendritic structure.

  11. A review on air pollution and various dust models for open cast mines in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangeeth, M.G.; Ahmed, Siraj; Bhagoria, J.L.; Pandit, G.G.

    2010-01-01

    Open cast coal mining continues to create significant environmental problems in India. In particular, this type of mining creates high rates of air pollution SPM, RPM, SO 2 and NO x . In these particulate matter i.e. SPM and RPM is major pollution in the open cast mines. It creates several heath hazards to mine workers and surrounding peoples and high environmental deterioration occurs. Several studies are carried out in the field of air pollution and air quality modeling of open cast projects and many researchers suggested several control measures for the air pollution control in mines. Different dust models FDM, ISC3 are available for prediction and transport of the pollutants. In this paper a review has been studied about air pollution in the open cast mines and dust dispersion models for open cast mines in India. (author)

  12. Structure and properties of plasma sprayed BaTiO(3) coatings: Spray parameters versus structure and photocatalytic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Ageorges, H.; Štengl, Václav; Murafa, Nataliya; Píš, I.; Zahoranová, T.; Nehasil, V.; Pala, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 7 (2011), s. 2561-2567 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Spectroscopy * Optical properties * BaTiO3 * Plasma spraying * Photocatalysis Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272884211002173

  13. Validation of HVOF WC/Co Thermal Spray Coatings as a Replacement for Hard Chrome Plating on Aircraft Landing Gear

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    .... This document constitutes the final report on a project to quality high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray WC/Co coatings as a replacement for hard chrome plating on landing gear components...

  14. WEAR-RESISTANCE OF CHROMIC CAST IRONS OF EUTECTIC COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Baranovskij

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Casting of wear-resistant chrome cast irons in combined molds and iron chills is studied. Application of these ways of casting results in blending of carbides and increasing of hardness of castings.

  15. Cast iron promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    During the Victorian era, a fiercely competitive industry emerged to build and operate Britain's railways. Many of the design and construction skills required were still fairly rudimentary, and were typically developed through practical experience. The resulting mix of entrepreneurship and new technology reshaped the landscape, but often in ways which proved hazardous for passengers. Minor accidents were commonplace, and a number of major failures occurred, one such being the collapse of the Tay Bridge, in 1879. Events in the ten years prior to this disaster still have some resonance today. Ambitions to exploit new technology are not always matched by foresight in the planning, financing or management of projects. Contracts may be based on wrong assumptions, and prove difficult to enforce. Once a project has gathered momentum, those working on it may fear that any attempt to draw attention to risks or defects will be seen as disloyal. When work is completed, it cannot be assumed that formal inspections will reveal potential flaws, or that those using the technology will appreciate the need to follow the procedures laid down for them. Some possible parallels with recent experiences in NHS computing are noted.

  16. Developing technological process of obtaining giality casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Issagulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the process of manufacturing castings using sand-resin forms and alloying furnace. Were the optimal technological parameters of manufacturing shell molds for the manufacture of castings of heating equipment. Using the same upon receipt of castings by casting in shell molds furnace alloying and deoxidation of the metal will provide consumers with quality products and have a positive impact on the economy in general engineering.

  17. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

    2000-11-30

    This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

  18. Inoculation Effects of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solidification sequence of graphite eutectic cells of A and D types, as well as globular and cementite eutectics. The morphology of eutectic cells in cast iron, the equations for their growth and the distances between the graphite precipitations in A and D eutectic types were analyzed. It is observed a critical eutectic growth rate at which one type of eutectic transformed into another. A mathematical formula was derived that combined the maximum degree of undercooling, the cooling rate of cast iron, eutectic cell count and the eutectic growth rate. One type of eutectic structure turned smoothly into the other at a particular transition rate, transformation temperature and transformational eutectic cell count. Inoculation of cast iron increased the number of eutectic cells with flake graphite and the graphite nodule count in ductile iron, while reducing the undercooling. An increase in intensity of inoculation caused a smooth transition from a cementite eutectic structure to a mixture of cementite and D type eutectic structure, then to a mixture of D and A types of eutectics up to the presence of only the A type of eutectic structure. Moreover, the mechanism of inoculation of cast iron was studied.

  19. Search for chameleons with CAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Arik, M.; Aune, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (βm) and to photons (βΥ) via the Primako eect. By reducing the X-ray detection...

  20. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  1. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Smegal, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  2. Pressure distribution in centrifugal dental casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J P

    1978-02-01

    Equations are developed for liquid metal pressure in centrifugal dental casting, given the instantaneous rotational velocity, density, and certain dimensions of the casting machine and casting pattern. A "reference parabola" is introduced making the fluid pressure concept more understandable. A specially designed specimen demonstrates experimentally the reference parabola at freezing.

  3. 14 CFR 23.621 - Casting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 23.621 Section 23.621... Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) through (d... do not support structural loads. (b) Bearing stresses and surfaces. The casting factors specified in...

  4. A boxing procedure for corrected cast impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, I H

    1994-01-01

    This new method for boxing a corrected cast impression for a distal extension removable partial denture improves the procedure. The framework with its impression is seated on the remainder of the cast after anatomic ridges have been removed and luted with sticky wax, and the assembly is inserted into a previously formed thermoplastic box and poured to make a new corrected cast.

  5. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fractures, but can be used when limbs are healing after a surgery. There are many types of casts. The most common casts are: Short arm casts: placed from the knuckles of the hand to just below the elbow. These types of ...

  6. Changing Relations between High Castes and Tamang in Melamchi Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Pokharel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the processes of transformation of social relations between high caste groups and Tamang in Melamchi Valley for the period of 1980-2010. Development interventions made by government of Nepal and (I NGOs, a decade long undergoing Melamchi Water Supply Project and labor migration are major factors for ongoing changes in the study area. Spread of literacy classes and primary education, availability of credit institutions, introduction of modern farming, road networks, seasonal out migration from the area, etc. primarily define new relations among the groups. Borrowing and lending money were one of the basis of high caste and Tamang relation in past. The latter was regarded as borrower loan from first one. Before 1980s, money and agriculture commodities were controlled by few rich and high castes people. Cash income from various sources made enable the Tamang to stand on an equal footing with high caste people. Open political economy and liberal policy for issuing pass port in 1990s and after that encourage the people to diversify the destination of seasonal migration from India to Gulf countries and East Asia. Various processes of socio-economic and political changes led to local peoples to seek their position and identity in the changing context. Discourse of Tamang, high castes and Dalit entered into the Valley along with the development resources of (INGO and political movements of the country. This made possible to Tamang and other disadvantage groups to define and redefine their ethnic identity. Keywords: High castes; Tamang; credit facilities; subsistence farming; identity construction; money lending; wage labor DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v4i0.4513 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.4 2010 pp.65-84

  7. Spray calcination of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.F.; Blair, H.T.; Romero, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    The spray calciner is a relatively simple machine; operation is simple and is easily automated. Startup and shutdown can be performed in less than an hour. A wide variety of waste compositions and concentrations can be calcined under easily maintainable conditions. Spray calcination of all commercial fuel reprocessor high-level liquid wastes and mixed high and intermediate-level wastes have been demonstrated. Wastes have been calcined containing over 2M sodium. Thus waste generated during plant startup and shutdown can be blended with normal waste and calcined. Spray calcination of ILLW has also been demonstrated. A remotely replaceable atomizing nozzle has been developed for use in plant scale equipment. The 6 mm (0.25 inch) orifice and ceramic tip offer freedom from plugging and erosion thus nozzle replacement should be required only after several months operation. Calciner capacity of over 75 l/h (20 gal/h) has been demonstrated in pilot scale equipment. Sintered stainless steel filters are effective in deentraining over 99.9 percent of the solids that result from calcining the feedstock. Since such a small amount of radionuclides escape the calciner the volume of recycle required from the effluent treatment system is very small. The noncondensable off-gas volume is also low, less than 0.5 m 3 /min (15 scfm) for a liquid feedrate of 75 l/hr (20 gal/hr). Calcine holdup in the calciner is less than 1 kg, thus the liquid feedrate is directly relatable to calcine flowrate. The calcine produced is very fine and reactive. Successful remote operation and maintenance of a heated wall spray calciner has been demonstrated while processing actual high-level waste. During these operations radionuclide volatilization from the calciner was acceptably low. 8 figures

  8. The 2016 Thermal Spray Roadmap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vardelle, A.; Moreau, Ch.; Akedo, J.; Ashrafizadeh, H.; Berndt, C. C.; Berghaus-Oberste, J.; Boulos, M.; Brogan, J.; Bourtsalas, A.C.; Dolatabadi, A.; Dorfman, M.; Eden, T.J.; Fauchais, P.; Fisher, G.; Gaertner, F.; Gindrat, M.; Henne, R.; Hyland, M.; Irissou, E.; Jordan, E.H.; Khor, K.A.; Killinger, A.; Lau, Y.C.; Li, C.-J.; Li, L.; Longtin, J.; Markocsan, N.; Masset, P.J.; Matějíček, Jiří; Mauer, G.; McDonald, A.; Mostaghimi, J.; Sampath, S.; Schiller, G.; Shinoda, K.; Smith, M.F.; Syed, A.A.; Themelis, N.J.; Toma, F.-L.; Trelles, J.P.; Vassen, R.; Vuoristo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 8 (2016), s. 1376-1440 ISSN 1059-9630 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : anti-wear and anti-corrosion coating s * biomedical * electronic s * energy generation * functional coating s * gas turbines * thermal spray processes Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11666-016-0473-x

  9. New Micromegas detectors in the CAST experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aune, S.; Braeuninger, H.; Dafni, T.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer Ribas, E.; Galan Lacarra, J.; Geralis, T.; Giomataris, I.; Iguaz, F.; Irastorza, I.G.; Kousouris, K.; Morales, J.; Mols, J.P.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M.; Ruz, J.; Soufli, R.; Tomas, A.; Zachariadou, K.

    2009-01-01

    A low background Micromegas detector was operating at the sunrise side of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment during the previous data taking periods (2002-2006). This detector, constructed of low radioactivity materials, operated efficiently and achieved a background level, 5x10 -5 keV -1 cm -2 s -1 , in the 2-7 keV region. This performance was accomplished by exploiting the spatial and energy resolution of the detector as well as the time information contained in the pulse shape of the events. During the second phase of the experiment, the detector at the sunrise was replaced and upgraded by including a shielding. Moreover, the old time projection chamber (TPC) covering the sunset side of the experiment was replaced by two new Micromegas detectors. These detectors belong to the newest generation of Micromegas detectors: 'bulk' and 'microbulk'. Performances and advantages will be presented.

  10. Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

    2004-03-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

  11. Spray granulation for drug formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Zhi Hui; Er, Dawn Z L; Chan, Lai Wah; Liew, Celine V; Heng, Paul W S

    2011-12-01

    Granulation is a key unit process in the production of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms and involves the agglomeration of fine particles with the aid of a binding agent. Fluidized bed granulation, a classic example of spray granulation, is a technique of particle agglomeration brought about by the spray addition of the binding liquid onto a stationary bed of powder particles that is transformed to a fluid-like state by the passage of air through it. The basic working principles, equipment set-up, advantages and challenges of fluidized bed granulation are introduced in this review. This is followed by an overview of the formulation and process-related variables affecting granulation performance. Technological advances, particularly in the application of process analytical tools, in the field of fluidized bed granulation research are also discussed. Fluidized bed granulation is a popular technique for pharmaceutical production, as it is a highly economical and efficient one-pot process. The research and development of process analytical technologies (PAT) has allowed greater process understanding and control to be achieved, even for the lesser known fluidized bed techniques, such as bottom spray and fluidized hot melt granulation. In view of its consistent mixing, as well as continuous and concurrent wetting and drying occurring throughout processing, fluidized bed granulation shows great potential for continuous production although more research is required to fully implement, validate and integrate the PAT tools in a production line.

  12. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    obtained from numerical simulations. For 17-4PH stainless steel parts, the alloy shrinkage factors were over-predicted, as compared with experimental data. Additional R&D focus was placed on obtaining material property data for filled waxes, waxes that are common in the industry. For the first time in the investment casting industry, the thermo-mechanical properties of unfilled and filled waxes were measured. Test specimens of three waxes were injected at commercial foundries. Rheometry measurement of filled waxes was conducted at ORNL. The analysis of the rheometry data to obtain viscoelastic properties was not completed due to the reduction in the budget of the project (approximately 50% funds were received).

  13. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at

  14. Determining casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts by computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehua; Oberdorfer, Bernd; Habe, Daniel; Schumacher, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Three types of near-net shape casting aluminum parts were investigated by computed tomography to determine casting defects and evaluate quality. The first, second, and third parts were produced by low-pressure die casting (Al-12Si-0.8Cu-0.5Fe-0.9Mg-0.7Ni-0.2Zn alloy), die casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), and semi-solid casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), respectively. Unlike die casting (second part), low-pressure die casting (first part) significantly reduced the formation of casting defects (i.e., porosity) due to its smooth filling and solidification under pressure. No significant casting defect was observed in the third part, and this absence of defects indicates that semi-solid casting could produce high-quality near-net shape casting aluminum parts. Moreover, casting defects were mostly distributed along the eutectic grain boundaries. This finding reveals that refinement of eutectic grains is necessary to optimize the distribution of casting defects and reduce their size. This investigation demonstrated that computed tomography is an efficient method to determine casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts.

  15. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF SPRAY RETENTION BY A 3D BARLEY PLANT: EFFECT OF FORMULATION SURFACE TENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massinon, M; De Cock, N; Salah, S Ouled Taleb; Lebeau, F

    2015-01-01

    A spray retention model was used in this study to explore theoretically the effect of a range of mixture surface tension on the spray retention and the variability of deposits. The spray retention model was based on an algorithm that tested whether droplets from a virtual nozzle intercepted a 3D plant model. If so, the algorithm determined the contribution of the droplet to the overall retention depending on the droplet impact behaviour on the leaf; adhesion, rebound or splashing. The impact outcome probabilities, function of droplet impact energy, were measured using high-speed imaging on an excised indoor grown barley leaf (BBCH12) both for pure water (surface tension of 0.072 N/m) and a non-ionic super spreader (static surface tension of 0.021 N/m) depending on the surface orientation. The modification of spray mixture properties in the simulations was performed by gradually changing the spray the droplet impact probabilities between pure water and a solution with non-ionic surfactant exhibiting super spreading properties. The plant architecture was measured using a structured light scanner. The final retention was expressed as the volume of liquid retained by the whole plant relative to the projected leaf surface area in the main spray direction. One hundred simulations were performed at different volumes per hectare and flat-fan nozzles for each formulation surface tension. The coefficient of variation was used as indicator of variability of deposits. The model was able to discriminate between mixture surface tension. The spray retention increased as the mixture surface tension decreased. The variability of deposits also decreased as the surface tension decreased. The proposed modelling approach provides a suited tool for sensitivity analysis: nozzle kind, pressure, volume per hectare applied, spray mixture physicochemical properties, plant species, growth stage could be screened to determine the best spraying characteristics maximizing the retention. The

  16. 1994 Thermal spray industrial applications: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, C.C.; Sampath, S.

    1994-01-01

    The 7th National Thermal Spray Conference met on June 20--24, 1994, in Boston, Massachusetts. The conference was sponsored by the Thermal Spray Division of ASM International and co-sponsored by the American Welding Society, Deutscher Verband fur Schweisstechnik e.V., High Temperature Society of Japan, International Thermal Spray Association, and Japanese Thermal Spraying Society. The conference covered applications for automobiles, aerospace, petrochemicals, power generation, and biomedical needs. Materials included metals, ceramics, and composites with a broad range of process developments and diagnostics. Other sections included modeling and systems control; spray forming and reactive spraying; post treatment; process, structure and property relationships; mechanical properties; and testing, characterization and wear. One hundred and seventeen papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  17. Effectiveness of containment sprays in containment management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Perez, S.E.; Lehner, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    A limited study has been performed assessing the effectiveness of containment sprays-to mitigate particular challenges which may occur during a severe accident. Certain aspects of three specific topics related to using sprays under severe accident conditions were investigated. The first was the effectiveness of sprays connected to an alternate water supple and pumping source because the actual containment spray pumps are inoperable. This situation could occur during a station blackout. The second topic concerned the adverse as well as beneficial effects of using containment sprays during severe accident scenario where the containment atmosphere contains substantial quantities of hydrogen along with steam. The third topic was the feasibility of using containment sprays to moderate the consequences of DCH

  18. High quality ceramic coatings sprayed by high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Sheng; Xu Binshi; Yao JiuKun

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduced the structure of the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun and the effects of hypersonic plasma jet on the sprayed particles. The optimised spraying process parameters for several ceramic powders such as Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Cr 3 C 2 and Co-WC were listed. The properties and microstructure of the sprayed ceramic coatings were investigated. Nano Al 2 O 3 -TiO 2 ceramic coating sprayed by using the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying was also studied. Compared with the conventional air plasma spraying, high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying improves greatly the ceramic coatings quality but at low cost. (orig.)

  19. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  20. Optimization of die filling in high pressure die cast part using MAGMAsoft®

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    Integrated modeling of an entire casting process has become a tool which favors design and optimization of manufactured parts. The aim of this project was to examine and optimize a high-pressure die cast part and its production process with respect to die filling and issues of residual stresses...... in the process and machine parameters were done and assessed. All simulations revealed that, the main causes of the problems were: a poor geometry of the casting leading to an improper filling pattern, and a massive gating system bringing thermal imbalance into the solidification process. Thus deformations due...

  1. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K. [National Institute of Rock Mechanics, KGF (India)

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  2. Eddy Covariance Measurements of the Sea-Spray Aerosol Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, I. M.; Norris, S. J.; Yelland, M. J.; Pascal, R. W.; Prytherch, J.

    2015-12-01

    Historically, almost all estimates of the sea-spray aerosol source flux have been inferred through various indirect methods. Direct estimates via eddy covariance have been attempted by only a handful of studies, most of which measured only the total number flux, or achieved rather coarse size segregation. Applying eddy covariance to the measurement of sea-spray fluxes is challenging: most instrumentation must be located in a laboratory space requiring long sample lines to an inlet collocated with a sonic anemometer; however, larger particles are easily lost to the walls of the sample line. Marine particle concentrations are generally low, requiring a high sample volume to achieve adequate statistics. The highly hygroscopic nature of sea salt means particles change size rapidly with fluctuations in relative humidity; this introduces an apparent bias in flux measurements if particles are sized at ambient humidity. The Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP) was developed specifically to make high rate measurements of aerosol size distributions for use in eddy covariance measurements, and the instrument and data processing and analysis techniques have been refined over the course of several projects. Here we will review some of the issues and limitations related to making eddy covariance measurements of the sea spray source flux over the open ocean, summarise some key results from the last decade, and present new results from a 3-year long ship-based measurement campaign as part of the WAGES project. Finally we will consider requirements for future progress.

  3. Initial solidification phenomena: Factors affecting heat transfer in strip casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolli, Paolo

    In the last few years a few companies have announced the final stage of the commercial development of strip casting of steels. In strip casting heat extraction and productivity are limited by the thermal resistance at the interface between processed material and moving mold (rolls for twin-roll strip casters). Among many factors influencing interfacial heat transfer, films of various composition, either formed during casting or deposited before casting on the surface of the rolls, melt superheat and gas atmosphere composition can have a significantly positive or negative effect on the achieved heat transfer rate. From an industrial point view, methods to improve interfacial heat transfer rates must be found, in order to increase productivity. The objective of this research project is to assess if it is feasible to improve heat transfer rates during solidification of steel in direct contact with a copper mold: (1) by the application of thin coatings on the mold surface; (2) by adding a reactive gas species containing sulfur in the gas shrouding where casting is performed. To address the former, solidification experiments were performed with the mold surface either kept uncoated or coated with coatings of different compositions. To address the latter, the experiments were performed in gas shrouding atmospheres with or without sulphydric acid. It was observed that the resulting heat extraction rates were improved by the application of certain coatings and by the addition of H2S to the gas atmosphere. These findings prove that the application of coatings and the use of small amounts of reactive gaseous species containing sulfur may be methods to increase productivity in strip casting. The effect of superheat and the effect of naturally deposited oxides (Mn-oxide) were also evaluated experimentally. A numerical study of the effect of the critical undercooling on the productivity of a twin-roll strip caster showed that the maximum allowable casting speed can be increased

  4. A critical investigation into the spray-drying of hydroxyapatite powder for thermal spray applications

    OpenAIRE

    Murtaza, Qasim

    2006-01-01

    This work examines the investigation of the spray drying process of Hydroxyapatite powder (HA) used as a thermal spray deposit in the application of orthopaedic femoral implants. In this research, the Niro- Minor™ mixed spray dryer was used for both modelling and experimental studies. The process parameters investigated included HA slurry viscosity, temperature, and air flowrate. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modelling and validation of the spray drying of HA powder was performed. An anal...

  5. Nondestructive characterization of ductile cast iron by magnetic adaptive testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Takagi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 322, č. 20 (2010), s. 3117-3121 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1323; GA AV ČR 1QS100100508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * magnetic hysteresis * cast iron Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.689, year: 2010

  6. Modeling the Mechanical Performance of Die Casting Dies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Allen Miller

    2004-02-27

    The following report covers work performed at Ohio State on modeling the mechanical performance of dies. The focus of the project was development and particularly verification of finite element techniques used to model and predict displacements and stresses in die casting dies. The work entails a major case study performed with and industrial partner on a production die and laboratory experiments performed at Ohio State.

  7. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine and Cast High Quality Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to conduct research and development targeted at designing a revolutionary steelmaking process. This process will deliver high quality steel from scrap to the casting mold in one continuous process and will be safer, more productive, and less capital intensive to build and operate than conventional steelmaking. The new process will produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  8. Graphite structure and magnetic parameters of flake graphite cast iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Kage, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 442, Nov (2017), s. 397-402 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * cast iron * graphite structure * pearlite content Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2016

  9. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Peter; Hutto, William R.; Philips, Albert R.

    1989-09-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  10. Search for chameleons with CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassopoulos, V; Aune, S; Barth, K; Belov, A; Bräuninger, H; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Cetin, S A; Christensen, F; Collar, J I; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Desch, K; Dermenev, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Friedrich, P; Galán, J; García, J A; Gardikiotis, A; Garza, J G; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Giomataris, I; Hailey, C; Haug, F; Hasinoff, M D; Hofmann, D H H; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; Jakobsen, A; Jakovčić, K; Kaminski, J; Karuza, M; Kavuk, M; Krčmar, M; Krieger, C; Krüger, A; Lakić, B; Laurent, J M; Liolios, A; Ljubičić, A; Luzón, G; Neff, S; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovarov, M J; Raffelt, G; Riege, H; Rosu, M; Ruz, J; Savvidis, I; Solanki, S K; Vafeiadis, T; Villar, J A; Vogel, J K; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K; Brax, P; Lavrentyev, I; Upadhye, A

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter ($\\beta_{\\rm m}$) and to photons ($\\beta_{\\gamma}$) via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1$\\,$keV to 400$\\,$eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600$\\,$eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of $\\beta_{\\gamma}\\!\\lesssim\\!10^{11}$ for $1<\\beta_{\\rm m}<10^6$.

  11. Search for chameleons with CAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Anastassopoulos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a search for (solar chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST. This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (βm and to photons (βγ via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1 keV to 400 eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600 eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of βγ≲1011 for 1<βm<106.

  12. Casting Ductile Iron in Layer Moulds Made from Ecological Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rączka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of tests performed under the target project in Hardtop Foundry Charsznica.The objective of the tests and studies was to develop a technology of making high-quality ductile iron castings, combined witheffective means of environmental protection. The studies presented in this article related to castings weighing from 1 to 300 kg made from ductile iron of grades 400-15 and 500-7, using two-layer moulds, where the facing and core sand was the sand with an alkaline organic binder, while backing sand was the sand with an inorganic geopolymer binder.A simplified method of sand reclamation was applied with possible reuse of the reclaim as an addition to the backing sand. The castiron spheroidising treatment and inoculation were selected taking into account the specific conditions of Hardtop Foundry. A pilot batch of castings was made, testing the gating and feeding systems and using exothermic sleeves on risers. The study confirmed the validity of the adopted concept of making ductile iron castings in layer moulds, while maintaining the content of sand with an organic binder at a level of maximum 15%.

  13. Search for Solar Axions with the CAST-Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, J.; Aune, S.; Autiero, D.; Barth, K.; Belov, A.; Beltran, B.; Borghi, S.; Bourlis, G.; Boydag, F. S.; Brauninger, H.; Carmona, J.; Cebrian, S.; Cetin, S. A.; Collar, J.I.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Di Lella, L.; Dogan, O. B.; Elefheriadis, C.; Elias, N.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Fisher, H.; Franz, J.; Galan, J.; Geralis, T.; Giomataris, I.; Gninenko, S.; Gomez, H.; Hasinoff, M.; Heinsius, H.; Hikmet, I.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jacoby, J.; Jakovcic, K.; Kang, D.; Konigsmann, K.; Kotthaus, R.; Krcmar, M.; Kousouris, K.; Kuster, M.; Lakic, B.; Lasseur, C.; Liolios, A.; Ljubicic, A.; Lutz, G.; Luzon, G.; Miller, D.; Morales, J.; Niinikoski, T.; Nordt, A.; Ortiz, A.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M.; Placci, A.; Raffelt, G.; Riege, H.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Savvidis, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Serpico, P.; Soufli, R.; Stewart, L.; Tzamarias, S.; Van Bibber, K.; Villar, J.; Walckiers, L.; Zioutas, K.; Morales, A.

    2008-01-01

    Solar axions can be produced in the Sun via the so-called Primakoff effect. The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) uses an LHC prototype magnet of about 9 T to reconvert these axions into photons. The magnet is able to follow the Sun for about 3 hours per day. Three different X-Ray detectors are mounted on its ends to detect photons from axion-to-photon conversion: a Time Projection Chamber (TPC), a MICROMEGAS (MICROMEsh GAseous Structure) and a Charge Coupled Device (CCD). For the CCD an X-ray focusing device is used to improve the signal-to-background ratio significantly. With the completion of CAST'S first phase, the current limits on the coupling constant gaγ for axion masses up to 0.02 eV have been improved. In its second phase, CAST extends the axion mass range by filling the magnet with a buffer gas. Masses up to about 0.4 eV have already been covered and thus the experiment is entering the regions favored by axion models. This paper will present the status of CAST'S second phase.

  14. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ABILITY in the Mediterranean Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-03-11 to 1966-06-30 (NODC Accession 6600720)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ABILITY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  15. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS EXULTANT in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1967-01-11 to 1967-01-12 (NODC Accession 6700017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS EXULTANT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the North Atlantic...

  16. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS FIRM in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1970-01-10 to 1970-02-11 (NODC Accession 7000174)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS FIRM in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  17. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS FIRM in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1967-03-25 to 1967-04-17 (NODC Accession 6600379)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS FIRM in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the South China Sea by...

  18. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENHANCE in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1965-11-17 to 1965-11-27 (NODC Accession 6500790)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENHANCE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the North Pacific...

  19. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS REAPER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-10-13 to 1966-10-23 (NODC Accession 6600189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS REAPER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the North Pacific...

  20. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1969-06-18 to 1969-06-23 (NODC Accession 6900720)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  1. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS AGILE in the Caribbean Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1962-09-28 to 1962-10-31 (NODC Accession 6200241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS AGILE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  2. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS VIREO in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1964-08-01 to 1964-08-30 (NODC Accession 6400671)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS VIREO in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  3. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC RUSH in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1974-10-23 to 1974-12-18 (NODC Accession 7500082)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC RUSH in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  4. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC EVERGREEN in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1972-06-04 to 1972-06-21 (NODC Accession 7200921)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC EVERGREEN in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  5. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC WESTWIND in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1976-07-07 to 1976-09-17 (NODC Accession 7601721)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC WESTWIND in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  6. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC DUANE in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1976-10-08 to 1976-10-09 (NODC Accession 7601718)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC DUANE in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  7. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS MULLANY in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 13 July 1954 to 05 March 1955 (NODC Accession 7501245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS MULLANY in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US navy; Ships of...

  8. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from NOAA Ship RAINIER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1981-09-15 to 1981-09-23 (NODC Accession 8100683)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from NOAA Ship RAINIER in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  9. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC MELLON in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1975-12-09 to 1975-12-15 (NODC Accession 7600031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC MELLON in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  10. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENERGY in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1964-09-04 to 1964-09-30 (NODC Accession 6400825)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENGAGE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  11. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENGAGE in the South and East China Seas in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 30 April to 1966-07-23 (NODC Accession 6600817)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENGAGE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  12. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENGAGE in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1964-05-08 to 1964-05-18 (NODC Accession 6400425)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENGAGE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  13. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENGAGE in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-08-08 to 1966-10-11 (NODC Accession 6600265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENGAGE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  14. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENGAGE in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-10-24 to 1966-12-12 (NODC Accession 6600267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENGAGE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  15. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENERGY in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1962-07-19 to 1962-07-29 (NODC Accession 6200632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENERGY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  16. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1963-04-05 to 1963-05-01 (NODC Accession 6300422)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  17. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC ACUSHNET in the Gulf of Mexico in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1973-09-25 to 1973-09-29 (NODC Accession 7301062)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC ACUSHNET in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  18. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC MORGENTHAU in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1975-05-21 to 1975-07-22 (NODC Accession 7500741)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC MORGENTHAU in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast...

  19. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from NOAA Ship Oregon in the Gulf of Alaska in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1975-04-19 to 1975-04-22 (NODC Accession 7500351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from NOAA Ship Oregon in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  20. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the BARTLETT in the Greenland Sea in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1974-08-01 to 1974-09-08 (NODC Accession 7400632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the BARTLETT in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Navy; Naval...

  1. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC MELLON in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1976-05-02 to 1976-07-02 (NODC Accession 7601398)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC MELLON in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  2. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC MUNRO in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1973-04-04 to 1973-05-08 (NODC Accession 7300593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC MUNRO in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  3. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC MIDGETT in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1977-07-15 to 1977-08-11 (NODC Accession 7700647)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC MIDGETT in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  4. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from NOAA Ship Researcher in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1973-10-01 to 1973-10-20 (NODC Accession 7301124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from NOAA Ship Researcher in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US DOC; NOAA;...

  5. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC MELLON in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1976-11-16 to 1976-11-18 (NODC Accession 7601864)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC MELLON in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  6. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the VIRGINIA KEY in the Gulf of Mexico in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1977-11-18 to 1977-12-01 (NODC Accession 7800094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the VIRGINIA KEY in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the Atlantic...

  7. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS PRIME in the Philippine Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1961-03-02 to 1961-04-27 (NODC Accession 6100056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS PRIME in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  8. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS WARBLER in the East China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project for 1963-03-04 (NODC Accession 6300680)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS WARBLER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  9. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS WARBLER in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-04-21 to 1966-05-28 (NODC Accession 6600712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS WARBLER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  10. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS BOLD in the Mediterranean Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project for 1955-08-25 (NODC Accession 5500036)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS BOLD in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  11. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS GUIDE in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1967-06-08 to 1967-07-12 (NODC Accession 6700293)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS GUIDE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  12. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC MELLON in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1976-09-21 to 1976-09-27 (NODC Accession 7601816)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC MELLON in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  13. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC UNIMAK in the East Coast - US/Canada in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project for 1974-01-24 (NODC Accession 7400103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC UNIMAK in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  14. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the USCGC UNIMAK in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project from 1973-09-05 to 1973-09-09 (NODC Accession 7301037)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the USCGC UNIMAK in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the US Coast Guard...

  15. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS PEACOCK in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1967-06-17 to 1967-07-17 (NODC Accession 6700701)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS PEACOCK in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  16. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS VIREO in the East China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1964-04-13 to 1964-04-26 (NODC Accession 6400688)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS VIREO in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  17. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS VIREO in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1965-01-26 to 1965-02-14 (NODC Accession 6500660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS VIREO in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  18. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENERGY in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1962-07-04 to 1962-07-18 (NODC Accession 6200445)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENERGY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  19. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the R/V TRIDENT in the Caribbean Ocean in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project for 1971-01-28 (NODC Accession 7600706)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the R/V TRIDENT in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the University of...

  20. Temperature profiles from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) casts from the R/V TRIDENT in the East Coast - US/Canada in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project for 1969-07-10 (NODC Accession 7600701)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT data were collected from the R/V TRIDENT in support of the Integrated Global Ocean Services System (IGOSS) project. Data were collected by the University of...

  1. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS GANNET in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-09-29 to 1966-10-10 (NODC Accession 6600402)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS GANNET in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  2. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS AGGRESSIVE in the Coastal Waters of Florida in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project for 1962-04-13 (NODC Accession 6200518)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS AGGRESSIVE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  3. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1961-05-04 to 1961-05-24 (NODC Accession 6100034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  4. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1961-11-05 to 1961-11-10 (NODC Accession 6100262)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  5. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1968-08-25 to 1968-10-01 (NODC Accession 6900682)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  6. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the Philippine Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1967-02-17 to 1967-02-19 (NODC Accession 6700064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  7. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1968-08-14 to 1968-11-28 (NODC Accession 7000894)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  8. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONFLICT in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-07-19 to 1966-07-21 (NODC Accession 6600106)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONFLICT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  9. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONFLICT in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1962-01-02 to 1962-02-09 (NODC Accession 6200043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONFLICT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  10. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONFLICT in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-07-23 to 1966-08-02 (NODC Accession 6600087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONFLICT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the North Pacific...

  11. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONFLICT in the Philippine Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1964-02-20 to 1964-02-24 (NODC Accession 6400778)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONFLICT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  12. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1970-01-19 to 1970-02-11 (NODC Accession 7000415)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  13. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS HUMMINGBIRD in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-08-31 to 1966-09-04 (NODC Accession 6600182)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS HUMMINGBIRD in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  14. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS HUMMINGBIRD in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1963-09-19 to 1963-09-20 (NODC Accession 6300789)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS HUMMINGBIRD in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  15. Feasibility of suspension spraying of yttria-stabilized zirconia with water-stabilized plasma torch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mušálek, Radek; Bertolissi, Gabriele; Medřický, J.; Kotlan, Jiří; Pala, Zdeněk; Curry, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 268, April (2015), s. 58-62 ISSN 0257-8972. [Rencontres Internationales de la Projection Thermique/6./. Limoges, 11.12.2013-13.12.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP108/12/P552 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Thermal spray coating * Suspension spraying * Thermal barrier coating * Water-stabilized plasma * High enthalpy plasma Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S025789721400680X

  16. Effect of cast steel production metallurgy on the emergence of casting defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Čamek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper documents metallurgical possibilities of high alloy cast steel production in open induction medium frequency furnaces and an electric arc furnace in a gravity die casting foundry. The observation was focused on the emergence of gas defects in steel castings. The content of gases achieved during the metallurgical processes was evaluated for every unit of the production equipment and the casting ladle before casting into disposable sand moulds. The sand mould area was considered to be constant. The aim was to evaluate the current metallurgical possibilities of affecting the content of gases in high alloy cast steel in the current technical conditions of the foundry.

  17. Marginal Accuracy of Castings Fabricated with Ringless Casting Investment System and Metal Ring Casting Investment System: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavathi, M; Sachin, Bhuvana; Prasanna, B G; Shreeharsha, T V; Praveen, B; Ragher, Mallikarjuna

    2016-02-01

    The thermal expansion of the investment can be restricted by the metal casting ring because the thermal expansion of the ring is less than that of the investment. The ringless casting procedure is in use in clinical dentistry, though there is little scientific data to support its use in fixed partial dentures. In this study, marginal discrepancy of castings produced with the ringless casting technique and the conventional technique using the metal rings were compared. A total of 30 wax patterns were fabricated directly on a metal die. Optical stereomicroscope was used to measure the marginal discrepancy between the metal die and wax patterns. A total of 15 castings were invested using Bellavest T phosphate-bonded investment with the ringless technique and 15 were invested with the same investment with a metal ring; 30 castings were produced using a nickel-chromium ceramo-metal alloy. The internal surface of the castings was not modified and seated with finger pressure. The vertical marginal discrepancy was measured using an optical stereomicroscope at a magnification of 100x. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using students t-test (paired t-test and unpaired t-test). The castings of the ringless technique provided less vertical marginal discrepancy (240.56 ± 45.81 μ) than the castings produced with the conventional metal ring technique (281.98± 53.05 μ). The difference was statistically significant. The ringless casting technique had produced better marginal accuracy compared with conventional casting technique. Ringless casting system can be used routinely for clinical purpose.

  18. The evaluation of working casts prepared from digital impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Y C; Park, Y S; Kim, H K; Hong, Y S; Ahn, J S; Ryu, J J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the reproducibility of working casts of a digital impression system by comparing them with the original, virtual, and rapid prototyping casts. A total of 54 cast sets in clinically stable occlusion were used. They were scanned by an iTero intraoral scanner and converted into STL format virtual casts. Rapid prototyping casts and polyurethane casts were fabricated from the iTero milling system based on the virtual casts. Several horizontal and vertical measurements were performed from the four types of casts, that is, original stone casts, virtual casts, rapid prototyping casts, and polyurethane casts of iTero. Measurement error, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and differences among the casts were calculated and compared. Casts from iTero milling machines exhibited greater dimensional differences and lower ICC values than did other casts. In addition, many of the measurements of the iTero working casts showed statistically significant differences in comparison to the three other types of casts. In contrast, there were no statistically significant differences between the virtual and original casts. Virtual casts made by the iTero intraoral scanner exhibited excellent reproducibility. However, the casts from the iTero milling machine showed greater dimensional differences and lower reproducibility compared to other types of casts.

  19. Experimental Analysis of Spray Dryer Used in Hydroxyapatite Thermal Spray Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, Q.; Stokes, J.; Ardhaoui, M.

    2012-09-01

    The spray drying process of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder used as a plasma spray powder on human hip implants was examined. The Niro-Minor mixed spray dryer was studied because it incorporates both co-current and counter-current air mixing systems. The process parameters of the spray drying were investigated: temperature, flow rate of the inlet hot air in the spray dryer, viscosity of feed/HA slurry, and responses (chamber and cyclone powder size, deposition of powder on the wall of spray dryer, and overall thermal efficiency). The statistical analysis (ANOVA test) showed that for the chamber particle size, viscosity was the most significant parameter, while for the cyclone particle size, the main effects were temperature, viscosity, and flow rate, but also their interaction effects were significant. The spray dried HA powder showed the two main shapes were a doughnut and solid sphere shape as a result of the different input.

  20. Spray Deflector For Water-Jet Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Disk on water-jet-machining nozzle protects nozzle and parts behind it from erosion by deflected spray. Consists of stainless-steel backing with neoprene facing deflecting spray so it does not reach nut or other vital parts of water-jet apparatus.

  1. Advanced Nanoscale Coatings with Plasma Spray

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atteridge, David

    2000-01-01

    .... A secondary research charter developed as this program proceeded was the assessment of the feasibility of using cored wire filled with WE-Co powder as a feed-stock for both plasma spray and twin-wire-arc spray (TWAS...

  2. New tools to optimise spray dryers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, M.; Straatsma, J.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Akkerman, C.; Jong, de P.

    2007-01-01

    Spray drying is an essential unit operation for the manufacture of many products with specific powder properties. It is characterised by atomisation of a solution or suspension into droplets, followed by subsequent drying of these droplets by evaporation of water or other solvents. Spray drying is

  3. The Role of Spraying Parameters and Inert Gas Shrouding in Hybrid Water-Argon Plasma Spraying of Tungsten and Copper for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Kavka, Tetyana; Bertolissi, Gabriele; Ctibor, Pavel; Vilémová, Monika; Mušálek, Radek; Nevrlá, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2013), s. 744-755 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI2/702; GA TA ČR TA01010300 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma spraying * tungsten * copper * inert gas shrouding * water-argon plasma torch * gas shroud * hybrid plasma torch * influence of spray parameters * nuclear fusion * oxidation Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.491, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11666-013-9895-x.pdf

  4. Delamination wear mechanism in gray cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, M.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of the friction and sliding wear of gray cast iron against chromium plated cast irons was carried out on a newly constructed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The tests were the first to be done on the test rig under dry conditions and at the speed of 170 cm/min, and variable loads of 20-260 N for a duration of 15 min. to 3 hours. The gray cast iron surfaces worn by a process of plastic deformation at the subsurface, crack nucleation, and crack growth leading to formation of plate like debris and therefore the delamination theory applies. No evidence of adhesion was observed. This could be due to formation of oxides on the wear surface which prevent adhesion. channel type chromium plating ''picked'' up cast iron from the counter-body surfaces by mechanically trapping cast iron debris on and within the cracks. The removal of the plated chromium left a pitted surface on the cast iron

  5. Homogenity of Die Casting and Returning Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Malik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneity of die castings is influenced by wide range of technological parameters as piston velocity in filling chamber of die casting machine, filling time of mould cavity, temperature of cast alloy, temperature of the mould, temperature of filling chamber, surface pressure on alloy during mould filling, final pressure and others. Based on stated parameters it is clear, that main parameters of die casting are filling time of die mould cavity and velocity of the melt in the ingates. Filling time must ensure the complete filling of the mould cavity before solidification process can negatively influence it. Among technological parameters also belong the returning material, which ratio in charge must be constrained according to requirement on final homogeneity of die castings. With the ratio of returning material influenced are the mechanical properties of castings, inner homogeneity and chemical composition.

  6. Development of volume deposition on cast iron by additive manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niyanth S, Niyanth [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Jordan, Brian H [ORNL; Babu, Suresh S. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2016-11-10

    ORNL partnered with Cummins to demonstrate the feasibility of using additive manufacturing techniques to help develop repair techniques for refurbished cast iron engine blocks. Cummins is interested in the refurbished engine business due to the increased cost savings and reduced emissions. It is expected that by refurbishing engines could help reduce the green house gas emissions by as much as 85%. Though such repair techniques are possible in principle there has been no major industry in the automotive sector that has deployed this technology. Therefore phase-1 would seek to evaluate the feasibility of using the laser directed energy deposition technique to repair cast iron engine blocks. The objective of the phase-1 would be to explore various strategies and understand the challenges involved. During phase-1 deposits were made using Inconel-718, Nickel, Nr-Cr-B braze filler. Inconel 718 builds showed significant cracking in the heat-affected zone in the cast iron. Nickel was used to reduce the cracking in the cast iron substrate, however the Ni builds did not wet the substrate sufficiently resulting in poor dimensional tolerance. In order to increase wetting the Ni was alloyed with the Ni-Cr-B braze to decrease the surface tension of Ni. This however resulted in significant cracks in the build due to shrinkage stresses associated with multiple thermal cycling. Hence to reduce the residual stresses in the builds the DMD-103D equipment was modified and the cast iron block was pre heated using cartridge heaters. Inconel-718 alloyed with Ni was deposited on the engine block. The pre-heated deposits showed a reduced susceptibility to cracking. If awarded the phase-2 of the project would aim to develop process parameters to achieve a crack free deposit engine block.

  7. Development testing of large volume water sprays for warm fog dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.; Beard, K. V.

    1986-01-01

    A new brute-force method of warm fog dispersal is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray induced air flow. Fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of the technique depends upon the drop size spectra in the spray, the height to which the spray can be projected, the efficiency with which fog laden air is processed through the curtain of spray, and the rate at which new fog may be formed due to temperature differences between the air and spray water. Results of a field test program, implemented to develop the data base necessary to assess the proposed method, are presented. Analytical calculations based upon the field test results indicate that this proposed method of warm fog dispersal is feasible. Even more convincingly, the technique was successfully demonstrated in the one natural fog event which occurred during the test program. Energy requirements for this technique are an order of magnitude less than those to operate a thermokinetic system. An important side benefit is the considerable emergency fire extinguishing capability it provides along the runway.

  8. The erosive potential of candy sprays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambon, D L; Brand, H S; Nieuw Amerongen, A V

    2009-05-23

    To determine the erosive potential of seven different commercially available candy sprays in vitro and in vivo. The erosive potential was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. The salivary pH and flow rate were measured in healthy volunteers after administration of a single dose of candy spray. Candy sprays have an extremely low pH (1.9-2.3) and a neutralisable acidity varying between 0.8-1.6 ml of 0.25M NaOH. In vivo, candy sprays induced a short-term 3.0 to 5.8-fold increase in salivary flow rate with a concomitant drop in salivary pH to values between 4.4 and 5.8. All candy sprays tested have an erosive potential. This information is of use for clinicians counselling juvenile patients with dental erosion.

  9. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  10. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  11. Optimal scaling of the CAST and of SDS Scale in a national sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani, L; Siciliano, V; Curzio, O; Luppi, C; Gori, M; Grassi, M; Molinaro, S

    2013-04-01

    Psychometric and screening properties of the Cannabis Abuse Screening Test (CAST) and of the Severity Dependence Scale (SDS) were investigated using DSM-IV diagnoses of cannabis dependence (CD) as external criteria. Performance of the SDS and of the CAST were compared. Cross-sectional European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD) was carried out in Italy in 2009. The sample consisted of 5787 Italian adolescents aged 15-19 who reported cannabis last year use. Uni-dimensionality, internal reliability, external validity, and optimal scaling of the 6 items for CAST and 5 items for SDS were performed. The Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI) was used as a gold standard for DSM-IV diagnoses, and all outputs were assessed by 10-fold cross validation procedure. Both scales were uni-dimensional and Cronbach's α was 0.74 for SDS and 0.78 for CAST. High and comparable area under curve (AUC) values indicate a good ability of both scales to discriminate between individuals with and without dependence diagnosis. Based on balanced sensitivity and specificity, the optimal cut-off scores for problematic use disorders were 7 for CAST MCA and 4 for SDS MCA. Both CAST and SDS overestimated CD prevalence. The CAST and SDS are equally useful for screening for problematic cannabis use disorders. Both clinical and research applications of the scales are possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  13. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early wr...

  14. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people

  15. The spray-drying process is sufficient to inactivate infectious porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Priscilla F; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2014-11-07

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is considered an emergent pathogen associated with high economic losses in many pig rearing areas. Recently it has been suggested that PEDV could be transmitted to naïve pig populations through inclusion of spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) into the nursery diet which led to a ban of SDPP in several areas in North America and Europe. To determine the effect of spray-drying on PEDV infectivity, 3-week-old pigs were intragastrically inoculated with (1) raw porcine plasma spiked with PEDV (RAW-PEDV-CONTROL), (2) porcine plasma spiked with PEDV and then spray dried (SD-PEDV-CONTROL), (3) raw plasma from PEDV infected pigs (RAW-SICK), (4) spray-dried plasma from PEDV infected pigs (SD-SICK), or (5) spray-dried plasma from PEDV negative pigs (SD-NEG-CONTROL). For the spray-drying process, a tabletop spray-dryer with industry-like settings for inlet and outlet temperatures was used. In the RAW-PEDV-CONTROL group, PEDV RNA was present in feces at day post infection (dpi) 3 and the pigs seroconverted by dpi 14. In contrast, PEDV RNA in feces was not detected in any of the pigs in the other groups including the SD-PEDV-CONTROL group and none of the pigs had seroconverted by termination of the project at dpi 28. This work provides direct evidence that the experimental spray-drying process used in this study was effective in inactivating infectious PEDV in the plasma. Additionally, plasma collected from PEDV infected pigs at peak disease did not contain infectious PEDV. These findings suggest that the risk for PEDV transmission through commercially produced SDPP is minimal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Cannell (EMTEC); Adrian S. Sabau (ORNL)

    2005-09-30

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The first part of the project involved preparation of reports on the state of the art at that time for all the areas under consideration (die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy). The primary R&D focus during Phase I was on the wax material since the least was known about it. The main R&D accomplishments during this phase were determination of procedures for obtaining the thermal conductivity and viscoelastic properties of an unfilled wax and validating those procedures. Phase II focused on die-wax and shell-alloy systems. A wax material model was developed based on results obtained during the previous R&D phase, and a die-wax model was successfully incorporated into and used in commercial computer programs. Current computer simulation programs have complementary features. A viscoelastic module was available in ABAQUS but unavailable in ProCAST, while the mold-filling module was available in ProCAST but unavailable in ABAQUS. Thus, the numerical simulation results were only in good qualitative agreement with experimental results, the predicted shrinkage factors being approximately 2.5 times larger than those measured. Significant progress was made, and results showed that the testing and modeling of wax material had great potential for industrial applications. Additional R&D focus was placed on one shell-alloy system. The fused-silica shell mold and A356 aluminum alloy were considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. It was very important to obtain accurate temperature data from actual castings, and significant effort was made to obtain temperature profiles in

  17. Microstructured metal molds fabricated via investment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Andrew H; King, William P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an investment casting process to produce aluminum molds having integrated microstructures. Unlike conventional micromolding tools, the aluminum mold was large and had complex curved surfaces. The aluminum was cast from curved microstructured ceramic molds which were themselves cast from curved microstructured rubber. The aluminum microstructures had an aspect ratio of 1:1 and sizes ranging from 25 to 50 µm. Many structures were successfully cast into the aluminum with excellent replication fidelity, including circular, square and triangular holes. We demonstrate molding of large, curved surfaces having surface microstructures using the aluminum mold.

  18. Mechanical Strength and Failure Characteristics of Cast Mg-9 pctAl-1 pctZn Alloys Produced by a Heated-Mold Continuous Casting Process: Tensile Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Ohfuji, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical properties and failure characteristics of a cast Mg alloy (AZ91: Mg-Al8.9-Zn0.6-Mn0.2) produced by a heated-mold continuous casting process (HMC) are investigated. In a modification of the original HMC process, the cooling of the liquid alloy by direct water spray is carried out in an atmosphere of high-purity argon gas. The HMC-AZ91 alloy exhibits excellent mechanical properties (high strength and high ductility) that are about twice as high as those for the same alloy produced by conventional gravity casting. The increased material strength and ductility of the HMC sample are attributed to nanoscale and microscale microstructural characteristics. The fine grains and tiny spherical eutectic structures ( e.g., Mg17Al12 and Al6Mn) distributed randomly in the matrix of the HMC alloy result in resistance to dislocation movement, leading to high tensile strength. Basal slip on (0001) planes in the relatively organized crystal orientation of the HMC alloy, as well as grain boundary sliding through tiny spherical eutectic structures, results in high ductility. Details of the failure mechanism under static loading in the HMC alloy are also discussed using failure models.

  19. Control of Cast Iron Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J.; Lillybeck, N.; Franco, N.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of microgravity for industrial research in the processing of cast iron was investigated. Solidification experiments were conducted using the KC-135 and F-104 aircraft, and an experiment plan was developed for follow-on experiments using the Shuttle. Three areas of interest are identified: (1) measurement of thermophysical properties in the melt; (2) understanding of the relative roles of homogeneous nucleation, grain multiplication, and innocultants in forming the microstructure; and (3) exploring the possibility of obtaining an aligned graphite structure in hypereutectic Fe, Ni, and Co.

  20. The Role of Indian Caste Identity and Caste Inconsistent Norms on Status Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Sekerdej, Maciek; von Hecker, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The Indian caste system is a complex social structure wherein social roles like one’s profession became ‘hereditary,’ resulting in restricted social mobility and fixed status hierarchies. Furthermore, we argue that the inherent property of caste heightens group identification with one’s caste. Highly identified group members would protect the identity of the group in situations when group norms are violated. In this paper, we were interested in examining the consequence of caste norm violatio...