WorldWideScience

Sample records for spotlight montessori potpourri

  1. Cosmology and Prehistory: Imagination on the Rise. Spotlight: Montessori Potpourri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallenberg, Harvey

    2001-01-01

    Presents the Maori cosmological perspective and the modern theory of evolution. Explains how these two creation stories can coexist. Discusses life on earth during its first 3 billion years, including concepts of singularity, Big Bang, time, space, matter, gravity, stars, planets, seas, and life. (DLH)

  2. The Essence of Montessori. Spotlight: Updating Our Agendas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Margaret H.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the essential elements of Montessori educational philosophy and theory, focusing on the integration, development, and maintenance of the four characteristics of normalization (concentration, work, discipline, sociability) into adulthood. Discusses Montessori's view that development and retention of these positive characteristics could be…

  3. Grandparenting--A Montessori Way. Spotlight: Updating Our Agendas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgholthaus, Page

    2002-01-01

    Defines the grandmother-grandchild relationship in light of Montessori theory, focusing on the prepared environment. Recommends having bookshelves for the grandparents' collection of their own favorite children's books, arranging puzzles and other manipulatives around the house, adapting home tasks to include the child, sharing meaningful time…

  4. Potpourri: conjeturas y cavilaciones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Amante

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Potpourri, Cambaceres’ first novel, raised a significant moral debate concerning its subject matter, its style of writing and the dismissiveness of its narrator, who was directly identified with the author. The article deals with this specific style –which was frequently criticized– in order to suggest that the narrative power and the experimental dimension of the novel are to be found precisely in its alleged formless surface, in its detachment from conventions and in the narrator’s indolence. Following this conceptual thread, the article inquires into some specific aspects of the novel: the anonymity, the whistle, the gossip, the open secrets and the architecture of the page

  5. Montessori for All: Magnolia Montessori

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDUCAUSE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The founders of Montessori For All, which opened Magnolia Montessori--a PK-8 public charter school in Austin, Texas--created a new school model that blends the best of authentic Montessori schooling (hands-on and self-directed learning) with best practices from high-performing charter schools (basic skills mastery to excel on standardized tests…

  6. Potpourri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, M. Jerry

    2002-01-01

    Considers the importance of audiobooks and notes special recognition to Random House Audiobooks for producing unabridged versions of some of this year's prize-winning books. Elaborates on some thoughts on students' attitudes toward reading assignments in graduate English courses. Addresses high school teacher reluctance to use young adult…

  7. Montessori Grows in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    Imagine going back in time and being the guiding spirit in Montessori's first "Casa dei Bambini" but with all the knowledge and skills developed as a Montessori teacher today. That is precisely the privilege this author has had as, over the past 2 years, she has worked to establish an Early Childhood Montessori program in Usa River,…

  8. Montessori Method and ICTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Drigas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article bridges the gap between the Montessori Method and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs in contemporary education. It reviews recent research works which recall the Montessori philosophy, principles and didactical tools applying to today’s computers and supporting technologies in children’s learning process. This article reviews how important the stimulation of human senses in the learning process is, as well as the development of Montessori materials using the body and the hand in particular, all according to the Montessori Method along with recent researches over ICTs. Montessori Method within information society age acquires new perspectives, new functionality and new efficacy.

  9. Public Knowledge of Montessori Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The American public generally recognizes the name "Montessori" because so many schools across the country and around the world use the Montessori name. However, the Montessori community has long believed that misunderstandings abound. A recent dissertation study quantified Montessori awareness and identified misconceptions in particular for those…

  10. Montessori and Constructivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind, David

    2003-01-01

    Presents three basic epistemological positions (empiricism, nativism, and constructivism) and argues that Maria Montessori's educational practice reflected all three positions. Describes how the constructivist position is reflected in the High/Scope program, and compares and contrasts this position with that of Montessori. Asserts that although…

  11. Montessori Index. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleege, Virginia B.; And Others

    This volume, the result of 2 years of work, is an index to 24 volumes on Montessori theory and practice. The books were read and analyzed a minimum of six times. Sixteen of the volumes are authored by Maria Montessori. (DR)

  12. Judaism and Montessori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Judaism, as a religion and a culture, places a high value on education and scholarly pursuits. As Jewish schools of varying affiliations and denominations look for ways to improve and revive programming, some are exploring the Montessori method. Based on education that follows the child, Montessori focuses on respect, independence, and preparing…

  13. Dear Maria Montessori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Paula K.

    2005-01-01

    Responding to Montessori's work, the author penned this letter, which teachers should find valuable for their own practice and reflection. Sections of the response include: (1) The Key for Me; (2) Observe: Freedom of Choice; (3) Observe: The Method; and (4) And Yet. A "Montessori Timeline" is also included.

  14. Why Montessori Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Beverley

    2007-01-01

    As Montessorians come to the beginning of the second century of the Montessori system of education, they are in agreement that following the principles and guidelines set out by Maria Montessori a century ago empowers them to present to children an environment that truly "works." As the child is very different and the changes very evident between…

  15. Characteristics of Montessori educators in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Uštević, Maja

    2016-01-01

    This diploma thesis presents the Montessori pedagogy with a focus on the characteristics of Montessori educators and Montessori education in Slovenia. It presents the development of the Montessori pedagogy and life of Maria Montessori, related to education and institutions which operate on the principle of Montessori pedagogy worldwide and in Slovenia. It describes the role of the Montessori educator, his/her duties and responsibilities in the process of education according to the Montessori ...

  16. Montessori, Superman, and Catwoman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Martin

    1988-01-01

    Differences between Montessori theories of instruction and other popular approaches such as Dewey's account for the brevity of her popularity during her lifetime. An analysis of Nietzsche's influence during the development of her theories is described. (CB)

  17. Montessori Transformation at Computer Associates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Describes the growth of the all-day Montessori program for children ages 6 weeks to 6 years at Computer Associates' corporate headquarters and multiple sites worldwide. Focuses on placement of AMI Montessori-trained teachers, refurbishing of the child development centers to fit Montessori specifications, and the Nido--the children's community--and…

  18. Playful Learning and Montessori Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2013-01-01

    Although Montessori education is often considered a form of playful learning, Maria Montessori herself spoke negatively about a major component of playful learning--pretend play, or fantasy--for young children. In this essay, the author discusses this apparent contradiction: how and why Montessori education includes elements of playful learning…

  19. Montessori All Day, All Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Connie; Davis, Liza

    2015-01-01

    Introducing real community into the Children's House goes back to the roots of Montessori education through all-day Montessori. The all-day environment is a house where children live with a "developmental room" of Montessori materials including a living room, kitchen, dining area, bedroom, bathroom, greeting rooms, and outdoor spaces.…

  20. The Training of Montessori Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Helen

    1994-01-01

    Explains the philosophy of the Montessori educational system and the training of Montessori teachers. Describes teacher training courses as seeking to produce a new kind of personality, which suppresses unhelpful qualities, such as impatience and loudness of voice. Explains how the theories of Montessori are practiced, including policies of…

  1. Authentic Montessori: The Teacher Makes the Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxel, Alexa C.

    2013-01-01

    What are the elements that make up authentic Montessori? Is Montessori something concrete or abstract? Are there intangibles that make Montessori what it is? Many classrooms today have Montessori materials and small tables and chairs. Are they authentic Montessori? When examining areas that traditionally make defining authentic Montessori…

  2. The Montessori Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathleen HASKINS

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Maria Montessori provided the world with a powerful philosophy and practice for the advancement of humanity: change how we educate children and we change the world. She understood two things very clearly: One, that we can build a better world, a more just and peaceful place, when we educate for the realization of the individual and collective human potential; and two, that the only way to create an educational system that will that will serve this end is to scrap the current system entirely and replace it with a completely new system. She gave us a system through which to accomplish that goal: The Montessori Method. The following is a personal and professional account of the Montessori Method of educating children.

  3. A Montessori Odyssey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Forty years ago, Peter Hanson decided to attend the 38th Indian Montessori Training Course. In this article he describes himself as a college-educated generalist who liked kids but was working for little more than minimum wage as a delivery boy. Becoming a teacher in an alternative school seemed like a good move, and a step up without…

  4. Montessori and Brain Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hranitz, John R.

    Researchers in medicine, education, and related fields continue to make new discoveries about how the brain functions or malfunctions. The implications of studies of how young children learn compare favorably with those of educators such as Maria Montessori, Jerome Bruner, and Jean Piaget. These researchers saw growth and development as a series…

  5. Reconstructing Montessori: On Being an Authentic Montessori School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Michele

    2006-01-01

    In preparation for the centennial of Montessori education, school leaders have a unique responsibility--not only to the communities, but also to Dr. Montessori's memory--to revise the educational practices in a manner that is both respectful of her theories and responsive to a changing educational landscape. This article outlines one example of…

  6. Towards a Constructivist Montessori Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Ian

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that the Montessori method can be recast as a viable contemporary, constructivist programme for early childhood education. Montessori believed that children in the crucial years from birth to age six possess extraordinary, innate mental powers to "absorb" the environment. This view was typical of the now outdated zeitgeist…

  7. The Impact of Montessori Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushamba, Ashley; Burney, Sonya Franklin; Kent, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the impact of School Y's Montessori approach on their students' academic achievement, perceptions of executive functioning skills, and the school's culture. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of length of enrollment on academic achievement in a Montessori upper elementary and middle school…

  8. The effects of Montessori education: Evidence from admission lotteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, N.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the causal effects of Montessori secondary education by exploiting admission lotteries in Dutch Montessori schools. Results from 308 to 625 students indicate that Montessori education provides an alternative way to attain similar outcomes. Montessori students obtain their

  9. Značilnosti pedagogov montessori v Sloveniji

    OpenAIRE

    Uštević, Maja

    2016-01-01

    V diplomskem delu je predstavljena pedagogika montessori, s poudarkom na značilnostih pedagogov montessori in izobraževanjih montessori v Sloveniji. Predstavljen je razvoj pedagogike montessori in življenje Marie Montessori, povezano z vzgojo in izobraževanjem ter razvoj ustanov, ki delujejo po principu pedagogike montessori, po svetu in v Sloveniji. Opisana je vloga pedagoga montessori ter njegove obveznosti in dolžnosti v procesu vzgoje in izobraževanja po metodi pedagogike montessori. Pred...

  10. The Kodaikanal Experience: Chapter II. Kahn-Montessori Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAMTA Journal, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an interview transcript between David Kahn and Mario Montessori (1898-1982), son of Dr. Maria Montessori. Mario Montessori dedicated his life to the preservation, dissemination and application of Montessori's works. Herein Kahn asks Montessori about his time living in the hills of Kodaikanal, India. Montessori touches upon…

  11. Maria Montessori on Speech Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David A.

    1973-01-01

    Montessori's theory of education, as related to speech communication skills learning, is explored for insights into speech and language acquisition, pedagogical procedure for teaching spoken vocabulary, and the educational environment which encourages children's free interaction and confidence in communication. (CH)

  12. Knowles and Montessori: Facilitators of Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newson, Ron

    1992-01-01

    Montessori's ideas contradict Knowles' statements about pedagogy but support his idea that andragogy may be appropriate for children in certain circumstances. If the concepts of child and adult are ignored, the theories of Knowles and Montessori sound similar. (SK)

  13. Marie Montessori a její pedagogika

    OpenAIRE

    Dvořáková, Martina

    2010-01-01

    Thesis "Maria Montessori and her teaching method" deals with main principles of the educational system proposed by Maria Montessori, Italian doctor and teacher. Thesis is divided into two parts, a theoretical part and a practical part. The theoretic part aims at fundamental ideas of Maria Montessori's pedagogical conception with the special emphasis on the teacher's role in this method. The practical part focuses on a comparison of a teacher's role in M. Montessori's method and teacher's role...

  14. Work in Society and in Montessori Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattin-McNichols, John

    2013-01-01

    Montessori educators follow Montessori's lead and use the word "work" to describe the child's concentrated attention with a hands-on material. But this word may lead to communication problems with parents and those in the non-Montessori world: educators, administrators, accreditors, and so on. These communication problems are…

  15. The Integration of Cultures: The Montessori Contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Winfried

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that Maria Montessori's concept of education is a theory, explaining that Montessori did not teach a method, but rather a vision for child development. Compares Montessori theory with five other educational theories. Emphasizes the power of different visionary, utopian educational theories which seek a definition of humans and their aims.…

  16. Maria Montessori: Portrait of a Young Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povell, Phyllis

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the biography of Maria Montessori, who pioneered early childhood education and introduced a new method of pedagogy. The innovations in education that Montessori introduced were enough to reserve a place for her in the history books. Montessori was ahead of her time in many aspects of her life. The decisions…

  17. Women in History--Maria Montessori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierdt, Ginger L.

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Maria Montessori, an international ambassador for children who became known for her theories and methods of pedagogy, called the "Montessori Method." Montessori developed an educational theory, which combined ideas of scholar Froebel, anthropologists Giuseooe Serge, French physicians Jean Itard and Edouard Sequin,…

  18. Montessori-based dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Janet

    2006-10-01

    Montessori-based Dementia Care is an approach used in Alzheimer's care that does not involve chemical or physical restraints. This program works by giving the elder with Alzheimer/Dementia a purpose by getting them involved. When staff/families care for a confused Alzheimer/Dementia patient, who is having behaviors, the Montessori program teaches them to look at what is causing the behavior. When assessing the elder to determine what is causing the behavior, the goal is to find the answer, but the answer cannot be dementia. The goal of the program is to bring meaning to the life of an Alzheimer/Dementia elder.

  19. NEUTRINOS: Moriond spotlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcov, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    The regular 'Rencontres de Moriond' meetings in the French Alps, which celebrate their 25th anniversary this year, have a strong tradition of reflecting new trends in physics thinking and January's session on 'Tests of Fundamental Laws in Physics' was no exception. The spotlight this time fell on the neutrino sector, a branch of physics frequently in evolution, if not controversial

  20. Montessori and Non-Montessori Early Childhood Teachers’ Attitudes Towards Inclusion and Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Danner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Montessori and non-Montessori general education early childhood teachers were surveyed about their attitudes towards including children with disabilities and providing access in their classrooms.  Both groups reported similar and positive supports for inclusion within their schools. Montessori teachers reported having less knowledge about inclusion and less special education professional development than their non-Montessori counterparts.   Implications for professional development and teacher preparation are described.

  1. Views on Montessori Approach by Teachers Serving at Schools Applying the Montessori Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atli, Sibel; Korkmaz, A. Merve; Tastepe, Taskin; Koksal Akyol, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Further studies on Montessori teachers are required on the grounds that the Montessori approach, which, having been applied throughout the world, holds an important place in the alternative education field. Yet it is novel for Turkey, and there are only a limited number of studies on Montessori teachers in Turkey. Purpose of…

  2. Preschool Children's Development in Classic Montessori, Supplemented Montessori, and Conventional Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2012-01-01

    Research on the outcomes of Montessori education is scarce and results are inconsistent. One possible reason for the inconsistency is variations in Montessori implementation fidelity. To test whether outcomes vary according to implementation fidelity, we examined preschool children enrolled in high fidelity classic Montessori programs, lower…

  3. Montessori and Non-Montessori Early Childhood Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion and Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Natalie; Fowler, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Montessori and non-Montessori general education early childhood teachers were surveyed about their attitudes toward including children with disabilities and providing these students access to the curriculum. Both groups reported similar and positive system-wide supports for inclusion within their schools. Montessori teachers reported having less…

  4. Providing Montessori: Identity and Dilemmas in a Montessori Teacher's Lived Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    This phenomenological case study was conducted to better understand the experience of a Montessori teacher in a leadership role. A veteran Montessori teacher, newly hired by an established Montessori preschool, was interviewed over the course of her first year in the position. A critical discourse analysis revealed multiple social identities that…

  5. Developing creativity in Montessori preschool class

    OpenAIRE

    KYSELOVÁ, Soňa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to point out the possibilities of developing creativity in a preschool classroom, which works by the philosophy of Montessori pedagogy that is sometimes critisised as too strict and not offering enough space for creativity and fantasy. The theoretical part will content characterisation of creativity and pedagogy of Maria Montessori, concept of creativity as perceived by Maria Montessori, art exploitation for developing creativity and it´s assertion in Montesori classro...

  6. Proving Montessori: Identity and Dilemmas in a Montessori Teacher’s Lived Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Christensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This phenomenological case study was conducted to better understand the experience of a Montessori teacher in a leadership role. A veteran Montessori teacher, newly hired by an established Montessori preschool, was interviewed over the course of her first year in the position. A critical discourse analysis revealed multiple social identities that contributed to her desire, and ability, to be what she felt was an authentic Montessori educator. While some of these discourses and social identities aligned, some did not, creating ideational dilemmas that affected her work, relationships, and personal identity. The findings suggest that current Montessori discourse excludes important characteristics of the teacher-lived experience. Acknowledging and discussing the social challenges Montessori teachers face is a necessary addition to teacher preparation, teacher support systems, and Montessori leadership decisions.

  7. The effects of Montessori education: evidence from admission lotteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, N.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of Montessori education, even though many students in many countries are educated in Montessori classrooms. This study investigates the causal effects of Montessori secondary education by exploiting admission lotteries in Dutch Montessori schools. The results

  8. Removing Supplementary Materials from Montessori Classrooms Changed Child Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S.; Heise, Megan J.

    2016-01-01

    Montessori classrooms vary in the degree to which they adhere to Maria Montessori's model, including in the provision of materials. Specifically, some classrooms use only Montessori materials, whereas others supplement the Montessori materials with commercially available materials like puzzles and games. A prior study suggested such…

  9. The Scientist in the Classroom: The Montessori Teacher as Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Ginni

    2016-01-01

    Ginni Sackett shares insights ignited by a presentation given by Professori Raniero Regni in Rome at an AMI International Trainers Meeting. Dr. Regni stated that, "To go beyond Montessori is to rediscover Montessori. Montessori is waiting for us in the future." By re-examining Montessori's writings, Sackett traces the subtle ways in…

  10. Montessori Parenting: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Sonnie; McFarland, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Since Dr. Maria Montessori's discovery of the true nature of childhood over a century ago, children around the globe have benefited from Montessori education. However, even parents who have children enrolled in Montessori schools could derive further benefits through the implementation of Montessori principles and practices in the home. Helping…

  11. Creating an Amazing Montessori Toddler Home Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The author states that raising her twins the Montessori way has made her life easy. Imagine two 1-year-olds eating entire meals on their own, setting their own tables by 20 months, and becoming potty-trained before 2. These are not statistics found in just one household. Children raised the Montessori way can take care of themselves and their…

  12. Best Practices in Montessori Secondary Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Marta

    2013-01-01

    This article is the result of years of study, both formal and informal; hundreds of hours of traditional and Montessori classroom observations; reading and digesting articles and books on secondary education, Montessori education, adolescent brain research, leadership, and best practices in education; and most enlightening of all, 20 years of…

  13. Montessori Practices: Options for a Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Mark Powell's plea for an open-minded view on the full scope of technology that is compatible with Montessori education enriches Maria Montessori's clear modernism of welcoming science into her educational vision. Growing up digital can be intelligently managed so that "technology may offer an effective, adaptable, and easily available means…

  14. Montessori, Maslow, and Self-Actualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, David R.

    2011-01-01

    What must never be forgotten by the Montessori teacher, or by any teacher of young children, is that his or her "primary" task, his or her "primary" obligation, his or her "primary" sacred duty is not the teaching of the "three Rs" but that of nurturing the psychological health of the child. Every element of Montessori methodology is designed for…

  15. Vygotsky and Montessori: One Dream, Two Visions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodrova, Elena

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on major themes in Vygotsky's theory of learning and development; compares the theoretical and practical implications of these major principles with those of Montessori. Considers both Vygotsky's and Montessori's views on the mechanisms of child development and methods of study; the relationship of teaching, learning, and development;…

  16. Montessori and Play: Theory vs. Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrence, Martha

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed Montessori preprimary teachers concerning attitudes toward pretend play in the classroom. Found mixed feelings among teachers toward pretend play. By a margin of 2 to 1, teachers were dissatisfied with the training they had received regarding the role of children's play in Montessori settings. (KB)

  17. A Clear Voice for Montessori: Elisabeth Caspari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Marjorie Ann

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author profiles Dr. Elisabeth Caspari (1899-2002). As a teacher of teachers, Caspari traveled extensively for 50 years, sharing the wisdom she had gleaned from her training under Dr. Maria Montessori in Adyar, India, and from 4 years of frequent association with Montessori and her son, Mario, in Kodaikanal. The threads of…

  18. The Montessori Paradigm of Learning: So What?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryadi, Qais

    2007-01-01

    This critical literature examines the methodology of teaching and learning developed by Dr. Maria Montessori. Maria Montessori always believed that children are a unique being and they always surprise us with their unseen capabilities. In order to fully develop those unseen capabilities, we must give them freedom of choice to explore their…

  19. Montessori and Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardin, Patricia A.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences. Shows how Maria Montessori and Howard Gardner drew similar conclusions regarding human capacity and potential. Examines how Gardner's eight intelligences and underlying core operations lie at the heart of the Montessori exercises and activities. (KB)

  20. The Montessori Method: The Origins of an Educational Innovation: Including an Abridged and Annotated Edition of Maria Montessori's The Montessori Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutek, Gerald Lee

    2004-01-01

    An essential resource for all students and scholars of early childhood education, this book offers a rich array of material about Maria Montessori and the Montessori Method. Distinguished education scholar Gerald Gutek begins with an in-depth biography of Montessori, exploring how a determined young woman overcame the obstacles that blocked her…

  1. Living in the spotlight

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Just a few weeks ago, we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the World Wide Web. It gave me my first opportunity since taking up my mandate to see first hand what CERN’s newfound public profile means in practice. There were over 60 media from around the world present at CERN for the event, and some 900 reports in the media over the following days. Some weeks before, Sony pictures held a press event for their upcoming movie, Angels and Demons, part of which takes place at CERN. That happened during the same week that we published the new LHC schedule, and it was the LHC that got the most media coverage. So what does this mean for how we carry out our daily work? Particle physics has always operated in a fully open and transparent way. It’s in our DNA to do so. Meetings are open to all comers, and it is important that we continue to foster such a culture of transparency. Nevertheless, we need to be aware that we are much more in the public spotlight than ever before....

  2. Starting a Montessori School in the 60's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Recounts starting a Montessori school in the 1960s in New Orleans. Highlights events of import: (1) decision to be nonsectarian and racially integrated; (2) early conflict between teachers and parents on Montessori practices; and (3) physical location problems. (DLH)

  3. Distraction. The Montessori Observer. Volume 31, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  4. Nomenclature. The Montessori Observer. Volume 31, Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature article,…

  5. Perceptual Mistakes. The Montessori Observer. Volume 31, Number 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  6. Clear Direction. The Montessori Observer. Volume 32, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  7. Personality Projections. The Montessori Observer. Volume 32, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  8. Power Struggles. The Montessori Observer. Volume 31, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  9. Scientific Education. The Montessori Observer. Volume 29, Number 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature article,…

  10. Context and Content. The Montessori Observer. Volume 30, Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2009

    2009-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  11. Montessori education: a review of the evidence base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Chloë

    2017-10-01

    The Montessori educational method has existed for over 100 years, but evaluations of its effectiveness are scarce. This review paper has three aims, namely to (1) identify some key elements of the method, (2) review existing evaluations of Montessori education, and (3) review studies that do not explicitly evaluate Montessori education but which evaluate the key elements identified in (1). The goal of the paper is therefore to provide a review of the evidence base for Montessori education, with the dual aspirations of stimulating future research and helping teachers to better understand whether and why Montessori education might be effective.

  12. [Montessori method applied to dementia - literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Daniela Filipa Soares; Martín, José Ignacio

    2012-06-01

    The Montessori method was initially applied to children, but now it has also been applied to people with dementia. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the research on the effectiveness of this method using Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline) with the keywords dementia and Montessori method. We selected lo studies, in which there were significant improvements in participation and constructive engagement, and reduction of negative affects and passive engagement. Nevertheless, systematic reviews about this non-pharmacological intervention in dementia rate this method as weak in terms of effectiveness. This apparent discrepancy can be explained because the Montessori method may have, in fact, a small influence on dimensions such as behavioral problems, or because there is no research about this method with high levels of control, such as the presence of several control groups or a double-blind study.

  13. Il periodo indiano di Maria Montessori

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    Giacomo Cives

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available On Maria Montessori (1870-1952, Italian educator of the twentieth century the most successful in the world, there is, also a growing if belated, interest in more recent times also in Italy. So to confine ourselves to two thousand years, studies have appeared on his life and works of great interest, finally showing that its value is recognized beyond resistance of the idealistic and Catholic area survived for a long time. The author investigates these new frontiers of research on the Montessori starting from a new biography dedicated to her which gives attention also to the Indian period.

  14. Pedagogika a škola Marie Montessori v České republice

    OpenAIRE

    Glaserová, Barbora

    2012-01-01

    This thesis "Pedagogy and Maria Montessori School in the Czech Republic" in the theoretical part describes the life of Maria Montessori, Montessori principles of education and development of Montessori schools with a focus on their development in the Czech Republic. The practical part deals with a case study of a Prague school with Montessori principles and a questionnaire survey with the headmaster of Montessori schools.

  15. Longitudinal Comparison of Montessori versus Non-Montessori Students’ Place-Value and Arithmetic Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elida V. Laski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Base-10 and place value understanding are important foundational math concepts that are associated with higher use of decomposition strategies and higher accuracy on addition problems (Laski, Ermakova, & Vasilyeva, 2014; Fuson, 1990; Fuson & Briars, 1990; National Research Council, 2001. The current study examined base-10 knowledge, place value, and arithmetic accuracy and strategy use for children in early elementary school from Montessori and non-Montessori schools. Children (N = 150 were initially tested in either kindergarten or first grade. We followed up with a subgroup of the sample (N = 53 two years later when the children were in 2nd and 3rd grade. Although Montessori curriculum puts a large emphasis on the base-10 structure of number, we found that children from Montessori schools only showed an advantage on correct use of base-10 canonical representation in kindergarten but not in first grade. Moreover, there were no program differences in place value understanding in 2nd and 3rd grade. Although Montessori children used different strategies to obtain answers to addition problems in 2nd and 3rd grade as compared with non-Montessori children, there were no program differences in addition accuracy at any grade level. Educational implications are discussed.

  16. [Cognitive disorders and the Montessori method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembach, Marie; Agret, Annie; Rochat, Armelle; Thomas, Stéphanie; Jeandel, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Trained in the Montessori method, a team takes a very positive approach to their patients. The nurses base their practice on patients' remaining capacities, helping them work around their impairments. They seek to offer each person the possibility to pursue a social life through individualised treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Montessori Elementary Philosophy Reflects Current Motivation Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Montessori's theories, developed more than 100 years ago, certainly resonate with current psychological research on improving education. Autonomy, interest, competence, and relatedness form the foundation for three contemporary efforts to organize the vast literature on motivation into a parsimonious theory. These four elements also comprise…

  18. Origins of Montessori Programming for Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the evolution of the use of Montessori educational methods as the basis for creating interventions for persons with dementia. The account of this evolution is autobiographical, as the development of Montessori Programming for Dementia (MPD) initially was through the efforts of myself and my research associates. My initial exposure to Maria Montessori's work came as a result of my involvement with my own children's education. This exposure influenced ongoing research on development of cognitive interventions for persons with dementia. A brief description of Montessori's work with children and the educational methods she developed is followed by a description of how this approach can be translated into development of activities for persons with dementia. Assessment tools to document effects of MPD were created, focusing on observational tools to measure engagement and affect during individual and group activities programming for persons with dementia. Examples of the use of MPD by researchers, staff members, and family members are given, as well as examples of how persons with dementia can provide MPD to other persons with dementia or to children. Finally, examples of MPD's dissemination internationally and future directions for research are presented.

  19. Why Montessori? Answers from a Parent's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Anu

    2013-01-01

    The author knew she would be picky about where her child started his schooling. After calling over 30 public and private schools within a 50-mile radius of her home, and then visiting more than 15 of them, the author chose Lexington Montessori School (LMS). However, when she tells friends and acquaintances about her son's fantastic school, she…

  20. Formulation: Implementing Successful Public Montessori Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Draws on the experiences of the OEkos Foundation for Education in implementing successful Montessori programs in 12 public school districts to present essential elements and key decisions needed for establishing such programs. Includes a schematic for the Decision Tree developed by the foundation. (ETB)

  1. Maria Montessori and Educational Forces in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortridge, P. Donohue

    2007-01-01

    When Maria Montessori addressed two wildly enthusiastic American audiences at Carnegie Hall in December 1913, she thrilled the parents in attendance, but sent a shock wave through the educational establishment. Instead of accommodating skeptics from the teacher-training institutions seated there that night, she appealed directly to parents who…

  2. MATERIALS AND (LANGUAGE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT BASED ON MONTESSORI CONCEPTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Kristiyani

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Montessori Education is widely spread in almost all countries in the world. Even though this school is meant for all kinds of learners including “normal” learners, the Montessori education concepts used in Montessori schools will be very supportive education for children with special needs. Therefore, the schools which adopt Montessori education concepts can facilitate inclusion, especially with the concepts of ‘I can do it myself.’ Inclusive education needs to be carefully prepared and implemented by schools. The movement brings about some challenges for teachers. This paper explores the environment and materials based on Montessori education concepts. The environment and materials are suitable for all types of learners and thus can be an option to be implemented in the inclusive education setting. Teaching materials rooted in Montessori education concepts indeed cater all ages and embrace the needs of all students.

  3. Montessori Education and Practice: A Review of the Literature, 2007-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagby, Janet H.; Jones, Natalie A.

    2010-01-01

    This literature review, a continuation of the first one published in "Montessori Life" (Bagby, 2007), identifies articles published in non-Montessori professional periodicals that included information about Maria Montessori and/or the Montessori method of education. While conducting the current search, the authors discovered 12 articles published…

  4. ICTs and Montessori for Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Drigas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper concentrates on the Montessori philosophy and examines how this learning theory currently gives credence to cognitive processes of the mind, as suitable intervention used to the training of children with learning disabilities. Furthermore, Montessori’s system and materials in combination with the support of new technologies as well as their implementation on various kinds of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs have great successes regarding the support of disability and the enhancement of learning process.

  5. Montessori-skole: die ander kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Viljoen

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Na aanleiding van die artikel “Die invloed van die New Age-beweging op die onderwysagenda van die toekoms” deur Lien van Niekerk en Corinne Meier van die Departement Historiese Opvoedkunde van Unisa (vgl. Koers, 59 (1 1994:69-84 wil ek graag ’n ander sy van Montessori-skole onder die aandag van Koers lesers bring.

  6. The Social Relevance of Montessori in the First Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sarah Werner

    2015-01-01

    This article represents an amazing reversal of linguistic analysis. Usually Montessori language is translated into "state" terminology. In this case, Sarah Werner Andrews puts state quality assessment terms into Montessori language. For example, domains for school readiness include 1) physical wellbeing and motor development, 2) social…

  7. Principle Elements of Curriculum in the Preschool Pattern of Montessori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmaee, Azizollah Baboli; Saadatmand, Zohreh; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Montessori the physician and educational philosopher was probably one of the most prominent and famous education theorizer in the field of preschool education. Current research attempts to extract and clarify the major elements of curriculum by reliance on Montessori viewpoints. In this paper first the philosophical basics of preschool education…

  8. Maria Montessori, John Dewey, and William H. Kilpatrick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer-Bacon, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    I explore Montessori's story in terms of her initial warm reception by America to her educational research, and her later cooling off, once Dewey's student, Kilpatrick, published The Montessori System Examined and declared her work to be based on psychological theory that was fifty years behind the times. I argue that there is a troubling gendered…

  9. Further Fostering Intrinsic Motivation in the Montessori Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Victoria A.

    2013-01-01

    The Montessori classroom appears to be the ideal learning environment for children throughout elementary and middle school. It is based on the philosophy of Dr. Maria Montessori which describes an environment tailored to the Sensitive Periods of children, prepared with materials appropriate for the age and abilities of the children in a particular…

  10. Understanding Optimal School Experience: Contributions from Montessori Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathunde, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    After summarizing the results from two studies the author conducted in Montessori middle schools, the chapter discusses nine characteristics of Montessori education in relation to various theoretical perspectives on education and development. [This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol. 113, No. 1.

  11. Leaving a Legacy: Passing Montessori to the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    For each of the past 19 years, the American Montessori Society has chosen to recognize one Montessorian as an AMS Living Legacy. Recipients are honored at the AMS annual conference for their salient work or volunteerism in the Montessori field and their dedication and leadership that has made an impact on the AMS community. It seems fitting that…

  12. International Education: The International Baccalaureate, Montessori and Global Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunold-Conesa, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The International Baccalaureate (IB) programs and Montessori education both claim to promote values associated with global citizenship in order to help prepare students for new challenges presented by an increasingly globalized world. While the IB's secondary programs are widespread in international schools, Montessori programs at that level are…

  13. The Power of Montessori's Positive Psychology in an Expanding Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Annette

    1999-01-01

    Relates Montessori theory of development with the concept of connection to the universe and natural world, noting Montessori education's role in nurturing reestablished connection with the natural world. Describes events leading to a fulfilled life as part of psychological normalization, noting the importance of identifying positive tendencies of…

  14. The effect of Montessori Method on teaching cultural and creative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Effect of the Montessori Method on teaching was investigated among children to discover their artistic development in Zaria, Kaduna State. The problem of the study is that the Montessori Method on teaching cultural and creative arts is not adequately explored in the primary schools, while other teaching methods used, ...

  15. Developing Resilient Children: After 100 Years of Montessori Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Meg

    2008-01-01

    In this millennium, educators are faced with a number of issues that Dr. Maria Montessori could not have predicted. Today, students are different from the children Dr. Montessori observed in her "Casa dei Bambini." They are influenced by technology in all its forms. Some suffer from medical problems such as complex food allergies, which wreak…

  16. Perpaduan Konsep Islam dengan Metode Montessori dalam Membangun Karakter Anak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilian Ria Adisti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Studi ini menguraikan perpaduan antara konsep Islam dan metode Montessori terutama untuk membangun karakter yang baik bagi anak-anak. Metode pendidikan Montessori adalah salah satu metode yang populer sebagai salah satu metode terbaik di Barat, terutama untuk mengajar anak-anak. Dalam al-Quran, sebagai sumber kehidupan masyarakat muslim, telah disebutkan semua laporan Montessori. Ada lima konsep dalam metode pendidikan Montessori yang bisa dipadukan dengan teori mengajar anak-anak dalam al-Quran dan al-Hadits; Konsep Kebebasan dengan konsep "Fitrah", Struktur dengan konsep Langkah demi langkah, Realitas dan Alam dengan konsep Mencintai Alam dan Makhluk Hidup, Keindahan dan Nuansa sejalan dengan konsep Kebersihan dan Keindahan Islam, dan Materi Montessori dengan Proses Konsep Pembelajaran Hidup. Hasil perpaduan nilai-nilai tersebut dapat membangun karakter yang baik untuk anak-anak, terutama menjadikan mereka orang beragama dengan sikap yang baik untuk masa depan mereka.   This study simply reveals about the assimilation of Islamic education values and Montessori education method especially to build the good character for children. Montessori education method is one of the method which really popular as one of the best method in Western, especially for teaching children. In al-Quran, as the source of Moslem people’s life, has mentioned all the statements of Montessori. There are five aspects in Montessori education methods that we collaborate with the theory of teaching children in al-Quran and al-Hadits; Concept of Freedom with Concept of “Fitrah”, Structure and Order with Concept of Step by Step, Reality and Nature with Concept of Loving the Nature and Living Being, Beauty and Nuance in line with Concept of Cleanness and Beauty of Islam, and Montessori Materials with Concept Process of Life Learning. The result of collaboration those methods can build the good character for children, especially create them to be religious person with the

  17. Montessori Preschool Elevates and Equalizes Child Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study

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    Angeline S. Lillard

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Quality preschool programs that develop the whole child through age-appropriate socioemotional and cognitive skill-building hold promise for significantly improving child outcomes. However, preschool programs tend to either be teacher-led and didactic, or else to lack academic content. One preschool model that involves both child-directed, freely chosen activity and academic content is Montessori. Here we report a longitudinal study that took advantage of randomized lottery-based admission to two public Montessori magnet schools in a high-poverty American city. The final sample included 141 children, 70 in Montessori and 71 in other schools, most of whom were tested 4 times over 3 years, from the first semester to the end of preschool (ages 3–6, on a variety of cognitive and socio-emotional measures. Montessori preschool elevated children’s outcomes in several ways. Although not different at the first test point, over time the Montessori children fared better on measures of academic achievement, social understanding, and mastery orientation, and they also reported relatively more liking of scholastic tasks. They also scored higher on executive function when they were 4. In addition to elevating overall performance on these measures, Montessori preschool also equalized outcomes among subgroups that typically have unequal outcomes. First, the difference in academic achievement between lower income Montessori and higher income conventionally schooled children was smaller at each time point, and was not (statistically speaking significantly different at the end of the study. Second, defying the typical finding that executive function predicts academic achievement, in Montessori classrooms children with lower executive function scored as well on academic achievement as those with higher executive function. This suggests that Montessori preschool has potential to elevate and equalize important outcomes, and a larger study of public Montessori

  18. Montessori Preschool Elevates and Equalizes Child Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S; Heise, Megan J; Richey, Eve M; Tong, Xin; Hart, Alyssa; Bray, Paige M

    2017-01-01

    Quality preschool programs that develop the whole child through age-appropriate socioemotional and cognitive skill-building hold promise for significantly improving child outcomes. However, preschool programs tend to either be teacher-led and didactic, or else to lack academic content. One preschool model that involves both child-directed, freely chosen activity and academic content is Montessori. Here we report a longitudinal study that took advantage of randomized lottery-based admission to two public Montessori magnet schools in a high-poverty American city. The final sample included 141 children, 70 in Montessori and 71 in other schools, most of whom were tested 4 times over 3 years, from the first semester to the end of preschool (ages 3-6), on a variety of cognitive and socio-emotional measures. Montessori preschool elevated children's outcomes in several ways. Although not different at the first test point, over time the Montessori children fared better on measures of academic achievement, social understanding, and mastery orientation, and they also reported relatively more liking of scholastic tasks. They also scored higher on executive function when they were 4. In addition to elevating overall performance on these measures, Montessori preschool also equalized outcomes among subgroups that typically have unequal outcomes. First, the difference in academic achievement between lower income Montessori and higher income conventionally schooled children was smaller at each time point, and was not (statistically speaking) significantly different at the end of the study. Second, defying the typical finding that executive function predicts academic achievement, in Montessori classrooms children with lower executive function scored as well on academic achievement as those with higher executive function. This suggests that Montessori preschool has potential to elevate and equalize important outcomes, and a larger study of public Montessori preschools is warranted.

  19. Maria Montessori a different children glance

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    Vittoria Bosna

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Montessori was  one of the most important female figures in the 20th-century Italian pedagogical overview. She deeply examined the child and his/her “absorbing” mind in a way that clarified the significant role played by the environment in cognitive and emotional education. Il metodo della pedagogia scientifica (1909 was her first study where she pointed out that science should analyse how the child’s personality develops in social interaction. Maria Montessori claimed children’s rights with respect to the adults’ world by underlining the traditional error -in psychological and educational terms-which used to compel the child to act not complying with his/her own nature. To this end, she organized the child’s educational context-that is the kindergarten- like an ideal place where the child could live his/her educational experiences by freely acting and by being appropriately stimulated. Montessori’s thought has led to fruitful implications related to such pedagogical topics as those currently tackled in contemporary pedagogy: i.e.: the relation between environment and education, the  organization of the teaching and  learning process, the use of procedures, methodologies and materials designed for a relevant pedagogical intervention.How to reference this articleBosna, V. (2015. Maria Montessori uno sguardo diverso sull’infanzia. Foro de Educación, 13(18, pp. 37-50. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/fde.2015.013.018.002 

  20. Montessori and Early Childhood Education: A Contemporary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Annette

    2000-01-01

    Surveys constructivism and developmental psychology, including work by Piaget, Vygotsky, Bruner, Gardner, Kamii, and DeVries. Considers the influence of Montessori pedagogy on early childhood education in contrast to its neglect in professional literature. (JPB)

  1. Racial and Economic Diversity in U.S. Public Montessori Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Catherine Debs

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As public Montessori schools rapidly expand through the United States, the question then arises: What population of students do the schools serve? This study presents a new empirical data set examining the racial and economic diversity of 300 whole-school, public Montessori programs open in 2012–2013, where the entire school uses the Montessori Method. While school-choice scholars are concerned that choice programs like Montessori lead to greater student segregation by race and social class, this study finds a variety of outcomes for public Montessori. Public Montessori as a sector has strengths in student racial and socioeconomic diversity, but it also has diversity challenges, particularly among Montessori charters. The study concludes with recommended strategies for public Montessori schools to enroll a racially and economically diverse student body.

  2. Holding a spotlight to an ageing society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Paul

    2008-07-01

    In May 2008 Help the Aged published its 3rd annual Spotlight Report. The report highlights the stark realities facing older people in the UK today and gives detailed statistical data on how the lives of some have improved but many are still being left behind.

  3. Square Pegs in Round Holes: Montessori Principals' Perceptions of Science Education in Texas Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the perceptions of Texas public Montessori school principals as instructional leaders in science. Twelve public Montessori school principals were interviewed for this study. Two research questions were used: How do public Montessori principals perceive Texas science standards in public…

  4. Predominantly Black Institutions and Public Montessori Schools: Reclaiming the "Genius" in African American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jor'dan, Jamilah R.

    2018-01-01

    There are more than 22,000 Montessori schools in over 100 countries worldwide. Beginning in the 1950s the American Montessori movement was primarily a private pre-school movement. There are more than 5,000 schools in the United States; over 500 of these are public. Montessori schools are an increasingly popular choice in the U.S. for public school…

  5. Physical Activity in Preschool Children: Comparison between Montessori and Traditional Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Russell R.; O'Neill, Jennifer R.; Byun, Wonwoo; McIver, Kerry L.; Dowda, Marsha; Brown, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the influence of Montessori methods on children's physical activity (PA). This cross-sectional study compared PA of children attending Montessori and traditional preschools. Methods: We enrolled 301 children in 9 Montessori and 8 traditional preschools in Columbia, South Carolina. PA was measured by accelerometry…

  6. Students of Color and Public Montessori Schools: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debs, Mira C.; Brown, Katie E.

    2017-01-01

    Students of color comprise a majority in public Montessori school enrollments around the United States, and practitioners are often asked for evidence of the Montessori Method's benefits for these students. This article examines the relevant literature related to the experiences of students of color in public Montessori schools. Research finds…

  7. Philosophy, Psychology, and Educational Goals for the Montessori Adolescent, Ages Twelve to Fifteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, David

    2003-01-01

    Defines Montessori theory in terms that can interface with developmental psychology, summarizing adolescent cognitive, social, emotional, and moral outcomes. Focuses on outcomes of the third plane of education for youth in an Erdkinder setting, Montessori's "Educational Syllabus," providing clues about the future Montessori adult.…

  8. Montessori Today: A Comprehensive Approach to Education from Birth to Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Paula Polk

    While many parents are familiar with Montessori schooling at the preschool level, Montessori elementary and middle schools have also proliferated in the past decade. This book provides an overview of Montessori theory and practice, with special emphasis on the child's elementary school years. Chapter 1 presents an introduction to the origin and…

  9. Montessori Theory into Practice: A Practical Newsletter for NAMTA Members, 1996-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori Theory into Practice Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This document is comprised of the four 1996 and 1997 issues of a newsletter for members of the North American Montessori Teachers Association (NAMTA) providing practical guidance on putting Montessori theory into classroom practice. The March 1996 issue features an article on offering variety in the Montessori classroom to stimulate student…

  10. Prednosti metode Montessori pri obravnavi oseb z demenco

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    Andreja Ljubič

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Uvod: Demenca je kronično obolenje s tendenco upadanja kognitivnih sposobnosti obolelega. Uporaba metod za obvladovanje in trening osnovnih življenjskih aktivnosti, ki omogočajo daljše obdobje samostojnega življenja pacienta z demenco, je v tujini uveljavljena z različnimi novejšimi koomplementarnimi pristopi. Ena izmed uveljavljenih metod je pristop Marie Montessori, prilagojen odraslim pacientom z demenco. V članku je predstavljena metoda montessori pri obravnavi pacienta z demenco in njeni učinki na kakovost življenja pacienta z demenco. Metode: Uporabljena je bila deskriptivna raziskovalna metodologija s pregledom domače in tuje literature. Za prikaz pregleda petih preko spleta dostopnih podatkovnih baz in odločanja o uporabnosti pregledanih virov je bila uporabljena metoda PRISMA. V končni pregled literature je bilo ključenih 19 člankov, objavljenih do maja 2016. Za obdelavo podatkov je bil uporabljen model analize konceptov. Večina zajetih raziskav je bila izvedena v Združenih državah Amerike. Rezultati: Po pregledu raziskav so bila identificirana tri tematska področja: (1 vpliv metode montessori na sodelovanje in prizadevanje, (2 vpliv metode montessori na vedenje, povezano s hranjenjem, in (3 vpliv metode montessori na širšo skupino kognitivnih sposobnosti. Diskusija in zaključek: Kljub majhnemu številu člankov, ki opisujejo uporabo metode montessori pri obravnavi pacientov z demenco, metodo lahko predstavimo kot učinkovito. Avtorji raziskav ugotavljajo, da pristop ne le omogoča ohranjanje kognitivnih sposobnosti, temveč le-te celo izboljšuje.

  11. Modernost pedagoške koncepcije Marije Montessori

    OpenAIRE

    Bašić, Slavica

    2011-01-01

    U zadnjim desetljećima sve veći broj znanstvenika i pedagoga praktičara pokazuje interes za Montessori pedagogiju, provjerava je u praksi i potvrđuje da je riječ o modernoj, vremenu primjerenoj pedagogiji koja odgovara na razvojne potrebe suvremene djece i mladih. Brojna istraživanja pokazuju kako djeca iz Montessori škola, u usporedbi s djecom iz standardnih škola, pokazuju bolju motivaciju za učenje, višestruke interese, samostalnost i pozitivan odnos prema učenju te veću odgovornost prema ...

  12. Efficient sliding spotlight SAR raw signal simulation of extended scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Pingping

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sliding spotlight mode is a novel synthetic aperture radar (SAR imaging scheme with an achieved azimuth resolution better than stripmap mode and ground coverage larger than spotlight configuration. However, its raw signal simulation of extended scenes may not be efficiently implemented in the two-dimensional (2D Fourier transformed domain. This article presents a novel sliding spotlight raw signal simulation approach from the wide-beam SAR imaging modes. This approach can generate sliding spotlight raw signal not only from raw data evaluated by the simulators, but also from real data in the stripmap/spotlight mode. In order to obtain the desired raw data from conventional stripmap/spotlight mode, the azimuth time-varying filtering, which is implemented by de-rotation and low-pass filtering, is adopted. As raw signal of extended scenes in the stripmap/spotlight mode can efficiently be evaluated in the 2D Fourier domain, the proposed approach provides an efficient sliding spotlight SAR simulator of extended scenes. Simulation results validate this efficient simulator.

  13. Sliding Spotlight Mode Imaging with GF-3 Spaceborne SAR Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjun Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic aperture radar (SAR sliding spotlight work mode can achieve high resolutions and wide swath (HRWS simultaneously by steering the radar antenna beam. This paper aims to obtain well focused images using sliding spotlight mode with the Chinese Gaofen-3 SAR sensor. We proposed an integrated imaging scheme with sliding spotlight echoes. In the imaging scheme, the two-step approach is applied to the spaceborne sliding spotlight SAR imaging algorithm, followed by the Doppler parameter estimation algorithm. The azimuth spectral folding phenomenon is overcome by the two-step approach. The results demonstrate a high Doppler parameter estimation accuracy. The proposed imaging process is accurate and highly efficient for sliding spotlight SAR mode.

  14. Spotlight on GME/GHSE Supported Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-07

    REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From- To) 12/07/2017 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Spotlight on GME/GHSE-Supported Research Sb...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 59th Clinical Research Division REPORT NUMBER 1100 Willford Hall Loop, Bldg 4430 JBSA... Research Division 1100 Willford Hall Loop, Bldg 4430 JBSA-Lack:land, TX 78236-9908 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT 210-292-7141 NUMBER(S) 12

  15. Care givers' knowledge of integrating the Montessori; indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study therefore sought to identify caregivers' knowledge of integrating Montessori, Indigenous Communicative Teaching and Reggio Emilia approaches in Early Childhood Care Education in Owerri Educational zone, Imo State, Nigeria. The study is a descriptive survey with the population comprising all caregivers in ...

  16. Three Approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Carolyn Pope

    2002-01-01

    Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia are three progressive approaches to early childhood education that appear to be growing in influence in North America and to have many points in common. This article provides a brief comparative introduction of these models and highlights several key areas of similarity and contrast. All three approaches…

  17. Montessori Early Childhood Teacher Perceptions of Family Priorities and Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Teachers of young children work closely with families. One component of teacher-family partnerships is teachers' understanding of family priorities and stressors. This study examines Montessori Early Childhood (ages three through six) teacher perceptions of family priorities and stressors through an analysis of responses to two parallel surveys.…

  18. Think Big: Leadership Projects for AMS and Montessori Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattin-McNichols, John

    2014-01-01

    The American Montessori Society's (AMS) 2014 Living Legacy recipient, John Chattin-McNichols, delivered the keynote address at the Annual Conference in Dallas, TX, on March 27, 2014, In his speech, he described three overall highlights of AMS: (1) AMS is now a world-leading organization; (2) It must become a learning organization; and (3)…

  19. Observation and Development: From Dr. Montessori's 1946 London Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This article exhorts the observer to take notice of the unconscious and conscious levels of the young child's absorbent mind (infant stare). Montessori notes the social awareness of young children and suggests that their amazing awareness of people, not merely their activities, is integral to observation. [Reprinted with permission from "AMI…

  20. Implementing a Robotics Curriculum in an Early Childhood Montessori Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, Mollie; Sullivan, Amanda; Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how robotics can be used as a new educational tool in a Montessori early education classroom. It presents a case study of one early educator's experience of designing and implementing a robotics curriculum integrated with a social science unit in her mixed-age classroom. This teacher had no prior experience using robotics in…

  1. Montessori Botany Studies: Why It Is Time for a Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Elisabeth; Spears, Priscilla

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the need to change the Montessori botany nomenclature cards to reflect the progress of the field over the past 55 years. Maintains that the materials used should reflect the goals of botany study for children. Provides a sample outline of lessons and nomenclature for the flowering plants. Discusses the need to use available reference…

  2. Montessori Education and Optimal Experience: A Framework for New Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathunde, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Discusses similarities between Montessori method and optimal experience theory. Considers three conceptual similarities between these educational theories: the child as focal point of human society; the role of deep concentration in learning and the evolution of human nature; and the understanding that social contexts can be designed to promote…

  3. Montessori and Steiner: A Pattern of Reverse Symmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Dee Joy

    2003-01-01

    Explains the educational movements precipitated by Maria Montessori and Rudolf Steiner as comprising a pattern of reverse symmetries. Notes the influence of war on their philosophies. Discusses reverse symmetries in curriculum related to mathematics, geography, and history. Maintains that each of these two movements holds the other at its core,…

  4. Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

    2013-08-01

    Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by prominent policy documents. Specifically, we examined the opportunities present in Montessori classrooms for students to develop an interest in the natural world, generate explanations in science, and communicate about science. Using ethnographic research methods in four Montessori classrooms at the primary and elementary levels, this research captured a range of scientific learning opportunities. The study found that the Montessori learning environment provided opportunities for students to develop enduring interests in scientific topics and communicate about science in various ways. The data also indicated that explanation was largely teacher-driven in the Montessori classroom culture. This study offers lessons for both conventional and Montessori classrooms and suggests further research that bridges educational contexts.

  5. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  6. Examining a Public Montessori School's Response to the Pressures of High-Stakes Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Corrie Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    A public Montessori school is expected to demonstrate high student scores on standardized assessments to succeed in the current school accountability era. A problem for a public Montessori elementary school is how to make sense of the school's high-stakes assessment scores in terms of Montessori's unique educational approach. This case study…

  7. Spotlight on Psoriasis: Preventing Patches of Itchy, Sore Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe August 2016 Print this issue Spotlight on Psoriasis Preventing Patches of Itchy, Sore Skin En español ... Sun Damage Sun and Skin Wise Choices Avoid Psoriasis Triggers Factors that may trigger psoriasis or make ...

  8. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-10-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • Evaluation and modeling of light water reactor accident tolerant fuel concepts • Status and results of recent TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiations, post-irradiation examinations, high-temperature safety testing to demonstrate the accident performance of this fuel system, and advanced microscopy to improve the understanding of fission product transport in this fuel system. • Improvements in and applications of meso and engineering scale modeling of light water reactor fuel behavior under a range of operating conditions and postulated accidents (e.g., power ramping, loss of coolant accident, and reactivity initiated accidents) using the MARMOT and BISON codes. • Novel measurements of the properties of nuclear (actinide) materials under extreme conditions, (e.g. high pressure, low/high temperatures, high magnetic field) to improve the scientific understanding of these materials. • Modeling reactor pressure vessel behavior using the GRIZZLY code. • New methods using sound to sense temperature inside a reactor core. • Improved experimental capabilities to study the response of fusion reactor materials to a tritium plasma. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at Idaho National Laboratory, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  9. An intergenerational program for persons with dementia using Montessori methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, C J; Judge, K S; Bye, C A; Fox, K M; Bowden, J; Bell, M; Valencic, K; Mattern, J M

    1997-10-01

    An intergenerational program bringing together older adults with dementia and preschool children in one-on-one interactions is described. Montessori activities, which have strong ties to physical and occupational therapy, as well as to theories of developmental and cognitive psychology, are used as the context for these interactions. Our experience indicates that older adults with dementia can still serve as effective mentors and teachers to children in an appropriately structured setting.

  10. Children's Temperament and Behavior in Montessori and Constructivist Early Childhood Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shu-Chen; Ispa, Jean M.

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed mothers and children at four constructivist and ten Montessori preschool classrooms. Found a near significant trend suggesting that temperamentally active boys were more likely to be perceived as behavior problems in Montessori settings, which are characterized by working quietly for long periods of time. No similar trends were revealed…

  11. Racial and Economic Diversity in U.S. Public Montessori Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debs, Mira C.

    2016-01-01

    As public Montessori schools rapidly expand through the United States, the question then arises: What population of students do the schools serve? This study presents a new empirical data set examining the racial and economic diversity of 300 whole-school, public Montessori programs open in 2012-2013, where the entire school uses the Montessori…

  12. Do Children in Montessori Schools Perform Better in the Achievement Test? A Taiwanese Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsin-Hui; Md-Yunus, Sham'ah

    2014-01-01

    The study examines whether elementary school students in Taiwan who had received Montessori education achieved significantly higher scores on tests of language arts, math, and social studies than students who attended non-Montessori elementary programs. One hundred ninety six children in first, second, and third grade participated in the study.…

  13. 19th International Montessori Training Course, London Lecture 29 17 November 1933

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Followers of Maria Montessori become accustomed to the oft-repeated stories that drive home a point, but here is a new treasure. This lecture tells of an experiment that Montessori began with 12- to 14-year-old children and then with 10-year-olds. When the poetry of Dante was introduced to these students, they became passionate and grew to love…

  14. Determining the Measurement Quality of a Montessori High School Teacher Evaluation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setari, Anthony Philip; Bradley, Kelly D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a psychometric validation of a course evaluation instrument, known as a student evaluation of teaching (SET), implemented in a Montessori high school. The authors demonstrate to the Montessori community how to rigorously examine the measurement and assessment quality of instruments used within Montessori…

  15. Technology in the Montessori Classroom: Teachers' Beliefs and Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sara J.

    2017-01-01

    As technology becomes ubiquitous in society, there is increasing momentum to incorporate it into education. Montessori education is not immune to this push for technology integration. This qualitative study investigates four Upper Elementary Montessori teachers' attitudes toward technology and technology integration in a public school setting.…

  16. Educational Gymnastics: The Effectiveness of Montessori Practical Life Activities in Developing Fine Motor Skills in Kindergartners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Punum; Davis, Alan; Shamas-Brandt, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: A quasi-experiment was undertaken to test the effect of Montessori practical life activities on kindergarten children's fine motor development and hand dominance over an 8-month period. Participants were 50 children age 5 in 4 Montessori schools and 50 students age 5 in a kindergarten program in a high-performing suburban…

  17. [Effects of Montessori education on the intellectual development in children aged 2 to 4 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Ling; Yan, Hong; Zuo, Ling; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Xi-Ping

    2009-12-01

    To compare the effects of Montessori education and traditional education on the intellectual development in children aged 2 to 4 years. Children aged between 2 to 3 years who were enrolled in a kindergarten in September 2006 were randomly assigned to the Montessori education and the traditional education groups. In addition to receiving the traditional education, the Montessori education group participated in the two-hour Montessori pedagogical activities every day. The intellectual development was evaluated by the Neuropsychological Development Examination Format for Children Aged 0~6 years published by Capital Pediatrics Research Institute at enrollment and one year after the trial. There were no significant differences in the intelligence growth level between the Montessori education and the traditional education groups at enrollment. After one year, the levels of fine movements, adaptation ability, language, and social behavior developments in the Montessori education group were significantly higher than those in the traditional education group (pMontessori education group were also higher than those in the traditional education group (pMontessori education can promote the development of large motor ability, fine movements, language, and social behavior in children.

  18. Determining the Measurement Quality of a Montessori High School Teacher Evaluation Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Philip Setari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to conduct a psychometric validation of a course evaluation instrument, known as a student evaluation of teaching (SET, implemented in a Montessori high school. The authors demonstrate to the Montessori community how to rigorously examine the measurement and assessment quality of instruments used within Montessori schools. The Montessori high school community needs an SET that has been rigorously examined for measurement issues. The examined SET was developed by a Montessori high school, and the sample data were collected from Montessori high school students. Using a Rasch partial credit model, the results of the analysis identified several measurement issues, including multidimensionality, misfit items, and inappropriate item difficulty levels. A revised version of the SET underwent the same analysis procedure, and the results indicated that measurement issues persisted. The authors suggest several ways to improve the overall measurement quality of the instrument while keeping the Montessori foundation. Additional validation studies with a revised version of the SET will be needed before the instrument can be endorsed for full implementation in a Montessori setting.

  19. Home-School Relations. The Montessori Observer. Volume 30, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2009

    2009-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness. This issue contains a feature article, "Home-School Relations," by…

  20. "Do You Teach Them Anything?" What Really Happens in a Montessori Toddler Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Heather S.

    2014-01-01

    The greatest sign of success for a teacher is to be able to say, "The children are now working as if I did not exist" (Montessori, 1967, p. 283). Montessori Toddler teachers spend a great amount of time preparing and perfecting their environments to allow and to encourage learning to happen. The teachers are constantly adjusting and…

  1. Music Education in Montessori Schools: An Exploratory Study of School Directors' Perceptions in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rekha S.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the changing role of music education and the availability of musical experiences for students attending Montessori schools in the Midwestern United States. On a survey instrument designed by the researcher, Montessori school directors (N = 36) from eight states shared descriptions of the current role of music at…

  2. An Analysis and Evaluation of the Montessori Theory of Inner Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sister Alicia

    The principles of the Montessori theory of inner discipline are discussed and evaluated through examination of the writings of and about Maria Montessori. The principles are also discussed in relation to available empirical and descriptive research concerning discipline. The principles of inner discipline may be summarized as follows: The child is…

  3. Best Practice Guidelines for Computer Technology in the Montessori Early Childhood Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Presents a draft for a principle-centered position statement of a Montessori early childhood program in central Pennsylvania, on the pros and cons of computer use in a Montessori 3-6 classroom. Includes computer software rating form. (Author/KB)

  4. Montessori Instruction: A Model for Inclusion in Early Childhood Classrooms and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ginger Kelley; Zascavage, Victoria S.

    2012-01-01

    Maria Montessori was one of the first special educators. In 1898, as an assistant instructor at the University of Rome's Psychiatric Clinic, Montessori visited an asylum for the "insane" and became interested in the children with special needs who were housed there. She noticed that the children were not being stimulated; learning was at a…

  5. Maria Montessori on the Natural Formation of Character in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Madonna

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines this issue of character formation from the perspective of Maria Montessori. Her method has much to offer in developing more peaceful classrooms and helping to develop compassionate and caring citizens. Maria Montessori developed a complete philosophy of education based on her discovery that the child has a mind able to absorb…

  6. Montessori Early Childhood Teacher Perceptions of Family Priorities and Stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Epstein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Teachers of young children work closely with families. One component of teacher-family partnerships is teachers’ understanding of family priorities and stressors. This study examines Montessori early childhood (ages three through six teacher perceptions of family priorities and stressors through an analysis of responses to two parallel surveys.  Eighty teachers (37% of those who received the survey and forty-nine family members (representing a 55% response rate completed the survey.  Significant differences were found between teachers’ perceptions of four (of seven family priorities and families’ actual responses. Teachers ranked “making academic progress” as the most important of seven possible family priorities. However, families stated that “developing kindness” is the most important priority for their young children. No significant differences were found when comparing teacher rankings of family stressors with actual family responses. Montessori early childhood teachers ranked “not having enough time” as the most stressful of six possible stressors. Families confirmed that time pressures cause them the most stress. Maria Montessori’s recommendations for teachers and families are summarized. Recommendations for building stronger family partnerships in the context of Montessori’s philosophy, for example on-going self-reflection, are provided.             Keywords: Montessori, teacher-family partnerships, early childhood teacher perceptions

  7. Social Justice Education in an Urban Charter Montessori School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Banks

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As the Montessori Method continues its expansion in public education, a social justice lens is needed to analyze its contributions and limitations, given the increase in racial and socioeconomic diversity in the United States. Furthermore, much of the work in Social Justice Education (SJE focuses on classroom techniques and curriculum, overlooking the essential work of school administrators and parents, whose work significantly influences the school community. The current study applied an SJE framework to the efforts of one urban, socioeconomically and racially integrated Montessori charter school. We examined the extent to which SJE principles were incorporated across the school community, using an inductive, qualitative, case-study approach that included meetings, surveys, focus groups, and interviews. Administrators quickly adopted a system-wide approach, but parents—often color-blind or minimizing of the relevance of race—consistently resisted. Study results imply a continued need for an institutional approach, not solely a classroom or curricular focus, when integrating social justice into Montessori schools.

  8. Technology in the Montessori Classroom: Teachers’ Beliefs and Technology Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jolly Jones

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As technology becomes ubiquitous in society, there is increasing momentum to incorporate it into education. Montessori education is not immune to this push for technology integration. This qualitative study investigates four Upper Elementary Montessori teachers’ attitudes toward technology and technology integration in a public school setting. Interviews and observations were used to understand the teachers’ thoughts and actions regarding technology in the classroom. Both the school context and teacher background played important roles in teachers’ beliefs and actions. Teachers in this study expressed positive views of technology in general, exhibiting high technology efficacy and valuing the development of technology skills in their students. However, all four teachers struggled to include instructional technology in ways that are consistent with a Montessori paradigm. Although individual student use of adaptive tutoring software was the most common use of technology, the teachers varied greatly in both the amount of student time spent on computers and the roles that technology played in their classrooms.

  9. Students of Color and Public Montessori Schools: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Debs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Students of color comprise a majority in public Montessori school enrollments around the United States, and practitioners are often asked for evidence of the Montessori Method’s benefits for these students. This article examines the relevant literature related to the experiences of students of color in public Montessori schools. Research finds Montessori education offers both opportunities and limitations for students of color in attending diverse schools, developing executive functions, achieving academically, accessing early childhood education and culturally responsive education, minimizing racially disproportionate discipline, and limiting overidentification for special education. Public Montessori education’s efficacy with students of color may be limited by several factors: the lack of diversity of the teaching staff and culturally responsive teacher education, schools that struggle to maintain racially diverse enrollments, and the challenge of communicating Montessori’s benefits to families with alternative views of education. The review concludes with directions for future research.

  10. Using a Montessori method to increase eating ability for institutionalised residents with dementia: a crossover design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Chan; Huang, Ya-Ju; Watson, Roger; Wu, Shiao-Chi; Lee, Yue-Chune

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy of applying a Montessori intervention to improve the eating ability and nutritional status of residents with dementia in long-term care facilities. An early intervention for eating difficulties in patients with dementia can give them a better chance of maintaining independence and reduce the risk of malnutrition. An experimental crossover design was employed. Twenty-nine residents were chosen from two dementia special care units in metropolitan Taipei. To avoid contamination between participants in units using both Montessori and control interventions, two dementia special care units were randomly assigned into Montessori intervention (I1) and routine activities (I2) sequence groups. A two-period crossover design was used, with 15 residents assigned to Montessori intervention sequence I (I1, I2) and 14 residents assigned to Montessori intervention sequence II (I2, I1). On each intervention day, residents were given their assigned intervention. Montessori intervention was provided in 30-min sessions once every day, three days per week, for eight weeks. There was a two-week washout period between each intervention. There was a significant reduction in the Edinburgh Feeding Evaluation in Dementia score for the Montessori intervention period but not for the routine activities period, while the mean differences for the Eating Behavior Scale score, self-feeding frequency and self-feeding time were significantly higher than those of the routine activities period. Except for the Mini-Nutritional Assessment score post-test being significantly less than the pre-test for the routine activities period, no significant differences for any other variables were found for the routine activities period. This study confirms the efficacy of a Montessori intervention protocol on eating ability of residents with dementia. Adopting Montessori intervention protocols to maintain residents' self-feeding ability in clinical practice is recommended. Montessori

  11. A Systematic Review of Montessori-Based Activities for Persons With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Christine L; McArthur, Caitlin; Hitzig, Sander L

    2016-02-01

    Montessori-based activities are becoming a popular approach for the care of older adults living with dementia. The aim of this study was to systematically assess the quality of the research examining the benefits of Montessori-based activities for persons with dementia. Six peer-reviewed databases were systematically searched for all relevant articles published until April 2015. Included articles were peer-reviewed studies published in English that employed Montessori-based activities with persons with dementia. Methodological quality was assessed by 2 independent raters using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale or the Downs and Black evaluation tool. Levels of evidence were assigned to the study design using a modified Sackett scale. One hundred fifty articles were identified, and 14 were selected for inclusion. Level-2 evidence examining the impact of Montessori-based activities on eating behaviors suggested that difficulties with eating could be reduced with Montessori training. There was limited level-4 evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on cognition, wherein benefits appeared to be specific to lower-level cognitive abilities including memory and attention. Finally, there is level-1 (n = 1), level-2 (n = 3), and level-4 (n = 6) evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on engagement and affect, whereby constructive engagement and positive affect were heightened. Overall, there is a strong level of evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on eating behaviors and weak evidence for the benefits on cognition. Evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on engagement and affect are mixed. Future research is needed to examine the long-term benefits of Montessori-based activities. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. "It's What We Use as a Community": Exploring Students' STEM Characterizations In Two Montessori Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostkowski, Alaina Hopkins

    Integrated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education promises to enhance elementary students' engagement in science and related fields and to cultivate their problem-solving abilities. While STEM has become an increasingly popular reform initiative, it is still developing within the Montessori education community. There is limited research on STEM teaching and learning in Montessori classrooms, particularly from student perspectives. Previous studies suggest productive connections between reform-based pedagogies in mainstream science education and the Montessori method. Greater knowledge of this complementarity, and student perspectives on STEM, may benefit both Montessori and non-Montessori educators. This instrumental case study of two elementary classrooms documented student characterizations of aspects of STEM in the context of integrated STEM instruction over three months in the 2016-2017 school year. Findings show that the Montessori environment played an important role, and that students characterized STEM in inclusive, agentive, connected, helpful, creative, and increasingly critical ways. Implications for teaching and future research offer avenues to envision STEM education more holistically by leveraging the moral and humanistic aspects of Montessori philosophy.

  13. Objectively measured sedentary behavior in preschool children: comparison between Montessori and traditional preschools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Wonwoo; Blair, Steven N; Pate, Russell R

    2013-01-03

    This study aimed to compare the levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior in children attending Montessori preschools with those attending traditional preschools. The participants in this study were preschool children aged 4 years old who were enrolled in Montessori and traditional preschools. The preschool children wore ActiGraph accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized using 15-second intervals and sedentary behavior was defined as Montessori preschools, after adjusting for selected potential correlates of preschoolers' sedentary behavior. Children attending Montessori preschools spent less time in sedentary behavior than those attending traditional preschools during the in-school (44.4. min/hr vs. 47.1 min/hr, P = 0.03), after-school (42.8. min/hr vs. 44.7 min/hr, P = 0.04), and total-day (43.7 min/hr vs. 45.5 min/hr, P = 0. 009) periods. School type (Montessori or traditional), preschool setting (private or public), socio-demographic factors (age, gender, and socioeconomic status) were found to be significant predictors of preschoolers' sedentary behavior. Levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior were significantly lower among children attending Montessori preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools. Future research should examine the specific characteristics of Montessori preschools that predict the lower levels of sedentary behavior among children attending these preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools.

  14. Maria Montessori, John Dewey, and William H. Kilpatrick

    OpenAIRE

    Thayer-Bacon, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    I explore Montessori’s story in terms of her initial warm reception by America to her educational research, and her later cooling off, once Dewey’s student, Kilpatrick, published The Montessori System Examined and declared her work to be based on psychological theory that was fifty years behind the times. I argue that there is a troubling gendered side to Montessori’s story that affected her in significant ways and still lingers and limits her contribution to educational theory, and for my pu...

  15. La Società Umanitaria e la diffusione del Metodo Montessori (1908-1923

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    Irene Pozzi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Società Umanitaria ofMilan, between 1918 and 1923, played an essential role in spreading and developing the Montessori Method. Studying in the Historical Archive of Società Umanitaria the numerous documents there collected, the author reconstructed the crucial moments of the extremely significant collaboration between Maria Montessori and Augusto Osimo, General Secretary of the Società Umanitaria.This complex and in-depth investigation was guided by the analysis, in specific, of the training courses for Montessori teachers organised by Società Umanitaria, essentially unexamined before this study, that allowed the researcher to have a deep insight into the action of Società Umanitaria aimed to promote and implement the Montessori Method in Italy and all around the world.

  16. Historical and Theoretical Study of the Use of the Montessori Cylinder Block as a Screening Test Instrument for Developmental Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    我妻, 則明; AZUMA, Noriaki

    1994-01-01

    Studies investigating mental development screening tests and the Montessori cylinderblock were described. The theoretical possibility was discussed for the use of theMontessori cylinder block B type as a mental development screening test instrument.It was a theoretically unique idea to use the Montessori cylinder block B type as ascreening test instrument in measuring the child's mental development. As a result ofresearching previous studies, not only in Japan but also in other countries, the...

  17. Examining a Public Montessori School’s Response to the Pressures of High-Stakes Accountability

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    Corrie Rebecca Block

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to succeed in the current school assessment and accountability era, a public Montessori school is expected to achieve high student scores on standardized assessments. A problem for a public Montessori elementary school is how to make sense of the school’s high-stakes assessment scores in terms of its unique educational approach. This case study examined a public Montessori elementary school’s efforts as the school implemented the Montessori Method within the accountability era. The research revealed the ways the principal, teachers, and parents on the school council modified Montessori practices, curriculum, and assessment procedures based on test scores. A quality Montessori education is designed to offer children opportunities to develop both cognitive skills and affective components such as student motivation and socio-emotional skills that will serve them beyond their public school experiences. Sadly, the high-stakes testing environment influences so much of public education today. When quality education was measured through only one narrow measure of success the result in this school was clearly a restriction of priorities to areas that were easily assessed.

  18. Objectively measured sedentary behavior in preschool children: comparison between Montessori and traditional preschools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byun Wonwoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to compare the levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior in children attending Montessori preschools with those attending traditional preschools. Methods The participants in this study were preschool children aged 4 years old who were enrolled in Montessori and traditional preschools. The preschool children wore ActiGraph accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized using 15-second intervals and sedentary behavior was defined as Results Children attending Montessori preschools spent less time in sedentary behavior than those attending traditional preschools during the in-school (44.4. min/hr vs. 47.1 min/hr, P = 0.03, after-school (42.8. min/hr vs. 44.7 min/hr, P = 0.04, and total-day (43.7 min/hr vs. 45.5 min/hr, P = 0. 009 periods. School type (Montessori or traditional, preschool setting (private or public, socio-demographic factors (age, gender, and socioeconomic status were found to be significant predictors of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Conclusions Levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior were significantly lower among children attending Montessori preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools. Future research should examine the specific characteristics of Montessori preschools that predict the lower levels of sedentary behavior among children attending these preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools.

  19. An Intervention Study: Removing Supplemented Materials from Montessori Classrooms Associated with Better Child Outcomes

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    Angeline S Lillard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Montessori classrooms vary a good deal in implementation, and one way in which implementation differs is the provision of materials.  Specifically, some classrooms use only Montessori materials, whereas others supplement the Montessori materials with commercially available materials like puzzles and games.  A prior study suggested this might be a reason for observed differences across studies and classrooms (Author, 2012 but an intervention study is the best test.  The present study presents such an intervention with 52 children in 3 Montessori classrooms with Supplementary materials. All children were given 6 pretests, and non-Montessori materials were removed from 2 of the classrooms.  Four months later, children were retested to see how much they changed across that period.  Children in the classrooms from which the non-Montessori materials were removed advanced significantly more in early reading and executive function, and to some degree advanced more in early math.  There were no differences across the classroom types in amount of change on the tests of vocabulary, social knowledge, or social skills.

  20. Způsoby prezentace učiva matematiky v 7. třídě Montessori školy

    OpenAIRE

    Vernerová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    The thesis called The Ways of Presentation of Mathematics in the 7th Grade of Montessori School provides with a description and detailed analysis of Montessori principles with regards to their use and fulfilling tasks during lessons of mathematics at Montessori Schools. Its further aim is to check out in the course of lessons if the three Montessori principles - discovering of facts by an individual, work with mistake and individual approach - are being applied during the presentations of new...

  1. Využití pomůcek systému pedagogiky Marie Montessori u osob s Downovým syndromem.

    OpenAIRE

    Bejšáková, Kristina

    2018-01-01

    This thesis examines how can Montessori teaching aids be used for educating persons with Down syndrome. It describes Down syndrome and mental disability that is associated with it, listing also the options for educating persons with Down syndrome by development stage. It provides an overview of Montessori pedagogics, its history, concepts and principles, and its status in the Czech Republic. It classifies Montessori pedagogics in terms of general didactics theory, and introduces Montessori th...

  2. Maria Montessori e seu método

    OpenAIRE

    Suelu Pereira Costa, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Neste artigo, a autora desenvolve reflexões sobre o Método Montessori, que há um século, por volta de 1907, já propunha uma educação libertadora para a criança, valorizando-a como um ser pensante e capaz de responder aos apelos do real, visando a formação de uma personalidade autônoma e do Homem Consciente. Esse método, além de adotar uma perpectiva filosófica e metodológica para atender a criança, construindo materiais pedagógicos específicos e estratégias pcdagógicas. introduz a a "Linh...

  3. Using spaced retrieval and Montessori-based activities in improving eating ability for residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Chan; Huang, Ya-Ju; Su, Su-Gen; Watson, Roger; Tsai, Belina W-J; Wu, Shiao-Chi

    2010-10-01

    To construct a training protocol for spaced retrieval (SR) and to investigate the effectiveness of SR and Montessori-based activities in decreasing eating difficulty in older residents with dementia. A single evaluator, blind, and randomized control trial was used. Eighty-five residents with dementia were chosen from three special care units for residents with dementia in long-term care facilities in Taiwan. To avoid any confounding of subjects, the three institutions were randomized into three groups: spaced retrieval, Montessori-based activities, and a control group. The invention consisted of three 30-40 min sessions per week, for 8 weeks. After receiving the intervention, the Edinburgh Feeding Evaluation in Dementia (EdFED) scores and assisted feeding scores for the SR and Montessori-based activity groups were significantly lower than that of the control group. However, the frequencies of physical assistance and verbal assistance for the Montessori-based activity group after intervention were significantly higher than that of the control group, which suggests that residents who received Montessori-based activity need more physical and verbal assistance during mealtimes. In terms of the effects of nutritional status after intervention, Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) in the SR group was significantly higher than that of the control group. This study confirms the efficacy of SR and Montessori-based activities for eating difficulty and eating ability. A longitudinal study to follow the long-term effects of SR and Montessori-based activities on eating ability and nutritional status is recommended. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Research on Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing for the Spaceborne Sliding Spotlight Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Shijian Shen; Xin Nie; Xinggan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Gaofen-3 (GF-3) is China’ first C-band multi-polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite, which also provides the sliding spotlight mode for the first time. Sliding-spotlight mode is a novel mode to realize imaging with not only high resolution, but also wide swath. Several key technologies for sliding spotlight mode in spaceborne SAR with high resolution are investigated in this paper, mainly including the imaging parameters, the methods of velocity estimation and ambiguity elimina...

  5. Racial Discipline Disproportionality in Montessori and Traditional Public Schools: A Comparative Study Using the Relative Rate Index

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    Katie E. Brown

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Research from the past 40 years indicates that African American students are subjected to exclusionary discipline, including suspension and expulsion, at rates two to three times higher than their White peers (Children’s Defense Fund, 1975; Skiba, Michael, Nardo, & Peterson, 2002. Although this phenomenon has been studied extensively in traditional public schools, rates of racially disproportionate discipline in public Montessori schools have not been examined. The purpose of this study is to examine racial discipline disproportionality in Montessori public elementary schools as compared to traditional elementary schools. The Relative Rate Index (RRI is used as a measure of racially disproportionate use of out-of-school suspensions (Tobin & Vincent, 2011. Suspension data from the Office of Civil Rights Data Collection was used to generate RRIs for Montessori and traditional elementary schools in a large urban district in the Southeast. While statistically significant levels of racial discipline disproportionality are found in both the Montessori and traditional schools, the effect is substantially less pronounced in Montessori settings. These findings suggest that Montessori schools are not immune to racially disproportionate discipline and should work to incorporate more culturally responsive classroom management techniques. Conversely, the lower levels of racially disproportionate discipline in the Montessori schools suggests that further study of discipline in Montessori environments may provide lessons for traditional schools to promote equitable discipline.

  6. Aspects That Arise in the Transition from the Montessori Method to a Traditional Method: A Fourth Grade Mathematics View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurdle, Zachariah B.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the dissertation is to investigate three particular aspects that may affect the transition between a third grade Montessori system and a fourth grade non-Montessori system, specifically within the context of teaching and learning mathematics. These aspects are 1) the change in pacing and structure of the classroom, 2) the removal of…

  7. Assessment of capabilities in persons with advanced stage of dementia: Validation of The Montessori Assessment System (MAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkes, Jérôme; Camp, Cameron J; Raffard, Stéphane; Gély-Nargeot And, Marie-Christine; Bayard, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the validity and reliability of the Montessori Assessment System. The Montessori Assessment System assesses preserved abilities in persons with moderate to severe dementia. In this respect, this instrument provides crucial information for the development of effective person-centered care plans. A total of 196 persons with a diagnosis of dementia in the moderate to severe stages of dementia were recruited in 10 long-term care facilities in France. All participants completed the Montessori Assessment System, the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale and/or the Mini Mental State Examination and the Severe Impairment Battery-short form. The internal consistency and temporal stability of the Montessori Assessment System were high. Additionally, good construct and divergent validity were demonstrated. Factor analysis showed a one-factor structure. The Montessori Assessment System demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties while being a useful instrument to assess capabilities in persons with advanced stages of dementia and hence to develop person-centered plans of care.

  8. La evaluación docente en la pedagogía Montessori: propuesta de un instrumento A avaliação docente na pedagogia Montessori: proposta de um instrumento Teacher Evaluation in Montessori Education: A Proposed Tool

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    Ana María Mendoza-Páez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue el diseño, la construcción y la validación del contenido de un instrumento que permita evaluar el desempeño docente en un colegio con metodología Montessori. Dicho instrumento se validó a través del método de jueces expertos en relación con la pertinencia, coherencia y redacción de cada ítem (participaron tres jueces; la fiabilidad de los jueces se obtuvo a través del coeficiente de concordancia o índice kappa, el cual puntuó alto (total acuerdo. Conforme a los resultados se eliminaron 27 ítems de los 102 propuestos, y quedaron 75 en el instrumento de aplicación. El instrumento contiene las dimensiones del ser, saber, saber hacer y saber comprender del docente. Posteriormente se hizo una aplicación piloto a los 30 participantes, los cuales pertenecen al colegio Montessori British School, institución que utiliza como pedagogía el método Montessori. En el análisis de la consistencia interna, obtenida por los índices alfa de Cronbach, estos fueron altos en todas las dimensiones evaluadas (promedio .88.Neste artigo, o objetivo foi desenhar, construir e validar o contido de um instrumento que permita avaliar o desempenho docente em uma escola com pedagogia Montessori. Esse instrumento foi validado pelo método de juízes expertos em quanto pertinência, coerência e redação de cada item (participaram três juízes. A fiabilidade dos juízes foi lograda mediante o coeficiente de concordância ou índice de kappa, o qual pontuou alto (acordo total. Seguindo os resultados, foram eliminados 27 itens dos 102 propostos. Os outros 75 permaneceram no instrumento de aplicação. O instrumento contem as dimensões do ser, saber, saber fazer e saber compreender do docente. Depois foi feita uma aplicação piloto aos 30 participantes, pertencentes à escola Montessori British School, instituição que emprega o método Montessori. Na análise da consistência interna, obtida mediante os índices alfa

  9. Método de Montessori aplicado à demência: revisão da literatura Método Montessori aplicado a la demencia: revisión de la literatura Montessori Method applied to dementia: literature review

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    Daniela Filipa Soares Brandão

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O método de Montessori foi aplicado inicialmente às crianças, mas atualmente aplica-se a pessoas com demência. O objetivo deste trabalho é fazer uma revisão sistemática da investigação sobre a eficácia desse método, utilizando a Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline com as palavras-chave demência e método de Montessori. Foram selecionados 10 estudos, onde se verificam melhorias significativas na participação e no envolvimento construtivo e diminuição dos afectos negativos e do envolvimento passivo. Não obstante, as revisões da literatura acerca desta intervenção não farmacológica em demência classificam esse método como fraco, em termos de eficácia. Essa aparente discrepância pode explicar-se porque o método de Montessori pode ter, de fato, uma influência pouco significativa em dimensões como a dos problemas comportamentais ou porque não existe investigação acerca desse método com elevados níveis de controle como são a presença de vários grupos de controle ou o duplo-cego.El método Montessori se aplicó inicialmente a los niños, pero ahora se aplica a las personas con demencia. El propósito de este estudio es revisar de forma sistemática la investigación sobre la eficacia de este método, utilizando Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline con las palabras clave demencia y método Montessori. Se seleccionaron 10 estudios, que tienen mejoras significativas en la participación y en el compromiso constructivo, y la reducción de efectos negativos y de la participación pasiva. Sin embargo, la revisión de la literatura sobre esta intervención no farmacológica en la demencia clasifica este método como débil en términos de eficacia. Esta aparente discrepancia puede explicarse porque el método Montessori puede tener una influencia poco significativa en los problemas de conducta, o porque no hay investigación sobre este método con altos niveles de

  10. Science and culture around the Montessori's first "Children's Houses" in Rome (1907-1915).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschi, Renato

    2008-01-01

    Between 1907 and 1908, Maria Montessori's (1870-1952) educational method was elaborated at the Children's Houses of the San Lorenzo district in Rome. This pioneering experience was the basis for the international fame that came to Montessori after the publication of her 1909 volume dedicated to her "Method." The "Montessori Method" was considered by some to be scientific, liberal, and revolutionary. The present article focuses upon the complex contexts of the method's elaboration. It shows how the Children's Houses developed in relation to a particular scientific and cultural eclecticism. It describes the factors that both favored and hindered the method's elaboration, by paying attention to the complex network of social, institutional, and scientific relationships revolving around the figure of Maria Montessori. A number of "contradictory" dimensions of Montessori's experience are also examined with a view to helping to revise her myth and offering the image of a scholar who was a real early-twentieth-century prototype of a "multiple" behavioral scientist. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Financial Management System: A Pivotal Tool for Fiscal Viability. CDS Spotlight. ECAR Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 CDS to better understand how higher education institutions approach financial management systems. Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of Core Data Service (CDS), which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from 525 institutions…

  12. BI Reporting, Data Warehouse Systems, and Beyond. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service [CDS] to better understand how higher education institutions approach business intelligence (BI) reporting and data warehouse systems (see the Sidebar for definitions). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of CDS, which contains several questions regarding…

  13. Maximize Institutional Relationships with CRMs. CDS Spotlight Report. ECAR Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach customer relationship management (CRM) systems. Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data survey, which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  14. Escuela integral de desarrollo de liderazgo (EIDL) para el colegio Montessori

    OpenAIRE

    Velasquez Zapata, Margarita Maria

    2013-01-01

    El propósito de este trabajo es plantear el desarrollo de una escuela de liderazgo para jóvenes preadolescentes y adolescentes del Colegio Montessori, institución de carácter privado, con sede en Medellín. El colegio está centrado en el planteamiento de un proyecto en la temática del liderazgo escolar, a partir del diseño de un programa de desarrollo de liderazgo para jóvenes del Colegio Montessori de Medellín, teniendo en cuenta los elementos conceptuales, procedimentales y estratégicos ...

  15. Maria Montessori (1870-1952): Women's emancipation, pedagogy and extra verbal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Maria Montessori is one of the most well-known women in Italian history. Although she was the first woman who graduated in medicine in Italy, she is mostly known as an educator. Her teaching method--the Montessori Method- is still used worldwide--Because she could not speak English during the imprisonment in India, there was a big obstacle for her communication with children. However, the need to adopt a non-verbal communication, led her to a sensational discovery: children use an innate and universal language. This language, made of gestures and mimic, is called extra verbal communication.

  16. La progettazione di nuovi spazi educativi per l’infanzia: da Ellen Key a Maria Montessori

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    Tiziana Pironi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The essay presents a comparison between the thought of Ellen Key and that of Maria Montessori. Changes that involved the role of women, caught in its interdependence with the development of new educational practices, were the center of the theoretical contribution of Ellen Key. Maria Montessori believed that only women work outside the home would guarantee the economic independence necessary to form a union on sentiment rather than on utilitarian calculations and therefore she did not seem to share the concerns of the Key on an increasingly massive female entry into the world of work. The paper offers an updated reflection on the work of two scholars of education.

  17. What Makes Mathematics Manipulatives Effective? Lessons From Cognitive Science and Montessori Education

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    Elida V. Laski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Manipulatives are ubiquitous in early childhood classrooms; yet, findings regarding their efficacy for learning mathematics concepts are inconsistent. In this article, we present four general principles that have emerged from cognitive science about ways to ensure that manipulatives promote learning when used with young children. We also describe how Montessori instruction offers a concrete example of the application of these principles in practice, which may, in turn, explain the high levels of mathematics achievement among children who attend Montessori programs during early childhood. The general principles and concrete examples presented in this article should help early childhood programs maximize the benefits of using manipulatives for developmentally appropriate mathematics instruction.

  18. The Intelligent Search: Some Considerations on the Mon-tessori Method

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    Rossella Certini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author, on the assumption that «the Montessori “method” still today arouses much debate», reads some key points of her educational project. At the center of the reflection is, again, the scientific mind of the child, which is the key tool to learn how-experiment with the many dimensions of life. The Montessori method is still widely used in many parts of the world for its principles of democracy and active experience and the author explores some of the motivations behind these choices.

  19. Using acupressure and Montessori-based activities to decrease agitation for residents with dementia: a cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Chan; Yang, Man-Hua; Kao, Chieh-Chun; Wu, Shiao-Chi; Tang, Sai-Hung; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2009-06-01

    To explore the effectiveness of acupressure and Montessori-based activities in decreasing the agitated behaviors of residents with dementia. A double-blinded, randomized (two treatments and one control; three time periods) cross-over design was used. Six special care units for residents with dementia in long-term care facilities in Taiwan were the sites for the study. One hundred thirty-three institutionalized residents with dementia. Subjects were randomized into three treatment sequences: acupressure-presence-Montessori methods, Montessori methods-acupressure-presence and presence-Montessori methods-acupressure. All treatments were done once a day, 6 days per week, for a 4-week period. The Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, Ease-of-Care, and the Apparent Affect Rating Scale. After receiving the intervention, the acupressure and Montessori-based-activities groups saw a significant decrease in agitated behaviors, aggressive behaviors, and physically nonaggressive behaviors than the presence group. Additionally, the ease-of-care ratings for the acupressure and Montessori-based-activities groups were significantly better than for the presence group. In terms of apparent affect, positive affect in the Montessori-based-activities group was significantly better than in the presence group. This study confirms that a blending of traditional Chinese medicine and a Western activities program would be useful in elderly care and that in-service training for formal caregivers in the use of these interventions would be beneficial for patients

  20. Implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzig, Sander L; Sheppard, Christine L

    2017-10-01

    A scoping review was conducted to develop an understanding of Montessori-based programing (MBP) approaches used in dementia care and to identify optimal ways to implement these programs across various settings. Six peer-reviewed databases were searched for relevant abstracts by 2 independent reviewers. Included articles and book chapters were those available in English and published by the end of January 2016. Twenty-three articles and 2 book chapters met the inclusion criteria. Four approaches to implementing MBP were identified: (a) staff assisted (n = 14); (b) intergenerational (n = 5); (c) resident assisted (n = 4); and (d) volunteer or family assisted (n = 2). There is a high degree of variability with how MBP was delivered and no clearly established "best practices" or standardized protocol emerged across approaches except for resident-assisted MBP. The findings from this scoping review provide an initial road map on suggestions for implementing MBP across dementia care settings. Irrespective of implementation approach, there are several pragmatic and logistical issues that need to be taken into account for optimal implementation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Research Skills for the Future: Research Workforce Under the Spotlight

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    Eva Dobozy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The value and training needs of the future research workforce is under the spotlight. In this article, I take up Ulrich and Dash's (2013 somewhat provocative invitation to engage in discussion and debate about current and future research. In my three-tiered response, I first discuss Ulrich and Dash's article, followed by my own observations about the APEC/Deloitte (2010 research report: "Skills and Competencies Needed in the Research Field: Objectives 2020," and finally, I explore, in some detail, challenges of building a twentyfirst-century research workforce.

  2. Montessori-based activities for long-term care residents with advanced dementia: effects on engagement and affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsulic-Jeras, S; Judge, K S; Camp, C J

    2000-02-01

    Sixteen residents in long-term care with advanced dementia (14 women; average age = 88) showed significantly more constructive engagement (defined as motor or verbal behaviors in response to an activity), less passive engagement (defined as passively observing an activity), and more pleasure while participating in Montessori-based programming than in regularly scheduled activities programming. Principles of Montessori-based programming, along with examples of such programming, are presented. Implications of the study and methods for expanding the use of Montessori-based dementia programming are discussed.

  3. The Epistemology behind the Educational Philosophy of Montessori: Senses, Concepts, and Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    This article seeks to re-introduce Dr. Maria Montessori's educational philosophy, which has been absent from modern philosophy of education literature. It describes and analyzes crucial aspects of her epistemology, as best known through her "Method." Discussed are the need for early education, the development of the senses, and the…

  4. How the Montessori Upper Elementary and Adolescent Environment Naturally Integrates Science, Mathematics, Technology, and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, John

    2016-01-01

    John McNamara shares his wisdom and humbly credits Camillo Grazzini, Jenny Höglund, and David Kahn for his growth in Montessori. Recognizing more than what he has learned from his mentors, he shares the lessons he has learned from his students themselves. Math, science, history, and language are so integrated in the curriculum that students…

  5. Using the Montessori approach for a clientele with cognitive impairments: a quasi-experimental study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Dominique; Robichaud, Line; Paradis, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The choice of activities responding to the needs of people with moderate to severe dementia is a growing concern for care providers trying to target the need for a feeling of self-accomplishment by adapting activities to the abilities of elderly patients. The activities created by Maria Montessori seem to be adaptable to this clientele. This study evaluates the short-term effects, as compared to regular activities offered in the milieu. This is a quasi-experimental study where each of the 14 participants was observed and filmed in two conditions: during Montessori activities, during regular activities, and one control condition (no activity). The results show that Montessori activities have a significant effect on affect and on participation in the activity. They support the hypothesis that when activities correspond to the needs and abilities of a person with dementia, these positive effects are also observed on behaviours. This study enabled its authors to corroborate the findings presented in the literature and to contribute additional elements on the positive effects of the use of Montessori activities and philosophy. Used with people with moderate to severe dementia these allow the satisfaction of their basic psychological needs, their well being, and hence, on their quality of life.

  6. The Effects of Music Instruction on Learning in the Montessori Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    The value of music in educating the young child is not being recognized, particularly in the area of mathematics. Despite the amount of literature available regarding the effects of music instruction on academic achievement, little has been written on different Montessori music pedagogies and their effects on students' math scores. This article…

  7. Longitudinal Academic Achievement Outcomes: Modeling the Growth Trajectories of Montessori Elementary Public School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Jan Davis

    2014-01-01

    Elementary education has theoretical underpinnings based on cognitive psychology. Ideas from cognitive psychologists such as James, Dewey, Piaget, and Vygotsky coalesce to form constructivism (Cooper, 1993; Yager, 2000; Yilmaz, 2011). Among others, the Montessori Method (1912/1964) is an exemplar of constructivism. Currently, public education in…

  8. Un-"Chartered" Waters: Balancing Montessori Curriculum and Accountability Measures in a Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    More than 6,000 charter schools exist in the United States, and of these 120 are Montessori charter schools. When studying charter school practices, researchers often examine issues such as performance accountability measures and effectiveness of charter school curricula. In doing so, the outcomes often overlook the challenges for teachers as they…

  9. The Effect of Steiner, Montessori, and National Curriculum Education upon Children's Pretence and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Julie Ann; Kidd, Evan

    2017-01-01

    Pretence and creativity are often regarded as ubiquitous characteristics of childhood, yet not all education systems value or promote these attributes to the same extent. Different pedagogies and practices are evident within the UK National Curriculum, Steiner and Montessori schools. In this study, 20 children participated from each of these…

  10. The Application of Montessori Method in Learning Mathematics: An Experimental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryadi, Qais

    2017-01-01

    The prime objective of this research was to investigate whether the Montessori method of learning helped kindergarten pupils improve their mathematical proficiency, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, besides training them to be responsible learners. Quantitative, qualitative, and observational methods were employed in the investigation.…

  11. Elementary Teachers' Perceptions of Mathematics Instruction in Montessori and Traditional Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofa, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Students in grades 3 and 4 attending a traditional public elementary school in a northeastern state did not meet proficiency levels in mathematics as measured by the state's assessment system. Published reports indicated that students attending the Montessori programs were more proficient in solving math problems compared to students in…

  12. John McDermott and the Road to Montessori Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povell, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author states that, for over 45 years, she has explored the issues of leadership and change, and, along the way, she has examined how diversity fits in with these ideas. She states that she found all three of these concepts embodied in the person of John McDermott, a leader in the American Montessori movement in the United…

  13. María Montessori y la educación cósmica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Morales Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La etapa de Montessori en la India fue uno de los periodos más enriquecedores en la vida de MariaMontessori. Allí escribió y publicó La Mente Absorbente del niño, y una serie de libros fundamentales. En suobra La educación de las potencialidades humanas desarrolló los principios de la “Educación Cósmica” queadaptó para el currículo de Primaria. Invitada en 1939 a dar unas conferencias en la India por el Presidente dela Sociedad Teosófica, Montessori y su hijo, se vieron atrapados por el estallido de la Segunda GuerraMundial, y su posterior desarrollo. Tenía 69 años cuando llegó a Madrás. Permaneció diez años. Pero nadasería igual que antes. Había una Montessori antes de la India, y otra mucho más profunda después. Cuandoregresaba a Europa declaró, a los que le preguntaban qué había hecho en la India: “creo que he aprendido aaprender, como el Niño”.

  14. The Effect of Montessori Method on Cognitive Tempo of Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayili, Gökhan

    2018-01-01

    This study was undertaken to discover the effect of the Montessori Method on the cognitive tempo of 4-5-year-old children. Using an experimental pre-test-post-test paired control group design, the study sample included 60 children attending Ihsan Dogramaci Applied Nursery School (affiliated to Selcuk University, Department of Health Sciences) in…

  15. The Montessori Experiment in Rhode Island (1913-1940): Tracing Theory to Implementation over 25 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Susan

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights archived documents pertaining to a 25-year experimental classroom implemented by Clara Craig, then supervisor of training at the Rhode Island Normal School. Craig is notable as she was the only participant in the first International Montessori Training Course in Rome, Italy, in 1913, to gain approval from the Rhode Island…

  16. Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by…

  17. Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in a Montessori Classroom: The Role of the Occupational Therapist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luborsky, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Barbabra Luborsky links the medical field and Montessori pedagogy to address atypical attention in children through the lens of the occupational therapist. She provides an overview of attention and sensory processing disorders and then informs about particular diagnoses, particularly ADHD and its comorbidity with other diagnoses. Her specific…

  18. Construction and Validation of a Holistic Education School Evaluation Tool Using Montessori Erdkinder Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setari, Anthony Philip

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct a holistic education school evaluation tool using Montessori Erdkinder principles, and begin the validation process of examining the proposed tool. This study addresses a vital need in the holistic education community for a school evaluation tool. The tool construction process included using Erdkinder…

  19. Homework Policy and Student Choice: Findings from a Montessori Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Catherine M.; Glaze, Nelda

    2017-01-01

    The use of homework has been a controversial topic in education for many years: what types of homework to give, how much, and how often. In previous years, Ocean Montessori School (a pseudonym), the site of this study, offered homework like that of traditional public schools, such as worksheets and rote skill practice. Feeling conflicted about the…

  20. Examination of the Effects of the Montessori Method on Preschool Children's Readiness to Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayili, Gokhan; Ari, Ramazan

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the Montessori Method on preschool children's readiness to primary education. The research group is composed of five-six year olds attending SU MEF Ihsan Dogramaci Application Nursery School in 2009-2010 school year in Selcuklu county of Konya. The participants composed of five-six year olds were unbiasedly…

  1. Hawaiian Culture-Based Education and the Montessori Approach: Overlapping Teaching Practices, Values, and Worldview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonleber, Nanette S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to investigate why the Montessori approach has been viewed as a culturally congruent educational model by some Hawaiian language immersion and culture-based (HLIC) educators and how aspects of it have been used in HLIC classrooms. Data collection included semi-structured interviews and focus group…

  2. Social Work in Family Life Enrichment: The Children of Alcoholics--A Montessori Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald-Jay, Celynn

    1978-01-01

    If the children of alcoholics are to break the alcoholic life style cycle, they must develop their potential for creativity, initiative, independence, inner discipline, and self confidence. The Montessori approach is particularly successful in achieving these qualities in children and in promoting parenting skills in alcoholic parents. (Author/GC)

  3. Using the Montessori Approach for a Clientele with Cognitive Impairments: A Quasi-Experimental Study Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Dominique; Robichaud, Line; Paradis, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background: The choice of activities responding to the needs of people with moderate to severe dementia is a growing concern for care providers trying to target the need for a feeling of self-accomplishment by adapting activities to the abilities of elderly patients. The activities created by Maria Montessori seem to be adaptable to this…

  4. Theories of Childhood: An Introduction to Dewey, Montessori, Erikson, Piaget & Vygotsky, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Carol Garhart

    2013-01-01

    This best-selling resource provides clear, straightforward introductions to the foundational theories of John Dewey, Maria Montessori, Erik Erikson, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky. Each chapter highlights a theorist's work and includes insight on how the theory impacts teaching young children today. Discussion questions and suggested readings are…

  5. A New Model for Service Projects: Bringing Power up Gambia to Wilmington Montessori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Susan Hanway; Zankowsky, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Maria Montessori understood that, innately, children feel connected to humanity, and recognized that children appreciate opportunities to serve others. This is an important connection that parents and teachers need to continue to nourish in students, providing opportunities for those meaningful connections. But what if, in addition to feeling good…

  6. Voicing Others’ Voices: Spotlighting the Researcher as Narrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan O’SULLIVAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As qualitative research undertakings are not independent of the researcher, the “indissoluble interrelationship between interpreter and interpretation” (Thomas & James, 2006, p. 782 renders it necessary for researchers to understand that their text is a representation, a version of the truth that is the product of writerly choices, and that it is discursive. Endlessly creative, artistic and political, as there is no single interpretative truth, the interpretative process facilitates the refashioning of representations, the remaking of choices and the probing of discourses. As a consequence of the particularity of any researcher’s account, issues pertaining to researcher identity and authorial stance always remain central to research endeavours (Kamler & Thomson, 2006, p. 68; Denzin & Lincoln 2011, pp. 14-15. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to be reflexive about their analyses and research accounts (Elliott, 2005, p. 152, as reflexivity helps spotlight the role of the researcher as narrator. In turn, spotlighting the researcher as narrator foregrounds a range of complex issues about voice, representation and interpretive authority (Chase, 2005, p. 657; Genishi & Glupczynski, 2006, p. 671; Eisenhart, 2006. In essence, therefore, this paper is reflective of the challenges of “doing” qualitative research in educational settings. Its particular focus-the shaping of beginning primary teachers’ identities, in Ireland, throughout the course of their initial year of occupational experience, post-graduation- endeavours to highlight issues pertaining to the researcher as narrator (O’Sullivan, 2014.

  7. Spotlighting quantum critical points via quantum correlations at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werlang, T.; Ribeiro, G. A. P.; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    We extend the program initiated by T. Werlang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 095702 (2010)] in several directions. Firstly, we investigate how useful quantum correlations, such as entanglement and quantum discord, are in the detection of critical points of quantum phase transitions when the system is at finite temperatures. For that purpose we study several thermalized spin models in the thermodynamic limit, namely, the XXZ model, the XY model, and the Ising model, all of which with an external magnetic field. We compare the ability of quantum discord, entanglement, and some thermodynamic quantities to spotlight the quantum critical points for several different temperatures. Secondly, for some models we go beyond nearest neighbors and also study the behavior of entanglement and quantum discord for second nearest neighbors around the critical point at finite temperature. Finally, we furnish a more quantitative description of how good all these quantities are in spotlighting critical points of quantum phase transitions at finite T, bridging the gap between experimental data and those theoretical descriptions solely based on the unattainable absolute zero assumption.

  8. Using frequency-scaling approach to process squint-mode spotlight SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinping; Mao, Shiyi; Liu, Zhongkan; Hong, Wen Q.

    2001-08-01

    Frequency scaling approach is a new spotlight SAR image formation algorithm. It precisely performs the range cell migration correction for dechirped raw data without interpolation by using a novel frequency scaling operation while residual video phase is corrected simultaneously. The computation requirements are lower than the other spotlight SAR image formation approaches such as polar format algorithm and range migration algorithm. In this paper, frequency scaling algorithm is applied to process high squint spotlight data. The new squint illumination geometry is defined and some modifications to the basic algorithm are presented. Point target simulations up to 45 deg squint angle are carried out to show the validity of the algorithm.

  9. Faktory ovlivňující umístění dítěte do Montessori školky

    OpenAIRE

    SMÉKALOVÁ, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with the search of motives that lead parents to search for alternative pre-school facilities for their child. In particular, in kindergarten Vlasim. In the theory section I describe Montessori pedagogy but I also mention the foundress Maria Montessori. In the next chapter I introduce the blue Montessori classroom in the kindergarten Vorlina. In later chapter, I address motivation as a psychological phenomenon. This section concludes a description of used methodology which is...

  10. [The significance of the Montessori method and phenomenon with a particular view to the therapy of the aphasics (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchmeier-Nussbaumer, A K

    1980-05-01

    The methods of the Italian physician Maria Montessori influenced the development of modern learning practices. There is general agreement that the Montessori phenomenon is personality forming. Aspects of this method, which are relevant for the rehabilitation of the brain-damaged and, in particular, the aphasics are presented. Possible shifts of emphasis within the relationship therapist - method - patient are analysed. Examples are used to outline in how far an increasingly patient-oriented therapy can influence the development of the aphasic patient.

  11. Research on Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing for the Spaceborne Sliding Spotlight Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijian Shen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaofen-3 (GF-3 is China’ first C-band multi-polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR satellite, which also provides the sliding spotlight mode for the first time. Sliding-spotlight mode is a novel mode to realize imaging with not only high resolution, but also wide swath. Several key technologies for sliding spotlight mode in spaceborne SAR with high resolution are investigated in this paper, mainly including the imaging parameters, the methods of velocity estimation and ambiguity elimination, and the imaging algorithms. Based on the chosen Convolution BackProjection (CBP and PFA (Polar Format Algorithm imaging algorithms, a fast implementation method of CBP and a modified PFA method suitable for sliding spotlight mode are proposed, and the processing flows are derived in detail. Finally, the algorithms are validated by simulations and measured data.

  12. Research on Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing for the Spaceborne Sliding Spotlight Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shijian; Nie, Xin; Zhang, Xinggan

    2018-02-03

    Gaofen-3 (GF-3) is China' first C-band multi-polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite, which also provides the sliding spotlight mode for the first time. Sliding-spotlight mode is a novel mode to realize imaging with not only high resolution, but also wide swath. Several key technologies for sliding spotlight mode in spaceborne SAR with high resolution are investigated in this paper, mainly including the imaging parameters, the methods of velocity estimation and ambiguity elimination, and the imaging algorithms. Based on the chosen Convolution BackProjection (CBP) and PFA (Polar Format Algorithm) imaging algorithms, a fast implementation method of CBP and a modified PFA method suitable for sliding spotlight mode are proposed, and the processing flows are derived in detail. Finally, the algorithms are validated by simulations and measured data.

  13. Convolution backprojection image reconstruction for spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M D; Jenkins, W K

    1992-01-01

    Convolution backprojection (CBP) image reconstruction has been proposed as a means of producing high-resolution synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images by processing data directly in the polar recording format which is the conventional recording format for spotlight mode SAR. The CBP algorithm filters each projection as it is recorded and then backprojects the ensemble of filtered projections to create the final image in a pixel-by-pixel format. CBP reconstruction produces high-quality images by handling the recorded data directly in polar format. The CBP algorithm requires only 1-D interpolation along the filtered projections to determine the precise values that must be contributed to the backprojection summation from each projection. The algorithm is thus able to produce higher quality images by eliminating the inaccuracies of 2-D interpolation, as well as using all the data recorded in the spectral domain annular sector more effectively. The computational complexity of the CBP algorithm is O(N (3)).

  14. Children’s stories in the educational theories of Ellen Key, Rudolf Steiner and Maria Montessori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Grandi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the educational value that Ellen Key (1849-1926, Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925 and Maria Montessori (1870-1952 attributed to children's stories. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century these three important authors contributed to the renewal of the educational theories and practices. They dedicated a part of their pedagogical reflections to the educational meanings of children's stories; consider, e.g., the many pages of Ellen Key on children's literature, the recommendations of Rudolf Steiner on the educational relevance of fairy tales and mythology or, finally, Maria Montessori's reflections on fairy tales. The article examines these ideas from a historical and pedagogical point of view.

  15. ERASMO PILOTTO AND THE USE OF MONTESSORI METHOD IN THE LITERACY IN PARANÁ

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Simone Ballmann

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the accomplished use of Montessori literacy by Erasmo Pilotto in the programs for primary education in Paraná. In addition, some of the specificities of Montessor appropriation by him in regard to Early Childhood Education are also presented. Through a historiographic narrative (MAGALHÃES, 2004), composed of advances and remissions in the work with the presented and interpreted materialities, we present a new scene of the History of the Brazilian Education with regard to ...

  16. Effects of intergenerational Montessori-based activities programming on engagement of nursing home residents with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Lee

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Michelle M Lee1, Cameron J Camp2, Megan L Malone21Midwestern University, Department of Behavioral Medicine, Downers Grove, IL , USA; 2Myers Research Institute of Menorah Park Center for Senior Living, Beachwood, OH, USA Abstract: Fourteen nursing home residents on a dementia special care unit at a skilled nursing facility took part in one-to-one intergenerational programming (IGP with 15 preschool children from the facility’s on-site child care center. Montessori-based activities served as the interface for interactions between dyads. The amount of time residents demonstrated positive and negative forms of engagement during IGP and standard activities programming was assessed through direct observation using a tool developed for this purpose – the Myers Research Institute Engagement Scale (MRI-ES. These residents with dementia displayed the ability to successfully take part in IGP. Most successfully presented “lessons” to the children in their dyads, similar to the way that Montessori teachers present lessons to children, while persons with more severe cognitive impairment took part in IGP through other methods such as parallel play. Taking part in IGP was consistently related with higher levels of positive engagement and lower levels of negative forms of engagement in these residents with dementia than levels seen in standard activities programming on the unit. Implications of using this form of IGP, and directions for future research, are discussed.Keywords: Montessori-based activities, intergenerational programming, engagement, dementia

  17. The profile of the Montessori assistant: historical paths and new education projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara De Serio

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the professional profile of the Montessori-trained teacher, as educated at the college devised by Maria Montessori and founded in the 1950s by one of her closest pupils, Adele Costa Gnocchi. The Montessori assistant was a professional figure specially trained to aid the birth process and the “mental” needs of the protagonists involved, referring specifically to the child. In this respect, the paper also looks at the subject of education from birth, starting with Montessori’s earliest ideas on new-born children and their creative capabilities. The purpose is to recover the scientific foundations on which the pedagogical practices usually applied by childhood services are based, with the awareness that these consolidated practices need strengthening and a scientific foundation – including on an historical level – in order to contribute to qualifying services for early childhood. Through specific methodological qualification, above all with regard to Montessori’s methods, as well as by placing more valid historical importance on the paths they began, early childhood services may even be able to move in the direction of possible institutionalised training.

  18. Study protocol: A Montessori approach to dementia-related, non-residential respite services in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Andrew; Donnelly, James; Aggar, Christina

    2018-03-27

    Given the social burden and significant cost of dementia care in Australia, finding evidence-based approaches that improve outcomes, maintain independence, and reduce the impact on patients and families is essential. Finding effective ways to train and assist the healthcare staff who support these individuals is also critical, as they are considered to be at risk of workplace stress, burnout, and other psychological disturbances which negatively affects standards of care. The current paper describes a protocol for evaluating the effects of a Montessori-based approach to dementia care, in non-residential respite centres. An 18 month prospective observational, cohort controlled design is suggested that will compare participants from a community respite service that has undergone a Montessori-based workplace culture change and those from a service that provides a person-centred 'care as usual' approach. To achieve this, the protocol includes the assessment of participants across multiple variables on a monthly basis including the cognitive, behavioural, and emotional functioning of clients with dementia, levels of caregiver burden experienced by informal carers, and burnout, compassion satisfaction and workplace engagement among respite staff. The protocol also employs a qualitative evaluation of program fidelity. This approach will provide further insight into the potential benefits of early intervention with Montessori approaches for persons living with dementia in the community, their caregivers, and the staff and volunteers who assist them. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. PROSES PEMBELAJARAN BERBASIS METODE MONTESSORI DALAM MENGEMBANGKAN KETERAMPILAN SOSIAL ANAK USIA DINI (Penelitian Deskriptif Di PAUD Assya’idiyah Kab. Bandung Barat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Sumitra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pada penelitian ini, penulis mengidentifikasi masalah sebagai berikut: 1. Perencanaan pembelajaran, pengembangan dan proses kegiatan pembelajaran belum mengacu betul terhadap tahap-tahap perkembangan anak, 2. Keterampilan sosial belum tertampilkan secara optimal mengingat sarana dan prasarana yang menunjang pengembangan keterampilan sosial belum memadai, 3. Pembelajaran anak usia dini masih terfokus pada peningkatan kemampuan akademik (hapalan dan calistung, 4. Rasa egois pada diri anak masih tinggi disebabkan cakrawala sosial anak terbatas dirumah, peserta didik seringkali memikirkan diri sendiri. Kemudian penulis merumuskan masalah sebagai berikut: Bagaimana proses pembelajaran metode montessori terhadap keterampilan sosial anak?Berdasarkan pada rumusan masalah di atas, tujuan yang ingin dicapai dalam penelitian ini adalah : 1. Rencana pembelajaran dengan metode montessori dalam upaya meningkatkan keterampilan sosial anak usia dini dengan bermacam aktifitas di PAUD, 2. Pelaksanaan pembelajaran dengan menggunakan metode montessori dalam mengembangkan keterampilan sosial anak usia dini, 3. Evaluasi proses pembelajaran dengan menggunakan metode montessori untuk meningkatkan keterampilan sosiak anak usia dini, 4. Untuk mengembangkan keterampilan sosial anak yang tertampilkan sebagai hasil pembelajaran dengan menggunakan metode montessori pada anak usia dini.Metode yang digunakan oleh penulis dalam penelitian ini adalah metode penelitian deskriptif dengan pendekatan kualitatif untuk mengetahui seberapa besar proses pembelajaran peserta didik dengan menggunakan metode montessori dalam mengembangkan keterampilan sosial anak. Data diperoleh dari hasil observasi, wawancara dan studi dokumentasi terhadap sumber data, objek penelitian yaitu PAUD Assya’idiyah, Kecamatan. Cipongkor, Kabupaten. Bandung Barat.Dari hasil penganalisisan data di peroleh sebagai berikut: 1. Perencanaan pembelajaran di PAUD Assya’idiyah sesuai dengan metode Montessori dimulai

  20. The Mystery of Pleasure: Thoughts on Teaching and learning Sex and Gender Relations in a Democratic Montessori Elementary Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Henry R. RICH

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Dr Maria Montessori (1870-1952, saw the child as a 'spiritual embryo' naturally gravitating towards a state of 'normalization' through the evolving discovery of a 'cosmic task' that emerged from inquiring into one's identity and role in the universe. Although she laid a philosophical framework for this 'educating of the human potential'; she never openly discussed sexuality and sexual knowledge as a necessary part of this development. Dr Riane Eisler is a contemporary feminist systems theorist whose 'partnership model' of sexual politics embraces (and, in fact, openly endorses the tenets of the Montessori approach.

  1. LHC Report: a Roman potpourri

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The last couple of weeks of operation have been a mixed bag, with time dedicated to TOTEM and ALFA, a floating machine development period and luminosity calibration runs. These special running periods were interleaved with some standard proton running where we’ve struggled a little to recover previous highs. The LHC has now returned to more routine operation.   The TOTEM and ALFA run required the development of special optics to produce large beam sizes and smaller angular spread at the interaction points in ATLAS and CMS. These special optics produce shallower angled proton-proton collisions than normal and thus allow experiments to probe the very small angle scattering regime. (For more information visit the TOTEM and ALFA websites.) The qualification of the new set-up at 4 TeV went well, paving the way for a 13-hour physics run for both TOTEM and ALFA with their Roman pots in position. Highlights from the 48-hour machine development period included the injection of high intensity bun...

  2. The effect of three different educational approaches on children's drawing ability: Steiner, Montessori and traditional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, M V; Rowlands, A

    2000-12-01

    Although there is a national curriculum for art education in the UK there are also alternative approaches in the private sector. This paper addresses the issue of the effect of these approaches on children's drawing ability. To compare the drawing ability in three drawing tasks of children in Steiner, Montessori and traditional schools. The participants were 60 school children between the ages of 5;11 and 7;2. Twenty children were tested in each type of school. Each child completed three drawings: a free drawing, a scene and an observational drawing. As predicted, the free and scene drawings of children in the Steiner school were rated more highly than those of children in Montessori and traditional schools. Steiner children's use of colour was also rated more highly, although they did not use more colours than the other children. Steiner children used significantly more fantasy topics in their free drawings. Further observation indicated that the Steiner children were better at using the whole page and organising their drawings into a scene; their drawings were also more detailed. Contrary to previous research Montessori children did not draw more inanimate objects and geometrical shapes or fewer people than other children. Also, contrary to the prediction, Steiner children were significantly better rather than worse than other children at observational drawing. The results suggest that the approach to art education in Steiner schools is conducive not only to more highly rated imaginative drawings in terms of general drawing ability and use of colour but also to more accurate and detailed observational drawings.

  3. Successful applications of montessori methods with children at risk for learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, J S

    1992-12-01

    The critical elements in the Montessori philosophy are respect for the child, individualization of the program to that child, and the fostering of independence. With her research background, Maria Montessori devised a multisensory developmental method and designed materials which isolate each concept the teacher presents to the child.In presenting these materials the teacher observes the concept and skill development level of the child, ascertaining areas of strength and weakness and matching the next presentation to the child's level of development. Using small sequential steps, the teacher works to ameliorate weakness and guide the student to maximize his strengths. These presentations, usually initiated by the child, enhance cognitive growth using a process which integrates his physical, social, and emotional development.The curriculum contains four major content areas: Practical Life; Sensorial; Oral and Written Language; and Mathematics. Geography, History, Science, Art, Music, Literature, and Motor Skills are also included. In all of these the Montessori presentations build from the simple to the complex, from the concrete to the abstract, and from percept to concept. Vocabulary and language usage are integral to each presentation.The procedures introduced through these presentations are designed to enhance attention, increase self-discipline and self-direction, and to promote order, organization, and the development of a work cycle. At-risk children benefit from the structure, the procedures, and the curriculum. Applications of this method require more teacher selection of materials and direct teaching, particularly of language and math symbols and their manipulations.This early childhood intervention provides an individualized program which allows the at-risk child a successful experience at the preschool level. The program includes a strong conceptual preparation for later academic learning and it promotes the development of a healthy self-concept.

  4. Montessori-based training makes a difference for home health workers & their clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelle, Gregg J; Kaiser, Kathy; Camp, Cameron J

    2003-01-01

    Home care visits can last several hours. Home care workers are often at a loss on how to fill time spent in homes of clients. The challenge is how to use this time in ways that are productive and engaging for both clients and home health workers. The authors trained home health aides to implement Montessori-based activities while interacting with clients who have dementia. The results were amazing. Among other positive results, the authors found a statistically significant increase in the amount of pleasure displayed by clients after health workers received training.

  5. Actividade e redenção: a criança nova em Maria Montessori

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Filipe Araújo, Alessandra Avanzini; Joaquim Machado de Araújo

    2011-01-01

    Resumo A ideia de Criança Nova em Maria Montessori (1870-1952) resulta da confluência de duas perspectivas, a da pedagogia que se pretende afirmar como ciência e a do humanismo cristão. Neste artigo, os autores procuram, numa primeira parte, especificar o que vem a ser para a pedagoga italiana a liberdade e a actividade da criança e o papel do adulto, principalmente do educador da criança que se auto-educa e, numa segunda parte, debruçam-se sobre o fundo religioso e humanista da obra montesso...

  6. Metolodología Montessori en 0-3 años

    OpenAIRE

    San Julián Pérez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    [ES]La indagación se inscribe en las aportaciones de la pedagoga italiana María Montessori. Sus sugerencias educativas -de gran relevancia- se apoyan en el estudio de la mente infantil durante 50 años. Descubrió que, en los tres primeros años de vida, el aprendizaje se realiza sin esfuerzo, de una forma natural. Se confirma así como la fase más importante del desarrollo humano. Dicho descubrimiento conlleva una gran responsabilidad pedagógica, especialmente para el trabajo en el primer ciclo ...

  7. Montessori and Jerome W. Berryman: Work, Play, Religious Education and the Art of Using the Christian Language System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    For more than 30 years, the thinking and writing of Jerome W. Berryman has made a significant and unique contribution to the religious education of children and adults in faith-based contexts. Claiming to be influenced primarily by the work of Maria Montessori, his writings reveal the purpose of religious education to be teaching children the art…

  8. Improving Outcomes for Refugee Children: A Case Study on the Impact of Montessori Education along the Thai-Burma Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Tierney; Boulmier, Prairie; Zhu, Wenyi; Hancock, Paul; Muennig, Peter

    2015-01-01

    There are 25 million displaced children worldwide, and those receiving schooling are often educated in overcrowded classrooms. Montessori is a child-centred educational method that provides an alternative model to traditional educational approaches. In this model, students are able to direct their own learning and develop at their own pace,…

  9. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Montessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Improving academic achievement for students of color has long been the subject of debate among advocates of education reform (Anyon, 2013; Breitborde & Swiniarski, 2006; Payne, 2008). Some scholars have advocated for the Montessori method as an alternative educational approach to address some chronic problems in public education (Lillard,…

  10. Playing to Learn: An Overview of the Montessori Approach with Pre-School Children with Autism Spectrum Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article explores some of the literature concerning the effectiveness of the Montessori educational approach for children with ASC within an English school context. Firstly, there is a discussion, including a short historical review, regarding the ideology of inclusion and how it has impacted upon mainstream education. Also, how this can be…

  11. Making Room for Children's Autonomy: Maria Montessori's Case for Seeing Children's Incapacity for Autonomy as an External Failing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frierson, Patrick R.

    2016-01-01

    This article draws on Martha Nussbaum's distinction between basic, internal, and external (or combined) capacities to better specify possible locations for children's "incapacity" for autonomy. I then examine Maria Montessori's work on what she calls "normalization", which involves a release of children's capacities for…

  12. Examining a Montessori Adolescent Program through a Self-Determination Theory Lens: A Study of the Lived Experiences of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casquejo Johnston, Luz Marie

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the influence of enrollment in a Montessori adolescent program on the development of self-determination. The study focused on seventh-grade students. Student feelings of self-determination were recorded through three cycles of interviews throughout the year to capture the change, if any, in feelings of self-determination.…

  13. Freedom, Order, and the Child: Self-Control and Mastery of the World Mark the Dynamic Montessori Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambusch, Nancy McCormick

    2010-01-01

    Today, on almost every continent, there are schools adopting in spirit and practice the ideas of Maria Montessori who ranks with Pestalozzi, Froebel, and Dewey in the field of education. Her approach to early childhood education can be linked to the Thomistic dictum that there is nothing in the intellect which is not first in the senses. In this…

  14. Diarrhea & Child Care: Controlling Diarrhea in Out-of-Home Child Care. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Robin B.; Pickering, Larry K.

    This report, the fourth in the National Center for Early Development and Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlights" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during a "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses controlling diarrhea in out-of-home child care. The report…

  15. Task-based Language Learning in Bilingual Montessori Elementary Schools: Customizing Foreign Language Learning and Promoting L2 Speaking Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Winnefeld

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign language learning has been a part of German elementary schools for several years now. Montessori schools focusing on individual learning, i.e. mostly independent from the teacher and based on auto-education, interest, and free choice, are also asked to teach an L2. The original lack of a concept of L2 learning for this environment has brought forth different approaches. Bilingual education seems to be feasible and applicable in Montessori education. The downside to this is that even in a bilingual classroom the Montessori way of learning may not allow for very much oral production of the foreign language. The role of L2 production (cf. Swain 1985, 1995, 2005 for language acquisition has been theoretically claimed and empirically investigated. Output can have a positive influence on L2 learning (cf. e.g. Izumi 2002, Keck et al. 2006. This also applies to interaction (cf. Long 1996, where negotiation of meaning and modified output are factors supporting L2 development (cf. e.g. de la Fuente 2002, McDonough 2005. Task-based Language Learning (TBLL presents itself as one way to promote oral language production and to provide opportunities for meaning-negotiation. Especially tasks with required information exchange and a closed outcome have been shown to be beneficial for the elicitation of negotiation of meaning and modified output. This paper argues that TBLL is a promising approach for the facilitation of L2 production and thus the development of speaking skills in a Montessori context. It also hypothesizes that TBLL can be implemented in a bilingual Montessori environment while still making the Montessori way of learning possible. Different tasks on various topics, examples of which are presented in this article, can lay the foundation for this. Offering such tasks in a bilingual Montessori elementary classroom promises to foster language production and the use of communication strategies like negotiation of meaning, both being

  16. It counts who counts: an experimental evaluation of the importance of observer effects on spotlight count estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunde, Peter; Jessen, Lonnie

    2013-01-01

    Spotlight surveys conducted by volunteers is a promising method to assess the abundance of nocturnally active mammals, but estimates are subject to bias if different observer groups differ in their ability to detect animals in the dark. We quantified the variation amongst volunteer spotlight...... observers with respect to their ability to detect and estimate distance to realistic animal silhouettes at different distances. Detection probabilities were higher for observers experienced in spotlighting mammals than for inexperienced observers, higher for observers with a hunting background compared...

  17. Effects of intergenerational Montessori-based activities programming on engagement of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle M; Camp, Cameron J; Malone, Megan L

    2007-01-01

    Fourteen nursing home residents on a dementia special care unit at a skilled nursing facility took part in one-to-one intergenerational programming (IGP) with 15 preschool children from the facility's on-site child care center. Montessori-based activities served as the interface for interactions between dyads. The amount of time residents demonstrated positive and negative forms of engagement during IGP and standard activities programming was assessed through direct observation using a tool developed for this purpose--the Myers Research Institute Engagement Scale (MRI-ES). These residents with dementia displayed the ability to successfully take part in IGP. Most successfully presented "lessons" to the children in their dyads, similar to the way that Montessori teachers present lessons to children, while persons with more severe cognitive impairment took part in IGP through other methods such as parallel play. Taking part in IGP was consistently related with higher levels of positive engagement and lower levels of negative forms of engagement in these residents with dementia than levels seen in standard activities programming on the unit. Implications of using this form of IGP, and directions for future research, are discussed.

  18. La función y el papel desempeñado por la maestra en la obra de Montessori - The role and the function of the teacher in Montessori works

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Avanzini

    2011-01-01

    A FUNÇÃO  E O PAPEL DESEMPENHADO PELA PROFESSORA NA OBRA DE MONTESSORI Resumo A função da professora constitui um aspecto fundamental dentro do sistema  teórico  montessoriano.   De   fato,   Montessori  atribui   à professora um papel muito  delicado: facilitar o correto crescimento da criança “pai  do homem”. É  por isto que o papel e a função da professora montessoriana devem responder aos pontos  fortes de sua teoria educativa: a necessidade de que haja uma forte idéia de escola, a necess...

  19. Il Centro Nascita Montessori. Dal neonato in famiglia al bambino e alla famiglia nel servizio educativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Franceschini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Intervento al Workshop Internazionale “Infanzie e Famiglie in Europa”, del 16 ottobre 2009, presso la Facoltà di Scienze della Formazione, Via Filippo Re, 6 Bologna (Aula Magna. L’intervento illustra i valori fondativi del Centro Nascita Montessori dalle sue origini ai giorni nostri attraverso un percorso che si è allargato nel tempo: dalla focalizzata attenzione e cura al neonato in famiglia o nel brefotrofio fino agli anni ’60 alla cura della crescita del bambino nei servizi educativi e alla cura della relazione con le famiglie dagli anni ‘70 in poi. Tale espansione del campo di interesse e d’indagine operativa ha arricchito il patrimonio di competenze e di conoscenze del C.N.M..

  20. Raw Data-Based Motion Compensation for High-Resolution Sliding Spotlight Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Niu, Shilin; Guo, Zhengwei; Liu, Yabo; Chen, Jiaqi

    2018-03-12

    For accurate motion compensation (MOCO) in airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, a high-precision inertial navigation system (INS) is required. However, an INS is not always precise enough or is sometimes not even included in airborne SAR systems. In this paper, a new, raw, data-based range-invariant motion compensation approach, which can effectively extract the displacements in the line-of-sight (LOS) direction, is proposed for high-resolution sliding spotlight SAR mode. In this approach, the sub-aperture radial accelerations of the airborne platform are estimated via a well-developed weighted total least square (WTLS) method considering the time-varying beam direction. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is validated by two airborne sliding spotlight C band SAR raw datasets containing different types of terrain, with a high spatial resolution of about 0.15 m in azimuth.

  1. Generalized Chirp Scaling Combined with Baseband Azimuth Scaling Algorithm for Large Bandwidth Sliding Spotlight SAR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tianzhu; He, Zhihua; He, Feng; Dong, Zhen; Wu, Mnaqing

    2017-05-29

    This paper presents an efficient and precise imaging algorithm for the large bandwidth sliding spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The existing sub-aperture processing method based on the baseband azimuth scaling (BAS) algorithm cannot cope with the high order phase coupling along the range and azimuth dimensions. This coupling problem causes defocusing along the range and azimuth dimensions. This paper proposes a generalized chirp scaling (GCS)-BAS processing algorithm, which is based on the GCS algorithm. It successfully mitigates the deep focus along the range dimension of a sub-aperture of the large bandwidth sliding spotlight SAR, as well as high order phase coupling along the range and azimuth dimensions. Additionally, the azimuth focusing can be achieved by this azimuth scaling method. Simulation results demonstrate the ability of the GCS-BAS algorithm to process the large bandwidth sliding spotlight SAR data. It is proven that great improvements of the focus depth and imaging accuracy are obtained via the GCS-BAS algorithm.

  2. Montessori Public School Pre-K Programs and the School Readiness of Low-Income Black and Latino Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Arya; Winsler, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Within the United States, there are a variety of early education models and curricula aimed at promoting young children's pre-academic, social, and behavioral skills. This study, using data from the Miami School Readiness Project (MSRP; Winsler et al., 2008, 2012), examined the school readiness gains of low-income Latino ( n = 7,045) and Black children ( n = 6,700) enrolled in two different types of Title-1 public school pre-K programs: those in programs using the Montessori curricula and those in more conventional programs using the High/Scope curricula with a literacy supplement. Parents and teachers reported on children's socio-emotional and behavioral skills with the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (DECA), while children's pre-academic skills (cognitive, motor, and language) were assessed directly with the Learning Accomplishment Profile Diagnostic (LAP-D) at the beginning and end of their four-year-old pre-K year. All children, regardless of curricula, demonstrated gains across pre-academic, socio-emotional, and behavioral skills throughout the pre-K year; however, all children did not benefit equally from Montessori programs. Latino children in Montessori programs began the year at most risk in pre-academic and behavioral skills, yet exhibited the greatest gains across these domains and ended the year scoring above national averages. Conversely, Black children exhibited healthy gains in Montessori, but demonstrated slightly greater gains when attending more conventional pre-K programs. Findings have implications for tailoring early childhood education programs for Latino and Black children from low-income communities.

  3. Does Learning the Alphabet in Kindergarten Give Children a Head Start in the First Year of School? A Comparison of Children's Reading Progress in Two First Grade Classes in State and Montessori Schools in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elben, Judy; Nicholson, Tom

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine whether the age at which children start to learn to read affects their later progress. The study was conducted in Zürich, Switzerland, and compared a first grade class in a local school with two first grade classes in a Montessori school. It was found that although the Montessori children had an…

  4. Trends in Personal Belief Exemption Rates Among Alternative Private Schools: Waldorf, Montessori, and Holistic Kindergartens in California, 2000–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Robert A.; Richards, Jennifer L.; Allen, Kristen E.; Warraich, Gohar J.; Omer, Saad B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate trends in rates of personal belief exemptions (PBEs) to immunization requirements for private kindergartens in California that practice alternative educational methods. Methods. We used California Department of Public Health data on kindergarten PBE rates from 2000 to 2014 to compare annual average increases in PBE rates between schools. Results. Alternative schools had an average PBE rate of 8.7%, compared with 2.1% among public schools. Waldorf schools had the highest average PBE rate of 45.1%, which was 19 times higher than in public schools (incidence rate ratio = 19.1; 95% confidence interval = 16.4, 22.2). Montessori and holistic schools had the highest average annual increases in PBE rates, slightly higher than Waldorf schools (Montessori: 8.8%; holistic: 7.1%; Waldorf: 3.6%). Conclusions. Waldorf schools had exceptionally high average PBE rates, and Montessori and holistic schools had higher annual increases in PBE rates. Children in these schools may be at higher risk for spreading vaccine-preventable diseases if trends are not reversed. PMID:27854520

  5. Trends in Personal Belief Exemption Rates Among Alternative Private Schools: Waldorf, Montessori, and Holistic Kindergartens in California, 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Julia M; Bednarczyk, Robert A; Richards, Jennifer L; Allen, Kristen E; Warraich, Gohar J; Omer, Saad B

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate trends in rates of personal belief exemptions (PBEs) to immunization requirements for private kindergartens in California that practice alternative educational methods. We used California Department of Public Health data on kindergarten PBE rates from 2000 to 2014 to compare annual average increases in PBE rates between schools. Alternative schools had an average PBE rate of 8.7%, compared with 2.1% among public schools. Waldorf schools had the highest average PBE rate of 45.1%, which was 19 times higher than in public schools (incidence rate ratio = 19.1; 95% confidence interval = 16.4, 22.2). Montessori and holistic schools had the highest average annual increases in PBE rates, slightly higher than Waldorf schools (Montessori: 8.8%; holistic: 7.1%; Waldorf: 3.6%). Waldorf schools had exceptionally high average PBE rates, and Montessori and holistic schools had higher annual increases in PBE rates. Children in these schools may be at higher risk for spreading vaccine-preventable diseases if trends are not reversed.

  6. La función y el papel desempeñado por la maestra en la obra de Montessori - The role and the function of the teacher in Montessori works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Avanzini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A FUNÇÃO  E O PAPEL DESEMPENHADO PELA PROFESSORA NA OBRA DE MONTESSORI Resumo A função da professora constitui um aspecto fundamental dentro do sistema  teórico  montessoriano.   De   fato,   Montessori  atribui   à professora um papel muito  delicado: facilitar o correto crescimento da criança “pai  do homem”. É  por isto que o papel e a função da professora montessoriana devem responder aos pontos  fortes de sua teoria educativa: a necessidade de que haja uma forte idéia de escola, a necessidade de diferenciar o momento teórico do momento prático e o papel desempenhado pelo desempenho científico da professora; o respeito que ambos devem ter com a criança (nem a professora nem a ciência  podem  fixar  a   priori   os   resultados  de  cada  criança: potencialmente  a   excelência é  para  todos;  o  xeque  a  qualquer pretensão de neutralidade/objetividade: quando a relação é com seres humanos  é  sem  sentido  pensar  que  existam  técnicos  capazes de transmitir conceitos de maneira asséptica. Como dito anteriormente, a professora em  Montessori se pode definir como um  técnico, no sentido de que não é o científico a que lê corresponde a  elaboração teórica  senão  técnico.  Um  técnico  que  não  é  nem  neutro  nem asséptico e cuja humanidade se colocará em um primeiro plano para que possa levar a cabo seu próprio trabalho o melhor possível. Palavras-chave: Montessori; didática; professora.   THE ROLE AND THE FUNCTION  OF THE TEACHER IN MONTESSORI WORKS Abstract The function of the teacher constitutes a fundamental aspect inside Montessori's system of thought. She offers to teacher a very delicate role, that of helping the right growth of child as "man's father". For this reason the  role and the function  of Montessori teacher must correspond to the principle points of her educative theory, that is to say: the necessity to have a

  7. An Improved Doppler Rate Estimation Approach for Sliding Spotlight SAR Data Based on the Transposition Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    She Xiao-qiang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In image processing of high-resolution sliding spotlight SAR, it is important to know the Doppler rate with accuracy; however, traditional Doppler rate estimation algorithms are not very helpful because of the azimuth spectrum folding phenomenon. In this study, an algorithm that works on the transposition domain is proposed to solve this problem. Furthermore, the algorithm is also helpful in obtaining excellent focused images by embedding it in the two-step technique. Finally, the proposed algorithm is verified using computer simulations.

  8. An implementation of a fast backprojection image formation algorithm for spotlight-mode SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we describe an algorithm for fast spotlight-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation that employs backprojection as the core, but is implemented such that its compute time is comparable to the often-used Polar Format Algorithm (PFA). (Standard backprojection is so much slower than PFA that it is impractical to use in many operational scenarios.) We demonstrate the feasibility of the algorithm on real SAR phase history data sets and show some advantages in the SAR image formed by this technique.

  9. Cherry Featured in NCI’s Spotlight on Scientists Video Series | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Cherry, Ph.D., learned at an early age that education is crucial to success. He credits his mentors, some of whom include his grandmother, Shepherd University professor Burton Lidgerding, Ph.D., David Munroe, Ph.D., Frederick National Lab, and Robert J. Hohman, Ph.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for guiding him to the career he has today. Cherry, scientific program director, Office of Scientific Operations (OSO), NCI at Frederick, is one of the scientists featured in NCI’s Spotlight on Scientists video series.

  10. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): training persons with dementia to serve as group activity leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J; Skrajner, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders' ability to learn the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with this role, were taken, as were measures of players' engagement and affect during standard activities programming and RAMP activities. Leaders demonstrated the potential to fill the role of group activity leader effectively, and they expressed a high level of satisfaction with this role. Players' levels of positive engagement and pleasure during the RAMP activity were higher than during standard group activities. This study suggests that to the extent that procedural learning is available to persons with early-stage dementia, especially when they are assisted with external cueing, these individuals can successfully fill the role of volunteers when working with persons with more advanced dementia. This can provide a meaningful social role for leaders and increase access to high quality activities programming for large numbers of persons with dementia. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  11. Actividade e redenção: a criança nova em Maria Montessori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Filipe Araújo, Alessandra Avanzini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Resumo A ideia de Criança Nova em Maria Montessori (1870-1952 resulta da confluência de duas perspectivas, a da pedagogia que se pretende afirmar como ciência e a do humanismo cristão. Neste artigo, os autores procuram, numa primeira parte, especificar o que vem a ser para a pedagoga italiana a liberdade e a actividade da criança e o papel do adulto, principalmente do educador da criança que se auto-educa e, numa segunda parte, debruçam-se sobre o fundo religioso e humanista da obra montessoriana que consagra a criança como um ser espiritual e de natureza divina. Palavras-chave: actividade; activismo; criança nova; redenção.   Abstract The idea of the New Child in Maria Montesori (1870-1952 is the result of the combination of two perspectives: a pedagogical one, directed at affirming its own scientific status, and one based on Christian Humanism. In this paper the authors try to specify what the Italian pedagogue considered as freedom and activity on the part of the child and the role of the adult, most particularly the role of the educator who also ends up educating himself. At a secondary stage they concentrate on the religious background and the humanism of the Montesorian working method which consecrated the child as a spiritual being who shared the divine nature. Keywords: activity; new child; redemption

  12. Join the Revolution: How Montessori for Aging and Dementia can Change Long-Term Care Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Michelle S; Brush, Jennifer; Elliot, Gail; Kelly, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Efforts to improve the quality of life of persons with dementia in long-term care through the implementation of various approaches to person-centered care have been underway for the past two decades. Studies have yielded conflicting reports evaluating the evidence for these approaches. The purpose of this article is to outline the findings of several systematic reviews of this literature, highlighting the areas of improvement needs, and to describe a new person-centered care model, DementiAbility Methods: The Montessori Way. This model focuses on the abilities, needs, interests, and strengths of the person and creating worthwhile and meaningful roles, routines, and activities for the person within a supportive physical environment. This is accomplished through gaining the commitment of the facility's leaders, training staff, and monitoring program implementation. The potential for a culture change in long-term care environments is dependent on the development and rigorous evaluation of person-centered care approaches. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Da Ellen Key a Maria Montessori: la progettazione di nuovi spazi educativi per l’infanzia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Pironi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In questa prima fase della ricerca - ancora in itinere - si compie un’analisi storico-pedagogica del rapporto infanzia/famiglie/istituzioni. L’indagine si focalizza sulle trasformazioni dei modelli familiari, visti nella loro interdipendenza con l’elaborazione di nuove pratiche educative. Al riguardo, l’avvento del’900 si profila come un passaggio importante, che trova un suo esito nel volume di Ellen Key, Il secolo dei fanciulli. Proprio in quest’opera, la scrittrice svedese elabora una nuova idea di “maternità” e di “paternità” che pone al centro i bisogni e le esigenze infantili. La sua prospettiva diventa oggetto di dibattito, agli inizi del secolo scorso, sia in campo pedagogico, sia in campo femminista, soprattutto in merito al dilemma per la donna di coniugare insieme sfera pubblica e sfera privata, maternità e autonomia individuale. Secondo l’ipotesi qui evidenziata è in particolare Maria Montessori a raccogliere la sfida di Ellen Key, con il suo esperimento pedagogico della “Casa dei bambini”, in cui lo spazio domestico, “privato” si trasforma in uno spazio scolastico, “pubblico”, a misura di “bambino” (valenza estetica degli ambienti, cura delle relazioni umane, ecc..

  14. Montessori-based activities among persons with late-stage dementia: Evaluation of mental and behavioral health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Scott E; Boyd, P August; Bates, Samantha M; Cain, Daphne S; Geiger, Jennifer R

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Literature regarding Montessori-based activities with older adults with dementia is fairly common with early stages of dementia. Conversely, research on said activities with individuals experiencing late-stage dementia is limited because of logistical difficulties in sampling and data collection. Given the need to understand risks and benefits of treatments for individuals with late-stage dementia, specifically regarding their mental and behavioral health, this study sought to evaluate the effects of a Montessori-based activity program implemented in a long-term care facility. Method Utilizing an interrupted time series design, trained staff completed observation-based measures for 43 residents with late-stage dementia at three intervals over six months. Empirical measures assessed mental health (anxiety, psychological well-being, quality of life) and behavioral health (problem behaviors, social engagement, capacity for activities of daily living). Results Group differences were observed via repeated measures ANOVA and paired-samples t-tests. The aggregate, longitudinal results-from baseline to final data interval-for the psychological and behavioral health measures were as follows: problem behaviors diminished though not significantly; social engagement decreased significantly; capacities for activities of daily living decreased significantly; quality of life increased slightly but not significantly; anxiety decreased slightly but not significantly; and psychological well-being significantly decreased. Conclusion Improvements observed for quality of life and problem behaviors may yield promise for Montessori-based activities and related health care practices. The rapid physiological and cognitive deterioration from late-stage dementia should be considered when interpreting these results.

  15. Putting culture under the 'spotlight' reveals universal information use for face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara, Roberto; Zhou, Xinyue; Miellet, Sébastien

    2010-03-18

    Eye movement strategies employed by humans to identify conspecifics are not universal. Westerners predominantly fixate the eyes during face recognition, whereas Easterners more the nose region, yet recognition accuracy is comparable. However, natural fixations do not unequivocally represent information extraction. So the question of whether humans universally use identical facial information to recognize faces remains unresolved. We monitored eye movements during face recognition of Western Caucasian (WC) and East Asian (EA) observers with a novel technique in face recognition that parametrically restricts information outside central vision. We used 'Spotlights' with Gaussian apertures of 2 degrees, 5 degrees or 8 degrees dynamically centered on observers' fixations. Strikingly, in constrained Spotlight conditions (2 degrees and 5 degrees) observers of both cultures actively fixated the same facial information: the eyes and mouth. When information from both eyes and mouth was simultaneously available when fixating the nose (8 degrees), as expected EA observers shifted their fixations towards this region. Social experience and cultural factors shape the strategies used to extract information from faces, but these results suggest that external forces do not modulate information use. Human beings rely on identical facial information to recognize conspecifics, a universal law that might be dictated by the evolutionary constraints of nature and not nurture.

  16. Comparison of algorithms for use in real-time spotlight-mode SAR image formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Bray, Brian K.; Bow, Wallace J., Jr.; Richards, John A.

    2004-09-01

    This paper compares three algorithms for potential use in a real-time, on-board implementation of spotlight-mode SAR image formation. These include: the polar formatting algorithm (PFA), the range migration algorithm (RMA), and the overlapped subapertures algorithm (OSA). We conclude that for any reasonable spotlight-mode imaging scenario, PFA is easily the algorithm of choice because its computational efficiency is significantly higher than that of either RMA or OSA. This comparison specifically includes cases in which wavefront curvature is sufficient to cause image defocus in conventional PFA, because a post-processing refocus step can be performed with PFA to yield excellent image quality for only a minimal increase in computation time. We demonstrate that real-time image formation for many imaging scenarios is achievable using PFA implemented on a single Pentium M processor. OSA is quite slow compared to PFA, especially for the case of moderate to high resolution (9 inches and better). RMA is not competitive with PFA for situations that do not require wavefront curvature correction. For those cases in which PFA requires post-processing to correct for wavefront curvature, RMA comes closer in efficiency to PFA, but is still outperformed by the modified PFA.

  17. Montessori-Based Activities as a Trans-Generational Interface for Persons with Dementia and Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J; Lee, Michelle M

    2011-12-12

    Montessori-based activities for persons with dementia have been used to successfully provide opportunities for programming between older adults and preschool children in shared site. intergenerational care programs. Such intergenerational programming allows older adults with dementia to fulfill roles of teacher or mentor to younger children or as collaborative workmates for persons with more advanced dementia while providing children with positive one-on-one interactions with older adults. We review several studies using this approach, describe characteristics of the programs, participants and results obtained and provide recommendations for those interested in extending this line of work.

  18. Montessori-Based Activities as a Trans-Generational Interface for Persons with Dementia and Preschool Children*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J.; Lee, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    Montessori-based activities for persons with dementia have been used to successfully provide opportunities for programming between older adults and preschool children in shared site. intergenerational care programs. Such intergenerational programming allows older adults with dementia to fulfill roles of teacher or mentor to younger children or as collaborative workmates for persons with more advanced dementia while providing children with positive one-on-one interactions with older adults. We review several studies using this approach, describe characteristics of the programs, participants and results obtained and provide recommendations for those interested in extending this line of work. PMID:22423215

  19. Montessori Public School Pre-K Programs and the School Readiness of Low-Income Black and Latino Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Arya; Winsler, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Within the United States, there are a variety of early education models and curricula aimed at promoting young children's pre-academic, social, and behavioral skills. This study, using data from the Miami School Readiness Project (MSRP; Winsler et al., 2008, 2012), examined the school readiness gains of low-income Latino (n = 7,045) and Black children (n = 6,700) enrolled in two different types of Title-1 public school pre-K programs: those in programs using the Montessori curricula and those...

  20. Hospitality and Inclusion Logistics of a Spotlight Event: An Insiders Look at the 2016 DNC in Philadelphia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leora Halpern Lanz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The 2016 Democratic National Convention held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania prioritized hospitality efforts and incorporated inclusion and diversity as its theme. These strategies helped to create a successful spotlight event, benefiting the city of Philadelphia and its hospitality industry.

  1. Scientist Spotlight Homework Assignments Shift Students’ Stereotypes of Scientists and Enhance Science Identity in a Diverse Introductory Science Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinske, Jeffrey N.; Perkins, Heather; Snyder, Amanda; Wyer, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Research into science identity, stereotype threat, and possible selves suggests a lack of diverse representations of scientists could impede traditionally underserved students from persisting and succeeding in science. We evaluated a series of metacognitive homework assignments (“Scientist Spotlights”) that featured counterstereotypical examples of scientists in an introductory biology class at a diverse community college. Scientist Spotlights additionally served as tools for content coverage, as scientists were selected to match topics covered each week. We analyzed beginning- and end-of-course essays completed by students during each of five courses with Scientist Spotlights and two courses with equivalent homework assignments that lacked connections to the stories of diverse scientists. Students completing Scientist Spotlights shifted toward counterstereotypical descriptions of scientists and conveyed an enhanced ability to personally relate to scientists following the intervention. Longitudinal data suggested these shifts were maintained 6 months after the completion of the course. Analyses further uncovered correlations between these shifts, interest in science, and course grades. As Scientist Spotlights require very little class time and complement existing curricula, they represent a promising tool for enhancing science identity, shifting stereotypes, and connecting content to issues of equity and diversity in a broad range of STEM classrooms. PMID:27587856

  2. Implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia™ in Ontario long-term care homes: Recreation staff and multidisciplinary consultants' perceptions of policy and practice issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducak, Kate; Denton, Margaret; Elliot, Gail

    2018-01-01

    Montessori-based activities use a person-centred approach to benefit persons living with dementia by increasing their participation in, and enjoyment of, daily life. This study investigated recreation staff and multidisciplinary consultants' perceptions of factors that affected implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia™ in long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. Qualitative data were obtained during semi-structured telephone interviews with 17 participants who worked in these homes. A political economy of aging perspective guided thematic data analysis. Barriers such as insufficient funding and negative attitudes towards activities reinforced a task-oriented biomedical model of care. Various forms of support and understanding helped put Montessori Methods for Dementia™ into practice as a person-centred care program, thus reportedly improving the quality of life of residents living with dementia, staff and family members. These results demonstrate that when Montessori Methods for Dementia™ approaches are learned and understood by staff they can be used as practical interventions for long-term care residents living with dementia.

  3. Scientist Spotlight Homework Assignments Shift Students' Stereotypes of Scientists and Enhance Science Identity in a Diverse Introductory Science Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinske, Jeffrey N; Perkins, Heather; Snyder, Amanda; Wyer, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Research into science identity, stereotype threat, and possible selves suggests a lack of diverse representations of scientists could impede traditionally underserved students from persisting and succeeding in science. We evaluated a series of metacognitive homework assignments ("Scientist Spotlights") that featured counterstereotypical examples of scientists in an introductory biology class at a diverse community college. Scientist Spotlights additionally served as tools for content coverage, as scientists were selected to match topics covered each week. We analyzed beginning- and end-of-course essays completed by students during each of five courses with Scientist Spotlights and two courses with equivalent homework assignments that lacked connections to the stories of diverse scientists. Students completing Scientist Spotlights shifted toward counterstereotypical descriptions of scientists and conveyed an enhanced ability to personally relate to scientists following the intervention. Longitudinal data suggested these shifts were maintained 6 months after the completion of the course. Analyses further uncovered correlations between these shifts, interest in science, and course grades. As Scientist Spotlights require very little class time and complement existing curricula, they represent a promising tool for enhancing science identity, shifting stereotypes, and connecting content to issues of equity and diversity in a broad range of STEM classrooms. © 2016 J. N. Schinske et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Geolocation with error analysis using imagery from an experimental spotlight SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonnacott, William Mark

    This dissertation covers the development of a geometry-based sensor model for a specific monostatic spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system---referred to as the ExSAR (for experimental SAR). This sensor model facilitates single- and multiple-image geopositioning with error analysis. It allows for the use of known ground control points in refining the collection geometry parameters (a process called image resection) and for the subsequent geopositioning of other points using the resected image. Theoretically, the model also allows for the potential recovery of bias-like, persistent errors common across multiple images. The model also includes multi-image correspondence equations to aid in the cross-image identification of conjugate points. The sensor model development begins with a generic, theoretical approach to the modeling of spotlight SAR. A closed-form solution to the range and range-rate condition equations and the corresponding error propagation equation are presented. (The SAR condition equations have traditionally been solved iteratively.) The application of the closed-form solution in the image-to-ground and ground-to-image transformations is documented. The theoretical work also includes a preliminary error sensitivity analysis and a treatment of the spotlight SAR resection process. The ExSAR-specific model is established and assessed with an extensive set of images collected using the experimental radar over arrays of ground control points. Using this set, the imagery metadata elements are assessed, and the optimal element set for geopositioning is determined. The ExSAR imagery is shown to be transformed to the ground plane in only one dimension. The eventual ExSAR sensor model is used with known elevations and single-image geopositioning to show a horizontal accuracy of 8.23 m (rms). With resection using five ground-surveyed control points per image, the horizontal accuracy of reserved check points is 0.45 m (rms). Resections using the same

  5. Sustainable prevention of obesity through integrated strategies: The SPOTLIGHT project’s conceptual framework and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakerveld Jeroen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Europe is high. It is a major cause of the overall rates of many of the main chronic (or non communicable diseases in this region and is characterized by an unequal socio-economic distribution within the population. Obesity is largely determined by modifiable lifestyle behaviours such as low physical activity levels, sedentary behaviour and consumption of energy dense diets. It is increasingly being recognised that effective responses must go beyond interventions that only focus on a specific individual, social or environmental level and instead embrace system-based multi-level intervention approaches that address both the individual and environment. The EU-funded project “sustainable prevention of obesity through integrated strategies” (SPOTLIGHT aims to increase and combine knowledge on the wide range of determinants of obesity in a systematic way, and to identify multi-level intervention approaches that are strong in terms of Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM. Methods/Design SPOTLIGHT comprises a series of systematic reviews on: individual-level predictors of success in behaviour change obesity interventions; social and physical environmental determinants of obesity; and on the RE-AIM of multi-level interventions. An interactive web-atlas of currently running multi-level interventions will be developed, and enhancing and impeding factors for implementation will be described. At the neighbourhood level, these elements will inform the development of methods to assess obesogenicity of diverse environments, using remote imaging techniques linked to geographic information systems. The validity of these methods will be evaluated using data from surveys of health and lifestyles of adults residing in the neighbourhoods surveyed. At both the micro- and macro-levels (national and international the different physical, economical, political and socio

  6. Spotlight: Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriquin, W

    1988-04-01

    In Zimbabwe, a reproductive health survey conducted in 1984 revealed the highest rate of contraceptive use in sub-Saharan Africa -- 38% of currently married women were using some form of family planning and 27% a modern contraceptive method. The majority of Zimbabwe's population, a country formerly known a Rhodesia, is African, but there also are about 100,000 whites, 20,000 persons of mixed race, and 10,000 Asians. Robert Mugabe formed the 1st government of Zimbabwe as a result of elections held in February 1980. Since independence, rifts have developed between the black nationalist leaders -- Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo -- and continues. Some guerrilla activity has occurred in rural areas and antigovernment dissidence creating security and economic problems. Zimbabwe has a broad range of natural resources -- large mineral deposits including coal, asbestos, copper, nickel, gold, and iron ore. In addition to a well-developed electrical power network, there is a good infrastructure of paved roads and a vital railroad link with neighboring South Africa. Due to the trade sanctions imposed between 1965 and independence, the country has had to look inward for production. The manufacturing sector is well developed as is agriculture. The government identifies the country's most urgent problems as the resettlement of displaced persons and reconstruction of roads, health establishments, and schools destroyed during guerrilla activity.

  7. Spotlight: Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, J C

    1988-05-01

    Afghanistan is a landlocked country approximately the size of Texas with an estimated population of 14.5 million. The fertility level (6.7 children per women) is estimated to be very high, as is the mortality rate (183 infant deaths/1,000 live births). Demographic data sources are scarce, and current estimates are based on a 1972-1974 series of surveys and a 1979 census which enumerated only 55-60% of the population. The government of Afghanistan, a Marxist state, has asked for international aid to improve data collection and analysis. Compounding the problems of accurate data collection is the state of civil war that has existed in Afghanistan since the Marxist coup in in 1978 and Soviet occupation in 1979. The war impelled the emigration of 5 million refugees, who live in camps in neighboring Pakistan and Iran. Although the population decline that resulted from this emigration is significant, the repatriation of the refugees will play a role in determining the population dynamics for the next decade, as will the withdrawal of Soviet troops -- expected in 1990. Because of Afghanistan's central-Asia location, there is a unique ethnic and linguistic mixture of tribes. The largest group is the Pushtus, who make up 40% of the population. Afghan Persian and Pushtu are the dominant languages, and 98% of all Afghans are Moslem. The economy is largely agricultural and half the cultivated land must be irrigated. 85% of the population live in rural areas and another 2.5 million are nomads. The low status of women and female children, low levels of health care, and high fertility contribute to the lower life expectancy of females over males. Although the government supports contraceptive services, such services are inadequate, and sterilization is illegal. The withdrawal of Soviet troops and the possible end to civil war between the Kabul government and the rebel factions, and the effects of repatriation of refugees will determine the direction of Afghanistan's future development.

  8. Spotlight: Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    This article describes the vital statistics and population growth in Ecuador as of mid-1997. Mid-1997 population numbered about 12 million. Fertility was 3.6 births/woman; deaths were 6/1000 population; and births were 29/1000 population. Ecuador was primarily an agricultural country, until oil was discovered in the early 1970s. The country has worked to increase per capita income and confront environmental consequences. The capital city of Quito is situated in a valley between two mountains and has very high air pollution levels due to cars and factories. In contrast, indigenous populations live in the Andean mountains and farm small plots. Land shortages have pushed these farmers onto higher slopes and more marginal land that is becoming eroded. 22% of Ecuador's forests were cleared for farming during 1980-90. The city of Guayaquil, on the Pacific coast, has serious water pollution problems, sewage problems, and industrial pollution. Shrimp farming relies on high levels of fertilizer, which is damaging coastlines. Oil exploration in the interior of Ecuador, has resulted in disruption of indigenous population, loss of forests, and pollution of rivers. Texaco Oil is accused of spilling about 17 million gallons of crude oil, or 50 times more than the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. Texaco argues that it met government environmental standards and agreed to a cleanup, which only partially meets the standards of its critics. Oil resources have funded improvements in education and health. About 90% of Ecuador's adult population is literate. Fertility has declined, but the population is still largely young and will be entering their reproductive years by 2025.

  9. Pakistan. Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, M

    1985-01-01

    Focus in this discussion of Pakistan is on demographic factors, the issue of ethnic versus national solidarity, and economic and social development. The population was estimated at 99.2 million in 1985. The birthrate was 43/1000 in 1984 and the deaths were 15/1000. The infant mortality rate is 105 infant deaths/1000 live births, and life expectancy at birth is 51 years. In 1983 the gross national product per capita was US$390. The population of Pakistan is concentrated around Karachi on the Arabian Sea and in the crescent formed by Lahore, Rawalpindi, and Peshawar. Pakistan was a British colony, part of the Indian subcontinent until partition in 1947, when Britain gave Pakistan and India their freedom. Pakistan is not a theocracy, but the military government turns to traditional Islam for affirmation of its authority. Its martial law regime, established in 1977, is headed by President Ziaul Haq. The issue of ethnic versus national solidarity has been a problem since independence. Bengali-speaking East Pakistanis felt they did not have equal power in their country whose official language was Urdu and whose capital was in West Pakistan. East and West Pakistan ended up in armed conflict with the formation of Bangladesh in 1971 as the result. Regional and ethnic conflict is exacerbated by the low rate of literacy and the low status of certain ethnic groups in Pakistan. In addition, Pakistan suffers problems typical of many developing nations: a low per capita income, a large and growing population, and a highly stratified traditional society. In 1981 doctors, engineers, and craftsmen were in short supply, but there was a surplus of 300,000 agricultural workers. Agriculture makes up 30% of the GNP and employs 55% of the work force. In Pakistan's 6th Five Year Plan, initiated in July 1983, the government acknowledged for the 1st time the extremely poor conditions for women as indicated by literacy, health, and fertility. The total fertility rate is 6.4 average births/woman. Although the government is ostensibly trying to help women, funding for women's programs during the Five Year Plan was cut. Economic growth has been good in recent years, but agricultural growth is a result of increased acreage rather than yield per acre.

  10. Iran: spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudi, N

    1987-09-01

    Given its location between Asia and Asia Minor, Iran has been a country of strategic political importance throughout history. More than 98% of Iran's population is Moslem. During the early 20th century, as Iran gradually gained independence from the USSR and Turkey, a modernization process was begun. However, this modernization process was forced to yield to Islamic traditionalism after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Women have been most affected by this change. The implementation of Islamic traditions has meant low job opportunity or motivation for continuing education among women. Although fertility remains high, the present government is satisfied with the current rate of population growth. Family planning is allowed if implemented within the framework of Islamic law, but abortion is illegal. Mortality fell substantially after World War II, but has not continued to decline. At present, both males and females have the same life expectancy at birth. Iran's population is growing at a rate of 4%/year, and can be expected to double in another 21 years. It has been projected that Iran, currently the 21st largest country in the world with a population of 50 million, will become the 15th largest with a population of 97 million by the year 2025. Tehran, the 20th largest city in 1985, is projected to be the 9th largest by the year 2000, with a population of 13.6 million.

  11. Spotlight: Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriquin, W

    1988-03-01

    Focus is on Malaysia -- its population and land area, its total fertility rate and mortality rate, economic development, contraceptive usage, and population policy. In 1987 Malaysia's population was estimated to be 16.1 million with births 31/1000 population and deaths 7/1000 population. The rate of natural increase is 2.4%, the total fertility rate 3.9 children/woman, and the infant mortality rate 30/1000 live births. Ethnically, Malaysia is made up of several distinct groups. Indigenous Malays are the most numerous -- about 50% of the population. Their unique characteristics include that they are Moslem, rural, and usually of lower economic status. Chinese make up the 2nd largest group of Malaysians, nearly 1/3 of the population. This group is active in trade, business, and finance and possesses considerable economic power. About 10% of the population is of Indian descent. Malaysia has experienced much economic growth. Traditional exports grew in volume and value during the 1970; the petroleum sector expanded so rapidly it accounts for 1/4 of all exports. One reason for Malaysia's rapid economic growth is the government's promotion of industrialization and foreign investment. According to the 1982 contraceptive prevalence survey, 42% of currently married women 15-44 years were using contraception. The government considers the current rate of national increase to be satisfactory, but in 1984 it adopted a population policy to more than quadruple its population in 2100 to 70 million. It intends to accomplish this by instituting pronatalist incentives to help the fall in the national growth rate. The government's rationale for more population growth is that a larger domestic population could better support industrial growth that otherwise might be stymied by "protectionist policies practiced by developed countries." Incentives to encourage fertility include income-tax deductions and maternity benefits for women who have up to 5 children.

  12. Spotlight: Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    Barbados was among the first to advocate a national system of family planning. In 1954 a joint committee report of birth legislation recommended the institution of a family planning system under the aegis of the government. The country's 1980 total fertility rate of 1.9 live births/woman attests to the success of the program. The rate is among the lowest of any developing nation. The population of Barbados was 122,298 at the 1st post emancipation census in 1844. In 1946 the population totaled 193,680. To a considerable extent, this very low rate of growth (0.46%) was due to substantial emigration, first to Trinidad and Guyana and later to countries outside the region such as the UK and more recently the US and Canada. Net emigration was so great between 1881 and 1921 that it exceeded natural increase by 54%. Consequently, the population declined from 182,867 to 156,724. By 1960, the population had reached 232,820, some 40,000 more than in 1946. Since then growth has been slow. Such a remarkably low rate of growth since World War 2 has been accomplished through continued high levels of emigration combined with declining fertility and mortality. The total fertility rate dropped from 4.7 in 1960 to 3.0 in 1970 to 1.9 in 1980. Life expectancy rose from about 50 in 1946 to 70 in 1980. Levels of net emigration have always been high and remain so. About 18,000 more persons left the country than entered it during the 1970s, a rate of 7.5/1000 population. While high, it is lower than in the 1960s. The mainstays of the economy are sugar and tourism. Since independence in 1966, sugar production has fallen steadily in response to depressed world sugar prices as well as increasing production costs. In recent years the government has sought to reduce dependence on the sugar industry. Tourism, adversely affected by the world recession, shows some signs of recovery. The discovery of some petroleum and natural gas may help. Barbados has one of the most developed infrastructures in the Caribbean and the government hopes to deal with current problems through diversification of the economy. As Barbados is the most densely populated country in the hemisphere, specialists agree that even a future population of 300,000 may be beyond the island's capacity. Because of high 1950s fertility, the labor force is expected to increase by 25% by the year 2000, a serious issue considering that current unemployment is already 14.7% After 2015, Barbados will be faced with an "elderly problem." Given its current demographic behavior, Barbados is in a better position to address and solve these problems than most developing countries.

  13. Spotlight: Azerbaijan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    As of mid-1998, Azerbaijan had a population of 7.7 million people residing in a land area of 33,436 square miles. There were 17 births and 6 deaths per 1000 population, as well as 19 infant deaths for every 1000 live births, and a population growing in size at 1.1% annually. The average woman had 2.1 births during her reproductive lifetime and life expectancy was 67 years for men and 74 years for women. Azerbaijan is an oil-producing country, although the agricultural sector is responsible for 25% of gross domestic product and employs 31% of the work force. Despite its oil wealth and strong agricultural and mining sectors, Azerbaijan is struggling to improve its environmental conditions and support a large refugee population. The country's air, water, and soil are severely polluted. Air pollution stems from petrochemical plants, refineries, exhaust fumes, and the burning of untreated garbage; water pollution is the result of oil spills, leaky pipelines and tanks, runoff of fertilizers and pesticides, and improperly treated sewage; and land pollution is due to inadequate waste management. The high incidence of waterborne diseases, including cholera, in Azerbaijan is caused by the inadequate treatment of drinking water and sewage intrusion into leaky distribution pipes. Although over 90% of infants under age 1 year are immunized against diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, polio, and measles, babies in Azerbaijan are 3 times as likely to die before reaching age 1 year than are babies in the US. Azerbaijani children are 5 times more likely to die by age 5 than are US children. Living conditions are especially difficult for the 12% of the overall population which are refugees.

  14. Spotlight: Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    Vietnam, with 57 million people, ranks as the world's 13th most populous country with much of the population concentrated in the rice producing areas of the coastal lowlands and the Mekong and Red River valleys. Since reunification, economic recovery has been difficult. Following the failure of the 1976-80 5-Year Plan, the 1981-85 Plan calls for increased food production and the attainment of self sufficiency. Part of this policy is the reduction of the population growth rate. Vietnam's labor force is about 70% agricultural, with women making up about 2/3 of the farm work force. Most heavy industry is in the North and, although badly damaged in the war, has regained much of its capacity. Coal continues to be Vietnam's leading export. The country's extensive forests also provide great potential for the lumber industry and Vietnam has recently begun offshore oil production. Yet, recovery has been elusive. Foreign aid now comes from the Soviet Union, China, Eastern Europe, and France. In recent years the foreign trade balance has improved, but there have been some setbacks in food production. Efforts to raise food production by encouraging private development of unused land have not been very successful, partly because of the continuing shortage of fertilizers, farm machinery, and insecticides. It is also likely that economic progress has been retarded by large military expenditures necessitated by the wars with Cambodia and China. 1 of the government's major efforts has been a large scale population redistribution from urban areas to the less densely inhabited provinces. New Economic Zones have been established in these areas in the hope that new residents will become self sufficient as soon as possible. As part of its national policy, the government has set a goal to reduce the rate of population growth to 1.5% by 1981 through the National Family Planning Program. Officially reported crude birthrates reflect a decline in fertility from about 40/1000 population in 1976 to about 29 in 1980.

  15. HISTORIANDO A MONTESSORI: DESDE EL FEMINISMO Y SOCIALISMO UTÓPICO HACIA SU COMPROMISO COMO PIONERA DEL HOLISMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celina Chavarría González

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente ensayo indaga acerca de las raíces de la educación montessoriana, pionera de concepciones holistas. Como resultado, se evidencia que únicamente puede ser abordada desde un paradigma de la complejidad y del compromiso con el destino de la humanidad. Solo una comprensión más amplia de su teleología, antropología y epistemología, nos proporcionará la perspectiva que permita integrar estas dimensiones. Con una introducción que parte de la primera costarricense en poner en práctica su filosofía, la preclara Carmen Lyra, se aborda la multi-texualidad, complejidad y trasdisciplinareidad de Montessori, así como sus contingencias y su época, indagación necesaria para sopesar su necesidad hoy.

  16. The effectiveness of spaced retrieval combined with Montessori-based activities in improving the eating ability of residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hua Shan; Lin, Li Chan; Wu, Shiao Chi; Lin, Ke Neng; Liu, Hsiu Chih

    2014-08-01

    To explore the long-term effects of standardized and individualized spaced retrieval combined with Montessori-based activities on the eating ability of residents with dementia. Eating difficulty is common in residents with dementia, resulting in low food intake, followed by eating dependence, weight loss and malnutrition. A single-blinded and quasi-experimental design with repeated measures. Ninety residents with dementia from four veterans' homes in Taiwan took part in this study. The intervention consisted of spaced retrieval combined with Montessori-based activities. Twenty-five participants in the standardized group received 24 intervention sessions over 8 weeks. Thirty-eight participants in the individualized group received tailored intervention sessions. The number of intervention sessions was adjusted according to the participant's recall responses in spaced retrieval. Twenty-seven participants in the control group received no treatment. The Chinese version of the Edinburgh Feeding Evaluation in Dementia was used, and eating amounts and body weight were measured pre-test, posttest and at 1-, 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Data were collected between July 2008-February 2010. Repeated measures of all dependent variables for the three groups were analysed by the linear mixed model. The standardized and individualized interventions could significantly decrease the scores for the Chinese version of the Edinburgh Feeding Evaluation in Dementia and increase the eating amount and body weight over time. Trained nurses in institutions can schedule the standardized or individualized intervention in usual activity time to ameliorate eating difficulty and its sequels. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Historiando a Montessori: Desde el feminismo y socialismo utópico hacia su compromiso como pionera del holismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavarría González, María Celina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El presente ensayo indaga acerca de las raíces de la educación montessoriana, pionera de concepciones holistas. Como resultado, se evidencia que únicamente puede ser abordada desde un paradigma de la complejidad y del compromiso con el destino de la humanidad. Solo una comprensión más amplia de su teleología, antropología y epistemología, nos proporcionará la perspectiva que permita integrar estas dimensiones. Con una introducción que parte de la primera costarricense en poner en práctica su filosofía, la preclara Carmen Lyra, se aborda la multi-texualidad, complejidad y trasdisciplinareidad de Montessori, así como sus contingencias y su época, indagación necesaria para sopesar su necesidad hoy.Abstract: A search for Montessori’s roots concludes that an authentic Montessori education, pioneer in holistic conceptions, can only be addressed from a paradigm of complexity, a Transdisciplinary perspective, and an attitude of compromise with the destiny of humanity. Only an all-encompassing understanding of her teleology, anthropology, and epistemology will provide a perspective to integrate these dimensions. In relating Montessori’s circumstances and life-experiences, a parallel is made to the challenges faced by the first practicing Montessorian in Costa Rica, Carmen Lyra, educator, writer, activist, and founding-member of the Costa Rican Communist Party. Montessori’s multi-texuality, contingencies and the quotidien are addressed in an effort to outline her relevance today.

  18. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Moshirfar, Majid; Pierson, Kasey; Hanamaikai, Kamalani; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Muthappan, Valliammai; Passi, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    Majid Moshirfar,1 Kasey Pierson,2,* Kamalani Hanamaikai,3,* Luis Santiago-Caban,1 Valliammai Muthappan,1 Samuel F Passi11Department of Ophthalmology, John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 3A T Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, Mesa, AZ, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the...

  19. Teachers' Potpourri: Public Speaking For Consciousness III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangervere, Robert J.

    1971-01-01

    The author discusses the interests and attitudes of present day students. The III's, students of consciousness III, reject the entire concept of academic rewards. Their interest in public speaking classes is not to learn to win others over but rather as a means to improve communication. (MS)

  20. Global Monitoring of Mountain Glaciers Using High-Resolution Spotlight Imaging from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, A.; Green, J. J.; Bills, B. G.; Goguen, J.; Ansar, A.; Knight, R. L.; Hallet, B.; Scambos, T. A.; Thompson, L. G.; Morin, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Mountain glaciers around the world are retreating rapidly, contributing about 20% to present-day sea level rise. Numerous studies have shown that mountain glaciers are sensitive to global environmental change. Temperate-latitude glaciers and snowpack provide water for over 1 billion people. Glaciers are a resource for irrigation and hydroelectric power, but also pose flood and avalanche hazards. Accurate mass balance assessments have been made for only 280 glaciers, yet there are over 130,000 in the World Glacier Inventory. The rate of glacier retreat or advance can be highly variable, is poorly sampled, and inadequately understood. Liquid water from ice front lakes, rain, melt, or sea water and debris from rocks, dust, or pollution interact with glacier ice often leading to an amplification of warming and further melting. Many mountain glaciers undergo rapid and episodic events that greatly change their mass balance or extent but are sparsely documented. Events include calving, outburst floods, opening of crevasses, or iceberg motion. Spaceborne high-resolution spotlight optical imaging provides a means of clarifying the relationship between the health of mountain glaciers and global environmental change. Digital elevation models (DEMs) can be constructed from a series of images from a range of perspectives collected by staring at a target during a satellite overpass. It is possible to collect imagery for 1800 targets per month in the ×56° latitude range, construct high-resolution DEMs, and monitor changes in high detail over time with a high-resolution optical telescope mounted on the International Space Station (ISS). Snow and ice type, age, and maturity can be inferred from different color bands as well as distribution of liquid water. Texture, roughness, albedo, and debris distribution can be estimated by measuring bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDF) and reflectance intensity as a function of viewing angle. The non-sun-synchronous orbit

  1. Bildung, Erziehung [education] and care in German early childhood settings – spotlights on current discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frindte Annegret

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In German there is a long tradition of institutionalized daycare center-based early education. These institutions are concerned with Bildung, Erziehung und Betreuung - the education and care of children up to six years of age. Education and childrearing as well as care are all important but separate processes in German early childhood settings. Looking back, this theoretical division has a very long tradition. However, the energized public, political and professional discussions about the PISA results at the beginning of the 21st century led to Bildung and ECEC settings becoming increasingly important. Taking into account this complex and difficult historical development it is interesting to have a critical look at the dominant programmatic frames that characterize the German ECEC system nowadays: Bildung and quality of early education. The former double motif of education (Bildung und Erziehung on the one hand and care (Betreuung on the other hand remains an important aspect of German ECEC practices. Nevertheless, in the political arena and professional discourses Erziehung and Betreuung have been pushed into the background, to remain in symbolic form. Bildung and quality of early education seem to be in the spotlight. We will show how those programmatic frames have taken shape and are manifested in early childhood programs and projects.

  2. Comparison of polar formatting and back-projection algorithms for spotlight-mode SAR image formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.; Doren, Neall

    2006-05-01

    The convolution/back-projection (CBP) algorithm has recently once again been touted as the "gold standard" for spotlight-mode SAR image formation, as it is proclaimed to achieve better image quality than the well-known and often employed polar formatting algorithm (PFA). In addition, it has been suggested that PFA is less flexible than CBP in that PFA can only compute the SAR image on one grid and PFA cannot add or subtract pulses from the imaging process. The argument for CBP acknowledges the computational burden of CBP compared to PFA, but asserts that the increased image accuracy and flexibility of the formation process is warranted, at least in some imaging scenarios. Because CBP can now be sped up by the proper algorithm design, it becomes, according to this line of analysis, the clear algorithm of choice for SAR image formation. In this paper we reject the above conclusion by showing that PFA and CBP achieve the same image quality, and that PFA has complete flexibility, including choice of imaging plane, size of illuminated beam area to be imaged, resolution of the image, and others. We demonstrate these claims via formation of both simulated and real SAR imagery using both algorithms.

  3. Educación ambiental y participación ciudadana en la Escuela Normal Superior Distrital María Montessori (Environmental education and citizen participation at Escuela Normal Superior Distrital María Montessori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Stella Manosalva Corredor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Frente al deterioro de las condiciones ambientales, el equipo ambiental de la Escuela Normal Superior Distrital María Montessori de Bogotá y el “Colectivo Acción Ciudadana” convocan a instituciones gubernamentales locales y “ciudadanos habitantes de calle” a un diálogo de saberes para encontrar soluciones concertadas a la problemática ambiental. En el mismo sentido, el proyecto Educación ambiental y participación ciudadana: estrategias de una política de desarrollo sustentable de la ENSDMM trabaja en la propuesta del Plan Institucional de Gestión Ambiental, por lo que realiza una evaluación estratégica ambiental y señala que la educación ambiental y la participación ciudadana son posibles si logran vincular educación y gestión en la definición de los procesos, actividades y actuaciones, con principios de una ética de responsabilidad social, para alcanzar las metas ambientales sustentables.Abstract: With the aim of facing up to the deterioration of the environmental condition, the environmental team of Escuela Normal Superior Distrital María Montessori and “the Collective Citizen Action” convoke the local government institutions and “the citizen street inhabitants” to have a dialogue of knowledge to find concerted solutions for the current environmental problems. In the same sense, the project Environmental Education and Citizen Participation: Strategies for a policy of sustainable development at ENSDMM works on the proposal of the Environmental Management Institutional Plan. It helps to develop a strategic environmental evaluation and points out that the environmental education and citizen participation are possible if education and management are involved in the processes, activities and actions based on principles of social responsibility ethics to achieve the sustainable environmental goals.

  4. "This one is stronger". Spotlights on the lifelong learning professional-in-action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josje van der Linden

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT“This one is stronger.” Spotlights on the lifelong learning professional-in-action Around the world, lifelong learning is being promoted as a strategy for coping with the changing realities of life and work. The fourth Sustainable Development Goal, agreed in September 2015, reflects this: “ensure equitable and inclusive quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”. Despite its importance, doubts remain about the implementation of this goal in practice (Van der Kamp, 2000; Regmi, 2015. This article looks at the practice of lifelong learning from the point of view of the professionals involved, their actions and the way these actions are challenged, supported and further developed. Following Schön’s “reflection-in-action” (1983, the term “professional-in-action” is used to stress the role of the professional in making the difference on the ground. The leading question is: how can lifelong learning professionals be supported in their contribution to surrounding society and its citizens? The professionals-in-action featured in this article include professionals based in the Netherlands as well as in other, less privileged contexts. Meaningful experiences are used to build a story about challenges, the right to exist, commitment, recognition and room to manoeuvre. The experiences reveal the importance of interacting with the learner and the professional space that is necessary to achieve this. Professionalization in professional learning communities and practice-oriented research must accompany this professional space. SAMENVATTING“Deze is sterker”. Spotlights op de leven lang leren professional-in-actieOm te kunnen omgaan met de veranderende realiteit in leven en werk, wordt wereldwijd een leven lang leren aangemoedigd. Het vierde duurzame ontwikkelingsdoel, vastgesteld in september 2015, weerspiegelt dit: “het verzekeren van kwalitatief goed onderwijs en het bevorderen van de mogelijkheden

  5. Putting the learner in the spotlight – Future directions for English teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne P A Swan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper asserts that English teachers’ understanding of their professionalism enables them to ‘put the learner in the spotlight’ through their highly-developed awareness of local contexts of English use. Changing attitudes to English language teacher identity include a revaluation of the’ native-non-native speaker’ dichotomy which is fast becoming irrelevant as teachers assert new identities based on factors such as professional beliefs about their teaching, understanding their students’ needs and understanding the role of English in their contexts. In a globalising world, these aspects no longer require ‘so-called’ native speaker skills, such as pronunciation and knowledge of ‘English’ culture. In fact, dwelling at length on the issues surrounding native and non-native speaker teacher identity tends to cloud understanding of what qualities English teachers need. Interviews with multilingual teachers of English, working in a variety of countries, have revealed an understanding of the diminishing importance of the ‘native speaker’ and the concomitant growth in the confidence of the multilingual teacher. This confidence has been acquired through depth of linguistic knowledge, through observance of other cultures, and through resistance to the encroachment of English by finding a place for the language which satisfies the needs of multilingual users without requiring subservience. In discovering these strengths of multilingual teachers, I show how stepping outside the boundaries of one’s own limited environment allows English language teachers, wherever they come from, to develop a truly enlightened international professionalism which puts learners firmly in the spotlight.

  6. Single-Side Two-Location Spotlight Imaging for Building Based on MIMO Through-Wall-Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Through-wall-radar imaging is of interest for mapping the wall layout of buildings and for the detection of stationary targets within buildings. In this paper, we present an easy single-side two-location spotlight imaging method for both wall layout mapping and stationary target detection by utilizing multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO through-wall-radar. Rather than imaging for building walls directly, the images of all building corners are generated to speculate wall layout indirectly by successively deploying the MIMO through-wall-radar at two appropriate locations on only one side of the building and then carrying out spotlight imaging with two different squint-views. In addition to the ease of implementation, the single-side two-location squint-view detection also has two other advantages for stationary target imaging. The first one is the fewer multi-path ghosts, and the second one is the smaller region of side-lobe interferences from the corner images in comparison to the wall images. Based on Computer Simulation Technology (CST electromagnetic simulation software, we provide multiple sets of validation results where multiple binary panorama images with clear images of all corners and stationary targets are obtained by combining two single-location images with the use of incoherent additive fusion and two-dimensional cell-averaging constant-false-alarm-rate (2D CA-CFAR detection.

  7. Nisaidie Nif Anye Mwenyewe, Pomogi Mne Eto Sdelat' Samomu: A Comparative Case Study of the Implementation of Montessori Pedagogy in the United Republic of Tanzania and the Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Candy A.

    2010-01-01

    The system of education developed by Maria Montessori, noted Italian feminist, anthropologist and physician, is the single largest pedagogy in the world with over 22,000 public, private, parochial, and charter schools on six continents, enduring even as other teaching methods have waxed and waned. Despite its international diffusion and longevity,…

  8. Space-variant post-filtering for wavefront curvature correction in polar-formatted spotlight-mode SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doren, Neall Evan

    Wavefront curvature defocus effects occur in spotlight-mode SAR imagery when reconstructed via the well-known polar-formatting algorithm (PFA) under certain imaging scenarios. These include imaging at close range, using a very low radar center frequency, utilizing high resolution, and/or imaging very large scenes. Wavefront curvature effects arise from the unrealistic assumption of strictly planar wavefronts illuminating the imaged scene. This dissertation presents a method for the correction of wavefront curvature defocus effects under these scenarios, concentrating on the generalized, squint-mode imaging scenario and its computational aspects. This correction is accomplished through an efficient one-dimensional, image domain filter applied as a post-processing step to PFA. This post-filter, referred to as SVPF, is precalculated from a theoretical derivation of the wavefront curvature effect and varies as a function of scene location. Prior to SVPF, severe restrictions were placed on the imaged scene size in order to avoid defocus effects under these scenarios when using PFA. The SVPF algorithm eliminates the need for scene size restrictions when wavefront curvature effects are present, correcting for wavefront curvature in broadside as well as squinted collection modes while imposing little additional computational penalty for squinted images. This dissertation covers the theoretical development, implementation and analysis of the generalized, squint-mode SVPF algorithm (of which broadside-mode is a special case) and provides examples of its capabilities and limitations as well as offering guidelines for maximizing its computational efficiency. Tradeoffs between the PFA/SVPF combination and other spotlight-mode SAR image formation techniques are discussed with regard to computational burden, image quality, and imaging geometry constraints. It is demonstrated that other methods fail to exhibit a clear computational advantage over polar-formatting in conjunction

  9. Space-Variant Post-Filtering for Wavefront Curvature Correction in Polar-Formatted Spotlight-Mode SAR Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOREN,NEALL E.

    1999-10-01

    Wavefront curvature defocus effects occur in spotlight-mode SAR imagery when reconstructed via the well-known polar-formatting algorithm (PFA) under certain imaging scenarios. These include imaging at close range, using a very low radar center frequency, utilizing high resolution, and/or imaging very large scenes. Wavefront curvature effects arise from the unrealistic assumption of strictly planar wavefronts illuminating the imaged scene. This dissertation presents a method for the correction of wavefront curvature defocus effects under these scenarios, concentrating on the generalized: squint-mode imaging scenario and its computational aspects. This correction is accomplished through an efficient one-dimensional, image domain filter applied as a post-processing step to PF.4. This post-filter, referred to as SVPF, is precalculated from a theoretical derivation of the wavefront curvature effect and varies as a function of scene location. Prior to SVPF, severe restrictions were placed on the imaged scene size in order to avoid defocus effects under these scenarios when using PFA. The SVPF algorithm eliminates the need for scene size restrictions when wavefront curvature effects are present, correcting for wavefront curvature in broadside as well as squinted collection modes while imposing little additional computational penalty for squinted images. This dissertation covers the theoretical development, implementation and analysis of the generalized, squint-mode SVPF algorithm (of which broadside-mode is a special case) and provides examples of its capabilities and limitations as well as offering guidelines for maximizing its computational efficiency. Tradeoffs between the PFA/SVPF combination and other spotlight-mode SAR image formation techniques are discussed with regard to computational burden, image quality, and imaging geometry constraints. It is demonstrated that other methods fail to exhibit a clear computational advantage over polar-formatting in conjunction

  10. NO TODO LO QUE SE DICE MONTESSORI LO ES: DECODIFICACIÓN DE ELEMENTOS ESENCIALES EN UN MUNDO GLOBALIZADO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celina Chavarría González

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Algunas prácticas montessorianas parecen pasar por alto y ser contradictorias con el sentido original de sus escritos. El presente artículo se pregunta sobre principios esenciales de la educación montessoriana, tomando como perspectiva sus propios escritos, a la luz del paradigma de la Complejidad. Los resultados de la indagación se organizan desde una perspectiva sistémica: (1 descubrimientos sobre la niñez en los contextos propiciados; (2 la relevancia de la educación como diseño cultural; (3 una formación de educadores y educadoras que enfatiza tanto la complejidad como una disposición a la comprensión empática de la niñez, la auto-observación y una perspectiva evolutiva planetaria y de la especie. Se vinculan los conceptos con las corrientes de pensamiento histórico-cultural y desde el paradigma de la complejidad. Como resultados, destacan como actuales los ideales de solidaridad y comunidad de aprendices, el papel de la observación y el respeto por los ciclos de actividad o flujo propuestos por Montessori, así como su convicción de que la evolución de la humanidad, aún incompleta, ha de ser conducida, transdisciplinariamente, en la línea de una evolución cultural consciente, particularmente urgente ante el mundo de las tecnologías de información y comunicación (TICs hoy.

  11. A randomized crossover trial to study the effect of personalized, one-to-one interaction using Montessori-based activities on agitation, affect, and engagement in nursing home residents with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Eva S; Eppingstall, Barbara; Camp, Cameron J; Runci, Susannah J; Taffe, John; O'Connor, Daniel W

    2013-04-01

    Increasingly more attention has been paid to non-pharmacological interventions as treatment of agitated behaviors that accompany dementia. The aim of the current study is to test if personalized one-to-one interaction activities based on Montessori principles will improve agitation, affect, and engagement more than a relevant control condition. We conducted a randomized crossover trial in nine residential facilities in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia (n = 44). Personalized one-to-one activities that were delivered using Montessori principles were compared with a non-personalized activity to control for the non-specific benefits of one-to-one interaction. Participants were observed 30 minutes before, during, and after the sessions. The presence or absence of a selected physically non-aggressive behavior was noted in every minute, together with the predominant type of affect and engagement. Behavior counts fell considerably during both the Montessori and control sessions relative to beforehand. During Montessori activities, the amount of time spend actively engaged was double compared to during the control condition and participants displayed more positive affect and interest as well. Participants with no fluency in English (all from non-English speaking backgrounds) showed a significantly larger reduction in agitation during the Montessori than control sessions. Our results show that even non-personalized social contact can assist in settling agitated residents. Tailoring activities to residents' needs and capabilities elicit more positive interactions and are especially suitable for people who have lost fluency in the language spoken predominantly in their residential facility. Future studies could explore implementation by family members and volunteers to avoid demands on facilities' resources. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12609000564257.

  12. Evaluation of personalised, one-to-one interaction using Montessori-type activities as a treatment of challenging behaviours in people with dementia: the study protocol of a crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Eva S; O'Connor, Daniel W

    2010-01-24

    The agitated behaviours that accompany dementia (e.g. pacing, aggression, calling out) are stressful to both nursing home residents and their carers and are difficult to treat. Behaviours stemming from pain, major depression or psychosis benefit from treatment with analgesics, antidepressants or antipsychotics. In other cases, psychotropic medications have limited efficacy but are used very widely. Therefore, increasingly more attention has been paid to nonpharmacological interventions which are associated with fewer risks. The aim of the current study is to test if personalised one-to-one interaction activities based on Montessori principles will reduce the frequency of behavioural symptoms of dementia significantly more than a relevant control condition. We will conduct a controlled trial with randomised cross-over between conditions. Persons with moderate to severe dementia and associated behavioural problems living in aged care facilities will be included in the study. Consented, willing participants will be assigned in random order to Montessori or control blocks for two weeks then switched to the other condition. Montessori activities derive from the principles espoused by Maria Montessori and subsequent educational theorists to promote engagement in learning, namely task breakdown, guided repetition, progression in difficulty from simple to complex, and the careful matching of demands to levels of competence. The control intervention consists of conversation or reading from and looking at pictures in a newspaper to control for non-specific benefits of one-to-one interaction. Presence of target behaviour will be noted as well as level of engagement and type of affect displayed. Secondary measures also include the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory and information on time and funds spend to prepare the activities. If our results show that use of Montessori activities is effective in treating challenging behaviours in individuals with dementia, it will

  13. Evaluation of personalised, one-to-one interaction using Montessori-type activities as a treatment of challenging behaviours in people with dementia: the study protocol of a crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The agitated behaviours that accompany dementia (e.g. pacing, aggression, calling out are stressful to both nursing home residents and their carers and are difficult to treat. Behaviours stemming from pain, major depression or psychosis benefit from treatment with analgesics, antidepressants or antipsychotics. In other cases, psychotropic medications have limited efficacy but are used very widely. Therefore, increasingly more attention has been paid to nonpharmacological interventions which are associated with fewer risks. The aim of the current study is to test if personalised one-to-one interaction activities based on Montessori principles will reduce the frequency of behavioural symptoms of dementia significantly more than a relevant control condition. Methods/Design We will conduct a controlled trial with randomised cross-over between conditions. Persons with moderate to severe dementia and associated behavioural problems living in aged care facilities will be included in the study. Consented, willing participants will be assigned in random order to Montessori or control blocks for two weeks then switched to the other condition. Montessori activities derive from the principles espoused by Maria Montessori and subsequent educational theorists to promote engagement in learning, namely task breakdown, guided repetition, progression in difficulty from simple to complex, and the careful matching of demands to levels of competence. The control intervention consists of conversation or reading from and looking at pictures in a newspaper to control for non-specific benefits of one-to-one interaction. Presence of target behaviour will be noted as well as level of engagement and type of affect displayed. Secondary measures also include the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory and information on time and funds spend to prepare the activities. Discussion If our results show that use of Montessori activities is effective in treating

  14. Caring for people with dementia in residential aged care: successes with a composite person-centered care model featuring Montessori-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gail; Morley, Catherine; Walters, Wendy; Malta, Sue; Doyle, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The moderating effect of nutritional status on depressive symptoms in veteran elders with dementia: a spaced retrieval combined with Montessori-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hua-Shan; Lin, Li-Chan

    2013-10-01

    To examine the long-term effects of fixed/individualized spaced retrieval combined with Montessori-based activities on nutritional status and body mass index and nutritional improvement's moderating effect on depressive symptoms for people with dementia during a specific follow-up period. The decrease in food intake, often combined with poor nutrition, may induce depressive symptoms in people with dementia. A single-blind, quasi-experimental study with repeated measures. Twenty-five fixed group participants received spaced retrieval combined with Montessori-based activities over 24 sessions. Thirty-eight individualized group participants received the same intervention with different sessions, which was adjusted according to each participant's learning response. Twenty-seven control group participants just received routine care. The Chinese version of the Mini-Nutritional Assessment and Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia scores and body mass index were recorded at pre-test, posttest and 1-, 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Data were collected between July 2008-February 2010. The Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores and body mass index of the fixed and individualized groups could be significantly increased over time. Additionally, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia scores could be significantly reduced as a result of the improvement of the Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores arising from the individualized intervention. The depressive symptoms of residents with dementia could be moderated by the individualized intervention through nutritional improvement. Trained clinical nurse specialists can use this individualized intervention for residents with dementia who also have poor nutrition and depressive symptoms. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. World nuclear power once again in the spotlight. Comments on the 13th Pacfic Basin Nuclear Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Mingchang; Ruan Keqiang

    2004-01-01

    This paper comments on The 13th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference held in Shenzhen, China, on October 21/25, 2002 and summarizes some key papers presented in the Conference and viewpoints from their following discussions, which indicates that nuclear power in the world is once again in the spotlight. The Conference shows that in the coming 50 years the roadmap to develop nuclear energy would be divided into two stages: Near-Term Deployment by 2010-2015, some advanced designs were developed for Utilities; Generation IV Program, its overall goal is to identify and develop next-generation nuclear power systems that could be deployed over the next 30 years to help meet the world's energy needs throughout the 21st century. Some visions is the future, such as co-generation of electricity and space heating or desalination, and combination of Generation IV and so-called Hydrogen Economy-the use of hydrogen in vehicle transport to replace petroleum, were presented. As a primary energy source nuclear power is particularly well suited to hydrogen production, offering the almost unique position of large-scale hydrogen production with near-zero emissions. (authors)

  17. Space-variant filtering for correction of wavefront curvature effects in spotlight-mode SAR imagery formed via polar formatting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Thompson, Paul A.; Doren, Neall E.

    1997-07-01

    Wavefront curvature defocus effects can occur in spotlight- mode SAR imagery when reconstructed via the well-known polar formatting algorithm under certain scenarios that include imaging at close range, use of very low center frequency, and/or imaging of very large scenes. The range migration algorithm, also known as seismic migration, was developed to accommodate these wavefront curvature effects. However, the along-track upsampling of the phase history data required of the original version of range migration can in certain instances represent a major computational burden. A more recent version of migration processing, the frequency domain replication and downsampling (FReD) algorithm, obviates the need to upsample, and is accordingly more efficient. In this paper we demonstrate that the combination of traditional polar formatting with appropriate space-variant post- filtering for refocus can be as efficient or even more efficient than FReD under some imaging conditions, as demonstrated by the computer-simulated results in this paper. The post-filter can be pre-calculated from a theoretical derivation of the curvature effect. The conclusion is that the new polar formatting with post filtering algorithm should be considered as a viable candidate for a spotight-mode image formation processor when curvature effects are present.

  18. Crossreactive T Cells Spotlight the Germline Rules for [alpha beta] T Cell-Receptor Interactions with MHC Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shaodong; Huseby, Eric S.; Rubtsova, Kira; Scott-Browne, James; Crawford, Frances; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W. (HHMI); (NJMRC)

    2008-10-31

    To test whether highly crossreactive {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) produced during limited negative selection best illustrate evolutionarily conserved interactions between TCR and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, we solved the structures of three TCRs bound to the same MHC II peptide (IA{sup b}-3K). The TCRs had similar affinities for IA{sup b}-3K but varied from noncrossreactive to extremely crossreactive with other peptides and MHCs. Crossreactivity correlated with a shrinking, increasingly hydrophobic TCR-ligand interface, involving fewer TCR amino acids. A few CDR1 and CDR2 amino acids dominated the most crossreactive TCR interface with MHC, including V{beta}8 48Y and 54E and V{alpha}4 29Y, arranged to impose the familiar diagonal orientation of TCR on MHC. These interactions contribute to MHC binding by other TCRs using related V regions, but not usually so dominantly. These data show that crossreactive TCRs can spotlight the evolutionarily conserved features of TCR-MHC interactions and that these interactions impose the diagonal docking of TCRs on MHC.

  19. That's Not Montessori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Dane L.

    2009-01-01

    The author could not contain herself one day at school recently when a parent of three children shared something she had heard from her eldest daughter. That morning, the eldest daughter was grumbling about the fact that she and her Lower Elementary brother had to go to school while her Preschool brother did not, and she announced to her mother,…

  20. Lack of interest in physical activity - individual and environmental attributes in adults across Europe: The SPOTLIGHT project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraça, Eliana V; Mackenbach, Joreintje D; Lakerveld, Jeroen; Rutter, Harry; Oppert, Jean-Michel; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Compernolle, Sofie; Roda, Célina; Bardos, Helga; Teixeira, Pedro J

    2018-02-21

    A considerable proportion of European adults report little or no interest in physical activity. Identifying individual-level and environmental-level characteristics of these individuals can help designing effective interventions and policies to promote physical activity. This cross-sectional study additionally explored associations between level of interest and physical activity, after controlling for other individual and environmental variables. Measures of objective and perceived features of the physical environment of residence, self-reported physical activity and other lifestyle behaviors, barriers towards physical activity, general health, and demographics were obtained from 5205 European adults participating in the 2014 online SPOTLIGHT survey. t-Tests, chi-square tests, and generalized estimating equations with negative binomial log-link function were conducted. Adults not interested in physical activity reported a higher BMI and a lower self-rated health, were less educated, and to a smaller extent female and less frequently employed. They were more prone to have less healthy eating habits, and to perceive more barriers towards physical activity. Only minor differences were observed in environmental attributes: the non-interested were slightly more likely to live in neighborhoods objectively characterized as less aesthetic and containing more destinations, and perceived as less functional, safe, and aesthetic. Even after controlling for other individual and environmental factors, interest in physical activity remained a significant correlate of physical activity, supporting the importance of this association. This study is among the first to describe characteristics of individuals with reduced interest in physical activity, suggesting that (lack of) interest is a robust correlate of physical activity in several personal and environmental conditions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Potpourri of proton induced x-ray emission analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangelson, N.F.; Nielson, K.K.; Eatough, D.J.; Hansen, L.D.

    1974-01-01

    A proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE) system using 2-MeV protons was developed. Measurements are being made in connection with several research projects. A study is being conducted to provide ecological baseline information in the region of the Navajo and the proposed Kaiparowits coal-fired electric generating stations. Trace-element measurements in this study are reported on air-particulate samples, small rodent tissues, soils, and plants. In another study air particulates collected near a source of SO 2 are extracted from the collection filter with an HCl solution and sulfate and sulfite ions are determined by calorimetric methods. The extraction solution is also analyzed by PIXE to determine the elemental composition. The latter information is necessary for an understanding of possible interferences with the calorimetric method and also indicates the heavy metals emitted by the source. Studies on human autopsy tissues, archeological artifacts, and in regular graduate and undergraduate laboratory classes are mentioned briefly

  2. 19 mm ballistic range: a potpourri of techniques and recipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpluk, G.T.

    1975-01-01

    The expansion of ballistic gun range facilities at LLL has introduced state-of-the-art diagnostic techniques to glovebox-enclosed ballistic guns systems. These enclosed ballistic ranges are designed for the study of one-dimensional shock phenomena in extremely toxic material such as plutonium. The extension of state-of-the-art phtographic and interferometric diagnostic systems to glovebox-enclosed gun systems introduces new design boundaries and performance criteria on optical and mechanical components. A technique for experimentally evaluating design proposals is illustrated, and several specific examples (such as, target alignment, collateral shrapnel damage, and soft recovery) are discussed

  3. Printmaking Potpourri: Three Projects for the Price of One!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubiner, Glenda

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a few of the many printmaking projects she has done over the years: (1) Op-Art prints; (2) Georgia O'Keeffe monoprints; and (3) CD etchings. When teaching printmaking, the author always ties the project into an art-history lesson or a unit the grade level is studying in their other subjects. One printmaking…

  4. A potpourri of results from the KAUST SRI-UQ

    KAUST Repository

    Tempone, Raul

    2016-01-08

    As the KAUST Strategic Research Initiative for Uncertainty Quantification completes its fourth year of existence we recall several results produced during its exciting journey of discovery. These include, among others, contributions on Multi-level and Multi-index sampling techniques that address both direct and inverse problems. We may discuss also several techniques for Bayesian Inverse Problems and Optimal Experimental Design.

  5. Sri Lanka. Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, M N

    1985-01-01

    Sri Lanka, an island country off the southeastern coast of India, populated by an estimated 16.1 million inhabitants, was one of the 1st developing countries to adopt a population policy aimed at reducing population growth and redistributing the population more equitably throughout the country. Population density is high. There are 636 persons/square mile, and 2/3 of the population lives in the southwestern and central regions of the country. Government redistribution policies seek to increase internal migration flows to the drier and less populated areas. The country's birth rate was 27 in 1982, the death rate was 6 in 1981, and the infant mortality rate was 34.4 in 1980. The rate of natural increase in 1982 was 2.1%, and the population growth rate declined from 2.5% prior to 1970 to 1.7% in 1980. The total fertility rate declined between 1963-74 from 5.0-3.4 and then increased to 3.7 in recent years. Given the age structure of the population, the population is expected to continue growing at a high rate in the coming years; however, the age at marriage is increasing and the proportion of young married women in the population is declining, and these trends will have an impact on population growth. These trends are due in part to increased educational and employment opportunities for women. The delay in marriage may also be linked to the dowry system. Given the high rate of poverty, it is difficult for parents to accummulate sufficient resources to provide dowries for their daughters. Sri lanka's economy is predominantly agricultural, with only 15% of the gross national product derived from manufacturing. Approximately 22% of thepopulation lives in urban areas. In 1981 exports totaled US$1.1 billion, and major export items were tea and rubber. In the same year, imports totaled US$1.8 billion and consisted primarily of food, petroleum, and fertilizers. The per capita gross national product was US$320 in 1982. Sri Lanka receives considerable foreign aid, and the country's family planning program receives substantial outside support.

  6. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  7. Spotlight: Health Newsmakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH). "Ensuring all Americans have health care is integral to the mission of HHS and the well– ... said, "Ensuring all Americans have health care is integral to the mission of HHS and the well ...

  8. Spotlight on VET Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents data on the vocational education and training (VET) in Denmark. VET plays a key role in the Danish strategy for lifelong learning and meeting the challenges of globalisation and technological change. The Danish education and training system comprises a mainstream system providing qualifications at all levels, from compulsory…

  9. Physics in the Spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    CERN, ESA and ESO Put Physics On Stage [1] Summary Can you imagine how much physics is in a simple match of ping-pong, in throwing a boomerang, or in a musical concert? Physics is all around us and governs our lives. The World-Wide Web and mobile communication are only two examples of technologies that have rapidly found their way from science into the everyday life. [Go to Physics On Stage Website at CERN] But who is going to maintain these technologies and develop new ones in the future? Probably not young Europeans, as recent surveys show a frightening decline of interest in physics and technology among Europe's citizens, especially schoolchildren. Fewer and fewer young people enrol in physics courses at university. The project "Physics on Stage" tackles this problem head on. An international festival of 400 physics educators from 22 European countries [2] gather at CERN in Geneva from 6 to 10 November to show how fascinating and entertaining physics can be . In a week-long event innovative methods of teaching physics and demonstrations of the fun that lies in physics are presented in a fair, in 10 spectacular performances, and presentations. Workshops on 14 key themes will give the delegates - teachers, professors, artists and other physics educators - the chance to discuss and come up with solutions for the worrying situation of disenchantment with Science in Europe. The European Science and Technology Week 2000 "Physics on Stage" is a joint project organised by the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) , the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , Europe's leading physics research organisations. This is the first time that these three organisations have worked together in such close collaboration to catalyse a change in attitude towards science and technology education. Physics on Stage is funded in part by the European Commission and happens as an event in the European Science and Technology Week 2000, an initiative of the EC to raise public awareness of science and technology. Other partners are the European Physical Society (EPS) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). European Commissioner Busquin to Visit Physics On Stage On Thursday, November 9, Philippe Busquin , Commissioner for Research, European Commission, Prof. Luciano Maiani , Director-General of CERN, Antonio Rodota , Director-General of ESA, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky , Director-General of ESO, and Dr. Achilleas Mitsos , Director-General of the Research DG in the European Commission, will participate in the activities of the Physics on Stage Festival. On this occasion, Commissioner Busquin will address conference delegates and the Media on the importance of Science and of innovative science and technology education. The Festival Each of the more than 400 delegates of the festival has been selected during the course of the year by committees in each of the 22 countries for outstanding projects promoting science. For example, a group of Irish physics teachers and their students will give a concert on instruments made exclusively of plumbing material, explaining the physics of sound at the same time. A professional theatre company from Switzerland stages a play on antimatter. Or two young Germans invite spectators to their interactive physics show where they juggle, eat fire and perform stunning physics experiments on stage. The colourful centrepiece of this week is the Physics Fair. Every country has its own stands where delegates show their projects, programmes or experiments and gain inspiration from the exhibits from other countries. Physics on Stage is a unique event. Nothing like it has ever happened in terms of international exchange, international collaboration and state of the art science and technology education methods. The Nobel prizewinners of 2030 are at school today. What ideas can Europe's teachers put forward to boost their interest in science? An invitation to the media We invite journalists to take part in this both politically and visually interesting event. We expect many useful results from this exchange of experience, there will a large choice of potential interview partners and of course uncountable images and impressions. Please fill in the form below and fax it back to CERN under +41 22 7850247. Go to the Webpage http://www.cern.ch/pos to find out all about Physics on Stage Festival at CERN. The main "Physics on Stage" web address is: http://www.estec.esa.nl/outreach/pos There is also a Physics On Stage webpage at ESO Notes [1] This is a joint Press Release by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) , the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO). [2] The 22 countries are the member countries of at least one of the participating organisations or the European Union: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.

  10. SPOTLIGHTING ENGLISH PHRASAL VERBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Kovács

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phrasal verbs or multi-word verbs, such as call off, go into and run up against, etc. represent a very interesting and challenging aspect of the English language. In ELT there is a widespread view that familiarity with a wide range of phrasal verbs and the ability to use them appropriately in context are among the distinguishing marks of a native-like command of English. However, it is also generally recognised that these verb+particle combinations pose special difficulties for both learners and teachers of English partly because there are so many of them, partly because they have special semantic, syntactic and stylistic properties. Besides, quite many of them can be used as nouns, e.g. a hideaway, a stowaway and a write-off, etc. and adjectives, e.g. a broken-down car and a knockdown price, etc. What is more, again quite many of them have a single word equivalent of Romance origin, which, however, often differs from them in terms of style, collocation and meaning, e.g. blow up ~ explode, do away with ~ eliminate and put out ~ extinguish, etc. Furthermore, it is a misconception that phrasal verbs are mainly used in informal style and in spoken English. In fact, they can be found in many styles of writing, ranging from highly formal texts to slang, e.g. call forth vs. gobble up, etc. This paper sets out to explore the unique and complex nature of English verb+particle constructions in order to make them a more manageable part of the vocabulary of English.

  11. Spotlight on Spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin County Board of Education, Elizabethtown, KY.

    Word lists and class activities are suggested for improving the spelling of elementary school students. The word lists contain rhyming words, antonyms, synonyms, homonyms, 100 spelling demons, look-alike words that are easily confused, and content area words (for geography, mathematics, science, sports, music, social studies). The suggested…

  12. Spotlight on the media

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Do you want to know more about how the media works, how to deal with journalists? How to maximise opportunity and minimise threat? Then please join us on 22 November. This session will cover how to work effectively with the media, including print, radio and TV. You’ll get an insight into how journalists and news rooms operate. You’ll learn to recognise both soft balls and traps - and develop the techniques for dealing with them. The challenges of explaining CERN to any media outlet will be dealt with too. This interactive presentation, given by Jessica Pryce-Jones, Managing Director of the consultancy firm iOpener Ltd, and Nisha Pillai, news anchor for BBC World, will be illustrated with various case studies. How to deal with the media: maximising opportunity and minimising threat Thursday 22 November, from 4.30 pm, Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500 Coffee break before the event at 4.00 pm

  13. Spotlight on VET: Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of VET (vocational education and training) in Ireland. In Ireland, the main providers of VET are the national Training and Employment Authority (FAS--a non-commercial semi-State body, part of the public sector) and vocational education committees (VECs--public sector bodies at county level responsible for vocational…

  14. Costa Rica. Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haub, C; Adams, J

    1985-05-01

    Costa Rica's demographic and economic characteristics are highlighted. Costa Rica's demographic situation is unique in certain respects. Between the late 1950s and the late 1970s, the total fertility rate declined from about 7 to 4 and then stabilized instead of continuing to decline to 2 as expected. This is especially surprising since the level of contraceptive use is similar to that of most European countries. Approximately 2/3 of all couples practice contraception. It is possible that the rate will slowly decline to the expected level, but a delayed decline will ultimately produce a much larger population than initially expected. The demographic situation in Costa Rica is being carefully monitored for insights which might be useful in predicting future fertility patterns in other developing countries. The government of Costa Rica recognizes that family planning is a necessary component of maternal and child health care; however, most family planning services are provided by private organizations. In 1982, population size was 2.6 million, the crude birth rate was 30.7, the crude death rate was 3.9, infant mortality was 19.3, and the rate of natural increase was 2.7%. The population is predominantly Spanish, and the indigenous population totals only 20,000. 48% of the population is urban. Costa Rica has a relatively stable deomocratic government. It relationshiops with other countries are generally peaceful, but tensions between Nicaragua and Costa Rica are increasing. The country's economic situation deteriorated in recent years due primarily to a decline in the price of coffee, the country's principle export commodity. The trade deficit increased markedly, unemployment increased, and income fell sharply. The economic slowdown is now showing signs of a reversal. In 1983 exports, consisting primarily of coffee, bananas, beef, sugar, cane and cacao, totalled US$871 million, and imports, consisting mainly of manufactured goods and equipment, chemicals, fuel, food, and fertilizer, amounted to US$870 million. In 1983 the per capita gross national product was US$1020.

  15. Spotlight on Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Lima's population grew from 1 million to 7 million during 1969-89, almost entirely due to rural-urban immigration. Other urban areas such as Iquitos experienced similar growth over the period. National, regional, and municipal governments have been working to restore civil order in the country and to bring basic health, sanitation, and education programs to the population. However, language, attitudinal, and cultural differences impede progress in this diverse and changing country. Peru's young population of median age 21 years presents a challenge to the development and implementation of effective reproductive health care programs for the country. Pathfinder's work in Peru is helped by current President Alberto Fujimori's strong and active support for family planning. In the face of strong opposition from the Roman Catholic Church, President Fujimori has held onto his conviction and commitment to reduce levels of maternal morbidity and mortality in Peru by increasing the accessibility of family planning programs. Pathfinder's work in Peru with the US Agency for International Development (USAID) includes the 5-year program Project 2000 designed to improve maternal and child health in 12 priority regions of the country. Pathfinder is also working with USAID to link family planning to postpartum services in 30 public hospitals throughout the country. New programs will be launched with contributions from individuals and foundations.

  16. Obesity-related behaviours and BMI in five urban regions across Europe: sampling design and results from the SPOTLIGHT cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakerveld, Jeroen; Ben Rebah, Maher; Mackenbach, Joreintje D; Charreire, Hélène; Compernolle, Sofie; Glonti, Ketevan; Bardos, Helga; Rutter, Harry; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Brug, Johannes; Oppert, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-27

    To describe the design, methods and first results of a survey on obesity-related behaviours and body mass index (BMI) in adults living in neighbourhoods from five urban regions across Europe. A cross-sectional observational study in the framework of an European Union-funded project on obesogenic environments (SPOTLIGHT). 60 urban neighbourhoods (12 per country) were randomly selected in large urban zones in Belgium, France, Hungary, the Netherlands and the UK, based on high or low values for median household income (socioeconomic status, SES) and residential area density. A total of 6037 adults (mean age 52 years, 56% female) participated in the online survey. Self-reported physical activity, sedentary behaviours, dietary habits and BMI. Other measures included general health; barriers and motivations for a healthy lifestyle, perceived social and physical environmental characteristics; the availability of transport modes and their use to specific destinations; self-defined neighbourhood boundaries and items related to residential selection. Across five countries, residents from low-SES neighbourhoods ate less fruit and vegetables, drank more sugary drinks and had a consistently higher BMI. SES differences in sedentary behaviours were observed in France, with residents from higher SES neighbourhoods reporting to sit more. Residents from low-density neighbourhoods were less physically active than those from high-density neighbourhoods; during leisure time and (most pronounced) for transport (except for Belgium). BMI differences by residential density were inconsistent across all countries. The SPOTLIGHT survey provides an original approach for investigating relations between environmental characteristics, obesity-related behaviours and obesity in Europe. First descriptive results indicate considerable differences in health behaviours and BMI between countries and neighbourhood types. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  17. For ignoring the moral rights of the photographer Marcus Igno Rudolf Loerbrocks the Dirección Nacional de Derecho de Autor condemned the Colegio Montessori Limitada of Cartagena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Andrea Triana Uribe

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Colombian Copyrights Office (dnda decided against the Colegio Montessori of Cartagena for infringing the moral rights of disclosure of Marcus Igno Rudolf Loerbroks. This case is important because it is one of the few decisions in which authors moral rights have been protected in Colombia. This ruling reveals the jurisprudential line that the dnda has gradually established for the protection of copyrights in our country, and especially for the moral rights enjoyed by the author of the art work as their owner. This is because, unlike the economic rights, moral rights are perpetual, inalienable and unassignable; as exposed in the case of the artist Gabriel Antonio Calle against the shopping mall San Diego and the case exposed in this review.

  18. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): use of a small group reading activity run by persons with dementia in adult day health care and long-term care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrajner, Michael J; Camp, Cameron J

    2007-01-01

    Six persons in the early to middle stages of dementia ("leaders") were trained in Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP) to lead a reading activity for 22 persons with more advanced dementia ("participants") in an adult day health center (ADHC) and a special care unit (SCU) in a skilled nursing facility. Researchers assessed the leaders' abilities to learn and follow the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with their roles. In addition, participants' engagement and affect were measured, both during standard activities programming and during client-led activities. Results of this study suggest that persons with dementia can indeed successfully lead small group activities, if several important prerequisites are met. Furthermore, the engagement and affect of participants was more positive in client-led activities than in standard activities programming.

  19. Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Detection with Post-Event Sub-Meter VHR TerraSAR-X Staring Spotlight Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Gong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Compared with optical sensors, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR can provide important damage information due to its ability to map areas affected by earthquakes independently from weather conditions and solar illumination. In 2013, a new TerraSAR-X mode named staring spotlight (ST, whose azimuth resolution was improved to 0.24 m, was introduced for various applications. This data source made it possible to extract detailed information from individual buildings. In this paper, we present a new concept for individual building damage assessment using a post-event sub-meter very high resolution (VHR SAR image and a building footprint map. With the building footprint map, the original footprints of buildings can be located in the SAR image. Based on the building imaging analysis of a building in the SAR image, the features in the building footprint can be extracted to identify standing and collapsed buildings. Three machine learning classifiers, including random forest (RF, support vector machine (SVM and K-nearest neighbor (K-NN, are used in the experiments. The results show that the proposed method can obtain good overall accuracy, which is above 80% with the three classifiers. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated based on samples of buildings using descending and ascending sub-meter VHR ST images, which were all acquired from the same area in old Beichuan County, China.

  20. Application of the EGM Method to a LED-Based Spotlight: A Constrained Pseudo-Optimization Design Process Based on the Analysis of the Local Entropy Generation Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Sciubba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the entropy generation minimization (EGM method is applied to an industrial heat transfer problem: the forced convective cooling of a LED-based spotlight. The design specification calls for eighteen diodes arranged on a circular copper plate of 35 mm diameter. Every diode dissipates 3 W and the maximum allowedtemperature of the plate is 80 °C. The cooling relies on the forced convection driven by a jet of air impinging on the plate. An initial complex geometry of plate fins is presented and analyzed with a commercial CFD code that computes the entropy generation rate. A pseudo-optimization process is carried out via a successive series of design modifications based on a careful analysis of the entropy generation maps. One of the advantages of the EGM method is that the rationale behind each step of the design process can be justified on a physical basis. It is found that the best performance is attained when the fins are periodically spaced in the radial direction.

  1. High resolution deformation maps of Volcán de Colima, Mexico, derived from a year-long TerraSAR-X Spotlight time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Jacqueline; Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.

    2015-04-01

    Volcán de Colima is a steep sloped explosive stratovolcano located in southern Central Mexico, and one of the most active volcanoes in North America. Major recent historical eruptions occured in 1818 (VEI 4) and 1913 (VEI 5), which removed several hundred meters from the summit of the volcanic edifice [1], and point towards the activity being marked by 100-year cycles which terminate in a large Plinian eruption. Also, five large flank collapse events have been identified during the Holocene [2]. Since the beginning of the most recent eruptiove period in 1998, the type of activity has been varying between predominantly explosive, dome building and dome collapse. Between 2007 and 2011, the activity at Colima was characterized by dome extrusion. The volcano then entered a period of low activity, which lasted until January 2013, when a series of explosions took place which initiated a new, still ongoing period of dome growth. The historical eruption of 1913, as well as the renewal of the activity in 2013, were both preceeded by longer periods of low activity, and only very limited short term precursors. The year 2012 at Volcán de Colima is therefore a good example to study volcanic activity in periods of quiescence, but leading up to an eruption. Furthermore, the possibility of a larger event in the future make it a particularly important volcano to study. We have acquired TerraSAR-X data in spotlight mode for ascending and descending tracks over Colima, obtaining a high spatial resolution of up to 2 m, and a temporal resolution of up to 11 days. Here we present the time series of the dome deformation between February and December 2012. We generated interferograms using an updated version of DORIS, accounting for the doppler variation in along track direction [3] and subsequently analysed the time series of the deformation pattern with the small baseline - persistent scatterer (PS) approach implemented in the StaMPS software. We removed the topographically correlated

  2. NO TODO LO QUE SE DICE MONTESSORI LO ES: DECODIFICACIÓN DE ELEMENTOS ESENCIALES EN UN MUNDO GLOBALIZADO (ARE WE BEING MONTESSORIANS? DECODING ESSENTIALS IN A GLOBALIZAD WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavarría González, María Celina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Algunas prácticas montessorianas parecen pasar por alto y ser contradictorias con el sentido original de sus escritos. El presente artículo se pregunta sobre principios esenciales de la educación montessoriana, tomando como perspectiva sus propios escritos, a la luz del paradigma de la Complejidad. Los resultados de la indagación se organizan desde una perspectiva sistémica: (1 descubrimientos sobre la niñez en los contextos propiciados; (2 la relevancia de la educación como diseño cultural; (3 una formación de educadores y educadoras que enfatiza tanto la complejidad como una disposición a la comprensión empática de la niñez, la auto-observación y una perspectiva evolutiva planetaria y de la especie. Se vinculan los conceptos con las corrientes de pensamiento histórico-cultural y desde el paradigma de la complejidad. Como resultados, destacan como actuales los ideales de solidaridad y comunidad de aprendices, el papel de la observación y el respeto por los ciclos de actividad o flujo propuestos por Montessori, así como su convicción de que la evolución de la humanidad, aún incompleta, ha de ser conducida, transdisciplinariamente, en la línea de una evolución cultural consciente, particularmente urgente ante el mundo de las tecnologías de información y comunicación (TICs hoy.Abstract: The present article involves an inquiry into essential conditions for a Montessori education, in three realms: (1 evolutionary characteristics of childhood-in-context; (2 a “scientifically” prepared existential environment, to act interactively towards the learning-education-development of potentialities; (3 a system for the transformation of educators, with emphasis on a disposition towards the empathic apprehension of childhood, a complexity approach, self-observation and a planetary and species evolutionary perspective. In order to relate her concepts with mainstream educational theory, links are made to cultural

  3. CURE Scholar Spotlight - Dr. Brady

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donita C. Brady, a Research Associate Senior at the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University, is investigating the role that copper plays in cell growth and tumor biology. Inspired by her mentor Christopher Counter, a cancer biologist, and Dennis Thiele, a copper biologist, at Duke University, Brady has a unique interest in the way copper interacts with protein pathways, such as the BRAF (a human gene that directs cell growth)-MEK-ERK pathway, which is a major target for targeted cancer therapies because the BRAF gene is mutated 60% of the time in melanoma.

  4. Spotlight on medicinal chemistry education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Simone; Xu, Yao-Zhong; Taylor, Peter; Turner, Nicholas; Coaker, Hannah; Crews, Kasumi

    2014-05-01

    The field of medicinal chemistry is constantly evolving and it is important for medicinal chemists to develop the skills and knowledge required to succeed and contribute to the advancement of the field. Future Medicinal Chemistry spoke with Simone Pitman (SP), Yao-Zhong Xu (YX), Peter Taylor (PT) and Nick Turner (NT) from The Open University (OU), which offers an MSc in Medicinal Chemistry. In the interview, they discuss the MSc course content, online teaching, the future of medicinal chemistry education and The OU's work towards promoting widening participation. SP is a Qualifications Manager in the Science Faculty at The OU. She joined The OU in 1993 and since 1998 has been involved in the Postgraduate Medicinal Chemistry provision at The OU. YX is a Senior Lecturer in Bioorganic Chemistry at The OU. He has been with The OU from 2001, teaching undergraduate courses of all years and chairing the master's course on medicinal chemistry. PT is a Professor of Organic Chemistry at The OU and has been involved with the production and presentation of The OU courses in Science and across the university for over 30 years, including medicinal chemistry modules at postgraduate level. NT is a Lecturer in Analytical Science at The OU since 2009 and has been involved in the production of analytical sciences courses, as well as contributing to the presentation of a number of science courses including medicinal chemistry.

  5. Spotlight on modern transformer design

    CERN Document Server

    Georgilakis, Pavlos S

    2009-01-01

    Increasing competition in the global transformer market has put tremendous responsibilities on the industry to increase reliability while reducing cost. This book introduces an approach to transformer design using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques in combination with finite element method (FEM).

  6. School Shootings in Policy Spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2006-01-01

    The three school shootings that left a principal and six students dead in less than a week have sparked a barrage of pledges from national and state political leaders to tighten campus security. School safety experts urged caution against overreacting to the horrific, but rare, incidents in rural schools in Colorado, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.…

  7. Spotlight on quantum black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Particle theorists are getting unusually excited these days as new ideas and different approaches converge in the search for a picture which describes all the underlying mechanisms of Nature. Although the final picture has yet to emerge, the outline is becoming clearer. While the intellectual mountain range to be crossed was once intimidating, these new developments are beginning to point to a way over. A series of recent topical workshops have highlighted these developments and leap-frogged ahead - including String 95 at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, this spring and a conference on Mirror Symmetry and S-duality held in June at Trieste's International Centre for Theoretical Physics. Closing the Trieste meeting, prominent theorist Ed Witten said ''this is one of the most exciting conferences in which I have ever participated''. With profound problems to be overcome, the new ideas now on the market at first look very unconventional. Classical electromagnetism exploits the parallels between electricity and magnetism but accepts the everyday wisdom that free magnetic charges (magnetic monopoles) do not exist. Particle theorists are not so sure, and for a long time magnetic monopoles have been tentatively included on the theoretical menu. The role of these monopoles has now become crucial. Also playing a central role is the idea of supersymmetry. In a quantum theory, basic particles, like quarks and leptons (fermions), interact through force-carrying particles (bosons) like the photon of electromagnetism, the W and Z of the weak nuclear force and the gluon of the strong inter-quark force. In supersymmetry, each fermion has additional boson partners, and vice versa. So far, no evidence for supersymmetry has been found, but the underlying ideas are so convincing that its existence is almost taken for granted among theorists. Supersymmetry would have governed the mechanics of the Big Bang, but as the temperature fell, supersymmetry 'froze' out and became almost invisible. In the late 1970s, Klaus Montonen and David Olive pointed out that if magnetic monopoles are included in a supersymmetric quantum picture, the electric and magnetic sectors are in some respects mutually complementary. Magnetic charges provide additional calculational leverage, sidestepping the traditional problem of having to solve the equations of the theory through sometimes unsatisfactory approximations. Subsequently, the ideas were enlarged to include 'dyons' - particles having both electric and magnetic charges, providing a much richer scenario

  8. Get prepared for the spotlight

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    With the re-start of the LHC, not just the scientific community will have its eyes on CERN. Hundreds of journalists will continue to ensure high media coverage of the Lab’s activities. As the DG stated in his message in issue No.15 of The Bulletin, "we have a greater degree of responsibility in the way we communicate". The Media Training organized by the Press Office gives you the chance to learn how to do it.If you are a scientist, engineer, computer expert or in any way a person likely to interact with the media, you might get the chance to be involved in the activities of the Press Office, which welcomes over 500 journalists from all over the world every year. "We are looking for enthusiastic scientists, researchers, engineers and IT specialists who are eager to explain their work to journalists", explains Renilde Vanden Broeck, Press Officer. "Last year we dealt with more than 700 media on-site. A regular media visit covers the main activities of CERN, namely accelerat...

  9. Refugee scientists under the spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extance, Andy

    2017-07-01

    Thousands of people are forced to flee war-torn regions every year, but the struggles of scientists who have to leave their homeland often goes under the radar. Andy Extance reports on initiatives to help

  10. CERN communication in the spotlight

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    A rich harvest of important prizes has recently been awarded to CERN communication efforts. The list includes: the European Excellence Award 2010, the physics.org “people’s choice” award for the best children's website, and two prizes in the UK Recruitment Advertising Awards for 2011. Given the high expectations surrounding CERN's future physics results, there is little doubt that the old refrain “the best is yet to come” also applies to communication at CERN.   Marie Anne Bugnon and Antonella del Rosso, from the Communication Group, accept the 2010 European Excellence Award for LHC First Physics. In recent years, efforts to communicate as much and as well as possible have been stepped up at CERN – across all communities – and the fruits have come little by little. First of all, awards represent the recognition of the public, which, on different levels, has shown that it appreciates CERN’s efforts to...

  11. Neutrino physics in the spotlight

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Following on from the Council recommendation made in Lisbon in 2006 and responding to the needs of a large community of scientists, CERN will organize the European Strategy for Future Neutrino Physics workshop on 1-3 October. One of the main goals of the workshop is to start establishing a roadmap for the coherent participation of Europe in neutrino physics."The format of the workshop will consist of invited talks to present the current situation and future possibilities; unlike other workshops, 30% of the time will be reserved for discussion", explains Ewa Rondio from the organising committee. "Resources for future neutrino experiments will be difficult to acquire. A coordinated approach and the participation of a large community of interested scientists are undoubtedly crucial factors". The workshop will be the opportunity to highlight the areas where substantial research and development activities are required in order to design the facilities of the next decade. "The w...

  12. Special Spotlight: 2014 AACR Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    A focus of the 7thAACR annual conference was community engagement and how to attract and retain racial and ethnic populations. Three community health educators from CRCHD’s National Outreach Network program delivered presentations in this area.

  13. Energy--Structure--Life, A Learning System for Understanding Science. A Potpourri of Miscellany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixby, Louis W.; And Others

    A discussion of the philosophy and rationale of Energy - Structure - Life, a two year high school sequence in integrated science, is contained in the introductory section of this manual. The student's copy of the laboratory activities and the quizzes for the first year of the program constitute the major portion of this volume. The two year course…

  14. A potpourri of impedance measurements at the advanced photon source storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereno, N.S.; Chae, Y.C.; Harkay, K.C.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Milton, S.V.; Yang, B.X.

    1997-01-01

    Machine coupling impedances were determined in the APS storage ring from measurements of the bunch length, synchronous phase, and synchrotron and betatron tunes vs single-bunch current. The transverse measurements were performed for various numbers of small gap insertion device (ID) chambers installed in the ring. The transverse impedance is determined from measurements of the transverse tunes and bunch length as a function of single-bunch current. The shift in the synchrotron tune was measured as a function of bunch current from which the total cavity impedance was extracted. The loss factor was determined by measuring the relative synchronous phase as a function of bunch current. The longitudinal resistive impedance is calculated using the loss factor dependence on the bunch length. From these results, the authors can estimate what the impedance would be for a full set of ID chambers

  15. Investigation on the separability of slums by multi-aspect TerraSAR-X dual-co-polarized high resolution spotlight images based on the multi-scale evaluation of local distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andreas; Sieg, Tobias; Wurm, Michael; Taubenböck, Hannes

    2018-02-01

    Following recent advances in distinguishing settlements vs. non-settlement areas from latest SAR data, the question arises whether a further automatic intra-urban delineation and characterization of different structural types is possible. This paper studies the appearance of the structural type ;slums; in high resolution SAR images. Geocoded Kennaugh elements are used as backscatter information and Schmittlet indices as descriptor of local texture. Three cities with a significant share of slums (Cape Town, Manila, Mumbai) are chosen as test sites. These are imaged by TerraSAR-X in the dual-co-polarized high resolution spotlight mode in any available aspect angle. Representative distributions are estimated and fused by a robust approach. Our observations identify a high similarity of slums throughout all three test sites. The derived similarity maps are validated with reference data sets from visual interpretation and ground truth. The final validation strategy is based on completeness and correctness versus other classes in relation to the similarity. High accuracies (up to 87%) in identifying morphologic slums are reached for Cape Town. For Manila (up to 60%) and Mumbai (up to 54%), the distinction is more difficult due to their complex structural configuration. Concluding, high resolution SAR data can be suitable to automatically trace potential locations of slums. Polarimetric information and the incidence angle seem to have a negligible impact on the results whereas the intensity patterns and the passing direction of the satellite are playing a key role. Hence, the combination of intensity images (brightness) acquired from ascending and descending orbits together with Schmittlet indices (spatial pattern) promises best results. The transfer from the automatically recognized physical similarity to the semantic interpretation remains challenging.

  16. Connecting Homework Effectiveness with Montessori Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagby, Janet; Sulak, Tracey

    2015-01-01

    This article examines recent educational research on the effectiveness of homework in improving achievement. The definition we have chosen to use for homework is any assignment intended to be completed during nonschool hours.

  17. L'insegnante secondo Maria Montessori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Pironi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Nella riflessione montessoriana, la figura dell’insegnante assume significati altamente innovativi che ne rivelano il grado estremo di complessità, evidenziando suggestive e mai risolte ambivalenze.

  18. Madagascar's open landscapes under the spotlight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharmaceuticals, and emblematic landscapes for tourism. This special issue consists of six contributions ... Switzerland. Indian Ocean e-Ink. Promoting African Publishing and Education www.ioeink.com. Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG). Madagascar Research and Conservation Program. BP 3391. Antananarivo, 1 01 , ...

  19. Program Spotlight: CRCHD Mock Grant Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CRCHD) held a Professional Development Workshop for its Continuing Umbrella of Research Experience (CURE) scholars on June 23-24, 2014, in Rockville, Maryland.

  20. "Crazy for You." Spotlight on Theater Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, John C.

    This booklet presents a variety of materials concerning the musical play "Crazy for You," a recasting of the 1930 hit, "Girl Crazy." After a brief historical introduction to the musical play, the booklet presents biographical information on composers George and Ira Gershwin, the book writer, the director, the star…

  1. The ATLAS cavern in the spotlight

    CERN Document Server

    On Wednesday, 4th June, the President of the Swiss Confederation, Pascal Couchepin, inaugurated the world's largest experimental cavern, which is to house the ATLAS detector in 2007, and announced Switzerland's gift to CERN of the "Palais de l'Equilibre".

  2. Spotlight on depression: a Pharma Matters report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, P; Jago, C

    2014-03-01

    Depression represents a huge pharmaceutical market opportunity. There are approximately 350 million people worldwide with depression, and it is the leading cause of disability in the world. In the U.S., 9.1% of the population suffers from depression. Globally, fewer than half of depression sufferers receive treatment for their illness, and in some countries this figure falls to fewer than 1 in 10. The high incidence rate, combined with limited market penetration, makes depression a high potential market for pharmaceuticals. However, companies developing drugs for depression also face a number of serious challenges. Psychosocial treatment options remain the preferred first-line therapy ahead of medication-and when it comes to drug treatment, the abundance of generic options available has significantly contributed to halving the value of the branded antidepressant market over recent years. Another hurdle faced by new drugs is the requirement that all antidepressants carry a black-box warning regarding the increased risk of suicide in children, adolescents and young adults, which limits their use in this population. Switching between medications presents both an opportunity and a challenge, as a significant number of patients will switch away from their first medication within the first year of treatment. The lack of complete understanding of why depression occurs also makes this area a difficult one, although it opens the door for the development of drugs with novel mechanisms of action. Copyright 2014 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  3. Spotlight on acupuncture in laboratory animal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magden ER

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth R Magden Department of Veterinary Sciences, Michale E Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, USA Abstract: Acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of years, although it is only in the past century that science has worked to unravel the mechanisms behind its use. Literature supporting the efficacious use of acupuncture to treat a variety of conditions has been and continues to be published, including the randomized controlled studies we all appreciate when practicing evidence-based medicine. The use of acupuncture in veterinary medicine has paralleled the trends observed in people, with an increasingly common use to remedy specific medical conditions. These conditions are commonly related to neurological dysfunction or orthopedic pain. Although pain relief is the most common use of acupuncture, numerous other conditions have been shown to improve with this therapy. Laboratory animals are also benefiting from acupuncture. Its use is starting to be incorporated into research settings, although there is still further progress to be made in this field. Acupuncture has been shown to improve clinical conditions and quality of life in laboratory animals, and should be considered as a tool to treat laboratory animals with conditions known to benefit from therapy. Here we review the history, mechanisms of action, and use of acupuncture to treat veterinary patients and laboratory animals. Keywords: acupuncture, laboratory animals, nonhuman primates

  4. Students as Active Historians. Spotlight Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopke-Wilson, MariRae

    2006-01-01

    Coming up with interesting information literacy lessons can be challenging for the high school librarian. If school librarians have taught their upper class students well, most are prepared to navigate their way successfully through libraries and Internet resources. In this article, the author explores a unique high school project that resulted in…

  5. Corruption: history and future in the spotlight

    OpenAIRE

    Sanudo, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Rezension zu: Frank Vogl, Waging War on Corruption (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2012). Shaazka Beyerle, Curtailing Corruption, People Power for Accountability and Justice (Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2014)

  6. Global women's health: a spotlight on caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Judith A; Woods, Nancy Fugate

    2009-09-01

    Caregiving is a women's health issue globally, as many more women than men are informal caregivers. Caregiving related to gender role socialization, burden, and economic and health consequences has been discussed in the literature. Together this body of work demonstrates some positive but mainly negative consequences to the health and economic circumstances of women. Overall achievement of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals has important implications for informal caregivers globally, because achievement of these goals is essential to reducing the undue burden, the lost opportunities, and the injustice of health care systems that take advantage of women's volunteer caregiving.

  7. 10 September: CERN in the media spotlight

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Media organisations around the world are holding their breath in anticipation for the moment the LHC circulates its first proton beam. On 10 September, the Globe and the experiment control rooms will not only be packed full of eager physicists and electrical engineers, but also journalists. Their aim? Capturing the first moments in the life of the LHC and beaming it around the world for millions of people to see! "Almost 250 journalists from 33 countries will be here on 10 September. The start-up of the LHC is not just a scientific landmark, but a news story that captures the imagination of people everywhere," comments James Gilles, the Communication Group leader. A media centre will be set up in the Globe along with a large screen showing the activity in the CCC. Throughout the day a member of the operations team will be on hand to explain what is happening. The first injection of the beam into the machine will be between 9:00 and 10:00 a. m., with the main objective...

  8. Fat & fabulous: bifunctional lipids in the spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkant, Per; Holthuis, Joost C M

    2014-08-01

    Understanding biological processes at the mechanistic level requires a systematic charting of the physical and functional links between all cellular components. While protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid networks have been subject to many global surveys, other critical cellular components such as membrane lipids have rarely been studied in large-scale interaction screens. Here, we review the development of photoactivatable and clickable lipid analogues-so-called bifunctional lipids-as novel chemical tools that enable a global profiling of lipid-protein interactions in biological membranes. Recent studies indicate that bifunctional lipids hold great promise in systematic efforts to dissect the elaborate crosstalk between proteins and lipids in live cells and organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Spotlight on the 9-valent HPV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Starting in 2006, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) has been progressively implemented in most developed countries. Two vaccines have been successfully used, a bivalent vaccine targeting HPV-related cancers (bHPV) and a quadrivalent vaccine (qHPV) targeting both HPV-related cancers and genital warts. Between December 2014 and June 2015, a new nonavalent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) was granted marketing authorization in the USA and Europe. The 9vHPV was developed from the qHPV and includes five additional HPV types that should increase the level of protection toward HPV-related cancers. Efficacy and/or immunogenicity of 9vHPV has been assessed in eight clinical studies. The 9vHPV vaccine induced a very robust immune response against all vaccine types, with seroconversion rates close to 100%. The safety profile of 9vHPV is comparable to that of qHPV. Local reactions, especially swelling, have been more frequently reported after 9vHPV than qHPV, and this slightly increases when the 9vHPV is coadministered with other vaccines. The additional coverage offered by the 9vHPV may prevent a significant proportion of HPV-related cancers (variable between 8% and 18%) depending on the local distribution of high-risk HPV types in the population. It is impossible, at present, to anticipate the actual impact of the wide use of the 9vHPV in comparison with the bHPV or the qHPV, since it depends on many variables including duration of protection, potential cross-protection toward nonvaccine types, and herd immunity effect.

  10. Spotlight on the 9-valent HPV vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopalco PL

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pier Luigi Lopalco Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Starting in 2006, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV has been progressively implemented in most developed countries. Two vaccines have been successfully used, a bivalent vaccine targeting HPV-related cancers (bHPV and a quadrivalent vaccine (qHPV targeting both HPV-related cancers and genital warts. Between December 2014 and June 2015, a new nonavalent HPV vaccine (9vHPV was granted marketing authorization in the USA and Europe. The 9vHPV was developed from the qHPV and includes five additional HPV types that should increase the level of protection toward HPV-related cancers. Efficacy and/or immunogenicity of 9vHPV has been assessed in eight clinical studies. The 9vHPV vaccine induced a very robust immune response against all vaccine types, with seroconversion rates close to 100%. The safety profile of 9vHPV is comparable to that of qHPV. Local reactions, especially swelling, have been more frequently reported after 9vHPV than qHPV, and this slightly increases when the 9vHPV is coadministered with other vaccines. The additional coverage offered by the 9vHPV may prevent a significant proportion of HPV-related cancers (variable between 8% and 18% depending on the local distribution of high-risk HPV types in the population. It is impossible, at present, to anticipate the actual impact of the wide use of the 9vHPV in comparison with the bHPV or the qHPV, since it depends on many variables including duration of protection, potential cross-protection toward nonvaccine types, and herd immunity effect. Keywords: human papillomavirus vaccine, immunogenicity, vaccine safety, cervical cancer, head and neck cancer, genital warts

  11. Spotlight on the 9-valent HPV vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Pier Luigi Lopalco Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Starting in 2006, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) has been progressively implemented in most developed countries. Two vaccines have been successfully used, a bivalent vaccine targeting HPV-related cancers (bHPV) and a quadrivalent vaccine (qHPV) targeting both HPV-related cancers and genital warts. Between December 2014 and June 2015,...

  12. Southern gas boom takes UK spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-11

    To encourage new offshore development needed to fill a gas supply gap that will emerge in the 1990s, British Gas Corp. is offering higher prices for gas produced by both foreign and United Kingdom-based companies in the UK sector of the North Sea. A rundown of recent exploration and development shows that in just 1 year, companies have proposed nine new development projects, primarily in fields previously considered unprofitable. Operators are also reappraising other finds from the 1970s and embarking on a sizable wildcat program.

  13. Fatal attraction: rare species in the spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Elena; Deves, Anne-Laure; Saint Jalmes, Michel; Courchamp, Franck

    2009-04-07

    The exploitation of rare and endangered species can end in the species's extinction because the increased value people associate with rarity increases the economic incentive to exploit the last individuals, creating a positive feedback loop. This recently proposed concept, called the anthropogenic Allee effect (AAE), relies on the assumption that people do value rarity, but this remains to be established. Moreover, it also remains to be determined whether attraction to rarity is a trait confined to a minority of hobbyists (e.g. wildlife collectors, exotic pet owners) or characteristic of the general public. We estimated how much the general public valued rare species compared with common ones, using five different metrics related to personal investment: time spent, physical effort, unpleasantness, economic investment and risk. We surveyed the visitors of a zoo. To see the rare species, the visitors to the zoo invested more time in searching and contemplation, they were ready to expend more physical effort, they tolerated more unpleasant conditions, they were willing to pay more and, finally, they risked more to obtain (steal) a rare species. Our results provide substantial evidence of how the general public places more value on rare species, compared with common species. This confirms the AAE as an actual process, which in addition concerns a large part of the population. This has important consequences for the conservation of species that are rare now, or that could become so in the future.

  14. International Geneva: intellectual property under the spotlight

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    On 17 July, the Director-General of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), Francis Gurry, will present his organisation to CERN people. You are invited to take part and discover the UN’s specialised agency for services, policy, information and cooperation relating to intellectual property.   This is the third in the “International Geneva comes to CERN” series of seminars, which presents other Geneva-based international organisations to CERN’s internal audience. In his seminar, Gurry will discuss how WIPO finds the right balance between the interests of innovators and the wider public and how the IP system aims to foster an environment in which creativity and innovation can flourish. In 2010, CERN and WIPO signed a collaboration agreement designed to strengthen the partnership between the two organisations. The agreement focused on four main areas for cooperation, namely: capacity building, awareness raising and knowledge sharing; tra...

  15. Spotlight on olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Violante M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mayela Rodríguez-Violante,1,2 Natalia Ospina-García,1,2 Christian Pérez-Lohman,1,2 Amin Cervantes-Arriaga1,2 1Movement Disorders Clinic, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Clinical Neurodegenerative Research Unit, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract: Olfactory dysfunction is frequent in Parkinson’s disease (PD. A correlation between olfactory dysfunction and the pathophysiological process of the disease has been confirmed. On the other hand, olfaction disturbances are also prevalent in other neurodegenerative diseases, and may be related to other factors such as gender, age, smoking, and trauma. Clinically, hyposmia is commonly assessed by smell identification testing. Good diagnostic accuracy has been widely reported, but differences in sensitivity and specificity due to sociocultural factors have also been reported. Since hyposmia may be present before the onset of motor symptoms, it has the potential to serve as a biomarker for the identification of subjects at risk of developing PD. Several studies have been conducted to assess the utility of smell testing as an isolated or combined biomarker for this end. Finally, severe olfactory dysfunction has been associated with faster disease progression and higher risk of cognitive decline in patients with PD. Olfactory dysfunction assessment in PD will continue to be relevant in research and clinical practice. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, olfaction, smell identification test, biomarker 

  16. Longitudinal Comparison of Place-Value and Arithmetic Knowledge in Montessori and Non-Montessori Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laski, Elida V.; Vasilyeva, Marina; Schiffman, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of base 10 and place value are important foundational math concepts that are associated with higher use of decomposition strategies and higher accuracy on addition problems (Laski, Ermakova, & Vasilyeva, 2014; Fuson, 1990; Fuson & Briars, 1990; National Research Council, 2001). The current study examined base-10 knowledge,…

  17. A 3-Year Study of Self-Regulation in Montessori and Non-Montessori Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Barbara; Wash, Pamela D.; Mecca, Marilyn E.

    2010-01-01

    Albert Bandura, the leading pioneer in the study of self-regulation, has defined the term as the child's ability to self-educate, self-direct, regulate motivation, and learn to think about what she is learning (1994). Lev Vygotsky's theory that children can be taught to think independently about how to solve problems expands upon Bandura's work…

  18. The Danube so colourful: A potpourri of plastic litter outnumbers fish larvae in Europe's second largest river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, Aaron; Keckeis, Hubert; Lumesberger-Loisl, Franz; Zens, Bernhard; Krusch, Reinhard; Tritthart, Michael; Glas, Martin; Schludermann, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on plastic pollution of aquatic ecosystems focused on the world's oceans. Large rivers as major pathways for land-based plastic litter, has received less attention so far. Here we report on plastic quantities in the Austrian Danube. A two year survey (2010, 2012) using stationary driftnets detected mean plastic abundance (n = 17,349; mean ± S.D: 316.8 ± 4664.6 items per 1000 m −3 ) and mass (4.8 ± 24.2 g per 1000 m −3 ) in the river to be higher than those of drifting larval fish (n = 24,049; 275.3 ± 745.0 individuals. 1000 m −3 and 3.2 ± 8.6 g 1000 m −3 ). Industrial raw material (pellets, flakes and spherules) accounted for substantial parts (79.4%) of the plastic debris. The plastic input via the Danube into the Black Sea was estimated to 4.2 t per day. - Highlights: • Here we first report on abundance and composition of plastic litter in a large river. • The mass and abundance of drifting plastic items in the Austrian Danube are higher than those of larval fish. • The plastic input of the River Danube into the Black Sea is estimated to 4.2 t per day. - 1) More plastic items than larval fish are drifting in the Austrian Danube. 2) The Danube is a major pathway of land-based plastics waste into the Black Sea

  19. The Danube so colourful: a potpourri of plastic litter outnumbers fish larvae in Europe's second largest river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Aaron; Keckeis, Hubert; Lumesberger-Loisl, Franz; Zens, Bernhard; Krusch, Reinhard; Tritthart, Michael; Glas, Martin; Schludermann, Elisabeth

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies on plastic pollution of aquatic ecosystems focused on the world's oceans. Large rivers as major pathways for land-based plastic litter, has received less attention so far. Here we report on plastic quantities in the Austrian Danube. A two year survey (2010, 2012) using stationary driftnets detected mean plastic abundance (n = 17,349; mean ± S.D: 316.8 ± 4664.6 items per 1000 m(-3)) and mass (4.8 ± 24.2 g per 1000 m(-3)) in the river to be higher than those of drifting larval fish (n = 24,049; 275.3 ± 745.0 individuals. 1000 m(-3) and 3.2 ± 8.6 g 1000 m(-3)). Industrial raw material (pellets, flakes and spherules) accounted for substantial parts (79.4%) of the plastic debris. The plastic input via the Danube into the Black Sea was estimated to 4.2 t per day. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A potpourri of pristine moon rocks, including a VHK mare basalt and a unique, augite-rich Apollo 17 anorthosite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, P. H.; Shirley, D. N.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    The anorthosite fragment, 76504,18, the first of the Apollo 17's pristine anorthosites, was found to have: (1) a higher ratio of high-Ca pyroxine to low-Ca pyroxene, (2) higher Na in its plagioclase, (3) higher contents of incompatible elements, and (4) a higher Eu/Al ratio in comparison to ferroan anorthosites. With a parent melt having a negative Eu anomaly, 76504,18 closely resembles a typical mare basalt. This anorthosite was among the latest to be formed by plagioclase flotation above a primordial magmasphere; typical mare basalt regions accumulated at about the same time or even earlier. Another fragment 14181c, a very high potassium basalt, was studied and found to be similar to typical Apollo 14 mare basalt though it has a K/La ratio of 1050. It is suggested that this lithology formed after a normal Apollo 14 mare basaltic melt partially assimilated granite. New data for siderphile elements in Apollo 12 mare basalts indicate that only the lowest of earlier data are trustworthy as being free of laboratory contamination.

  1. The Danube so colourful: A potpourri of plastic litter outnumbers fish larvae in Europe's second largest river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Aaron; Keckeis, Hubert; Lumesberger-Loisl, Franz; Zens, Bernhard; Krusch, Reinhard; Tritthart, Michael; Glas, Martin; Schludermann, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on plastic pollution of aquatic ecosystems focused on the world's oceans. Large rivers as major pathways for land-based plastic litter, has received less attention so far. Here we report on plastic quantities in the Austrian Danube. A two year survey (2010, 2012) using stationary driftnets detected mean plastic abundance (n = 17,349; mean ± S.D: 316.8 ± 4664.6 items per 1000 m−3) and mass (4.8 ± 24.2 g per 1000 m−3) in the river to be higher than those of drifting larval fish (n = 24,049; 275.3 ± 745.0 individuals. 1000 m−3 and 3.2 ± 8.6 g 1000 m−3). Industrial raw material (pellets, flakes and spherules) accounted for substantial parts (79.4%) of the plastic debris. The plastic input via the Danube into the Black Sea was estimated to 4.2 t per day. PMID:24602762

  2. Spotlight census of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes and the domestic cat (Felis catus in three sample areas of the Marches region (Central Italy / Censimento notturno di Volpe (Vulpes vulpes e di Gatto domestico (Felis catus in tre aree campione delle Marche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Pandolfi

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to evaluate the density of the red fox and of the domestic cat, 55 transects were made from 1986 to 1989 using spotlight census method in three sample areas. The mean density of foxes agreed substantially with its biological cycle and the hightes values (2.01 foxes/km² in spring and 4.3 foxes/km² in winter were recorded in the study area with the better natural characteristics. Foxes selected the shrub woodland (macchia all year round, the inhabited area in spring. The domestic cat was widely spread and abundant, and selected especially inhabited areas where the density varied from 4.27 cats/km² (in winter to 12.42 cat/km² (in spring. Riassunto Dal 1986 al 1989, con il metodo dei percorsi notturni con fari, sono stati effettuati complessivamente 55 conteggi in tre aree campione per valutare la densità della Volpe (Vulpes vulpes e del Gatto domestico (Felis catus nonché le loro preferenze ambientali limitatamente ad una zona campione. Per la Volpe le densità medie rilevate sono sostanzialmente in accordo con il ciclo biologico della specie e quelle più elevate (2,O1 volpi/km² in primavera e 4,3 volpi/km² in inverno sono state registrate nella zona campione con maggior presenza di boschi ed aree incolte. La Volpe seleziona le zone con vegetazione "di macchia" in ogni periodo dell'anno, e le aree abitate in primavera. Per il Gatto domestico le densità rilevate evidenziano la presenza di una diffusa ed abbondante popolazione. La specie mostra una spiccata preferenza per le aree abitate dove raggiunge densità di 4,27 individui/km² e 12,42 individui/km² in inverno e primavera rispettivamente.

  3. Follow the Poet: Poetry in the Montessori Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Poetry enables teachers to connect with their students in new ways. Teachers can show students that "poetry is something people do to capture thoughts, feelings, and experience." When poetry is incorporated across the curriculum, students learn to make discoveries by looking at their environment in new ways. Poetry stands apart from storytelling…

  4. Report on the Meadowbrook Montessori Farm School, Warfield, Berkshire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruyssevelt, P.; Cohen, R.

    1994-01-01

    This two part report looks at the design, construction and operational performance of the Meadowbrook Montessri Farm School in Berkshire. The first part of the report looks at the energy and environmental design advice provided and assesses its implementation in the building which was constructed. The second part of the report looks at current use of the building and whether actual performance meets its environmental design aims, with particular reference to daylighting, and natural ventilation. (UK)

  5. Building Intercultural Competency in the Language Immersion Montessori Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver-Akers, Kateri

    2013-01-01

    In her article entitled, "Theoretical Reflections: Intercultural Framework / Model" Darla Deardorff provides the Pyramid Model of Cultural Competency. At the bottom of the pyramid she places three "Requisite Attitudes," which support the remaining three blocks above ("Knowledge & Comprehension/Skills,"…

  6. Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in the Montessori Classroom: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehring Massie, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Catherine Nehring Massie provides important contextual information in considering children with attentional challenges. She discusses the prevalence of attentional challenges in today's culture and the contributing factors. She gives a general overview of the spectrum of attentional challenges and some of the indicators in children. Her history of…

  7. Montessori and Nature Study: Preserving Wonder through School Gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Current research suggests that nature experience and the cultivation of environmental literacy among students contributes to creative thinking, improved academic performance, and positive relationships with the natural world (Children and Nature Network, retrieved June 2013). Author Kelley Johnson saw this in her own childhood, which was blessed…

  8. Maria Montessori's Cosmic Vision, Cosmic Plan, and Cosmic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazzini, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This classic position of the breadth of Cosmic Education begins with a way of seeing the human's interaction with the world, continues on to the grandeur in scale of time and space of that vision, then brings the interdependency of life where each growing human becomes a participating adult. Mr. Grazzini confronts the laws of human nature in…

  9. Maria Montessori and the Secret of Tabula Rasa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, David

    2009-01-01

    The "tabula rasa" of this article's title is a Latin term meaning "clean slate." For centuries before January 6, 1907, and continuing more than 100 years since, teachers have walked into classrooms of young children convinced they know full well what is good for them, and what should be poured into their minds and by what means. But on that day,…

  10. Implantación de guías de buenas prácticas en España. Programa de centros comprometidos con la excelencia en cuidados / Best Practice Guidelines Implementation in Spain. Best Practice Spotlight Organizations / Implementação de manuais sobre boas práticas na Espanha. Programa dos Centros comprometidos com a excelência no atendimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Albornos-Muñoz, BS.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El programa de implantación de Guías de Buenas Prácticas, denominado en España Centros Comprometidos con la Excelencia en Cuidados®, se inició en 2010 tras un acuerdo de colaboración entre la Unidad de Investigación en Cuidados de Salud (Investén-isciii de España, el Centro Colaborador Español del Instituto Joanna Briggs para los Cuidados de Salud basados en la Evidencia y la Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario (RNAO, siguiendo los mismos principios que el programa Best Practice Spotlight Organizations (BPSO® iniciado por RNAO, en Canadá, en 1999. Objetivo: Describir la implantación de Guías de Buenas Prácticas de RNAO en el marco del programa de Centros Comprometidos con la Excelencia en Cuidados® (Best Practice Spotlight Organizations® en España. El programa tiene como objetivo fomentar, facilitar y apoyar la implantación, evaluación y mantenimiento de buenas prácticas en cuidados, para el periodo 2012-2014. Metodología y Resultados: se han seleccionado 8 instituciones de salud y una universidad que implantan las guías de buenas prácticas de RNAO en función de sus necesidades. Tras los 24 primeros meses de implantación se ha formado a los profesionales de salud, constituido grupos estables de trabajo, desarrollado o actualizado protocolos de cuidados y registros correspondientes, también se han evaluado de forma sistemática los resultados de proceso y de salud de los pacientes. También se han difundido activamente los principales logros del programa. Conclusiones: Los candidatos a Centros Comprometidos con la Excelencia en Cuidados® están realizando un gran esfuerzo y los resultados empiezan a mostrar que son positivos, con una creciente cultura de cuidados basados en la evidencia, y el impulso de la investigación y el inicio de un trabajo colaborativo en red. [Albornos-Muñoz L, González-María E, Moreno-Casbas T. Implantación de guías de buenas prácticas en España. Programa de

  11. Spotlight on middle childhood: Rejuvenating the ‘forgotten years’

    OpenAIRE

    Mah, V Kandice; Ford-Jones, E Lee

    2012-01-01

    Middle childhood, from six to 12 years of age, is often known as the ‘forgotten years’ of development because most research is focused on early childhood development or adolescent growth. However, middle childhood is rich in potential for cognitive, social, emotional and physical advancements. During this period, the brain is actively undergoing synaptic pruning and, as such, is constantly becoming more refined, a process that is heavily dependent on a child’s environment. This discovery open...

  12. Special Spotlight: The Alabama Project Celebrates Survivors and Their Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recognition of cancer survivors and their families, CRCHD celebrates cancer survivorship with a focus in on The Alabama Project and its visual storytelling of the powerful impact of community in survivorship.

  13. Research Spotlight: Satellites monitor air pollutant emissions in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    A new satellite study verifies that Chinese emission control efforts did reduce power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a harmful gas that causes acid rain and can form sulfate aerosols; these aerosols play an important role in the climate system by affecting clouds and precipitation patterns and altering the amount of sunlight that is reflected away from Earth.

  14. Spotlight on dream recall: the ages of dreams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangiaruga A

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anastasia Mangiaruga, Serena Scarpelli, Chiara Bartolacci, Luigi De Gennaro Department of Psychology, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy Abstract: Brain and sleep maturation covary across different stages of life. At the same time, dream generation and dream recall are intrinsically dependent on the development of neural systems. The aim of this paper is to review the existing studies about dreaming in infancy, adulthood, and the elderly stage of life, assessing whether dream mentation may reflect changes of the underlying cerebral activity and cognitive processes. It should be mentioned that some evidence from childhood investigations, albeit still weak and contrasting, revealed a certain correlation between cognitive skills and specific features of dream reports. In this respect, infantile amnesia, confabulatory reports, dream-reality discerning, and limitation in language production and emotional comprehension should be considered as important confounding factors. Differently, growing evidence in adults suggests that the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the encoding and retrieval of episodic memories may remain the same across different states of consciousness. More directly, some studies on adults point to shared neural mechanisms between waking cognition and corresponding dream features. A general decline in the dream recall frequency is commonly reported in the elderly, and it is explained in terms of a diminished interest in dreaming and in its emotional salience. Although empirical evidence is not yet available, an alternative hypothesis associates this reduction to an age-related cognitive decline. The state of the art of the existing knowledge is partially due to the variety of methods used to investigate dream experience. Very few studies in elderly and no investigations in childhood have been performed to understand whether dream recall is related to specific electrophysiological pattern at different ages. Most of all, the lack of longitudinal psychophysiological studies seems to be the main issue. As a main message, we suggest that future longitudinal studies should collect dream reports upon awakening from different sleep states and include neurobiological measures with cognitive performances. Keywords: dreaming, sleep mentation, development, sleep, continuity hypothesis, aging

  15. Fifty years of CERN history in the spotlight

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    The programme of events for CERN's Golden Jubilee year was officially unveiled at a press conference on 8 March. The first of these events took place the following day, when the Swiss commemorative postage stamp issued in the Laboratory's honour went on sale in post offices throughout Switzerland.

  16. Cameras instead of sieves for aggregate characterization : research spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Michigan researchers explored the use of cameras and software that may eventually replace the use of screen sieves in sizing and assessing crushed aggregate for pavement construction. This research explored approaches to imaging aggregate as a way to...

  17. Spreading the word about the quick clearance law : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Motorists traditionally were taught to leave : their vehicles in place after a crash occurred : to make it easier for police to reconstruct : the incident and evaluate who was at fault. : However, the practice of leaving vehicles in : the roadway can...

  18. Spotlight on orlistat in the management of patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Monique P; Scott, Lesley J

    2005-01-01

    Orlistat is an inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases and, therefore, prevents the absorption of dietary fat. This agent reduced weight in obese adults and adolescents with or without co-morbidities (including type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, metabolic syndrome) who received up to 4 years of therapy in conjunction with a hypocaloric diet. In obese patients, orlistat in combination with a hypocaloric diet improved metabolic risk factors and reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, this agent was cost effective in patients with obesity, particularly those with type 2 diabetes. Orlistat is generally well tolerated, with gastrointestinal adverse events being most commonly reported. Orlistat, in addition to lifestyle and dietary intervention, is thus an attractive option for the treatment of patients with obesity, especially those with associated co-morbidities or at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

  19. American high school students shine a spotlight on CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Between 2 and 7 April eighteen American high school students were let loose at CERN armed with video cameras. Their mission? To take on the role of broadcast journalists and inspire their peers across the US with short documentaries and blogs illuminating the work happening at the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. Members of the teams of budding physicists and broadcast journalists pose in front of the ATLAS detector.Following in the footsteps of professional journalists around the world, six teams of American high school students recently travelled to CERN to experience the increasing excitement in the run-up to the switch-on of the LHC. The six teams are from five states across the US and were the winners of a competition sponsored and funded by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Science and the National Science Foundation. Each team consists of three students plus a teacher, who combine their knowledge of ph...

  20. Soil stabilization with recycled materials improves subgrade performance : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The use of recycled materials for subgrade stabilization can provide the support needed for construction vehicle loading and more typical long-term traffic loading. This is a particular need in Michigan due to the prevalence of weak subgrade soils. U...

  1. Research Spotlight: Climate commitment in an uncertain world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-02-01

    Even if humans immediately ceased emitting carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases, the planet would continue to warm, mainly due to thermal inertia of the world's oceans. This “climate commitment” has been of interest recently for both science and policy because it provides a measure of the minimum climate change the planet will face given human activity that has already occurred. Several studies have looked at what would happen if human emission of CO2 were halted, but these studies have overlooked the role of aerosols and non-CO2 greenhouse gases such as methane and nitrous oxide, which Armour and Roe include in a new study. If human emission stopped, atmospheric aerosols, which cool the planet by blocking light from the surface, would fall to preindustrial levels within weeks. However, non-CO2 greenhouse gases would remain in the atmosphere for decades to centuries, and elevated levels of CO2 would persist for millennia. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL045850, 2011)

  2. Study-Abroad Practices in the Spotlight, Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Karin

    2008-01-01

    A lawsuit that challenges the policy of Wheaton College, in Massachusetts, to charge its regular tuition to students studying abroad on less-costly independent programs is the latest sign of scrutiny into the finances of overseas education. Wheaton officials say the tuition policy is stated online and in program materials, maintaining that…

  3. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees (Ethiopians, Nigerians, and Somalis) in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  4. January Monthly Spotlight: Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    In January, CRCHD joins the nation in raising awareness for Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities. This month we share a special focus on NCI/CRCHD research programs that are trying to reduce cervical cancer disparities in underserved communities and the people who are spreading the word about the importance of early detection.

  5. What is Climate Leadership: Spotlight on Innovative Partnerships Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innovative Partnerships category winners from the 2015 Climate Leadership Award recipients discuss their innovative and collaborative initiatives and achievements that allowed them to measure the successes of their greenhouse gas reduction goals.

  6. Co-firing plans in the spotlight over biomass imports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Spurred by the renewables obligation, coal-fired power stations with a capacity of over 20GW could be co-firing with biomass by early next year. But, with little of their fuel coming from dedicated energy crops, the generators are in danger of entering a minefield. UK wood panel manufacturers fear that their raw material costs will rise in the face of subsidised competition from power stations, while the generators' growing biomass imports are stirring sensitivities about rainforest destruction and dislocation of overseas markets for agricultural by-products. 1 tab., 2 photos.

  7. Spotlight on middle childhood: Rejuvenating the 'forgotten years'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, V Kandice; Ford-Jones, E Lee

    2012-02-01

    Middle childhood, from six to 12 years of age, is often known as the 'forgotten years' of development because most research is focused on early childhood development or adolescent growth. However, middle childhood is rich in potential for cognitive, social, emotional and physical advancements. During this period, the brain is actively undergoing synaptic pruning and, as such, is constantly becoming more refined, a process that is heavily dependent on a child's environment. This discovery opens the door to optimizing the experiences a child needs to provide themselves with a strong foundation for adulthood. The present article reviews the neurological changes that occur in middle childhood, their impact on overall development and how to implement this knowledge to augment a child's capabilities.

  8. THE ROLE OF SPOTLIGHT ON POVERTY AND INEQUALITY OF WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis García-Horta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poverty is measured in terms of deficits and unmet basic needs using indicators such as the amount of food intake, income, access to health services, education and housing. This approach assumes that the well is only about the ability to meet the basic needs of food and clothing that are covered, traditionally, with the proceeds of the household head. However, when these revenues are not sufficient for the reproduction of the family, quality of life for women and children were severely affected.This article discusses the role of microfinance as one of the strategies adopted by some countries to reduce poverty in which women live. To achieve this objective, a survey to 82 users of microfinance ProMujer offered through one of its offices in Ixmiquilpan, State of Hidalgo. The results show that women are able to increase the amount of family income and to initiate a process of empowerment, however, and given the flexibility of the labor market, reproduce male domination through economic activities undertaken to use microcredit they are a palliative, but poverty in which they live is not resolved.

  9. Development and Use of Early Warning Systems. SLDS Spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Jenny; Hurwitch, Bill; Olson, Tom

    2012-01-01

    An early warning system is a data-based tool that helps predict which students are on the right path towards eventual graduation or other grade-appropriate goals. Through such systems, stakeholders at the school and district levels can view data from a wide range of perspectives and gain a deeper understanding of student data. This "Statewide…

  10. Stepping into the Spotlight: Collaborative Efforts towards Musical Inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Rickson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents findings from qualitative research which aimed to capture the experience and views of people who were supporting fourteen learners with intellectual disabilities (aged 12-18 to perform with a professional orchestra. Findings have been analysed in two stages. The first analysis, published elsewhere (Rickson 2012, focused on supporters’ experiences of organising and preparing for the performance. The supporters believed that through practising and performing an orchestral work the diverse musicians had the potential to challenge stereotyped portrayals of disability, change attitudes and foster the ongoing inclusion of people with diverse abilities. However, while the learners’ responses during preparatory workshops were described as interesting, meaningful and creative, there seemed to be a general perception that they were vulnerable and in need of protection from potentially unsympathetic audiences. This dichotomy was examined in post-performance interviews with supporters and audience members. Findings, presented here, show that the narrative of vulnerability and ‘overcoming’ persisted. Nevertheless, interviewees remained convinced of the artistic value of the work and believed the learners had the potential to attract wider audiences to their performances. Further opportunities for young people with intellectual disabilities to be involved in community arts projects alongside non-disabled musicians may result.

  11. Spotlight on Brain Tumors: Do You Know the Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or convulsions) Nausea and vomiting Changes in speech, vision, or hearing Problems balancing or walking Changes in your mood, personality, or ability to concentrate Problems with memory Numbness, tingling, or weakness in the arms or ...

  12. Gamma rays spotlight a dark horse for dark matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Seife, C

    2004-01-01

    "Do mysterious gamma rays emanating from the center of the galaxy hold the secret to the missing matter in the universe? A team of physicists suggests that they might. The controversial finding also shows how little is known about most of the mass in the cosmos"(1/2 page)

  13. Hypothalamic Inflammation and Energy Balance Disruptions: Spotlight on Chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophélia Le Thuc

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance as it controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural, and nutrient-related signals and cues. Many years of research have focused on the regulation of energy balance by hypothalamic neurons, but the most recent findings suggest that neurons and glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, in the hypothalamus actually orchestrate together several metabolic functions. Because glial cells have been described as mediators of inflammatory processes in the brain, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and the deregulations of feeding behavior, leading to involuntary weight loss or obesity for example, has been suggested. Several inflammatory pathways that could impair the hypothalamic control of energy balance have been studied over the years such as, among others, toll-like receptors and canonical cytokines. Yet, less studied so far, chemokines also represent interesting candidates that could link the aforementioned pathways and the activity of hypothalamic neurons. Indeed, chemokines, in addition to their role in attracting immune cells to the inflamed site, have been suggested to be capable of neuromodulation. Thus, they could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators involved in the maintenance of energy balance. This review discusses the different inflammatory pathways that have been identified so far in the hypothalamus in the context of feeding behavior and body weight control impairments, with a particular focus on chemokines signaling that opens a new avenue in the understanding of the major role played by inflammation in obesity.

  14. A framework for planning right of way development : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Roadside rights of way serve a wide range of societal, economic and : environmental functions. While these functions traditionally include : providing space for transportation infrastructure, utilities and drainage, : Michigan and many other states a...

  15. Spotlight on ixazomib: potential in the treatment of multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muz B

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Muz,1 Rachel Nicole Ghazarian,1,2 Monica Ou,1,3 Micah John Luderer,1 Hubert Daniel Kusdono,1,2 Abdel Kareem Azab1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Biology Division, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, 2Department of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, St Louis College of Pharmacy, 3Department of Biology, St Louis University, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Despite the significant therapeutic advances achieved with proteasome inhibitors (PIs such as bortezomib and carfilzomib in prolonging the survival of patients with multiple myeloma, the development of drug resistance, peripheral neuropathy, and pharmacokinetic limitations continue to pose major challenges when using these compounds. Ixazomib is a second-generation PI with improved activity over other PIs. Unlike bortezomib and carfilzomib, which are administered by injection, ixazomib is the first oral PI approved by US Food and Drug Administration. This review discusses the biochemical properties, mechanisms of action, preclinical efficacy, and clinical trial results leading to the US Food and Drug Administration approval of ixazomib. Keywords: proteasome inhibitor, oral administration, biological mechanism, clinical trials

  16. Accelerating bridge construction to minimize traffic disruption : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Since 2008, MDOT has been using accelerated bridge construction, which utilizes prefabricated components and structural placements, to minimize traffic disruptions during bridge replacement or rehabilitation. A recent project provided MDOT with a new...

  17. Grantee Spotlight: Elisa Rodriguez, Ph.D., M.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Elisa M. Rodriguez tests the feasibility of community-based participatory research approaches to engaging Hispanics, African Americans, and the medically underserved in the Buffalo, NY area in biospecimen donation for cancer research.

  18. Abuses of sugar market in Latvia, Estonia under spotlight

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Läti konkurentsiamet sulges hindade mõjutamise tõttu riigi suuruselt teise suhkruvabriku. Eestit trahvitakse suhkru varumise eest enne Euroopa Liitu astumist. Leedus on aga suhkru tarbimine langenud

  19. Money, money, money [spotlight on financial activity in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahai, I.M.

    1998-01-01

    India, with its long history of and vast potential for hydroelectric power, seems set to prioritise this form of power generation, by encouraging private investment in the hydroelectric power through financial incentives. The main reason for the lack of development of the country''s hydro potential is a paucity of financial resources and consequent tardy investment in the hydropower sector, because of the slow rate of return to investors. Government pressure and an expected announcement about policy on hydropower has led to new initiatives to fund new hydroelectric power plants and refurbish the older ones. (UK)

  20. Spotlight on advances in VTE management: CALLISTO and EINSTEIN CHOICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Miriam; Bauersachs, Rupert

    2016-09-28

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with numerous complications and high mortality rates. Patients with cancer are at high risk of developing cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), and VTE recurrence is common. Evidence supporting use of non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with cancer is lacking - direct comparisons between NOACs and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) are needed, along with patient-reported outcomes. Cancer Associated thrombosis - expLoring soLutions for patients through Treatment and Prevention with RivarOxaban (CALLISTO) is an international research programme exploring the potential of the direct, oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban for the prevention and treatment of CAT, supplementing existing data from EINSTEIN DVT and EINSTEIN PE. Here, we focus on four CALLISTO studies: A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Rivaroxaban Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Ambulatory Cancer Participants receiving Chemotherapy (CASSINI), Anticoagulation Therapy in SELECTeD Cancer Patients at Risk of Recurrence of Venous Thromboembolism (SELECT-D), Rivaroxaban in the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism in Cancer Patients - a Randomized Phase III Study (CONKO-011) and a database analysis. Optimal anticoagulation duration for VTE treatment has always been unclear. Following favourable results for rivaroxaban 20 mg once-daily (Q. D.) for secondary VTE prevention (EINSTEIN EXT), EINSTEIN CHOICE is assessing rivaroxaban safety and (20 mg Q. D. or 10 mg Q. D.) vs acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), and will investigate whether an alternative rivaroxaban dose (10 mg Q. D.) could offer long-term VTE protection. It is anticipated that results from these studies will provide important answers and expand upon current evidence for rivaroxaban in VTE management.

  1. Nutrition in the spotlight: metabolic effects of environmental light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, Ruth I.; Stenvers, Dirk J.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Bisschop, Peter H.; Serlie, Mireille J.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Use of artificial light resulted in relative independence from the natural light-dark (LD) cycle, allowing human subjects to shift the timing of food intake and work to convenient times. However, the increase in artificial light exposure parallels the increase in obesity prevalence. Light is the

  2. Nutrition in the spotlight metabolic effects of environmental light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, Ruth I; Stenvers, Dirk J; Kalsbeek, A.; Bisschop, Peter H; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2016-01-01

    Use of artificial light resulted in relative independence from the natural light-dark (LD) cycle, allowing human subjects to shift the timing of food intake and work to convenient times. However, the increase in artificial light exposure parallels the increase in obesity prevalence. Light is the

  3. Monitoring highway assets using remote sensing technology : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Collecting inventory data about roadway assets is a critical part of : MDOTs asset management efforts, which help the department operate, : maintain and upgrade these assets cost-effectively. Federal law requires : that states develop a risk-based...

  4. New bridge design promises to lengthen service life : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In Michigans winter climate, the steel reinforcements in traditional boxbeam : bridges are susceptible to concrete cracking, deterioration and : corrosion. They are also difficult to inspect. To address these problems, : MDOT has partnered with Io...

  5. CERN in the spotlight at the Geneva Festival

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    CERN will be the guest of honour at the Geneva Festival, which takes place from 29 July to 8 August. The Organization will be involved in two big events: the curtain-raising firework display and the end-of-festival concert. Come and see the creation of the Universe... acted out by fireworks! CERN, celebrating its 50th anniversary, will raise the curtain on the annual Geneva Festival (Fêtes de Genève) on Friday 30 July at 10.15 p.m. with a pyrotechnical and musical extravaganza. The display will be accompanied by a narration explaining the different stages of creation, written by CERN physicist Rolf Landua. Pyro-musical design is by Catherine Walder, overall firework design by René Gousset and pyrotechnical design by Pierre-Alain Beretta (Pyrostars). For further information see: www.cern.ch/cern50/events/Fireworks/Fireworks-en.html. At the end of the Festival, the CERN choir, itself celebrating its thirtieth year, joins forces with the Annecy choir Pro Musica to give a special performance of Jo...

  6. Spotlight on topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alburquerque-Sendín F

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Alburquerque-Sendín,1 Pascal Madeleine,2 César Fernández-de-las-Peñas,3 Paula Rezende Camargo,4 Tania Fátima Salvini4 1Department of Socio-Sanitary Sciences, Radiology and Physical Medicine, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain; 2Physical Activity and Human Performance Group, SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; 3Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain; 4Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brazil Abstract: Mechanical hyperalgesia defined as decreased pressure pain thresholds (PPTs is commonly associated with pain. In this narrative review, we report the current state of the art within topographical pressure sensitivity maps. Such maps are based on multiple PPT assessments. The PPTs are assessed by an a priori defined grid with special focus on both spatial and temporal summation issues. The grid covers the muscle or the body region of interest using absolute or relative values determined from anatomical landmarks or anthropometric values. The collected PPTs are interpolated by Shepard or Franke and Nielson interpolation methods to create topographical pressure sensitivity maps. This new imaging technique has proven to be valuable in various disciplines including exercise physiology, neurology, physical therapy, occupational medicine, oncology, orthopedics, and sport sciences. The reviewed papers have targeted different body regions like the scalp, low back, neck–shoulder, and upper and lower extremities. The maps have delineated spatial heterogeneity in the pressure pain sensitivity underlining the different extents of pressure pain hyperalgesia in both experimentally induced and disease-associated pain conditions. Furthermore, various intervention studies have proven the utility of topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps. Topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps have contributed to revealing the efficacy of therapeutic, ergonomic, or training interventions that aim at reducing pain. Keywords: pressure pain, topographical, muscle, musculo-tendinous, hyperalgesia

  7. Mitochondria in the spotlight of aging and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Ana L.; Rojas, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic age-related lung disease with high mortality that is characterized by abnormal scarring of the lung parenchyma. There has been a recent attempt to define the age-associated changes predisposing individuals to develop IPF. Age-related perturbations that are increasingly found in epithelial cells and fibroblasts from IPF lungs compared with age-matched cells from normal lungs include defective autophagy, telomere attrition, altered proteostasis, and cell senescence. These divergent processes seem to converge in mitochondrial dysfunction and metabolic distress, which potentiate maladaptation to stress and susceptibility to age-related diseases such as IPF. Therapeutic approaches that target aging processes may be beneficial for halting the progression of disease and improving quality of life in IPF patients. PMID:28145905

  8. Spotlight on Biomimetic Systems Based on Lyotropic Liquid Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana F. de Souza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of lyotropic biomimetic systems in drug delivery was reviewed. These behaviors are influenced by drug properties, the initial water content, type of lyotropic liquid crystals (LLC, swell ability, drug loading rate, the presence of ions with higher or less kosmotropic or chaotropic force, and the electrostatic interaction between the drug and the lipid bilayers. The in vivo interaction between LCC—drugs, and the impact on the bioavailability of drugs, was reviewed. The LLC with a different architecture can be formed by the self-assembly of lipids in aqueous medium, and can be tuned by the structures and physical properties of the emulsion. These LLC lamellar phase, cubic phase, and hexagonal phase, possess fascinating viscoelastic properties, which make them useful as a dispersion technology, and a highly ordered, thermodynamically stable internal nanostructure, thereby offering the potential as a sustained drug release matrix for drug delivery. In addition, the biodegradable and biocompatible nature of lipids demonstrates a minimum toxicity and thus, they are used for various routes of administration. This review is not intended to provide a comprehensive overview, but focuses on the advantages over non modified conventional materials and LLC biomimetic properties.

  9. Spotlight on Biomimetic Systems Based on Lyotropic Liquid Crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Juliana F; Pontes, Katiusca da S; Alves, Thais F R; Amaral, Venâncio A; Rebelo, Márcia de A; Hausen, Moema A; Chaud, Marco V

    2017-03-07

    The behavior of lyotropic biomimetic systems in drug delivery was reviewed. These behaviors are influenced by drug properties, the initial water content, type of lyotropic liquid crystals (LLC), swell ability, drug loading rate, the presence of ions with higher or less kosmotropic or chaotropic force, and the electrostatic interaction between the drug and the lipid bilayers. The in vivo interaction between LCC-drugs, and the impact on the bioavailability of drugs, was reviewed. The LLC with a different architecture can be formed by the self-assembly of lipids in aqueous medium, and can be tuned by the structures and physical properties of the emulsion. These LLC lamellar phase, cubic phase, and hexagonal phase, possess fascinating viscoelastic properties, which make them useful as a dispersion technology, and a highly ordered, thermodynamically stable internal nanostructure, thereby offering the potential as a sustained drug release matrix for drug delivery. In addition, the biodegradable and biocompatible nature of lipids demonstrates a minimum toxicity and thus, they are used for various routes of administration. This review is not intended to provide a comprehensive overview, but focuses on the advantages over non modified conventional materials and LLC biomimetic properties.

  10. Teratozoospermia: spotlight on the main genetic actors in the human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutton, Charles; Escoffier, Jessica; Martinez, Guillaume; Arnoult, Christophe; Ray, Pierre F

    2015-01-01

    Male infertility affects >20 million men worldwide and represents a major health concern. Although multifactorial, male infertility has a strong genetic basis which has so far not been extensively studied. Recent studies of consanguineous families and of small cohorts of phenotypically homogeneous patients have however allowed the identification of a number of autosomal recessive causes of teratozoospermia. Homozygous mutations of aurora kinase C (AURKC) were first described to be responsible for most cases of macrozoospermia. Other genes defects have later been identified in spermatogenesis associated 16 (SPATA16) and dpy-19-like 2 (DPY19L2) in patients with globozoospermia and more recently in dynein, axonemal, heavy chain 1 (DNAH1) in a heterogeneous group of patients presenting with flagellar abnormalities previously described as dysplasia of the fibrous sheath or short/stump tail syndromes, which we propose to call multiple morphological abnormalities of the flagella (MMAF). A comprehensive review of the scientific literature available in PubMed/Medline was conducted for studies on human genetics, experimental models and physiopathology related to teratozoospermia in particular globozoospermia, large headed spermatozoa and flagellar abnormalities. The search included all articles with an English abstract available online before September 2014. Molecular studies of numerous unrelated patients with globozoospermia and large-headed spermatozoa confirmed that mutations in DPY19L2 and AURKC are mainly responsible for their respective pathological phenotype. In globozoospermia, the deletion of the totality of the DPY19L2 gene represents ∼ 81% of the pathological alleles but point mutations affecting the protein function have also been described. In macrozoospermia only two recurrent mutations were identified in AURKC, accounting for almost all the pathological alleles, raising the possibility of a putative positive selection of heterozygous individuals. The recent identification of DNAH1 mutations in a proportion of patients with MMAF is promising but emphasizes that this phenotype is genetically heterogeneous. Moreover, the identification of mutations in a dynein strengthens the emerging point of view that MMAF may be a phenotypic variation of the classical forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia. Based on data from human and animal models, the MMAF phenotype seems to be favored by defects directly or indirectly affecting the central pair of axonemal microtubules of the sperm flagella. The studies described here provide valuable information regarding the genetic and molecular defects causing infertility, to improve our understanding of the physiopathology of teratozoospermia while giving a detailed characterization of specific features of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, these findings have a significant influence on the diagnostic strategy for teratozoospermic patients allowing the clinician to provide the patient with informed genetic counseling, to adopt the best course of treatment and to develop personalized medicine directly targeting the defective gene products. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Spotlight on the perioperative use of maropitant citrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hay Kraus BL

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bonnie L Hay Kraus Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Ames, IA, USA Abstract: Neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptors are present in both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Substance P (SP is the major ligand and is involved in multiple processes including pain transmission, vasodilation, modulation of the inflammatory response, as well as the sensory neuronal transmission involved in stress, anxiety, and emesis. The involvement of NK-1 and SP in the vomiting reflex has led to the development of NK-1 antagonists to prevent and treat vomiting in human and veterinary medicine. Maropitant is a potent, selective neurokinin (NK-1 receptor antagonist that blocks the pharmacologic action of SP in the central nervous system. Maropitant is available in both an injectable and tablet formulation and approved for use in dogs and cats for the treatment and prevention of vomiting from a variety of clinical causes and motion sickness. When administered prior to anesthetic premedication, maropitant prevents or significantly decreases the incidence of opioid-induced vomiting and signs of nausea in dogs and cats. Maropitant has also been shown to improve postoperative return to feeding and food intake in dogs. The minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurage is decreased in both dogs and cats by maropitant, indicating a potential role as an adjunct analgesic, especially for visceral pain. This article will review the background information and literature, including clinical recommendations with respect to the perioperative use of maropitant in canine and feline veterinary patients. Keywords: maropitant, perioperative nausea and vomiting, neurokinin-1 antagonist, Substance P

  12. The 2015 Five-yearly review: diversity in the spotlight

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As mentioned in Echo 201, with the Council Decision of last June the CERN 2015 five-yearly review has formally begun. Following the procedure defined in Annex A1 of the Staff Rules and Regulations CERN will thus review its financial and social conditions that should enable it to recruit from all its Member States, and retain, staff of the highest competence and integrity necessary to perform its mission. In addition, these conditions should increase the attractiveness of CERN in all Member States and motivate staff of all ages and all occupations throughout their careers. Annex A1 stipulates that a five-yearly review must include basic salaries (stipends for Fellows and subsistence allowances for associated members of the personnel) and, optionally, may include any other financial or social conditions. For this optional part of the 2015 exercise, the CERN career structure and measures to improve diversity were chosen. Towards a better diversity policy The analysis of the 2013 Staff Associat...

  13. Spotlight on dream recall: the ages of dreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiaruga, Anastasia; Scarpelli, Serena; Bartolacci, Chiara; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    Brain and sleep maturation covary across different stages of life. At the same time, dream generation and dream recall are intrinsically dependent on the development of neural systems. The aim of this paper is to review the existing studies about dreaming in infancy, adulthood, and the elderly stage of life, assessing whether dream mentation may reflect changes of the underlying cerebral activity and cognitive processes. It should be mentioned that some evidence from childhood investigations, albeit still weak and contrasting, revealed a certain correlation between cognitive skills and specific features of dream reports. In this respect, infantile amnesia, confabulatory reports, dream-reality discerning, and limitation in language production and emotional comprehension should be considered as important confounding factors. Differently, growing evidence in adults suggests that the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the encoding and retrieval of episodic memories may remain the same across different states of consciousness. More directly, some studies on adults point to shared neural mechanisms between waking cognition and corresponding dream features. A general decline in the dream recall frequency is commonly reported in the elderly, and it is explained in terms of a diminished interest in dreaming and in its emotional salience. Although empirical evidence is not yet available, an alternative hypothesis associates this reduction to an age-related cognitive decline. The state of the art of the existing knowledge is partially due to the variety of methods used to investigate dream experience. Very few studies in elderly and no investigations in childhood have been performed to understand whether dream recall is related to specific electrophysiological pattern at different ages. Most of all, the lack of longitudinal psychophysiological studies seems to be the main issue. As a main message, we suggest that future longitudinal studies should collect dream reports upon awakening from different sleep states and include neurobiological measures with cognitive performances. PMID:29391838

  14. Spotlight on dream recall: the ages of dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiaruga, Anastasia; Scarpelli, Serena; Bartolacci, Chiara; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    Brain and sleep maturation covary across different stages of life. At the same time, dream generation and dream recall are intrinsically dependent on the development of neural systems. The aim of this paper is to review the existing studies about dreaming in infancy, adulthood, and the elderly stage of life, assessing whether dream mentation may reflect changes of the underlying cerebral activity and cognitive processes. It should be mentioned that some evidence from childhood investigations, albeit still weak and contrasting, revealed a certain correlation between cognitive skills and specific features of dream reports. In this respect, infantile amnesia, confabulatory reports, dream-reality discerning, and limitation in language production and emotional comprehension should be considered as important confounding factors. Differently, growing evidence in adults suggests that the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the encoding and retrieval of episodic memories may remain the same across different states of consciousness. More directly, some studies on adults point to shared neural mechanisms between waking cognition and corresponding dream features. A general decline in the dream recall frequency is commonly reported in the elderly, and it is explained in terms of a diminished interest in dreaming and in its emotional salience. Although empirical evidence is not yet available, an alternative hypothesis associates this reduction to an age-related cognitive decline. The state of the art of the existing knowledge is partially due to the variety of methods used to investigate dream experience. Very few studies in elderly and no investigations in childhood have been performed to understand whether dream recall is related to specific electrophysiological pattern at different ages. Most of all, the lack of longitudinal psychophysiological studies seems to be the main issue. As a main message, we suggest that future longitudinal studies should collect dream reports upon awakening from different sleep states and include neurobiological measures with cognitive performances.

  15. University of Florida potato variety trials spotlight: 'Peter Wilcox'

    Science.gov (United States)

    'Peter Wilcox’ is a fresh market potato variety selected from progeny of a cross between B0810-1 and B0918-5, and tested under the pedigree B1816-5 by K.G. Haynes. It was jointly released by United States Department of Agriculture, North Carolina Agricultural Research Service, Agricultural Experimen...

  16. University of Florida potato variety trials spotlight: 'Harley Blackwell'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Harley Blackwell’ is a potato variety that is commonly grown for the potato chip market. It was selected from the progeny of a cross between B0155-24 and B9935-8, and tested under the pedigree B0564-8. It was released and named jointly by the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department ...

  17. Spotlight on the Diagnosis of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (AML ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QR-RT-PCR demonstrated bcr1 positivity in the 4 patients diagnosed by Karyotyping with t (15;17) and in the 8 patients can not diagnosed by Cytogenetic methods. Conclusion: Despite the fact that cytogenetics permit the identification of many chromosomal changes within a sample, FISH analysis is more sensitive when ...

  18. Web-Based Family Life Education: Spotlight on User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Jennifer; Doty, Matthew; Dwrokin, Jodi

    2011-01-01

    Family Life Education (FLE) websites can benefit from the field of user experience, which makes technology easy to use. A heuristic evaluation of five FLE sites was performed using Neilson's heuristics, guidelines for making sites user friendly. Greater site complexity resulted in more potential user problems. Sites most frequently had problems…

  19. Pediatric Celiac Disease: Follow-Up in the Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitutti, Francesco; Trovato, Chiara Maria; Montuori, Monica; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The follow-up of celiac disease (CD) is challenging due to the scarcity of published data and the lack of standardized evidence-based protocols. The worldwide frequency and methods of CD follow-up appear to be heavily influenced by expert opinions of the individual physicians who assess children with CD. The aim of this review was to summarize the available studies on CD follow-up in children. We conducted a literature search with the use of PubMed, Medline, and Embase (from 1900 to 15 December 2016) for terms relevant to this review, including CD, follow-up, dietary adherence or dietary compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, complications, and quality of life. The aims of follow-up are as follows: to ensure strict adherence to a gluten-free diet, to ensure nutritional adequacy, to improve quality of life, and to prevent disease complications. For the correct evaluation of children with CD at follow-up, a clinical and biochemical evaluation is necessary on a regular basis. It is advisable to assess compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, or possible complications once a year at the referral center. Laboratory tests might be useful for a thorough evaluation of any patient with CD to rule out a micronutrient deficiency (full blood count, ferritin, folic acid, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12) and possible cardiovascular risk factors (glucose, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides). Biochemical evaluation is essential when there are clinical problems and should be customized on the basis of the specific clinical suspicion. Associated autoimmune thyroiditis should also be screened for yearly by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid autoantibody concentrations, regardless of symptoms, because hypothyroidism is often subtle and methods for early treatment are available and desirable. Although evidence-based recommendations for follow-up of pediatric patients with CD have not yet been established, we advise a yearly follow-up visit as the safest approach. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Spotlight on Ethics: Institutional Review Boards as Systemic Bullies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Caleb T.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying, often considered an interpersonal or intergroup behaviour, has not been explored as an unintended artefact of organisational structure. Institutional review boards (IRBs), the 'human research ethics committees' at US universities, help oversee the protection of human research subjects, particularly in the social sciences within…

  1. Fisheries management worldwide has been under the spotlight in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    and bag limits) for both recreational and commercial linefish species were introduced in December 1984. Since then, some new regulations have been added, whereas others have been amended as new evidence on the biology of individual species has come to light. The failure of these conventional fishery control mea-.

  2. THE BRICS IN THE SPOTLIGHT: A RESEARCH AGENDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Scaffardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On November 6–7, 2014, the University of Parma (Italy hosted a profound two-day discussion on the BRICS, i.e. Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, a relatively new actor in the international arena, gathering the most innovative research and the leading experts and scholars.

  3. Software offers transparent, straightforward assessment of pavement additives : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Adding new materials to pavement layers is a proven technique to : improve performance. Many types of additivesfrom engineered : polymers and acids to recycled pavement, crumb rubber, shingles : and glasshave been used to help construct better ...

  4. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The EU-NATO Syndrome: Spotlight on Transatlantic Realities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajnalka Vincze

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the relations between the European Union (EU and NATO in light of both of the current, deeply unhealthy, state of the transatlantic relationship, and of its ongoing evolution. The first part is devoted to a retrospective outline of the links between European defence and the Atlantic system, which highlights the major constant features of these last sixty years, as well as the rupture points. Then, various issues, from the problem of the division of labour and the definition of the chain of command to coordination on the ground and arms procurement, are evoked as concrete examples where the same fundamental question marks emerge, again and again; all of them revolving around the concept of sovereignty – that of the Europeans vis-à-vis America. It is suggested in the article that current European dependence does not allow but superficial and/or temporary ‘progress’ in EU-NATO relations, just as is the case in the broader Euro-American relationship. As long as Europeans will not assume fully the objective of autonomy (i.e. freedom of decision and action, with all the commitments it would imply, their subjection will continue to generate increasing tensions, since this inherent imbalance is not only detrimental to Europe’s own interests, but it also excludes any reciprocity and prohibits any genuine partnership with the United States.

  6. Research Spotlight: New method to assess coral reef health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-03-01

    Coral reefs around the world are becoming stressed due to rising temperatures, ocean acidification, overfishing, and other factors. Measuring community level rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and biogenic calcification is essential to assessing the health of coral reef ecosystems because the balance between these processes determines the potential for reef growth and the export of carbon. Measurements of biological productivity have typically been made by tracing changes in dissolved oxygen in seawater as it passes over a reef. However, this is a labor-intensive and difficult method, requiring repeated measurements. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL046179, 2011)

  7. PARTICLE FACTORIES: Tau-charm in the spotlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Following earlier workshops in Stanford (1989) and in Orsay (1990), some hundred physicists from Europe and the United States met from 29 April to 2 May in Seville, Spain, to consolidate plans for a Tau-Charm Factory

  8. Comprehensive guidance for pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements : Research Spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Planners and designers at every level of government look for ways to make Michigan roads safer for pedestrians and bicyclists. A wide range of improvement options at intersections and along corridors offers the potential for safer streets. MDOT under...

  9. A THEORETICAL SPOTLIGHT OVER THE ROMANIAN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcza Teodora

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at identifying and classifying new types of agricultural products, especially in Romania, but not only. As we well know, all the countries all over the world have their own history, traditions, economic structure, and a certain type of agriculture, adapted to their soil, climate, and nevertheless to theirs people needs. So, we know that certain countries used to cultivate certain agricultural products, while others are wellknown for others. Usually, we associate Spain with great wines, Belgium with delicious chocolate, Turkey with coffee, India with rice, Romania with grain, Russia with cereals, SUA – tobacco, etc.\\r\

  10. Research Spotlight: Identifying oceanic sources of continental precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Leslie; Tretkoff, Ernie

    Ninety percent of water that evaporates from the oceans precipitates back to the oceans. The remaining 10% is transported to the continents and plays an important role in the land branch of the hydrological cycle. Studies have suggested that rising global temperatures will lead to increased evaporation and precipitation, altering the hydrological cycle. To identify regions that will be vulnerable to these changes in the hydrological cycle, Gimeno et al. used a model to detect major oceanic moisture source areas and the continental regions significantly influenced by each moisture source.

  11. Potpourri of comments about the fiber optic gyro for its 40th anniversary, and how fascinating it was and it still is!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Hervé C.

    2016-05-01

    This 40th anniversary is the opportunity to recall how fascinating is the fiber-optic gyro with its potential perfection. Pure unaided strapdown inertial navigation yielding drift of less than one nautical mile in a month has been demonstrated in a laboratory. This paper also adds several comments about points that could be better known and should be outlined.

  12. Obravnava otrok z disleksijo z vključevanjem elementov pedagogike Marie Montessori

    OpenAIRE

    Brudar, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Disleksija je najpogostejša nevrološko pogojena specifična učna težava. Za otroke z disleksijo je značilna kombinacija težav povezanih s črkovanjem, branjem, pisanjem in pravopisom. Prisotni so primanjkljaji na področju izvršilnih funkcij, motorike, zaznavnih, verbalnih in jezikovnih sposobnosti, pozornosti in spomina. V primeru, da otrokove primarne težave niso ustrezno prepoznane, lahko nastopijo nekatere čustvene težave kot so stres, tesnobnost, slaba samopodoba in pomanjkanje motivacije. ...

  13. The treatment of children with dyslexia with inclusion of Montessori pedagogy elements

    OpenAIRE

    Brudar, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Dyslexia is the most common neurologically-based specific learning disability. Dyslexia in children is characterized by a combination of difficulties related to spelling, reading, writing and orthography. Evident are difficulties in executive functioning, motor skills, perception, verbal communication, attention and memory. In case child’s primary difficulties are not identified properly, some emotional problems such as stress, anxiety, low self-esteem and lack of motivation may occur. M...

  14. Teaching english in the first triad of the primary school using elements of Montessori pedagogic

    OpenAIRE

    Hrastnik, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Early foreign language teaching in primary schools is moving from the fourth grade to lower grades. This means that the didactical and methodological approaches will have to be updated and implemented to the seven year- old child’s learning abilities. By using the elements of Maria Montessori’s pedagogical method, we can enrich the process of early language learning. In the thesis, the reader learns about the multilingualism and the early foreign language learning around the world and in Slov...

  15. AN EPISTEMOLOGICAL GLANCE AT THE CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH: CONSTRUCTIVIST LEARNING IN DEWEY, PIAGET, AND MONTESSORI

    OpenAIRE

    Emel Ültanır

    2012-01-01

    What people gain through sensation and cognition make up the individuals’ experiences and knowledge. Individuals benefit from previous experiences when resolving problems. Knowledge is constructed from the meanings one attributes to nature and the environment. In theories, it means that constructers depend on observation and when directly translated, the theory has the meaning of observation. In other words, we construct our own reality with those belonging to our social circle. For us, there...

  16. Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in a Montessori Classroom: The Role of the Physician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy-Ryan, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Maureen Murphy-Ryan offers a clinical look at attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Her thorough definition of ADHD and the diagnoses that may occur simultaneously offer teachers an awareness of what this could look like in a classroom. However, it is only with professional medical input that a true diagnosis can be made and appropriate…

  17. Riflessioni sulle pratiche educative osservate in un nido del Centro Nascita Montessori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Franceschini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available L’articolo presenta una ricerca basata sull’osservazione di un contesto educativo di ispirazione montessoriana. La ricerca intendeva mettere in luce gli atteggiamenti, le proposte e le strategie delle educatrici, e le risposte dei bambini a queste sollecitazioni. Il testo si articola in una introduzione metodologica che illustra il tipo di servizio educativo, la metodologia di osservazione adottata e la traccia che ha guidato le osservazioni; seguono alcune considerazioni sull’autonomia del bambino, l’attenzione al singolo bambino e la cura del bambino, emerse dalla analisi delle osservazioni; conclude l’articolo la trascrizione di una delle tre osservazioni condotte.

  18. AN EPISTEMOLOGICAL GLANCE AT THE CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH: CONSTRUCTIVIST LEARNING IN DEWEY, PIAGET, AND MONTESSORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Ültanır

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available What people gain through sensation and cognition make up the individuals’ experiences and knowledge. Individuals benefit from previous experiences when resolving problems. Knowledge is constructed from the meanings one attributes to nature and the environment. In theories, it means that constructers depend on observation and when directly translated, the theory has the meaning of observation. In other words, we construct our own reality with those belonging to our social circle. For us, there is the world and we can’t disregard that; however, the relationship between us and the outside world is a joining as materialistic and structural as in a social environment. In this article, while the foundation of constructivism is being thoroughly analysed, Vico’s ideas in the 18th century and the neurobiological studies of scientific knowledge have been utilized. In light of constructivist learning, Dewey’s opinion on “Experience and Education”, Piaget’s cognitive schema theory in “cognitive development”, and Montessori’s ideas on “Decentring the Teacher” have been examined. Finally, the ideas of the three names on constructivist learning have been interpreted.

  19. A organização confessional e o desenvolvimento humano frente à pedagogia Montessori

    OpenAIRE

    Guilhon, Edite Maria Barbosa

    2002-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro Tecnológico. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia de Produção. Os fenômenos associados ao contexto das organizações e sua relação com o desenvolvimento humano dos profissionais nela envolvidos têm sido alvo de várias pesquisas e reflexões. Embora muito se fale em mudanças organizacionais, com ênfase na inclusão total e no desenvolvimento do ser humano, de concreto, muito pouco se tem praticado. Num cenário em que...

  20. Technology in the Montessori Classroom: Benefits, Hazards and Preparation for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Greg MacDonald cites much research on the pros and cons of technology for children of all ages and gives the reader the information and space to sort out what their own policy will be. He supports the use of computers in elementary classrooms if there is a practical purpose, a group project, or no alternative approach available, such as for…

  1. Global Science and Social Systems: The Essentials of Montessori Education and Peace Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, David

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by Baiba Krumins-Grazzini's interdependencies lecture at NAMTA's Portland conference, David Kahn shows the unifying structures of the program that are rooted in the natural and social sciences. Through a connective web, these sciences explore the integration of all knowledge and lead to a philosophical view of life on earth, including…

  2. The Montessori Model in Puebla, Mexico: How One Nonprofit Is Helping Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harger, Jeni

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how the JUCONI Foundation in Puebla, Mexico is helping children. (JUCONI is an acronym for "Junto con los Ninos", or "Together with the Children)." This Mexican nongovernmental organization (NGO) has been successfully working with distressed families and children in Puebla since 1989. For…

  3. An Epistemological Glance at the Constructivist Approach: Constructivist Learning in Dewey, Piaget, and Montessori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultanir, Emel

    2012-01-01

    What people gain through sensation and cognition make up the individuals' experiences and knowledge. Individuals benefit from previous experiences when resolving problems. Knowledge is constructed from the meanings one attributes to nature and the environment. In theories, it means that constructers depend on observation and when directly…

  4. From Zero to Infinity: Montessori Parent Education in Hong Kong and Greater China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Daisy; Yau, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    It was a hot and humid afternoon in 2006, 3 months after the opening of the Children's House at the Infinity Children's School in Hong Kong. A 3-year-old boy selected a table-scrubbing activity. He moved erratically and without purpose, accidentally bumping into another child and spilling water on the floor. Meanwhile, a toddler girl strolled…

  5. Montessori Secondary Schools: Preparing Today's Adolescents for the Challenges of Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ginger Kelley

    2007-01-01

    They are adolescents--and those who work with them must understand them, connect with them, and make learning relevant to their lives. This article looks at recent theories and educational practices identified as appropriate for supporting the educational learning experiences of students ages 12 to 15. In this article, the author also discusses,…

  6. Challenging the Gaze: The Subject of Attention and a 1915 Montessori Demonstration Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobe, Noah W.

    2004-01-01

    The child's attention, how this attention is reasoned about, and how attention works as a surface for pedagogical intervention are central to understanding modern schooling. This article examines attention as an object of knowledge related to the organization and management of individuals. I address what we might learn about attention by studying…

  7. Biodiversity and Peace: Where Technology and Montessori Come Together in the Children's Eternal Rainforest, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Jeff Norris, initially shocked by the Montessorians who are calling technology into question, states that technology can offer a means of development for the child who is concurrently supporting and learning from the rich and overpowering biodiversity of the rainforest. He speaks for the Children's Eternal Rainforest citizen's science as well as…

  8. The Photography and Propaganda of the Maria Montessori Method in Spain (1911-1931)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Francesca Comas; Garcia, Bernat Sureda

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses photography as a tool for reinforcing textual discourses in the written press and supporting the popularisation of certain methods and practices in the illustrated press and magazines. The photographs will not be analysed as educational documents or testimony to educational activities but rather in an effort to explore the…

  9. Spotlight on frovatriptan: a review of its efficacy in the treatment of migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Gianni; Benedetto, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder, affecting millions of people worldwide. Current guidelines recommend triptans as first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe migraine attacks. Frovatriptan is a second-generation triptan with a longer terminal elimination half-life in blood than other triptans (~26 hours). Three double-blind, randomized crossover preference studies have been recently conducted, assessing efficacy and safety of frovatriptan versus rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, and almotriptan, respectively. Frovatriptan showed favorable tolerability and sustained effect, with a significantly lower rate of relapse over 48 hours versus the other triptans. These findings were confirmed in a series of analyses of patient subsets from the three studies, including patients with menstrually related and oral contraceptive-induced migraine, hypertension, obesity, weekend migraine, as well as patients with migraine with aura. In all patient subsets analyzed, lower headache recurrence rates were observed versus the comparator triptans, indicating a more sustained pain-relieving effect on migraine symptoms. A further randomized, double-blind study demonstrated that frovatriptan given in combination with the fast-acting cyclooxygenase inhibitor dexketoprofen provided improved migraine pain-free activity at 2 hours, and gave more sustained pain-free activity at 24 hours, versus frovatriptan alone. These benefits were observed both when the combination was administered early (1 hour after onset). Different pharmacokinetic, but synergistic, properties between frovatriptan and dexketoprofen may make the combination of these agents particularly effective in migraine treatment, with rapid onset of action and sustained effect over 48 hours. These benefits, together with potential cost-effectiveness advantages versus other triptans could drive selection of the most appropriate treatment for acute migraine attacks. PMID:27757013

  10. Spotlight on frovatriptan: a review of its efficacy in the treatment of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allais G

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gianni Allais, Chiara Benedetto Department of Surgical Sciences, Women’s Headache Center, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder, affecting millions of people worldwide. Current guidelines recommend triptans as first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe migraine attacks. Frovatriptan is a second-generation triptan with a longer terminal elimination half-life in blood than other triptans (~26 hours. Three double-blind, randomized crossover preference studies have been recently conducted, assessing efficacy and safety of frovatriptan versus rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, and almotriptan, respectively. Frovatriptan showed favorable tolerability and sustained effect, with a significantly lower rate of relapse over 48 hours versus the other triptans. These findings were confirmed in a series of analyses of patient subsets from the three studies, including patients with menstrually related and oral contraceptive-induced migraine, hypertension, obesity, weekend migraine, as well as patients with migraine with aura. In all patient subsets analyzed, lower headache recurrence rates were observed versus the comparator triptans, indicating a more sustained pain-relieving effect on migraine symptoms. A further randomized, double-blind study demonstrated that frovatriptan given in combination with the fast-acting cyclooxygenase inhibitor dexketoprofen provided improved migraine pain-free activity at 2 hours, and gave more sustained pain-free activity at 24 hours, versus frovatriptan alone. These benefits were observed both when the combination was administered early (<1 hour after symptom onset or late (>1 hour after onset. Different pharmacokinetic, but synergistic, properties between frovatriptan and dexketoprofen may make the combination of these agents particularly effective in migraine treatment, with rapid onset of action and sustained effect over 48 hours. These benefits, together with potential cost-effectiveness advantages versus other triptans could drive selection of the most appropriate treatment for acute migraine attacks. Keywords: migraine, frovatriptan, menstrual, dexketoprofen, triptans, migraine with aura

  11. Effective Professional Development Programs for Teachers of English Language Learners. Spotlight on Student Success. No. 803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Kip; Waxman, Hersh C.

    2005-01-01

    One of our greatest educational challenges continues to be improving the education of English language learners (ELLs). Because many new teachers are underprepared and many veteran teachers wholly unprepared for teaching ELLs, school districts nationwide have initiated professional development programs for inservice teachers. In this article, the…

  12. Cable median barriers : a cost-effective means to save lives : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Median-crossover crashes are among the most hazardous events that : can occur on freeways, often leading to serious injury or death. In recent : years, high-tension cable median barriers have emerged as a cost-effective alternative to conventional ba...

  13. Black Achievers' Experiences with Racial Spotlighting and Ignoring in a Predominantly White High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter Andrews, Dorinda J.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Despite a history of racial oppression and degradation in U.S. schools, African Americans have responded to racism and discrimination in ways that promote educational attainment and school success. Many Black adolescents have been empowered to succeed academically partly because of their awareness of racist practices in…

  14. Kinesin moving through the spotlight: Single-motor fluorescence microscopy with submillisecond time resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbrugge, S.; Kapitein, L.C.; Peterman, E.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Kinesin-1 is one of the motor proteins that drive intracellular transport in eukaryotes. This motor makes hundreds of 8-nm steps along a microtubule before releasing. Kinesin-1 can move at velocities of up to ∼800 nm/s, which means that one turnover on average takes 10 ms. Important details,

  15. Rasagiline meta-analysis: a spotlight on clinical safety and adverse events when treating Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-García del Pozo, Julián; Mínguez-Mínguez, Sara; de Groot, Piet W J; Jordán, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Rasagiline (Azilect, AGN 1135) is a selective irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B). MAO-B regulates the brain concentrations of important neurotransmitters that are related to movement, emotion, and cognition. Oral rasagiline, as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy to levodopa, was effective in the symptomatic treatment of adult patients with Parkinson's disease participating in double-blind, placebo-controlled, international studies. This article reviews the reported adverse effects of rasagiline. A MEDLINE search was performed for all articles from 1990 to present, which reported any adverse effects from rasagiline or related references. We conducted an analysis of the adverse effects of rasagiline based on the reported clinical studies. Furthermore, we compared the incidence of adverse events in clinical trials for rasagiline and placebo. Among the most frequently reported adverse effects for rasagiline as monotherapy are headache, dizziness, and insomnia. Depression, dizziness, somnolence, and other sleep disorders are reported when used in combination therapy. Our analysis demonstrates that the most frequently reported adverse effects in trials did not occur more often with rasagiline than placebo. In conclusion, rasagiline is a well-tolerated MAO-B inhibitor that may help to achieve the desired level of clinical benefit in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Putting urban soils in the spotlight: A learning experience through the Climate-KIC's initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maymó, Ana; Gimeno-García, Eugenia; Pascual-Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Andreu, Vicente; Rubio, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    The European Commission encourages integrating ecosystem-based approaches in the portfolio of adaptation strategies also in the urban areas. However, the renewed interest in the environmental benefits from green infrastructures coexists with the marginality with which they are treated in practice and, especially, where soil is concerned. Despite its critical functions, soils in cities have often been neglected. In fact, urban soil issues rarely get society attention or even from our policy makers. But, how to make urban soils visible?. From academia we need to extend our communication and networking abilities to engage citizens with projects related to urban soils. Through the Climate-KIC's professional placement programme, Pioneers into Practice, we were able to connect with stakeholders with widely different interests, and engage a broad range of opinions and comments on local circumstances and needs in a semi-quantitative form. Methodology included an actor analysis, an actor network map and a set of semi-structured actor interviews. This involved a local stakeholder network establishment. This stakeholder network reaches out beyond the usual suspects we would expect to partner and it is represented by the following groups: local administration, local governmental services (e.g., forestry and agriculture extension), relevant non-governmental organizations (e.g., dedicated to environment or development) at local level, planners, developers, and individuals (e.g., long-term local residents). The approach is focused on the non-technical barriers to success, whether they are social, institutional, financial, behavioral or regulatory, and how to overcome them. In this context, of a raising environmental awareness, the principal response from interviews demonstrated strong support for a strategic approach to soil management at the urban core and the countryside fringe. Herein, the contribution of urban soils to the provision of ecosystem services, in the framework of the Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES), aroused a great deal of interest among the different stakeholders interviewed. However, the low level of community awareness and understanding of threats to soil natural capital and the long-term consequences of this were also recognized.

  17. Spotlighting a Silent Category of Young Females: The Life Experiences of "House Girls" in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Kezban; Lukuslu, Demet

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the everyday life experiences of young women in Turkey known as "ev kizi" or "house girls." The article explores how traditional gender roles and family structure in Turkish society limit their full participation in political, economic, and public life. The study is based on in-depth interviews conducted…

  18. Spotlight on the presenter : a study into presentations of conference papers with PowerPoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertz, B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 1. Introduction PowerPoint is the most widely used presentation software tool. As of 2012, PowerPoint had more than 200 million presenters worldwide. Presenters all over the world use the program. Some use it for university teaching, others for business

  19. Spotlight on Speech Codes 2010: The State of Free Speech on Our Nation's Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each year, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) conducts a rigorous survey of restrictions on speech at America's colleges and universities. The survey and resulting report explore the extent to which schools are meeting their legal and moral obligations to uphold students' and faculty members' rights to freedom of speech,…

  20. Spotlight on Speech Codes 2011: The State of Free Speech on Our Nation's Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each year, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) conducts a rigorous survey of restrictions on speech at America's colleges and universities. The survey and accompanying report explore the extent to which schools are meeting their legal and moral obligations to uphold students' and faculty members' rights to freedom of speech,…

  1. Spotlight on Speech Codes 2009: The State of Free Speech on Our Nation's Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Each year, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) conducts a wide, detailed survey of restrictions on speech at America's colleges and universities. The survey and resulting report explore the extent to which schools are meeting their obligations to uphold students' and faculty members' rights to freedom of speech, freedom of…

  2. Video Book Trailers: Coming to a Library Near You! Spotlight Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopke-Wilson, MariRae

    2009-01-01

    This article features two library media specialists who discovered a way to motivate high school students to read. When most people go to the movies, the "coming attractions" or movie trailers are as anticipated as the popcorn! This Americana movie tradition hooks people again and again on what they will come back to see next. So, it's no surprise…

  3. Spotlight on botulinum toxin and its potential in the treatment of stroke-related spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Michelle; Simpson, David M

    2016-01-01

    Poststroke spasticity affects up to one-half of stroke patients and has debilitating effects, contributing to diminished activities of daily living, quality of life, pain, and functional impairments. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is proven to be safe and effective in the treatment of focal poststroke spasticity. The aim of this review is to highlight BoNT and its potential in the treatment of upper and lower limb poststroke spasticity. We review evidence for the efficacy of BoNT type A and B formulations and address considerations of optimal injection technique, patient and caregiver satisfaction, and potential adverse effects of BoNT. PMID:27022247

  4. Ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from spotlights incorporating tungsten halogen lamps

    CERN Document Server

    MacKinlay, Alistair F; Whillock, M J

    1989-01-01

    This report summarises measurements of the ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from eleven 'desk-top' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamps and one 'floor-standing' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamp available in the UK. Values of occupational hazard weighted and erythemally weighted ultraviolet radiation irradiance and measurements and relevant calculations of blue-light hazards are presented. It is concluded that the safety design of some desk-top tungsten halogen lamps is inadequate to prevent unnecessary exposure of the skin to potentially harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is recommended that all tungsten halogen lamps should have sufficient filtration to reduce their ultraviolet emissions to an acceptably low level. As long as the comfort aversion responses of the eye are respected, direct viewing of the lamps examined should not constitute a retinal hazard.

  5. De Novo Adult Transcriptomes of Two European Brittle Stars: Spotlight on Opsin-Based Photoreception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Delroisse

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technology allows to obtain a deeper and more complete view of transcriptomes. For non-model or emerging model marine organisms, NGS technologies offer a great opportunity for rapid access to genetic information. In this study, paired-end Illumina HiSeqTM technology has been employed to analyse transcriptomes from the arm tissues of two European brittle star species, Amphiura filiformis and Ophiopsila aranea. About 48 million Illumina reads were generated and 136,387 total unigenes were predicted from A. filiformis arm tissues. For O. aranea arm tissues, about 47 million reads were generated and 123,324 total unigenes were obtained. Twenty-four percent of the total unigenes from A. filiformis show significant matches with sequences present in reference online databases, whereas, for O. aranea, this percentage amounts to 23%. In both species, around 50% of the predicted annotated unigenes were significantly similar to transcripts from the purple sea urchin, the closest species to date that has undergone complete genome sequencing and annotation. GO, COG and KEGG analyses were performed on predicted brittle star unigenes. We focused our analyses on the phototransduction actors involved in light perception. Firstly, two new echinoderm opsins were identified in O. aranea: one rhabdomeric opsin (homologous to vertebrate melanopsin and one RGR opsin. The RGR-opsin is supposed to be involved in retinal regeneration while the r-opsin is suspected to play a role in visual-like behaviour. Secondly, potential phototransduction actors were identified in both transcriptomes using the fly (rhabdomeric and mammal (ciliary classical phototransduction pathways as references. Finally, the sensitivity of O.aranea to monochromatic light was investigated to complement data available for A. filiformis. The presence of microlens-like structures at the surface of dorsal arm plate of O. aranea could potentially explain phototactic behaviour differences between the two species. The results confirm (i the ability of these brittle stars to perceive light using opsin-based photoreception, (ii suggest the co-occurrence of both rhabdomeric and ciliary photoreceptors, and (iii emphasise the complexity of light perception in this echinoderm class.

  6. Damaging effects of hyperglycemia on cardiovascular function: spotlight on glucose metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapanga, Rudo F; Essop, M Faadiel

    2016-01-15

    The incidence of cardiovascular complications associated with hyperglycemia is a growing global health problem. This review discusses the link between hyperglycemia and cardiovascular diseases onset, focusing on the role of recently emerging downstream mediators, namely, oxidative stress and glucose metabolic pathway perturbations. The role of hyperglycemia-mediated activation of nonoxidative glucose pathways (NOGPs) [i.e., the polyol pathway, hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and protein kinase C] in this process is extensively reviewed. The proposal is made that there is a unique interplay between NOGPs and a downstream convergence of detrimental effects that especially affect cardiac endothelial cells, thereby contributing to contractile dysfunction. In this process the AGE pathway emerges as a crucial mediator of hyperglycemia-mediated detrimental effects. In addition, a vicious metabolic cycle is established whereby hyperglycemia-induced NOGPs further fuel their own activation by generating even more oxidative stress, thereby exacerbating damaging effects on cardiac function. Thus NOGP inhibition, and particularly that of the AGE pathway, emerges as a novel therapeutic intervention for the treatment of cardiovascular complications such as acute myocardial infarction in the presence hyperglycemia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Stealing the spotlight: CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase docks WD40-repeat proteins to destroy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hui

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent investigation of Cullin 4 (CUL4 has ushered this class of multiprotein ubiquitin E3 ligases to center stage as critical regulators of diverse processes including cell cycle regulation, developmental patterning, DNA replication, DNA damage and repair, and epigenetic control of gene expression. CUL4 associates with DNA Damage Binding protein 1 (DDB1 to assemble an ubiquitin E3 ligase that targets protein substrates for ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. CUL4 ligase activity is also regulated by the covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to CUL4, or neddylation, and the COP9 signalosome complex (CSN that removes this important modification. Recently, multiple WD40-repeat proteins (WDR were found to interact with DDB1 and serve as the substrate-recognition subunits of the CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase. As more than 150–300 WDR proteins exist in the human genome, these findings impact a wide array of biological processes through CUL4 ligase-mediated proteolysis. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the mechanism of CUL4 ubiquitin E3 ligase and discuss the architecture of CUL4-assembled E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes by comparison to CUL1-based E3s (SCF. Then, we will review several examples to highlight the critical roles of CUL4 ubiquitin ligase in genome stability, cell cycle regulation, and histone lysine methylation. Together, these studies provide insights into the mechanism of this novel ubiquitin ligase in the regulation of important biological processes.

  8. Spotlight on blisibimod and its potential in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenert A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aleksander Lenert,1 Timothy B Niewold,2 Petar Lenert3 1Division of Rheumatology, University of Kentucky, Kentucky Clinic, Lexington, KY, 2Division of Rheumatology and Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 3Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: B cells in general and BAFF (B cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor [TNF] family in particular have been primary targets of recent clinical trials in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. In 2011, belimumab, a monoclonal antibody against BAFF, became the first biologic agent approved for the treatment of SLE. Follow-up studies have shown excellent long-term safety and tolerability of belimumab. In this review, we critically analyze blisibimod, a novel BAFF-neutralizing agent. In contrast to belimumab that only blocks soluble BAFF trimer but not soluble 60-mer or membrane BAFF, blisibimod blocks with high affinity all three forms of BAFF. Furthermore, blisibimod has a unique structure built on four high-affinity BAFF-binding peptides fused to the IgG1-Fc carrier. It was tested in phase I and II trials in SLE where it showed safety and tolerability. While it failed to reach the primary endpoint in a recent phase II trial, post hoc analysis demonstrated its efficacy in SLE patients with higher disease activity. Based on these results, blisibimod is currently undergoing phase III trials targeting this responder subpopulation of SLE patients. The advantage of blisibimod, compared to its competitors, lies in its higher avidity for BAFF, but a possible drawback may come from its immunogenic potential and the anticipated loss of efficacy over time. Keywords: BAFF, APRIL, lupus, B cells, blisibimod

  9. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight: Yavapai College, Chino Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-12-22

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Yavapai College of Chino Valley, Arizona. These college students built a Building America Builders Challenge house that achieved the remarkably low HERS score of -3 and achieved a tight building envelope.

  10. Lifestyle correlates of overweight in adults: a hierarchical approach (the SPOTLIGHT project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Célina; Charreire, Hélène; Feuillet, Thierry; Mackenbach, Joreintje D; Compernolle, Sofie; Glonti, Ketevan; Bárdos, Helga; Rutter, Harry; McKee, Martin; Brug, Johannes; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Lakerveld, Jeroen; Oppert, Jean-Michel

    2016-11-03

    Obesity-related lifestyle behaviors usually co-exist but few studies have examined their simultaneous relation with body weight. This study aimed to identify the hierarchy of lifestyle-related behaviors associated with being overweight in adults, and to examine subgroups so identified. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional survey conducted across 60 urban neighborhoods in 5 European urban regions between February and September 2014. Data on socio-demographics, physical activity, sedentary behaviors, eating habits, smoking, alcohol consumption, and sleep duration were collected by questionnaire. Participants also reported their weight and height. A recursive partitioning tree approach (CART) was applied to identify both main correlates of overweight and lifestyle subgroups. In 5295 adults, mean (SD) body mass index (BMI) was 25.2 (4.5) kg/m 2 , and 46.0 % were overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 ). CART analysis showed that among all lifestyle-related behaviors examined, the first identified correlate was sitting time while watching television, followed by smoking status. Different combinations of lifestyle-related behaviors (prolonged daily television viewing, former smoking, short sleep, lower vegetable consumption, and lower physical activity) were associated with a higher likelihood of being overweight, revealing 10 subgroups. Members of four subgroups with overweight prevalence >50 % were mainly males, older adults, with lower education, and living in greener neighborhoods with low residential density. Sedentary behavior while watching television was identified as the most important correlate of being overweight. Delineating the hierarchy of correlates provides a better understanding of lifestyle-related behavior combinations which may assist in targeting preventative strategies aimed at tackling obesity.

  11. RE@21 spotlight: most influential papers from the requirements engineering conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glinz, Martin; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    Since 2003, an award has been presented annually at the IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference for the Most Influential Paper presented at the conference 10 years previously. In 2013, we celebrate 21 years of the Requirements Engineering Conference, and we use this as an opportunity

  12. Improving Critical Thinking through Socratic Seminars. Spotlight on Student Success. No. 110.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polite, Vernon C.; Adams, Arlin Henry

    This research digest reports on the efforts of Socratic Seminar methodology at Lookout Valley Middle School, a small middle school in Chattanooga (Tennessee). An integral part of the Paideia Schools Movement among public schools in Chattanooga, Socratic Seminars are well-planned opportunities for middle school students to engage in intelligent…

  13. Operando surface spectroscopy-placing catalytic solids at work under the spotlight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arean, C.O.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Zecchina, A.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is involved in the vast majority of industrial chemical processes performed nowadays, and an increased understanding of catalytic reactions is of the utmost relevance to develop a sustainable and cleaner technology. In order to make new (or improved) catalytic solids, an

  14. Generation Me in the spotlight : Linking reality TV to materialism, entitlement, and narcissism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opree, S.J.; Kühne, R.

    2016-01-01

    Today’s youth, the Generation Me, is deemed materialistic, entitled, and narcissistic. Individuality has become an important value in child-rearing and is cultivated in the media—especially within the reality TV genre. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adolescents’ and emerging

  15. Spotlight on fish: light pollution affects circadian rhythms of European perch but does not cause stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Preuer, Torsten; Kloas, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Flora and fauna evolved under natural day and night cycles. However, natural light is now enhanced by artificial light at night, particularly in urban areas. This alteration of natural light environments during the night is hypothesised to alter biological rhythms in fish, by effecting night-time production of the hormone melatonin. Artificial light at night is also expected to increase the stress level of fish, resulting in higher cortisol production. In laboratory experiments, European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to four different light intensities during the night, 0 lx (control), 1 lx (potential light level in urban waters), 10 lx (typical street lighting at night) and 100 lx. Melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24 hour period. This study revealed that the nocturnal increase in melatonin production was inhibited even at the lowest light level of 1 lx. However, cortisol levels did not differ between control and treatment illumination levels. We conclude that artificial light at night at very low intensities may disturb biological rhythms in fish since nocturnal light levels around 1 lx are already found in urban waters. However, enhanced stress induction could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. THE CURRENT STATUS OF MAPPING IN THE WORLD – SPOTLIGHT ON OCEANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Trinder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A summary is presented of the results of questionnaires sent to mapping agencies in Oceania, covering Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Island countries, to investigate the status of mapping in those countries. After World War II, the Australian Federal Government funded the initial small scale mapping of the whole country leading to increased percentages of map coverage of Australia. Mapping at larger scales is undertaken by the states and territories in Australia, including cadastral mapping. In New Zealand mapping is maintained by Land Information New Zealand (LINZ at 1:50,000 scale and smaller with regular updating. The results of the questionnaires also demonstrate the extent of map coverage in six Pacific Islands, but there is little information available on the actual percent coverage. Overall there are estimated to be an increases in the percentages of coverage of most map scales in Oceania. However, there appear to be insufficient professionals in most Pacific Island countries to maintain the mapping programs. Given that many Pacific Island countries will be impacted by rising sea level in the future, better mapping of these countries is essential. The availability of modern technology especially satellite images, digital aerial photography and airborne lidar data should enable the Pacific Island countries to provide better map products in future, but this would depend on foreign aid on many occasions.

  17. Course Placement Series: Spotlight on High School Math Course Enrollment. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Education explored course enrollment patterns in an effort to better understand in which courses students are enrolling and whether course enrollment policies and procedures are promoting students' interests. This report focuses on math course enrollment patterns throughout high school by following the 2013-14 twelfth…

  18. Angioedema Spotlight: A Closer Examination of Sacubitril/Valsartan Safety Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Ryan E; Oliphant, Carrie S

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of neprilysin inhibition into heart failure pharmacotherapy regimens has recently been recommended by U.S. guidelines, based on results from the PARADIGM-HF trial comparing sacubitril/valsartan to enalapril. While most of the discussion has focused on efficacy, a closer examination of the safety results, particularly the incidence of angioedema during the run-in and double-blind periods, is also warranted. Although no major safety concerns were identified, an angioedema risk comparable to enalapril was found, primarily in the black population. Therefore, despite combination with an angiotensin receptor blocker, which historically has a lower incidence of angioedema, the addition of neprilysin inhibition yields an angioedema risk profile comparable to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Clinicians should recognize this safety risk when prescribing sacubitril/valsartan and remain vigilant in counseling patients regarding the signs and symptoms of angioedema. As recommended by the guidelines, avoiding sacubitril/valsartan use concurrently or within 36 hours of the last dose of an ACE inhibitor or in patients with a history of angioedema is also crucial to minimize angioedema risk and prevent patient harm. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Tow plows could help Michigan save time and money on winter maintenance : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    As winter maintenance costs rise, MDOT is looking into innovative approaches to increase snow removal efficiency. As part of this effort, the department recently estimated the costs and benefits of incorporating tow plows into its equipment fleet. Re...

  20. Obesity in Children and the 'Myth of Psychological Maladjustment': Self-Esteem in the Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew J

    2017-03-01

    There are contrasting views regarding the psychological well-being of children with obesity. Responding to limitations of existing evidence, Jane Wardle in 2005 argued for a 'myth of psychological maladjustment'. This review looks again at self-esteem. The different characterisations of self-esteem each offer value. Global self-esteem is reduced in nearly all studies of youth with obesity. Dimensional self-esteem reveals physical appearance, athletic and social competence as the most affected areas, confirmed by research that has operationalised low self-competence. Children with obesity are also more likely to be victimised by their peers, generally and for their fatness. Victims who bully others appear to preserve some aspects of self-esteem. A relatively small proportion of youth with obesity has low self-esteem, but those with severe and persistent obesity are especially compromised. Weight loss is only weakly associated with improved self-competence suggesting the value of resilience and asset approaches to improving well-being.

  1. Spotlight on sirukumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: the evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzerini PE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Enea Lazzerini,1 Pier Leopoldo Capecchi,1 Giacomo Maria Guidelli,1 Enrico Selvi,1 Maurizio Acampa,2 Franco Laghi-Pasini1 1Department of Medical Sciences, Surgery and Neurosciences, University of Siena, 2Stroke Unit, University Hospital of Siena, Siena, Italy Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease primarily affecting synovial joints and is characterized by persistent high-grade systemic inflammation. Proinflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6, are of crucial importance in the pathogenesis of the disease, driving both joint inflammation and extra-articular comorbidities. Tocilizumab, a humanized IL-6 receptor-inhibiting monoclonal antibody, has been the first, and, to date, the only, IL-6 inhibitor approved for the treatment of RA. Many studies have demonstrated the potency and effectiveness of tocilizumab in controlling disease activity and radiological progression of RA. These successful results have encouraged the development of novel IL-6 inhibitors, among which a promising agent is sirukumab (SRK, a human anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody currently under evaluation in Phase II/III studies in patients with RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, giant-cell arteritis, and major depressive disorder. The evidence to date indicates SRK as an effective and well-tolerated new therapeutic tool for patients with active RA, with some preliminary data suggesting a specific beneficial impact on relevant systemic complications associated with the disease, such as depression and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, although pathophysiological considerations make plausible the hypothesis that IL-6 blockade with SRK may also be beneficial in the treatment of many diseases other than RA (either autoimmune or not, available clinical data in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus do not seem to support this view, also giving rise to potentially relevant concerns about drug safety. If large Phase III clinical trials currently in progress in patients with RA confirm the efficacy and tolerability of SRK, then in the long term, this drug could, in the near future, occupy a place in the treatment of the disease, potentially also opening the doors to a more extended use of SRK in a wide range of disorders in which IL-6 plays a key pathogenic role. Keywords: sirukumab, rheumatoid arthritis, interleukin-6, tocilizumab, systemic lupus erythematosus, cardiovascular disease, interleukin-6

  2. GqPCR-mediated Signalling in the Spotlight: From Visualization Towards Dissection and Quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalink, K.; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Signals relayed through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) play pivotal roles in human physiology and are important drug targets. About 40% of all GPCRs couple to the heterotrimeric G protein Gq. Biochemical studies as well as crystallography have improved our understanding of GqPCRs and their

  3. Taking flight with sensing equipment will deliver benefits across MDOT : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Recent strides in technology have opened the doors for using unmanned : aerial vehicles (UAVs, sometimes called drones) throughout MDOT. An : extensive study on the viability of UAVs instrumented with remote : sensors demonstrated a wide range of cos...

  4. Physical Environmental Correlates of Domain-Specific Sedentary Behaviours across Five European Regions (the SPOTLIGHT Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, Sofie; De Cocker, Katrien; Roda, Célina; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Mackenbach, Joreintje D; Lakerveld, Jeroen; Glonti, Ketevan; Bardos, Helga; Rutter, Harry; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    The relation between neighbourhood environmental factors and domain-specific sedentary behaviours among adults remains unclear. This study firstly aims to examine the association of perceived and objectively measured neighbourhood safety, aesthetics, destinations and functionality with transport-related, work-related and leisure-time sedentary behaviour. Secondly, the study aims to assess whether these associations are moderated by age, gender or educational level. In 60 randomly sampled neighbourhoods from 5 urban regions in Europe (Ghent and suburbs, Paris and inner suburbs, Budapest and suburbs, the Randstad, and Greater London), a virtual audit with Google Street View was performed to assess environmental characteristics. A total of 5,205 adult inhabitants of these neighbourhoods reported socio-demographic characteristics, sedentary behaviours, and neighbourhood perceptions in an online survey. Generalized linear mixed models were conducted to examine associations between physical environmental neighbourhood factors and sedentary behaviours. Interaction terms were added to test the moderating role of individual-level socio-demographic variables. Lower levels of leisure-time sedentary behaviour (i.e. all leisure activities except television viewing and computer use) were observed among adults who perceived greater numbers of destinations such as supermarkets, recreational facilities, or restaurants in their neighbourhood, and among adults who lived in a neighbourhood with more objectively measured aesthetic features, such as trees, water areas or public parks. Lower levels of work-related sedentary behaviour were observed among adults who perceived less aesthetic features in their neighbourhood, and among adults who lived in a neighbourhood with less objectively measured destinations. Both age, gender and educational level moderated the associations between neighbourhood environmental factors and sedentary behaviours. Preliminary evidence was found for associations between neighbourhood environmental factors and domain-specific sedentary behaviours among adults. However, these associations varied according to objective or subjective environmental measures. More research is needed to confirm and clarify the associations.

  5. Obesity in Children and the ?Myth of Psychological Maladjustment?: Self-Esteem in the Spotlight

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review There are contrasting views regarding the psychological well-being of children with obesity. Responding to limitations of existing evidence, Jane Wardle in 2005 argued for a ?myth of psychological maladjustment?. This review looks again at self-esteem. Recent Findings The different characterisations of self-esteem each offer value. Global self-esteem is reduced in nearly all studies of youth with obesity. Dimensional self-esteem reveals physical appearance, athletic and soci...

  6. Spotlight on Schools. AMAL Aleph Arts and Sciences Technological High School, Petach Tikva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Dina

    1998-01-01

    Israel's AMAL Aleph High School combines advanced technology with regular high school academic studies. This article describes how one English-as-a-Second-Language teacher joined a project to develop an online English student magazine for the Center for Educational Technology Internet site, then used to the project to improve students' English…

  7. TURNING THE SPOTLIGHT ON CLASS REPRESENTATIVES -EMPIRICAL INSIGHTS FROM DOWN UNDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Caruana

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ten months before Ontario became the first Canadian common law province to authorise American-style class actions, class actions became available in the Federal Court of Australia. In these two countries and in the United States, the named plaintiffs, commonly referred to as class representatives, are the only claimants formally in charge of the litigation, on the plaintiff side, whilst the outcome of class actions binds not only them and their opponents but also the claimants that they represent, the absent class members. And yet, to date, there have been no comprehensive studies of class representatives in these three countries. The aim of this article is to partly address this significant lacuna in the international legal literature by providing the findings of an empirical study, that the authors have undertaken, of the persons that acted as class representatives in the class actions that were filed in the first 17 years of the operation of the class action procedure in the Federal Court of Australia. It is hoped that this article will prompt Canadian scholars to undertake similar studies with respect to Canadian class representatives. Dix mois avant que l’Ontario devienne la première province de common law canadienne à autoriser les recours collectifs à l’américaine, la Cour fédérale d’Australie autorisait ceux-ci. Dans ces deux pays, ainsi qu’aux États-Unis, les demandeurs nommés, communément appelés représentants, sont les seuls demandeurs formellement mêlés au litige du côté de la partie demanderesse, tandis que l’issue des recours collectifs lie non seulement les représentants et leurs adversaires, mais aussi les demandeurs qu’ils représentent, c’est-à-dire les personnes inscrites au recours collectif qui sont absentes. Pourtant, il n’y a eu à ce jour aucune étude approfondie sur ces représentants de groupes dans ces trois pays. L’objet du présent article est de combler en partie cette importante lacune dans la littérature juridique internationale en fournissant les conclusions d’une étude empirique effectuée par les auteurs et portant sur les représentants dans le cadre des recours collectifs introduits dans les 17 premières années du régime des recours collectifs devant la Cour fédérale d’Australie. Il est à espérer que le présent article incitera les chercheurs canadiens à entreprendre de telles études en ce qui concerne les représentants de groupes canadiens.

  8. Spotlight on eltrombopag in the treatment of children with chronic immune thrombocytopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Michele P

    2016-01-01

    Michele P Lambert,1,2 1Division of Hematology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 2Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Pediatric data on the use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists are fairly limited. The recent approval of eltrombopag by the US Food and Drug Administration for children aged ≥1 year, based on data from two randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, may lead to the increas...

  9. Nearly Half of College Student Treatment Admissions Were for Primary Alcohol Abuse. Data Spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Many students, and the public in general, believe that drinking alcohol is a normal part of the college experience. Unfortunately, students' efforts to "be sociable" or "fit in" can escalate into substance use behavior that puts their health and well-being at risk: One in four full-time college students have experienced past year alcohol abuse or…

  10. Spotlight on rituximab in the treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moog P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Philipp Moog, Klaus Thuermel Abteilung für Nephrologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany Abstract: A 54-year-old patient presented to his general practitioner because of strong muscle pain in both thighs. Inflammatory parameters (CRP 16.3 mg/dL and white blood cells (15 g/L were elevated. The patient reported a weight loss of 10 kg in 4 weeks. There was no fever or any other specific symptoms. Urine dipstick examination and computed tomography of the chest were unremarkable. Because of increasing symptoms, the patient was referred to our department. Magnetic resonance tomography showed diffuse inflammatory changes of the muscles of both thighs. Neurological examination and electrophysiology revealed axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and ground-glass opacities of both lungs had occurred. Serum creatinine increased to 229 µmol/L within a few days, with proteinuria of 3.3 g/g creatinine. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse pauci-immune proliferative glomerulonephritis. Proteinase 3-specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were markedly increased. Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score was 35. Within 2 days, serum creatinine further increased to 495 µmol/L. Plasma exchange, high-dose glucocorticosteroids, and hemodialysis were started. The patient received cyclophosphamide 1 g twice and rituximab 375 mg/m2 four times according to the RITUXVAS protocol. Despite ongoing therapy, hemodialysis could not be withdrawn and had to be continued over 3 weeks until diuresis normalized. Glucocorticosteroids were tapered to 20 mg after 2 months, and serum creatinine was 133 µmol/L. However, nephritic urinary sediment reappeared. Another dose of 1 g cyclophosphamide was given, and glucocorticosteroids were raised for another 4 weeks. After 6 months, the daily prednisolone dose was able to be tapered to 5 mg. Serum creatinine was 124 µmol/L, proteinuria further decreased to 382 mg/g creatinine, and the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score was 0. Maintenance therapy with rituximab 375 mg/m2 every 6 months was started. At the last visit after 8 months, the patient was still in remission, with only minor persistent dysesthesia of the left foot and a persistent serum creatinine of 133 µmol/L. Keywords: ANCA, GPA, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MPA, microscopic polyangiitis, management

  11. Cognitive factors shape brain networks for auditory skills: spotlight on auditory working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Nina; Strait, Dana L; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra

    2012-04-01

    Musicians benefit from real-life advantages, such as a greater ability to hear speech in noise and to remember sounds, although the biological mechanisms driving such advantages remain undetermined. Furthermore, the extent to which these advantages are a consequence of musical training or innate characteristics that predispose a given individual to pursue music training is often debated. Here, we examine biological underpinnings of musicians' auditory advantages and the mediating role of auditory working memory. Results from our laboratory are presented within a framework that emphasizes auditory working memory as a major factor in the neural processing of sound. Within this framework, we provide evidence for music training as a contributing source of these abilities. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Research Spotlight: Model suggests path to ending the ongoing Haitian cholera epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-05-01

    Since early November 2010 a deadly cholera epidemic has been spreading across the Caribbean nation of Haiti, killing thousands of people and infecting hundreds of thousands. While infection rates are being actively monitored, health organizations have been left without a clear understanding of exactly how the disease has spread across Haiti. Cholera can spread through exposure to contaminated water, and the disease travels over long distances if an infected individual moves around the country. Using representations of these two predominant dispersion mechanisms, along with information on the size of the susceptible population, the number of infected individuals, and the aquatic concentration of the cholera-causing bacteria for more than 500 communities, Bertuzzo et al. designed a model that was able to accurately reproduce the progression of the Haitian cholera epidemic. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL046823, 2011)

  13. Spotlight on dupilumab in the treatment of atopic dermatitis: design, development, and potential place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Erme AM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Angelo Massimiliano D’Erme,1,2 Marco Romanelli,2 Andrea Chiricozzi2 1Dermatology Unit, Livorno Hospital, Livorno, 2Dermatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is among the most common inflammatory skin diseases in children and adults in industrialized countries. Up to one-third of adults (probably a smaller proportion in childhood suffer from moderate-to-severe AD, whose recommended treatment is usually based on systemic therapies. The currently available therapeutics are limited, and AD management becomes challenging in most cases. Over the last few years, new advances in the understanding of AD pathogenic mechanisms and inflammatory pathways have led to the identification of specific therapeutic targets and new molecules have been tested. Dupilumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody directed against the IL-4 receptor α subunit that is able to block the signaling of both IL-4 and IL-13 and achieve rapid and significant improvements in adults with moderate-to-severe AD. Dupilumab is ready to inaugurate a long and promising biological target treatment option for Th2 cell-mediated atopic immune response that characterizes AD. Keywords: dupilumab, atopic dermatitis, eczema, IL-4, IL-13, biologics

  14. MDOT innovation leading to faster, longer-lasting pavement repairs : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Current methods of patching pavement must evolve to meet increasing mobility demands. : To address this need, MDOT has been testing a new generation of rapid set full-depth : pavement repair materials. Initial results are promising. The new materials...

  15. The dead end of domestic violence: spotlight on children's narratives during forensic investigations following domestic homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Carmit

    2014-12-01

    The current study provides an in-depth exploration of the narratives of children who witnessed their father killing their mother. This exploration was conducted using a thematic analysis of the children's forensic interviews based on seven investigative interviews that were conducted with children following the domestic homicide. Investigative interviews were selected for study only for substantiated cases and only if the children disclosed the domestic homicide. All of the investigative interviews were conducted within 24h of the domestic homicide. Thematic analysis revealed the following four key categories: the domestic homicide as the dead end of domestic violence, what I did when daddy killed mommy, that one time that daddy killed mommy, and mommy will feel better and will go back home. The discussion examines the multiple layers of this phenomenon as revealed in the children's narratives and its consequences for professionals within the legal and clinical contexts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spotlight: maquiladora employment: new data confirm pickup in Juarez factory jobs

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Coronado; Jesus Canas

    2010-01-01

    For decades, Mexico's maquiladoras have been a major growth engine in the Rio Grande region, and monthly reports on the industry's employment, wages and production were key barometers for the border region's economy. ; We developed a model to estimate Juarez's monthly maquiladora employment. This model will continue to be a timely indicator of El Paso-Juárez area manufacturing activity, given its track record and Mexico's two-month lag in reporting IMMEX (Maquiladora Manufacturing Industry an...

  17. In Glare of Public Spotlight, College Officials Struggle to Deal with Perceived Lawlessness of Their Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Douglas

    1990-01-01

    Many college athletes have been involved in crimes this year, ranging from misdemeanors to felonies. The incidents are more likely than before to be made public. Coaches and administrators disagree about disciplinary policy, but some institutions are responding with educational programs for athletes. (MSE)

  18. Putting attention in the spotlight: The influence of APOE genotype on visual search in mid adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Claire; Forster, Sophie; Tabet, Naji; Rusted, Jennifer

    2017-09-15

    The Apolipoprotein E e4 allele is associated with greater cognitive decline with age, yet effects of this gene are also observed earlier in the lifespan. This research explores genotype differences (e2, e3, e4) in the allocation of visuospatial attention in mid-adulthood. Sixty-six volunteers, aged 45-55 years, completed two paradigms probing the active selection of information at the focus of attention (a dynamic scaling task) and perceptual capacity differences. Two methods of statistical comparison (parametric statistics, Bayesian inference) found no significant difference between e4 carriers and the homozygous e3 group on either the dynamic scaling or perceptual load task. E2 carriers, however, demonstrated less efficient visual search performance on the dynamic scaling task. The lack of an e4 difference in visuospatial attention, despite previous suggestion in the literature of genotype effects, indicates that select attentional processes are intact in e4 carriers in mid-adulthood. The association of e2 genotype with slower visual search performance complicates the premised protective effects of this allele in cognitive ageing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Knowledge-aided Two-dimensional Autofocus for Spotlight SAR Polar Format Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Conventional two-dimensional (2-D) autofocus algorithms blindly estimate the phase error in the sense that they do not exploit any a priori information on the structure of the 2-D phase error. As such, they often suffer from low computational efficiency and lack of data redundancy to accurately estimate the 2-D phase error. In this paper, a knowledge-aided (KA) 2-D autofocus algorithm which is based on exploiting a priori knowledge about the 2-D phase error structure, is presented. First, as ...

  20. JEM spotlight: Nuclear desalination--environmental impacts and implications for planning and monitoring activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasov, Vladimir; Khamis, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear desalination has been identified as an option since the 1960s, but only recently, as climate change intensifies, has it gained interest again. Although environmental impacts of nuclear desalination have not been paid a lot of attention in the few implemented projects, now more than ever, it is essential to provide an overview of their nature and magnitude. The gathered information and basic analysis allow for a general comparison of a 200,000 m(3)/d nuclear desalination facility using a once-through cooling system as a reference case, with alternative co-location options. Results of the review indicate that the potential for marine impacts requires careful planning and monitoring. They also reveal that adverse coastal, atmospheric and socio-economic impacts are minor in comparison with other co-location alternatives. The issues regarding public health are discussed and experiences presented. Nuclear desalination facilities are expected to show a better environmental performance than other co-located power/desalination options. Environmental planning and monitoring activities are thus much simpler and their scope smaller, with the most important monitoring parameters listed. In conclusion, the application of nuclear desalination is recommended as a less environmentally harmful option.