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Sample records for spotless starling sturnus

  1. Do spotless starlings place feathers at their nests by ultraviolet color?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés, Jesús M.; Parejo, Deseada; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Navarro, Carlos; Soler, Juan J.

    2010-02-01

    A considerable number of bird species carry feathers to their nests. Feathers’ presence in the nests has traditionally been explained by their insulating properties. Recently, however, it has been suggested that feathers carried to the nests by females of the spotted starling ( Sturnus unicolor L.) could have an ornamental function based on their ultraviolet (300-400 nm) and human-visible longer wavelength (400-700 nm) coloration. In our population, 95.7% of feathers found inside next-boxes occupied by nesting starlings were rock dove fly feathers. Of these feathers, 82.7% were naturally positioned with their reverse side oriented toward the entrance hole and 42.4% of all found feathers were situated within the nest-cup. Here we experimentally assess the signaling function of ultraviolet coloration of feathers in nests of spotless starlings by providing nests with a number of pigeon flight feathers that were respectively treated on their obverse, reverse, both, or neither side with a UV blocker. Starlings placed 42.5% of the experimental feathers in the nest-cup irrespective of the UV block treatment. Orientation of feathers toward the entrance hole was not related with their ultraviolet radiation. However, feathers placed within the nest-cup were more likely found with their reverse side oriented toward the entrance hole confirming our correlative findings. These results suggest a minor role of ultraviolet coloration on feather location by spotless starlings.

  2. Reproductive state modulates testosterone-induced singing in adult female European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    OpenAIRE

    Rouse, Melvin L.; Stevenson, Tyler J.; Fortune, Eric S.; Ball, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) exhibit seasonal changes in singing and in the volumes of the neural substrate. Increases in song nuclei volume are mediated at least in part by increases in day length, which is also associated with increases in plasma testosterone (T), reproductive activity, and singing behavior in males. The correlations between photoperiod (i.e. daylength), T, reproductive state and singing hamper our ability to disentangle causal relationships. We investigated how ph...

  3. Ahemeral light regimens test the photoperiodic threshold of the european starling (Sturnus vulgaris)

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    Schwab, R. G.

    1980-03-01

    Male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were held for three consecutive photoperiod oscillations (ahemeral years) composed of 30-h day lengths, i.e., the “daily” light and dark each lasted three hours longer than under the natural daily photoperiod at latitude 38°N. These starlings had no gonad metamorphosis during the 45 actual months necessary to complete the three ahemeral photoperiod oscillations; nor did subsequent exposure to continuous illumination elicit gonad response. It is concluded that the daily duration of light and darkness (although certainly operant in controlling starling sexual cycles under temperate-zone photoperiod oscillations) is not the critical factor establishing a sexual cycle under the ahemeral regimen. Rather, it appears that this species must experience a daily duration of light of 12 hours or less (a definitive photoperiodic threshold) before photo-induction of a sexual cycle is possible.

  4. Common Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris increasingly select for grazed areas with increasing distance-to-nest.

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    Henning Heldbjerg

    Full Text Available The abundant and widespread Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris is currently declining across much of Europe due to landscape changes caused by agricultural intensification. The proximate mechanisms causing adverse effects to breeding Starlings are unclear, hampering our ability to implement cost-efficient agri-environmental schemes to restore populations to former levels. This study aimed to show how this central foraging farmland bird uses and selects land cover types in general and how use of foraging habitat changes in relation to distance from the nest. We attached GPS-loggers to 17 breeding Starlings at a Danish dairy cattle farm in 2015 and 2016 and analysed their use of different land cover types as a function of distance intervals from the nest and their relative availability. As expected for a central place forager, Starlings increasingly avoided potential foraging areas with greater distance-to-nest: areas ≥ 500 m were selected > 100 times less frequently than areas within 100 m. On average, Starlings selected the land cover category Grazed most frequently, followed by Short Grass, Bare Ground, Meadow and Winter Crops. Starlings compensated for elevated travel costs by showing increasing habitat selection the further they foraged from the nest. Our results highlight the importance of Grazed foraging habitats close to the nest site of breeding Starlings. The ecological capacity of intensively managed farmlands for insectivorous birds like the Starling is decreasing through conversion of the most strongly selected land cover type (Grazed to the least selected (Winter Crops which may be further exacerbated through spatial segregation of foraging and breeding habitats.

  5. Common Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) increasingly select for grazed areas with increasing distance-to-nest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldbjerg, Henning; Fox, Anthony D; Thellesen, Peder V; Dalby, Lars; Sunde, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The abundant and widespread Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) is currently declining across much of Europe due to landscape changes caused by agricultural intensification. The proximate mechanisms causing adverse effects to breeding Starlings are unclear, hampering our ability to implement cost-efficient agri-environmental schemes to restore populations to former levels. This study aimed to show how this central foraging farmland bird uses and selects land cover types in general and how use of foraging habitat changes in relation to distance from the nest. We attached GPS-loggers to 17 breeding Starlings at a Danish dairy cattle farm in 2015 and 2016 and analysed their use of different land cover types as a function of distance intervals from the nest and their relative availability. As expected for a central place forager, Starlings increasingly avoided potential foraging areas with greater distance-to-nest: areas ≥ 500 m were selected > 100 times less frequently than areas within 100 m. On average, Starlings selected the land cover category Grazed most frequently, followed by Short Grass, Bare Ground, Meadow and Winter Crops. Starlings compensated for elevated travel costs by showing increasing habitat selection the further they foraged from the nest. Our results highlight the importance of Grazed foraging habitats close to the nest site of breeding Starlings. The ecological capacity of intensively managed farmlands for insectivorous birds like the Starling is decreasing through conversion of the most strongly selected land cover type (Grazed) to the least selected (Winter Crops) which may be further exacerbated through spatial segregation of foraging and breeding habitats.

  6. Embryonic modulation of maternal steroids in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

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    Paitz, Ryan T; Bowden, Rachel M; Casto, Joseph M

    2011-01-07

    In birds, maternally derived yolk steroids are a proposed mechanism by which females can adjust individual offspring phenotype to prevailing conditions. However, when interests of mother and offspring differ, parent-offspring conflict will arise and embryonic interests, not those of the mother, should drive offspring response to maternal steroids in eggs. Because of this potential conflict, we investigated the ability of developing bird embryos to process maternally derived yolk steroids. We examined how progesterone, testosterone and oestradiol levels changed in both the yolk/albumen (YA) and the embryo of European starling eggs during the first 10 days of development. Next, we injected tritiated testosterone into eggs at oviposition to characterize potential metabolic pathways during development. Ether extractions separated organic and aqueous metabolites in both the embryo and YA homogenate, after which major steroid metabolites were identified. Results indicate that the concentrations of all three steroids declined during development in the YA homogenate. Exogenous testosterone was primarily metabolized to an aqueous form of etiocholanolone that remained in the YA. These results clearly demonstrate that embryos can modulate their local steroid environment, setting up the potential for parent-offspring conflict. Embryonic regulation must be considered when addressing the evolutionary consequences of maternal steroids in eggs.

  7. Reproductive state modulates testosterone-induced singing in adult female European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Melvin L; Stevenson, Tyler J; Fortune, Eric S; Ball, Gregory F

    2015-06-01

    European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) exhibit seasonal changes in singing and in the volumes of the neural substrate. Increases in song nuclei volume are mediated at least in part by increases in day length, which is also associated with increases in plasma testosterone (T), reproductive activity, and singing behavior in males. The correlations between photoperiod (i.e. daylength), T, reproductive state and singing hamper our ability to disentangle causal relationships. We investigated how photoperiodic-induced variation in reproductive state modulates the effects of T on singing behavior and song nuclei volumes in adult female starlings. Female starlings do not naturally produce measureable levels of circulating T but nevertheless respond to exogenous T, which induces male-like singing. We manipulated photoperiod by placing birds in a photosensitive or photorefractory state and then treated them with T-filled or empty silastic implants. We recorded morning singing behavior for 3 weeks, after which we assessed reproductive condition and measured song nuclei volumes. We found that T-treated photosensitive birds sang significantly more than all other groups including T-treated photorefractory birds. All T-treated birds had larger song nuclei volumes than with blank-treated birds (despite photorefractory T-treated birds not increasing song-rate). There was no effect of photoperiod on the song nuclei volumes of T-treated birds. These data show that the behavioral effects of exogenous T can be modulated by reproductive state in adult female songbirds. Furthermore, these data are consistent with other observations that increases in singing rate in response to T are not necessarily due to the direct effects of T on song nuclei volume. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Egg pigmentation reflects female and egg quality in the spotless starling Sturnus unicolor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    López-Rull, I.; Mikšík, Ivan; Gil, D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 12 (2008), s. 1877-1884 ISSN 0340-5443 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : egg pigments * biliverdin * yolk androgens Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.917, year: 2008

  9. Yolk androgens as modulators of life history trade-offs in the spotless starling (Sturnus unicolor)

    OpenAIRE

    Muriel, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Tesis presentada para para optar al grado de Doctor en el Departamento de Ecología Evolutiva del Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales – CSIC (Madrid). Esta memoria está además adscrita académicamente al Departamento de Zoología y Antropología Física de la Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

  10. Comparison of intraosseous pentobarbital administration and thoracic compression for euthanasia of anesthetized sparrows (Passer domesticus) and starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

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    Paul-Murphy, Joanne R; Engilis, Andrew; Pascoe, Peter J; Williams, D Colette; Gustavsen, Kate A; Drazenovich, Tracy L; Keel, M Kevin; Polley, Tamsen M; Engilis, Irene E

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare intraosseous pentobarbital treatment (IPT) and thoracic compression (TC) on time to circulatory arrest and an isoelectric electroencephalogram (EEG) in anesthetized passerine birds. ANIMALS 30 wild-caught adult birds (17 house sparrows [Passer domesticus] and 13 European starlings [Sturnus vulgaris]). PROCEDURES Birds were assigned to receive IPT or TC (n = 6/species/group). Birds were anesthetized, and carotid arterial pulses were monitored by Doppler methodology. Five subdermal braided-wire electrodes were used for EEG. Anesthetic depth was adjusted until a continuous EEG pattern was maintained, then euthanasia was performed. Times from initiation of euthanasia to cessation of carotid pulse and irreversible isoelectric EEG (indicators of death) were measured. Data (medians and first to third quartiles) were summarized and compared between groups within species. Necropsies were performed for all birds included in experiments and for another 6 birds euthanized under anesthesia by TC (4 sparrows and 1 starling) or IPT (1 sparrow). RESULTS Median time to isoelectric EEG did not differ significantly between treatment groups for sparrows (19.0 and 6.0 seconds for TC and IPT, respectively) or starlings (88.5 and 77.5 seconds for TC and IPT, respectively). Median times to cessation of pulse were significantly shorter for TC than for IPT in sparrows (0.0 vs 18.5 seconds) and starlings (9.5 vs 151.0 seconds). On necropsy, most (14/17) birds that underwent TC had grossly visible coelomic, pericardial, or perihepatic hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that TC might be an efficient euthanasia method for small birds. Digital pressure directly over the heart during TC obstructed venous return, causing rapid circulatory arrest, with rupture of the atria or vena cava in several birds. The authors propose that cardiac compression is a more accurate description than TC for this procedure.

  11. Water and heat balance during flight in the rose-colored starling (Sturnus roseus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Sophia; Biebach, Herbert; Visser, G. Henk

    2006-01-01

    Water imbalance during flight is considered to be a potentially limiting factor for flight ranges in migrating birds, but empirical data are scarce. We studied flights under controlled ambient conditions with rose-colored starlings in a wind tunnel. In one experiment, we measured water fluxes with

  12. Estradiol differentially affects auditory recognition and learning according to photoperiodic state in the adult male songbird, European starling (Sturnus vulgaris

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    Rebecca M. Calisi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in hormones can affect many types of learning in vertebrates. Adults experience fluctuations in a multitude of hormones over a temporal scale, from local, rapid action to more long-term, seasonal changes. Endocrine changes during development can affect behavioral outcomes in adulthood, but how learning is affected in adults by hormone fluctuations experienced during adulthood is less understood. Previous reports have implicated the sex steroid hormone estradiol (E2 in both male and female vertebrate cognitive functioning. Here, we examined the effects of E2 on auditory recognition and learning in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris. European starlings are photoperiodic, seasonally breeding songbirds that undergo different periods of reproductive activity according to annual changes in day length. We simulated these reproductive periods, specifically 1. photosensitivity, 2. photostimulation, and 3. photorefractoriness in captive birds by altering day length. During each period, we manipulated circulating E2 and examined multiple measures of learning. To manipulate circulating E2, we used subcutaneous implants containing either 17-β E2 and/or fadrozole (FAD, a highly specific aromatase inhibitor that suppresses E2 production in the body and the brain, and measured the latency for birds to learn and respond to short, male conspecific song segments (motifs. We report that photostimulated birds given E2 had higher response rates and responded with better accuracy than those given saline controls or FAD. Conversely, photosensitive, animals treated with E2 responded with less accuracy than those given FAD. These results demonstrate how circulating E2 and photoperiod can interact to shape auditory recognition and learning in adults, driving it in opposite directions in different states.

  13. Constitutive immune function in European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, is decreased immediately after an endurance flight in a wind tunnel.

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    Nebel, Silke; Bauchinger, Ulf; Buehler, Deborah M; Langlois, Lillie A; Boyles, Michelle; Gerson, Alexander R; Price, Edwin R; McWilliams, Scott R; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2012-01-15

    Life-history theory predicts that animals face a trade-off in energy allocation between performing strenuous exercise, such as migratory flight, and mounting an immune response. We experimentally tested this prediction by studying immune function in European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, flown in a wind tunnel. Specifically, we predicted that constitutive immune function decreases in response to training and, additionally, in response to immediate exercise. We compared constitutive immune function among three groups: (1) 'untrained' birds that were kept in cages and were not flown; (2) 'trained' birds that received flight training over a 15 day period and performed a 1-4 h continuous flight, after which they rested for 48 h before being sampled; and (3) 'post-flight' birds that differed from the 'trained' group only in being sampled immediately after the final flight. A bird in our trained group represents an individual during migration that has been resting between migratory flights for at least 2 days. A bird in our post-flight group represents an individual that has just completed a migratory flight and has not yet had time to recover. Three of our four indicators (haptoglobin, agglutination and lysis) showed the predicted decrease in immune function in the post-flight group, and two indicators (haptoglobin, agglutination) showed the predicted decreasing trend from the untrained to trained to post-flight group. Haptoglobin levels were negatively correlated with flight duration. No effect of training or flight was detected on leukocyte profiles. Our results suggest that in European starlings, constitutive immune function is decreased more as a result of immediate exercise than of exercise training. Because of the recent emergence of avian-borne diseases, understanding the trade-offs and challenges faced by long-distance migrants has gained a new level of relevance and urgency.

  14. Bottom of the heap: having heavier competitors accelerates early-life telomere loss in the European starling, Sturnus vulgaris.

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    Daniel Nettle

    Full Text Available Early-life adversity is associated with poorer health and survival in adulthood in humans and other animals. One pathway by which early-life environmental stressors could affect the adult phenotype is via effects on telomere dynamics. Several studies have shown that early-life adversity is associated with relatively short telomeres, but these are often cross-sectional and usually correlational in design. Here, we present a novel experimental system for studying the relationship between early-life adversity and telomere dynamics using a wild bird, the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris. We used cross-fostering to experimentally assign sibling chicks to either small or large broods for twelve days of the growth period. We measured telomere length in red blood cells using quantitative PCR near the beginning of the experimental manipulation (4 days old, at the end of the experimental manipulation (15 days old, and once the birds were independent (55 days old. Being in a larger brood slowed growth and retarded wing development and the timing of fledging. We found no evidence that overall brood size affected telomere dynamics. However, the greater the number of competitors above the focal bird in the within-brood size hierarchy, the greater was the telomere loss during the period of the experimental manipulation. The number of competitors below the focal in the hierarchy had no effect. The effect of heavier competitors was still evident when we controlled for the weight of the focal bird at the end of the manipulation, suggesting it was not due to retarded growth per se. Moreover, the impact of early competition on telomeres was still evident at independence, suggesting persistence beyond early life. Our study provides experimental support for the hypothesis that social stress, in this case induced by the presence of a greater number of dominant competitors, accelerates the rate of telomere loss.

  15. Estimation of unsteady aerodynamics in the wake of a freely flying European starling (Sturnus vulgaris.

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    Hadar Ben-Gida

    Full Text Available Wing flapping is one of the most widespread propulsion methods found in nature; however, the current understanding of the aerodynamics in bird wakes is incomplete. The role of the unsteady motion in the flow and its contribution to the aerodynamics is still an open question. In the current study, the wake of a freely flying European starling has been investigated using long-duration high-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV in the near wake. Kinematic analysis of the wings and body of the bird has been performed using additional high-speed cameras that recorded the bird movement simultaneously with the PIV measurements. The wake evolution of four complete wingbeats has been characterized through reconstruction of the time-resolved data, and the aerodynamics in the wake have been analyzed in terms of the streamwise forces acting on the bird. The profile drag from classical aerodynamics was found to be positive during most of the wingbeat cycle, yet kinematic images show that the bird does not decelerate. It is shown that unsteady aerodynamics are necessary to satisfy the drag/thrust balance by approximating the unsteady drag term. These findings may shed light on the flight efficiency of birds by providing a partial answer to how they minimize drag during flapping flight.

  16. Estimation of unsteady aerodynamics in the wake of a freely flying European starling (Sturnus vulgaris).

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    Ben-Gida, Hadar; Kirchhefer, Adam; Taylor, Zachary J; Bezner-Kerr, Wayne; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Kopp, Gregory A; Gurka, Roi

    2013-01-01

    Wing flapping is one of the most widespread propulsion methods found in nature; however, the current understanding of the aerodynamics in bird wakes is incomplete. The role of the unsteady motion in the flow and its contribution to the aerodynamics is still an open question. In the current study, the wake of a freely flying European starling has been investigated using long-duration high-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in the near wake. Kinematic analysis of the wings and body of the bird has been performed using additional high-speed cameras that recorded the bird movement simultaneously with the PIV measurements. The wake evolution of four complete wingbeats has been characterized through reconstruction of the time-resolved data, and the aerodynamics in the wake have been analyzed in terms of the streamwise forces acting on the bird. The profile drag from classical aerodynamics was found to be positive during most of the wingbeat cycle, yet kinematic images show that the bird does not decelerate. It is shown that unsteady aerodynamics are necessary to satisfy the drag/thrust balance by approximating the unsteady drag term. These findings may shed light on the flight efficiency of birds by providing a partial answer to how they minimize drag during flapping flight.

  17. Hand-rearing reduces fear of humans in European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris.

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    Gesa Feenders

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pending changes in European legislation ban the use of wild-caught animals in research. This change is partly justified on the assumption that captive-breeding (or hand-rearing increases welfare of captive animals because these practices result in animals with reduced fear of humans. However, there are few actual data on the long-term behavioural effects of captive-breeding in non-domestic species, and these are urgently needed in order to understand the welfare and scientific consequences of adopting this practice. We compared the response of hand-reared and wild-caught starlings to the presence of a human in the laboratory. During human presence, all birds increased their general locomotor activity but the wild-caught birds moved away from the human and were less active than the hand-reared birds. After the human departed, the wild-caught birds were slower to decrease their activity back towards baseline levels, and showed a dramatic increase in time at the periphery of the cage compared with the hand-reared birds. We interpret these data as showing evidence of a greater fear response in wild-caught birds with initial withdrawal followed by a subsequent rebound of prolonged attempts to escape the cage. We found no effects of environmental enrichment. However, birds in cages on low shelves were less active than birds on upper shelves, and showed a greater increase in the time spent at the periphery of their cages after the human departed, perhaps indicating that the lower cages were more stressful. In demonstrating reduced fear of humans in hand-reared birds, our results support one of the proposed welfare benefits of this practice, but without further data on the possible welfare costs of hand-rearing, it is not yet possible to reach a general conclusion about its net welfare impact. However, our results confirm a clear scientific impact of both hand-rearing and cage position at the behavioural level.

  18. Experimental Challenge of a Peridomestic Avian Species, European Starlings ( Sturnus vulgaris ), with Novel Influenza A H7N9 Virus from China.

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    Hall, Jeffrey S; Ip, Hon S; TeSlaa, Joshua L; Nashold, Sean W; Dusek, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    In 2013 a novel avian influenza H7N9 virus was isolated from several critically ill patients in China, and infection with this virus has since caused more than 200 human deaths. Live poultry markets are the likely locations of virus exposure to humans. Peridomestic avian species also may play important roles in the transmission and maintenance of H7N9 at live poultry markets. We experimentally challenged wild European Starlings ( Sturnus vulgaris ) with the novel H7N9 virus and measured virus excretion, clinical signs, and infectious dose. We found that European Starlings can be infected with this virus when inoculated with relatively high doses, and we predict that infected birds excrete sufficient amounts of virus to transmit to other birds, including domestic chickens. Infected European Starlings showed no clinical signs or mortality after infection with H7N9. This abundant peridomestic bird may be a source of the novel H7N9 virus in live poultry markets and may have roles in virus transmission to poultry and humans.

  19. Experimental challenge of a peridomestic avian species, European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), with novel Influenza A H7N9 virus from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Ip, Hon S.; Teslaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Dusek, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 a novel avian influenza H7N9 virus was isolated from several critically ill patients in China, and infection with this virus has since caused more than 200 human deaths. Live poultry markets are the likely locations of virus exposure to humans. Peridomestic avian species also may play important roles in the transmission and maintenance of H7N9 at live poultry markets. We experimentally challenged wild European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) with the novel H7N9 virus and measured virus excretion, clinical signs, and infectious dose. We found that European Starlings can be infected with this virus when inoculated with relatively high doses, and we predict that infected birds excrete sufficient amounts of virus to transmit to other birds, including domestic chickens. Infected European Starlings showed no clinical signs or mortality after infection with H7N9. This abundant peridomestic bird may be a source of the novel H7N9 virus in live poultry markets and may have roles in virus transmission to poultry and humans.

  20. Are female starlings able to recognize the scent of their offspring?

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    Luisa Amo

    Full Text Available Although there is growing evidence that birds may have individual chemical profiles that can function in several social contexts, offspring recognition based on olfactory cues has never been explored. This ability should be more likely evolved in colonial birds and/or species suffering brood parasitism, in which the risk of being engaged in costly misdirected parental care is high.We performed a choice experiment to examine whether females of the spotless starling, Sturnus unicolor, a species that is colonial, and where a fraction of the population is exposed to intraspecific brood parasitism, can discriminate between the scent of their offspring and that of unrelated nestlings. We also explored whether the development of the uropygial gland secretion may play a role in such olfactory discrimination by performing the choice experiments to females rearing nestlings of two different ages, that is, without and with developed uropygial glands. Results showed that female starlings did not preferentially choose the scent of their offspring, independently of whether the gland of nestlings was developed or not.Our results suggest that female starlings do not have or do not show the ability to distinguish their offspring based on olfaction, at least up to 12-14 days of nestling age. Further research is needed to examine whether odour-based discrimination may function when fledgling starlings leave the nest and the risk of costly misidentification is likely to increase.

  1. Photoperiodic differences in a forebrain nucleus involved in vocal plasticity: enkephalin immunoreactivity reveals volumetric variation in song nucleus lMAN but not NIf in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

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    Stevenson, Tyler J; Ball, Gregory F

    2010-09-15

    Seasonal variation in the volume of various song control nuclei in many passerine species remains one of the best examples of naturally occurring adult neuroplasticity among vertebrates. The lateral portion of the magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (lMAN) is a song nucleus that is important for song learning and seems to be critical for inducing variability in the song structure that is later pruned via a feedback process to produce adult crystallized song. To date, lMAN has not been shown to exhibit seasonal changes in volume, probably because it is difficult to resolve the boundaries of lMAN when employing histological methods based on Nissl staining. Here, lMAN(core) volumes were examined in intact photostimulated (i.e., breeding), castrated photostimulated and photorefractory (i.e., nonbreeding) male starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) to investigate the degree of seasonal variation in brain morphology. We present data demonstrating that the volumes of the total MAN and lMAN(core) delineated by enkephalin immunoreactivity are greater in photostimulated male starlings as compared to photorefractory males. Moreover, two other regions associated with the song system that have not been investigated previously in the context of seasonal plasticity namely (i) the medial portion of MAN (mMAN), and (ii) the nucleus interfacialis (NIf) did not display significant volumetric variation. We propose that greater lMAN(core) volumes are associated with the increase in vocal plasticity that is generally observed prior to production of stereotyped song.

  2. The decline of the Starling Sturnus vulgaris in Denmark is related to changes in the extent and intensity of cattle grazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heldbjerg, Henning; Fox, Anthony David; Levin, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    and 2014 were positively correlated with loss of high intensity grazing pressure by dairy cattle, as more animal husbandry moved indoors. The long-term decline in national Starling abundance was positively correlated with the long term numbers of dairy cattle grazing outdoors. This study therefore confirms...... that not only does the extent of available grassland to breeding Starlings affect their relative abundance, but that the intensity of grazing of these grasslands is also of importance....

  3. Foraging behavior of European starlings: implications for mitigating their impact on native species

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    Kathryn L. Purcell

    2015-01-01

    European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) are a remarkably successful invasive species known to compete with native bird species for nest sites. The objective of this study was to understand why starlings avoid ungrazed pastures and provide recommendations to help mitigate the impacts of starlings on native bird species. I used aviary trials to examine...

  4. Nest defense behaviors of native cavity-nesting birds to European Starlings

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    Rodney G. Olsen; Kathryn L. Purcell; David. Grubbs

    2008-01-01

    We used behavioral experiments to evaluate competition for nest sites and the extent to which European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) are seen as a threat by native bird species at the San Joaquin Experimental Range, Madera County, CA. We quantified the level of aggressive behavior of four species of native cavity-nesting birds to starlings at active...

  5. Propagating waves in starling, Sturnus vulgaris, flocks under predation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Procaccini, Andrea; Orlandi, Alberto; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Zoratto, Francesca; Santucci, Daniela; Chiarotti, Flavia; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K.; Alleva, Enrico; Parisi, Giorgio; Carere, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The formation of waves is a vivid example of collective behaviour occurring in insects, birds, fish and mammals, which has been interpreted as an antipredator response. In birds a quantitative characterization of this phenomenon, involving thousands of individuals, is missing and its link with

  6. Differential Effects of Pinealectomy on Circadian Rhythms of Feeding and Perch Hopping in the European Starling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gwinner, Eberhard; Subbaraj, Ramanujam; Bluhm, Cynthia K.; Gerkema, Menno

    1987-01-01

    To study the effects of pinealectomy on the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and feeding, European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were held in constant light (0.2 lux and 200 lux) and under constant temperature conditions. Locomotor activity was measured by means of perches with microswitches

  7. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella enterica transmission associated with starling-livestock interactions.

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    Carlson, James C; Hyatt, Doreene R; Ellis, Jeremy W; Pipkin, David R; Mangan, Anna M; Russell, Michael; Bolte, Denise S; Engeman, Richard M; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Linz, George M

    2015-08-31

    Bird-livestock interactions have been implicated as potential sources for bacteria within concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO). European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in particular are known to contaminate cattle feed and water with Salmonella enterica through their fecal waste. We propose that fecal waste is not the only mechanisms through which starlings introduce S. enterica to CAFO. The goal of this study was to assess if starlings can mechanically move S. enterica. We define mechanical movement as the transportation of media containing S. enterica, on the exterior of starlings within CAFO. We collected 100 starlings and obtained external wash and gastrointestinal tract (GI) samples. We also collected 100 samples from animal pens. Within each pen we collected one cattle fecal, feed, and water trough sample. Isolates from all S. enterica positive samples were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. All sample types, including 17% of external starling wash samples, contained S. enterica. All sample types had at least one antimicrobial resistant (AMR) isolate and starling GI samples harbored multidrug resistant S. enterica. The serotypes isolated from the starling external wash samples were all found in the farm environment and 11.8% (2/17) of isolates from positive starling external wash samples were resistant to at least one class of antibiotics. This study provides evidence of a potential mechanism of wildlife introduced microbial contamination in CAFO. Mechanical movement of microbiological hazards, by starlings, should be considered a potential source of bacteria that is of concern to veterinary, environmental and public health. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Energy expenditure during flight in relation to body mass : effects of natural increases in mass and artificial load in Rose Coloured Starlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, Carola A.; Engel, Sophia; Visser, G. Henk

    Rose Coloured Starlings (Sturnus roseus) flew repeatedly for several hours in a wind tunnel while undergoing spontaneous variation in body mass. The treatments were as follows: flying unrestrained (U), with a control harness of 1.2% of their body mass (C), or with a harness of 7.4% of their body

  9. On the Relation Between Spotless Days and the Sunspot Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2005-01-01

    Spotless days are examined as a predictor for the size and timing of a sunspot cycle. For cycles 16-23 the first spotless day for a new cycle, which occurs during the decline of the old cycle, is found to precede minimum amplitude for the new cycle by about approximately equal to 34 mo, having a range of 25-40 mo. Reports indicate that the first spotless day for cycle 24 occurred in January 2004, suggesting that minimum amplitude for cycle 24 should be expected before April 2007, probably sometime during the latter half of 2006. If true, then cycle 23 will be classified as a cycle of shorter period, inferring further that cycle 24 likely will be a cycle of larger than average minimum and maximum amplitudes and faster than average rise, peaking sometime in 2010.

  10. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica isolates associated with starling-livestock interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, James C; Hyatt, Doreene R; Bentler, Kevin; Mangan, Anna M; Russell, Michael; Piaggio, Antoinette J; Linz, George M

    2015-08-31

    Bird-livestock interactions have been implicated as potential sources for bacteria within concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO). In this study we characterized XbaI-digested genomic DNA from Salmonella enterica using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The PFGE analysis was conducted using 182 S. enterica isolates collected from a single CAFO between 2009 and 2012. Samples collected in 2012 were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The analysis was limited to S. enterica serotypes, with at least 10 isolates, known to occur in both European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) and cattle (Bos taurus) within this CAFO. A total of five different serotypes were screened; S. Anatum, S. Kentucky, S. Meleagridis, S. Montevideo, S. Muenchen. These samples were recovered from five different sample types; starling gastrointestinal tracts (GI), starling external wash, cattle feces, cattle feed and cattle water troughs. Indistinguishable S. enterica PFGE profiles were recovered from isolates originating in all sample types. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was also associated with indistinguishable S. enterica isolates recovered from all samples types. These data suggests that AMR S. enterica is transmitted between cattle and starlings and that shared feed sources are likely contributing to infections within both species. Moreover we isolated indistinguishable PFGE profiles across all years of data collection, suggesting long-term environmental persistence may be mediated by starling visits to CAFO. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The confusion effect when attacking simulated three-dimensional starling flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Benedict G; Hildenbrandt, Hanno; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E; Cuthill, Innes C; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K

    2017-01-01

    The confusion effect describes the phenomenon of decreasing predator attack success with increasing prey group size. However, there is a paucity of research into the influence of this effect in coherent groups, such as flocks of European starlings ( Sturnus vulgaris ). Here, for the first time, we use a computer game style experiment to investigate the confusion effect in three dimensions. To date, computerized studies on the confusion effect have used two-dimensional simulations with simplistic prey movement and dynamics. Our experiment is the first investigation of the effects of flock size and density on the ability of a (human) predator to track and capture a target starling in a realistically simulated three-dimensional flock of starlings. In line with the predictions of the confusion effect, modelled starlings appear to be safer from predation in larger and denser flocks. This finding lends credence to previous suggestions that starling flocks have anti-predator benefits and, more generally, it suggests that active increases in density in animal groups in response to predation may increase the effectiveness of the confusion effect.

  12. Diffusion of individual birds in starling flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, A.; Queirós, S. M. Duarte; Giardina, I.; Stefanini, F.; Viale, M.

    2013-01-01

    Flocking is a paradigmatic example of collective animal behaviour, where global order emerges out of self-organization. Each individual has a tendency to align its flight direction with those of neighbours, and such a simple form of interaction produces a state of collective motion of the group. When compared with other cases of collective ordering, a crucial feature of animal groups is that the interaction network is not fixed in time, as each individual moves and continuously changes its neighbours. The possibility to exchange neighbours strongly enhances the stability of global ordering and the way information is propagated through the group. Here, we assess the relevance of this mechanism in large flocks of starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). We find that birds move faster than Brownian walkers both with respect to the centre of mass of the flock, and with respect to each other. Moreover, this behaviour is strongly anisotropic with respect to the direction of motion of the flock. We also measure the amount of neighbours reshuffling and find that neighbours change in time exclusively as a consequence of the random fluctuations in the individual motion, so that no specific mechanism to keep one's neighbours seems to be enforced. On the contrary, our findings suggest that a more complex dynamical process occurs at the border of the flock. PMID:23407827

  13. Flying starlings, PET and the evolution of volant dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Maria Eugenia Leone; Schulz, Daniela; Budassi, Michael; Gignac, Paul M; Vaska, Paul; Norell, Mark A

    2016-04-04

    Birds have evolved behavioral and morphological adaptations for powered flight. Many aspects of this transition are unknown, including the neuroanatomical changes that made flight possible [1]. To understand how the avian brain drives this complex behavior, we utilized positron emission tomography (PET) scanning and the tracer (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to document regional metabolic activity in the brain associated with a variety of locomotor behaviors. FDG studies are typically employed in rats [2] though the technology has been applied to birds [3]. We examined whole-brain function in European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), trained to fly in a wind tunnel while metabolizing the tracer. Drawing on predictions from early anatomical studies [4], we hypothesized increased metabolic activity in the Wulst and functionally related visual brain regions during flight. We found that flight behaviors correlated positively with entopallia and Wulst activity, but negatively with thalamic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. On the Relationship Between Spotless Days and the Sunspot Cycle: A Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2006-01-01

    This study provides supplemental material to an earlier study concerning the relationship between spotless days and the sunspot cycle. Our previous study, Technical Publication (TP)-2005-213608 determined the timing and size of sunspot minimum and maximum for the new sunspot cycle, relative to the occurrence of the first spotless day during the declining phase of the old sunspot cycle and the last spotless day during the rising portion of the new cycle. Because the number of spotless days (NSD) rapidly increases as the cycle nears sunspot minimum and rapidly decreases thereafter, the size and timing of sunspot minimum and maximum might be more accurately determined using a higher threshold for comparison, rather than using the first and last spotless day occurrences. It is this aspect that is investigated more thoroughly in this TP.

  15. Neural correlates of behavioural olfactory sensitivity changes seasonally in European starlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert De Groof

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Possibly due to the small size of the olfactory bulb (OB as compared to rodents, it was generally believed that songbirds lack a well-developed sense of smell. This belief was recently revised by several studies showing that various bird species, including passerines, use olfaction in many respects of life. During courtship and nest building, male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris incorporate aromatic herbs that are rich in volatile compounds (e.g., milfoil, Achillea millefolium into the nests and they use olfactory cues to identify these plants. Interestingly, European starlings show seasonal differences in their ability to respond to odour cues: odour sensitivity peaks during nest-building in the spring, but is almost non-existent during the non-breeding season.This study used repeated in vivo Manganese-enhanced MRI to quantify for the first time possible seasonal changes in the anatomy and activity of the OB in starling brains. We demonstrated that the OB of the starling exhibits a functional seasonal plasticity of certain plant odour specificity and that the OB is only able to detect milfoil odour during the breeding season. Volumetric analysis showed that this seasonal change in activity is not linked to a change in OB volume. By subsequently experimentally elevating testosterone (T in half of the males during the non-breeding season we showed that the OB volume was increased compared to controls.By investigating the neural substrate of seasonal olfactory sensitivity changes we show that the starlings' OB loses its ability during the non-breeding season to detect a natural odour of a plant preferred as green nest material by male starlings. We found that testosterone, applied during the non-breeding season, does not restore the discriminatory ability of the OB but has an influence on its size.

  16. On the Estimation of Time Dependent Lift of a European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris during Flapping Flight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Stalnov

    Full Text Available We study the role of unsteady lift in the context of flapping wing bird flight. Both aerodynamicists and biologists have attempted to address this subject, yet it seems that the contribution of unsteady lift still holds many open questions. The current study deals with the estimation of unsteady aerodynamic forces on a freely flying bird through analysis of wingbeat kinematics and near wake flow measurements using time resolved particle image velocimetry. The aerodynamic forces are obtained through two approaches, the unsteady thin airfoil theory and using the momentum equation for viscous flows. The unsteady lift is comprised of circulatory and non-circulatory components. Both approaches are presented over the duration of wingbeat cycles. Using long-time sampling data, several wingbeat cycles have been analyzed in order to cover both the downstroke and upstroke phases. It appears that the unsteady lift varies over the wingbeat cycle emphasizing its contribution to the total lift and its role in power estimations. It is suggested that the circulatory lift component cannot assumed to be negligible and should be considered when estimating lift or power of birds in flapping motion.

  17. A marker of biological ageing predicts adult risk preference in European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, Clare; Nettle, Daniel; Reichert, Sophie; Bedford, Tom; Monaghan, Pat; Bateson, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Why are some individuals more prone to gamble than others? Animals often show preferences between 2 foraging options with the same mean reward but different degrees of variability in the reward, and such risk preferences vary between individuals. Previous attempts to explain variation in risk preference have focused on energy budgets, but with limited empirical support. Here, we consider whether biological ageing, which affects mortality and residual reproductive value, predicts risk preferen...

  18. European starlings use their acute vision to check on feline predators but not on conspecifics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2018-01-01

    Head movements allow birds with laterally placed eyes to move their centers of acute vision around and align them with objects of interest. Consequently, head movements have been used as indicator of fixation behavior (where gaze is maintained). However, studies on head movement behavior have not elucidated the degree to which birds use high-acuity or low-acuity vision. We studied how European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) used high-acuity vision in the early stages of visual exploration of a stuffed cat (common terrestrial predator), a taxidermy Cooper’s hawk (common aerial predator), and a stuffed study skin of a conspecific. We found that starlings tended to use their high acuity vision when looking at predators, particularly, the cat was above chance levels. However, when they viewed a conspecific, they used high acuity vision as expected by chance. We did not observe a preference for the left or right center of acute vision. Our findings suggest that starlings exposed to a predator (particularly cats) may employ selective attention by using high-acuity vision to obtain quickly detailed information useful for a potential escape, but exposed to a social context may use divided attention by allocating similar levels high- and low-quality vision to monitor both conspecifics and the rest of the environment. PMID:29370164

  19. Spatial Clustering of Escherichia coli with Reduced Susceptibility to Cefotaxime and Ciprofloxacin among Dairy Cattle Farms Relative to European Starling Night Roosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhanie, G A; Pearl, D L; McEwen, S A; Guerin, M T; Jardine, C M; Schrock, J; LeJeune, J T

    2017-05-01

    European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) have been implicated in the dispersal of zoonotic enteric pathogens. However, their role in disseminating antimicrobial-resistant organisms through their home range has not been clearly established. The aim of this study was to determine whether starling night roosts served as foci for spreading organisms with reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials among dairy cattle farms. Bovine faecal pats were collected from 150 dairy farms in Ohio. Each farm was visited twice (in summer and fall) between 2007 and 2009. A total of 1490 samples (10 samples/farm over two visits) were tested for Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin. Using a spatial scan statistic, focal scans were conducted to determine whether clusters of farms with a high prevalence of organisms with reduced susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin surrounded starling night roosts. Faecal pats 13.42% and 13.56% of samples carried Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Statistically significant (P Escherichia coli showing reduced susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin were identified around these night roosts. This finding suggests that the risk of carriage of organisms with reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials in cattle closer to starling night roosts was higher compared to cattle located on farms further from these sites. Starlings might have an important role in spreading antimicrobial-resistant E. coli to livestock environments, thus posing a threat to animal and public health. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Starlings uphold principles of economic rationality for delay and probability of reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Tiago; Vasconcelos, Marco; Kacelnik, Alex

    2013-04-07

    Rationality principles are the bedrock of normative theories of decision-making in biology and microeconomics, but whereas in microeconomics, consistent choice underlies the notion of utility; in biology, the assumption of consistent selective pressures justifies modelling decision mechanisms as if they were designed to maximize fitness. In either case, violations of consistency contradict expectations and attract theoretical interest. Reported violations of rationality in non-humans include intransitivity (i.e. circular preferences) and lack of independence of irrelevant alternatives (changes in relative preference between options when embedded in different choice sets), but the extent to which these observations truly represent breaches of rationality is debatable. We tested both principles with starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), training subjects either with five options differing in food delay (exp. 1) or with six options differing in reward probability (exp. 2), before letting them choose repeatedly one option out of several binary and trinary sets of options. The starlings conformed to economic rationality on both tests, showing strong stochastic transitivity and no violation of the independence principle. These results endorse the rational choice and optimality approaches used in behavioural ecology, and highlight the need for functional and mechanistic enquiring when apparent violations of such principles are observed.

  1. Effects of oral doses of fluoride on nestling European starlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.; Schuler, C.A.; Bunck, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Nestling European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), raised and fed by free-living adults, were given daily oral doses of either distilled water, 193 mg sodium as Na2CO3 per kg of body weight (sodium control group), or 6, 10, 13, 17,23, 30, 40, 80, 160 mg of the fluoride ion as NaF in distilled water per kg of body weight (mg/kg). Dosing began when nestlings were 24-48 hr old and continued for 16 days. The 24-hr LD50 of fluoride for day-old starlings was 50 mg/kg. The 16-day LD50 was 17 mg/kg. The sodium control group did not differ from the water control group with respect to any of the measured variables. Growth rates were significantly reduced in the 13 and 17 mg of fluoride/kg groups; weights of birds given higher dose levels were omitted from growth comparisons because of high, fluoride-induced mortality. Although pre-fledging weights for the 10, 13, and 17 mg of fluoride/kg groups averaged 3.6 to 8.6% less than controls at 17 days, this difference was not significant. Feather and bone growth of the fluoride and control groups were not different, except for keel length measured at 17 days of age which averaged less in the fluoride groups. Liver and spleen weights were not affected by fluoride treatments. No histological damage related to fluoride treatments was found in liver, spleen, or kidney. The logarithm of bone fluoride and magnesium concentration increased with the logarithm of increasing fluoride treatment levels and were significantly correlated with each other. Fluoride treatments had no effect on percent calcium or phosphorus in bone or plasma alkaline phosphatase activity. Oral doses of fluoride appear to be more toxic than equivalent dietary levels. Most birds probably acquire fluoride through their diet. Therefore, the results of the study may overestimate the potential effects of fluorides on songbirds living in fluoride-contaminated environments.

  2. Birds of a feather flock together: Insights into starling murmuration behaviour revealed using citizen science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne E Goodenough

    Full Text Available Pre-roost murmuration displays by European starlings Sturnus vulgaris are a spectacular example of collective animal behaviour. To date, empirical research has focussed largely on flock movement and biomechanics whereas research on possible causal mechanisms that affect flock size and murmuration duration has been limited and restricted to a small number of sites. Possible explanations for this behaviour include reducing predation through the dilution, detection or predator confusion effects (the "safer together" hypotheses or recruiting more birds to create larger (warmer roosts (the "warmer together" hypothesis. We collected data on size, duration, habitat, temperature and predators from >3,000 murmurations using citizen science. Sightings were submitted from 23 countries but UK records predominated. Murmurations occurred across a range of habitats but there was no association between habitat and size/duration. Size increased significantly from October to early February, followed by a decrease until the end of the season in March (overall mean 30,082 birds; maximum 750,000 birds. Mean duration was 26 minutes (± 44 seconds SEM. Displays were longest at the start/end of the season, probably due to a significant positive relationship with day length. Birds of prey were recorded at 29.6% of murmurations. The presence of predators including harrier Circus, peregrine Falco peregrinus, and sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus was positively correlated with murmuration size (R2 = 0.401 and duration (R2 = 0.258, especially when these species were flying near to, or actively engaging with, starlings. Temperature was negatively correlated with duration but the effect was much weaker than that of day length. When predators were present, murmurations were statistically more likely to end with all birds going down en masse to roost rather than dispersing from the site. Our findings suggest that starling murmurations are primarily an anti-predator adaptation rather

  3. Context-dependent preferences in starlings: linking ecology, foraging and choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available Foraging animals typically encounter opportunities that they either pursue or skip, but occasionally meet several alternatives simultaneously. Behavioural ecologists predict preferences using absolute properties of each option, while decision theorists focus on relative evaluations at the time of choice. We use European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris to integrate ecological reasoning with decision models, linking and testing hypotheses for value acquisition and choice mechanism. We hypothesise that options' values depend jointly on absolute attributes, learning context, and subject's state. In simultaneous choices, preference could result either from comparing subjective values using deliberation time, or from processing each alternative independently, without relative comparisons. The combination of the value acquisition hypothesis and independent processing at choice time has been called the Sequential Choice Model. We test this model with options equated in absolute properties to exclude the possibility of preference being built at the time of choice. Starlings learned to obtain food by responding to four stimuli in two contexts. In context [AB], they encountered options A5 or B10 in random alternation; in context [CD], they met C10 or D20. Delay to food is denoted, in seconds, by the suffixes. Observed latency to respond (Li to each option alone (our measure of value ranked thus: LA≈LCStarlings preferred A5 over C10 and C10 over B10. There was no detectable evaluation time, and preference magnitude was predictable from latency differentials. This implies that value reflects learning rather than choice context, that preferences are not constructed by relative judgements at the time of choice

  4. On-farm starling populations and other environmental and management factors associated with the presence of cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli among dairy cattle in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhanie, Genet A; Pearl, David L; McEwen, Scott A; Guerin, Michele T; Jardine, Claire M; Schrock, Jennifer; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2016-11-01

    Wild birds that forage around livestock facilities have been implicated as vectors of antimicrobial resistant organisms. Although antimicrobial resistant bacteria have been isolated from European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), their role in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistant elements in livestock facilities needs further investigation. To determine whether on-farm starling density and other factors were associated with the presence of cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli among dairy cows in Ohio, bovine fecal pats from 150 farms were tested for the presence of cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli. Each farm was visited twice (during the summer and fall of 2007-2009). Multi-level logistic regression models with a random intercept to account for fecal pats collected within a specific visit to a farm were used to assess the associations. The percentage of samples with cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli was 13.4% and 13.6%, respectively. The percentage of farms having at least one sample testing positive for cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli was 56.7% and 48.7%, respectively. The odds of detecting cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli in the samples was significantly higher in 2007 compared to 2008 and 2009, in fall compared to summer, and from farms closer than 60km to starling night roost sites compared to the farms further than 60km. The presence of starlings during the day had a negative association with the likelihood of detecting cefotaxime resistant E. coli. Presence of calves also had a negative association with the likelihood of detecting both cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli. European starlings might play a role in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistant agents in livestock facilities related to their daily population movements rather than the specific density of birds on farm during the day. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of early life adversity and sex on dominance in European starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Tom; Oliver, Caitlin Jade; Andrews, Clare; Bateson, Melissa; Nettle, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Dominance in socially foraging animals may be related to sex and to variation in individual quality. Individual quality may in turn reflect conditions during early development. We studied dominance in a cohort of adult European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris , that had been subject to experimental manipulations of food supply and begging effort when they were nestlings. We measured dominance in two different contexts, contests over a food resource and relative position on a sloping perch, over the course of 3 weeks. Dominance in food contests was extremely stable over the 3 weeks and relative perch position somewhat stable. Males were dominant over females in contests over food and perched in higher positions. These sex differences were not explained by males' greater size or body weight. Food dominance and perch position were uncorrelated. Neither early life food supply nor early life begging effort affected food dominance; nor did an alternative measure of developmental stress, developmental telomere attrition. Birds that had been made to beg more as nestlings perched in higher positions than those that had begged less. Our results did not support the hypothesis that early life adversity leads to lower adult dominance rank in the context of feeding, and we suggest that relative perch position may have measured individual preference rather than competitive ability.

  6. Further studies on the use of enzyme profiles to monitor residue accumulation in wildlife: Plasma enzymes in starlings fed graded concentrations of morsodren, DDE, Aroclor 1254, and malathion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter, M.P.

    1975-01-01

    Wild-trapped starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were fed concentrations of Morsodren (2, 4, and 8 ppm), DDE or Aroclor 1254 (5, 25, and 100 ppm), or malathion (8, 35, and 160 ppm) that were found to be sublethal in pen-reared Coturnix quail fed these amounts for 12 weeks. Plasma enzymes had to be measured earlier than planned in starlings fed Morsodren (at three weeks) or the organochlorine compounds (at seven weeks) because of unexpected, subsequent mortality. Variations in enzyme response were greater in wild than in pen-reared birds, but not enough to mask the toxicant-induced changes in enzyme activity. Cholinesterase activities decreased in birds fed Morsodren or malathion, and increased in those fed the organochlorine compounds. Lactate dehydrogenase activities increased two-fold in starlings fed Morsodren and two- to four-fold in those fed the organochlorine compounds, but only 50% in those fed malathion. Further examination of enzyme profiles showed that creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase activities increased two-to four-fold in birds fed Morsodren or the organochlorine compounds but not at all in those fed malathion. Thus the classes of environmental contaminants fed to starlings could be easily distinguished by these enzymatic parameters. Evaluation of enzymatic profiles appears to be a potentially valuable technique to monitor the presence of toxicants in wild populations, especially if used to complement standard chemical residue analyses. Here the residue analyses showed, after three weeks feeding, that mercury in the carcasses reflected the concentrations fed daily, whereas accumulation in the livers was two- to four-fold greater. After seven weeks feeding, liver residues of either organochlorine compound were about three-fold higher than the concentrations fed daily. However, four times as much DDE as Aroclor 1254 had accumulated in the carcasses.

  7. The return of the erased: memory and forgetfulness in Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind (2004).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carel, Havi

    2007-08-01

    Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind is a film about remembering and forgetting loss. This essay reads the film as an examination of mourning and melancholia, which are distinct ways of remembering and forgetting both a love object and its loss. Freud distinguished mourning from its pathological counterpart, melancholia, claiming that there is a normal way to grieve, mourning, and its degeneration into an abnormal pattern, melancholia. The author aims to make two points: firstly, that both processes are characterized by ambivalence and identification and therefore have some commonalities; secondly, that there is a difference between the two processes that is less apparent than the ones discussed by Freud. This is the difference between remembering a good and a bad object. Following Klein the author argues that this is a crucial qualitative difference between mourning and melancholia. She concludes that a central issue in grieving is not forgetting but remembering well.

  8. Sensitivity of nestling and adult starlings to dicrotophos, an organophosphate pesticide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grue, C.E.; Shipley, B.K.

    1984-01-01

    The 24-hr median lethal dose (LD50) of dicrotophos (3-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-cis-crotonamide dimethyl phosphate) for free-living 5-day-old nestling European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris, LDso = 4.92 mg/kg body wt) was about one-half that obtained for free-living 15day-old nestlings (9.59 mg/kg) and captive adult males (8.37 mg/kg) and females (8.47 mg/ kg). Nestlings and adults with low pretreatment body weights appeared to be more vulnerable to organophosphate (OP) exposure. Brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was severely depressed in all birds that died (74-94%); the degree of inhibition did not vary with age or sex. Inhibition of brain ChE in 5-day-old nestlings alive 24 hr post dose (X = 28-43%) was lower than that of 15-day-old (X = 55-68%) and adult (X = 55-77%) survivors. Body weights of OP-dosed birds that died were depressed an average of 20 to 46% in 5-day-olds, 7 to 20% in 15-day-olds, and 0 to 10% in adults; weight losses varied inversely with age and dosage, and directly with time to death. Average weight losses in 5- and 15-day-old survivors (X < 31 and 26%, respectively) varied directly with dose and exceeded comparable values for adults (X = 3-15%). Results suggest that (1) young nestling songbirds may be nearly twice as sensitive as adults to OPs, (2) growth of nestlings may be severely depressed following OP exposure, and (3) recovery of brain ChE activity following exposure to ChE inhibitors may be more rapid in nestlings than adults.

  9. Care of nestlings by wild female starlings exposed to an organophosphate pesticide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grue, C.E.; Powell, G.V.N.; McChesney, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    (1) Our objective was to determine the effect of exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (OP), dicrotophos (3-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-cis-scrotonamide dimethyl phosphate), on care of nestlings by wild female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)....(2) We selected twelve pairs of active nests based on synchrony in the reproductive cycle. When nestlings were 10 days old (day 10), adult males were captured and killed and brood size was adjusted to four. The frequency and temporal distribution of sorties made by each pair of females to feed their young were recorded for 2 h at 18.00 hours on day 11 and 06.00 hours on day 12. One female from each pair was given a single oral dose of dicrotophos (2.5 mg/kg of body weight) dissolved in corn oil; the second female received an equivalent exposure of pure corn oil. Birds were released and their nestlings weighed. Parental care was again monitored between 18.00 and 20.00 hours on day 12 and 06.00 and 08.00 hours on day 13. Females were then captured and they with their young were weighed and killed. Changes in parental care in OP-dosed and control females were compared using paired t-tests. ....(3) The OP-dosed females made significantly (P organophosphate pesticides. The potential for a reduction or modification in parental care to alter reproductive success in passerines is discussed..... (5) Techniques utilized, or modifications thereof, may be useful in collecting the additional data needed to adequately assess the impact of OPs on songbird reproduction.

  10. Reappraising Starling: the physiology of the microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Matthias; Chappell, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Vascular permeability is traditionally explained by Starling's principle, describing two opposing forces across the endothelial cell line to maintain compartments in balance. Several contradictions to this principle have recently questioned its validity. Hydraulic conductivity is kept low by a properly working endothelial surface layer, created by binding and intercalating plasma constituents with the structural elements of an endothelial glycocalyx. Limiting fluid filtration is not closely related to the interstitial protein concentration. Rather, the oncotic pressure difference pertinent to fluid homeostasis is built up between the intravascular space and a small protein-free zone beneath the protein-loaded endothelial glycocalyx. This crucial structure, and therefore the resistance of the barrier against outflow of large molecules, is endangered by ischaemia, inflammation and intravascular hypervolaemia. An intact endothelial surface layer retains iso-oncotic preparations of large molecules infused to compensate for acute bleeding. Crystalloids cannot be held back sufficiently, even if preload is warranted. Starling's principle requires an adaptation to recognize that there is no inward-directed oncotic pressure gradient across the whole anatomical vessel wall. The carrier of vascular barrier competence is the intact endothelial surface layer which might be protected by avoiding intravascular hypervolaemia and limiting inflammation.

  11. Opposite Effects of Early-Life Competition and Developmental Telomere Attrition on Cognitive Biases in Juvenile European Starlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bateson

    Full Text Available Moods are enduring affective states that we hypothesise should be affected by an individual's developmental experience and its current somatic state. We tested whether early-life adversity, induced by manipulating brood size, subsequently altered juvenile European starlings' (Sturnus vulgaris decisions in a judgment bias task designed to provide a cognitive measure of mood. We predicted that starlings from larger broods, specifically those that had experienced more nest competitors larger than themselves would exhibit reduced expectation of reward, indicative of a 'pessimistic', depression-like mood. We used a go/no-go task, in which 30 starlings were trained to probe a grey card disc associated with a palatable mealworm hidden underneath and avoid a different shade of grey card disc associated with a noxious quinine-injected mealworm hidden underneath. Birds' response latencies to the trained stimuli and also to novel, ambiguous stimuli intermediate between these were subsequently tested. Birds that had experienced greater competition in the nest were faster to probe trained stimuli, and it was therefore necessary to control statistically for this difference in subsequent analyses of the birds' responses to the ambiguous stimuli. As predicted, birds with more, larger nest competitors showed relatively longer latencies to probe ambiguous stimuli, suggesting reduced expectation of reward and a 'pessimistic', depression-like mood. However, birds with greater developmental telomere attrition--a measure of cellular aging associated with increased morbidity and reduced life-expectancy that we argue could be used as a measure of somatic state--showed shorter latencies to probe ambiguous stimuli. This would usually be interpreted as evidence for a more positive or 'optimistic' affective state. Thus, increased competition in the nest and poor current somatic state appear to have opposite effects on cognitive biases. Our results lead us to question

  12. A breeding record of Abbott's Starling Cinnyricinclus femoralis from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ). Given the paucity of ecological knowledge of this species, I share some observations of a pair of Abbott's Starlings found tending an active nest in the southern Kikuyu. Escarpment forests in November 2015. On 2 November 2015 at 1030, ...

  13. Bioactive Peptides from Cartilage Protein Hydrolysate of Spotless Smoothhound and Their Antioxidant Activity In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment, crude proteins from spotless smoothhound (Mustelus griseus, cartilages were isolated by HCl-Guanidine buffer, and its hydrolysate was prepared using trypsin at pH 8.0, 40 °C with a total enzyme dose of 2.5%. Subsequently, three antioxidant peptides were purified from the hydrolysate using membrane ultrafiltration, anion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration chromatography, and reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The amino acid sequences of isolated peptides were identified as Gly-Ala-Glu-Arg-Pro (MCPE-A; Gly-Glu-Arg-Glu-Ala-Asn-Val-Met (MCPE-B; and Ala-Glu-Val-Gly (MCPE-C with molecular weights of 528.57, 905.00, and 374.40 Da, respectively, using protein amino acid sequence analyzer and mass spectrum. MCPE-A, MCPE-B and MCPE-C exhibited good scavenging activities on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH• (EC50 3.73, 1.87, and 2.30 mg/mL, respectively, hydroxyl radicals (HO• (EC50 0.25, 0.34, and 0.06 mg/mL, respectively, 2,2′-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radicals (ABTS+• (EC50 0.10, 0.05, and 0.07 mg/mL, respectively and superoxide anion radicals ( O 2 − • (EC50 0.09, 0.33, and 0.18 mg/mL, respectively. MCPE-B showed similar inhibiting ability on lipid peroxidation with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT in a linoleic acid model system. Furthermore, MCPE-A, MCPE-B, and MCPE-C could protect H2O2-induced HepG2 cells from oxidative stress by decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA and increasing the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and glutathione reductase (GSH-Rx. Glu, Gly, Met, and Pro in their sequences and low molecular weight could be attributed to the antioxidant activities of three isolated peptides. These results suggested that GAERP (MCPE-A, GEREANVM (MCPE-B, and AEVG (MCPE-C from cartilage protein hydrolysate of spotless smoothhound might serve as potential antioxidants and be used in the pharmaceutical and

  14. Two seconds is all it takes: European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) increase levels of circulating glucocorticoids after witnessing a brief raptor attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Blake C; Smith, Adam D; Bebus, Sara E; Schoech, Stephan J

    2016-02-01

    Researchers typically study "acute" activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by measuring levels of circulating glucocorticoids in animals that have been exposed to a predator or a cue from a predator (e.g., odor), or have experienced a standardized capture-and-restraint protocol, all of which are many minutes in duration. However, exposure to predators in the "wild", either as the subject of an attack or as a witness to an attack, is generally much shorter as most depredation attempts upon free-living animals last raptor attack upon a conspecific, a human "attack" (i.e., a researcher handling a conspecific), and an undisturbed control. Witnesses of a raptor attack responded with CORT levels comparable to that induced by a standardized capture-and-restraint protocol. Glucocorticoid levels of individuals following the control treatment were similar to baseline levels, and those that witnessed a human "attack" had intermediate levels. Our results demonstrate that witnessing a predator attack of very brief duration triggers a profound adrenocortical stress response. Given the considerable evidence of a role for glucocorticoids in learning and memory, such a response may affect how individuals learn to recognize and appropriately react to predators. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Distributed Recognition of Natural Songs by European Starlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Daniel; Thompson, Jason V.; Gentner, Timothy Q.

    2010-01-01

    Individual vocal recognition behaviors in songbirds provide an excellent framework for the investigation of comparative psychological and neurobiological mechanisms that support the perception and cognition of complex acoustic communication signals. To this end, the complex songs of European starlings have been studied extensively. Yet, several…

  16. Starling flock networks manage uncertainty in consensus at low cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George F Young

    Full Text Available Flocks of starlings exhibit a remarkable ability to maintain cohesion as a group in highly uncertain environments and with limited, noisy information. Recent work demonstrated that individual starlings within large flocks respond to a fixed number of nearest neighbors, but until now it was not understood why this number is seven. We analyze robustness to uncertainty of consensus in empirical data from multiple starling flocks and show that the flock interaction networks with six or seven neighbors optimize the trade-off between group cohesion and individual effort. We can distinguish these numbers of neighbors from fewer or greater numbers using our systems-theoretic approach to measuring robustness of interaction networks as a function of the network structure, i.e., who is sensing whom. The metric quantifies the disagreement within the network due to disturbances and noise during consensus behavior and can be evaluated over a parameterized family of hypothesized sensing strategies (here the parameter is number of neighbors. We use this approach to further show that for the range of flocks studied the optimal number of neighbors does not depend on the number of birds within a flock; rather, it depends on the shape, notably the thickness, of the flock. The results suggest that robustness to uncertainty may have been a factor in the evolution of flocking for starlings. More generally, our results elucidate the role of the interaction network on uncertainty management in collective behavior, and motivate the application of our approach to other biological networks.

  17. Starling Flock Networks Manage Uncertainty in Consensus at Low Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, George F.; Scardovi, Luca; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2013-01-01

    Flocks of starlings exhibit a remarkable ability to maintain cohesion as a group in highly uncertain environments and with limited, noisy information. Recent work demonstrated that individual starlings within large flocks respond to a fixed number of nearest neighbors, but until now it was not understood why this number is seven. We analyze robustness to uncertainty of consensus in empirical data from multiple starling flocks and show that the flock interaction networks with six or seven neighbors optimize the trade-off between group cohesion and individual effort. We can distinguish these numbers of neighbors from fewer or greater numbers using our systems-theoretic approach to measuring robustness of interaction networks as a function of the network structure, i.e., who is sensing whom. The metric quantifies the disagreement within the network due to disturbances and noise during consensus behavior and can be evaluated over a parameterized family of hypothesized sensing strategies (here the parameter is number of neighbors). We use this approach to further show that for the range of flocks studied the optimal number of neighbors does not depend on the number of birds within a flock; rather, it depends on the shape, notably the thickness, of the flock. The results suggest that robustness to uncertainty may have been a factor in the evolution of flocking for starlings. More generally, our results elucidate the role of the interaction network on uncertainty management in collective behavior, and motivate the application of our approach to other biological networks. PMID:23382667

  18. Energetic state during learning affects foraging choices in starlings

    OpenAIRE

    Barnaby Marsh; Cynthia Schuck-Paim; Alex Kacelnik

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the influence of energetic state at the time of acquaintance with a new food source on preference for that source on later encounters, using wild-caught European starlings as subjects. Twelve birds learned to obtain food rewards by pecking at either of two keys identified by color. The keys were encountered in different sessions, while the subjects were food deprived or prefed. Food rewards from both sources were always identical. After an equal number of reinforced trials wit...

  19. Ernest Henry Starling (1866-1927): the scientist and the man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H

    2005-01-01

    The pre-eminent achievements of the English physician and physiologist Ernest Henry Starling were his quantitative explanation of the transcapillary transport of fluid, the discovery of the first hormone, secretin, and his formulation of the law of the heart. In some ways Starling was an outsider...

  20. Campylobacter jejuni colonization and population structure in urban populations of ducks and starlings in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Vathsala; Stevenson, Mark; Marshall, Jonathan; Fearnhead, Paul; Holland, Barbara R; Hotter, Grant; French, Nigel P

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. and the population structure of C. jejuni in European starlings and ducks cohabiting multiple public access sites in an urban area of New Zealand. The country's geographical isolation and relatively recent history of introduction of wild bird species, including the European starling and mallard duck, create an ideal setting to explore the impact of geographical separation on the population biology of C. jejuni, as well as potential public health implications. A total of 716 starling and 720 duck fecal samples were collected and screened for C. jejuni over a 12 month period. This study combined molecular genotyping, population genetics and epidemiological modeling and revealed: (i) higher Campylobacter spp. isolation in starlings (46%) compared with ducks (30%), but similar isolation of C. jejuni in ducks (23%) and starlings (21%), (ii) significant associations between the isolation of Campylobacter spp. and host species, sampling location and time of year using logistic regression, (iii) evidence of population differentiation, as indicated by FST, and host-genotype association with clonal complexes CC ST-177 and CC ST-682 associated with starlings, and clonal complexes CC ST-1034, CC ST-692, and CC ST-1332 associated with ducks, and (iv) greater genetic diversity and genotype richness in ducks compared with starlings. These findings provide evidence that host-associated genotypes, such as the starling-associated ST-177 and ST-682, represent lineages that were introduced with the host species in the 19th century. The isolation of sequence types associated with human disease in New Zealand indicate that wild ducks and starlings need to be considered as a potential public health risk, particularly in urban areas. We applied molecular epidemiology and population genetics to obtain insights in to the population structure, host-species relationships, gene flow and

  1. Flame retardants in eggs of American kestrels and European starlings from southern Lake Ontario region (North America).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Letcher, Robert J; Martin, Pamela

    2012-11-01

    While a number of studies have extensively investigated flame retardant (FR) contamination in aquatic ecosystems from the Laurentian Great Lakes basin, there remains a dearth of information for terrestrial ecosystems. In the current study, American kestrels (Falco sparverius) (AMKE) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) (EUST) that are terrestrial ecosystem consumers, and from the southern Lake Ontario regions, were investigated as potential terrestrial bio-monitoring species. Egg homogenates were screened for sixteen PBDE congeners and nineteen non-PBDE FRs of established or emerging environmental importance. PBDE congeners dominated the FR burdens in eggs of AMKE and EUST, with total concentrations ranging from 3.4 to 39.8 (median: 13.5) and 1.5 to 117 (median: 4.9) ng g(-1) wet weight (ww), respectively. Although the production and application of the Firemaster FF-1 (a commercial hexabromobiphenyl PBB mixture) has been discontinued for over four decades, its major component, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl (BB-153), was still frequently detected in AMKE and EUST eggs. Two isomers of the chlorinated FR Dechlorane plus (DP) were mostly detected in eggs collected from Niagara-on-the-Lake in the western portion of Lake Ontario, approximately 15 km from the only North American DP manufacturing site, clearly reflecting point source influences. FR comparisons in eggs from AMKE, EUST and Great Lakes herring gulls revealed species-specific contamination burdens and PBDE congener profiles, likely due to influences from trophic levels and PBDE congener-specific bioaccumulation and biomagnification capacities in terrestrial versus aquatic food chains. Insectivorous birds (e.g. great tit) and relatives of AMKE have also been used as bio-monitoring tools in European and Asian regions, allowing investigation of spatial distribution patterns on a more international scale. AMKE and EUST have also been used as model species for laboratory evaluation of FR toxic effects in

  2. Activity patterns of cochlear ganglion neurones in the starling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, G A; Gleich, O; Leppelsack, H J; Oeckinghaus, H

    1985-09-01

    Spontaneous activity and responses to simple tonal stimuli were studied in cochlear ganglion neurones of the starling. Both regular and irregular spontaneous activity were recorded. Non-auditory cells have their origin in the macula lagenae. Mean spontaneous rate for auditory cells (all irregularly spiking) was 45 spikes s-1. In half the units having characteristic frequencies (CFs) less than 1.5 kHz, time-interval histograms (TIHs) of spontaneous activity showed regularly-spaced peaks or 'preferred' intervals. The spacing of the peak intervals was, on average, 15% greater than the CF-period interval of the respective units. In TIH of lower-frequency cells without preferred intervals, the modal interval was also on average about 15% longer than the CF-period interval. Apparently, the resting oscillation frequency of these cells lies below their CF. Tuning curves (TCs) of neurones to short tone bursts show no systematic asymmetry as in mammals. Below CF 1 kHz, the low-frequency flanks of the TCs are, on average, steeper than the high-frequency flanks. Above CF 1 kHz, the reverse is true. The cochlear ganglion and nerve are tonotopically organized. Low-frequency fibres arise apically in the papilla basilaris and are found near non-auditory (lagenar) fibres. Discharge rates to short tones were monotonically related to sound pressure level. Saturation rates often exceeded 300 spikes s-1. 'On-off' responses and primary suppression of spontaneous activity were observed. A direct comparison of spontaneous activity and tuning-curve symmetry revealed that, apart from quantitative differences, fundamental qualitative differences exist between starling and guinea-pig primary afferents.

  3. Ectoparasite Activity During Incubation Increases Microbial Growth on Avian Eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, G; Martín-Gálvez, D; Ruiz-Castellano, C; Ruiz-Rodríguez, M; Peralta-Sánchez, J M; Martín-Vivaldi, M; Soler, J J

    2018-01-13

    While direct detrimental effects of parasites on hosts are relatively well documented, other more subtle but potentially important effects of parasitism are yet unexplored. Biological activity of ectoparasites, apart from skin injuries and blood-feeding, often results in blood remains, or parasite faeces that accumulate and modify the host environment. In this way, ectoparasite activities and remains may increase nutrient availability that may favour colonization and growth of microorganisms including potential pathogens. Here, by the experimental addition of hematophagous flies (Carnus hemapterus, a common ectoparasite of birds) to nests of spotless starlings Sturnus unicolor during incubation, we explore this possible side effect of parasitism which has rarely, if ever, been investigated. Results show that faeces and blood remains from parasitic flies on spotless starling eggshells at the end of incubation were more abundant in experimental than in control nests. Moreover, eggshell bacterial loads of different groups of cultivable bacteria including potential pathogens, as well as species richness of bacteria in terms of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), were also higher in experimental nests. Finally, we also found evidence of a link between eggshell bacterial loads and increased embryo mortality, which provides indirect support for a bacterial-mediated negative effect of ectoparasitism on host offspring. Trans-shell bacterial infection might be one of the main causes of embryo death and, consequently, this hitherto unnoticed indirect effect of ectoparasitism might be widespread in nature and could affect our understanding of ecology and evolution of host-parasite interactions.

  4. Test of the Starling resistor model in the human upper airway during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Andrew; Genta, Pedro R; Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Loring, Stephen H; White, David P; Jackson, Andrew C; Pedersen, Ole F; Butler, James P

    2014-12-15

    The human pharyngeal airway during sleep is conventionally modeled as a Starling resistor. However, inspiratory flow often decreases with increasing effort (negative effort dependence, NED) rather than remaining fixed as predicted by the Starling resistor model. In this study, we tested a major prediction of the Starling resistor model--that the resistance of the airway upstream from the site of collapse remains fixed during flow limitation. During flow limitation in 24 patients with sleep apnea, resistance at several points along the pharyngeal airway was measured using a pressure catheter with multiple sensors. Resistance between the nose and the site of collapse (the upstream segment) was measured before and after the onset of flow limitation to determine whether the upstream dimensions remained fixed (as predicted by the Starling resistor model) or narrowed (a violation of the Starling resistor model). The upstream resistance from early to mid inspiration increased considerably during flow limitation (by 35 ± 41 cmH2O · liter(-1) · s(-1), P < 0.001). However, there was a wide range of variability between patients, and the increase in upstream resistance was strongly correlated with the amount of NED (r = 0.75, P < 0.001). Therefore, patients with little NED exhibited little upstream narrowing (consistent with the Starling model), and patients with large NED exhibited large upstream narrowing (inconsistent with the Starling model). These findings support the idea that there is not a single model of pharyngeal collapse, but rather that different mechanisms may dominate in different patients. These differences could potentially be exploited for treatment selection. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Use of captive starlings to determine effects of pollutants on passerine reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grue, C.E.; Christian, C.L.; Lamb, D.W.; Kenaga, E.E.

    1981-01-01

    Three reproductive trials were conducted to develop techniques for propagation of captive starlings (Stumus vulgaris) which could determine the effects of environmental contaminants on passerine reproduction. Trials were conducted during the spring of 1979 in five adjacent 2.4 by 3 by 12-m outdoor wire pens containing four or ten pairs of starlings, a similar number of nest boxes, perches, water, commercial turkey starter, and alfalfa hay as nesting material. Nestling diets consisted of combinations of Nebraska Brand bird of prey diet, live or frozen mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) and crickets (Acheta domestica), or live earthworms (Pheretima sp.). Starlings reproduced successfully when the number of breeding pairs per pen was reduced from ten to four. The average clutch sizes for each pen (4.3 to 4.9) were similar to those reported for wild starlings. Hatching (60 to 90.4 percent) and fledging (0 to 100 percent) success varied among pens. The fledging success was greatest in the pens which received the most diverse nestling diets: Nebraska Brand diet plus frozen or live mealworms and crickets. Whether the insects were presented alive or frozen appeared to have little effect on the reproductive success. The starlings did not consume or carry earthworms to their young. The body weights of 20-day-old nestlings raised in captivity (X=73.9 g) were similar to those of starlings in the wild. The use of single pairs per pen may eliminate problems in presentation of nestling diets due to asynchrony in breeding between pairs and excessive interactions among individuals, which may interfere with parental care. The starling appears to be an excellent model for examining the effects of environmental contaminants on the reproduction of songbirds in captivity.

  6. Near wake features of a flying European Starling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhefer, Adam; Kopp, Gregory; Gurka, Roi

    2013-11-01

    A great deal of research focusing on flapping wings has been motivated by their high performance capabilities, especially in low Reynolds number configurations where static wing performance typically suffers. The approaches to studying flapping wings have taken different forms. One form has been the systematic investigation of the parameters that influence the relationship between flapping wings and their wake. The other form, and the approach used in the present work, is the investigation of flapping wings in nature. While the earliest work on the flapping wings of animals consists of observations of bird flight by Leonardo DaVinci, advances in technology have allowed for quantitative measurements of the wake. The near wake of a freely flying European starling has been measured using high speed, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry, simultaneously with high speed cameras which imaged the bird. These have been used to measure the near wake two-dimensional velocity field that can be associated with the bird's location and wing configuration in an avian wind tunnel. Time series of the velocities have been expressed as composite wake plots, which depict segments of the wing beat cycle for various spanwise locations in the wake. Measurements indicate that downwash is not produced during the upstroke, suggesting that the upstroke does not generate lift. As well, the wake velocities imply the presence of streamwise vortical structures, in addition to tip vortices. These two characteristics indicate similarities between the wake of a bird and the wake of a bat.

  7. Measurements of Neuronal Soma Size and Estimated Peptide Concentrations in Addition to Cell Abundance Offer a Higher Resolution of Seasonal and Reproductive Influences of GnRH-I and GnIH in European Starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorin, Nelson; Calisi, Rebecca M

    2015-08-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in vertebrate reproduction, gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH-I) and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), can vary in the abundance of immunoreactive cells as a function of the reproductive status and nest box occupation of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). While using the abundance of cells as an indicator of the activity of neurohormones is informative, incorporating information on cell size (readily observed using immunohistochemistry) can offer a more detailed understanding of environmentally-mediated changes in hormonal dynamics. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the size of cells' somas and the estimated concentration of peptides in cells immunoreactive (ir) for GnRH-I and GnIH would vary throughout the breeding season and as a function of nest-box status (resident or not). In the absence of a direct assay of protein, we estimated an index of the concentration of hypothalamic peptides via the relative optical density (i.e., the difference between the mean optical density and the optical density of background staining). In support of our hypothesis, we found that GnRH-I- and GnIH-ir soma size and peptide concentration changed both in males and females throughout the breeding season. Somas were largest and estimated peptide concentration was highest mid-season when compared with earlier in the season or to the non-breeding period. For nest-box residents, GnIH-ir soma size and peptide concentration were higher during the middle of the breeding season than earlier in the breeding season, although residence in the nest box was not related to GnRH-I-ir variables. Our results confirm that previously reported changes in cell abundance mimic changes we see in GnRH-I and GnIH-ir soma size and our proxy for peptide concentration. However, investigating changes in the soma of GnRH-I-ir cells revealed a peak in size during the middle of the breeding season, a change not evident when solely examining data on the

  8. Ernest Henry Starling (1866-1927): the scientist and the man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H

    2005-01-01

    The pre-eminent achievements of the English physician and physiologist Ernest Henry Starling were his quantitative explanation of the transcapillary transport of fluid, the discovery of the first hormone, secretin, and his formulation of the law of the heart. In some ways Starling was an outsider...... and he was the centre of several scientific and social controversies. However, throughout his life he stressed fundamental scientific attitudes and ideas with remarkable persistence and power, although also balance, and his scientific achievements have stood the test of time....

  9. Ernest Henry Starling: the history of cardiovascular endocrinology and the continuous need for developing animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2014-01-01

    are trained in this fundamental physiological knowledge as a matter of course, but Starling’s numerous publications from 1890 to 1928 contributed considerably towards the transition of circulatory physiology from a qualitative discipline to a quantitative science. The present paper deals with Starling......’s achievements in cardiovascular physiology and endocrinology....

  10. Molecular epidemiology and public health relevance of Campylobacter isolated from dairy cattle and European starlings in Ohio, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanad, Yasser M; Closs, Gary; Kumar, Anand; LeJeune, Jeffrey T; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2013-03-01

    Dairy cattle serve as a potential source for Campylobacter infection in humans. Outbreaks associated with consumption of either Campylobacter contaminated raw milk or contaminated milk after treatment were previously recorded in the United States. Further, starlings have been implicated in the spread of bacterial pathogens among livestock. Here, we determined the prevalence, genotypic, and phenotypic properties of Campylobacter isolated from fecal samples of dairy cattle and starlings found on the same establishment in northeastern Ohio. Campylobacter were detected in 83 (36.6%) and 57 (50.4%) out of 227 dairy and 113 starling fecal samples, respectively. Specifically, 79 C. jejuni, five C. coli, and two other Campylobacter spp. were isolated from dairy feces, while all isolates from starlings (n=57) were C. jejuni. Our results showed that the prevalence of C. jejuni in birds was significantly (pepidemiology of clinically important C. jejuni in dairy population.

  11. Update for nurse anesthetists. The Starling resistor: a model for explaining and treating obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalford, Catherine B

    2004-04-01

    Recent epidemiological research places the incidence of obstructive sleep apnea as high as 16% in the general population. Serious postoperative respiratory complications and death have been reported in this population. Anesthetic drugs contribute to these complications secondary to acute and residual influences on the complex orchestration of airway muscles and reflexes involved in airway patency. The Starling resistor model is a theoretical model that has application in explaining upper airway dynamics and the treatment and management of obstructive sleep apnea. The model postulates the oropharynx as a collapsible tube. The oropharynx remains open or partially or completely closed as a result of pressure upstream at the nose and mouth, pressure downstream at the trachea and below, or tissue pressure surrounding the oropharynx. This AANA Journal course provides an overview of the Starling resistor model, its application to obstructive sleep apnea, and preoperative and postoperative anesthetic considerations.

  12. Thyroidectomy prevents the development of photorefractoriness and the associated rise in plasma prolactin in starlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, A.R.; Nicholls, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Intact and radiothyroidectomized male starlings were transferred from short (8-hr) to long (16-hr) day lengths and measurements made of testicular development and of plasma prolactin concentrations. In intact birds the testes reached full maturity within 3 weeks and regressed after 6 weeks of photostimulation, indicative of the development of photorefractoriness . Prolactin levels increased gradually, reaching maximal values at the time of testicular regression. Testicular growth was normal in the thyroidectomized birds. Removal of the testes from thyroidectomized birds after 1 year on long days resulted in a marked rise in plasma FSH, indicating that these birds were indeed not photorefractory ; FSH levels in the refractory-intact starlings remained low after castration. These results confirm that the presence of an intact thyroid gland is essential for the development of photorefractoriness and for the release of prolactin which normally follows photostimulation

  13. Prolactin is associated with the development of photorefractoriness in intact, castrated, and testosterone-implanted starlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, A.R.; Nicholls, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using radioimmunoassays, prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured in the plasma of intact, castrated, and testosterone-implanted male starlings. Two groups of birds (intact and castrated males) were transferred when photosensitive from short (8-hr) to long (16-hr) day lengths; in both cases plasma prolactin levels increased steadily reaching a peak after 5 weeks of photostimulation, at the time of the onset of photorefractoriness. Three groups (intacts, castrates, and castrates implanted with Silastic capsules containing testosterone) were exposed to day lengths increasing by 30 min per week from 8 to 16 hr. Again, prolactin levels increased in a similar fashion in all three groups at the time of refractoriness, which occurred when the day length reached 15-16 hr. Thus the timing of photorefractoriness and the associated rise in prolactin secretion which occur in response to photostimulation do not depend upon the presence of the gonads and are not affected when testosterone is maintained at a constant high level. Nor is the increase in prolactin altered when the cycle of gonadotrophin secretion which normally precedes it is completely suppressed by the implantation of a testosterone capsule. It would seem that prolactin secretion in the starling is stimulated by transfer from short to long day lengths, but not as a consequence of high gonadotrophin or androgen secretion rates

  14. Preload-based Starling-like control of rotary blood pumps: An in-vitro evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Mansouri

    Full Text Available Due to a shortage of donor hearts, rotary left ventricular assist devices (LVADs are used to provide mechanical circulatory support. To address the preload insensitivity of the constant speed controller (CSC used in conventional LVADs, we developed a preload-based Starling-like controller (SLC. The SLC emulates the Starling law of the heart to maintain mean pump flow ([Formula: see text] with respect to mean left ventricular end diastolic pressure (PLVEDm as the feedback signal. The SLC and CSC were compared using a mock circulation loop to assess their capacity to increase cardiac output during mild exercise while avoiding ventricular suction (marked by a negative PLVEDm and maintaining circulatory stability during blood loss and severe reductions in left ventricular contractility (LVC. The root mean squared hemodynamic deviation (RMSHD metric was used to assess the clinical acceptability of each controller based on pre-defined hemodynamic limits. We also compared the in-silico results from our previously published paper with our in-vitro outcomes. In the exercise simulation, the SLC increased [Formula: see text] by 37%, compared to only 17% with the CSC. During blood loss, the SLC maintained a better safety margin against left ventricular suction with PLVEDm of 2.7 mmHg compared to -0.1 mmHg for CSC. A transition to reduced LVC resulted in decreased mean arterial pressure (MAP and [Formula: see text] with CSC, whilst the SLC maintained MAP and [Formula: see text]. The results were associated with a much lower RMSHD value with SLC (70.3% compared to CSC (225.5%, demonstrating improved capacity of the SLC to compensate for the varying cardiac demand during profound circulatory changes. In-vitro and in-silico results demonstrated similar trends to the simulated changes in patient state however the magnitude of hemodynamic changes were different, thus justifying the progression to in-vitro evaluation.

  15. The Habitat Susceptibility of Bali Starling (Leucopsar rothschildi Stresemann> 1912) Based on Forest Fire Vulnerability Mappin in West Bali National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramatana, F.; Prasetyo, L. B.; Rushayati, S. B.

    2017-10-01

    Bali starling is an endemic and endangered species which tend to decrease of its population in the wild. West Bali National Park (WBNP) is the only habitat of bali starling, however it is threatened nowadays by forest fire. Understanding the sensitivity of habitat to forest & land fire is urgently needed. Geographic Information System (GIS) can be used for mapping the vulnerability of forest fire. This study aims to analyze the contributed factor of forest fire, to develop vulnerability level map of forest fire in WBNP, to estimate habitat vulnerability of bali starling. The variable for mapping forest fire in WBNP were road distance, village distance, land cover, NDVI, NDMI, surface temperature, and slope. Forest fire map in WBNP was created by scoring from each variable, and classified into four classes of forest fire vulnerability which are very low (9 821 ha), low (5 015.718 ha), middle (6 778.656 ha), and high (2 126.006 ha). Bali starling existence in the middle and high vulnerability forest fire class in WBNP, consequently the population and habitat of bali starling is a very vulnerable. Management of population and habitat of bali starling in WBNP must be implemented focus on forest fire impact.

  16. The classical Starling resistor model often does not predict inspiratory airflow patterns in the human upper airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Butler, James P; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew

    2014-04-15

    The upper airway is often modeled as a classical Starling resistor, featuring a constant inspiratory airflow, or plateau, over a range of downstream pressures. However, airflow tracings from clinical sleep studies often show an initial peak before the plateau. To conform to the Starling model, the initial peak must be of small magnitude or dismissed as a transient. We developed a method to simulate fast or slow inspirations through the human upper airway, to test the hypothesis that this initial peak is a transient. Eight subjects [4 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 4 controls] slept in an "iron lung" and wore a nasal mask connected to a continuous/bilevel positive airway pressure machine. Downstream pressure was measured using an epiglottic catheter. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, subjects were hyperventilated to produce a central apnea, then extrathoracic pressure was decreased slowly (∼2-4 s) or abruptly (resistor model, the upper airway exhibits marked NED in some subjects.

  17. 100 år med hormoner: fysiologen Ernest H. Starlings introduktion af hormonbegrebet og den manglende nobelpris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H

    2005-01-01

    The term hormone is by now familiar to all, but it is the English physiologist and physician Ernest H. Starling's term, and before him the search made little sense even in the light of "internal secretion". He saw the great potential of regulatory physiology through chemical coordination of the b......The term hormone is by now familiar to all, but it is the English physiologist and physician Ernest H. Starling's term, and before him the search made little sense even in the light of "internal secretion". He saw the great potential of regulatory physiology through chemical coordination...... of the bodily functions by the circulating blood. Throughout his life he stressed fundamental scientific attitudes and ideas with remarkable persistence and power, and hormones have stood the test of time. Sadly, he never received a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Aug-15...

  18. Mechanoelectric feedback does not contribute to the Frank-Starling relation in the rat and guinea pig heart

    OpenAIRE

    D Kelly; L Mackenzie; David A. Saint

    2014-01-01

    Mechanoelectric feedback (MEF) is the process by which mechanical forces on the myocardium can alter its electrical properties. The effect can be large enough to induce ectopic beats or fibrillation. However, the role of MEF at physiological levels of mechanical stress is not clear. We have investigated alteration in action potential morphology in rat and guinea pig ventricle and in rat atrial tissue at levels of stretch near the plateau of the Frank-Starling curve. Stretch of >100 mm.Hg E...

  19. The status of the Brahminy Starling Sturnia pagodarum (Gmelin, 1789 (Aves: Passeriformes: Sturnidae in Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soe Naing

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To date, the status of the Brahminy Starling Sturnia pagodarum, in Southeast Asia has been unclear.  The origins of the few reported sightings, where commented upon, have often been listed as ‘uncertain’ or ‘unknown’ with the implication that some, maybe all, are escaped captivity birds.  The current paper brings together data on distribution, date of observation, and number of individuals to illustrate a pattern that clearly supports the view that records from Myanmar, Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore should be treated as ‘winter vagrants’.  With one exception, they are all of five birds or less and have been observed from October to March.  The paper includes the first authenticate record from Myanmar, which is the 1115th wild bird species listed for the country.  However, the status of a single record from Cambodia is treated with caution since it represents a considerable range extension and was observed on 01 April, which is relatively late in the season.  For these reasons, it is here listed as ‘origin uncertain’ until further data are available.  

  20. Starling forces drive intracranial water exchange during normal and pathological states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linninger, Andreas A; Xu, Colin; Tangen, Kevin; Hartung, Grant

    2017-12-31

    To quantify the exchange of water between cerebral compartments, specifically blood, tissue, perivascular pathways, and cerebrospinal fluid-filled spaces, on the basis of experimental data and to propose a dynamic global model of water flux through the entire brain to elucidate functionally relevant fluid exchange phenomena. The mechanistic computer model to predict brain water shifts is discretized by cerebral compartments into nodes. Water and species flux is calculated between these nodes across a network of arcs driven by Hagen-Poiseuille flow (blood), Darcy flow (interstitial fluid transport), and Starling's Law (transmembrane fluid exchange). Compartment compliance is accounted for using a pressure-volume relationship to enforce the Monro-Kellie doctrine. This nonlinear system of differential equations is solved implicitly using MATLAB software. The model predictions of intraventricular osmotic injection caused a pressure rise from 10 to 22 mmHg, followed by a taper to 14 mmHg over 100 minutes. The computational results are compared to experimental data with R2=0.929. Moreover, simulated osmotic therapy of systemic (blood) injection reduced intracranial pressure from 25 to 10 mmHg. The modeled volume and intracranial pressure changes following cerebral edema agree with experimental trends observed in animal models with R2=0.997. The model successfully predicted time course and the efficacy of osmotic therapy for clearing cerebral edema. Furthermore, the mathematical model implicated the perivascular pathways as a possible conduit for water and solute exchange. This was a first step to quantify fluid exchange throughout the brain.

  1. How social experience shapes song representation in the brain of starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Isabelle; Cousillas, Hugo

    2013-06-01

    Birdsong, like speech, is a learned behaviour whose critical function is to communicate with others and whose development critically depends on social influences. Song learning is a complex phenomenon that involves not only the development of species-specific vocalisations, but also the development of the ability to organise these vocalisations and to use them in an appropriate context. Although the fact that interactions with adult experienced models are essential for song production to develop properly has been well established, far less is known about song perception and processing. The fact that songbirds learn to vocalise and to use their vocalisations selectively through interactions with adults questions whether such interactions are also required for songbirds to perceive and process their vocalisations selectively and whether social interactions may shape song perception and processing as they shape song production. In order to address these questions, our team uses an original neuroethological approach to study the neural bases of song behaviour in a highly social songbird species: the European starlings. We provide here a synthesis of the results we have obtained using this approach over the last decade. Our results show that direct social experience with adult experienced models not only shapes song behaviour but also shapes these songbirds' brains and their ability to perceive and to process acoustic signals whose communicative value, as well as their acoustic structure, have to be learned. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Myosin head orientation: a structural determinant for the Frank-Starling relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farman, Gerrie P.; Gore, David; Allen, Edward; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P. (IIT); (UIC)

    2011-09-06

    The cellular mechanism underlying the Frank-Starling law of the heart is myofilament length-dependent activation. The mechanism(s) whereby sarcomeres detect changes in length and translate this into increased sensitivity to activating calcium has been elusive. Small-angle X-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the intact myofilament lattice undergoes numerous structural changes upon an increase in sarcomere length (SL): lattice spacing and the I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} intensity ratio decreases, whereas the M3 meridional reflection intensity (I{sub M3}) increases, concomitant with increases in diastolic and systolic force. Using a short ({approx}10 ms) X-ray exposure just before electrical stimulation, we were able to obtain detailed structural information regarding the effects of external osmotic compression (with mannitol) and obtain SL on thin intact electrically stimulated isolated rat right ventricular trabeculae. We show that over the same incremental increases in SL, the relative changes in systolic force track more closely to the relative changes in myosin head orientation (as reported by IM3) than to the relative changes in lattice spacing. We conclude that myosin head orientation before activation determines myocardial sarcomere activation levels and that this may be the dominant mechanism for length-dependent activation.

  3. Modulation of the Cardiomyocyte Contraction inside a Hydrostatic Pressure Bioreactor: In Vitro Verification of the Frank-Starling Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Fassina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied beating mouse cardiac syncytia in vitro in order to assess the inotropic, ergotropic, and chronotropic effects of both increasing and decreasing hydrostatic pressures. In particular, we have performed an image processing analysis to evaluate the kinematics and the dynamics of those pressure-loaded beating syncytia starting from the video registration of their contraction movement. By this analysis, we have verified the Frank-Starling law of the heart in in vitro beating cardiac syncytia and we have obtained their geometrical-functional classification.

  4. Mechanoelectric feedback does not contribute to the Frank-Starling relation in the rat and guinea pig heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Kelly

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanoelectric feedback (MEF is the process by which mechanical forces on the myocardium can alter its electrical properties. The effect can be large enough to induce ectopic beats or fibrillation. However, the role of MEF at physiological levels of mechanical stress is not clear. We have investigated alteration in action potential morphology in rat and guinea pig ventricle and in rat atrial tissue at levels of stretch near the plateau of the Frank-Starling curve. Stretch of >100 mm.Hg End Diastolic Left Ventricular Pressure (EDLVP or rapidly applied stretch (EDLVP increased by 25 mm.Hg within 100 ms often triggered ectopic beats in isolated rat and guinea-pig hearts. However, ventricular epicardial monophasic action potentials (MAPs recorded during stretch to EDLVP up to 30 mm. Hg showed no consistent changes in action potential duration (at APD20, APD50 or APD80 in either species. MAP recording detected APD prolongation with very small concentrations of 4-AP (10 μM, confirming the discrimination of the recording technique. In isolated rat atrial strips, no changes in intracellular action potential morphology or membrane potential were seen when stretched to levels producing an optimum increase in contractility. We conclude that alteration in action potential morphology with stretch does not contribute to the Frank-Starling relation in ventricle of rat or guinea-pig isolated heart, or in rat atrial tissue.

  5. Sexual and natural selection in the evolution of extended phenotypes: the use of green nesting material in starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubalcaba, J G; Polo, V; Maia, R; Rubenstein, D R; Veiga, J P

    2016-08-01

    Although sexual selection is typically considered the predominant force driving the evolution of ritualized sexual behaviours, natural selection may also play an important and often underappreciated role. The use of green aromatic plants among nesting birds has been interpreted as a component of extended phenotype that evolved either via natural selection due to potential sanitary functions or via sexual selection as a signal of male attractiveness. Here, we compared both hypotheses using comparative methods in starlings, a group where this behaviour is widespread. We found that the use of green plants was positively related to male-biased size dimorphism and that it was most likely to occur among cavity-nesting species. These results suggest that this behaviour is likely favoured by sexual selection, but also related to its sanitary use in response to higher parasite loads in cavities. We speculate that the use of green plants in starlings may be facilitated by cavity nesting and was subsequently co-opted as a sexual signal by males. Our results represent an example of how an extended phenotypic component of males becomes sexually selected by females. Thus, both natural selection and sexual selection are necessary to fully understand the evolution of ritualized behaviours involved in courtship. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  6. Revised Starling equation and the glycocalyx model of transvascular fluid exchange: an improved paradigm for prescribing intravenous fluid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, T E; Woodcock, T M

    2012-03-01

    I.V. fluid therapy does not result in the extracellular volume distribution expected from Starling's original model of semi-permeable capillaries subject to hydrostatic and oncotic pressure gradients within the extracellular fluid. Fluid therapy to support the circulation relies on applying a physiological paradigm that better explains clinical and research observations. The revised Starling equation based on recent research considers the contributions of the endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL), the endothelial basement membrane, and the extracellular matrix. The characteristics of capillaries in various tissues are reviewed and some clinical corollaries considered. The oncotic pressure difference across the EGL opposes, but does not reverse, the filtration rate (the 'no absorption' rule) and is an important feature of the revised paradigm and highlights the limitations of attempting to prevent or treat oedema by transfusing colloids. Filtered fluid returns to the circulation as lymph. The EGL excludes larger molecules and occupies a substantial volume of the intravascular space and therefore requires a new interpretation of dilution studies of blood volume and the speculation that protection or restoration of the EGL might be an important therapeutic goal. An explanation for the phenomenon of context sensitivity of fluid volume kinetics is offered, and the proposal that crystalloid resuscitation from low capillary pressures is rational. Any potential advantage of plasma or plasma substitutes over crystalloids for volume expansion only manifests itself at higher capillary pressures.

  7. Environmental Assessment for Veterinary Clinic and Military Working Dog Kennels at Mountain Home AFB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Lupinus sp. Sagebrush Russian thistle Sasola kali Disturbed Sagebrush Artemisia spp. Sagebrush/ Grasslands Sandberg’s bluegrass Poa...Aquatic European starling Sturnus vulgaris Urban/ Various House finch Carpodacus mexicanus Urban/ Grasslands/ Shrubland/ Canyon Killdeer

  8. Environmental Assessment of the Proposed Denver Security Operations Center (DSOC) Center of Excellence at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    European starling (Sturnus vulgaris ), house sparrow (Passer domesticus), house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), and pigeon (Columba livia). Several...Mixed grass-dwarf shrub communities that occur on sandy soils; principally the sand sagebrush ( Artemisia fillifolia)-bluestem (Andropogon spp

  9. Environmental Assessment for Education Center Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), fox squirrel ( Sciurus niger), deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and prairie vole...grackle (Quiscalus quiscula), and non-native house sparrow (Passer domesticus), rock dove (Columba livia), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris

  10. Final Environmental Assessment: Demolition/Restoration of Ipswich Antenna Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    starling (Sturnus vulgaris ), blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata), tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater), northern cardinal...southern building, while gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis) nests were observed in the overstory within forested uplands. The adjacent Great Neck

  11. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Construction and Operation of New Vehicle Maintenance Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    tridecemlineatus), fox squirrel ( Sciurus niger), deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and prairie vole (Microtus ochragaster). Common lagomorphs...Quiscalus quiscula), and the non-native house sparrow (Passer domesticus), rock dove (Columba livia), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris ). Raptor

  12. Environmental Assessment of the Relocation and Construction of a Military Working Dog (MWD) Kennel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Buckley AFB include plains pocket gopher (Geomys bursarius), thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), fox squirrel ( Sciurus ...nonnative house sparrow (Passer domesticus), rock dove (Columba livia; aka pigeon), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris ). Raptor species known or

  13. Calleguas Creek Simi Valley to Moorpark Ventura County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    Regulus calendula * Loggerhead shrike Lanius ludovicianus *Starling Sturnus vulgaris ’V ireos Vireo spp. Orange-crowned warbler Vermnivora celata...bachmani Audubon cottontail S. audubonji *California ground squirrel Otospermophilus beecheyl Western gray squirrel Sciurus griseus Pocket gopher

  14. Environmental Statement, Oswego Steam Station, Unit Six.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-03-29

    woodcock (Philohela minor , cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus), ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) and gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis). There are a...herring gull (Laurus argentatus) crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos rock dove (Columbo livia) wood thrush (Hylacichia inustelina) starling (Sturnus vulgaris

  15. Buffalo Metropolitan Area, New York Water Resources Management. Interim Report on Feasibility of Flood Management in Cazenovia Creek Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    chipmunk Tamiasciurus hudsonicus red squirrel Sciurus carolinensis grey squirrel Glauconus volans flying squirrel Castor canadensis beaver Peromyscus...necked pheasant Alectoris graeca chukar Perdx perdix gray partridge Columba livia rock dove Sturnus vulgaris starling Passer domesticus house sparrow

  16. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Disposal and Reuse of Portions of Grissom Air Force Base, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    leucopus Deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus Raccoon Procyvon lotor Gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis Thirteen-lined ground squirrel Spermophilus...carolinensis Field sparrow Spizella pusil/a Eastern meadowlark Sturnella magna European starling Sturnus vulgaris Carolina wren Thryothorus ludovicianus

  17. Environmental Assessment of the Construction of the Joint Use Small Arms Range for the 934th Airlift Wing at Minneapolis-St. paul International Airport Air Reserve Station, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Sylvilagus floridanus), woodchuck (Marmota monax), Eastern gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis), and raccoon (Procyon lotor). Avian species might...starling (Sturnus vulgaris ). Other species might include the common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) and the American toad (Bufo americanus) (934 AW

  18. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Security Forces Operations Facility, Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    pocket gopher (Geomys bursarius), thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), fox squirrel ( Sciurus niger), deer mouse...native house sparrow (Passer domesticus), rock dove (Columba livia), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris ). Raptor species known or likely to

  19. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Replacement of the Squadron Operations Facility at the 140th Wing, Colorado Air National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularia) Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis) Starling (Sturnus vulgaris ) Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) Swainson’s Hawk (Buteo...Culaea inconstans)1 white sucker (Catostomus commersoni)1 Small Mammals blacktailed jackrabbit (Lepus californicus) fox squirrel ( Sciurus

  20. Effect of volume loading on the Frank-Starling relation during reductions in central blood volume in heat-stressed humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Wilson, T E; Seifert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    During reductions in central blood volume while heat stressed, a greater decrease in stroke volume (SV) for a similar decrease in ventricular filling pressure, compared to normothermia, suggests that the heart is operating on a steeper portion of a Frank-Starling curve. If so, volume loading...... of heat-stressed individuals would shift the operating point to a flatter portion of the heat stress Frank-Starling curve thereby attenuating the reduction in SV during subsequent decreases in central blood volume. To investigate this hypothesis, right heart catheterization was performed in eight males.......06). However, subsequent volume loading increased SV to 143 +/- 29 ml (P = 0.003). LBNP provoked a larger decrease in SV relative to the decrease in PCWP during heating (8.6 +/- 1.9 ml mmHg(1)) compared to normothermia (4.5 +/- 3.0 ml mmHg(1), P = 0.02). After volume loading while heat stressed, the reduction...

  1. Reward associated with singing behavior correlates with opioid-related gene expression in the medial preoptic nucleus in male European starlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren V Riters

    Full Text Available Birdsong consists of species-specific learned vocal sequences that are used primarily to attract mates and to repel competitors during the breeding season. However, many birds continue to sing at times when vocal production has no immediate or obvious impact on conspecific behavior. The mechanisms that ensure that animals produce important behaviors in contexts in which the function of these behaviors is not immediate or obvious are not known. One possibility is that animals engage in such behaviors because they are associated with pleasure. Here we examined the hypothesis that male European starlings sing outside of the breeding season in part because the act of singing in this context is facilitated and/or maintained by opioid-mediated reward. We measured song-associated reward using a conditioned place preference (CPP test in male starlings producing fall, non-breeding season-typical song. We used quantitative real time PCR to measure expression of the enkephalin opioid precursor preproenkephalin (PENK and mu opioid receptors (MOR in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM; a region in which opioids are implicated in both reward and starling fall song and additionally the song control region HVC as a control. Starlings developed a strong preference for a place that had been paired previously with the act of producing fall-typical song, indicating that fall song production was associated with a positive affective state. Both PENK and MOR mRNA expression in the POM, but not HVC, correlated positively with both individual reward state (as reflected in CPP and undirected singing behavior. These results suggest that singing induces opioid receptor and enkephalin expression in the POM and consequent reward, and/or that opioid release in the POM induced by individual or environmental factors (e.g., the presence of food, safety of a flock or the absence of predators induces a positive affective state which then facilitates singing behavior.

  2. Description of two new Isospora species causing visceral coccidiosis in captive superb glossy starlings, Lamprotornis superbus (Aves: Sturnidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Mian A; Stasiak, Iga; Delnatte, Pauline; El-Sherry, Shiem; Smith, Dale A; Barta, John R

    2014-09-01

    Isospora greineri sp. n. and Isospora superbusi sp. n. are described from captive superb glossy starlings, Lamprotornis superbus, from the Toronto Zoo succumbing to visceral coccidiosis. Sequence data from nuclear 18S recombinant DNA (rDNA) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) loci from sporulated oocysts and infected tissues (liver, lung, or spleen) demonstrated two distinct Isospora sp. genotypes that varied in their relative abundance. In the tissues of one affected bird, as well as its associated fecal sample, two distinct COI sequences (1.7% divergence) and two distinct 18S rDNA sequences (0.6% divergence) were found at almost the same abundance; in other specimens, one of the 18S and one of the COI sequences were less abundant than the other. In the tissues of some birds, only a single COI and single 18S sequence were present. In all cases, the same pair of 18S rDNA and COI sequences fluctuated in abundance in parallel, indicating that there were two distinct species present rather than one species with more than one COI or 18S locus. The oocysts of these new species cannot be differentiated morphologically. Sporulated oocysts of both were spherical to subspherical measuring 17.7 ± 0.22 μm by 17.1 ± 0.20 μm with a mean L/W ratio of 1.03 ± 0.004. Sporocysts were ovoid measuring 13.5 ± 0.17 μm by 9.3 ± 0.15 μm with a mean L/W ratio of 1.4 ± 0.02. Sporocysts had a small Stieda body with indistinct sub-Stieda body; each sporocyst had a compact residuum. Two morphologically similar but genetically divergent Isospora species were shown to cause simultaneous enteric and extraintestinal infections in captive superb glossy starlings.

  3. Final Environmental Assessment for the Military Family Housing Privatization Initiative Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-03

    include gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis), southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans), swamp rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus), and white-tailed deer...Cedar waxwing Starlings and allies Sturnus vulgaris European starling Vireos Vireo griseus White-eyed vireo Wood-warblers Dendroica coronata Yellow...volans Southern flying squirrel Marmot monax Woodchuck Sciurus carolinensis Gray squirrel Sciurus niger Fox squirrel Squirrels Tamias striatus

  4. Interpreting population estimates of birds following pesticide applications--behavior of male starlings exposed to an organophosphate pesticide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grue, C.E.; Shipley, B.J.; Ralph, C. John; Scott, J. Michael

    1981-01-01

    We determined activity budgets for 10 pairs of captive male Starlings between 7 May and 18 July 1980. Our objective was to quantify changes in behavior after exposure to an organophosphate (OP) pesticide and to assess the impact of changes in behavior on the interpretation of population estimates of birds following pesticide applications. We observed each pair of males for an hour at 07:30 and 09:30 for four days and classified their behavior into one of four categories: flying, perching, foraging, or singing and displaying. At 06:30 on day 2, one male received a single oral dose of 2.5 mg dicrotophos (3-hydroxy-N, N-dimethyl-cis-crotonamide dimethyl phosphate) per kg of body weight; the other male received an equivalent exposure of corn oil. Changes in the activity budgets of OP-dosed and control males were compared using t-tests. Activity of OP-dosed males was significantly (P _ 0.05) reduced within the 2-4 h following exposure. OP-dosed males spent more time perching (46.1%) than controls and less time flying (-96.6%), foraging (-28.5%), and singing and displaying (-49.5%). The frequency of perching (-75.3%), flying (-83.8%), foraging (-54.1%), and singing and displaying (- 59.2%) was significantly reduced. Activity in OP-dosed males returned to normal by 26-28 h posttreatment. Results suggest that movement and vocalization may be significantly reduced in birds exposed to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Conventional censusing techniques and population estimating procedures may, therefore, be inadequate to assess changes in bird populations after pesticide applications because of the difficulty in separating decreases in density due to mortality or emigration from reductions in activity.

  5. The role of the Frank-Starling law in the transduction of cellular work to whole organ pump function: a computational modeling analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A Niederer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a multi-scale biophysical electromechanics model of the rat left ventricle at room temperature. This model has been applied to investigate the relative roles of cellular scale length dependent regulators of tension generation on the transduction of work from the cell to whole organ pump function. Specifically, the role of the length dependent Ca(2+ sensitivity of tension (Ca(50, filament overlap tension dependence, velocity dependence of tension, and tension dependent binding of Ca(2+ to Troponin C on metrics of efficient transduction of work and stress and strain homogeneity were predicted by performing simulations in the absence of each of these feedback mechanisms. The length dependent Ca(50 and the filament overlap, which make up the Frank-Starling Law, were found to be the two dominant regulators of the efficient transduction of work. Analyzing the fiber velocity field in the absence of the Frank-Starling mechanisms showed that the decreased efficiency in the transduction of work in the absence of filament overlap effects was caused by increased post systolic shortening, whereas the decreased efficiency in the absence of length dependent Ca(50 was caused by an inversion in the regional distribution of strain.

  6. The cross-bridge dynamics is determined by two length-independent kinetics: Implications on muscle economy and Frank-Starling Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiad Pavlov, Daria; Landesberg, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying the Frank-Starling Law of the heart and the skeletal muscle force-length relationship are not clear. This study tested the effects of sarcomere length (SL) on the average force per cross-bridge and on the rate of cross-bridge cycling in intact rat cardiac trabeculae (n=9). SL was measured by laser diffraction and controlled with a fast servomotor to produce varying initial SLs. Tetanic contractions were induced by addition of cyclopiazonic acid, to maintain a constant activation. Stress decline and redevelopment in response to identical ramp shortenings, starting at various initial SLs, was analyzed. Both stress decline and redevelopment responses revealed two distinct kinetics: a fast and a slower phase. The duration of the rapid phases (4.2 ± 0.1 msec) was SL-independent. The second slower phase depicted a linear dependence of the rate of stress change on the instantaneous stress level. Identical slopes (70.5 ± 1.6 [1/s], p=0.33) were obtained during ramp shortening at all initial SLs, indicating that the force per cross-bridge and cross-bridge cycling kinetics are length-independent. A decrease in the slope at longer SLs was obtained during stress redevelopment, due to internal shortening. The first phase is attributed to rapid changes in the average force per cross-bridge. The second phase is ascribed to both cross-bridge cycling between its strong and weak conformations and to changes in the number of strong cross-bridges. Cross-bridge cycling kinetics and muscle economy are length-independent and the Frank-Starling Law cannot be attributed to changes in the force per cross-bridge or in the single cross-bridge cycling rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Avicenna (980-1037) on the Role of the Liver in Separating Fluid from the Blood, with Insight into the Process from E.H. Starling (1866-1907) a Millennium Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Leon G

    2016-01-01

    A statement was made by Avicenna (980-1037) in his Canon of Medicine that the liver separates fluid from the blood. An explanation for this view has not been considered. Since the statement emerged from an existing English translation of the Canon (which was made from a prior Latin edition), an alternative English translation of the first Hebrew edition was made in order to verify the statement and to seek additional insight, which could explain its basis, in fact. The English edition of Avicenna's Canon of Medicine published in 1932, translated from the Latin. First Hebrew edition of Avicenna's Canon of Medicine published in 1491, translated from the Arabic. None. The relevant sections of the Hebrew Canon on the origin of the body fluids were translated and compared with the existing English translation. The fluid generated by the liver is likely to be protein-containing, since it was described as frothy and suggests that it is lymph. The suggestion that the liver needs a watery fluid for its action cannot be explained. Ernest Henry Starling (1866-1907) measured lymph formation, showing it to be driven by physical forces. The liver stood out as being the organ with the largest capacity for lymph formation. The vascular walls within the liver were shown to have a higher permeability to serum proteins than any other source of lymph. Data are derived from Starling's publications based on individual experiments. These were not analyzed statistically. The explanation for Avicenna's statement that the liver separates moisture from the blood is most likely to be the discovery by Starling, a millennium later, that the liver is the major source of lymph production. The liver is a major source of lymph. Distortion of the architecture of the liver in cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases lead to ascites, a condition of lymph overflow from the liver. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Wintering Ecology of Shrubland Birds: Linking Landscape and Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    sagebrush ( Artemisia spp.) in the western United States represent one of the nation’s most imperiled ecosystems due to extensive habitat loss and habitat...hyemalis 6 42 15 63 European Starling Sturnus vulgaris 1 1 17 Table 3: Continued Species

  9. Saugus River and Tributaries Flood Damage Reduction Study; Lynn, Malden, Revere and Saugus, Massachusetts. Section 2. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Final Environmental Impact Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    foredunes and beach vegetation. The dunes are vegetated by American beach grass (Ammophila breviligulata), dusty miller ( Artemisia stelleriana) and beach...Saugus lion Works. Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris ) make use of the upper Saugus River and Shute Brook as brood-rearing, feeding and resting habitat. Black

  10. Programmatic Environmental Assessment, Francis E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-17

    Artemisia frigida). The riparian communities are found in narrow strands along Crow Creek and its tributaries, and are associated with...livia), European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris ), and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) are known to occur year-round on the installation. Fish are

  11. Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment: Demolition and Abandonment of Atlas and Titan Facilities Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-13

    of Atlas and Titan Facilities Chapter 3. Affected Environment ( Artemisia californica) and bush lupine (Lupinus chamissonis). Also present are...throated swift (Aeronautes saxatalis) European starling (Sturnus vulgaris ), Northern flicker (Colaptes auratus) and Western meadowlark (Sturnella...pilularis and Artemisia californica. Carpobrotus edulis and various grasses dominate the herbaceous layer. Demolition outside of avian nesting season

  12. Environmental Statement, Lake City Station, Unit One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-09-17

    western fox squirrel, exists in the site vicinity. Sizeable populations of gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis) and deer (Odocoileus virginianus...crowned kinglet Re gulus satrapa 11 Cedar waxwing Bombycilla decrorum 107 Northern shrike Lanius excubitor 1 Starling Sturnus vulgaris 76 Myrtle warbler...carolinensis Fox squirrel Sciurus nie Fed squirrel Tamiasciurus hudscriicus Eastern flying squirrel Glauctrys volans Deer mouse Peromyscus hniiiulatus White

  13. Draft Environmental Impact Statement, West Bank Hurricane Protection Levee, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    Eastern pipistrelle Pipistrellus subflavus Eastern wood rat Neotoma floridana Fox squirrel Sciurus niger Fulvous harvest mouse Reithrodontomys fulvescens...Gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis Hispid cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus House mouse Mus musculus Marsh rice rat Oryzomys palustris Nearctic river otter...meadowlark Sturnella magna Eastern phoebe Sayornis phoebe Eastern wood pewee Contopus virens European starling Sturnus vulgaris Fish crow Corvus

  14. Tonawanda Creek, Genesee County, New York, Regional Flood Control. Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    Linarea vulgaris Wild Mustard :Brasica sp. Sensitive Fern :Onoclea sensibilis *Christmas Fern :As21dium acrostichoides Panic Grass :Panicum sp. Barnyard... Sciurus carolinensis Reptiles E ’tern Painted Turtle :Chrysemys picta picta Birds Mallard :Anas platyrhynchos Black Duck :Anas rubripes Ring-necked...migratorius migratorius Starling :Sturnus vulgaris Eastern Golden-crowned Kinglet :Regulus satrapa satrapa Rusty Blackbird :Euphagus carolinus Red

  15. Disposal and Reuse of England Air Force Base, Louisiana, Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    starling (Sturnus vulgaris ). Additional common species typical in close association with humans include rock dove (Columbia livia) and house sparrow...water source, provide habitat for a diverse assemblage of wildlife species. Mammals detected include opossum, fox squirrel ( Sciurus niger), beaver...squirrel, eastern gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis), coyote, and white-tailed deer. The forests are particularly important to raptors because they

  16. Biological Survey, Buffalo River and Outer Harbor of Buffalo, New York. Volume II. Data Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    phoeniceus Red-winged blackbird 26 Passer domsticus House sparrow I Sturnus vulgaris Starling 7 Larus delawarensis Ring-billed gull 90 Carduelis tristis...teal 10 Agelaius phoeniceus Red-winged blackbird 15 Melospiza melodia Song sparrow 4 Larus arqentatus Herring gull 6 Carduelis tristis American

  17. No Outsiders and "The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Child"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Mary Lou

    2011-01-01

    "Interrogating Heteronormativity in Primary Schools: The No Outsiders Project" is a book that reflects on a research project based in primary schools and funded by The Economic and Social Research Council of the UK. This text is accompanied by another practice-focused work: "Undoing Homophobia in Primary Schools". The project…

  18. Failure of frank-starling mechanism detected on radionuclide ambulatory monitoring (C-vest II) is associated with severe prognosis in ischemic dilatative cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboni, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    variables, only ex AD and PFR during SC had however a significant value in predicting severe cardiovascular events (p < 0.05, for both). Conclusions: Interactions between structural anomalies (necrosis/fibrosis) and ischemia may elicit electrical instability and act as a trigger for fatal arrhythmias and thus for cardiac death. In addition ,increases in PFR values without increases in end-diastolic volumes indicate failure of the Frank-Starling mechanism: This failure, may have a crucial role in worsening cardiac performace during daily activities in spite of the presence of an apparently preserved LV contractile reserve. The use of VEST seems thus to be, in such a circumstances, a valid method to explain the underlying reasons for a severe prognosis in ICMP and therefore for a precise therapeutical intervention. (authors)

  19. Operation and Maintence, Vermilion Harbor, Erie County, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-01

    Sylvilagus floridanus) and fox squirrel ( Sciurus niger) are found to a limited extent in the harbor area. It is possible that the endangered Indiana...explain the low number of species of birds which are residents in Vermilion Harbor. Such species as starling (Sturnus vulgaris ), house sparrow (Passer...ILeptodora kindtiil Rotifers Polyarthra vulgaris 108 Polyarthra euryptera 2 Trichocerca sp. 8 9 Keratella cochicaris 2 3 Kellicottia longispina 0.5 0.5

  20. Draft Reformulation. Phase I. General Design Memorandum and Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Geneva-on-the-Lake, Ohio Small Boat Harbor. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    vulgaris Lesser duckweed Lemna minor 3B. Loosestrife Shallow Marsh Swamp loosestrife Decadon verticillatus 3C. Emergent Shallow Marsh Softstem bulrush...Starling x x b Sturnus vulgaris Red-eyed vireo x x b Vireo olivaceus Warbling vireo x B Vireo gilvus Yellow warbler x x x B Dendroica petechia Yellow...Park Marmota monax Eastern chipmunk C Marsh, Cowles Tamias striatus Eastern fox squirrel U Marsh, Cowles Sciurus niger Red squirrel U Marsh Tamiasciurus

  1. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Machine: Protecting Privacy with Ephemeral Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Alan M.; Lee, Michael Z.; Jana, Suman; Kim, Sangman; Silberstein, Mark; Xu, Yuanzhong; Shmatikov, Vitaly; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    Modern systems keep long memories. As we show in this paper, an adversary who gains access to a Linux system, even one that implements secure deallocation, can recover the contents of applications’ windows, audio buffers, and data remaining in device drivers—long after the applications have terminated. We design and implement Lacuna, a system that allows users to run programs in “private sessions.” After the session is over, all memories of its execution are erased. The key abstraction in Lacuna is an ephemeral channel, which allows the protected program to talk to peripheral devices while making it possible to delete the memories of this communication from the host. Lacuna can run unmodified applications that use graphics, sound, USB input devices, and the network, with only 20 percentage points of additional CPU utilization. PMID:24755709

  2. Mitochondrial genome of the spotless smooth-hound Mustelus griseus (Carcharhiniformes: Triakidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Peng, Zaiqing; Pan, Lianghao; Shi, Xiaofang; Cai, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Mustelus griseus was first determined in this study. It is 16,754 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region with the typical gene order in vertebrates. Overall nucleotide base composition of the mitogenome is 30.7% A, 24.9% C, 14.0% G and 30.3% T. After aligning, it comes to us that the mitogenomic portions of M. griseus are very similar to those of Mustelus manazo, ranging from 86.92% (control region) to 100% (tRNA-His and tRNA-Leu2). The origin of L-strand replication (OL) is identified between tRNA-Asn and tRNA-Cys genes. The control region is located between the tRNA-Pro and tRNA-Phe genes, containing one termination-associated sequence (TAS) and three short conserved sequences (CSB 1-3).

  3. Seeking a Spotless Mind: Extinction, Deconsolidation, and Erasure of Fear Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maren, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Learning to contend with threats in the environment is essential to survival, but dysregulation of memories for traumatic events can lead to disabling psychopathology. Recent years have witnessed an impressive growth in our understanding of the neural systems and synaptic mechanisms underlying emotional memory formation. As a consequence, interest has emerged in developing strategies for suppressing, if not eliminating, fear memories. Here I review recent work employing sophisticated behavioral, pharmacological, and molecular tools to target fear memories, placing these memories firmly behind the crosshairs of neurobiologically informed interventions. PMID:21658578

  4. The avian tail reduces body parasite drag by controlling flow separation and vortex shedding.

    OpenAIRE

    Maybury, W. J.; Rayner, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The aerodynamic effect of the furled avian tail on the parasite drag of a bird's body was investigated on mounted, frozen European starling Sturnus vulgaris in a wind tunnel at flight speeds between 6 and 14 m s(-1). Removal of tail rectrices and dorsal and ventral covert feathers at the base of the tail increased the total parasite drag of the body and tail by between 25 and 55%. Flow visualization and measurements of dynamic pressure in the tail boundary layer showed that in the intact bird...

  5. Mutual ornamentation, age, and reproductive performance in the European starling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, J; Oorebeek, M; van Overveld, T; Cuthill, IC; Cuthill, Innes C.

    2005-01-01

    Ornamental traits expressed in both sexes are widespread among birds. Many studies have indicated that male ornaments develop through sexual selection. Female ornaments may be correlated effects of selection on males or have signaling functions in their own right. In the facultatively polygynous

  6. Recursive Vocal Pattern Learning and Generalization in Starlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Tiffany Corinna

    2012-01-01

    Among known communication systems, human language alone exhibits open-ended productivity of meaning. Interest in the psychological mechanisms supporting this ability, and their evolutionary origins, has resurged following the suggestion that the only uniquely human ability underlying language is a mechanism of recursion. This "Unique…

  7. Auditory memory for temporal characteristics of sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zokoll, Melanie A; Klump, Georg M; Langemann, Ulrike

    2008-05-01

    This study evaluates auditory memory for variations in the rate of sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM) of noise bursts in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). To estimate the extent of the starling's auditory short-term memory store, a delayed non-matching-to-sample paradigm was applied. The birds were trained to discriminate between a series of identical "sample stimuli" and a single "test stimulus". The birds classified SAM rates of sample and test stimuli as being either the same or different. Memory performance of the birds was measured as the percentage of correct classifications. Auditory memory persistence time was estimated as a function of the delay between sample and test stimuli. Memory performance was significantly affected by the delay between sample and test and by the number of sample stimuli presented before the test stimulus, but was not affected by the difference in SAM rate between sample and test stimuli. The individuals' auditory memory persistence times varied between 2 and 13 s. The starlings' auditory memory persistence in the present study for signals varying in the temporal domain was significantly shorter compared to that of a previous study (Zokoll et al. in J Acoust Soc Am 121:2842, 2007) applying tonal stimuli varying in the spectral domain.

  8. The seroprevalence of avipoxvirus and its association with avian malaria (Plasmodium spp.) infection in introduced passerine birds in the southern regions of the North Island of New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, H J; Banda, M; Alley, M R; Howe, L; Gartrell, B D

    2013-03-01

    Blood samples were collected from 65 free-ranging birds from six species in the southern North Island of New Zealand. Sera from the birds were tested for the presence of avipoxvirus (APV) antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and blood cells from 55 birds were also tested for Plasmodium spp. by PCR. Forty-five birds (69.2%) tested seropositive to APV. Song thrushes (Turdus philomelos) presented the highest seroprevalence at 100% (4/4), followed by Eurasian blackbirds (Turdus merula) (96.86%, 31/32), chaffinches (Fringilla coelebs) (54.55%, 6/11), starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) (25%, 3/12), greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) (25%, 1/4), and European goldfinches (Carduelis carduelis) (0%, 0/2). Plasmodium spp. DNA was detected in 15/55 birds (27.3%), including 11 Eurasian blackbirds, one song thrush, and three starlings. Eight Eurasian blackbird isolates (73%) grouped within the subgenus Novyella. Two Eurasian blackbird isolates and the song thrush isolate clustered within a different group with previously reported lineages LINN1 and AFTRU5. In addition, all three starling isolates clustered within the well-characterized lineage Plasmodium (Huffia) elongatum GRW06. All Plasmodium-positive Eurasian blackbirds and the song thrush were seropositive to APV, whereas only 67% of Plasmodium-positive starlings showed evidence of previous exposure to APV. A significant relationship between birds seropositive to APV and birds infected by Plasmodium spp. was observed (chi2 = 5.69, df = 1, P = 0.0086). To the authors' knowledge this is the first report describing the seroprevalence of APV and its association with Plasmodium spp. infection in introduced bird species in New Zealand.

  9. The prevalence of serum antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in Ontario mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizard, I R; Harmeson, J; Lai, C H

    1978-01-01

    The prevalence of seropositive reactions to Toxoplasma gondii was studied in farm animals, companion animals, wild rodents and birds. Of the animals tested, 17% of cattle, 65% of sheep, 45% of pigs, 9% of horses, 33% of dogs and 20% of cats were seropositive by the Sabin-Feldman dye test. In addition 11% of mice (Mus musculus), 5% of deer mice (Peromyscus), 3% of rats (Rattus norvegicus) and less than 2% of sparrows (Passer domestcus) were seropositive. All samples from short-tailed field mice (Microtus pennsylvanicus), squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), chipmunks (Tamias striatus), meadow jumping mice (Zapus hudsonius) and starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were seronegative. The significance of these findings in relation to the epizootiology of toxoplasmosis in Ontario is discussed. PMID:667705

  10. Acute oral toxicity of sodium cyanide in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hill, E.F.; Carpenter, J.W.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sensitivities of six avian species, black vulture (Coragyps atratus), American kestrel (Falco sparverius), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), eastern screech-owl (Otus asio), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris), to acute poisoning by sodium cyanide (NaCN) were compared by single dose LD50's. Three species, domestic chickens, black vultures, and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), were dosed with NaCN to determine cyanide residues in those that died and also in survivors, in addition to postmortem fate. Three flesh-eating species (black vulture, American kestrel, and eastern screech-owl; LD50's 4.0-8.6 mg/kg) were more sensitive to NaCN than three species (Japanese quail, domestic chicken, and European starling; LD50's 9.4-21 mg/kg) that fed predominantly on plant material. Elevated concentrations of cyanide were found in the blood of birds that died of cyanide poisoning; however, concentrations in birds that died overlapped those in survivors. Blood was superior to liver as the tissue of choice for detecting cyanide exposure. No gross pathological changes related to dosing were observed at necropsy.

  11. Some causes of the variable shape of flocks of birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte K Hemelrijk

    Full Text Available Flocks of birds are highly variable in shape in all contexts (while travelling, avoiding predation, wheeling above the roost. Particularly amazing in this respect are the aerial displays of huge flocks of starlings (Sturnus vulgaris above the sleeping site at dawn. The causes of this variability are hardly known, however. Here we hypothesise that variability of shape increases when there are larger local differences in movement behaviour in the flock. We investigate this hypothesis with the help of a model of the self-organisation of travelling groups, called StarDisplay, since such a model has also increased our understanding of what causes the oblong shape of schools of fish. The flocking patterns in the model prove to resemble those of real birds, in particular of starlings and rock doves. As to shape, we measure the relative proportions of the flock in several ways, which either depend on the direction of movement or do not. We confirm that flock shape is usually more variable when local differences in movement in the flock are larger. This happens when a flock size is larger, b interacting partners are fewer, c the flock turnings are stronger, and d individuals roll into the turn. In contrast to our expectations, when variability of speed in the flock is higher, flock shape and the positions of members in the flock are more static. We explain this and indicate the adaptive value of low variability of speed and spatial restriction of interaction and develop testable hypotheses.

  12. Seasonality in a temperate zone bird can be entrained by near equatorial photoperiods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Alistair

    2007-03-07

    Birds use photoperiod to control the time of breeding and moult. However, it is unclear whether responses are dependent on absolute photoperiod, the direction and rate of change in photoperiod, or if photoperiod entrains a circannual clock. If starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) are kept on a constant photoperiod of 12h light:12h darkness per day (12L:12D), then they can show repeated cycles of gonadal maturation, regression and moult, which is evidence for a circannual clock. In this study, starlings kept on constant 11.5L:12.5D for 4 years or 12.5L:11.5D for 3 years showed no circannual cycles in gonadal maturation or moult. So, if there is a circannual clock, it is overridden by a modest deviation in photoperiod from 12L:12D. The responses to 11.5L:12.5D and 12.5L:11.5D were very different, the former perceived as a short photoperiod (birds were photosensitive for most of the time) and the latter as a long photoperiod (birds remained permanently photorefractory). Starlings were then kept on a schedule which ranged from 11.5L:12.5D in mid-winter to 12.5L:11.5D in mid-summer (simulating the annual cycle at 9 degrees N) for 3 years. These birds entrained precisely to calendar time and changes in testicular size and moult were similar to those of birds under a simulated cycle at 52 degrees N. These data show that birds are very sensitive to changes in photoperiod but that they do not simply respond to absolute photoperiod nor can they rely on a circannual clock. Instead, birds appear to respond to the shape of the annual change in photoperiod. This proximate control could operate from near equatorial latitudes and would account for similar seasonal timing in individuals of a species over a wide range of latitudes.

  13. Carotenoid supplementation positively affects the expression of a non-visual sexual signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain J-M Van Hout

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of pigments which are widely used by animals for the expression of yellow-to-red colour signals, such as bill or plumage colour. Since they also have been shown to promote immunocompetence and to function as antioxidants, many studies have investigated a potential allocation trade-off with respect to carotenoid-based signals within the context of sexual selection. Although an effect of carotenoids on non-visual (e.g. acoustic signals involved in sexual selection has been hypothesized, this has to date not been investigated. First, we examined a potential effect of dietary carotenoid supplementation on overall song rate during the non-breeding season in captive male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris. After only 3-7 days, we found a significant (body-mass independent positive effect of carotenoid availability on overall song rate. Secondly, as a number of studies suggest that carotenoids could affect the modulation of sexual signals by plasma levels of the steroid hormone testosterone (T, we used the same birds to subsequently investigate whether carotenoid availability affects the increase in (nestbox-oriented song rate induced by experimentally elevated plasma T levels. Our results suggest that carotenoids may enhance the positive effect of elevated plasma T levels on nestbox-oriented song rate. Moreover, while non-supplemented starlings responded to T-implantation with an increase in both overall song rate and nestbox-oriented song, carotenoid-supplemented starlings instead shifted song production towards (reproductively relevant nestbox-oriented song, without increasing overall song rate. Given that song rate is an acoustic signal rather than a visual signal, our findings therefore indicate that the role of carotenoids in (sexual signalling need not be dependent on their function as pigments.

  14. Trophic structure of arthropods in Starling nests matter to blood parasites and thereby to nestling development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfs, Peter H. J.; Lesna, Izabela K.; Sabelis, Maurice W.; Komdeur, Jan; Bairlein, F.

    Nestling development and long-term survival in many bird species depend on factors such as parental feeding, time of breeding and environmental conditions. However, little research has been carried out on the effect of ectoparasites on nestling development, and no research on the impact of the

  15. Trophic structure of arthropods in Starling nests matter to blood parasites and thereby to nestling development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfs, P.H.J.; Lesna, I.K.; Sabelis, M.W.; Komdeur, J.

    2012-01-01

    Nestling development and long-term survival in many bird species depend on factors such as parental feeding, time of breeding and environmental conditions. However, little research has been carried out on the effect of ectoparasites on nestling development, and no research on the impact of the

  16. Sleep-dependent consolidation of auditory discrimination learning in adult starlings

    OpenAIRE

    Brawn, Timothy P.; Nusbaum, Howard C.; Margoliash, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Memory consolidation is widely believed to benefit from sleep. Sleep-dependent memory consolidation has been established broadly in humans, appearing in declarative and procedural tasks. Animal studies have indicated a variety of mechanisms that could potentially serve as the neural basis of sleep-dependent consolidation, such as the offline replay of waking neural activity and the modulation of specific sleep parameters or synaptic strength during sleep. Memory consolidation, however, cannot...

  17. Contrasting effects of reduced incubation cost on clutch attendance by male and female European starlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magrath, MJL; van Overveld, T; Komdeur, J

    2005-01-01

    In biparental birds, the relative contribution of the sexes to parental care can be viewed as a co-operative equilibrium that reflects the relative costs and benefits to each parent. If there are asymmetries in these costs or benefits, then any changes to the cost of care could result in a

  18. Effect of thermal stress on Frank-Starling relations in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, T.E.; Brothers, R.M.; Tollund, C.

    2009-01-01

    derived cardiac output/heart rate). Subjects experienced lower-body negative-pressure (LBNP) of 0, 15 and 30 mmHg during normothermia, skin-surface cooling (decrease in mean skin temperature of 4.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C (mean +/- s.e.m.) via perfusing 16 degrees C water through a tubed-lined suit), and whole-body...... heating (increase in blood temperature of 1.0 +/- 0.1 degrees C via perfusing 46 degrees C water through the suit). SV was 123 +/- 8, 121 +/- 10, 131 +/- 7 ml prior to LBNP, during normothermia, skin-surface cooling, and whole-body heating, respectfully (P = 0.20). LBNP of 30 mmHg induced greater...

  19. Starlings uphold principles of economic rationality for delay and probability of reward

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Tiago; Vasconcelos, Marco; Kacelnik, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Rationality principles are the bedrock of normative theories of decision-making in biology and microeconomics, but whereas in microeconomics, consistent choice underlies the notion of utility; in biology, the assumption of consistent selective pressures justifies modelling decision mechanisms as if they were designed to maximize fitness. In either case, violations of consistency contradict expectations and attract theoretical interest. Reported violations of rationality in non-humans include ...

  20. Three dimensional reconstruction of starling flocks: an empirical investigation of collective animal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, Irene

    2009-03-01

    Bird flocking is a striking example of animal collective behaviour: thousands of birds gather above the roosting site, forming sharp-bordered flocks, which wheel and turn with remarkable coherence and synchronization. Despite an increasing theoretical interest, empirical investigations of collective motion have been limited so far by the difficulties of getting data on large systems. By means of stereoscopic photography and using statistical mechanics, optimization theory and computer vision techniques, we have measured for the first time the three-dimensional positions and trajectories of individual birds in groups of up to three thousands elements. This allowed us to analyze global morphological properties of the flocks, as well as structural and dynamical properties. Most notably, we investigated the nature of the inter-individual interaction. We found that the interaction between birds does not depend on their mutual metric distance, as most current models and theories assume, but rather on the topological distance (number of intermediate neighbors). In fact, we discovered that each individual interacts on average with a fixed number of neighbors (six-seven), rather than with all neighbors within a fixed metric distance. We argue that a topological interaction of this kind is indispensable to maintain flock's cohesion against the large density changes caused by external perturbations, typically predation. More recently, we characterized the velocity field, and computed dynamical observables. We showed that flocks exhibit long range correlations, which are a signature of their remarkable collective behavior.

  1. Self-organized aerial displays of thousands of starlings : a model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildenbrandt, H.; Carere, C.; Hemelrijk, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Through combining theoretical models and empirical data, complexity science has increased our understanding of social behavior of animals, in particular of social insects, primates, and fish. What are missing are studies of collective behavior of huge swarms of birds. Recently detailed empirical

  2. Evaluating the risk of pathogen transmission from wild animals to domestic pigs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Hayley E; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L; Lapidge, Steven J; Hernández-Jover, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Wild animals contribute to endemic infection in livestock as well as the introduction, reintroduction and maintenance of pathogens. The source of introduction of endemic diseases to a piggery is often unknown and the extent of wildlife contribution to such local spread is largely unexplored. The aim of the current study was to quantitatively assess the probability of domestic pigs being exposed to different pathogens from wild animals commonly found around commercial piggeries in Australia. Specifically, this study aims to quantify the probability of exposure to the pathogens Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. from European starlings (Sturnus vulgarus); Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, Lawsonia intracellularis and Salmonella spp. from rats (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus); and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Leptospira spp., Brucella suis and L. intracellularis from feral pigs (Sus scrofa). Exposure assessments, using scenario trees and Monte Carlo stochastic simulation modelling, were conducted to identify potential pathways of introduction and calculate the probabilities of these pathways occurring. Input parameters were estimated from a national postal survey of commercial pork producers and from disease detection studies conducted for European starlings, rats and feral pigs in close proximity to commercial piggeries in Australia. Based on the results of the exposure assessments, rats presented the highest probability of exposure of pathogens to domestic pigs at any point in time, and L. intracellularis (median 0.13, 5% and 95%, 0.05-0.23) and B. hyodysenteriae (median 0.10, 0.05-0.19) were the most likely pathogens to be transmitted. Regarding European starlings, the median probability of exposure of domestic pigs to pathogenic E. coli at any point in time was estimated to be 0.03 (0.02-0.04). The highest probability of domestic pig exposure to feral pig pathogens at any point in time was found to be for M. hyopneumoniae (median 0.013, 0

  3. Stress, captivity, and reproduction in a wild bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Molly J; Bentley, George E

    2014-09-01

    In seasonal species, glucocorticoid concentrations are often highest during the breeding season. However, the role of increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity in the regulation of reproduction remains poorly understood. Our study is the first, to our knowledge, to document reproductive consequences of a non-pharmacological hindrance to seasonal HPA fluctuations. Using wild-caught male and female European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) housed in an outdoor, semi-natural environment, we divided birds into two mixed-sex groups. One group remained in the outdoor aviary, where starlings breed at the appropriate time of year. The other group was transferred into an indoor flight aviary, where we predicted reproductive suppression to occur. We measured changes in corticosterone (CORT) at baseline and stress-induced concentrations prior to group separation and at the experiment's conclusion. After ten days, the birds showed remarkable differences in breeding behavior and HPA activity. Outdoor birds exhibited increases in baseline and stress-induced CORT and progressed into active breeding (pairing, nest building, egg laying, etc.). In contrast, indoor birds displayed no change in baseline or stress-induced CORT and few signs of active breeding. We found significant sex and treatment effects on expression of HPA and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis elements, suggesting sex-specific regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest a novel, facilitating role for the HPA axis in the transition between early breeding and active breeding in a wild, seasonal avian species. In addition, understanding how changes in housing condition affect seasonal HPA fluctuations may help alleviate barriers to breeding wild animals in captivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expected Shannon Entropy and Shannon Differentiation between Subpopulations for Neutral Genes under the Finite Island Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Anne; Jost, Lou; Hsieh, T C; Ma, K H; Sherwin, William B; Rollins, Lee Ann

    2015-01-01

    Shannon entropy H and related measures are increasingly used in molecular ecology and population genetics because (1) unlike measures based on heterozygosity or allele number, these measures weigh alleles in proportion to their population fraction, thus capturing a previously-ignored aspect of allele frequency distributions that may be important in many applications; (2) these measures connect directly to the rich predictive mathematics of information theory; (3) Shannon entropy is completely additive and has an explicitly hierarchical nature; and (4) Shannon entropy-based differentiation measures obey strong monotonicity properties that heterozygosity-based measures lack. We derive simple new expressions for the expected values of the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distribution at a neutral locus in a single isolated population under two models of mutation: the infinite allele model and the stepwise mutation model. Surprisingly, this complex stochastic system for each model has an entropy expressable as a simple combination of well-known mathematical functions. Moreover, entropy- and heterozygosity-based measures for each model are linked by simple relationships that are shown by simulations to be approximately valid even far from equilibrium. We also identify a bridge between the two models of mutation. We apply our approach to subdivided populations which follow the finite island model, obtaining the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distributions of the subpopulations and of the total population. We also derive the expected mutual information and normalized mutual information ("Shannon differentiation") between subpopulations at equilibrium, and identify the model parameters that determine them. We apply our measures to data from the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris) in Australia. Our measures provide a test for neutrality that is robust to violations of equilibrium assumptions, as verified on real world data from starlings.

  5. Is Cycle 24 the Beginning of a Dalton-Like Minimum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M. Lindholm; Kjeldsen, H.

    2011-05-01

    The unexpected development of cycle 24 emphasizes the need for a better way to model future solar activity. In this article, we analyze the accumulation of spotless days during individual cycles from 1798 - 2010. The analysis shows that spotless days do not disappear abruptly in the transition toward an active Sun. A comparison with past cycles indicates that the ongoing accumulation of spotless days is comparable to that of cycle 5 near the Dalton minimum and to that of cycles 12, 14, and 15. It also suggests that the ongoing cycle has as much as 20±8 spotless days left, from July 2010, before it reaches the next solar maximum. The last spotless day is predicted to be in December 2012, with an uncertainty of 11 months. This trend may serve as input to the solar dynamo theories.

  6. Community ecology of helminth parasitism in an insular passerine avifauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C L; Crites, J L

    1976-02-01

    Three hundred and thirty specimens of 7 species of passerine birds from South Bass Island, Ottawa County, Ohio, were examined for helminth parasites. The total number of helminth specimens collected was 4,333. Forty-one helminth taxa were identified. Ten species of helminths were identified as having foci of infection on the island. An index of association for these 10 species is presented. The low association revealed between helminth species utilizing common species of intermediate hosts indicated that a single intermediate host specimen is likely to harbor infective stages of only one species of parasitic helminth. An index of similarity is presented to express the species importance relationships of the helminth faunas of the 7 species of birds: red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata), brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), house sparrows (Passer domesticus), starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), and robins (Turdus migratorius). The results reveal that competition between these avian species for invertebrate food resources helps to maximize the transmission of those helminth populations which utilize these same invertebrates as intermediate hosts. The aggregation of birds into mixed feeding flocks insures a heavy loading of the feeding grounds with agents infective for the invertebrate populations.

  7. Factors determining presence of passerines breeding within White Stork Ciconia ciconia nests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbyryt, Adam; Jakubas, Dariusz; Tobolka, Marcin

    2017-08-18

    Nests of White Stork Ciconia ciconia are commonly used by various passerines as nesting sites. In this study, we investigated factors determining presence and number of pairs of species breeding within White Stork nests in an extensive farmland in NE Poland. In 133 (57%) out of 233 White Stork nests, we found at least one breeding pair of passerine bird. These were from three species: House Sparrows Passer domesticus (68% of 133 nests with co-breeding), Tree Sparrows Passer montanus (65%), and Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (30%). The probability of breeding passerines within White Stork nests increased with increasing nest thickness, and was significantly higher in currently occupied nests. Sparrows were more likely to breed in White Stork nests located on electricity poles, situated closer to settlements and surrounded mainly by arable fields where meadows were not prevalent. In this paper, we show that White Stork nests are favorable nesting sites for passerines, as they are well insulated and provide an anti-predatory shield.

  8. Nest Boxes Facilitate Local-Scale Conservation of Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula and Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Corrigan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We tested the general predictions of increased use of nest boxes and positive trends in local populations of Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula and Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola following the large-scale provision of nest boxes in a study area of central Alberta over a 16-year period. Nest boxes were rapidly occupied, primarily by Common Goldeneye and Bufflehead, but also by European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris. After 5 years of deployment, occupancy of large boxes by Common Goldeneye was 82% to 90% and occupancy of small boxes by Bufflehead was 37% to 58%. Based on a single-stage cluster design, experimental closure of nest boxes resulted in significant reductions in numbers of broods and brood sizes produced by Common Goldeneye and Bufflehead. Occurrence and densities of Common Goldeneye and Bufflehead increased significantly across years following nest box deployment at the local scale, but not at the larger regional scale. Provision of nest boxes may represent a viable strategy for increasing breeding populations of these two waterfowl species on landscapes where large trees and natural cavities are uncommon but wetland density is high.

  9. Effects of sibling competition on growth, oxidative stress, and humoral immunity: a two-year brood-size manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeon, Sophie; Guindre-Parker, Sarah; Williams, Tony D

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ecological context (by comparing data from two consecutive years) and experimentally manipulated nestling developmental conditions (large vs. small brood size) on immune function (immunoglobulin Y [IgY]) and oxidative stress in nestling European starlings Sturnus vulgaris. On the basis of annual differences in chicks' morphological traits and body masses close to fledging, we established that 2007 was a relative low-quality year and 2008 was a relatively high-quality year. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was significantly lower in experimentally enlarged broods, but only in the low-quality year (2007). Total oxidant status (TOS) was independent of brood size in both years but was 45% higher in the low-quality year. Consequently, plasma oxidative status (the ratio between TOS and TAC) was higher in 2007. In contrast, plasma IgY levels were higher in the experimentally enlarged broods and in the high-quality year (2008). Thus, immune function and oxidative stress showed inverse relationships with developmental conditions and annual variation in year quality. Finally, TOS and TAC were positively correlated, but only in the low-quality year (2007), and there was no relationship observed between IgY and markers of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the importance of taking into account year effects or ecological context when assessing environmental effects on physiological mechanisms underlying the life-history traits of chicks, such as oxidative stress.

  10. A Physiological Signature of the Cost of Reproduction Associated with Parental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Melinda A; Williams, Tony D

    2017-12-01

    Costs of reproduction are an integral and long-standing component of life-history theory, but we still know relatively little about the specific physiological mechanisms underlying these trade-offs. We experimentally manipulated workload during parental care in female European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) using attachment of radios and/or wing clipping and assessed measures of workload, current breeding productivity, future fecundity, and survival (local return rate) in relation to treatment. Females with wing clipping and radio attachment paid a clear cost of reproduction compared with all other treatment groups: they had lower future fecundity and lower return rates despite having lower current breeding productivity. We then measured 13 physiological traits, including measures of aerobic/metabolic capacity, oxidative stress and muscle damage, intermediary metabolism and energy supply, and immune function. Our results show that the cost of reproduction in females with wing clipping and radio attachment was associated with lower oxygen-carrying capacity (lower hematocrit and hemoglobin levels), lower energy reserves (plasma nonesterified fatty acid and triglyceride levels), decreased immune function (lower haptoglobin levels), and elevated levels of oxidative stress (higher levels of dROMs [reactive oxygen metabolites] and lower levels of the endogenous antioxidant uric acid). Our study provides evidence that costs of reproduction involve a widespread decline in physiological function across multiple physiological systems consistent with long-standing ideas of cumulative "wear and tear" and allostatic load.

  11. Carotenoids, birdsong and oxidative status: administration of dietary lutein is associated with an increase in song rate and circulating antioxidants (albumin and cholesterol and a decrease in oxidative damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Casagrande

    Full Text Available Despite the appealing hypothesis that carotenoid-based colouration signals oxidative status, evidence supporting the antioxidant function of these pigments is scarce. Recent studies have shown that lutein, the most common carotenoid used by birds, can enhance the expression of non-visual traits, such as birdsong. Nevertheless, the underlying physiological mechanisms remain unclear. In this study we hypothesized that male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris fed extra lutein increase their song rate as a consequence of an improved oxidative status. Although birdsong may be especially sensitive to the redox status, this has, to the best of our knowledge, never been tested. Together with the determination of circulating oxidative damage (ROMs, reactive oxygen metabolites, we quantified uric acid, albumin, total proteins, cholesterol, and testosterone, which are physiological parameters potentially sensitive to oxidation and/or related to both carotenoid functions and birdsong expression. We found that the birds fed extra lutein sang more frequently than control birds and showed an increase of albumin and cholesterol together with a decrease of oxidative damage. Moreover, we could show that song rate was associated with high levels of albumin and cholesterol and low levels of oxidative damage, independently from testosterone levels. Our study shows for the first time that song rate honestly signals the oxidative status of males and that dietary lutein is associated with the circulation of albumin and cholesterol in birds, providing a novel insight to the theoretical framework related to the honest signalling of carotenoid-based traits.

  12. The avian tail reduces body parasite drag by controlling flow separation and vortex shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybury, W J; Rayner, J M

    2001-07-07

    The aerodynamic effect of the furled avian tail on the parasite drag of a bird's body was investigated on mounted, frozen European starling Sturnus vulgaris in a wind tunnel at flight speeds between 6 and 14 m s(-1). Removal of tail rectrices and dorsal and ventral covert feathers at the base of the tail increased the total parasite drag of the body and tail by between 25 and 55%. Flow visualization and measurements of dynamic pressure in the tail boundary layer showed that in the intact bird a separation bubble forms on the ventral side of the body, and reattaches to the ventral side of the tail. This bubble is a consequence of the morphology of the body, with a rapid contraction posterior to the pelvis and hind legs. The tail and the covert feathers at its base act as a combined splitter plate and wedge to control vortex shedding and body wake development, and thereby are important to minimize drag. This hitherto unsuspected mechanism is central to understanding the morphology of the avian body, and may have had a significant influence on the evolution of avian tail morphology by pre-adapting the tail for radiation and specialization as an aerodynamic lifting structure and as an organ of communication in sexual selection.

  13. Carotenoids, Birdsong and Oxidative Status: Administration of Dietary Lutein Is Associated with an Increase in Song Rate and Circulating Antioxidants (Albumin and Cholesterol) and a Decrease in Oxidative Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Stefania; Pinxten, Rianne; Zaid, Erika; Eens, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the appealing hypothesis that carotenoid-based colouration signals oxidative status, evidence supporting the antioxidant function of these pigments is scarce. Recent studies have shown that lutein, the most common carotenoid used by birds, can enhance the expression of non-visual traits, such as birdsong. Nevertheless, the underlying physiological mechanisms remain unclear. In this study we hypothesized that male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) fed extra lutein increase their song rate as a consequence of an improved oxidative status. Although birdsong may be especially sensitive to the redox status, this has, to the best of our knowledge, never been tested. Together with the determination of circulating oxidative damage (ROMs, reactive oxygen metabolites), we quantified uric acid, albumin, total proteins, cholesterol, and testosterone, which are physiological parameters potentially sensitive to oxidation and/or related to both carotenoid functions and birdsong expression. We found that the birds fed extra lutein sang more frequently than control birds and showed an increase of albumin and cholesterol together with a decrease of oxidative damage. Moreover, we could show that song rate was associated with high levels of albumin and cholesterol and low levels of oxidative damage, independently from testosterone levels. Our study shows for the first time that song rate honestly signals the oxidative status of males and that dietary lutein is associated with the circulation of albumin and cholesterol in birds, providing a novel insight to the theoretical framework related to the honest signalling of carotenoid-based traits. PMID:25549336

  14. Factors determining presence of passerines breeding within White Stork Ciconia ciconia nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbyryt, Adam; Jakubas, Dariusz; Tobolka, Marcin

    2017-10-01

    Nests of White Stork Ciconia ciconia are commonly used by various passerines as nesting sites. In this study, we investigated factors determining presence and number of pairs of species breeding within White Stork nests in an extensive farmland in NE Poland. In 133 (57%) out of 233 White Stork nests, we found at least one breeding pair of passerine bird. These were from three species: House Sparrows Passer domesticus (68% of 133 nests with co-breeding), Tree Sparrows Passer montanus (65%), and Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (30%). The probability of breeding passerines within White Stork nests increased with increasing nest thickness, and was significantly higher in currently occupied nests. Sparrows were more likely to breed in White Stork nests located on electricity poles, situated closer to settlements and surrounded mainly by arable fields where meadows were not prevalent. In this paper, we show that White Stork nests are favorable nesting sites for passerines, as they are well insulated and provide an anti-predatory shield.

  15. Parathion poisoning of Mississippi kites in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. Christian

    1994-01-01

    Parathion(phosphorothioic acid O, O-diethyl O-[4-nitrophenyl] ester) is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide, used on a variety of crops and occasionally for mosquito control, and is highly toxic to birds (Smith 1987). Intentional poisoning with parathion is reported to have killed more than 8000 red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in two separate instances (Stone et al. 1984). Use of parathion on wheat fields has resulted in the mortality of about 1600 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and other waterfowl in one instance (White et al. 1982) and about 200 Canada geese in another (Flickinger et al. 1991). More than 200 laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) died near cotton fields treated with parathion (White et al. 1979). Secondary poisoning of raptors resulting from the consumption of prey exposed to parathion, has been reported experimentally and in the field. Stone et al. (1984) found two dead red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), a Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) and an American kestrel (Falco sparverius) that had fed on blackbirds killed by parathion. One of four American kestrels died after being fed cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) that had been exposed to 10ppm parathion for 96 hr (Fleming et al. 1982). The Mississippi kite (Ictinia mississippensis) is highly insectivorous (Brown and Amadon 1968) and is thus subject to secondary poisoning resulting from consumption of insects exposed to pesticides. I report here an instance of secondary parathion poisoning in wild Mississippi kites.

  16. Breeding Bird Assemblage in a Mosaic of Urbanized Habitats in a Central European City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopij Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of data on the population densities of birds breeding in a mosaic of typical urbanized habitats. This study was undertaken to partly fulfil this gap in our knowledge. Counts were conducted in 2008 by means of simplified territory mapping method in a fragment (1197 ha of a large Central European city (Wrocław, SW Poland. In total, 50 bird species were breeding in the study area in 2008. The House Sparrow Passer domesticus, Common Swift Apus apus and Rock Dove comprised about 3/5 of all breeding pairs. The other group of species, each one with a density between 6 and 13 pairs per 100 ha, included seven species, namely the Starling, Sturnus vulgaris, Greenfinch, Carduelis chloris, House Martin, Delichon urbica, Tree Sparrow, Passer montanus, Great Tit, Parus major, Blue Tit, Parus caeruleus, and Jackdaw, Corvus monedula. They comprised together about 1/5. The remaining 40 species nested in a density between 0.1 and 3.5 pairs per 100 ha. The most numerous feeding guild were granivores (53.8% and insectivores (37.9 %. Birds nesting on buildings comprised together 74 % of all breeding pairs. For a few species (Luscinia megarhynchos, Saxicola torquata, Corvus cornix and Turdus pilaris an increase in their numbers in the last three decades has been evidenced.

  17. An avifaunal case study of a plateau from Goa, India: an eye opener for conservation of plateau ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Desai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The lateritic plateaux typical of the midlands between the Western Ghats and the coastal plains of the Arabian Sea are known to be a unique ecosystem with a sizeable endemic flora. However, there is a total lack of studies on the faunal diversity of these plateaux, which are currently experiencing enormous anthropogenic pressures. We conducted a year-long study on the avifauna of the Taleigao Plateau, Goa. The Taleigao Plateau harbours 114 species of birds, accounting for 37% of the avifaunal diversity of the state. The resident bird population did not vary significantly through the seasons. Among the migrant birds, Rosy Starling Sturnus roseus was particularly partial to the plateau. Besides, five species of larks, grassland specialists were also recorded on the plateau. However, the absence of forest birds like the Malabar Pied Hornbill and the Indian Grey Hornbill (recorded earlier and the predominance of habitat generalists like the House Crow and the Jungle Myna seemed to be the offshoot of heavy anthropogenic pressures on the plateau. It is recommended that at least some plateaux in the belt deserve to be protected from the impact of unsustainable developmental process

  18. Vertebrate host specificity and experimental vectors of Plasmodium (Novyella) kempi sp. n. from the eastern wild turkey in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, B M; Barnes, H J; Rowley, W A

    1983-07-01

    Vertebrate host specificity, experimental laboratory vectors, and a description of Plasmodium (Novyella) kempi sp. n. from eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris Vieillot) in Iowa are presented. Plasmodium kempi is infective for domestic turkeys, bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), chukars (Alectoris graeca), guinea fowl (Numida meleagris), peacocks (Pavo cristatus), and canaries (Serinus canaria), produces a transient infection in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and domestic geese (Anser anser), but will not infect ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), pigeons (Columba livia), Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix), leghorn white chickens (Gallus gallus), or starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Oocysts and (or) sporozoites were recovered from 68% (84/124) and 98% (60/61) of the Culex pipiens pipiens and C. tarsalis examined, respectively. Oocysts developed faster and sporozoites invaded the salivary glands sooner in C. tarsalis (6 days) than in C. p. pipiens (7 days). Culex tarsalis transmitted P. kempi more effectively than C. p. pipiens, although both species were capable of transmitting the parasite by natural feeding. Oocysts developed and sporozoites also were produced in C. restuans, but its ability to transmit the parasite was not determined. Aedes aegypti (Rockefeller strain) and A. triseriatus were refractive to P. kempi. Plasmodium kempi produces trophozoites with large refractile globules and fine cytoplasmic extensions, mature schizonts in the form of a condensed fan containing four to eight nuclei (usually 5), and elongate gametocytes with irregular borders. All stages are confined almost exclusively to mature erythrocytes, with no effect on host cell size or position of host cell nucleus. Plasmodium kempi is most similar morphologically to P. (Novyella) hexamerium and P. (Novyella) vaughani. It differs from P. hexamerium in having large refractile globules in trophozoites and immature schizonts, an inability to infect starlings, an absence of

  19. In search of millions of lost Starlings across Europe: The relation between monitoring, science and conservation in a declining species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heldbjerg, Henning; Fox, Anthony David

    at a mean annual rate of -2.01 ± 0.26 % during 1980-2012. We fitted log-linear Poisson regression models to European Bird Census Council data from 27 national breeding bird monitoring schemes across Europe to compare and contrast annual indices of changes in abundance using trim software. The results from...

  20. Food composition of the Little Owl (Athene noctua in a farmland area of Central Hungary, with particular attention to arthropod diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hámori Dániel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The feeding of Little Owl (Athene noctua was studied in a farmland area of Kiskunság, Central Hungary. For the analyses, a total of 661 Little Owl pellets were collected between February and September 2005 from three locations, corresponding known Little Owl territories situated nearby the settlements Apaj, Kunpeszér and Ladánybene. The aim of the present study was to explore the diet composition of Little Owl and to give a detailed evaluation of the arthropod diversity based on the pellet analysis. The identified prey items represented 15 vertebrate and 39 invertebrate species/taxa. In terms of prey number, dominance of small mammals was observed in two sites (Apaj – 55%, Kunpeszér – 68%, while birds and mammals shared almost equal dominance (~25% in Ladánybene. The most numerous mammal species was the Common Vole (Microtus arvalis, while the Starling (Sturnus vulgaris played key role among the birds. Contribution of amphibian Common Spadefoot (Pelobates fuscus was considerable, while share of reptiles was marginal. Vertebrates also played a predominant role by contributing over 99% of the overall prey biomass in all study sites. Invertebrate prey dominance ranged from 24.8–30.0% while their contribution to the overall biomass was very low (0.14–0.34%. Large sized beetles (Pentodon idiota, Melolontha hippocastani and orthopterans (Tettigonia viridissima, Gryllotalpa gryllotalpa were preferred. Arthropod species richness and diversity were the highest in Kunpeszér, supposedly owing to the rich mosaic habitat structure.

  1. Developmental stress impairs performance on an association task in male and female songbirds, but impairs auditory learning in females only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Tara M; Morgan, Amanda; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    In songbirds, early-life environments critically shape song development. Many studies have demonstrated that developmental stress impairs song learning and the development of song-control regions of the brain in males. However, song has evolved through signaller-receiver networks and the effect stress has on the ability to receive auditory signals is equally important, especially for females who use song as an indicator of mate quality. Female song preferences have been the metric used to evaluate how developmental stress affects auditory learning, but preferences are shaped by many non-cognitive factors and preclude the evaluation of auditory learning abilities in males. To determine whether developmental stress specifically affects auditory learning in both sexes, we subjected juvenile European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, to either an ad libitum or an unpredictable food supply treatment from 35 to 115 days of age. In adulthood, we assessed learning of both auditory and visual discrimination tasks. Females reared in the experimental group were slower than females in the control group to acquire a relative frequency auditory task, and slower than their male counterparts to acquire an absolute frequency auditory task. There was no difference in auditory performance between treatment groups for males. However, on the colour association task, birds from the experimental group committed more errors per trial than control birds. There was no correlation in performance across the cognitive tasks. Developmental stress did not affect all cognitive processes equally across the sexes. Our results suggest that the male auditory system may be more robust to developmental stress than that of females.

  2. Ranking the risk of wildlife species hazardous to military aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, E.J.; Bissonette, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Collisions between birds and aircraft (birdstrikes) pose a major threat to aviation safety. Different species pose different levels of threat; thus, identification of the most hazardous species can help managers identify the level of hazard and prioritize mitigation efforts. Dolbeer et al. (2000) assessed the hazard posed by birds to civilian aircraft by analyzing data from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Wildlife Strike Database to rank the hazardous species and species groups. A similar analysis has not been done for the military but would be useful and necessary. Military flight characteristics differ from those of civilian flights. During the period 1985-1998, birdstrikes cost the United States Air Force (USAF) an average of $35 million/year in damage. Using the USAF Birdstrike Database, we selected and evaluated each species or species group by the number of strikes recorded in each of 3 damage categories. We weighted damage categories to reflect extent and cost of damage. The USAF Birdstrike Database contained 25,519 records of wildlife strikes in the United States. During the period 1985-1998, 22 (mean = 1.6/year) Class-A birdstrikes (>$1,000,000 damage, loss of aircraft, loss of life, or permanent total disability) were sustained, accounting for 80% of total monetary losses caused by birds. Vultures (Cathartes aura, Coragyps atratus, Caracara cheriway) were ranked the most hazardous species group (Hazard Index Rank [HIR] = 127) to USAF aircraft, followed by geese (Branta canadensis, Chen caerulescens, HIR = 76), pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos, P. occidentalis, HIR = 47), and buteos (Buteo sp., HIR = 30). Of the smaller flocking birds, blackbirds and starlings (mostly Agelaius phoeniceus, Euphagus cyanocephalus, Molothrus ater, Sturnus vulgaris, HIR = 46), horned larks (Eremophila alpestris, HIR = 24), and swallows (Families Hirundinidae, Apodidae, HIR = 23) were species groups ranked highest. Coupling these results with local bird census

  3. Surveillance for Ixodes pacificus and the tick-borne pathogens Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Borrelia burgdorferi in birds from California's Inner Coast Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingler, Regina J; Wright, Stan A; Donohue, Ann M; Macedo, Paula A; Foley, Janet E

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the involvement of birds in the ecology of the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus, and its associated zoonotic bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, at two interior coast-range study sites in northern California. Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the agent of granulocytic anaplasmosis (GA), and B. burgdorferi s.s., the agent of Lyme disease (LD), are tick-borne pathogens that are well established in California. We screened blood and ticks from 349 individual birds in 48 species collected in 2011 and 2012 using pathogen-specific PCR. A total of 617 immature I. pacificus was collected with almost three times as many larvae than nymphs. There were 7.5 times more I. pacificus at the Napa County site compared to the Yolo County site. Two of 74 (3%) nymphal pools from an Oregon junco (Junco hyemalis) and a hermit thrush (Catharus guttatus) and 4 individual larvae (all from Oregon juncos) were PCR-positive for B. burgdorferi. Blood samples from a golden-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla) and a European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) were positive for A. phagocytophilum DNA at very low levels. Birds that forage on ground or bark and nest on the ground, as well as some migratory species, are at an increased risk for acquiring I. pacificus. Our findings show that birds contribute to the ecologies of LD and GA in California by serving as a blood-meal source, feeding and transporting immature I. pacificus, and sometimes as a source of Borrelia infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Second intermediate host land snails and definitive host animals of Brachylaima cribbi in southern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butcher A.R.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study of infection of southern Australian land snails with Brachylaima cribbi metacercariae has shown that all commonly encountered native and introduced snails are susceptible second intermediate hosts. The range of infected snails is extensive with metacercariae-infected snails being present in all districts across southern Australia. C. virgata has the highest average natural metacercarial infection intensity of 6.1 metacercariae per infected snail. The susceptibility of birds, mammals and reptiles to B. cribbi infection was studied in South Australia by capturing, dissecting and examining the intestinal tract contents of animals which commonly eat land snails as a food source. Indigenous Australian little ravens (Corvus mellori, which are a common scavenger bird, and two other passeriform birds, the black bird (Turdus merula and the starling (Sturnus vulgaris, which are both introduced European birds, were found to have the highest infection rates of all animals examined. Other birds found infected with B. cribbi were an emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae, chickens (Gallus gallus and a pigeon (Columba livia. Natural infections were also detected in field mice (Mus domesticus and shingleback lizards (Tiliqua rugosa although the intensity of infection was lower than that observed in birds. Susceptibility studies of laboratory mice, rats and ducks showed that mice developed patent infections which persisted for several weeks, rats developed a short-lived infection of three weeks’ duration and ducks did not support infection. This study has shown for the first time that a brachylaimid can infect a wide host range of birds, mammals and reptiles in nature.

  5. The direct response of the gonads to cues of stress in a temperate songbird species is season-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette L. McGuire

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH system in the hypothalamus is often considered the final point in integration of environmental cues as they pertain to the reproductive axis. However, cues such as stress and food availability are detectable in the plasma (as glucocorticoid and metabolic fuel fluctuations. Vertebrate gonads express glucocorticoid receptor, therefore we hypothesized that the gonads can detect and respond directly to cues of stress. We provide evidence here that, in addition to regulation by the brain, the gonads of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris respond directly to fluctuations in corticosterone and metabolic fuels by modulating sex steroid secretion. Using a 4-h gonad culture, we show that physiologically-relevant concentrations of corticosterone and metabolic stress (via use of the glucose utilization inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose and the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor ethyl 2-mercaptoacetate (2DG/MA can directly decrease testosterone and estradiol secretion from luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone (LH/FSH-stimulated testes and ovaries. This effect is regulated seasonally. Prior to the breeding season, testes and ovaries respond to corticosterone and 2DG/MA by significantly decreasing gonadal steroid release. Within the breeding season, the testes do not respond to these cues of stress, while the ovaries respond only to corticosterone. This seasonal difference in response may be due in part to the influence of these cues of stress on gonadal neuropeptide expression: corticosterone upregulates GnIH expression in the testes while metabolic stress upregulates GnIH in the ovaries. Thus the gonads can directly respond to fluctuations in corticosterone and metabolic fuels during a time of critical importance to the onset of breeding.

  6. A mutation in the glutamate-rich region of RNA-binding motif protein 20 causes dilated cardiomyopathy through missplicing of titin and impaired Frank-Starling mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Bollen, I. A. E.; Rasmussen, T. B.

    2016-01-01

    -rich region of RBM20. Western blot analysis of endogenous RBM20 protein revealed strongly reduced protein levels in the heart of an RBM20(E913K/+) carrier. RNA deep-sequencing demonstrated massive inclusion of exons coding for the spring region of titin in the RBM20(E913K/+) carrier. Titin isoform analysis...

  7. A time-dependent multi-layered mathematical model of filtration and solute exchange, the revised Starling principle and the Landis experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Facchini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell oxygenation and nutrition is vitally important for human and animal life. Oxygen and nutrients are transported by the blood stream and cross microvessel walls to penetrate the cell’s membrane. Pathological alterations in the transport of oxygen, and other nutrition elements, across microvessel walls may have serious consequences to cell life, possibly leading to localized cell necrosis. We present a transient model of plasma filtration and solute transport across microvessel walls by coupling flow and transport equations, the latter being non-linear in solute concentration. The microvessel wall is modeled through the superimposition of two or more membranes with different physical properties, representing key structural elements. With this model, the combined effect of the endothelial cells, the glycocalyx and other coating membranes specific of certain microvessels, can be analyzed. We investigate the role of transient external pressures in the study of trans-vascular filtration and solute exchange during the drop of blood capillary pressure due to the pathological decrease of blood volume called hypovolaemia, as well as hemorrhage. We discuss the advantage of using a multi-layered model, rather than a model considering the microvessel wall as a single and homogeneous membrane.

  8. The Frank-Starling mechanism involves deceleration of cross-bridge kinetics and is preserved in failing human right ventricular myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Canan, Benjamin D; Elnakish, Mohammad T; Davis, Jonathan P; Chung, Jae-Hoon; Fedorov, Vadim V; Binkley, Philip F; Higgins, Robert S D; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-12-15

    Cross-bridge cycling rate is an important determinant of cardiac output, and its alteration can potentially contribute to reduced output in heart failure patients. Additionally, animal studies suggest that this rate can be regulated by muscle length. The purpose of this study was to investigate cross-bridge cycling rate and its regulation by muscle length under near-physiological conditions in intact right ventricular muscles of nonfailing and failing human hearts. We acquired freshly explanted nonfailing (n = 9) and failing (n = 10) human hearts. All experiments were performed on intact right ventricular cardiac trabeculae (n = 40) at physiological temperature and near the normal heart rate range. The failing myocardium showed the typical heart failure phenotype: a negative force-frequency relationship and β-adrenergic desensitization (P kinetics in human myocardium. Decreasing muscle length accelerated the rate of cross-bridge reattachment (ktr) in both nonfailing and failing myocardium (P 0.05), indicating that this regulatory mechanism is preserved in heart failure. Length-dependent assessment of twitch kinetics mirrored these findings; normalized dF/dt slowed down with increasing length of the muscle and was virtually identical in diseased tissue. This study shows for the first time that muscle length regulates cross-bridge kinetics in human myocardium under near-physiological conditions and that those kinetics are preserved in the right ventricular tissues of heart failure patients. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Effect of volume loading on the Frank-Starling relation during reductions in central blood volume in heat-stressed humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Wilson, T E; Seifert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    -body heating after intravascular volume expansion. Volume expansion was accomplished by administration of a combination of a synthetic colloid (HES 130/0.4, Voluven) and saline. Before LBNP, SV was not affected by heating (122 +/- 30 ml; mean +/- s.d.) compared to normothermia (110 +/- 20 ml; P = 0...

  10. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented.

  11. Behavior of Bali Starling at Bali Barat National Park and Nusa Penida Island (PERILAKU JALAK BALI DI TAMAN NASIONAL BALI BARAT DAN PULAU NUSA PENIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudaryanto .

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jalak Bali (Leucopsar rothschildi sejak tahun 1966 dimasukan oleh International Union forConservation of Nature (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species dan Convention on International Trade inEndangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES. Jalak Bali dikelompokan sebagai satwa terancampunah dengan kategori kritis (Critically Endangered dan di Indonesia telah dilindungi sejak tahun 1970.Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui perilaku Jalak Bali di Taman Nasional Bali Barat danPulau Nusa Penida untuk konservasi burung tersebut. Metode yang digunakan adalah scan samplingdengan instataneous sampling. Perilaku Jalak Bali di Taman Nasional Bali Barat terdiri dari terbang17%, makan buah 3%, makan serangga 1%, menelisik bulu 15%, menegakkan jambul 6%, bobbing 7%,berkicau 40%, minum 0,5%, dan berjalan 10%. Sementara di Nusa Penida pada musim hujan terdiriterbang 13%, makan buah 19%, makan serangga 4%, menelisik bulu 7%, menegakkan jambul 7%, bobbing8%, berkicau 11%, minum 1%, 1% mandi, berjalan 16% , bersarang 2%, mengeram 9% dan mengasuh anak3%, dan di Nusa Penida pada musim kemarau terdiri terbang 11%, makan buah 9%, makan serangga21%, menelisik bulu 7%, menegakkan jambul 6%, bobbing 7%, berkicau 9%, minum 2%, mandi 1%, berjalan18% , dan bersarang 8%. Jalak Bali berkembang biak di Nusa Penida pada musim hujan dan musimkemarau, tetapi di Taman Nasional Bali Barat pada musim hujan.

  12. Wound-healing ability is conserved during periods of chronic stress and costly life history events in a wild-caught bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRant, S E; de Bruijn, R; Tran, M N; Romero, L M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic stress, potentially through the actions of corticosterone, is thought to directly impair the function of immune cells. However, chronic stress may also have an indirect effect by influencing allocation of energy, ultimately shifting resources away from the immune system. If so, the effects of chronic stress on immune responses may be greater during energetically-costly life history events. To test whether the effects of chronic stress on immune responses differ during expensive life history events we measured wound healing rate in molting and non-molting European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) exposed to control or chronic stress conditions. To determine whether corticosterone correlated with wound healing rates before starting chronic stress, we measured baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and two estimates of corticosterone release and regulation, negative feedback (using dexamethasone injection), and maximal capacity of the adrenals to secrete corticosterone (using adrenocorticotropin hormone [ACTH] injection). After 8days of exposure to chronic stress, we wounded both control and chronically stressed birds and monitored healing daily. We monitored nighttime heart rate, which strongly correlates with energy expenditure, and body mass throughout the study. Measures of corticosterone did not differ with molt status. Contrary to work on lizards and small mammals, all birds, regardless of stress or molt status, fully-healed wounds at similar rates. Although chronic stress did not influence healing rates, individuals with low baseline corticosterone or strong negative feedback had faster healing rates than individuals with high baseline corticosterone or weak negative feedback. In addition, wound healing does appear to be linked to energy expenditure and body mass. Non-molting, chronically stressed birds decreased nighttime heart rate during healing, but this pattern did not exist in molting birds. Additionally, birds of heavier body mass at the start of

  13. Mortality and pathology in birds due to Plasmodium (Giovannolaia) homocircumflexum infection, with emphasis on the exoerythrocytic development of avian malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgūnas, Mikas; Bukauskaitė, Dovilė; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Iezhova, Tatjana A; Dinhopl, Nora; Nedorost, Nora; Weissenbacher-Lang, Christiane; Weissenböck, Herbert; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-05-04

    Species of avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium) are widespread, but their virulence has been insufficiently investigated, particularly in wild birds. During avian malaria, several cycles of tissue merogony occur, and many Plasmodium spp. produce secondary exoerythrocytic meronts (phanerozoites), which are induced by merozoites developing in erythrocytic meronts. Phanerozoites markedly damage organs, but remain insufficiently investigated in the majority of described Plasmodium spp. Avian malaria parasite Plasmodium (Giovannolaia) homocircumflexum (lineage pCOLL4) is virulent and produces phanerozoites in domestic canaries Serinus canaria, but its pathogenicity in wild birds remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathology caused by this infection in species of common European birds. One individual of Eurasian siskin Carduelis spinus, common crossbill Loxia curvirostra and common starling Sturnus vulgaris were exposed to P. homocircumflexum infection by intramuscular sub-inoculation of infected blood. The birds were maintained in captivity and parasitaemia was monitored until their death due to malaria. Brain, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidney, and a piece of breast muscle were examined using histology and chromogenic in situ hybridization (ISH) methods. All exposed birds developed malaria infection, survived the peak of parasitaemia, but suddenly died between 30 and 38 days post exposure when parasitaemia markedly decreased. Numerous phanerozoites were visible in histological sections of all organs and were particularly easily visualized after ISH processing. Blockage of brain capillaries with phanerozoites may have led to cerebral ischaemia, causing cerebral paralysis and is most likely the main reason of sudden death of all infected individuals. Inflammatory response was not visible around the brain, heart and muscle phanerozoites, and it was mild in parenchymal organs. The endothelial damage likely causes dysfunction and failure of

  14. Phosphorus ligand imaging with two-photon fluorescence spectroscopy: towards rational catalyst immobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marras, F.; Kluwer, A.M.; Siekierzycka, J.R.; Vozza, A.; Brouwer, A.M.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2010-01-01

    Spotless catalysts: Ligand immobilization was studied by two-photon fluorescence microscopy with a fluorescent nixantphos ligand as probe (see picture). In the immobilization process ligand aggregates form in solution and are deposited on the support, where they appear as bright spots in

  15. Using Cinema and Literature to Explore Existentialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Jennifer; Tucker, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how the book "When Nietzsche Wept: A Novel of Obsession" and the movie "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" can be used to help counseling graduate students understand existential theory and its application to clients. Yalom's Four Givens of Existence, which consists of freedom and responsibility, meaninglessness,…

  16. Assessment of Environmental Problems and Methods of Waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    showed that waste management personnel have contributed immensely to the management of waste in the area. However ... Another factor identified is that the technology in use in industrialized countries are .... Hotels and Rest houses such as Pathfinder Hotel, Dave Hotel, After '7' Guest. House, Anisulowo Hotel, Spotless ...

  17. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Construction Freight Transfer Facility, Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), fox squirrel ( Sciurus niger), deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and prairie vole (Microtus...Sturnus vulgaris ). Raptor species known or likely to occur at Buckley AFB include burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia; discussed further in Section

  18. 78 FR 17711 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ...) Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalskii) Pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus... Cercopithecidae Hominidae Hylobatidae Lemuridae Tapiridae Species Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) Grevy's Zebra (Equus grevyi) Golden parakeet (Guarouba guarouba) Bali starling (Leucopsar rothschildi) Radiated tortoise...

  19. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. B. Starling Emerald1 2 L. S. Shashidhara1. Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad, India 500 007; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany ...

  20. A Comparative Morphometrical Study of the Pecten Oculi in Different Avian Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Orhun Dayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study was investigated the structure of pecten oculi in the ostrich, duck, pigeon, turkey, and starling. The pecten oculi of the ostrich was vaned type and made up primary, secondary, and few tertiary lamellae. However, duck, pigeon, turkey and starling had a pleated-type pecten oculi which displayed folded structure. The numbers of pleats of the pectens were 12, 13-14, 21-22, and 17 in duck, pigeon, turkey, and starling, respectively. Light microscopic investigation demonstrated that pecten oculi is basically composed of numerous capillaries, large blood vessels, and pigment cells in all investigating avian species. Capillaries were 20.23, 14.34, 11.78, 12.58, and 12.78 μm in diameter in ostrich, duck, pigeon, turkey, and starling, respectively. The capillaries are surrounded by thick basal membrane, and pigmented cells were observed around the capillaries.

  1. 78 FR 23286 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... likely to influence agency decisions are: (1) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and...) African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) Rothschild's starling (Leucopsar rothschildi) Radiated tortoise...) Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) Andean condor (Vultur gryphus) Harpy...

  2. Phase 2 Site Investigations Report. Volume 1 of 3: General Annex-Wide Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Sturnus vulgaris 11:UC6101-21RC1132-07/131% -2 Page 2 of 3 Table 2-1 BIRDS THAT ARE LIKELY TO OCCUR AT THE SUDBURY ANNEX, MASSACHUSETTS Common Name...34 Sciurus carolinensis Eastern mole Scalopus aquaticus Eastern pipistrel Piitrellus subflavus Fisher Martes pennanti Hairytail mole Parascalops brewr

  3. Redes interdiscursivas e convergência de mídias: uma análise de Brilho Eterno de uma Mente Sem Lembranças

    OpenAIRE

    Rogério Secomandi Mestriner

    2011-01-01

    Com a vasta disseminação das mídias digitais à sociedade, comprovada pela expansão do mercado de jogos eletrônicos e a crescente inclusão digital propiciada pelo avanço da Web 2.0 e a telefonia móvel, a expressão audiovisual se transforma de forma significativa, sendo que seus efeitos são notados principalmente na estrutura de diversos filmes, como Brilho Eterno de Uma Mente Sem Lembranças (Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind, EUA, 2004), de Michel Gondry. A presente pesquisa pretende elabo...

  4. Sunspot Activity Near Cycle Minimum and What it Might Suggest for Cycle 24, the Next Sunspot Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2009-01-01

    In late 2008, 12-month moving averages of sunspot number, number of spotless days, number of groups, area of sunspots, and area per group were reflective of sunspot cycle minimum conditions for cycle 24, these values being of or near record value. The first spotless day occurred in January 2004 and the first new-cycle, high-latitude spot was reported in January 2008, although old-cycle, low-latitude spots have continued to be seen through April 2009, yielding an overlap of old and new cycle spots of at least 16 mo. New-cycle spots first became dominant over old-cycle spots in September 2008. The minimum value of the weighted mean latitude of sunspots occurred in May 2007, measuring 6.6 deg, and the minimum value of the highest-latitude spot followed in June 2007, measuring 11.7 deg. A cycle length of at least 150 mo is inferred for cycle 23, making it the longest cycle of the modern era. Based on both the maximum-minimum and amplitude-period relationships, cycle 24 is expected to be only of average to below-average size, peaking probably in late 2012 to early 2013, unless it proves to be a statistical outlier.

  5. Estimating Bird / Aircraft Collision Probabilities and Risk Utilizing Spatial Poisson Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-10

    16 Coyote 15 17 6 15 20 American Kestrel 16 10 16 16 14 Shorebirds 17 19 14 17 12 Crows - Ravens 18 16 15 18 12 Blackbirds - Starl ing 19 18 18 19 9...Vultures 63 Geese 52 Cranes 48 Osprey 50 Pel icans 44 Ducks 37 Hawks 25 Eagles 31 Rock Dove 24 Gul ls 22 Herons 22 Mourning Dove 17 Owls 16 American Kestrel ...3.6 141 0 American Kestrel 0 0 3.4 141 0 Shorebirds 0 0 3.2 141 0 Crows - Ravens 0 0 3 141 0 Blackbirds - Starling 0 0 2.8 141 0 Sparrows 0 0 2.6 141 0

  6. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results for /ρ from the present EOS thus obtained are compared with Percus-Yevick (PY), scaled particle theory (SPT), and Carnahan–Starling (CS). In addition, we have found a simple EOS for the HS fluid in the region which represents the simulation data accurately. It is observed that, this EOS for HS gives, PY ...

  7. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short Note Regular moult-breeding overlap in the Pale-winged Starling Onychognathus nabouroup. Abstract · Vol 85, No 1 (2014) - Articles Nectar feeding by weavers (Ploceidae) and their role as pollinators. Abstract · Vol 85, No 2 (2014) - Articles Primary wing-moult and site fidelity in South African mousebirds (Coliidae)

  8. Note: equation of state and the freezing point in the hard-sphere model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Miguel; López de Haro, Mariano; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-07

    The merits of different analytical equations of state for the hard-sphere system with respect to the recently computed high-accuracy value of the freezing-point packing fraction are assessed. It is found that the Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa and the branch-point approximant equations of state yield the best performance.

  9. Control of Vertebrate Pests of Agricultural Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Robert G.; Studholme, Clinton R.

    This agriculture extension service publication of Pennsylvania State University discusses the damage from and control of vertebrate pests. Specific discussions describe the habits, habitat, and various control measures for blackbirds and crows, deer, meadow and pine mice, European starlings, and woodchucks. Where confusion with non-harmful species…

  10. Flow and oscillations in collapsible tubes: Physiological applications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... by partial venous collapse, and in arteries, which exhibit self-excited oscillations (Korotkov sounds) when compressed by a blood-pressure cuff. Laboratory experiments are frequently conducted in a Starling resistor, a finite length of flexible tube, mounted between two rigid tubes and contained in a pressurised chamber.

  11. Communally Nesting Migratory Birds Create Ecological Hot-Spots in Tropical Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J D Natusch

    Full Text Available Large numbers of metallic starlings (Aplonis metallica migrate annually from New Guinea to the rainforests of tropical Australia, where they nest communally in single emergent trees (up to 1,000 birds. These aggregations create dense and species-rich faunal "hot-spots", attracting a diverse assemblage of local consumers that utilise this seasonal resource. The starlings nested primarily in poison-dart trees (Antiaris toxicaria near the rainforest-woodland boundary. Surveys underneath these colonies revealed that bird-derived nutrients massively increased densities of soil invertebrates and mammals (primarily wild pigs beneath trees, year-round. Flying invertebrates, nocturnal birds, reptiles, and amphibians congregated beneath the trees when starlings were nesting (the wet-season. Diurnal birds (primarily cockatoos and bush turkeys aggregated beneath the trees during the dry-season to utilise residual nutrients when the starlings were not nesting. The abundance of several taxa was considerably higher (to > 1000-fold under colony trees than under nearby trees. The system strikingly resembles utilisation of bird nesting colonies by predators in other parts of the world but this spectacular system has never been described, emphasizing the continuing need for detailed natural-history studies in tropical Australia.

  12. Advanced Cardiovascular Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, E.E.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Frank-Starling curve (the curvilinear relation between cardiac output (CO) and preload) can be used for optimalization of the blood circulation and tissue oxygenation, in order to decrease morbidity and mortality in high risk surgery and critically ill patients. Measurement of CO and preload

  13. Finding of No Significant Impact: SLC-4 to SLC-6 Replacement Waterline Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-28

    include coastal buckwheat (Eriogonum parv~folium). California sagebrush ( Artemisia calUornica). black sage (Salvia melUera). silver lupine (Lupinus...beach grass * Amsinkia spp. Fiddleneck * Anagallis arvensis Scarlet pimpernel * Arctostaphvlos purissima4 La Purisima manzanita * Artemisia ...Northern mockingbird H Jfi nms polvglottos California thrasher H * H H H Toxostoma redivivum 4 European starling H H H Sturmts vulgaris

  14. Verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli in wild birds and rodents in close proximity to farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva Møller; Skov, Marianne; Madsen, Jesper J.

    2004-01-01

    Wild animals living close to cattle and pig farms (four each) were examined for verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC; also known as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli). The prevalence of VTEC among the 260 samples from wild animals was generally low. However, VTEC isolates from a starling (S...

  15. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. L. S. Shashidhara. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 79 Issue 2 August 2000 pp 61-70. Negative regulation of Ultrabithorax expression by engrailed is required for proper specification of wing development in Drosophila melanogaster · B. Starling Emerald L. S. Shashidhara.

  16. Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids including volume effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Lyklema, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids in the presence of small ions and for non-dilute conditions, by extending the work of Biben and Hansen (1994 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 A345). For a monocomponent system, they included a Carnahan-Starling

  17. A definition of normovolaemia and consequences for cardiovascular control during orthostatic and environmental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truijen, Jasper; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2010-01-01

    not increase further indicating that in the supine resting position the heart operates on the plateau of the Frank-Starling curve which, therefore, may be taken as a functional definition of normovolaemia. Since the capacity of the vascular system surpasses the blood volume, orthostatic and environmental...

  18. Removal (and attempted removal) of material from a Hooded Vulture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relatively little is documented about nest material theft in vultures. We used camera traps to monitor Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus nests for a year. We report camera trap photographs of a starling Lamprotornis sp. removing what appeared to be dung from an inactive Hooded Vulture nest on Cleveland Game ...

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2009-12-09

    Dec 9, 2009 ... For Nostratic dictionaries, see http: starling.rinet.ru/main.html.) As for the plant names found in these old sources, it must be observed that recent advances in archaeobotany (Fuller 2006a,b, 2009a,b) indicate at least three major nuclei of food production in the subcontinent. They can be briefly characterized ...

  20. Eclampsia - a method of management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-02

    Apr 2, 1983 ... position, falling when the head is raised and rising when it is lowered. ... brain water. This latter follows from the increase in filtration pressure in the cerebral capillary which, in accordance with. Starling's hypothesis (Fig. 2), produces an ... and a decrease in the water content of the normal brain. The.

  1. Flexible equation of state for a hard sphere and Lennard–Jones fluid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Many workers, such as Robles and de Haro [13] used Carnahan–Starling (CS) as a reference system. ... for study. 1.1 Motivation for the present work. The disadvantage of old modified equation of state is that it contains more than two model.

  2. Group-size effect on scanning behaviour of Maasai Ostrich Struthio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flocking and predator surveillance in House Sparrows: test of a hypothesis. Animal Behaviour 29: 868–872. Fernández-Juricic, e., SmiTh, r. & kaceLnik, a. 2005. Increasing the costs of conspecific scanning in socially foraging starlings affects vigilance and foraging behaviour. Animal Behaviour 69: 73–81. Fernández-Juricic ...

  3. A practical approach to diagnosing pleural effusion in southern Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Excessive fluid accumulating within the pleural space is a common medical a iction and invariably indicates disease.[1,2] Under physiological conditions fluid enters and exits the pleural space at the same rate.[3] e rate of production is determined by Starling's forces,. i.e. hydrostatic pressure, osmotic pressure and.

  4. Ecology: From Individuals to Collectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    formation in vegetation, and collective behaviour in animal societies and evolutionary theory. .... able management tools to preserve our ecosystems. Be- low, I provide two examples, one from population biol- .... At smaller scales, behavioural ecologists might look at a flock of starlings to investigate their fascinating group.

  5. jfewr ©2017 - jfewr Publications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR OGUNSUSI

    determined bird species abundance and their relationship with habitat variables of tree, shrub and herb ..... 70. Chestnut- winged Starling Onychognatus fulgidus. “ 1. 1. 1. 4. 71. Yellow white- eye. Zosterops senegalensis. Zesteropidae. 10. 9. 6. 72. Splendid Sunbird ..... structure on bird communities in oak and pine.

  6. Monitoring impacts of air pollution: PIXE analysis and histopathological modalities in evaluating relative risks of elemental contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, Sohail; Camer, Gerry Amor; Anwar, Khaleeq; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    Environmental toxicants invariably affect all biological organisms resulting to sufferings ranging from subclinical to debilitating clinical conditions. This novel research aimed to determine the toxic burdens of increased environmental elements in some vital organs/tissues of the wild animals (starling, owl, crow and pigeon), exposed to air polluted environment were assessed using particle induced X-ray emission and histopathological approaches. The presence of significantly elevated amounts of elemental toxicants namely: Aluminum (Al), Chlorine (Cl), Iron (Fe), Potassium (K), Magnesium (Mg), Manganese (Mn), Silicon (Si) and Vanadium (V) from the skin, muscle, lungs, liver and kidney of sampled animals were in concurrence with the observed histopathological changes. The skin of sampled starling, owl, pigeon and crow spotlighted highly significant increase (P birds may as well be afflicting people living within the polluted area. Further assessment to more conclusively demonstrate correlations of current findings to those of the populace within the area is encouraged.

  7. Forest bird and fruit bat populations on Sarigan, Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancy, Steven G.; Craig, Robert J.; Kessler, Curt T.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted the first quantitative surveys of forest bird and bat populations on the uninhabited island of Sarigan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Severe habitat degradation has occurred on Sarigan because of overgrazing by introduced goats and pigs. Planting of coconut palms (Cocos nucifera) for copra production has also eliminated much of the island’s native forest. We recorded five species of forest birds on Sarigan: Micronesian Honeyeater (Myzomela rubratra), Micronesian Megapode (Megapodius laperouse laperouse), Micronesian Starling (Aplonis opaca), Collared Kingfisher (Halcyon chloris), and White-throated Ground Dove (Gallicolumba xanthonura). Estimated population sizes (95% confidence interval) in 1997 were 1,821 (1,617–2,026) for Micronesian Honeyeater, 677 (545–810) for Micronesian Megapode, 497 (319–675) for Micronesian Starling, 107 (82–131) for Collared Kingfisher, and 170 (101–238) for Mariana Fruit Bat (Pteropus mariannus).

  8. Myofilament length dependent activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C. (IIT); (Loyola)

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  9. Statistical mechanics for natural flocks of birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialek, William; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Mora, Thierry; Silvestri, Edmondo; Viale, Massimiliano; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Flocking is a typical example of emergent collective behavior, where interactions between individuals produce collective patterns on the large scale. Here we show how a quantitative microscopic theory for directional ordering in a flock can be derived directly from field data. We construct the minimally structured (maximum entropy) model consistent with experimental correlations in large flocks of starlings. The maximum entropy model shows that local, pairwise interactions between birds are sufficient to correctly predict the propagation of order throughout entire flocks of starlings, with no free parameters. We also find that the number of interacting neighbors is independent of flock density, confirming that interactions are ruled by topological rather than metric distance. Finally, by comparing flocks of different sizes, the model correctly accounts for the observed scale invariance of long-range correlations among the fluctuations in flight direction. PMID:22427355

  10. The Pharmacology of p-Aminopropiophenone in the Detoxification of Cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    administration or its use as a murder weapon. Cyanogenic glycosides can be found in a wide variety of foods and natural products including clover, almonds, lima...79 Starling P.o. >316 79 Red-winged blackbird p.o. 133 (ND) 79 Black-billed magpie P.o. 178 (100-316) 79 Mouse, male i.v. 145 (82-217) 80 Mouse

  11. Experience with adults shapes multisensory representation of social familiarity in the brain of a songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Isabelle; Cousillas, Hugo; Richard, Jean-Pierre; Hausberger, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Social animals learn to perceive their social environment, and their social skills and preferences are thought to emerge from greater exposure to and hence familiarity with some social signals rather than others. Familiarity appears to be tightly linked to multisensory integration. The ability to differentiate and categorize familiar and unfamiliar individuals and to build a multisensory representation of known individuals emerges from successive social interactions, in particular with adult, experienced models. In different species, adults have been shown to shape the social behavior of young by promoting selective attention to multisensory cues. The question of what representation of known conspecifics adult-deprived animals may build therefore arises. Here we show that starlings raised with no experience with adults fail to develop a multisensory representation of familiar and unfamiliar starlings. Electrophysiological recordings of neuronal activity throughout the primary auditory area of these birds, while they were exposed to audio-only or audiovisual familiar and unfamiliar cues, showed that visual stimuli did, as in wild-caught starlings, modulate auditory responses but that, unlike what was observed in wild-caught birds, this modulation was not influenced by familiarity. Thus, adult-deprived starlings seem to fail to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar individuals. This suggests that adults may shape multisensory representation of known individuals in the brain, possibly by focusing the young's attention on relevant, multisensory cues. Multisensory stimulation by experienced, adult models may thus be ubiquitously important for the development of social skills (and of the neural properties underlying such skills) in a variety of species.

  12. Proceedings of the Environmental Research and Development (R&D) technical Workshop Held in San Diego, California on 7-9 November 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    herbivorous insects (e.g., grasshoppers ) and mammals (e.g., voles), and omnivorous mammals (e.g., mice), which in turn will expose animals feeding on...Feare 1984). Consequently, starlings may be exposed to a wide array of contaminants in the grazing (e.g., grasshoppers , catepillars) and detritivore...of identical DNA material between the two sister chromatids of a chromosome. Both micronuclei and sister 160 In Situ Array Figure 7. Mussels cages used

  13. An alternative theoretical approach to escape decision-making: the role of visual cues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javůrková, V.; Šizling, A. L.; Kreisinger, J.; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2012), e32522 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA AV ČR KJB601110803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Flight-initiation distance * Risk-assessment * Predator avoidance * Dabbling ducks * Fiddler-crabs * Behavior * Sensitivity * Vigilance * Starlings * Birds Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  14. The Pathogenesis of Traumatic Coagulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    occur after military trauma may or may not result in different pathophysiological responses when compared with a civilian after a road traffic accident or...and in vitro bleeding time [9]. (2) Dilution. The reversal of Starling forces and con- sequent shifts of interstitial fluid into the vascular © 2014...Corporation, Brain - tree, MA, USA) and ROTEM (TEM International GmbH, Munich, Germany) are being used to guide trauma resuscitation [38, 41]. Minimally

  15. THERRP: a thermodynamic properties program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeds, R.S.

    1977-05-01

    The computer program THERPP, a program that calculates the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons and mixtures of light hydrocarbons is documented. A specific pressure--temperature or pressure--enthalpy grid is input to obtain properties in the desired region. THERPP is a modification of the program HSGC. Thermodynamic properties are calculated using Starling's modification to the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state.

  16. Surface tension of a Yukawa fluid according to mean-field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Norris, Joseph; May, Sylvio

    2017-04-07

    Yukawa fluids consist of particles that interact through a repulsive or attractive Yukawa potential. A surface tension arises at the walls of the container that encloses the fluid or at the interface between two coexisting phases. We calculate that surface tension on the level of mean-field theory, thereby either ignoring the particle size (ideal Yukawa fluid) or accounting for a non-vanishing particle size through a nonideal contribution to the free energy, exemplified either on the level of a lattice gas (lattice Yukawa fluid) or based on the Carnahan-Starling equation of state (Carnahan-Starling Yukawa fluid). Our mean-field results, which do not rely on assuming small gradients of the particle concentrations, become exact in the limit of large temperature and large screening length. They are calculated numerically in the general case and analytically in the two limits of small particle concentration and close to the critical point for a phase-separating system. For a sufficiently small particle concentration, our predicted surface tension is accurate whereas for a phase boundary, we expect good agreement with exact calculations in the limit of a large screening length and if the mean-field model employs the Carnahan-Starling equation of state.

  17. Assessment of fennel aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and their predators in fennel intercropped with cotton with colored fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, F S; Fernandes, F S; Nascimento, A R B; Nascimento Júnior, J L; Malaquias, J B; Silva, C A D

    2012-02-01

    The fennel aphid, Hyadaphis foeniculi (Passerini) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is a major pest of fennel, Foeniculum vulgare Miller in northeast region of Brazil. We hypothesize that intercropping can be used as an alternative pest management strategy to reduce aphid yield loss in fennel. Thus, we investigated the severity of fennel plant damage in relation to infestation by the fennel aphid and predation by Cycloneda sanguinea (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) (spotless lady beetle), green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), and Scymnus spp. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in sole fennel plots and plots of fennel intercropped with cotton with colored fibers. The fennel aphid populations in nontreated plots were significantly larger in sole fennel plots than in intercropped plots. The highest densities of C. sanguinea, green lacewings and Scymnus spp., associated with the suppression of fennel aphid populations was found in fennel in the intercropping systems. Fennel aphids reduced the fennel seed yield by 80% in the sole fennel plots compared with approximately 30% for all intercropping systems. The results obtained in this research are of practical significance for designing appropriate strategies for fennel aphid control in fennel-cotton intercropping systems. In summary, intercropping fennel with cotton with colored fibers apparently promoted biocontrol of fennel aphid in fennel.

  18. The 17 GHz active region number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A. [IP and D-Universidade do Vale do Paraíba-UNIVAP, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Costa, J. E. R. [CEA, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A. [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, São Paulo (Brazil); Shibasaki, K., E-mail: caius@univap.br [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  19. Presence of exotic birds in San Luis Potosi city, Mexican Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-Albores, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We recorded 12 exotic bird species in San Luis Potosi, Mexico and adjacent areas. Obtained data were collected during the period August 2012 to August 2013. From the total of recorded species, eight are confirmations (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus, Cairina moschata, Bubulcus ibis, Columba livia, Sturnus vulgaris, Turdus rufopalliatus, Quiscalus mexicanus and Passer domesticus and four are new records (Aratinga canicularis, Amazona oratrix, A. autumnalis and Cyanocorax yncas. Although not all exotic species represent a risk because of the lack of the necessary resources for the establishment of abundant viable populations, it is important to publicize their status in the region. Therefore, knowing the presence of exotic species in a new distribution area is important for monitoring its establishment and colonization, and defining management, control and eradication programs of these species, along with environmental education programs that would lead to a better understanding of impacts that these species can cause.

  20. EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION ON ANIMAL DIVERSITY IN BALI, INDONESSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Kasa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bali is a small beautiful tropical island of Indonesia archipelago, lies between the continent of Asia and Australia, as well as the Indian and Pacific Ocean. As a tropical archipelago, many kinds of biodiversity can be found. The island of Bali in particular, there are typical animal diversity that could not be investigated beyond such island, such as, Bali cattle, Bali dog, Bali starling and others. As time goes on, the existance of such biodiversity decreases in both body weight and population number. Both global warming/climate change and land use change are the main factors affecting such phenomenon. This study has been conducted by employing field observation as well as literature study. It was found that, the quality of purebred Bali cattle species decreases genetically that could be notified of smaller bodysize for both male and female. Land use change of agriculture activity to the hotels, house of living, roads and other infrastructures are the main factors for Bali cattle existence. For typical famous bird of Balistarling, the problem is because of deforestation which cause natural habitat loss, due to land use change for agricultural activity and house building by local people. In case of Bali dog, the mad dog of rabies is just introduce and spreading over Bali island, whichis formerly the island of Bali has been recognised as free zone area of the rabies. As consequence, suffering dogs must be eliminated by  mass killing cause decrease total number of such poor dog. Overall, it could be concluded that environmental degradations of land use change, deforestation and desease are the main causes of biodiversity decreasing number of the Bali cattle, Bali white starling and Bali dog respectively, beside global warming/climate change natural disaster. Key words: Environment, Bali cattle, Bali starling, Bali dog, Bali island.

  1. EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION ON ANIMAL DIVERSITY IN BALI, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Waya Kasa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bali is a small beautiful tropical island of Indonesia archipelago lies betweens the continent of Asia and Australia as well as the Indian and Pacific Ocean. As a tropical archipelago, of course, many kinds of biodiversity can be found over there. In the island of Bali in particular, there are typical animal diversity that could not be investigated beyond such island, such as, Bali cattle, Bali dog, Bali white starling and others. As time goes on, the existance of such biodiversity decreases in both quality and quantity. Both global warming/climate change and land use change are the main factors affecting such phenomenon. This study has been conducted by employing field observation as well as literature study. It was found that, the quality of purebred Bali cattle species decreases genetically that could be notified of smaller bodysize for both male and female. Land use change of agriculture activity to the hotels, house of living, roads and other infrastructures are the main factors for Bali cattle existancy. For typical famous bird of white starling, the problem is because of deforestation which cause natural habitat loss, due to land use change for agricultural activity and house building by local people. In case of Bali dog, the mad dog of rabies is just introduce and spreading over Bali island, whichis formerly the island of Bali has been recognised as free zone area of the rabies. As consequency, suffering dogs must be eliminated by a mass killing cause decrease total number of such poor dog. Overall, it could be concluded that environmental degradations of land use change, deforestation and desease are the main causes of biodiversity decreasing number of the Bali cattle, Bali white starling and Bali dog respectively, beside global warming/climate change natural disaster.

  2. Effects of high-altitude exercise training on contractile function of rat skinned cardiomyocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, O; Aït Mou, Y; Goret, L; Vassort, G; Dauzat, M; Lacampagne, A; Tanguy, S; Obert, P

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have questioned whether there is an improved cardiac function after high-altitude training. Accordingly, the present study was designed specifically to test whether this apparent blunted response of the whole heart to training can be accounted for by altered mechanical properties at the cellular level. Adult rats were trained for 5 weeks under normoxic (N, NT for sedentary and trained animals, respectively) or hypobaric hypoxic (H, HT) conditions. Cardiac morphology and function were evaluated by echocardiography. Calcium Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile machinery was estimated in skinned cardiomyocytes isolated from the left ventricular (LV) sub-epicardium (Epi) and sub-endocardium (Endo) at short and long sarcomere lengths (SL). Cardiac remodelling was harmonious (increase in wall thickness with chamber dilatation) in NT rats and disharmonious (hypertrophy without chamber dilatation) in HT rats. Contrary to NT rats, HT rats did not exhibit enhancement in global cardiac performance evaluated by echocardiography. Stretch- dependent Ca2+ sensitization of the myofilaments (cellular index of the Frank-Starling mechanism) increased from Epi to Endo in N rats. Training in normoxic conditions further increased this stretch-dependent Ca2+ sensitization. Chronic hypoxia did not significantly affect myofibrilar Ca2+ sensitivity. In contrast, high-altitude training decreased Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofilaments at both SL, mostly in Endo cells, resulting in a loss of the transmural gradient of the stretch-dependent Ca2+ sensitization. Expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms was affected both by training and chronic hypoxia but did not correlate with mechanical data. Training at sea level increased the transmural gradient of stretch-dependent Ca2+ sensitization of the myofilaments, accounting for an improved Frank-Starling mechanism. High-altitude training depressed myofilament response to Ca2+, especially in the Endo layer. This led to a reduction in

  3. Prevalence and multidrug resistance pattern of Salmonella isolated from resident wild birds of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al Faruq

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Salmonellosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases, and the presence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella in wild birds is global public health threat. Throughout the last decades, multidrug resistance of Salmonella spp. has increased, particularly in developing countries. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella spp. and antimicrobial resistance pattern against Salmonella spp. from two species of resident wild birds namely house crow (Corvus splendens and Asian pied starling (Gracupica contra. Materials and Methods: Samples were collected from cloacal swabs of house crows and Asian pied starling for isolating Salmonella spp. (bacteriological culture methods followed by antimicrobial susceptibility testing (disk diffusion method against Salmonella spp. isolates during March to December 2014. Results: The prevalence of Salmonella in Asian pied starling and house crows were 67% and 65%, respectively. Within the category of samples from different species, the variation in prevalence was not varied significantly (p>0.05. Isolated Salmonella spp. was tested for resistance to six different antimicrobial agents. Among six antimicrobial tested, 100% resistance were found to penicillin, oxacillin, and clindamycin followed by erythromycin (50-93%, kanamycin (7-20%, and cephalothin (30-67% from both species of birds. Kanamycin remained sensitive in (70-73%, cephalothin (26-70%, and erythromycin appeared to be (0-30% sensitive against Salmonella spp. isolates. Isolated Salmonella spp. was multidrug resistant up to three of the six antimicrobials tested. Conclusion: It can be said that the rational use of antimicrobials needs to be adopted in the treatment of disease for livestock, poultry, and human of Bangladesh to limit the emergence of drug resistance to Salmonella spp.

  4. Alteraciones de la presión oncótica en el gran quemado. Estudio clínico experimental

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez de la Fe, José Manuel

    1991-01-01

    En 1861, Grahan menciona la fuerza ejercida por las sustancias coloides del plasma; esta noción fue precisada por Starling en 1896, quien estableció la relación entre la filtración y las diferentes presiones que intervienen a nivel de los capilares. De 1922 a 1924, Krought evoca la existencia de una ligazón entre la baja de la presión oncótica (PO) y ciertas formas de edema agudo de pulmón (EAP), esta relación fue verificada ex...

  5. Perancangan dan Pembuatan Aplikasi Pengenalan Batik "Indonesiaku" Melalui Permainan Berbasis Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cornelius Andika

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Game atau yang biasa disebut permainan merupakan aktivitas terstruktur yang biasanya bertujuan untuk menghibur. Seiring berkembangnya zaman tidak dapat dipungkiri bahwa game terus berkembang pesat. Game itu sendiri telah dipergunakan untuk berbagai macam jenis keperluan, termasuk pendidikan. Jenis konsol yang digunakan juga bervariasi. Di sini penulis mencoba mengembangkan suatu permainan bertema pengenalan budaya batik berjudul "Indonesiaku" dengan tujuan mengenalkan budaya batik di Indonesia yang merupakan warisan budaya bangsa. Permainan ini berbasis Android dan dikembangkan dengan framework Starling serta aplikasi Adobe Flash Builder. Pembuatan batik dalam permainan ini memiliki 4 tahap yaitu nglowong, nembok, medeli, dan nglorod. Tahap tahap tersebut digunakan sebagai simulasi saat membuat batik tulis.

  6. Plasma-to-ascitic fluid transport rate of albumin in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Relation to intraperitoneal albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Ring-Larsen, H; Lassen, N A

    1983-01-01

    was on the average 0.22 of that of plasma and directly correlated to the plasma concentration (rlin = 0.68, P less than 0.01). The hydrostatic pressure difference across the splanchnic microvasculature (assessed as wedged hepatic vein minus inferior vena caval pressure) was directly correlated to the effective...... (plasma minus ascitic fluid) oncotic pressure (rlin = 0.74, P less than 0.001) but significantly higher than that (P less than 0.005), indicating a 'non-equilibrium' in the splanchnic Starling forces. The results point to a multivariate genesis and perpetuation of cirrhotic ascites as laid down...

  7. Songbirds use pulse tone register in two voices to generate low-frequency sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Cooper, Brenton G.; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2007-01-01

    , the syrinx, is unknown. We present the first high-speed video records of the intact syrinx during induced phonation. The syrinx of anaesthetized crows shows a vibration pattern of the labia similar to that of the human vocal fry register. Acoustic pulses result from short opening of the labia, and pulse...... generation alternates between the left and right sound sources. Spontaneously calling crows can also generate similar pulse characteristics with only one sound generator. Airflow recordings in zebra finches and starlings show that pulse tone sounds can be generated unilaterally, synchronously...

  8. ANYmal - A Highly Mobile and Dynamic Quadrupedal Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-09

    predecessor StarlETH [10], the MIT cheetah [9], IIT HyQ [7], Big Dog [6] or other legged systems, the leg links of ANYmal are built with an offset such...advantages of the big range of motion as the legs can be moved relatively far in all directions. Using a 50% duty cycle gait, the machine achieves a...Detailed measurements unveil that even full-speed running requires less than 280 W, resulting in an autonomy of more than 2 h. I. INTRODUCTION Legged

  9. A Respiratory Airway-Inspired Low-Pressure, Self-Regulating Valve for Drip Irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruo-Qian; Winter, Amos G.; GEAR Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    One of the most significant barriers to achieving large-scale dissemination of drip irrigation is the cost of the pump and power system. An effective means of reducing power consumption is by reducing pumping pressure. The principle source of pressure drop in a drip system is the high flow resistance in the self-regulating flow resistors installed at the outlets of the pips, which evenly distribute water over a field. Traditional architectures require a minimum pressure of ~1 bar to maintain a constant flow rate; our aim is to reduce this pressure by 90% and correspondingly lower pumping power to facilitate the creation of low-cost, off-grid drip irrigation systems. This study presents a new Starling resistor architecture that enables the adjustment of flow rate with a fixed minimum pressure demand of ~0.1 bar. A Starling resistor is a flexible tube subjected to a transmural pressure, which collapses the tube to restrict flow. Our design uses a single pressure source to drive flow through the flexible tube and apply a transmural pressure. Flow into the flexible tube is restricted with a needle valve, to increase the transmural pressure. Using this device, a series of experiments were conducted with different flexible tube diameters, lengths and wall thickness. We found that the resistance of the needle valve changes flow rate but not the minimum transmural pressure required to collapse the tube. A lumped-parameter model was developed to capture the relationships between valve openings, pressure, and flow rates.

  10. Detecting Methemoglobinemia in Animals with a Drop of Blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni G Patton

    Full Text Available A major concern during pesticide development and use is the impact on non-target species, such as raptors or domestic cats and dogs. Sodium nitrite and para-aminopropiophenone (PAPP are two toxicants currently being studied for the control of invasive species, such as starlings and feral swine. When given to an animal these compounds oxidize hemoglobin, which renders it unable to carry oxygen resulting in methemoglobinemia. This study developed a method to estimate methemoglobin levels in mammals and birds by examining the efficacy of sodium nitrite to induce the conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin. Varying concentrations of sodium nitrite were added to aliquots of coyote, vole, feral swine, starling, and duck blood, collected from captive animals. The blood samples were analyzed spectrophotometrically to determine percent methemoglobin and digitally to determine red color values (RCV associated with different methemoglobin levels. The avian and mammalian blood reached 100% methemoglobin levels at 200 mM and 15 mM sodium nitrite, respectively. All animals had similar RCV for a given percent methemoglobin. In conclusion, this study developed a procedure to quickly determine methemoglobin levels in mammals and birds. Furthermore, percent methemoglobin can be estimated with one standard curve from any animal species and an image of a blood spot. The technique will be useful during field studies, in agricultural areas, or in a veterinarian's office for the rapid diagnosis of methemoglobinemia in non-target animals that have eaten toxicants/baits or baited animals.

  11. Boundary Information Inflow Enhances Correlation in Flocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Ginelli, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The most conspicuous trait of collective animal behavior is the emergence of highly ordered structures. Less obvious to the eye, but perhaps more profound a signature of self-organization, is the presence of long-range spatial correlations. Experimental data on starling flocks in 3D show that the exponent ruling the decay of the velocity correlation function, C(r)˜1/rγ, is extremely small, γ≪1. This result can neither be explained by equilibrium field theory nor by off-equilibrium theories and simulations of active systems. Here, by means of numerical simulations and theoretical calculations, we show that a dynamical field applied to the boundary of a set of Heisenberg spins on a 3D lattice gives rise to a vanishing exponent γ, as in starling flocks. The effect of the dynamical field is to create an information inflow from border to bulk that triggers long-range spin-wave modes, thus giving rise to an anomalously long-ranged correlation. The biological origin of this phenomenon can be either exogenous—information produced by environmental perturbations is transferred from boundary to bulk of the flock—or endogenous—the flock keeps itself in a constant state of dynamical excitation that is beneficial to correlation and collective response.

  12. Integrating Medical Simulation Into the Physician Assistant Physiology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixin; Lopes, John; Zhou, Joseph Yi; Xu, Biao

    2016-12-01

    Medical simulation has recently been used in medical education, and evidence indicates that it is a valuable tool for teaching and evaluation. Very few studies have evaluated the integration of medical simulation in medical physiology education, particularly in PA programs. This study was designed to assess the value of integrating medical simulation into the PA physiology curriculum. Seventy-five students from the PA program at Central Michigan University participated in this study. Mannequin-based simulation was used to simulate a patient with hemorrhagic shock and congestive heart failure to demonstrate the Frank-Starling force and cardiac function curve. Before and after the medical simulation, students completed a questionnaire as a self-assessment. A knowledge test was also delivered after the simulation. Our study demonstrated a significant improvement in student confidence in understanding congestive heart failure, hemorrhagic shock, and the Frank-Starling curve after the simulation. Medical simulation may be an effective way to enhance basic science learning experiences for students and an ideal supplement to traditional, lecture-based teaching in PA education.

  13. Linking social and vocal brains: could social segregation prevent a proper development of a central auditory area in a female songbird?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Cousillas

    Full Text Available Direct social contact and social interaction affect speech development in human infants and are required in order to maintain perceptual abilities; however the processes involved are still poorly known. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that social segregation during development would prevent the proper development of a central auditory area, using a "classical" animal model of vocal development, a songbird. Based on our knowledge of European starling, we raised young female starlings with peers and only adult male tutors. This ensured that female would show neither social bond with nor vocal copying from males. Electrophysiological recordings performed when these females were adult revealed perceptual abnormalities: they presented a larger auditory area, a lower proportion of specialized neurons and a larger proportion of generalist sites than wild-caught females, whereas these characteristics were similar to those observed in socially deprived (physically separated females. These results confirmed and added to earlier results for males, suggesting that the degree of perceptual deficiency reflects the degree of social separation. To our knowledge, this report constitutes the first evidence that social segregation can, as much as physical separation, alter the development of a central auditory area.

  14. Effects of tannins on fruit selection in three southern African frugivorous birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zungu, Manqoba M; Downs, Colleen T

    2015-02-01

    Tannins are common secondary compounds in plant material and are known for their ability to bind to protein which reduces nitrogen availability in the diet. In fruits, these compounds are responsible for their astringency which is thought to result in reduced food intake. In this study, the repellent effects of tannins were examined in three species of frugivorous birds: red-winged starlings Onychognathus morio, speckled mousebirds Colius striatus and Cape white-eyes Zosterops virens. Birds were fed artificial fruit diets containing varying levels of tannins in paired choice tests with the amount of food eaten by birds used to determine preference. Red-winged starlings were attracted to the control diet, indifferent to the medium tannin diet and deterred by the high tannin diet whereas speckled mousebirds and Cape white-eyes were not deterred at all concentrations. The discrepancy in the results was attributed to differences in taste sensitivity, tolerance levels and detoxification mechanisms of secondary compounds between species. Because fruit selection and ultimately fruit removal rates affect plant community composition, the disparity in the results suggests that frugivorous birds do not contribute equally to plant community dynamics. However, plant secondary compounds in fruits are diverse and their effects are similarly diverse and there is potential that different groups of secondary compounds generate disparate effects. Similar studies on other types of secondary compounds may thus contribute towards a broader understanding of the role of secondary compounds in mediating fruit-frugivore interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Titin isoform variance and length dependence of activation in skinned bovine cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Norio; Wu, Yiming; Farman, Gerrie; Irving, Thomas C; Granzier, Henk

    2003-11-15

    We have explored the role of the giant elastic protein titin in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart by measuring the sarcomere length (SL) dependence of activation in skinned cardiac muscles with different titin-based passive stiffness characteristics. We studied muscle from the bovine left ventricle (BLV), which expresses a high level of a stiff titin isoform, and muscle from the bovine left atrium (BLA), which expresses more compliant titin isoforms. Passive tension was also varied in each muscle type by manipulating the pre-history of stretch prior to activation. We found that the SL-dependent increases in Ca2+ sensitivity and maximal Ca2+-activated tension were markedly more pronounced when titin-based passive tension was high. Small-angle X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that the SL dependence of reduction of interfilament lattice spacing is greater in BLV than in BLA and that the lattice spacing is coupled with titin-based passive tension. These results support the notion that titin-based passive tension promotes actomyosin interaction by reducing the lattice spacing. This work indicates that titin may be a factor involved in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart by promoting actomyosin interaction in response to stretch.

  16. Índice de intensidade de infecção adaptado ao estudo de manchas de sementes de arroz Index of infection intensity adapted for the study of spotted rice seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaciro Soave

    1988-01-01

    State of São Paulo, Brazil, in 1982/83, were used. Each trial had the same 16 cultivars with four replications, totalizing 64 samples per site. Seeds of each sample were visually separated in one of four categories: n0 = spotless seeds; n1 = up to 5% of the seed surface spotted; n2 = from 6 to 25% of seed surface spotted; and n3 = over 25% of the seed surface spotted. The number of seeds was counted in each category in order to calculate the index of infection intensity. The same seed samples were separated in two groups: spotted and spotless seeds, independently of the surface area attacked. The number of seeds in each group was counted in order to calculate the percentage of spotted seeds. After the statistical analysis (F test and correlation performed, the results showed highly significant correlation between both methods, and the so called "spot intensity index" presented better discrimination among cultivars than the percentage of spotted seeds. The authors suggest the use of the new index for selection of rice cultivars aiming to less spotted seeds.

  17. Floral polymorphism and the fitness implications of attracting pollinating and florivorous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Marinus L; Ellis, Allan G

    2014-01-01

    Floral polymorphism is frequently attributed to pollinator-mediated selection. Multiple studies, however, have revealed the importance of non-pollinating visitors in floral evolution. Using the polymorphic annual daisy Ursinia calenduliflora, this study investigated the importance of different insect visitors, and their effects on fitness, in the maintenance of floral polymorphism. The spatial structure of a discrete floral polymorphism was characterized based on the presence/absence of anthocyanin floret spots in U. calenduliflora. A 3-year observational study was then conducted in polymorphic populations to investigate differences in visitation rates of dominant visitors to floral morphs. Experiments were performed to explore the floral preference of male and female Megapalpus capensis (the dominant insect visitor) and their effectiveness as pollinators. Next, floral damage by antagonistic florivores and the reproductive success of the two floral morphs were surveyed in multiple populations and years. Floral polymorphism in U. calenduliflora was structured spatially, as were insect visitation patterns. Megapalpus capensis males were the dominant visitors and exhibited strong preference for the spotted morph in natural and experimental observations. While this may indicate potential fitness benefits for the spotted morph, female fitness did not differ between floral morphs. However, as M. capensis males are very efficient at exporting U. calenduliflora pollen, their preference may likely increase the reproductive fitness of the spotted morph through male fitness components. The spotted morph, however, also suffered significantly greater costs due to ovule predation by florivores than the spotless morph. The results suggest that pollinators and florivores may potentially exert antagonistic selection that could contribute to the maintenance of floral polymorphism across the range of U. calenduliflora. The relative strength of selection imposed by each agent is

  18. Compressed liquid densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel; Galicia-Luna, Luis A.; Camacho-Camacho, Luis E.

    2007-01-01

    (p, ρ, T) properties were determined in liquid phase for 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainty is estimated to be lower than ±0.2 kg . m -3 for the experimental densities. Nitrogen and water were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. Experimental densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol were correlated with a short empirical equation and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations were reported. Published densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol are compared with values calculated with the BWRS EoS using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with available correlations for 1-butanol and 2-butanol

  19. Density measurements of liquid 2-propanol at temperatures between (280 and 393) K and at pressures up to 10 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringari, Paolo; Scalabrin, Giancarlo; Valtz, A.; Richon, D.

    2009-01-01

    Liquid densities for 2-propanol have been measured at T = (280, 300, 325, 350, 375, and 393) K from about atmospheric pressure up to 10 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The period of vibration has been converted into density using the Forced Path Mechanical Calibration method. The R134a has been used as reference fluid for T ≤ 350 K and water for T > 350 K. The uncertainty of the measurements is lower than ±0.05%. The measured liquid densities have been correlated with a Starling BWR equation with an overall AAD of 0.025%. The same BWR equation agrees within an AAD lower than 0.2% with the experimental values available in the literature over the same temperature and pressure range

  20. A definition of normovolaemia and consequences for cardiovascular control during orthostatic and environmental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truijen, Jasper; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2010-01-01

    stress including bed rest/microgravity, exercise and training, thermal loading, illness, and trauma/haemorrhage is likely to restrict venous return and Q. Consequently the cardiovascular responses are determined primarily by their effect on the central blood volume. Thus during environmental stress, flow......The Frank-Starling mechanism describes the relationship between stroke volume and preload to the heart, or the volume of blood that is available to the heart--the central blood volume. Understanding the role of the central blood volume for cardiovascular control has been complicated by the fact...... redistribution becomes dependent on sympathetic activation affecting not only skin and splanchnic blood flow, but also flow to skeletal muscles and the brain. This review addresses the hypothesis that deviations from normovolaemia significantly influence these cardiovascular responses....

  1. An anesthetic management of negative pressure pulmonary edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti Raj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE is one of the common complications of upper airway obstruction seen by anesthesiologist during either in induction or emergence sometimes both. Patients who have experienced NPPE are generally healthy without comorbidities. NPPE is a result of marked decrease in intrathoracic pressure caused by ventilator efforts against a closed glottis resulting in disruption of normal intravascular Starling mechanism, leading to transudation of intravascular protein, and fluids into the pulmonary interstitium. The onset of NPPE is usually rapid and without prompt recognition and intervention, the outcome can be fatal. This case report is of a 40-year-old female adult, who underwent right-sided percutaneous nephrolithotomy for stone in the right kidney otherwise uncomplicated surgical procedure.

  2. On the Generalization Capabilities of the Ten-Parameter Jiles-Atherton Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Maria Lozito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes an analysis on the generalization capabilities for the modified version of the classic Jiles-Atherton model for magnetic hysteresis. The modified model takes into account the use of dynamic parameterization, as opposed to the classic model where the parameters are constant. Two different dynamic parameterizations are taken into account: a dependence on the excitation and a dependence on the response. The identification process is performed by using a novel nonlinear optimization technique called Continuous Flock-of-Starling Optimization Cube (CFSO3, an algorithm belonging to the class of swarm intelligence. The algorithm exploits parallel architecture and uses a supervised strategy to alternate between exploration and exploitation capabilities. Comparisons between the obtained results are presented at the end of the paper.

  3. Nitric oxide improves the hemodynamic performance of the hypoxic goldfish (Carassius auratus) heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imbrogno, Sandra; Capria, C.; Tota, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    nitric oxide (NO) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Cardiac performance was examined both under basal (constant preload and afterload) and loading conditions, i.e. preload-induced increases in stroke volume (SV) and hence cardiac output at constant afterload (the Frank–Starling response). Hypoxic......Goldfish tolerate prolonged and severe hypoxia, thus representing a well-suited model to study the maintenance of cardiac function when O2 availability represents a limiting factor. Using a working heart preparation, we explored the role of the intracardiac nitric oxide synthase (NOS)- derived...... complemented by Western blotting analysis which revealed increased expressions of NOS and hypoxia inducible factor α(HIF-1α). In conclusion, we demonstrated that intracardiac NO/NOS enhances goldfish heart performance, remarkably expanding its hypoxic tolerance....

  4. Mechanical stimulation in the engineering of heart muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Norman Yu; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2016-01-15

    Recreating the beating heart in the laboratory continues to be a formidable bioengineering challenge. The fundamental feature of the heart is its pumping action, requiring considerable mechanical forces to compress a blood filled chamber with a defined in- and outlet. Ventricular output crucially depends on venous loading of the ventricles (preload) and on the force generated by the preloaded ventricles to overcome arterial blood pressure (afterload). The rate of contraction is controlled by the spontaneously active sinus node and transmission of its electrical impulses into the ventricles. The underlying principles for these physiological processes are described by the Frank-Starling mechanism and Bowditch phenomenon. It is essential to consider these principles in the design and evaluation of tissue engineered myocardium. This review focuses on current strategies to evoke mechanical loading in hydrogel-based heart muscle engineering. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Non-Newtonian Mathematical Model and Numerical Simulations for the Blood Flow in Capillary Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balazs ALBERT

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, taking into consideration the rheological Cross type non-Newtonian model, we elaborate an axial-symmetric mathematical model for the blood flow in capillary vessel with adequate numeric algorithms. We take into account the elastic and porous behavior of the vessel wall which leads to a more realistic approach of the problem. We also accept that the change of substances through these vessels complies with the Starling hypothesis. This hypothesis states that the mass debit through the capillary wall is proportional to the pressure difference between outside and inside the capillaries. The existence of a slip condition along the permeable surface is also accepted using the results of Beavers and Joseph. The numerical experiments are made using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.3. Some numerical results with respect to the velocity field, pressure variation and the wall shear stress are presented.

  6. Avances recientes en HIV/SIDA: Patogénesis, historia natural y carga viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael E Campo

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of recent investigations have given us a new understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV infection. This findings provide us with a kinetic model of pathogenesis in which continuous, high-grade viral replication. This findings provide us with a kinetic model of pathogenesis in which continuous, high-grade viral replication is the principal force driving the destruction of CD4 lymphocytes. This knowledge will lead us to design better treatment strategies directed to curtail viral replication and prevent the emergence of viral resistance, and the use of combination antiretroviral therapy is a first example of these new strategies. The concept of viral load is introduced, and we discuss the usefulness of viral load in the clinical prognosis of this disease, and its use as an aid in the decision-making process when starling or mordifyng antiretroviral therapy in our patients. (Rev Med Hered 1996; 7: 182-188.

  7. Density distributions and depth in flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. M.; Turner, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that interactions in flocks of birds do not involve a characteristic length scale. Bird flocks have also been revealed to have an inhomogeneous density distribution, with the density of birds near the border greater than near the centre. We introduce a strictly metric-free model for collective behaviour that incorporates a distributed motional bias, providing control of the density distribution. A simple version of this model is then able to provide a good fit to published data for the density variation across flocks of Starlings. We find that it is necessary for individuals on the edge of the flock to have an inward motional bias but that birds in the interior of the flock instead must have an outward bias. We discuss the ability of individuals to determine their depth within a flock and show how this might be achieved by relatively simple analysis of their visual environment.

  8. Boundary information inflow enhances correlation in flocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Ginelli, Francesco

    2013-04-19

    The most conspicuous trait of collective animal behavior is the emergence of highly ordered structures. Less obvious to the eye, but perhaps more profound a signature of self-organization, is the presence of long-range spatial correlations. Experimental data on starling flocks in 3D show that the exponent ruling the decay of the velocity correlation function, C(r)~1/r(γ), is extremely small, γflocks. The effect of the dynamical field is to create an information inflow from border to bulk that triggers long-range spin-wave modes, thus giving rise to an anomalously long-ranged correlation. The biological origin of this phenomenon can be either exogenous-information produced by environmental perturbations is transferred from boundary to bulk of the flock-or endogenous-the flock keeps itself in a constant state of dynamical excitation that is beneficial to correlation and collective response.

  9. Compressed liquid densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galicia-Luna, Luis A. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: lgalicial@ipn.mx; Camacho-Camacho, Luis E. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-02-15

    (p, {rho}, T) properties were determined in liquid phase for 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainty is estimated to be lower than {+-}0.2 kg . m{sup -3} for the experimental densities. Nitrogen and water were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. Experimental densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol were correlated with a short empirical equation and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations were reported. Published densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol are compared with values calculated with the BWRS EoS using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with available correlations for 1-butanol and 2-butanol.

  10. FOD impact testing of composite fan blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of impact tests on large, fiber composite fan blades for aircraft turbofan engine applications are discussed. Solid composite blades of two different sizes and designs were tested. Both graphite/epoxy and boron/epoxy were evaluated. In addition, a spar-shell blade design was tested that had a boron/epoxy shell bonded to a titanium spar. All blades were tested one at a time in a rotating arm rig to simulate engine operating conditions. Impacting media included small gravel, two inch diameter ice balls, gelatin, and RTV foam-simulated birds, as well as starlings and pigeons. The results showed little difference in performance between the graphite and boron/epoxy blades. The results also indicate that composite blades may be able to tolerate ice ball and small bird impacts but need improvement to tolerate birds in the small duck and larger category.

  11. Impact testing on composite fan blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of impact tests on large, fiber composite fan blades for aircraft turbofan engine applications are discussed. Solid composite blades of two different sizes and designs were tested. Both graphite/epoxy and boron/epoxy were evaluated. In addition, a spar-shell blade design was tested that had a boron/epoxy shell bonded to a titanium spar. All blades were tested one at a time in a rotating arm rig to simulate engine operating conditions. Impacting media included small gravel, two inch diameter ice balls, gelatin and RTV foam-simulated birds, as well as starlings and pigeons. The results showed little difference in performance between the graphite and boron/epoxy blades. The results also indicate that composite blades may be able to tolerate ice ball and small bird impacts but need improvement to tolerate birds in the small duck and larger category.

  12. In vitro assessment of cardiac performance after irradiation using an isolated working rat heart preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Laarse, A. van der; Ravels, F.J.M. van; Wermeskerken, A.-M. van; Verhoeve, H.R.; Graaf, B.W. de; Leer, J.W.H.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on cardiac function was assessed using an isolated working rat heart preparation. The animals were given single doses of X-rays in the range 15-30 Gy to their hearts. Cardiac output (CO = aortic flow + coronary flow), heart weight and body weight were followed for a period of 10 months after treatment. Irradiation led to a decrease in cardiac function. This reduction was dose-dependent and progressive with time after treatment. The shape of the Frank-Starling curves constructed for irradiated hearts suggests a loss of contractile function of the myocardium. Coronary flow rates measured in 'working' hearts and in 'Langendorff' hearts were not significantly changed by the irradiation treatment. The isolated working rat heart preparation proved to be a simple and suitable animal model for the investigation of irradiation-induced cardiotoxicity. (author)

  13. Die argumentatiewe funksie van Jakobus 1:9-11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. P. Wolmarans

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The connection between James 1:9-11 and the preceding verses is disputed among commentators. According to the disjointedness hypothesis, there is no connection. Variants of the unitary hypothesis connect 1:9-11 either to 1:2-4 or to 1:5-8. This article proposes a new variant of the unitary hypothesis, namely that 1:9-11 is part of a deductive argument starling at 1:2. The author of James wants to prove that believers suffering from poverty should be glad when they suffer, because they will receive everlasting life. He proves this by supplying an instance of modus ponens (1:2-8 as well as an instance of modus tollens (1:9-11. James 1:9-11 is therefore connected to the previous section as a demonstration that the antithesis to the poverty of the oppressed believer is everlasting death.

  14. DESBUNDE

    OpenAIRE

    DESBUNDE, coletivo

    2016-01-01

    Ficha Técnica
Idealização e Argumento: Juliana DrummondDireção Geral: Juliana Drummond e Abaetê QueirozRoteiro: Sérgio MaggioDesigner: Jana Ferreira e Caetano Maia MatosLuz: Abaetê QueirozSom: Marcelo Dal Col e Sascha KratzerAtores-criadores: Tullio Guimarães, Guilherme Monteiro, Tulio Starling, Kael Studart e Roustang Carrilho.Coreografias: Juliana Drummond e Lívia BennetPreparação Corporal: Lívia BennetDireção de Arte (cenário e figurino): Maíra CarvalhoCenotécnico: Rodrigo LélisProdução ex...

  15. Effect of muscle length on cross-bridge kinetics in intact cardiac trabeculae at body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Xu, Ying; Davis, Jonathan P; Campbell, Kenneth S; Janssen, Paul M L

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic force generation in cardiac muscle, which determines cardiac pumping activity, depends on both the number of sarcomeric cross-bridges and on their cycling kinetics. The Frank-Starling mechanism dictates that cardiac force development increases with increasing cardiac muscle length (corresponding to increased ventricular volume). It is, however, unclear to what extent this increase in cardiac muscle length affects the rate of cross-bridge cycling. Previous studies using permeabilized cardiac preparations, sub-physiological temperatures, or both have obtained conflicting results. Here, we developed a protocol that allowed us to reliably and reproducibly measure the rate of tension redevelopment (k(tr); which depends on the rate of cross-bridge cycling) in intact trabeculae at body temperature. Using K(+) contractures to induce a tonic level of force, we showed the k(tr) was slower in rabbit muscle (which contains predominantly β myosin) than in rat muscle (which contains predominantly α myosin). Analyses of k(tr) in rat muscle at optimal length (L(opt)) and 90% of optimal length (L(90)) revealed that k(tr) was significantly slower at L(opt) (27.7 ± 3.3 and 27.8 ± 3.0 s(-1) in duplicate analyses) than at L(90) (45.1 ± 7.6 and 47.5 ± 9.2 s(-1)). We therefore show that k(tr) can be measured in intact rat and rabbit cardiac trabeculae, and that the k(tr) decreases when muscles are stretched to their optimal length under near-physiological conditions, indicating that the Frank-Starling mechanism not only increases force but also affects cross-bridge cycling kinetics.

  16. Population Densities of Birds Breeding in Urbanized Habitats in the Grabiszyn District in the City of Wrocław

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopij Grzegorz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out in 2010 by mean of simplified version of the mapping method. The study area (395 ha was located close to the city centre. It comprised a mosaic of urbanized habitats, with a clear dominance of green areas, such as parks (41.1 ha, gardens, cemeteries and tree clumps. A total of 48 breeding bird species were recorded in the whole study area. The most common (<25 pairs/100 ha were Passer domesticus, Passer montanus, Sturnus vulgaris, Parus caeruleus, Parus major, Apus apus and Columba livia. Numerous (7-15 pairs/100 ha were also the following species: Columba palumbus, Turdus pilaris, Sylvia atricapilla, Serinus serinus, Turdus merula and Pica pica. Insectivorous birds were the most common birds constituting 63.3%, and granivorous -32.6% of all pairs recorded. Most birds nested in tree holes (39.3%, in/on buildings (30.2% and in trees/shrubs (25.6%. Distribution of breeding pairs of 23 bird species was presented on maps. Population trends for 17 species were documented. Rapid increase in numbers of Turdus pilaris, Corvus cornix and Phoenicurus phoenicurus and decrease of Pica pica were recorded.

  17. Detection of Babesia Sp. EU1 and members of spotted fever group rickettsiae in ticks collected from migratory birds at Curonian Spit, North-Western Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movila, Alexandru; Reye, Anna L; Dubinina, Helen V; Tolstenkov, Oleg O; Toderas, Ion; Hübschen, Judith M; Muller, Claude P; Alekseev, Andrey N

    2011-01-01

    To reveal the prevalence of spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae and Babesia sp. in Ixodes ricinus (L.) ticks from migratory birds, 236 specimens represented 8 species of Passeriformes and were collected at Curonian Spit in Kaliningrad enclave of North-Western Russia. The ticks (total 126) being detached from four bird species, Turdus philomelos, Fringilla coelebs, Parus major, and Sturnus vulgaris, were investigated by PCR using the primers Rp CS.877p/Rp CS.1258n for the detection of Rickettsia and BJ1/BN2 for Babesia spp. Babesia spp. were detected in 2 of 126 (1.6%) ticks. The partial sequence of 18S rDNA had 100% similarity to human pathogenic Babesia sp. EU1. The SFG rickettsiae were detected in 19 of 126 (15.1%) ticks collected from the above-mentioned bird species. BLAST analysis of SFG rickettsia gltA assigned sequences to human pathogenic Rickettsia helvetica (10.3%), Rickettsia monacensis (3.9%), and Rickettsia japonica (0.8%) with 98%-100% sequence similarity. The SFG rickettsiae and Babesia sp. EU1 in ticks collected from the passerines in Russia were detected for the first time. The survey indicates that migratory birds may become a reservoir for Babesia spp. and SFG rickettsiae. Future investigations need to characterize the role of birds in the epidemiology of these human pathogens in the region.

  18. TERMITES (INSECTA: BLATTODEA BUILDINGS IN URBAN LOCATED IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF SEROPÉDICA, RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. M. Soares

    2017-10-01

    inspected households. The occurrence of moisture spots in residences was found in 34% of the most infested households (44% over the moisture spotless (22%. Infestation history in the past five years was recorded in 31% of the households and in general, residences with previous history, were more infested (58% than the residences without history (17%. Generally, the infestation by termites takes place via exotic and native species, being the exotic species more relevant in colonization of the municipality residences. Occurrence of N. corniger has not been identified at Ecologia neighbourhood, which had greatest occurrence of C. gestroi in attacked residences. Buildings without moisture spots are predominantly infested by C. brevis. The species C. gestroi and C. brevis are the most seen in residences with infestation history, whilst residences without infestation are predominantly damaged by the species C. brevis.

  19. Current land bird distribution and trends in population abundance between 1982 and 2012 on Rota, Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Richard J.; Brinck, Kevin W.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Amidon, Fred A.; Radley, Paul M.; Berkowitz, S. Paul; Banko, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The western Pacific island of Rota is the fourth largest human-inhabited island in the Mariana archipelago and designated an Endemic Bird Area. Between 1982 and 2012, 12 point-transect distance-sampling surveys were conducted to assess bird population status. Surveys did not consistently sample the entire island; thus, we used a ratio estimator to estimate bird abundances in strata not sampled during every survey. Trends in population size were reliably estimated for 11 of 13 bird species, and 7 species declined over the 30-y time series, including the island collared-dove Streptopelia bitorquata, white-throated ground-dove Gallicolumba xanthonura, Mariana fruit-dove Ptilinopus roseicapilla, collared kingfisher Todiramphus chloris orii, Micronesian myzomela Myzomela rubratra, black drongo Dicrurus macrocercus, and Mariana crow Corvus kubaryi. The endangered Mariana crow (x̄  =  81 birds, 95% CI 30–202) declined sharply to fewer than 200 individuals in 2012, down from 1,491 birds in 1982 (95% CI  =  815–3,115). Trends increased for white tern Gygis alba, rufous fantail Rhipidura rufifrons mariae, and Micronesian starling Aplonis opaca. Numbers of the endangered Rota white-eye Zosterops rotensis declined from 1982 to the late 1990s but returned to 1980s levels by 2012, resulting in an overall stable trend. Trends for the yellow bittern Ixobrychus sinensis were inconclusive. Eurasian tree sparrow Passer montanus trends were not assessed; however, their numbers in 1982 and 2012 were similar. Occupancy models of the 2012 survey data revealed general patterns of land cover use and detectability among 12 species that could be reliably modeled. Occupancy was not assessed for the Eurasian tree sparrow because of insufficient detections. Based on the 2012 survey, bird distribution and abundance across Rota revealed three general patterns: 1) range restriction, including Mariana crow, Rota white-eye, and Eurasian tree sparrow; 2) widespread distribution, low

  20. Cardiac remodeling in response to 1 year of intensive endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Perhonen, Merja; Howden, Erin; Peshock, Ronald M; Zhang, Rong; Adams-Huet, Beverly; Haykowsky, Mark J; Levine, Benjamin D

    2014-12-09

    It is unclear whether, and to what extent, the striking cardiac morphological manifestations of endurance athletes are a result of exercise training or a genetically determined characteristic of talented athletes. We hypothesized that prolonged and intensive endurance training in previously sedentary healthy young individuals could induce cardiac remodeling similar to that observed cross-sectionally in elite endurance athletes. Twelve previously sedentary subjects (aged 29±6 years; 7 men and 5 women) trained progressively and intensively for 12 months such that they could compete in a marathon. Magnetic resonance images for assessment of right and left ventricular mass and volumes were obtained at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of training. Maximum oxygen uptake ( max) and cardiac output at rest and during exercise (C2H2 rebreathing) were measured at the same time periods. Pulmonary artery catheterization was performed before and after 1 year of training, and pressure-volume and Starling curves were constructed during decreases (lower body negative pressure) and increases (saline infusion) in cardiac volume. Mean max rose from 40.3±1.6 to 48.7±2.5 mL/kg per minute after 1 year (Pathletes. In contrast, left ventricular volume did not change significantly until 6 months of training, although right ventricular volume increased progressively from the outset; Starling and pressure-volume curves approached but did not match those of elite athletes. One year of prolonged and intensive endurance training leads to cardiac morphological adaptations in previously sedentary young subjects similar to those observed in elite endurance athletes; however, it is not sufficient to achieve similar levels of cardiac compliance and performance. Contrary to conventional thinking, the left ventricle responds to exercise with initial concentric but not eccentric remodeling during the first 6 to 9 months after commencement of endurance training depending on the duration and

  1. Physiological control of dual rotary pumps as a biventricular assist device using a master/slave approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Michael C; Wilson, Stephen; Bradley, Andrew; Fraser, John; Timms, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Dual rotary left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) can provide biventricular mechanical support during heart failure. Coordination of left and right pump speeds is critical not only to avoid ventricular suction and to match cardiac output with demand, but also to ensure balanced systemic and pulmonary circulatory volumes. Physiological control systems for dual LVADs must meet these objectives across a variety of clinical scenarios by automatically adjusting left and right pump speeds to avoid catastrophic physiological consequences. In this study we evaluate a novel master/slave physiological control system for dual LVADs. The master controller is a Starling-like controller, which sets flow rate as a function of end-diastolic ventricular pressure (EDP). The slave controller then maintains a linear relationship between right and left EDPs. Both left/right and right/left master/slave combinations were evaluated by subjecting them to four clinical scenarios (rest, postural change, Valsalva maneuver, and exercise) simulated in a mock circulation loop. The controller's performance was compared to constant-rotational-speed control and two other dual LVAD control systems: dual constant inlet pressure and dual Frank-Starling control. The results showed that the master/slave physiological control system produced fewer suction events than constant-speed control (6 vs. 62 over a 7-min period). Left/right master/slave control had lower risk of pulmonary congestion than the other control systems, as indicated by lower maximum EDPs (15.1 vs. 25.2-28.4 mm Hg). During exercise, master/slave control increased total flow from 5.2 to 10.1 L/min, primarily due to an increase of left and right pump speed. Use of the left pump as the master resulted in fewer suction events and lower EDPs than when the right pump was master. Based on these results, master/slave control using the left pump as the master automatically adjusts pump speed to avoid suction and increases pump flow

  2. Does amniotic fluid volume affect fetofetal transfusion in monochorionic twin pregnancies? Modelling two possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umur, Asli; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Ross, Michael G.

    2002-06-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that increased amniotic fluid volume due to polyhydramnios increases placental vascular resistance. We have sought to model the possible effects of an increased amniotic fluid volume on the net fetofetal transfusion in monochorionic twin pregnancies. We wanted to compare these effects with the results of previous simulations, which aimed to explain why the twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) placentas more often include bidirectional arteriovenous (AV) rather than AV plus arterioarterial (AA) anastomoses. We extended our mathematical model of TTTS by simulating two different mechanisms that increase the placental vascular resistance as a consequence of polyhydramnios. First, there is an increase in the placental capillary resistance and hence in deep AV and opposite AV (denoted as VA) resistances due to polyhydramnios. Second, there is an increase in the resistance of chorionic veins due to polyhydramnios, assuming that these veins act as Starling resistors. We then simulated the effects of polyhydramnios on different placental anastomotic patterns. The results were as follows. In the first mechanism (polyhydramnios affects AV-VA resistances), an increased amniotic fluid volume hardly affected bidirectional AV, but slightly decreased fetofetal transfusion in AV plus AA anastomoses. However, for these effects to change the natural development of the pregnancy, polyhydramnios needed to persist for approximately 4 weeks, and by comparing the effects of polyhydramnios with the effects of amnioreduction, amnioreduction was more beneficial for normalizing the donor amniotic fluid volume. Therefore, these beneficial effects due to polyhydramnios have no practical clinical significance. In the second mechanism (Starling resistor for chorionic veins), polyhydramnios slightly increased fetofetal transfusion and hence slightly increased TTTS severity in bidirectional AV and AV plus VV, but did not affect AV plus AA anastomoses. In conclusion, we

  3. Influence of ion sterics on diffusiophoresis and electrophoresis in concentrated electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Robert F.; Khair, Aditya S.

    2017-01-01

    We quantify the diffusiophoresis and electrophoresis of a uniformly charged, spherical colloid in a binary electrolyte using modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that account for steric repulsion between finite sized ions. Specifically, we utilize the Bikerman (Bik) lattice gas model and the Carnahan-Starling (CS) and Boublik-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland (BMCSL) equations of state for monodisperse and polydisperse, respectively, hard spheres. We compute the phoretic mobility for weak applied fields using an asymptotic approach for thin diffuse layers, where ion steric effects are expected to be most prevalent. The thin diffuse layer limit requires λD/R →0 , where λD is the Debye screening length and R is the particle radius; this limit is readily attained for micron-sized colloids in concentrated electrolytic solutions. It is well known that the classic Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) model for pointlike, noninteracting ions leads to a prediction of a maximum in both the diffusiophoretic and electrophoretic mobilities with increasing particle zeta potential (at fixed λD/R ). In contrast, we find that ion sterics essentially eliminate this maximum (for reasonably attainable zeta potentials) and increase the mobility relative to PB. Next, we consider the more experimentally relevant case of a particle with a constant surface charge density and vary the electrolyte concentration, neglecting charge regulation on surface active sites. Rather surprisingly, there is little difference between the predictions of the four models (PB, Bik, CS, and BMCSL) for electrophoretic mobility in concentrated solutions, at reasonable surface charge densities (˜1 -10 μ C /cm2 ). This is because as the concentration increases, the zeta potential is reduced (to below the thermal voltage for concentrations above about 1 M) and therefore the diffuse layer structure is largely unaffected by ion sterics. For gradients of symmetric electrolytes (equal diffusivities, charge, and size

  4. Usutu virus, Austria and Hungary, 2010–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakonyi, Tamás; Erdélyi, Károly; Brunthaler, René; Dán, Ádám; Weissenböck, Herbert; Nowotny, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Usutu virus (USUV, Flaviviridae) was first reported in Europe in Austria in 2001, where it caused wild bird (mainly blackbird) mortality until 2005. Since 2006 no further USUV cases were diagnosed in the country. However, the virus emerged in other European countries (Hungary, Italy, Switzerland, Spain, Germany and the Czech Republic) between 2005 and 2011. In 2016, widespread USUV-associated wild bird mortality was observed in Germany, France, Belgium and the Netherlands. In this study, we report the results of passive monitoring for USUV in Austria and Hungary between 2010 and 2016. In Hungary, USUV caused sporadic cases of wild bird mortality between 2010 and 2015 (altogether 18 diagnosed cases), whereas in summer and autumn 2016 the number of cases considerably increased to 12 (ten blackbirds, one Eurasian jay and one starling). In Austria, USUV was identified in two blackbirds in 2016. Phylogenetic analyses of coding-complete genomes and partial regions of the NS5 protein gene revealed that USUVs from Hungary between 2010 and 2015 are closely related to the virus that emerged in Austria in 2001 and in Hungary in 2005, while one Hungarian sequence from 2015 and all sequences from Hungary and Austria from 2016 clustered together with USUV sequences reported from Italy between 2009 and 2010. The results of the study indicate continuous USUV circulation in the region and exchange of USUV strains between Italy, Austria and Hungary. PMID:29018253

  5. Usutu virus, Austria and Hungary, 2010-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakonyi, Tamás; Erdélyi, Károly; Brunthaler, René; Dán, Ádám; Weissenböck, Herbert; Nowotny, Norbert

    2017-10-11

    Usutu virus (USUV, Flaviviridae) was first reported in Europe in Austria in 2001, where it caused wild bird (mainly blackbird) mortality until 2005. Since 2006 no further USUV cases were diagnosed in the country. However, the virus emerged in other European countries (Hungary, Italy, Switzerland, Spain, Germany and the Czech Republic) between 2005 and 2011. In 2016, widespread USUV-associated wild bird mortality was observed in Germany, France, Belgium and the Netherlands. In this study, we report the results of passive monitoring for USUV in Austria and Hungary between 2010 and 2016. In Hungary, USUV caused sporadic cases of wild bird mortality between 2010 and 2015 (altogether 18 diagnosed cases), whereas in summer and autumn 2016 the number of cases considerably increased to 12 (ten blackbirds, one Eurasian jay and one starling). In Austria, USUV was identified in two blackbirds in 2016. Phylogenetic analyses of coding-complete genomes and partial regions of the NS5 protein gene revealed that USUVs from Hungary between 2010 and 2015 are closely related to the virus that emerged in Austria in 2001 and in Hungary in 2005, while one Hungarian sequence from 2015 and all sequences from Hungary and Austria from 2016 clustered together with USUV sequences reported from Italy between 2009 and 2010. The results of the study indicate continuous USUV circulation in the region and exchange of USUV strains between Italy, Austria and Hungary.Emerging Microbes &Infections (2017) 6, e85; doi:10.1038/emi.2017.72; published online 11 October 2017.

  6. Gravity, the hydrostatic indifference concept and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2011-02-01

    Gravity, like any acceleration, causes a hydrostatic pressure gradient in fluid-filled bodily compartments. At a force of 1G, this pressure gradient amounts to 10 kPa/m. Postural changes alter the distribution of hydrostatic pressure patterns according to the body's alignment to the acceleration field. At a certain location--referred to as hydrostatically indifferent--within any given fluid compartment, pressure remains constant during a given change of position relative to the acceleration force acting upon the body. At this specific location, there is probably little change in vessel volume, wall tension, and the balance of Starling forces after a positional manoeuvre. In terms of cardiac function, this is important because arterial and venous hydrostatic indifference locations determine postural cardiac preload and afterload changes. Baroreceptors pick up pressure signals that depend on their respective distance to hydrostatic indifference locations with any change of body position. Vascular shape, filling volume, and compliance, as well as temperature, nervous and endocrine factors, drugs, and time all influence hydrostatic indifference locations. This paper reviews the physiology of pressure gradients in the cardiovascular system that are operational in a gravitational/acceleration field, offers a broadened hydrostatic indifference concept, and discusses implications that are relevant in physiological and clinical terms.

  7. Densities and derived thermodynamic properties of 1-heptanol and 2-heptanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 22 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel; Galicia-Luna, Luis A.; Betancourt-Cardenas, Felix F.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental densities were determined in liquid phase for 1-heptanol and 2-heptanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 22 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. Water and nitrogen were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainties of the experimental measurements in the whole range of reported data are estimated to be ±0.03 K for temperature, ±0.008 MPa for pressure, and ±0.20 kg . m -3 for density. The experimental data are correlated using a short empirical equation of six parameters and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations are reported. Published density data of 1-heptanol are compared with values calculated with the 6-parameter equation using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with an available correlation for 1-heptanol. Densities of 2-heptanol at high pressure were not found in the literature and the data reported here represent the first set of data reported in the literature. Isothermal compressibilities and isobaric thermal expansivity are calculated using the 6-parameter equation for both alcohols within uncertainties estimated to be ±0.025 Gpa -1 and ±4 x 10 -7 K -1 , respectively

  8. Hypoxia in tumors: pathogenesis-related classification, characterization of hypoxia subtypes, and associated biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of tumors leading to (mal-)adaptive processes, development of aggressive phenotypes and treatment resistance. Based on underlying mechanisms and their duration, two main types of hypoxia have been identified, coexisting with complex spatial and temporal heterogeneities. Chronic hypoxia is mainly caused by diffusion limitations due to enlarged diffusion distances and adverse diffusion geometries (e.g., concurrent vs. countercurrent microvessels, Krogh- vs. Hill-type diffusion geometry) and, to a lesser extent, by hypoxemia (e.g., in anemic patients, HbCO formation in heavy smokers), and a compromised perfusion or flow stop (e.g., due to disturbed Starling forces or intratumor solid stress). Acute hypoxia mainly results from transient disruptions in perfusion (e.g., vascular occlusion by cell aggregates), fluctuating red blood cell fluxes or short-term contractions of the interstitial matrix. In each of these hypoxia subtypes oxygen supply is critically reduced, but perfusion-dependent nutrient supply, waste removal, delivery of anticancer or diagnostic agents, and repair competence can be impaired or may not be affected. This detailed differentiation of tumor hypoxia may impact on our understanding of tumor biology and may aid in the development of novel treatment strategies, tumor detection by imaging and tumor targeting, and is thus of great clinical relevance.

  9. No need to talk, I know you: familiarity influences early multisensory integration in a songbird's brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle GEORGE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that visual information can affect auditory perception, as in the famous McGurk effect, but little is known concerning the processes involved. To address this issue, we used the best-developed animal model to study language-related processes in the brain: songbirds. European starlings were exposed to audiovisual compared to auditory-only playback of conspecific songs, while electrophysiological recordings were made in their primary auditory area (Field L. The results show that the audiovisual condition modulated the auditory responses. Enhancement and suppression were both observed, depending on the stimulus familiarity. Seeing a familiar bird led to suppressed auditory responses while seeing an unfamiliar bird led to response enhancement, suggesting that unisensory perception may be enough if the stimulus is familiar while redundancy may be required for unfamiliar items. This is to our knowledge the first evidence that multisensory integration may occur in a low-level, putatively unisensory area of a non-mammalian vertebrate brain, and also that familiarity of the stimuli may influence modulation of auditory responses by vision.

  10. Pressure and surface tension of soild-liquid interface using Tarazona density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   The weighted density functional theory proposed by Tarazona is applied to study the solid-liquid interface. In the last two decades the weighted density functional became a useful tool to consider the properties of inhomogeneous liquids. In this theory, the role of the size of molecules or the particles of which the matter is composed, was found to be important. In this resarch we study a hard sphere fluid beside a hard wall. For this study the liquid is an inhomogeneous system. We use the definition of the direct correlation function as a second derivative of free energy with respect to the density. We use this definition and the definition of the weighting function, then we minimize the grand potential with respect to the density to get the Euler Lagrange equation and we obtain an integral equation to find the inhomogeneous density profile. The obtained density profile as a function of the distance from the wall, for different bulk density is plotted in three dimensions. We also calculate the pressure and compare it with the Carnahan-starling results, and finally we obtained the surface tension at liquid-solid interface and compared it with the results of Monte Carlo simulation.

  11. Modeling birds on wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğdu, A; Frasca, P; D'Apice, C; Manzo, R; Thornton, J M; Gachomo, B; Wilson, T; Cheung, B; Tariq, U; Saidel, W; Piccoli, B

    2017-02-21

    In this paper we introduce a mathematical model to study the group dynamics of birds resting on wires. The model is agent-based and postulates attraction-repulsion forces between the interacting birds: the interactions are "topological", in the sense that they involve a given number of neighbors irrespective of their distance. The model is first mathematically analyzed and then simulated to study its main properties: we observe that the model predicts birds to be more widely spaced near the borders of each group. We compare the results from the model with experimental data, derived from the analysis of pictures of pigeons and starlings taken in New Jersey: two different image elaboration protocols allow us to establish a good agreement with the model and to quantify its main parameters. We also discuss the potential handedness of the birds, by analyzing the group organization features and the group dynamics at the arrival of new birds. Finally, we propose a more refined mathematical model that describes landing and departing birds by suitable stochastic processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management of Edema in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Demetrius

    2015-01-01

    Generalized edema is a major presenting clinical feature of children with nephrotic syndrome (NS) exemplified by such primary conditions as minimal change disease (MCD). In these children with classical NS and marked proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, the ensuing tendency to hypovolemia triggers compensatory physiological mechanisms, which enhance renal sodium (Na(+)) and water retention; this is known as the "underfill hypothesis." Edema can also occur in secondary forms of NS and several other glomerulonephritides, in which the degree of proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, are variable. In contrast to MCD, in these latter conditions, the predominant mechanism of edema formation is "primary" or "pathophysiological," Na(+) and water retention; this is known as the "overfill hypothesis." A major clinical challenge in children with these disorders is to distinguish the predominant mechanism of edema formation, identify other potential contributing factors, and prevent the deleterious effects of diuretic regimens in those with unsuspected reduced effective circulatory volume (i.e., underfill). This article reviews the Starling forces that become altered in NS so as to tip the balance of fluid movement in favor of edema formation. An understanding of these pathomechanisms then serves to formulate a more rational approach to prevention, evaluation, and management of such edema.

  13. Biotic interactions mediate the influence of bird colonies on vegetation and soil chemistry at aggregation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natusch, Daniel James Deans; Lyons, Jessica Ann; Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Colonial-nesting organisms can strongly alter the chemical and biotic conditions around their aggregation sites, with cascading impacts on other components of the ecosystem. In tropical Australia, Metallic Starlings (Aplonis metallica) nest in large colonies far above the forest canopy, in emergent trees. The ground beneath those trees is open, in stark contrast to the dense foliage all around. We surveyed the areas beneath 27 colony trees (and nearby randomly chosen trees lacking bird colonies) to quantify the birds' impacts on soil and vegetation characteristics, and to test alternative hypotheses about the proximate mechanisms responsible for the lack of live vegetation beneath colony trees. Nutrient levels were greatly elevated beneath colony trees (especially, those with larger colonies), potentially reaching levels toxic to older trees. However, seedlings thrived in the soil from beneath colony trees. The primary mechanism generating open areas beneath colony trees is disturbance by scavengers (feral pigs and native Turkeys) that are attracted in vast numbers to these nutrient hotspots. Seedlings flourished within exclosures inaccessible to vertebrate herbivores, but were rapidly consumed if unprotected. Our results contrast with previous studies of colonies of seabirds on remote islands, where a lack of large terrestrial herbivores results in bird colonies encouraging rather than eliminating vegetation in areas close to the nesting site. In our continental study system, scavengers may rapidly dilute the spatial heterogeneity generated by the massive nutrient subsidy from bird colonies. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  14. Effects of Shugan Jieyuling self-made on behavior and levels of serum IL-2, IL-6 and cortisol in depression models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiubo; Yao Di; Zhang Ping; Li Youtian; Xu Dan; Jiang Sailin; Xu Caiyun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of Shugan Jieyuling self-made (SJSM) on behavior, levels of serum IL-2, IL-6 and cortisol in depression model mice. Methods: The adult mice separately raised and treated with chronic unpredictable middle stress stimulus were used to establish depression models. The curative effect of SJSM was observed in depression model mice. The changes of weight and behavior were detected in a period. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to examine the contents of serum IL-2, IL-6 and cortisol levels. Results: The increased weights of the depression model mice were declined compared with the normal mice before administration. The mental state and behavior of the depression mice were changed. The mice were starling, dreadful, helpless and immobile. At the same time the contents of serum IL-2, IL-6 and cortisol were obviously lower than those of the normal mice. SJSM (large and low doses) and Baiyoujie changed the increased weights and behaviors of the depression after administration for 21 d. The mental state was meliorated simultaneously, and the serum IL-2, IL-6 and cortisol levels in the depression model mice were decreased significantly compared with normal mice. Conclusion: The levels of serum IL-2, IL-6 and cortisol may be the guideline for the diagnosis of depression disease. SJSM can obviously improve both the symptoms of the depression models and the levels of serum IL-2, IL-6 and cortisol. (authors)

  15. Vertebrate species introductions in the United States and its territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. WITMER, Pam L. FULLER

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available At least 1,065 introduced vertebrate species have been introduced in the United States and its territories, including at least 86 mammalian, 127 avian, 179 reptilian/amphibian, and 673 fish species. Examples in each major taxonomic group include domestic cat, small Indian mongoose, red fox, goat, pig, rabbit, rats, house mouse, gray squirrel, nutria, starling, Indian common myna, red-vented bulbul, brown treesnake, red-eared slider, brown trout, tilapia, and grass carp. We briefly review some of these species and the types of damage they cause. We then review the basic types of methods used for control or eradication of each taxonomic group, including physical, chemical, biological, and cultural methods. We discuss some of the challenges in managing these species, including issues with the use of toxicants, land access, public attitudes, and monitoring difficulties. Finally, we list some ongoing research and future research needs, including improved detection methods, improved attractants, improved barriers, improved capture methods, fertility control, and risk assessment methods [Current Zoology 57 (5: 559–567, 2011].

  16. Stokes-Einstein relation and excess entropy scaling law in liquid Copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pasturel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an ab initio study of structural and dynamic properties of liquid copper as a function of temperature. In particular, we have evaluated the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient from the velocity autocorrelation function as well the temperature dependence of the viscosity from the transverse current correlation function. We show that LDA based results are in close agreement with experimental data for both the self-diffusion coefficient and the viscosity over the temperature range investigated. Our findings are then used to test empirical approaches like the Stokes-Einstein relation and the excess entropy scaling law widely used in the literature. We show that the Stokes-Einstein relation is valid for the liquid phase and that the excess entropy scaling law proposed by Dzugutov is legitimate only if a self-consistent method for determining the packing fraction of the hard sphere reference liquid is used within the Carnahan-Starling approach to express the excess entropy.

  17. Female extrapair mate choice in a cooperative breeder: trading sex for help and increasing offspring heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2007-08-07

    Sexual conflict between males and females over mating is common. Females that copulate with extrapair mates outside the pair-bond may gain (i) direct benefits such as resources or increased paternal care, (ii) indirect genetic benefits for their offspring, or (iii) insurance against infertility in their own social mate. Few studies have been able to demonstrate the different contexts in which females receive varying types of benefits from extrapair mates. Here, I examined sexual conflict, female extrapair mate choice, and patterns of extrapair paternity in the cooperatively breeding superb starling Lamprotornis superbus using microsatellite markers. Although extrapair paternity was lower than many other avian cooperative breeders (14% of offspring and 25% of nests), females exhibited two distinct mating patterns: half of the extrapair fertilizations were with males from inside the group, whereas half were with males from outside the group. Females with few potential helpers copulated with extrapair mates from within their group and thereby gained direct benefits in the form of additional helpers at the nest, whereas females paired to mates that were relatively less heterozygous than themselves copulated with extrapair mates from outside the group and thereby gained indirect genetic benefits in the form of increased offspring heterozygosity. Females did not appear to gain fertility insurance from copulating with extrapair mates. This is the first study to show that individuals from the same population mate with extrapair males and gain both direct and indirect benefits, but that they do so in different contexts.

  18. CFSO3: A New Supervised Swarm-Based Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Laudani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present CFSO3, an optimization heuristic within the class of the swarm intelligence, based on a synergy among three different features of the Continuous Flock-of-Starlings Optimization. One of the main novelties is that this optimizer is no more a classical numerical algorithm since it now can be seen as a continuous dynamic system, which can be treated by using all the mathematical instruments available for managing state equations. In addition, CFSO3 allows passing from stochastic approaches to supervised deterministic ones since the random updating of parameters, a typical feature for numerical swam-based optimization algorithms, is now fully substituted by a supervised strategy: in CFSO3 the tuning of parameters is a priori designed for obtaining both exploration and exploitation. Indeed the exploration, that is, the escaping from a local minimum, as well as the convergence and the refinement to a solution can be designed simply by managing the eigenvalues of the CFSO state equations. Virtually in CFSO3, just the initial values of positions and velocities of the swarm members have to be randomly assigned. Both standard and parallel versions of CFSO3 together with validations on classical benchmarks are presented.

  19. Polymer physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gedde, Ulf W

    1999-01-01

    This book is the result of my teaching efforts during the last ten years at the Royal Institute of Technology. The purpose is to present the subject of polymer physics for undergraduate and graduate students, to focus the fundamental aspects of the subject and to show the link between experiments and theory. The intention is not to present a compilation of the currently available literature on the subject. Very few reference citations have thus been made. Each chapter has essentially the same structure: starling with an introduction, continuing with the actual subject, summarizing the chapter in 30D-500 words, and finally presenting problems and a list of relevant references for the reader. The solutions to the problems presented in Chapters 1-12 are given in Chapter 13. The theme of the book is essentially polymer science, with the exclusion of that part dealing directly with chemical reactions. The fundamentals in polymer science, including some basic polymer chemistry, are presented as an introduction in t...

  20. Thermodynamics and elastic moduli of fluids with steeply repulsive potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1997-08-01

    Analytic expressions for the thermodynamic properties and elastic moduli of molecular fluids interacting with steeply repulsive potentials are derived using Rowlinson's hard-sphere perturbation treatment which employs a softness parameter, λ specifying the deviation from the hard-sphere potential. Generic potentials of this form might be used to represent the interactions between near-hard-sphere stabilized colloids. Analytic expressions for the equivalent hard-sphere diameter of inverse power [ɛ(σ/r)n where ɛ sets the energy scale and σ the distance scale] exponential and logarithmic potential forms are derived using the Barker-Henderson formula. The internal energies in the hard-sphere limit are predicted essentially exactly by the perturbation approach when compared against molecular dynamics simulation data using the same potentials. The elastic moduli are similarly accurately predicted in the hard-sphere limit, as they are trivially related to the internal energy. The compressibility factors from the perturbation expansion do not compare as favorably with simulation data, and in this case the Carnahan-Starling equation of state prediction using the analytic effective hard-sphere diameter would appear to be a preferable route for this thermodynamic property. A more refined state point dependent definition for the effective hard-sphere diameter is probably required for this property.

  1. Circulatory effects of expiratory flow-limited exercise, dynamic hyperinflation and expiratory muscle pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Macklem

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent research in normal subjects exercising with and without expiratory flow limitation at 1 L·s–1 imposed by a Starling resistor in the expiratory line, and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, using optoelectronic plethysmography to measure respiratory kinematics, combined with mouth, pleural and abdominal pressure measurements, to assess work of breathing and respiratory muscle performance. In normal subjects, flow-limited exercise resulted in the following: 1 Impaired exercise performance due to intolerable dyspnoea; 2 hypercapnia; 3 excessive respiratory muscle recruitment; 4 blood shifts from trunk to extremities; 5 a 10% reduction in cardiac output and a 5% reduction in arterial oxygen saturation, decreasing energy supplies to working respiratory and locomotor muscles. In both normal subjects and in COPD patients, dynamic hyperinflation did not always occur. Those patients that hyperinflated had worse lung function and less work of breathing, but better exercise performance than the others, in whom expiratory muscle recruitment prevented dynamic hyperinflation at the cost of increased work of breathing and excessive oxygen cost of breathing. This established an early competition between respiratory and locomotor muscles for available energy supplies. Dynamic hyperinflation is a better exercise strategy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than expiratory muscle recruitment, but the benefit it confers is small.

  2. Composition and Diversity of Avian Communities Using a New Urban Habitat: Green Roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Brian E.; Swearingin, Ryan M.; Pullins, Craig K.; Rice, Matthew E.

    2016-06-01

    Green roofs on buildings are becoming popular and represent a new component of the urban landscape. Public benefits of green roof projects include reduced stormwater runoff, improved air quality, reduced urban heat island effects, and aesthetic values. As part of a city-wide plan, several green roofs have been constructed at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport (ORD). Like some other landscaping features, green roofs on or near an airport might attract wildlife and thus increase the risk of bird-aircraft collisions. During 2007-2011, we conducted a series of studies to evaluate wildlife use of newly constructed green roofs and traditional (gravel) roofs on buildings at ORD. These green roofs were 0.04-1.62 ha in area and consisted of primarily stonecrop species for vegetation. A total of 188 birds were observed using roofs during this research. Of the birds using green roofs, 66, 23, and 4 % were Killdeer, European Starlings, and Mourning Doves, respectively. Killdeer nested on green roofs, whereas the other species perched, foraged, or loafed. Birds used green roofs almost exclusively between May and October. Overall, avian use of the green roofs was minimal and similar to that of buildings with traditional roofs. Although green roofs with other vegetation types might offer forage or cover to birds and thus attract potentially hazardous wildlife, the stonecrop-vegetated green roofs in this study did not increase the risk of bird-aircraft collisions.

  3. Music for the birds: effects of auditory enrichment on captive bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lindsey; Margulis, Susan W

    2016-01-01

    With the increase of mixed species exhibits in zoos, targeting enrichment for individual species may be problematic. Often, mammals may be the primary targets of enrichment, yet other species that share their environment (such as birds) will unavoidably be exposed to the enrichment as well. The purpose of this study was to determine if (1) auditory stimuli designed for enrichment of primates influenced the behavior of captive birds in the zoo setting, and (2) if the specific type of auditory enrichment impacted bird behavior. Three different African bird species were observed at the Buffalo Zoo during exposure to natural sounds, classical music and rock music. The results revealed that the average frequency of flying in all three bird species increased with naturalistic sounds and decreased with rock music (F = 7.63, df = 3,6, P = 0.018); vocalizations for two of the three species (Superb Starlings and Mousebirds) increased (F = 18.61, df = 2,6, P = 0.0027) in response to all auditory stimuli, however one species (Lady Ross's Turacos) increased frequency of duetting only in response to rock music (X(2) = 18.5, df = 2, P < 0.0001). Auditory enrichment implemented for large mammals may influence behavior in non-target species as well, in this case leading to increased activity by birds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dissociating the effects of alternative early-life feeding schedules on the development of adult depression-like phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Vikki; Andrews, Clare; Nettle, Daniel; Bateson, Melissa

    2017-11-01

    Early-life adversity is associated with increased vulnerability to depression in humans, and depression-like phenotypes in animals. However, different types of adverse experience may leave different signatures in adulthood. We experimentally manipulated the Amount of food delivered to European starling nestlings and the begging Effort required to obtain food during early development. Here, we report behavioural data in adulthood from a task that assessed sensitivity to shifts in reward magnitude characteristic of depression-like low mood. Birds that had experienced Hard Effort were more food motivated than birds that had experienced Easy Effort. Both Effort and Amount affected sensitivity to shifts in reward magnitude: Hard Effort birds showed an enhanced negative contrast effect following loss of reward ('disappointment'), and Lean Amount birds failed to show a normal positive contrast effect following gain in reward (a lack of 'elation'). Therefore, the feeding schedule experienced for just 10 days in early life caused enduring effects on feeding motivation and sensitivity to reward loss/gain consistent with human depression. Furthermore, the contrast effects were specific to different types of adversity. These results highlight the importance of early-life feeding schedules in the development of depression-like phenotypes.

  5. Nasal Involvement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Daniel de Sousa; Rodrigues, Amanda da Mota Silveira; Nakanishi, Márcio; Sampaio, André Luiz Lopes; Venosa, Alessandra Ramos

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported an association between nasal obstruction and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), but the precise nature of this relationship remains to be clarified. This paper aimed to summarize data and theories on the role of the nose in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea as well as to discuss the benefits of surgical and medical nasal treatments. A number of pathophysiological mechanisms can potentially explain the role of nasal pathology in OSAS. These include the Starling resistor model, the unstable oral airway, the nasal ventilatory reflex, and the role of nitric oxide (NO). Pharmacological treatment presents some beneficial effects on the frequency of respiratory events and sleep architecture. Nonetheless, objective data assessing snoring and daytime sleepiness are still necessary. Nasal surgery can improve the quality of life and snoring in a select group of patients with mild OSAS and septal deviation but is not an effective treatment for OSA as such. Despite the conflicting results in the literature, it is important that patients who are not perfectly adapted to CPAP are evaluated in detail, in order to identify whether there are obstructive factors that could be surgically corrected. PMID:25548569

  6. One-step affinity purification of the yeast ribosome and its associated proteins and mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Toshifumi; Winstall, Eric; Tarun, Salvador Z; Yates, John R; Schieltz, Dave; Sachs, Alan B

    2002-07-01

    We describe a one-step affinity method for purifying ribosomes from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Extracts from yeast strains expressing only C-terminally tagged Rpl25 protein or overexpressing this protein in the presence of endogenous Rpl25p were used as the starling materials. The purification was specific for tagged 60S subunits, and resulted in the copurification of 80S subunits and polysomes, as well as ribosome-associated proteins and mRNAs. Two of these associated proteins, Mpt4p and Asc1p, were nearly stoichiometrically bound to the ribosome. In addition, the degree of mRNA association with the purified ribosomes was found to reflect the mRNA's translational status within the cell. The one-step purification of ribosome and its associated components from a crude extract should provide an important tool for future structural and biochemical studies of the ribosome, as well as for expression profiling of translated mRNAs.

  7. Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management of Edema in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Demetrius

    2016-01-01

    Generalized edema is a major presenting clinical feature of children with nephrotic syndrome (NS) exemplified by such primary conditions as minimal change disease (MCD). In these children with classical NS and marked proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, the ensuing tendency to hypovolemia triggers compensatory physiological mechanisms, which enhance renal sodium (Na+) and water retention; this is known as the “underfill hypothesis.” Edema can also occur in secondary forms of NS and several other glomerulonephritides, in which the degree of proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, are variable. In contrast to MCD, in these latter conditions, the predominant mechanism of edema formation is “primary” or “pathophysiological,” Na+ and water retention; this is known as the “overfill hypothesis.” A major clinical challenge in children with these disorders is to distinguish the predominant mechanism of edema formation, identify other potential contributing factors, and prevent the deleterious effects of diuretic regimens in those with unsuspected reduced effective circulatory volume (i.e., underfill). This article reviews the Starling forces that become altered in NS so as to tip the balance of fluid movement in favor of edema formation. An understanding of these pathomechanisms then serves to formulate a more rational approach to prevention, evaluation, and management of such edema. PMID:26793696

  8. Pathophysiology, Evaluation and Management of Edema in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrius eEllis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized edema is a major presenting clinical feature of children with nephrotic syndrome (NS exemplified by such primary conditions as minimal change disease (MCD. In these children with classical NS and marked proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, the ensuing tendency to hypovolemia triggers compensatory physiologic mechanisms which enhance renal sodium (Na+ and water retention; this is known as the underfill hypothesis. Edema can also occur in secondary forms of NS and several other glomerulonephritides, in which the degree of proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, are variable. In contrast to MCD, in these latter conditions the predominant mechanism of edema formation is primary or pathophysiologic, Na+ and water retention; this is known as the overfill hypothesis. A major clinical challenge in children with these disorders is to distinguish the predominant mechanism of edema formation, identify other potential contributing factors, and prevent the deleterious effects of diuretic regimens in those with unsuspected reduced effective circulatory volume (i.e., underfill. This article reviews the Starling forces that become altered in NS so as to tip the balance of fluid movement in favor of edema formation. An understanding of these pathomechanisms then serves to formulate a more rational approach to prevention, evaluation and management of such edema

  9. Heart rate and flow velocity variability as determined from umbilical Doppler velocimetry at 10-20 weeks of gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursem, N T; Struijk, P C; Hop, W C; Clark, E B; Keller, B B; Wladimiroff, J W

    1998-11-01

    1. The aim of this study was to define from umbilical artery flow velocity waveforms absolute peak systolic and time-averaged velocity, fetal heart rate, fetal heart rate variability and flow velocity variability, and the relation between fetal heart rate and velocity variables in early pregnancy.2.A total of 108 women presenting with a normal pregnancy from 10 to 20 weeks of gestation consented to participate in a cross-sectional study design. Doppler ultrasound recordings were made from the free-floating loop of the umbilical cord.3. Umbilical artery peak systolic and time-averaged velocity increased at 10-20 weeks, whereas fetal heart rate decreased at 10-15 weeks of gestation and plateaued thereafter. Umbilical artery peak systolic velocity variability and fetal heart rate variability increased at 10-20 and 15-20 weeks respectively.4. The inverse relationship between umbilical artery flow velocity and fetal heart rate at 10-15 weeks of gestation suggests that the Frank-Starling mechanism regulates cardiovascular control as early as the late first and early second trimesters of pregnancy. A different underlying mechanism is suggested for the observed variability profiles in heart rate and umbilical artery peak systolic velocity. It is speculated that heart rate variability is mediated by maturation of the parasympathetic nervous system, whereas peak systolic velocity variability reflects the activation of a haemodynamic feedback mechanism.

  10. How unpredictable access to food increases the body fat of small passerines: A mechanistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselme, Patrick; Otto, Tobias; Güntürkün, Onur

    2017-11-01

    Unpredictable rewards increase the vigor of responses in autoshaping (a Pavlovian conditioning procedure) and are preferred to predictable rewards in free-choice tasks involving fixed- versus variable-delay schedules. The significance those behavioral properties may have in field conditions is currently unknown. However, it is noticeable that when exposed to unpredictable food, small passerines - such as robins, titmice, and starlings - get fatter than when food is abundant. In functional terms, fattening is viewed as an evolutionary strategy acting against the risk of starvation when food is in short supply. But this functional view does not explain the causal mechanisms by which small passerines come to be fatter under food uncertainty. Here, it is suggested that one of these causal mechanisms is that involved in behavioral invigoration and preference for food uncertainty in the laboratory. Based on a psychological theory of motivational changes under food uncertainty, we developed an integrative computational model to test this idea. We show that, for functional (adaptive) reasons, the excitatory property of reward unpredictability can underlie the propensity of wild birds to forage longer and/or more intensively in an unpredictable environment, with the consequence that they can put on more fat reserves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interaction of the cardiovascular system with an implanted rotary assist device: simulation study with a refined computer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollkron, Michael; Schima, Heinrich; Huber, Leopold; Wieselthaler, Georg

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, implanted rotary pumps have achieved the level of extended clinical application including complete mobilization and physical exercise of the recipients. A computer model was developed to study the interaction between a continuous-flow pump and the recovering cardiovascular system, the effects of changing pre- and afterloads, and the possibilities for indirect estimation of hemodynamic parameters and pump control. A numerical model of the cardiovascular system using Matlab Simulink simulation software was established. Data of circulatory system modules were derived from patients, our own in vitro and in vivo experiments, and the literature. Special care was taken to simulate properly the dynamic pressure-volume characteristics of both left and right ventricle, the Frank-Starling behavior, and the impedance of the proximal vessels. Excellent correlation with measured data was achieved including pressure and flow patterns within the time domain, response to varying loads, and effects of previously observed pressure-flow hysteresis in rotary pumps. Potential energy, external work, pressure-volume area, and other derived heart work parameters could be calculated. The model offers the possibility to perform parameter variations to study the effects of changing patient condition and therapy and to display them with three-dimensional graphics (demonstrated with the effects on right ventricular work and efficiency). The presented model gives an improved understanding of the interaction between the pump and both ventricles. It can be used for the investigation of various clinical and control questions in normal and pathological conditions of the left ventricular assist device recipient.

  12. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  13. Flocking dynamics and mean-field limit in the Cucker-Smale-type model with topological interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan

    2013-10-01

    We introduce a Cucker-Smale-type model for flocking, where the strength of interaction between two agents depends on their relative separation (called "topological distance" in previous works), which is the number of intermediate individuals separating them. This makes the model scale-free and is motivated by recent extensive observations of starling flocks, suggesting that the interaction ruling animal collective behavior depends on topological rather than the metric distance. We study the conditions leading to asymptotic flocking in the topological model, defined as the convergence of the agents\\' velocities to a common vector. The shift from metric to topological interactions requires development of new analytical methods, taking into account the graph-theoretical nature of the problem. Moreover, we provide a rigorous derivation of the mean-field limit of large populations, recovering kinetic and hydrodynamic descriptions. In particular, we introduce the novel concept of relative separation in continuum descriptions, which is applicable to a broad variety of models of collective behavior. As an example, we shortly discuss a topological modification of the attraction-repulsion model and illustrate with numerical simulations that the modified model produces interesting new pattern dynamics. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluctuation-driven flocking movement in three dimensions and scale-free correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niizato, Takayuki; Gunji, Yukio-Pegio

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of flocking behavior have permitted more sophisticated analyses than previously possible. The concepts of "topological distances" and "scale-free correlations" are important developments that have contributed to this improvement. These concepts require us to reconsider the notion of a neighborhood when applied to theoretical models. Previous work has assumed that individuals interact with neighbors within a certain radius (called the "metric distance"). However, other work has shown that, assuming topological interactions, starlings interact on average with the six or seven nearest neighbors within a flock. Accounting for this observation, we previously proposed a metric-topological interaction model in two dimensions. The goal of our model was to unite these two interaction components, the metric distance and the topological distance, into one rule. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the metric-topological interaction model could explain a real bird flocking phenomenon called scale-free correlation, which was first reported by Cavagna et al. In this study, we extended our model to three dimensions while also accounting for variations in speed. This three-dimensional metric-topological interaction model displayed scale-free correlation for velocity and orientation. Finally, we introduced an additional new feature of the model, namely, that a flock can store and release its fluctuations.

  15. Bio-Inspired Vision-Based Leader-Follower Formation Flying in the Presence of Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Oyekan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Flocking starlings at dusk are known for the mesmerizing and intricate shapes they generate, as well as how fluid these shapes change. They seem to do this effortlessly. Real-life vision-based flocking has not been achieved in micro-UAVs (micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to date. Towards this goal, we make three contributions in this paper: (i we used a computational approach to develop a bio-inspired architecture for vision-based Leader-Follower formation flying on two micro-UAVs. We believe that the minimal computational cost of the resulting algorithm makes it suitable for object detection and tracking during high-speed flocking; (ii we show that provided delays in the control loop of a micro-UAV are below a critical value, Kalman filter-based estimation algorithms are not required to achieve Leader-Follower formation flying; (iii unlike previous approaches, we do not use external observers, such as GPS signals or synchronized communication with flock members. These three contributions could be useful in achieving vision-based flocking in GPS-denied environments on computationally-limited agents.

  16. Fluctuation-driven flocking movement in three dimensions and scale-free correlation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Niizato

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the study of flocking behavior have permitted more sophisticated analyses than previously possible. The concepts of "topological distances" and "scale-free correlations" are important developments that have contributed to this improvement. These concepts require us to reconsider the notion of a neighborhood when applied to theoretical models. Previous work has assumed that individuals interact with neighbors within a certain radius (called the "metric distance". However, other work has shown that, assuming topological interactions, starlings interact on average with the six or seven nearest neighbors within a flock. Accounting for this observation, we previously proposed a metric-topological interaction model in two dimensions. The goal of our model was to unite these two interaction components, the metric distance and the topological distance, into one rule. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the metric-topological interaction model could explain a real bird flocking phenomenon called scale-free correlation, which was first reported by Cavagna et al. In this study, we extended our model to three dimensions while also accounting for variations in speed. This three-dimensional metric-topological interaction model displayed scale-free correlation for velocity and orientation. Finally, we introduced an additional new feature of the model, namely, that a flock can store and release its fluctuations.

  17. Spatially balanced topological interaction grants optimal cohesion in flocking models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperi, Marcelo; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Parisi, Giorgio; Silvestri, Edmondo

    2012-12-06

    Models of self-propelled particles (SPPs) are an indispensable tool to investigate collective animal behaviour. Originally, SPP models were proposed with metric interactions, where each individual coordinates with neighbours within a fixed metric radius. However, recent experiments on bird flocks indicate that interactions are topological: each individual interacts with a fixed number of neighbours, irrespective of their distance. It has been argued that topological interactions are more robust than metric ones against external perturbations, a significant evolutionary advantage for systems under constant predatory pressure. Here, we test this hypothesis by comparing the stability of metric versus topological SPP models in three dimensions. We show that topological models are more stable than metric ones. We also show that a significantly better stability is achieved when neighbours are selected according to a spatially balanced topological rule, namely when interacting neighbours are evenly distributed in angle around the focal individual. Finally, we find that the minimal number of interacting neighbours needed to achieve fully stable cohesion in a spatially balanced model is compatible with the value observed in field experiments on starling flocks.

  18. Densities and derived thermodynamic properties of 1-heptanol and 2-heptanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 22 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738 Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galicia-Luna, Luis A. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738 Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: lgalicial@ipn.mx; Betancourt-Cardenas, Felix F. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738 Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    Experimental densities were determined in liquid phase for 1-heptanol and 2-heptanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 22 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. Water and nitrogen were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainties of the experimental measurements in the whole range of reported data are estimated to be {+-}0.03 K for temperature, {+-}0.008 MPa for pressure, and {+-}0.20 kg . m{sup -3} for density. The experimental data are correlated using a short empirical equation of six parameters and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations are reported. Published density data of 1-heptanol are compared with values calculated with the 6-parameter equation using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with an available correlation for 1-heptanol. Densities of 2-heptanol at high pressure were not found in the literature and the data reported here represent the first set of data reported in the literature. Isothermal compressibilities and isobaric thermal expansivity are calculated using the 6-parameter equation for both alcohols within uncertainties estimated to be {+-}0.025 Gpa{sup -1} and {+-}4 x 10{sup -7} K{sup -1}, respectively.

  19. A simplified study of trans-mitral Doppler patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas George

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trans-mitral Doppler produces complex patterns with a great deal of variability. There are several confusing numerical measures and indices to study these patterns. However trans-mitral Doppler produces readymade data visualization by pattern generation which could be interpreted by pattern analysis. By following a systematic approach we could create an order and use this tool to study cardiac function. Presentation of the hypothesis In this new approach we eliminate the variables and apply pattern recognition as the main criterion of study. Proper terminologies are also devised to avoid confusion. In this way we can get some meaningful information. Testing the hypothesis Trans-mitral Doppler should be seen as patterns rather than the amplitude. The hypothesis can be proven by logical deduction, extrapolation and elimination of variables. Trans-mitral flow is also analyzed vis-à-vis the Starling's Law applied to the left atrium. Implications of the hypothesis Trans-mitral Doppler patterns are not just useful for evaluating diastolic function. They are also useful to evaluate systolic function. By following this schema we could get useful diagnostic information and therapeutic options using simple pattern recognition with minimal measurements. This simplified but practical approach will be useful in day to day clinical practice and help in understanding cardiac function better. This will also standardize research and improve communication.

  20. A simplified study of trans-mitral Doppler patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, George

    2008-11-28

    Trans-mitral Doppler produces complex patterns with a great deal of variability. There are several confusing numerical measures and indices to study these patterns. However trans-mitral Doppler produces readymade data visualization by pattern generation which could be interpreted by pattern analysis. By following a systematic approach we could create an order and use this tool to study cardiac function. In this new approach we eliminate the variables and apply pattern recognition as the main criterion of study. Proper terminologies are also devised to avoid confusion. In this way we can get some meaningful information. Trans-mitral Doppler should be seen as patterns rather than the amplitude. The hypothesis can be proven by logical deduction, extrapolation and elimination of variables. Trans-mitral flow is also analyzed vis-à-vis the Starling's Law applied to the left atrium. Trans-mitral Doppler patterns are not just useful for evaluating diastolic function. They are also useful to evaluate systolic function. By following this schema we could get useful diagnostic information and therapeutic options using simple pattern recognition with minimal measurements. This simplified but practical approach will be useful in day to day clinical practice and help in understanding cardiac function better. This will also standardize research and improve communication.

  1. Worldwide phylogenetic relationship of avian poxviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyuranecz, Miklós; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Dán, Ádám; Ip, Hon S.; Egstad, Kristina F.; Parker, Patricia G.; Higashiguchi, Jenni M.; Skinner, Michael A.; Höfle, Ursula; Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Dorrestein, Gerry M.; Solt, Szabolcs; Sós, Endre; Kim, Young Jun; Uhart, Marcela; Pereda, Ariel; González-Hein, Gisela; Hidalgo, Hector; Blanco, Juan-Manuel; Erdélyi, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Poxvirus infections have been found in 230 species of wild and domestic birds worldwide in both terrestrial and marine environments. This ubiquity raises the question of how infection has been transmitted and globally dispersed. We present a comprehensive global phylogeny of 111 novel poxvirus isolates in addition to all available sequences from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis of Avipoxvirus genus has traditionally relied on one gene region (4b core protein). In this study we have expanded the analyses to include a second locus (DNA polymerase gene), allowing for a more robust phylogenetic framework, finer genetic resolution within specific groups and the detection of potential recombination. Our phylogenetic results reveal several major features of avipoxvirus evolution and ecology and propose an updated avipoxvirus taxonomy, including three novel subclades. The characterization of poxviruses from 57 species of birds in this study extends the current knowledge of their host range and provides the first evidence of the phylogenetic effect of genetic recombination of avipoxviruses. The repeated occurrence of avian family or order-specific grouping within certain clades (e.g. starling poxvirus, falcon poxvirus, raptor poxvirus, etc.) indicates a marked role of host adaptation, while the sharing of poxvirus species within prey-predator systems emphasizes the capacity for cross-species infection and limited host adaptation. Our study provides a broad and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the Avipoxvirus genus, an ecologically and environmentally important viral group, to formulate a genome sequencing strategy that will clarify avipoxvirus taxonomy.

  2. Gastrointestinal Hormones Induced the Birth of Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabitsch, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The physiological studies by British physiologists William Maddock Bayliss and Ernest Henry Starling, at the beginning of the last century, demonstrated the existence of specific messenger molecules (hormones) circulating in the blood that regulate the organ function and physiological mechanisms. These findings led to the concept of endocrinology. The first 2 hormones were secretin, discovered in 1902, and gastrin, discovered in 1905. Both hormones that have been described are produced in the gut. This chapter summarizes the history around the discovery of these 2 hormones, which is perceived as the birth of endocrinology. It is noteworthy that after the discovery of these 2 gastrointestinal hormones, many other hormones were detected outside the gut, and thereafter gut hormones faded from both the clinical and scientific spotlight. Only recently, the clinical importance of the gut as the body's largest endocrine organ producing a large variety of hormones has been realized. Gastrointestinal hormones are essential regulators of metabolism, growth, development and behavior and are therefore the focus of a modern pediatric endocrinologist. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  4. Congener-specific egg contribution of polychlorinated biphenyls to nestlings in two passerine species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, Jonathan D.; Schuler, Lance J.; Halbrook, Richard S.; Lydy, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residues in nestlings of avian species is a common method for assessing trophic transfer and risk at PCB-contaminated sites. The proportion of nestling PCB mass due to maternal transfer is often accounted for by subtracting total PCB mass in eggs from nestlings. However, variation in physicochemical properties and metabolism among congeners may lead to differences between egg contribution based on total PCBs and dioxin-like congeners. We examined congener-specific variation in contribution of PCBs from eggs to nestlings in tree swallows and European starlings. Egg contribution of total PCB mass was 14.3 and 16.2%, respectively, whereas contribution based on dioxin-like congeners was 14.8 and 13.6%, respectively. These data suggest that using total PCB mass in eggs to adjust estimates of PCB accumulation in nestlings may not reflect patterns for dioxin-like congeners, potentially over or under-estimating the risk of toxicity of PCBs. - Congener-specific contribution of PCBs from egg to nestlings was examined.

  5. The role of wing kinematics of freely flying birds downstream the wake of flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Krishnamoorthy; Gurka, Roi

    2016-11-01

    Avian aerodynamics has been a topic of research for centuries. Avian flight features such as flapping, morphing and maneuvering make bird aerodynamics a complex system to study, analyze and understand. Aerodynamic performance of the flapping wings can be quantified by measuring the vortex structures present in the downstream wake. Still, the direct correlation between the flapping wing kinematics and the evolution of wake features need to be established. In this present study, near wake of three bird species (western sandpiper, European starling and American robin) have been measured experimentally. Long duration, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry technique has been used to capture the wake properties. Simultaneously, the bird kinematics have been captured using high speed camera. Wake structures are reconstructed from the collected PIV images for long chord distances downstream. Wake vorticities and circulation are expressed in the wake composites. Comparison of the wake features of the three birds shows similarities and some key differences are also found. Wing tip motions of the birds are extracted for four continuous wing beat cycle to analyze the wing kinematics. Kinematic parameters of all the three birds are compared to each other and similar trends exhibited by all the birds have been observed. A correlation between the wake evolutions with the wing motion is presented. It was found that the wings' motion generates unique flow patterns at the near wake, especially at the transition phases. At these locations, a drastic change in the circulation was observed.

  6. How disturbances and management practices affect bird communities in a Carpathian river ecosystem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacko, Jozef; Topercer, Ján; Súľovský, Marek

    2018-04-01

    We studied how interactions between disturbances, succession, human alterations and other habitat and landscape attributes affect bird community patterns in a lower reach of a large West Carpathian river Váh with complex disturbance and alteration histories. Breeding-bird communities, their habitats (54 variables) and surrounding landscapes (11 metrics) were sampled using standardized point counts with limited distances at 40 riparian sites divided among two transects along a 12.9 km river stretch. The most frequent and abundant birds were generalists typically associated with forest edge habitats, such as Parus major, Sylvia atricapilla, Fringilla coelebs, Oriolus oriolus, Phylloscopus collybita, Sturnus vulgaris, Turdus merula and Luscinia megarhynchos. Abundances show significant increase at the lower transect responding apparently to greater size and heterogeneity of riparian habitats and more abundant food supply linked to more diverse and intense human influences in a suburban zone. Both indirect (NMDS) and direct ordination (CCA) revealed remarkably large number of evenly important factors underlying riparian bird-habitat interactions. It suggests considerable environmental heterogeneity and complexity of these interactions as a likely outcome of long and complex disturbance and alteration histories of the area. Yet structure and relative importance of first two gradients (longitudinal and lateral linkages) remains simple and stable, complying well with predictions of river continuum concept and stream ecosystem theory. Of the nine statistically significant variables most strongly correlated with first two CCA axes, percentages of Helianthus tuberosus, footpaths, fields, Calystegia sepium and steep banks uphold our hypotheses predicting significant effects of invasive species, visitor disturbances, agricultural land use and unaltered river banks/bed on bird community composition and structure. A small but significant contribution of patch size standard

  7. Volume management in critically ill patients: new insights Avaliação da volemia em pacientes críticos: nova proposta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Rezende Lopes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to turn a fluid challenge into a significant increase in stroke volume and cardiac output, 2 conditions must be met: 1 fluid infusion has to significantly increase cardiac preload and 2 the increase in cardiac preload has to induce a significant increase in stroke volume. In other words, a patient can be nonresponder to a fluid challenge because preload does not increase during fluid infusion or/and because the heart (more precisely, at least 1 of the ventricles is operating on the flat portion of the Frank-Starling curve. Volumetric markers of cardiac preload are therefore useful for checking whether cardiac preload effectively increases during fluid infusion. If this is not the case, giving more fluid, using a venoconstricting agent (to avoid venous pooling, or reducing the intrathoracic pressure (to facilitate the increase in intrathoracic blood volume may be useful for achieving increased cardiac preload. Arterial pulse pressure variation is useful for determining whether stroke volume can/will increase when preload does increase. If this is not the case, only an inotropic drug can improve cardiac output. Therefore, the best option for determining the usefulness of, and monitoring fluid therapy in critically ill patients is the combination of information provided by the static indicators of cardiac preload and arterial pulse pressure variation.Para ser efetivo em aumentar significativamente o volume sistólico um volume de fluido precisa preencher duas condições : 1- A infusão deste fluido tem que aumentar a pré-carga 2- O aumento da pré-carga tem que promover uma elevação proporcional do volume sistólico Em outras palavras o paciente pode ser não responsivo à infusão de volume em termos de volume sistólico, devido a quantidade de fluidos ainda não ser a necessária ou o coração já estar operando na faixa superior da curva de Frank-Starling. Os indicadores volumétricos da pré-carga cardíaca são úteis para

  8. Envejecimiento del sistema cardiovascular Cardiovascular system aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Ocampo

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El envejecimiento del sistema cardiovascular está asociado con un número característico de cambios a nivel bioquímico, histológico y morfológico. Sin embargo, no todas las modificaciones presentadas se asocian con deterioro en la función. Entre los cambios a nivel cardiaco se tienen: disminución en el número de miocitos y en las células del sistema de conducción cardiaca, desarrollo de fibrosis, cambios en el transporte de calcio a través de las membranas y disminución del cronotropismo, inotropismo y lusitropismo mediados por estímulo b-adrenérgico. A nivel vascular, hay incremento en la rigidez de la pared de las arterias, con aumento en la velocidad de la onda de pulso, disfunción endotelial y disminución de la vasodilatación mediada por estímulo b-adrenérgico. Durante el reposo el sistema cardiovascular es capaz de desarrollar mecanismos adaptativos eficientes, pero en situaciones de estrés como el ejercicio, los cambios asociados con el envejecimiento se hacen evidentes ya que está disminuida la capacidad para obtener la frecuencia cardiaca máxima, está incrementada la postcarga y hay disminución de la contractilidad intrínseca. Por lo anterior, los ancianos deben utilizar al máximo el mecanismo de Frank-Starling para mantener el gasto cardiaco. Los cambios estructurales y funcionales asociados con el envejecimiento cardiovascular, disminuyen de forma significativa el umbral en el cual las enfermedades cardiacas llegan a ser evidentes, y deben ser conocidos por el personal de salud encargado de cuidar a los ancianos.Cardiovascular aging is associated with characteristic biochemical, histological and morphological changes. Nevertheless, these changes are not necessarily associated to a deterioration in its function. Among the cardiac changes found, there is a reduction in the number of myocytes and of the cardiac conduction system cells, development of fibrosis, changes in the trans-membrane calcium transport and a

  9. Testes in vitro e in vivo com o Coração Artificial Auxiliar (CAA: um novo modelo de coração artificial totalmente implantável e heterotópico In vitro and in vivo tests with the Auxiliary Total Artificial Heart (ATAH: a new device of a totally implantable and heterotopic artificial heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron ANDRADE

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Um novo modelo de coração artificial está sendo desenvolvido e testado em nossos laboratórios, o Coração Artificial Auxiliar (CAA. Este dispositivo foi projetado com dimensões reduzidas para ser implantado em paralelo ao coração natural do paciente, dentro da cavidade torácica direita de forma heterotópica. Foram realizados testes in vitro, em um circuito simulador do sistema circulatório humano, para verificação do desempenho hidrodinâmico do CAA. Os resultados mostraram que o CAA pode fornecer um fluxo de até 5,8 L/min, com uma pré-carga de 20 mmHg e uma pós-carga de 100 mmHg. A freqüência de batimento do CAA e, consequentemente, o débito cardíaco são dependentes da pré-carga do ventrículo esquerdo, funcionamento semelhante ao coração natural (Lei de Frank Starling. Testes in vivo animal estão sendo realizados para avaliar os resultados obtidos com os testes in vitro e para verificar o comportamento do CAA em ambiente e condições fisiológicas difíceis de serem simuladas. Os testes in vivo estão sendo também importantes para o desenvolvimento de técnicas cirúrgicas e treinamento dos cirurgiões cardiovasculares envolvidos no projeto. Até o momento, dois estudos agudos in vivo foram realizados, com o CAA funcionando por 5h, implantado na cavidade torácica direta de carneiros adultos (50 ± 5 kg. Os resultados destes estudos in vivo demonstraram que o funcionamento do CAA é sincronizado ao coração natural, sendo possível estudar o comportamento do CAA quando, gradativamente, o coração natural teve sua contratilidade reduzida até sua parada total.A miniaturized artificial heart is being developed in the authors laboratories, the Auxiliary Total Artificial Heart (ATAH. This device is an electromechanically driven ATAH using a brushless direct current (DC motor fixed in a center aluminum piece. This pusher plate type ATAH is controlled based on Frank-Starling's law. The beating frequency is regulated

  10. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M; Chen, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  11. Prognostic value of computed tomography pulmonary angiography indices in patients with cancer-related pulmonary embolism: Data from a multicenter cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plasencia-Martínez, Juana María, E-mail: plasen79@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Hospital Universitario Morales Meseguer, Av Marqués de los Vélez, s/n, 30008, Murcia (Spain); Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto [Hematology and Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Morales Meseguer, Av Marqués de los Vélez, s/n, 30008, Murcia (Spain); Calvo-Temprano, David [Radiology Department, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Avenida de Roma, s/n, 33011, Oviedo (Spain); Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Avenida de Roma, s/n, 33011, Oviedo (Spain); Fenoy, Francisco [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, University of Murcia, s/n, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain); Benegas, Mariana; Sánchez, Marcelo [Radiology Department, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona (HCB), Villarroel, 170, 08036, Barcelona (Spain); Font, Carme [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Translational Genomics and Targeted Therapeutics in Solid Tumors, IDIBAPS, Villarroel, 170, 08036, Barcelona (Spain); Varona, Diego [Radiology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Passeig de la Vall d' Hebron, 119-129, 08035, Barcelona (Spain); Martínez de la Haza, David [Radiology Department, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Institut Català d’Oncologia (ICO), Avinguda Granvia, 199-203, 08907, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • CTPA can predict the prognosis of pulmonary embolism in cancer patients. • Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) is predictive of complications at 15 days. • The Frank-Starling mechanism is the theoretical framework to interpret RVD signs. • Pulmonary artery obstruction plays a pathophysiological role only in subjects with RVD. • A proposal for an explanation of clinical-radiological dissociation is presented. - Abstract: Objective: To analyze the prognostic value of pulmonary artery obstruction versus right-ventricle (RV) dysfunction radiologic indices in cancer-related pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: We enrolled 303 consecutive patients with paraneoplastic PE, evaluated by computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) between 2013 and 2014. The primary outcome measure was serious complications at 15 days. Multivariate analyses were conducted by using binary logistic and robust regressions. Radiological features such as the Qanadli index (QI) and RV dysfunction signs were analyzed with Spearman’s partial rank correlations. Results: RV diameter was the only radiological variable associated with an adverse outcome. Subjects with enlarged RV (diameter > 45 mm) had more 15-day complications (58% versus 40%, p = 0.001). The QI correlated with the RV diameter (r = 0.28, p < 0.001), left ventricle diameter (r = −0.19, p < 0.001), right ventricular-to-left ventricular diameter ratio (r = 0.39, p < 0.001), pulmonary artery diameter (r = 0.22, p < 0.001), and pulmonary artery/ascending aorta ratio (r = 0.27, p < 0.001). A QI ≥ 50% was only associated with 15-day complications in subjects with enlarged RV, inverted intraventricular septum, or chronic cardiopulmonary diseases. The central or peripheral PE location did not affect the correlations among radiological variables and was not associated with clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Right ventricular dysfunction signs in CTPA are more useful than QI in predicting cancer-related PE outcome.

  12. Quantitative relationships between thallium-201 estimated myocardial infarct size and left ventricular function in the acute or convalescent phase of the first attack of myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Hajime; Ueda, Keiji; Sakai, Makoto

    1983-01-01

    Correlations between left ventricular (LV) function and infarct size estimated by computer-assisted thallium (Tl)-201 scintigraphy were studied in 16 patients in the acute or convalescent phase of the first attack of transmural myocardial infarction (MI). Tl-201 estimation of the infarct size was done using a ''corrected'' circumferential profile method, by which the total defect score could be obtained. The LV function was evaluated by radionuclide angiography, echocardiography and cardiac catheterization study. The following results were obtained: 1) A close inverse relationship was found between the defect score and the ejection fraction (r = -0.649, p < 0.01). 2) The linear correlation coefficient was 0.540 (p < 0.05) between the defect score and the pulmonary arterial end-diastolic pressure and -0.616 (p < 0.02) between the defect score and the stroke volume index. There was no significant correlation between the defect score and the cardiac index. 3) There was a linear correlation between the defect score and the LV end-diastolic dimension (r = -0.852, p < 0.001). However, there was no relation between the defect score and the left atrial dimension. When the LV indices were compared between the small (S) and the large (L) defect score group, the L defect group had faster heart rate, larger LV chamber size and the smaller stroke volume index than the S defect group. However, there was no significant difference in the cardiac index between these 2 groups. These results suggest that the LV dilatation in acute or convalescent phase of the first attack of transmural MI is an ominous sign because it was usually accompanied by large infarct size. The present study also indicates that LV dilatation accompanying a large infarct does not satisfactorily compensate for LV dysfunction by Frank-Starling mechanism. (J.P.N.)

  13. Cardiac Electromechanical Models: From Cell to Organ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Trayanova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is a multiphysics and multiscale system that has driven the development of the most sophisticated mathematical models at the frontiers of computation physiology and medicine. This review focuses on electromechanical (EM models of the heart from the molecular level of myofilaments to anatomical models of the organ. Because of the coupling in terms of function and emergent behaviors at each level of biological hierarchy, separation of behaviors at a given scale is difficult. Here, a separation is drawn at the cell level so that the first half addresses subcellular/single cell models and the second half addresses organ models. At the subcelluar level, myofilament models represent actin-myosin interaction and Ca-based activation. Myofilament models and their refinements represent an overview of the development in the field. The discussion of specific models emphasizes the roles of cooperative mechanisms and sarcomere length dependence of contraction force, considered the cellular basis of the Frank-Starling law. A model of electrophysiology and Ca handling can be coupled to a myofilament model to produce an EM cell model, and representative examples are summarized to provide an overview of the progression of field. The second half of the review covers organ-level models that require solution of the electrical component as a reaction-diffusion system and the mechanical component, in which active tension generated by the myocytes produces deformation of the organ as described by the equations of continuum mechanics. As outlined in the review, different organ-level models have chosen to use different ionic and myofilament models depending on the specific application; this choice has been largely dictated by compromises between model complexity and computational tractability. The review also addresses application areas of EM models such as cardiac resynchronization therapy and the role of mechano-electric coupling in arrhythmias and

  14. Pattern-Induced Covert Category Learning in Songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comins, Jordan A; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2015-07-20

    Language is uniquely human, but its acquisition may involve cognitive capacities shared with other species. During development, language experience alters speech sound (phoneme) categorization. Newborn infants distinguish the phonemes in all languages but by 10 months show adult-like greater sensitivity to native language phonemic contrasts than non-native contrasts. Distributional theories account for phonetic learning by positing that infants infer category boundaries from modal distributions of speech sounds along acoustic continua. For example, tokens of the sounds /b/ and /p/ cluster around different mean voice onset times. To disambiguate overlapping distributions, contextual theories propose that phonetic category learning is informed by higher-level patterns (e.g., words) in which phonemes normally occur. For example, the vowel sounds /Ι/ and /e/ can occupy similar perceptual spaces but can be distinguished in the context of "with" and "well." Both distributional and contextual cues appear to function in speech acquisition. Non-human species also benefit from distributional cues for category learning, but whether category learning benefits from contextual information in non-human animals is unknown. The use of higher-level patterns to guide lower-level category learning may reflect uniquely human capacities tied to language acquisition or more general learning abilities reflecting shared neurobiological mechanisms. Using songbirds, European starlings, we show that higher-level pattern learning covertly enhances categorization of the natural communication sounds. This observation mirrors the support for contextual theories of phonemic category learning in humans and demonstrates a general form of learning not unique to humans or language. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reproductive skew and selection on female ornamentation in social species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Dustin R; Lovette, Irby J

    2009-12-10

    Male animals are typically more elaborately ornamented than females. Classic sexual selection theory notes that because sperm are cheaper to produce than eggs, and because males generally compete more intensely for reproductive opportunities and invest less in parental care than females, males can obtain greater fitness benefits from mating multiply. Therefore, sexual selection typically results in male-biased sex differences in secondary sexual characters. This generality has recently been questioned, because in cooperatively breeding vertebrates, the strength of selection on traits used in intrasexual competition for access to mates (sexual selection) or other resources linked to reproduction (social selection) is similar in males and females. Because selection is acting with comparable intensity in both sexes in cooperatively breeding species, the degree of sexual dimorphism in traits used in intrasexual competition should be reduced in cooperative breeders. Here we use the socially diverse African starlings (Sturnidae) to demonstrate that the degree of sexual dimorphism in plumage and body size is reduced in cooperatively breeding species as a result of increased selection on females for traits that increase access to reproductive opportunities, other resources, or higher social status. In cooperative breeders such as these, where there is unequal sharing of reproduction (reproductive skew) among females, and where female dominance rank influences access to mates and other resources, intrasexual competition among females may be intense and ultimately select for female trait elaboration. Selection is thereby acting with different intensities on males and females in cooperatively versus non-cooperatively breeding species, and female-female interactions in group-living vertebrates will have important consequences for the evolution of female morphological, physiological and behavioural traits.

  16. A potential neural substrate for processing functional classes of complex acoustic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle George

    Full Text Available Categorization is essential to all cognitive processes, but identifying the neural substrates underlying categorization processes is a real challenge. Among animals that have been shown to be able of categorization, songbirds are particularly interesting because they provide researchers with clear examples of categories of acoustic signals allowing different levels of recognition, and they possess a system of specialized brain structures found only in birds that learn to sing: the song system. Moreover, an avian brain nucleus that is analogous to the mammalian secondary auditory cortex (the caudo-medial nidopallium, or NCM has recently emerged as a plausible site for sensory representation of birdsong, and appears as a well positioned brain region for categorization of songs. Hence, we tested responses in this non-primary, associative area to clear and distinct classes of songs with different functions and social values, and for a possible correspondence between these responses and the functional aspects of songs, in a highly social songbird species: the European starling. Our results clearly show differential neuronal responses to the ethologically defined classes of songs, both in the number of neurons responding, and in the response magnitude of these neurons. Most importantly, these differential responses corresponded to the functional classes of songs, with increasing activation from non-specific to species-specific and from species-specific to individual-specific sounds. These data therefore suggest a potential neural substrate for sorting natural communication signals into categories, and for individual vocal recognition of same-species members. Given the many parallels that exist between birdsong and speech, these results may contribute to a better understanding of the neural bases of speech.

  17. A Bird's Eye View of Sleep-Dependent Memory Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawn, Timothy P; Margoliash, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    How new experiences are solidified into long-lasting memories is a central question in the study of brain and behavior. One of the most intriguing discoveries in memory research is that brain activity during sleep helps to transform newly learned information and skills into robust memories. Though the first experimental work linking sleep and memory was conducted 90 years ago by Jenkins and Dallenbach, the case for sleep-dependent memory consolidation has only garnered strong support in the last decade. Recent studies in humans provide extensive behavioral, imaging, and polysomnographic data supporting sleep consolidation of a broad range of memory tasks. Likewise, studies in a few animal model systems have elucidated potential mechanisms contributing to sleep consolidation such as neural reactivation and synaptic homeostasis. Here, we present an overview of sleep-dependent memory consolidation, focusing on how investigations of sleep and learning in birds have complemented the progress made in mammalian systems by emphasizing a strong connection between behavior and physiology. We begin by describing the behavioral approach that has been utilized to demonstrate sleep consolidation in humans. We then address neural reactivation in the rodent hippocampal system as a putative mechanism of sleep consolidation. Next, we discuss the role of sleep in the learning and maintenance of song in zebra finches. We note that while both the rodent and zebra finch systems provide evidence for sleep-dependent memory changes in physiology and behavior, neither duplicates the pattern of changes most commonly observed in humans. Finally, we present a recently developed model of sleep consolidation involving auditory classification learning in European starlings , which has the potential to connect behavioral evidence of sleep consolidation as developed in humans with underlying neural mechanisms observable in animals.

  18. [Does fasting influence preload responsiveness in ASA 1 and 2 volunteers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniel Rodrigues; Ribeiras, Regina

    Preoperative fasting was long regarded as an important cause of fluid depletion, leading to hemodynamic instability during surgery should replenishment not be promptly instituted. Lately, this traditional point of view has been progressively challenged, and a growing number of authors now propose a more restrictive approach to fluid management, although doubt remains as to the true hemodynamic influence of preoperative fasting. We designed an observational, analytic, prospective, longitudinal study in which 31 ASA 1 and ASA 2 volunteers underwent an echocardiographic examination both before and after a fasting period of at least 6h. Data from both static and dynamic preload indices were obtained on both periods, and subsequently compared. Static preload indices exhibited a markedly variable behaviour with fasting. Dynamic indices, however, were far more consistent with one another, all pointing in the same direction, i.e., evidencing no statistically significant change with the fasting period. We also analysed the reliability of dynamic indices to respond to known, intentional preload changes. Aortic velocity time integral (VTI) variation with the passive leg raise manoeuvre was the only variable that proved to be sensitive enough to consistently signal the presence of preload variation. Fasting does not appear to cause a change in preload of conscious volunteers nor does it significantly alter their position in the Frank-Starling curve, even with longer fasting times than usually recommended. Transaortic VTI variation with the passive leg raise manoeuvre is the most robust dynamic index (of those studied) to evaluate preload responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Does fasting influence preload responsiveness in ASA 1 and 2 volunteers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniel Rodrigues; Ribeiras, Regina

    Preoperative fasting was long regarded as an important cause of fluid depletion, leading to hemodynamic instability during surgery should replenishment is not promptly instituted. Lately, this traditional point of view has been progressively challenged, and a growing number of authors now propose a more restrictive approach to fluid management, although doubt remains as to the true hemodynamic influence of preoperative fasting. We designed an observational, analytic, prospective, longitudinal study in which 31 ASA 1 and ASA 2 volunteers underwent an echocardiographic examination both before and after a fasting period of at least 6hours (h). Data from both static and dynamic preload indices were obtained on both periods, and subsequently compared. Static preload indices exhibited a markedly variable behaviour with fasting. Dynamic indices, however, were far more consistent with one another, all pointing in the same direction, i.e., evidencing no statistically significant change with the fasting period. We also analysed the reliability of dynamic indices to respond to known, intentional preload changes. Aortic velocity time integral (VTI) variation with the passive leg raise manoeuvre was the only variable that proved to be sensitive enough to consistently signal the presence of preload variation. Fasting does not appear to cause a change in preload of conscious volunteers nor does it significantly alter their position in the Frank-Starling curve, even with longer fasting times than usually recommended. Transaortic VTI variation with the passive leg raise manoeuvre is the most robust dynamic index (of those studied) to evaluate preload responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. The benefit of enhanced contractility in the infarct borderzone: A virtual experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong eZhang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A. Objectives Contractile function in the normally perfused infarct borderzone (BZ is depressed. However, the impact of reduced BZ contractility on left ventricular (LV pump function is unknown. As a consequence, there have been no therapies specifically designed to improve BZ contractility. We tested the hypothesis that an improvement in borderzone contractility will improve LV pump function.B. Methods From a previously reported study, magnetic resonance (MRI images with non-invasive tags were used to calculate 3D myocardial strain in five sheep 16 weeks after anteroapical myocardial infarction. Animal specific finite element (FE models were created using MRI data and LV pressure obtained at early diastolic filling. Analysis of borderzone function using those FE models has been previously reported. Chamber stiffness, pump function (Starling’s law and stress in the fiber, cross fiber and circumferential directions were calculated. Animal-specific FE models were performed for three cases: a impaired BZ contractility (INJURED; b BZ contractility fully restored (100% BZ IMPROVEMENT; or c BZ contractility partially restored (50% BZ IMPROVEMENT.C. Results 100% BZ IMPROVEMENT and 50% BZ IMPROVEMENT both caused an upward shift in the Starling relationship, resulting in a large (36% and 26% increase in stroke volume at LVPED = 20 mm Hg (8.0 ml, p<0.001. Moreover, there were a leftward shift in the end systolic pressure volume relationship, resulting in a 7% and 5% increase in LVPES at 110 mm Hg (7.7 ml, p<0.005. It showed that even 50% BZ IMPROVEMENT was sufficient to drive much of the calculated increase in function. D. Conclusions. Improved borderzone contractility has a beneficial effect on LV pump function. Partial improvement of borderzone contractility was sufficient to drive much of the calculated increase in function. Therapies specifically designed to improve borderzone contractility should be developed.

  1. Papel da titina na modulação da função cardíaca e suas implicações fisiopatológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Castro-Ferreira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A titina é uma proteína sarcomérica gigante que se estende desde a linha Z até a linha M. Em razão de sua localização, representa um importante sensor biomecânico com um papel fundamental na manutenção da integridade estrutural do sarcômero. A titina funciona como uma "mola bidirecional" que regula o comprimento sarcomérico e realiza ajustes adequados da tensão passiva sempre que o comprimento varia. Dessa forma, não só determina a rigidez ventricular e a função diastólica, como também influencia a função cardíaca sistólica, modulando o mecanismo de Frank-Starling. O miocárdio expressa duas isoformas dessa macromolécula: a N2B, mais rígida, e a isoforma N2BA, mais complacente. As alterações na expressão relativa das duas isoformas da titina ou alterações do seu estado de fosforilação têm sido implicadas na fisiopatologia de várias doenças como a insuficiência cardíaca diastólica, a cardiomiopatia dilatada, a cardiomiopatia isquêmica e a estenose aórtica. Neste artigo pretende-se descrever sumariamente a estrutura e localização da titina, a sua relação com diferentes cardiomiopatias, e compreender de que forma as alterações dessa macromolécula influenciam a fisiopatologia da insuficiência cardíaca diastólica, salientando o potencial terapêutico da manipulação dessa macromolécula.

  2. Revisiting the slow force response: the role of the PKG signaling pathway in the normal and the ischemic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Ferreira, Ricardo; Neves, João Sérgio; Ladeiras-Lopes, Ricardo; Leite-Moreira, André M; Neiva-Sousa, Manuel; Almeida-Coelho, João; Ferreira-Martins, João; F Leite-Moreira, Adelino

    2014-09-01

    The myocardial response to acute stretch consists of a two-phase increase in contractility: an acute increase by the Frank-Starling mechanism and a gradual and time-dependent increase in force generated known as the slow force response (SFR). The SFR is actively modulated by different signaling pathways, but the role of protein kinase G (PKG) signaling is unknown. In this study we aim to characterize the role of the PKG signaling pathway in the SFR under normal and ischemic conditions. Rabbit papillary muscles were stretched from 92 to 100% of maximum length (Lmax) under basal conditions, in the absence (1) or presence of: a PKG agonist (2) and a PKG inhibitor (3); under ischemic conditions in the absence (4) or presence of: a PKG agonist (5); a nitric oxide (NO) donor (6) and a phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor (7). Under normoxia, the SFR was significantly attenuated by inhibition of PKG and remained unaltered with PKG activation. Ischemia induced a progressive decrease in myocardial contractility after stretch. Neither the PKG agonist nor the NO donor altered the myocardial response to stretch under ischemic conditions. However, the use of a PDE5 inhibitor in ischemia partially reversed the progressive deterioration in contractility. PKG activity is essential for the SFR. During ischemia, a progressive decline in the force is observed in response to acute myocardial stretch. This dysfunctional response can be partially reversed by the use of PDE5 inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Going beyond the second virial coefficient in the hadron resonance gas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaev, K. A.; Sagun, V. V.; Ivanytskyi, A. I.; Yakimenko, I. P.; Nikonov, E. G.; Taranenko, A. V.; Zinovjev, G. M.

    2018-02-01

    We develop a novel formulation of the hadron resonance gas model which, besides a hard-core repulsion, explicitly accounts for the surface tension induced by the interaction between the particles. Such an equation of state allows us to go beyond the Van der Waals approximation for any number of different hard-core radii. A comparison with the Carnahan-Starling equation of state shows that the new model is valid for packing fractions 0.2-0.22, while the usual Van der Waals model is inapplicable at packing fractions above 0.1-0.11. Moreover, it is shown that the equation of state with induced surface tension is softer than the one of hard spheres and remains causal at higher particle densities. The great advantage of our model is that there are only two equations to be solved and neither their number nor their form depend on the values of the hard-core radii used for different hadronic resonances. Such an advantage leads to a significant mathematical simplification compared to other versions of truly multi-component hadron resonance gas models. Using this equation of state we obtain a high-quality fit of the ALICE hadron multiplicities measured at the center-of-mass energy 2.76 TeV per nucleon and we find that the dependence of χ2 / ndf on the temperature has a single global minimum in the traditional hadron resonance gas model with the multi-component hard-core repulsion. Also we find two local minima of χ2 / ndf in the model in which the proper volume of each hadron is proportional to its mass. However, it is shown that in the latter model a second local minimum located at higher temperatures always appears far above the limit of its applicability.

  4. The short-term effects of increasing plasma colloid osmotic pressure in patients with noncardiac pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibbald, W.J.; Driedger, A.A.; Wells, G.A.; Myers, M.L.; Lefcoe, M.

    1983-01-01

    We infused hyperoncotic albumin (25 or 50 gm of a 50% solution) into patients with noncardiac pulmonary edema (adult respiratory distress syndrome [ARDS]) to evaluate its effect on the transmicrovascular flux from blood to pulmonary edema fluid of two radiotracers-- 111 In-DTPA (mol wt 504) and 125 I-human serum albumin (HSA) (mol wt 69,000). Two groups of patients were studied--one with a modest increase in permeability of the pulmonary alveolocapillary membrane to 125 I-HSA (group 1) and another with a large increase in permeability to 125 I-HSA (group 2). We used furosemide, when necessary, to minimize the effect of albumin infusion to increase the pulmonary microvascular hydrostatic pressure (Pmv), measured clinically as the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP). Therapy significantly increased the mean colloid osmotic pressure (COP) in both groups, but not the mean PCWP or calculated Pmv. Albumin had no significant effect on the mean pulmonary transmicrovascular flux of the radiotracers in either group, despite the increase in COP. In individual patients, a change in the Pmv in response to albumin infusion was directly correlated with the change in flux of 111 In-DTPA [group 1: delta In-DTPA (%) . 8.66 + 1.4 delta Pmv (%) r . 0.51, P less than 0.02; group 2: delta In-DTPA (%) . -3.43 + 1.6 delta Pmv (%) r . 0.67, P less than 0.01]. A change in the transmicrovascular flux of I-HSA also correlated with a change in the intravascular Starling forces in both groups. We conclude that albumin infusion in patients with ARDS will not augment the pulmonary transmicrovascular flux of low or high molecular-weight solutes when the effect of albumin to increase the Pmv is minimized; nor, however, does an increase in plasma COP significantly reduce the flux of such solutes

  5. Fisiología Endocrina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Ángela Casas Figueroa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fragmento.El estudio y conocimiento del sistema endocrino clásico lleva ya más de un siglo, a partir del descubrimiento de la Secretina por los fisiólogos británicos Bayliss y Starling, quienes lo propusieron como un sistema de control celular. La propuesta llegaba para complementar lo planteado por Pavlov, quien consideraba al sistema nervioso como único sistema regulador. Que lo uno no excluye lo otro, se sabe desde hace algún tiempo. Los sistemas endocrino, nervioso e inmune, de manera integrada, regulan todos los otros aparatos y órganos. Aprender sobre estos mecanismos de la biología molecular nos permite perfeccionar nuestro conocimiento sobre las hormonas y sus acciones sobre la función general de órganos específicos.En 1972, el endocrinólogo Alfredo Jácome Roca, docente por excelencia, se propuso compartir su conocimiento sobre la fisiología endocrina con los estudiantes de medicina de la Universidad Javeriana y de otras escuelas médicas colombianas. Fue así como editó su primer texto con el sello de la Editorial El Ateneo de Buenos Aires, explicando las interrelaciones glandulares con el medio interno y propuso una aproximación de estas a la práctica clínica. Pasaron los años, los descubrimientos avanzaron y El Ateneo publicó su segunda edición en 1979. Al terminar el siglo XX e iniciarse una nueva era con conceptos nuevos y revolucionarios, decidió lanzar una tercera edición de este valioso texto de enseñanza médica en 2005, esta vez con el patrocinio de la Academia Nacional de Medicina de Colombia, plasmando allí los nuevos avances en el conocimiento.

  6. Spirituality and well being among elders: differences between elders with heart failure and those without heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T Quinn Griffin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mary T Quinn Griffin1, Yi-Hui Lee2, Ali Salman1, Yaewon Seo1, Patricia A Marin3, Randall C Starling3, Joyce J Fitzpatrick11Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH; 2College of Nursing and Health Wright State University Dayton, OH; 3Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OhioAbstract: Heart failure is a chronic debilitating disease that affects all aspects of a person’s life, including physical, mental and spiritual dimensions. The associations among these dimensions, and the relationship to overall health status, have not been clearly identified. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to explore differences between spirituality, depressive symptoms, and quality of life among elders with and without heart failure. A total of 44 elders with heart failure and 40 non-heart failure elders completed several questionnaires including: The Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES, Spirituality Index of Well-Being (SIWB, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, and SF-12™ Health Survey. There were significant differences in the groups on gender and ethnicity; thus these variables were controlled in the analyses related to the dependent variables. After controlling for gender and ethnicity, there were significant differences in the physical component of quality of life and spiritual well-being. The heart failure patients had significantly lower physical quality of life but more spiritual well-being than the non-heart failure patients. There were no significant differences in daily spiritual experiences, mental component of quality of life, and depressive symptoms between the two groups.Keywords: spiritual experience, spiritual well-being, heart failure, depressive symptoms, quality of life, elders

  7. Identifying knowledge gaps for gene drive research to control invasive animal species: The next CRISPR step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian Moro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive animals have been linked to the extinctions of native wildlife, and to significant agricultural financial losses or impacts. Current approaches to control invasive species require ongoing resources and management over large geographic scales, and often result in the short-term suppression of populations. New and innovative approaches are warranted. Recently, the RNA guided gene drive system based on CRISPR/Cas9 is being proposed as a potential gene editing tool that could be used by wildlife managers as a non-lethal addition or alternative to help reduce pest animal populations. While regulatory control and social acceptance are crucial issues that must be addressed, there is an opportunity now to identify the knowledge and research gaps that exist for some important invasive species. Here we systematically determine the knowledge gaps for pest species for which gene drives could potentially be applied. We apply a conceptual ecological risk framework within the gene drive context within an Australian environment to identify key requirements for undertaking work on seven exemplar invasive species in Australia. This framework allows an evaluation of the potential research on an invasive species of interest and within a gene drive and risk context. We consider the currently available biological, genetic and ecological information for the house mouse, European red fox, feral cat, European rabbit, cane toad, black rat and European starling to evaluate knowledge gaps and identify candidate species for future research. We discuss these findings in the context of future thematic areas of research worth pursuing in preparation for a more formal assessment of the use of gene drives as a novel strategy for the control of these and other invasive species. Keywords: Invasive species, Gene drive, CRISPR, Pest management, Islands

  8. Charles Darwin and the evolution of human grammatical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Hugh W; Christman, Sarah S

    2010-04-08

    Charles Darwin's evolutionary theories of animal communication were deeply embedded in a centuries-old model of association psychology, whose prodromes have most often been traced to the writings of Aristotle. His notions of frequency of occurrence of pairings have been passed down through the centuries and were a major ontological feature in the formation of associative connectivity. He focused on the associations of cause and effect, contiguity of sequential occurrence, and similarity among items. Cause and effect were often reduced to another type of contiguity relation, so that Aristotle is most often evoked as the originator of the associative bondings through similarity and contiguity, contiguity being the most powerful and frequent means of association. Contiguity eventually became the overriding mechanism for serial ordering of mental events in both perception and action. The notions of concatenation throughout the association psychology took the form of "trains" of events, both sensory and motor, in such a way that serial ordering came to be viewed as an item-by-item string of locally contiguous events. Modern developments in the mathematics of serial ordering have advanced in sophistication since the early and middle twentieth century, and new computational methods have allowed us to reevaluate the serial concatenative theories of Darwin and the associationists. These new models of serial order permit a closer comparative scrutiny between human and nonhuman. The present study considers Darwin's insistence on a "degree" continuity between human and nonhuman animal serial ordering. We will consider a study of starling birdsongs and whether the serial ordering of those songs provides evidence that they have a syntax that at best differs only in degree and not in kind with the computations of human grammatical structures. We will argue that they, in fact, show no such thing.

  9. Inherent noise can facilitate coherence in collective swarm motion

    KAUST Repository

    Yates, C. A.

    2009-03-31

    Among the most striking aspects of the movement of many animal groups are their sudden coherent changes in direction. Recent observations of locusts and starlings have shown that this directional switching is an intrinsic property of their motion. Similar direction switches are seen in self-propelled particle and other models of group motion. Comprehending the factors that determine such switches is key to understanding the movement of these groups. Here, we adopt a coarse-grained approach to the study of directional switching in a self-propelled particle model assuming an underlying one-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation for the mean velocity of the particles. We continue with this assumption in analyzing experimental data on locusts and use a similar systematic Fokker-Planck equation coefficient estimation approach to extract the relevant information for the assumed Fokker-Planck equation underlying that experimental data. In the experiment itself the motion of groups of 5 to 100 locust nymphs was investigated in a homogeneous laboratory environment, helping us to establish the intrinsic dynamics of locust marching bands. We determine the mean time between direction switches as a function of group density for the experimental data and the self-propelled particle model. This systematic approach allows us to identify key differences between the experimental data and the model, revealing that individual locusts appear to increase the randomness of their movements in response to a loss of alignment by the group. We give a quantitative description of how locusts use noise to maintain swarm alignment. We discuss further how properties of individual animal behavior, inferred by using the Fokker-Planck equation coefficient estimation approach, can be implemented in the self-propelled particle model to replicate qualitatively the group level dynamics seen in the experimental data.

  10. Terrestrial bird population trends on Aguiguan (Goat Island), Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Fred; Camp, Richard J.; Marshall, Ann P.; Pratt, Thane K.; Williams, Laura; Radley, Paul; Cruz, Justine B.

    2014-01-01

    The island of Aguiguan is part of the Mariana archipelago and currently supports populations of four endemic species, including one endemic genus, Cleptornis. Bird population trends since 1982 were recently assessed on the neighbouring islands of Saipan, Tinian, and Rota indicating declines in some native species. Point-transect surveys were conducted in 2008 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to assess population densities and trends on Aguiguan. Densities for six of the nine native birds—White-throated Ground-dove Gallicolumba xanthonura, Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris, Rufous Fantail Rhipidura rufifrons, Golden White-eye Cleptornis marchei, Bridled White-eye Zosterops conspicillatus and Micronesian Starling Aplonis opaca—and the non-native bird—Island Collared-dove Streptopelia bitorquata—were significantly greater in 2008 than in 1982. No differences in densities were detected among the surveys for Mariana Fruit-dove Ptilinopus roseicapilla, and Micronesian MyzomelaMyzomela rubratra. Three federally and locally listed endangered birds—Nightingale Reed-warbler Acrocephalus luscinius, Mariana Swiftlet Collocalia bartschi, and Micronesian Megapode Megapodius laperous)—were either not detected during the point-transect counts, the surveys were not appropriate for the species, or the numbers of birds detected were too small to estimate densities. The factors behind the increasing trends for some species are unknown but may be related to increased forest cover on the island since 1982. With declining trends for some native species on neighbouring islands, the increasing and stable trends on Aguiguan is good news for forest bird populations in the region, as Aguiguan populations can help support conservation efforts on other islands in the archipelago.

  11. Ventricular performance and Na+-K+ ATPase activity are reduced early and late after myocardial infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stefanon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction leads to compensatory ventricular remodeling. Disturbances in myocardial contractility depend on the active transport of Ca2+ and Na+, which are regulated by Na+-K+ ATPase. Inappropriate regulation of Na+-K+ ATPase activity leads to excessive loss of K+ and gain of Na+ by the cell. We determined the participation of Na+-K+ ATPase in ventricular performance early and late after myocardial infarction. Wistar rats (8-10 per group underwent left coronary artery ligation (infarcted, Inf or sham-operation (Sham. Ventricular performance was measured at 3 and 30 days after surgery using the Langendorff technique. Left ventricular systolic pressure was obtained under different ventricular diastolic pressures and increased extracellular Ca2+ concentrations (Ca2+e and after low and high ouabain concentrations. The baseline coronary perfusion pressure increased 3 days after myocardial infarction and normalized by 30 days (Sham 3 = 88 ± 6; Inf 3 = 130 ± 9; Inf 30 = 92 ± 7 mmHg; P < 0.05. The inotropic response to Ca2+e and ouabain was reduced at 3 and 30 days after myocardial infarction (Ca2+ = 1.25 mM; Sham 3 = 70 ± 3; Inf 3 = 45 ± 2; Inf 30 = 29 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05, while the Frank-Starling mechanism was preserved. At 3 and 30 days after myocardial infarction, ventricular Na+-K+ ATPase activity and contractility were reduced. This Na+-K+ ATPase hypoactivity may modify the Na+, K+ and Ca2+ transport across the sarcolemma resulting in ventricular dysfunction.

  12. Human Cardiovascular Adaptation to Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Entering weightlessness (0 G) induces immediately a shift of blood and fluid from the lower to the upper parts of the body inducing expansion of the cardiac chambers (Bungo et al. 1986; Charles & Lathers 1991; Videbaek & Norsk 1997). For many years the effects of sudden 0 G on central venous pressure (CVP) was discussed, and it puzzled researchers that CVP compared to the 1-G supine position decreased during the initial hours of spaceflight, when at the same time left atrial diameter increased (Buckey et al. 1996). By measuring esophageal pressure as an estimate of inter-pleural pressure, it was later shown that this pressure decreases more than CVP does during 0 G induced by parabolic flights (Videbaek & Norsk 1997). Thus, transmural CVP is increased, which distends the cardiac chambers. This unique lung-heart interaction whereby 1) inter-pleural pressure decreases and 2) central blood volume is expanded is unique for 0 G. Because transmural CVP is increased, stroke volume increases according to the law of Frank-Starling leading to an increase in cardiac output, which is maintained increased during months of 0 G in space to levels of some 25% above that of the 1-G seated position (Norsk unpublished). Simultaneously, sympathetic nervous activity is at the level of the upright 1-G posture, which is difficult to explain based on the high stroke volume and decreased blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. This paradox should be explored and the mechanisms revealed, because it might have implications for estimating the cardiovascular risk of travelling in space.

  13. A graphical simulation software for instruction in cardiovascular mechanics physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Computer supported, interactive e-learning systems are widely used in the teaching of physiology. However, the currently available complimentary software tools in the field of the physiology of cardiovascular mechanics have not yet been adapted to the latest systems software. Therefore, a simple-to-use replacement for undergraduate and graduate students' education was needed, including an up-to-date graphical software that is validated and field-tested. Methods Software compatible to Windows, based on modified versions of existing mathematical algorithms, has been newly developed. Testing was performed during a full term of physiological lecturing to medical and biology students. Results The newly developed CLabUZH software models a reduced human cardiovascular loop containing all basic compartments: an isolated heart including an artificial electrical stimulator, main vessels and the peripheral resistive components. Students can alter several physiological parameters interactively. The resulting output variables are printed in x-y diagrams and in addition shown in an animated, graphical model. CLabUZH offers insight into the relations of volume, pressure and time dependency in the circulation and their correlation to the electrocardiogram (ECG). Established mechanisms such as the Frank-Starling Law or the Windkessel Effect are considered in this model. The CLabUZH software is self-contained with no extra installation required and runs on most of today's personal computer systems. Conclusions CLabUZH is a user-friendly interactive computer programme that has proved to be useful in teaching the basic physiological principles of heart mechanics. PMID:21262003

  14. Supplementary Feeding, Plumage Documentation and Early Season Prey of Peregrine Falcons at the New Mexico Alpha Eyrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponton, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-20

    A review of what is known about avian physiology and the biological effects of DDE suggests that some benefit to peregrine falcon egg condition could be attained by artificially feeding DDE free prey to the female from the time of her arrival on the nesting grounds until completion of egg laying; the magnitude of potential benefit is unknown. Sporadic efforts in the past demonstrated the need for precision methods of prey delivery. Two methods were developed and tried; providing dead prey items by dropping them in a day perch, and delivery of live prey by remotely controlled release from compartments positioned at the top of the cliff occupied by the falcons. Maintaining quail in the day perch for 21 days resulted in at least one and probably two meals for the female peregrine. Of 16 live birds released (mostly pigeons) 13 were pursued and three caught. Blinding the pigeons with tape proved to be necessary to enable capture. Also, some reluctance of the male peregrine to attack pigeons was observed, and problems with equipment, visibility, and the proximity of the falcons to the release box were encountered. Manpower was the most significant resource requirement. Baiting of great-horned owls, possibly leading to owl attack on the falcons, is judged to be the largest detrimental effect of supplemental feeding. It is recommended that supplemental feeding be reserved for falcons or eyries where complete reproductive failure is expected. Plumage documentation photography was successfully conducted by a remotely controlled camera as an aid to identification of individual falcons. American robin, red-winged blackbird, starling, white-throated swift, bluebird, and mourning dove were among natural prey consumed by the peregrines before completion of egg laying. All activities in close proximity to the cliff were conducted at night to preclude direct disturbance of the falcons.

  15. Parallels in Communication and Navigation Technology and Natural Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The premise is more than art imitates life, or technology imitates nature it is a nascent step to see how we might be unwittingly inspired and influenced. An example that might immediately come to mind is a starling murmuration (a phenomenon called scale-free correlation) and Intels recent Coachella music festival drone performance. Superconductivity is a macroscopic manifestation of a quantum phenomenon - choreographed electrons (i.e. an electron murmuration) that enable astonishing devices. There is indeed an intimate connectedness between biology and electromagnetism. Our brains are complex neural circuits generating magnetic fields with a magnitude around 100 femtoTesla (roughly one billion times weaker than a typical magnet used to tack notes to a refrigerator door). Migratory birds navigate by orienteering with respect to the Earth's magnetic field. Electromagnetic field therapy is used in orthopedics to aid in bone repair. The electric eel generates a large electric field for self-defense. Sharks apparently detect extremely weak electric fields for finding prey. And so on. There are similarities between the way a field of wheat responds to a breeze and the natural restoring forces of a semiconductor crystal. And waves in a slowly moving river can lap backwards against a peninsular shoreline mimicking a diffraction effect. Getting back to the introductory sentence and mysterious links over cosmic distances, in August 2016, China launched the Quantum Experiments at Space Scale (QUESS) satellite. The technology is based on a non-linear crystal that produces pairs of entangled photons whose attributes apparently remain entwined regardless of how far apart they are separated. This paper will, no doubt superficially, attempt to enumerate and examine these types of connections and parallelisms.

  16. The physics of flocking: Correlation as a compass from experiments to theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomás S.

    2018-01-01

    Collective behavior in biological systems is a complex topic, to say the least. It runs wildly across scales in both space and time, involving taxonomically vastly different organisms, from bacteria and cell clusters, to insect swarms and up to vertebrate groups. It entails concepts as diverse as coordination, emergence, interaction, information, cooperation, decision-making, and synchronization. Amid this jumble, however, we cannot help noting many similarities between collective behavior in biological systems and collective behavior in statistical physics, even though none of these organisms remotely looks like an Ising spin. Such similarities, though somewhat qualitative, are startling, and regard mostly the emergence of global dynamical patterns qualitatively different from individual behavior, and the development of system-level order from local interactions. It is therefore tempting to describe collective behavior in biology within the conceptual framework of statistical physics, in the hope to extend to this new fascinating field at least part of the great predictive power of theoretical physics. In this review we propose that the conceptual cornerstone of this ambitious program be that of correlation. To illustrate this idea we address the case of collective behavior in bird flocks. Two key threads emerge, as two sides of one single story: the presence of scale-free correlations and the dynamical mechanism of information transfer. We discuss first static correlations in starling flocks, in particular the experimental finding of their scale-free nature, the formulation of models that account for this fact using maximum entropy, and the relation of scale-free correlations to information transfer. This is followed by a dynamic treatment of information propagation (propagation of turns across a flock), starting with a discussion of experimental results and following with possible theoretical explanations of those, which require the addition of behavioral

  17. Model of pulmonary fluid traffic homeostasis based on respiratory cycle pressure, bidirectional bronchiolo-pulmonar shunting and water evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven; Kurbel, Beatrica; Gulam, Danijela; Spajić, Borislav

    2010-06-01

    The main puzzle of the pulmonary circulation is how the alveolar spaces remain dry over a wide range of pulmonary vascular pressures and blood flows. Although normal hydrostatic pressure in pulmonary capillaries is probably always below 10 mmHg, well bellow plasma colloid pressure of 25 mmHg, most textbooks state that some fluid filtration through capillary walls does occur, while the increased lymph drainage prevents alveolar fluid accumulation. The lack of a measurable pressure drop along pulmonary capillaries makes the classic description of Starling forces unsuitable to the low pressure, low resistance pulmonary circulation. Here presented model of pulmonary fluid traffic describes lungs as a matrix of small vascular units, each consisting of alveoli whose capillaries are anastomotically linked to the bronchiolar capillaries perfused by a single bronchiolar arteriole. It proposes that filtration and absorption in pulmonary and in bronchiolar capillaries happen as alternating periods of low and of increased perfusion pressures. The model is based on three levels of filtration control: short filtration phases due to respiratory cycle of the whole lung are modulated by bidirectional bronchiolo-pulmonar shunting independently in each small vascular unit, while fluid evaporation from alveolar groups further tunes local filtration. These mechanisms are used to describe a self-sustaining regulator that allows optimal fluid traffic in different settings. The proposed concept is used to describe development of pulmonary edema in several clinical entities (exercise in wet or dry climate, left heart failure, people who rapidly move to high altitudes, acute cyanide and carbon monoxide poisoning, large pulmonary embolisms). .

  18. Increased cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain in left atria and decreased myocardial insulin-like growth factor (Igf-I) expression accompany low heart rate in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, N D; Nelson, O L; Robbins, C T; Rourke, B C

    2011-01-01

    due to excessive work against an optimally filled ventricle, a response unpredicted by the Frank-Starling mechanism.

  19. A graphical simulation software for instruction in cardiovascular mechanics physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenger Roland H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer supported, interactive e-learning systems are widely used in the teaching of physiology. However, the currently available complimentary software tools in the field of the physiology of cardiovascular mechanics have not yet been adapted to the latest systems software. Therefore, a simple-to-use replacement for undergraduate and graduate students' education was needed, including an up-to-date graphical software that is validated and field-tested. Methods Software compatible to Windows, based on modified versions of existing mathematical algorithms, has been newly developed. Testing was performed during a full term of physiological lecturing to medical and biology students. Results The newly developed CLabUZH software models a reduced human cardiovascular loop containing all basic compartments: an isolated heart including an artificial electrical stimulator, main vessels and the peripheral resistive components. Students can alter several physiological parameters interactively. The resulting output variables are printed in x-y diagrams and in addition shown in an animated, graphical model. CLabUZH offers insight into the relations of volume, pressure and time dependency in the circulation and their correlation to the electrocardiogram (ECG. Established mechanisms such as the Frank-Starling Law or the Windkessel Effect are considered in this model. The CLabUZH software is self-contained with no extra installation required and runs on most of today's personal computer systems. Conclusions CLabUZH is a user-friendly interactive computer programme that has proved to be useful in teaching the basic physiological principles of heart mechanics.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soltani

    Full Text Available Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  1. Application of the Principles of Systems Biology and Wiener's Cybernetics for Analysis of Regulation of Energy Fluxes in Muscle Cells in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Guzun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of regulation of respiration and energy fluxes in the cells are analyzed based on the concepts of systems biology, non-equilibrium steady state kinetics and applications of Wiener’s cybernetic principles of feedback regulation. Under physiological conditions cardiac function is governed by the Frank-Starling law and the main metabolic characteristic of cardiac muscle cells is metabolic homeostasis, when both workload and respiration rate can be changed manifold at constant intracellular level of phosphocreatine and ATP in the cells. This is not observed in skeletal muscles. Controversies in theoretical explanations of these observations are analyzed. Experimental studies of permeabilized fibers from human skeletal muscle vastus lateralis and adult rat cardiomyocytes showed that the respiration rate is always an apparent hyperbolic but not a sigmoid function of ADP concentration. It is our conclusion that realistic explanations of regulation of energy fluxes in muscle cells require systemic approaches including application of the feedback theory of Wiener’s cybernetics in combination with detailed experimental research. Such an analysis reveals the importance of limited permeability of mitochondrial outer membrane for ADP due to interactions of mitochondria with cytoskeleton resulting in quasi-linear dependence of respiration rate on amplitude of cyclic changes in cytoplasmic ADP concentrations. The system of compartmentalized creatine kinase (CK isoenzymes functionally coupled to ANT and ATPases, and mitochondrial-cytoskeletal interactions separate energy fluxes (mass and energy transfer from signalling (information transfer within dissipative metabolic structures – intracellular energetic units (ICEU. Due to the non-equilibrium state of CK reactions, intracellular ATP utilization and mitochondrial ATP regeneration are interconnected by the PCr flux from mitochondria. The feedback regulation of respiration occurring via

  2. Transformation in the diversity of avifauna under the influence of recreational load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Shupova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the bird community of a large reservoir and its surrounding area , located in the central part of a large city in the northern part of the steppe zone of Ukraine. The city, Krivoy Rog, has a population of over 700,000 people. Large areas of the city have undergone dramatic transformation. Industrial and and residential areas of the city are located around the reservoir. The shores of the reservoirs are subject to recreational loading. The natural landscape here is a combination of steppe habitats and scubland.. The material for this study was collected in the breeding seasons of 1996, 1999, 2012, 2015. The number and distribution of birds were determined by registrations of birds along transects. The diversity index, dominance and evenness of species distribution in the breeding bird communities were compared for different habitats and different years. In breeding season 73 bird species belonging to 15 orders were found on the territory of the reservoir. Of these, 62 species bred, and 11 more used the area for foraging but bred in adjacent habitats. 24 species were present in winter. The average density of the breeding birds per species increased from 1.8 ± 0.4 pairs/km of survey route in 1996 to 3.2 ± 0.8 pairs/km in 2015. The dominant species in the breeding bird communities were Passer montanus L., Sturnus vulgaris L., Parus major L., Fulica atra L., Podiceps cristatus L. In the period 1996–1999 the habitat conditions in the territory of the water reservoir changed. These changes were associated with mass recreation of city residents here. The changes resulted in a stressful situation for the habitats and the bird communities. The changes resulted in an imbalance in the development of the bird communities. Since 2012 the birds adapted to the new environmental conditions and formed a new community. By 2015, the species diversity of birds had increased, the degree of pressure on the dominant species and the species

  3. Blood Pressure and Altitude: An Observational Cohort Study of Hypertensive and Nonhypertensive Himalayan Trekkers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Linda E; Sallade, Thomas Douglas; Duke, Charles; Starling, Jennifer; Sheets, Alison; Pant, Sushil; Young, David S; Twillman, David; Regmi, Nirajan; Phelan, Benoit; Paudel, Purshotam; McElwee, Matthew; Mather, Luke; Cole, Devlin; McConnell, Theodore; Basnyat, Buddha

    2017-09-01

    Keyes, Linda E., Thomas Douglas Sallade, Charles Duke, Jennifer Starling, Alison Sheets, Sushil Pant, David S. Young, David Twillman, Nirajan Regmi, Benoit Phelan, Purshotam Paudel, Matthew McElwee, Luke Mather, Devlin Cole, Theodore McConnell, and Buddha Basnyat. Blood pressure and altitude: an observational cohort study of hypertensive and nonhypertensive Himalayan trekkers in Nepal. High Alt Med Biol. 18:267-277, 2017. To determine how blood pressure (BP) changes with altitude in normotensive versus hypertensive trekkers. Secondary aims were to evaluate the prevalence of severe hypertension (BP ≥180/100 mmHg) and efficacy of different antihypertensive agents at high altitude. This was an observational cohort study of resting and 24-hour ambulatory BP in normotensive and hypertensive trekkers at 2860, 3400, and 4300 m in Nepal. We enrolled 672 trekkers age 18 years and older, 60 with a prior diagnosis of hypertension. Mean systolic and diastolic BP did not change between altitudes in normotensive or hypertensive trekkers, but was higher in those with hypertension. However, there was large interindividual variability. At 3400 m, the majority (60%, n = 284) of normotensive participants had a BP within 10 mmHg of their BP at 2860 m, while 21% (n = 102) increased and 19% (n = 91) decreased. The pattern was similar between 3400 and 4300 m (64% [n = 202] no change, 21% [n = 65] increased, 15% [n = 46] decreased). BP decreased in a greater proportion of hypertensive trekkers versus normotensives (36% [n = 15] vs. 21% at 3400 m, p = 0.01 and 30% [n = 7] vs. 15% at 4300 m, p = 0.05). Severe hypertension occurred in both groups, but was asymptomatic. In a small subset of participants, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring showed that nocturnal BP decreased in normotensive (n = 4) and increased in hypertensive trekkers (n = 4). Most travelers, including those with well-controlled hypertension, can be reassured

  4. Diseño de nudos en estructuras de fabrica: análisis comparativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Valcárcel, Juan B.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The resistent verification of a section of a masonry wall basically depends on determining the eccentricitry in the application of the axial load; this eccentricitry is also the starling point to confirm buckling. Given the current regulation situation, we consider relevant to revise the eccentricity evaluation methods proposed by different references in our environment, and the comparative evaluation of the results obtained. We start with the analysis of the different methods developped, which computing tools can be translated into a series of graphics reflecting the behaviour of each of them. Previously, we must define the elements that can be evaluated by means of any of those methods; this adds justification to the initial analysis of those methods. The graphics generated alert on the divergence of the different formulations results, at the same time as they activate [he control mechanisms inherent in the graphic representation.La verificación resistente de una sección de un muro de fábrica depende básicamente de la determinación de la excentricidad en la aplicación del mil, excentricidad que es además el punto de arranque de la comprobación de pandeo. Dada la situación de revisión normativa en la que nos encontramos inmersos, ha parecido relevante la revisión de los métodos de evaluación de la excentricidad que proponen diversas referencias de nuestro entorno y la evaluación comparativa de los resultados obtenidos. Se parte del análisis de los diversos métodos desarrollados, cuya implementación informática se traduce en una serie de gráficas que muestran el comportamiento de cada uno de ellos. Para ello es preciso definir previamente elementos que puedan ser evaluados por cualquiera de los métodos, lo que añade una justificación al análisis previo. Se trufa de activar los mecanismos de control que los métodos gráficos incluyen, al tiempo que se alerta sobre la divergencia de los resultados de las diferentes

  5. Are extinction opinions extinct?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamsin E. Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extinction models vary in the information they require, the simplest considering the rate of certain sightings only. More complicated methods include uncertain sightings and allow for variation in the reliability of uncertain sightings. Generally extinction models require expert opinion, either as a prior belief that a species is extinct, or to establish the quality of a sighting record, or both. Is this subjectivity necessary? We present two models to explore whether the individual quality of sightings, judged by experts, is strongly informative of the probability of extinction: the ‘quality breakpoint method’ and the ‘quality as variance method’. For the first method we use the Barbary lion as an exemplar. For the second method we use the Barbary lion, Alaotra grebe, Jamaican petrel and Pohnpei starling as exemplars. The ‘quality breakpoint method’ uses certain and uncertain sighting records, and the quality of uncertain records, to establish whether a change point in the rate of sightings can be established using a simultaneous Bayesian optimisation with a non-informative prior. For the Barbary lion, there is a change in subjective quality of sightings around 1930. Unexpectedly sighting quality increases after this date. This suggests that including quality scores from experts can lead to irregular effects and may not offer reliable results. As an alternative, we use quality as a measure of variance around the sightings, not a change in quality. This leads to predictions with larger standard deviations, however the results remain consistent across any prior belief of extinction. Nonetheless, replacing actual quality scores with random quality scores showed little difference, inferring that the quality scores from experts are superfluous. Therefore, we deem the expensive process of obtaining pooled expert estimates as unnecessary, and even when used we recommend that sighting data should have minimal input from experts in terms of

  6. Proceedings of the Franco-British Marine Energies Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufenacht, Antoine; Holmes, John; Moore, Alan; David, Pierre; Dal Ferro, Benoit; Shanahan, Gary; Bal, Jean-Louis; Ruer, Jacques; Laleu, Vincent de; Dupard, Dominique; Smith, George; Vandenbroucke, Eric; Bahaj, Abubakr; Le Guen, Yone; Mill, Andrew; Kermode, Neil; Taylor, Alan; Rousset, Jean Marc; Brossard, Jerome; Rawlinson Smith, Rob; Hassan, Garrad; Facon, Guy; Clement, Alain; Carcas, Max; Babarit, Aurelien; Ruellan, Marie; Langston, David; Crow, Nigel; Dreau, Guillaume; Cooper, Bill; Jenner, Chris; Abonnel, Cyrille; Fraenkel, Peter; Majastre, Herve; Imbault, Didier; Pagot, Jean Philippe; Huxley-Reynard, Chris; Auty, Fiona; Hughes, Gareth; Adrian, David; Starling, Michael; Eyraud, Delphine; Cochevelou, Gilles; Vallat, Francis; Operto, Gianni; Boston, Jon; Chrupek, Thierry; Mocilnikar, Tristan; Cassin, Fabrice; Gouverneur, Philippe; Lrivain, Alain; Perrot, Jean-Yves; Paillard, Michael; Sibun, Giles; Le Lann, Gilbert; Schirmann-Duclos, Danielle; Populus, Jacques; Maheut, Alexis; Lesieur, Christopher; Delgery, Chloe; Crutchfield, Zoe; David, Pierre; Abonnel, Cyril; Cochevelou, Gilles; Sibun, Giles; Crutchfield, Zoe

    2006-01-01

    This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this French-British seminar on Marine Energies. Content: 1 - Session I - Wave and Tidal, Prospects and Policy: Introduction (Pierre David); Wave and Tidal Resources - the scale of the opportunity (Benoit Dal Ferro); UK Policy and European Programmes (Gary Shanahan); French Policy on New and Renewable Energies (Jean-Louis Bal); Marine Energies and French Policy (Jacques Ruer, Vincent de Laleu); New Paths Towards Sustainable Energy (Dominique Dupard); 2 - Session II - Centres of Excellence in Research, Testing and Infrastructure: Introduction (George Smith, Eric Vandenbroucke); R and D - Universities and Companies in the UK (Abubakr Bahaj); METRI, A European infrastructure for research and testing on hydrodynamic behaviour of structure and ages of materials in marine environments (Yone Le Guen); 1/10 Scale Wave Tank Testing (Andrew Mill); Full Scale Testing (Neil Kermode); Long Term Monitoring (Alan Taylor); Experimental Methods and Numerical Simulation (Jean Marc Rousset); Modelling (Jerome Brossard, Rob Rawlinson Smith); Mediterranean Testing Centres (Guy Facon); 3 - Session III - Practitioners and Business Development - Wave Energy: Introduction (Alain Clement, Max Carcas, Aurelien Babarit, Marie Ruellan, David Langston, Nigel Crow, Guillaume Dreau, Bill Cooper, Chris Jenner); 4 - Session IV - Practitioners and Business Development - Current Energy: Introduction (Cyrille Abonnel, Peter Fraenkel, Herve Majastre, Didier Imbault, Jean Philippe Pagot, Chris Huxley-Reynard, Fiona Auty, Gareth Hughes, David Adrian, Michael Starling); 5 - Session V - Economics and Financing of Wave and Marine Energy Conversion: Introduction (Delphine Eyraud, Gilles Cochevelou); Role of French Cluster (Francis Vallat); Funding Panorama (Gianni Operto); The Technologist's Experience (Max Carcas); The Utility's Perspective (Jon Boston); French Methods and Policies for Development (Thierry Chrupek

  7. [Clinical and experimental studies on the pathogenesis in pregnancy induced hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, A

    1988-08-01

    Placental ischemia is one of the etiological factors of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), however, the pathogenesis of placental and renal ischemia has not been clarified. The purposes of this investigation are (1) to clarify the fetomaternal hemodynamic changes in PIH and the influence of maternal postural change on fetomaternal hemodynamics, measured by thermodilution method, impedance cardiography and pulsed doppler method during pregnancy, (2) to provide to relationship between intrauterine resting tonus and maternal hemodynamics, that is, blood pressure, placental and renal blood flow measured by electromagnetic flowmeter and thermocouple method, and renal nerve activity, and (3) to study the influence of placental ischemia on vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II measured by Magnus method in animal experiment. (1) The increase in C.O and blood volume were recognized from the beginning of pregnancy to 24 GW, and subsequently, the decreasing tendency were found from about 32 GW to the onset of labor. However this decreasing tendency were subsided in the lateral position. These circulatory changes were observed in both normotensive and PIH cases, and especially, the decrease in C.O and blood volume in late pregnancy were more remarkable in PIH than that in normotensive pregnancy. From the results of Starling curve, left ventricular work was more hyperdynamic status in PIH than that in normotensive pregnancy, these results show that there are a compensatory mechanism against high vascular resistance in PIH. A/B (S/D) ratio in uterine artery, umbilical artery and fetal aorta were lowered in II-nd and III-rd trimester and more decreased in the lateral position from the supine position, on the other hand these ratio in PIH were elevated respectively. These results show that there are the aortocaval compression by the heavy tensive uterus and subsequent sluice flow mechanism in fetoplacental circulation in the supine position in late pregnancy. (2) These

  8. Anatomy and Physiology of Left Ventricular Suction Induced by Rotary Blood Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonsen, Robert Francis; Lim, Einly; Moloney, John; Lovell, Nigel Hamilton; Rosenfeldt, Franklin L

    2015-08-01

    This study in five large greyhound dogs implanted with a VentrAssist left ventricular assist device focused on identification of the precise site and physiological changes induced by or underlying the complication of left ventricular suction. Pressure sensors were placed in left and right atria, proximal and distal left ventricle, and proximal aorta while dual perivascular and tubing ultrasonic flow meters measured blood flow in the aortic root and pump outlet cannula. When suction occurred, end-systolic pressure gradients between proximal and distal regions of the left ventricle on the order of 40-160 mm Hg indicated an occlusive process of variable intensity in the distal ventricle. A variable negative flow difference between end systole and end diastole (0.5-3.4 L/min) was observed. This was presumably mediated by variable apposition of the free and septal walls of the ventricle at the pump inlet cannula orifice which lasted approximately 100 ms. This apposition, by inducing an end-systolic flow deficit, terminated the suction process by relieving the imbalance between pump requirement and delivery from the right ventricle. Immediately preceding this event, however, unnaturally low end-systolic pressures occurred in the left atrium and proximal left ventricle which in four dogs lasted for 80-120 ms. In one dog, however, this collapse progressed to a new level and remained at approximately -5 mm Hg across four heart beats at which point suction was relieved by manual reduction in pump speed. Because these pressures were associated with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure of -5 mm Hg as well, they indicate total collapse of the entire pulmonary venous system, left atrium, and left ventricle which persisted until pump flow requirement was relieved by reducing pump speed. We suggest that this collapse caused the whole vascular region from pulmonary capillaries to distal left ventricle to behave as a Starling resistance which further reduced right

  9. Western Canada study of animal health effects associated with exposure to emissions from oil and gas field facilities : interpretive overview by the science advisory panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidotti, T.; Nielsen, O.; Berhane, K.; Cohen, B.S.; Hunter, B.; Lasley, B.; Martin, W.; Ribble, C.; Thorne, P.; Tollerud, D.; Witschi, H. [Western Interprovincial Scientific Studies Association, Calgary, AB (Canada). Science Advisory Panel

    2006-05-15

    European Starlings in the region were also presented. 4 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  10. The Relationship between Left Atrial Mechanical Function and Functional Capacity in Mitral Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mücahit Yetim

    2013-11-01

    correlation with symptomatology is poor.  These findings suggest that there is such a mechanism like Frank Starling in the left atrium. The mild increase in preload ( volume and pressure provides the contiuation of left atrial functions while the additional increase in preload causes destruction of correspondance of contraction between  left atrial myofibrils and thus left atrial disfunction occurs. For this reason  the value of left atrial ejection as a parameter reflecting clinical sypmtomatology   is decreased.  Key words: Mitral stenosis; left atrial function; functional capacity

  11. A protocol to study ex vivo mouse working heart at human-like heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2018-01-01

    Genetically modified mice are widely used as experimental models to study human heart function and diseases. However, the fast rate of normal mouse heart at 400-600bpm limits its capacity of assessing kinetic parameters that are important for the physiology and pathophysiology of human heart that beats at a much slower rate (75-180bpm). To extend the value of mouse models, we established a protocol to study ex vivo mouse working hearts at a human-like heart rate. In the presence of 300μM lidocaine to lower pacemaker and conductive activities and prevent arrhythmia, a stable rate of 120-130bpm at 37°C is achieved for ex vivo mouse working hearts. The negative effects of decreased heart rate on force-frequency dependence and lidocaine as a myocardial depressant on intracellular calcium can be compensated by using a higher but still physiological level of calcium (2.75mM) in the perfusion media. Multiple parameters were studied to compare the function at the human-like heart rate with that of ex vivo mouse working hearts at the standard rate of 480bpm. The results showed that the conditions for slower heart rate in the presence of 300μM lidocaine did not have depressing effect on left ventricular pressure development, systolic and diastolic velocities and stroke volume with maintained positive inotropic and lusitropic responses to β-adrenergic stimulation. Compared with that at 480bpm, the human-like heart rate increased ventricular filling and end diastolic volume with enhanced Frank-Starling responses. Coronary perfusion was increased from longer relaxation time and interval between beats whereas cardiac efficiency was significantly improved. Although the intrinsic differences between mouse and human heart remain, this methodology for ex vivo mouse hearts to work at human-like heart rate extends the value of using genetically modified mouse models to study cardiac function and human heart diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Time-Trends and Congener Profiles of PBDEs and PCBs in California Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, June-Soo; Holden, Arthur; Chu, Vivian; Kim, Michele; Rhee, Alexandra; Patel, Puja; Shi, Yating; Linthicum, Janet; Walton, Brian J.; Mckeown, Karen; Jewell, Nicholas P.; Hooper, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High levels (µg/g lw) of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in peregrine falcon eggs from California (n = 90 eggs from 52 birds, 38 nest sites, collected 1986–2007, ΣPBDEs median = 4.53, range = 0.08–53.1). Over the past 22 years, PBDE levels more than tripled each decade in the eggs, whereas PCB levels had no significant changes. PBDE levels were highest in eggs from major California cities (“Big Cities”), whereas PCBs showed no difference across the regions. For PBDEs, Big City eggs had markedly different patterns from Coastal eggs:BDE-209 and the higher brominated PBDEs (hexa–nona) were dominant congeners in Big City eggs, while BDE-47 and -99 were dominant in Coastal eggs. In many of the birds that gave multiple eggs over time (“time series”), PBDE patterns changed over time: the high proportions of BDE-209 and higher brominated PBDEs (short half-lives) in young birds contrasted with increasingly higher proportions of BDE-153 (long half-life) and other lower brominated PBDEs as the birds aged. These data are consistent with metabolic debromination of BDE-209 (t1/2 = 1–2 weeks) to the lower brominated PBDEs, with accumulation over time of BDE-153 (t1/2 = 3–4 years). In contrast, PCB patterns showed no differences by locations, and did not change over time. Diet (prey birds) may explain the urban PBDE pattern, as the patterns in urban pigeons and peregrines were similar, with high proportions of BDE-209 and the higher-brominated PBDEs. Also, our prey data (feathers from peregrine nests) showed urban peregrines having a higher proportion (>2 fold) of granivorous/opportunistic birds (e.g., “introduced feral” pigeons, mourning doves, starlings) in their diet than coastal peregrines. In summary, these data indicate that BDE-209 exits consumer products as an environmental contaminant to be taken up by wildlife (particularly in urban locations), and undergoes metabolic debromination to the

  13. Totally implantable robot to treat chronic atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Hayoz, Daniel; Thévenaz, Pierrick; Roulet, Jean-Yves; Salchli, Francois; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2008-09-01

    (-3) J. Maximal volume pumped was 492 ml min(-1). This artificial muscle pump is compact, follows the Starling law and reproduces the hemodynamic performances of a normal atrium. It could represent a new tool to restore the atrial kick in persistent atrial fibrillation.

  14. Status and trends of the land bird avifauna on Tinian and Aguiguan, Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Richard J.; Pratt, Thane K.; Amidon, Fred; Marshall, Ann P.; Kremer, Shelly; Laut, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Avian surveys were conducted on the islands of Tinian and Aguiguan, Marianas Islands, in 2008 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to provide current baseline densities and abundances and assess population trends using data collected from previous surveys. On Tinian, during the three surveys (1982, 1996, and 2008), 18 species were detected, and abundances and trends were assessed for 12 species. Half of the 10 native species—Yellow Bittern (Ixobrychus sinensis), White-throated Ground-Dove (Gallicolumba xanthonura), Collared Kingfisher (Todiramphus chloris), Rufous Fantail (Rhipidura rufifrons), and Micronesian Starling (Aplonis opaca)—and one alien bird—Island Collared-Dove (Streptopelia bitorquata)—have increased since 1982. Three native birds—Mariana Fruit-Dove (Ptilinopus roseicapilla), Micronesian Honeyeater (Myzomela rubratra), and Tinian Monarch (Monarcha takatsukasae)—have decreased since 1982. Trends for the remaining two native birds—White Tern (Gygis alba) and Bridled White-eye (Zosterops saypani)—and one alien bird—Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus)—were considered relatively stable. Only five birds—White-throated Ground-Dove, Mariana Fruit-Dove, Tinian Monarch, Rufous Fantail, and Bridled White-eye—showed significant differences among regions of Tinian by year. Tinian Monarch was found in all habitat types, with the greatest monarch densities observed in limestone forest, secondary forest, and tangantangan (Leucaena leucocephala) thicket and the smallest densities found in open fields and urban/residential habitats. On Aguiguan, 19 species were detected on one or both of the surveys (1982 and 2008), and abundance estimates were produced for nine native and one alien species. Densities for seven of the nine native birds—White-throated Ground-Dove, Mariana Fruit-Dove, Collared Kingfisher, Rufous Fantail, Bridled White-eye, Golden White-eye (Cleptornis marchei), and Micronesian Starling—and the alien bird— Island

  15. Caracterização funcional da hipertrofia miocárdica induzida pelo isoproterenol e de sua regressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Neif

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as disfunções da hipertrofia miocárdica induzida pelo isoproterenol e de sua regressão. Corações isolados hipertrofiados por isoproterenol (ISO (8 dias e após 22 dias de sua suspensão (regressão foram distendidos. MÉTODOS: Até pressão de repouso (Pr de 60mmHg, analisaram-se: pressão desenvolvida máxima (PDmáx.; estresse sistólico (sigmamáx; inclinação da reta estresses/deformações; constante de relaxamento; rigidez da câmara e rigidez miocárdica. RESULTADOS: Nos corações hipertrofiados (H as variações de volume (deltaV necessárias para Pr=60mmHg foram heterogêneas. Em alguns (H1; n=10 deltaV equivaleu à dos controle (C enquanto em outros (H2; n=10 foi inferior, e também diferiram quanto ao peso seco, complacência ventricular, rigidez miocárdica, constante de relaxamento,e sigmamáx. PDmáx dos grupos H1 e H2 foram superiores às de C (n=8 e Regressão (R (n=8. Contudo, sigmamáx de H2 foi menor que C, H1 e R. O mecanismo de Frank-Starling foi deprimido nos corações hipertrofiados. A constante de relaxamento de H2 indicou retardo no decaimento da pressão associado a menor complacência ventricular e rigidez miocárdica acentuada. CONCLUSÃO: Hipertrofia miocárdica induzida pelo ISO não é homogênea. Alguns corações têm alterações pouco expressivas; outros têm comprometimento das funções sistólica e diastólica. A hipertrofia miocárdica reduz a capacidade de gerar força e aprimora a capacidade em variar pressão por aumento da relação massa/volume. Há, também, comprometimento da complacência ventricular e da rigidez muscular.

  16. Native fruit traits may mediate dispersal competition between native and non-native plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Aslan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Seed disperser preferences may mediate the impact of invasive, non-native plant species on their new ecological communities. Significant seed disperser preference for invasives over native species could facilitate the spread of the invasives while impeding native plant dispersal. Such competition for dispersers could negatively impact the fitness of some native plants. Here, we review published literature to identify circumstances under which preference for non-native fruits occurs. The importance of fruit attraction is underscored by several studies demonstrating that invasive, fleshy-fruited plant species are particularly attractive to regional frugivores. A small set of studies directly compare frugivore preference for native vs. invasive species, and we find that different designs and goals within such studies frequently yield contrasting results. When similar native and non-native plant species have been compared, frugivores have tended to show preference for the non-natives. This preference appears to stem from enhanced feeding efficiency or accessibility associated with the non-native fruits. On the other hand, studies examining preference within existing suites of co-occurring species, with no attempt to maximize fruit similarity, show mixed results, with frugivores in most cases acting opportunistically or preferring native species. A simple, exploratory meta-analysis finds significant preference for native species when these studies are examined as a group. We illustrate the contrasting findings typical of these two approaches with results from two small-scale aviary experiments we conducted to determine preference by frugivorous bird species in northern California. In these case studies, native birds preferred the native fruit species as long as it was dissimilar from non-native fruits, while non-native European starlings preferred non-native fruit. However, native birds showed slight, non-significant preference for non-native fruit

  17. Adubação do milho: XVIII - Ensaios com diversos fosfatos (4.ª série. Fertilizer experiments with corn: XVIII - Trials with various phosphorus sources (4th series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P Viégas

    1961-01-01

    first year. In three of the four trials superphosphate was much superior to hyperphosphate and mainly to Serrote-phosphate (from the Serrote hill, near Juquiá. State of São Paulo; in the other trial the last two types of phosphates gave similar results and were only a little inferior to superphosphate. Florida-phosphate, included in two experiments, was practically equal to byperphosphate. The superiority of superphosphate came chiefly from its greater efficiency in the first year; star-ling from the second year the tendency was for equivalence of the phosphates studied. In the experiment conducted for five years the lime application was ineffective in the first two years, but il increased appreciably the yields in the following years. In another experiment, couduceted for two years in a move acid soil, lime was fairly effective even in the first and very effective in the second year. The addition of lime enhanced the effect of superphosphate, but affected contradictorily those of the natural phosphates.

  18. The Progress in the Novel Pediatric Rotary Blood Pump Sputnik Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telyshev, Dmitry; Denisov, Maxim; Pugovkin, Alexander; Selishchev, Sergey; Nesterenko, Igor

    2018-03-06

    stress distribution was calculated along the pump volume. The volume in which shear stress exceed 150 Pa is less than 0.38% of the total pump volume at flow rates of 1, 3, and 5 L/min. In this study, a mock circulatory system (MCS) allowing simulation of physiological cardiovascular characteristics was used to investigate the interaction of the Sputnik PRBP with the cardiovascular system. MCS allows reproducing the Frank-Starling autoregulation mechanism of the heart. PRBP behavior was tested in the speed range of 6 000 to 15 000 rpm. Decreased contractility can be expressed in a stroke volume decrease approximately from 18 to 4 mL and ventricle systolic pressure decrease approximately from 92 to 20 mm Hg. The left ventricle becomes fully supported at a pump speed of 10 000 rpm. At a pump speed of 14 000 rpm, the left ventricle goes into a suction state in which fluid almost does not accumulate in the ventricle and only passes through it to the pump. The proposed PRBP showed potential for improved clinical outcomes in pediatric patients with a body surface area greater than 0.6 m 2 and weight greater than 12 kg. © 2018 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The occurrence and significance of polychlorinated biphenyls in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustman, E.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Blus, L.J.; Reichel, W.L.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    1971-01-01

    SUMMARY: Polychlorinated biphenyls constitute a group of chlorine-bearing compounds of industrial origin that have permeated the natural environment throughout the world. Their chemical structure resembles that of some of the organochlorine pesticides. They are troublesome interferences in gas chromatographic analysis of these pesticides. Although methods have been developed to overcome analytical problems, measurements of quantity still are only approximate. Special studies in the United States, Netherlands, and Great Britain have traced PCB's to industrial effluent, but other possible sources have not been followed. Their use in paints, cartons, and insulating fluids suggests that environmental pollution may be from many different sources. PCB's are present in fish and wildlife in many countries of the world. Quantities are higher in animals living near industrial areas. PCB's build up in biological food chains with increases of tens to thousands of times from lower to higher organisms. Experimental studies have shown that PCB's have a toxicity to mallards, pheasants, bobwhite quail, coturnix quail, red-winged blackbirds, starlings, cowbirds, and grackles that is of the same order as the toxicity of DDE to these species. Overt signs of poisoning also are similar to those caused by compounds of the DDT group. Toxic effects of DDE and Aroclor 1254 to coturnix chicks were additive, but not synergistic. PCB's containing higher percentages of chlorine are more toxic to birds than those containing lower percentages. PCB's of foreign manufacture contained contaminants to an extent that greatly increased their toxicity Aroclor 1242. Statistical evaluations of the role that different chemicals may play in thinning of eggshells of brown pelicans show that DDE residues correlate better with shell thinning than do residues of dieldrin or PCB's. Studies of the effects of PCB's in the environment are as yet insufficient for well-rounded conclusions. The evidence available

  20. Biological data on PCBs in animals other than man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.

    1972-01-01

    SUMMARY: Polychlorinated biphenyls have become ubiquitous in the world ecosystem in quantities similar to those of DDE. Experimental studies have shown that PCBs have a toxicity to mallards, pheasants, bobwhite quail, coturnix quail, red-winged blackbirds, starlings, cowbirds, and grackles that is of the same order as the toxicity of DDE to these species. Overt signs of poisoning also are similar to those caused by compounds of the DDT group. Toxic effects of DDE and Aroclor 1254 to coturnix chicks were additive, but not synergistic. PCBs containing higher percentages of chlorine are more toxic to birds than those containing lower percentages. PCBs of foreign manufacture contained contaminants to an extent that greatly increased their toxicity. Residues of PCBs in the brains of birds killed by these compounds measure in the hundreds of parts per million. PCBs may have contributed to mortality of some birds in the field. Toxicity to insects of PCBs of different degrees of chlorination is the reverse of the pattern in birds: the lower chlorinations are more toxic to insects. PCBs enhanced the toxicity of dieldrin and DDT to insects. Shrimp are very sensitive to PCBs and most will die as a result of 20-day exposure to a concentration of 5 ppb. PCBs also inhibit shell growth of oysters. Crabs are less sensitive; all accumulate residues to many times the concentrations in the water, and a test with crabs showed that they lost the residues very slowly. Growth of certain species of marine diatoms was experimentally inhibited by PCBs, but algae were not affected. The small marine crustacean, Gammarus, is sensitive to PCBs in concentrations of thousandths to tenths of a part per billion. Exposure to 5 ppb of Aroclor 1254 caused mortality of two species of fish in 14-45 days. Onset of death was delayed and was accompanied by fungus-like lesions. Rainbow trout were quickly killed by terphenyls at 10 ppb under normal oxygen conditions and at 2 ppb with reduced oxygen

  1. [Experts consensus on the management of the right heart function in critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X T; Liu, D W; Zhang, H M; Long, Y; Guan, X D; Qiu, H B; Yu, K J; Yan, J; Zhao, H; Tang, Y Q; Ding, X; Ma, X C; Du, W; Kang, Y; Tang, B; Ai, Y H; He, H W; Chen, D C; Chen, H; Chai, W Z; Zhou, X; Cui, N; Wang, H; Rui, X; Hu, Z J; Li, J G; Xu, Y; Yang, Y; Ouyan, B; Lin, H Y; Li, Y M; Wan, X Y; Yang, R L; Qin, Y Z; Chao, Y G; Xie, Z Y; Sun, R H; He, Z Y; Wang, D F; Huang, Q Q; Jiang, D P; Cao, X Y; Yu, R G; Wang, X; Chen, X K; Wu, J F; Zhang, L N; Yin, M G; Liu, L X; Li, S W; Chen, Z J; Luo, Z

    2017-12-01

    To establish the experts consensus on the right heart function management in critically ill patients. The panel of consensus was composed of 30 experts in critical care medicine who are all members of Critical Hemodynamic Therapy Collaboration Group (CHTC Group). Each statement was assessed based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) principle. Then the Delphi method was adopted by 52 experts to reassess all the statements. (1) Right heart function is prone to be affected in critically illness, which will result in a auto-exaggerated vicious cycle. (2) Right heart function management is a key step of the hemodynamic therapy in critically ill patients. (3) Fluid resuscitation means the process of fluid therapy through rapid adjustment of intravascular volume aiming to improve tissue perfusion. Reversed fluid resuscitation means reducing volume. (4) The right ventricle afterload should be taken into consideration when using stroke volume variation (SVV) or pulse pressure variation (PPV) to assess fluid responsiveness.(5)Volume overload alone could lead to septal displacement and damage the diastolic function of the left ventricle. (6) The Starling curve of the right ventricle is not the same as the one applied to the left ventricle,the judgement of the different states for the right ventricle is the key of volume management. (7) The alteration of right heart function has its own characteristics, volume assessment and adjustment is an important part of the treatment of right ventricular dysfunction (8) Right ventricular enlargement is the prerequisite for increased cardiac output during reversed fluid resuscitation; Nonetheless, right heart enlargement does not mandate reversed fluid resuscitation.(9)Increased pulmonary vascular resistance induced by a variety of factors could affect right heart function by obstructing the blood flow. (10) When pulmonary hypertension was detected in clinical scenario, the differentiation of

  2. The use of Sporothrix insectorum and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus against Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887: in vitro assay and electronic microscopy/ Atividade anti-ixodídica dos fungos Sporothrix insectorum e Paecilomyces fumosoroseus sobre Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887: bioensaios emicroscopia eletrônica de varredura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvimar José da Costa

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available In function of the development resistance to the several existent quimiotherapics, biological control has being a promising alternative to the control of Boophilus microplus. In this work, the pathogenic action of Sporothrix insectorum and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus in the different stages of life cycle of Boophilus microplus was evaluated. The fungis in study were cultivated in appropriate culture medium and suspensions in the concentrations of 105, 106, 107, 108, 109 conidia/mL for both fungis were prepared, starling from stock suspension. The eggs and the larvaes were treated by spray, and the engorged tick were immersed in the different conidia suspensions. The pathogenicity of the fungis were appraised for the reproductive performance of the ticks. The experimental was accomplished with five repetitions for each treatment group, in the different fungal concentrations. The fungis S. insectorum and P. fumosoroseus reduced in 50,19% and 49,34%, respectively, the posture of the infected engorged female ticks, in the concentration 108 conidia/mL. In relation to effectiveness, the fungis S. insectorum and P. fumosoroseus, they reached the values 82,99%, in the concentration 108 conidia/mL, and 82,93% in the concentration 109 conidia/mL, for the respective fungis. In the eggs treatment with the S. insectorum and P. fumosoroseus, the fungi P. fumosoroseus presented a superiority with reduction of eclodibility in 79,04%, in the concentration 106 conidia/mL, while the S. insectorum, reduced in only 37,92%, in the concentration 107 conidia/mL. In the larvas treatment there were not significant differences in the larva mortality in both fungi. The electronic microscopy, in different stage of life of the B. microplus, showed the power predatory of the fungi S. insectorum and P. fumosoroseus. With these results, it can be inferred that S. insectorum and P. fumosoroseus presented deleterious action on engorged female of B. microplus in vitro, what