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Sample records for spot friction welds

  1. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP Steel

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the ma...... electron microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction. Microhardness measurements and lap-shear tensile tests completed the investigations of the welded samples and allow evaluation of the quality of the welds.......In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the main...... parameters to control friction stir welding, the influence of the rotational speed of the tool was investigated. Three different rotational speeds (500 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1500 rpm, respectively) were applied. The microstructure of the welded samples was investigated with reflected light microscopy, scanning...

  2. Friction stir spot welding of dissimilar aluminium alloys

    Bozkurt, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) has been proposed as an effective technology to spot weld the so-called “difficult to be welded” metal alloys such as thin sheets aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials. FSSW is derived from friction stir welding technology, its principle benefit being low cost joining, lower welding temperature and shorter welding time than conventional welding methods. In this study, dissimilar AlMg 3 and AlCu 4 Mg 1 aluminium alloy plates were FSSWed by offsetting the low strength sheet on upper side of the weld. The effects of tool rotation speed on the microstructure, lap shear fracture load (LSFL), microhardness and fracture features of the weld are investigated by constant welding parameters. The maximum LSFL was obtained by increasing the tool rotational speed. However, the joints exhibited pull-out nugget fracture mode under lap shear tensile testing conditions. The largest completely bonded zone was observed as 5.86 mm which was narrower at the opposite position of the joint. Key words: friction stir spot welding, aluminium alloys, mechanical properties, dissimilar joint, welding parameters

  3. Microstructure characterization of Friction Stir Spot Welded TRIP steel

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Peterson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels have not yet been successfully joined by any welding technique. It is desirable to search for a suitable welding technique that opens up for full usability of TRIP steels. In this study, the potential of joining TRIP steel with Friction Stir Spot...

  4. Effects of welding parameters on friction stir spot welding of high density polyethylene sheets

    Bilici, Mustafa Kemal; Yukler, Ahmet Irfan

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (a) Schematic illustration of the cross section of a friction stir spot weld and (b) Geometry of the weld bonded area, x: nugget thickness and y: the thickness of the upper sheet. Highlights: → Welding parameters affect the FSSW nugget formation and the strength of the joint. → Melting of polyethylene occurred in the vicinity of the tool pin. → The joint that fractures with a pull nugget failure mode has a higher strength. -- Abstract: Friction stir spot welding parameters affect the weld strength of thermoplastics, such as high density polyethylene (HDPE) sheets. The effects of the welding parameters on static strength of friction stir spot welds of high density polyethylene sheets were investigated. For maximizing the weld strength, the selection of welding parameters is very important. In lap-shear tests two fracture modes were observed; cross nugget failure and pull nugget failure. The tool rotational speed, tool plunge depth and dwell time were determined to be important in the joint formation and its strength. The joint which had a better strength fails with a pull nugget failure morphology. Weld cross section image analysis of the joints were done with a video spectral comparator. The plunge rate of the tool was determined to have a negligible effect on friction stir spot welding.

  5. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  6. Effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot welding of polypropylene sheets

    M. K. Bilici

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of tool geometry and properties on friction stir spot welding properties of polypropylene sheets were studied. Four different tool pin geometries, with varying pin angles, pin lengths, shoulder diameters and shoulder angles were used for friction stir spot welding. All the welding operations were done at the room temperature. Lap-shear tensile tests were carried out to find the weld static strength. Weld cross section appearance observations were also done. From the experiments the effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot weld formation and weld strength were determined. The optimum tool geometry for 4 mm thick polypropylene sheets were determined. The tapered cylindrical pin gave the biggest and the straight cylindrical pin gave the lowest lap-shear fracture load.

  7. Hybrid multi-response optimization of friction stir spot welds: failure ...

    O O OJO

    2018-06-08

    Jun 8, 2018 ... Friction stir spot welding; effective bonded size; failure load; expelled flash volume; hybrid multi- response ... eliminated with the application of FSSW process. Conse- ... design of experiment is generally applied in either single.

  8. Material Characterization of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot Welded Aluminium and Copper Alloy

    Sanusi, K. O.; Akinlabi, E. T.

    2017-08-01

    In this research study, material characterization of dissimilar friction stir spot welded Aluminium and Copper was evaluated. Rotational speeds of 800 rpm and transverse speeds of 50 mm/min, 150 mm/min and 250 mm/min were used. The total numbers of samples evaluated were nine altogether. The spot welds were characterised by microstructure characterization using optical microscope (OEM) and scanning electron microscopy technique (SEM) by observing the evolution of the microstructure across the weld’s cross-section. lap-shear test of the of the spot weld specimens were also done. From the results, it shows that welding of metals and alloys using Friction stir spot welding is appropriate and can be use in industrial applications.

  9. Effect of tool rotational speed and penetration depth on dissimilar aluminum alloys friction stir spot welds

    Joaquín M. Piccini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the automotive industry is looking for the use of aluminum parts in replace of steel parts in order to reduce the vehicles weight. These parts have to be joined, for instance, by welding processes. The more common welding process in the automotive industry is the Resistance Spot Welding (RSW technique. However, RSW of aluminum alloys has many disadvantages. Regarding this situation, a variant of the Friction Stir Welding process called Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW has been developed, showing a strong impact in welding of aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials in thin sheets. Process parameters affect the characteristics of the welded joints. However, the information available on this topic is scarce, particularly for dissimilar joints and thin sheets. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the rotational speed and the tool penetration depth on the characteristics of dissimilar FSS welded joints. Defects free joints have been achieved with higher mechanical properties than the ones reported. The maximum fracture load was 5800 N. It was observed that the effective joint length of the welded spots increased with the tool penetration depth, meanwhile the fracture load increased and then decreased. Finally, welding at 1200 RPM produced welded joints with lower mechanical properties than the ones achieved at 680 and 903 RPM.

  10. Development of liquid-nitrogen-cooling friction stir spot welding for AZ31 magnesium alloy joints

    Wu, Dong; Shen, Jun; Zhou, Meng-bing; Cheng, Liang; Sang, Jia-xing

    2017-10-01

    A liquid-nitrogen-cooling friction stir spot welding (C-FSSW) technology was developed for welding AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. The liquid-nitrogen cooling degraded the deformability of the welded materials such that the width of interfacial cracks increased with increasing cooling time. The grain size of the stirred zone (SZ) and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the C-FSSW-welded joints decreased, whereas that of the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) increased with increasing cooling time. The maximum tensile shear load of the C-FSSW-welded joints welded with a cooling time of 5 or 7 s was larger than that of the friction stir spot welding (FSSW)-welded joint, and the tensile shear load decreased with increasing cooling time. The microhardness of the C-FSSW-welded joints was greater than that of the FSSW-welded joint. Moreover, the microhardness of the SZ and the HAZ of the C-FSSW-welded joints increased, whereas that of the TMAZ decreased, with increasing cooling time.

  11. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-01-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl 2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting

  12. Effect of process parameters on mechanical properties of friction stir spot welded magnesium to aluminum alloys

    Rao, H.M.; Yuan, W.; Badarinarayan, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Lap-shear failure load of ∼2.5 kN was achieved in dissimilar Mg to Al spot welds. • Failure load depends on both welding geometrical features and IMCs formation. • Thin and discontinuous IMCs formed in stir zone are beneficial for weld strength. • Low heat input and good material mixing/interlocking is essential for high strength. - Abstract: Friction stir spot welding was applied to dissimilar cast magnesium (Mg) alloy AM60B and wrought aluminum (Al) alloy 6022-T4 under various welding conditions. The influence of tool rotation rate and shoulder plunge depth on lap-shear failure load was examined. Welds were made at four different tool rotation rates of 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500 revolution per minute (rpm) and various tool shoulder plunge depths from 0 mm to 0.9 mm. The cross section of each weld exhibited the formation of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in the stir zone. An increase in tool rotation rate decreased the width of the stir zone and resulted in lower lap-shear failure loads. The stir zone width increased and interlocking of IMCs was observed with an increase in tool shoulder plunge depth at 1000 rpm. High lap-shear failure loads were achieved in welds having a large stir zone width with formation of discontinuous IMCs at the tip of the interfacial hook. An average lap-shear failure load of 2.5 kN was achieved for welds made at 1000 rpm and 0.9 mm shoulder plunge. The present study suggests that the mechanical properties of friction stir spot welded dissimilar alloys are greatly influenced by the stir zone width, interfacial hooks and IMCs which are all weld process dependent

  13. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP steel

    Lomholt, Trine Colding

    , scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Microhardness measurements and lab-shear tests completed the investigations of the welded samples and allow evaluation of the quality of the welds as seen from a practical point of view. Selected samples were also investigated by X...... Welding (FSSW) is investigated. The aim of the study is to assess whether high quality welds can be produced and, in particular, to obtain an understanding of the microstructural changes during welding. The microstructure of the welded samples was investigated by means of reflected light microscopy......-ray diffraction. The complementary use of the various characterization techniques allowed subdivision of the microstructure in the weld in different zones: two thermo-mechanically affected zones (TMAZs), and two heat-affected zones (HAZs). The dual behavior of the microstructure in the zones is related to the two...

  14. Influence of tool geometry and process parameters on macrostructure and static strength in friction stir spot welded polyethylene sheets

    Bilici, Mustafa Kemal; Yuekler, Ahmet Irfan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → All velding parameters and different tool geometries have demonstrated a different effects on weld strength. → Friction stir spot welding of polyethylene mechanical scission is very important. → Metric screw the tool has a great influence on the weld strength of FSSW. -- Abstract: The effect of important welding parameters and tool properties that are effective on static strength in friction stir spot welds of polyethylene sheets were studied. Six different tool pin profiles (straight cylindrical, tapered cylindrical, threaded cylindrical, triangular, square and hexagonal) with different shoulder geometries, different pin length, pin angle and concavity angle were used to fabricate the joints. The tool rotational speed, tool plunge depth and dwell time were determined welding parameters. All the welding operations were done at the room temperature. Welding force and welding zone material temperature measurements were also done. Lap-shear tests were carried out to find the weld static strength. Weld cross section appearance observations were also done. From the experiments, the effect of pin profile, pin length, pin angle, dwell time and tool rotational speed on friction stir spot welding formation and weld strength was determined.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Performance of Friction Stir Spot-Welded Aluminum-5754 Sheets

    Pathak, N.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Sarangi, M.; Panda, Sushanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a recent trend of joining light-weight sheet metals while fabricating automotive and aerospace body components. For the successful application of this solid-state welding process, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of the weld microstructure, mechanical performance, and failure mechanism. In the present study, FSSW of aluminum-5754 sheet metal was tried using tools with circular and tapered pin considering different tool rotational speeds, plunge depths, and dwell times. The effects of tool design and process parameters on temperature distribution near the sheet-tool interface, weld microstructure, weld strength, and failure modes were studied. It was found that the peak temperature was higher while welding with a tool having circular pin compared to tapered pin, leading to a bigger dynamic recrystallized stir zone (SZ) with a hook tip bending towards the upper sheet and away from the keyhole. Hence, higher lap shear separation load was observed in the welds made from circular pin compared to those made from tapered pin. Due to influence of size and hardness of SZ on crack propagation, three different failure modes of weld nugget were observed through optical cross-sectional micrograph and SEM fractographs.

  16. Application of laser ultrasonic method for on-line monitoring of friction stir spot welding process.

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua

    2015-09-01

    Application of a laser ultrasonic method is developed for on-line monitoring of the friction stir spot welding (FSSW) process. Based on the technology of FSSW, laser-generated ultrasonic waves in a good weld and nonweld area are simulated by a finite element method. The reflected and transmitted waves are analyzed to disclose the properties of the welded interface. The noncontact-laser ultrasonic-inspection system was established to verify the numerical results. The reflected waves in the good-weld and nonweld area can be distinguished by time-of-flight. The transmitted waves evidently attenuate in the nonweld area in contrast to signal amplitude in the good weld area because of interfacial impedance difference. Laser ultrasonic C-scan images can sufficiently evaluate the intrinsic character of the weld area in comparison with traditional water-immersion ultrasonic testing results. The research results confirm that laser ultrasonics would be an effective method to realize the characterization of FSSW defects.

  17. Weldability of an iron meteorite by Friction Stir Spot Welding: A contribution to in-space manufacturing

    Evans, William Todd; Neely, Kelsay E.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Cook, George E.

    2017-11-01

    Friction Stir Welding has been proposed as an efficient and appropriate method for in space welding. It has the potential to serve as a viable option for assembling large scale space structures. These large structures will require the use of natural in space materials such as those available from iron meteorites. Impurities present in most iron meteorites limit its ability to be welded by other space welding techniques such as electron beam laser welding. This study investigates the ability to weld pieces of in situ Campo del Cielo meteorites by Friction Stir Spot Welding. Due to the rarity of the material, low carbon steel was used as a model material to determine welding parameters. Welded samples of low carbon steel, invar, and Campo del Cielo meteorite were compared and found to behave in similar ways. This study shows that meteorites can be Friction Stir Spot Welded and that they exhibit properties analogous to that of FSSW low carbon steel welds. Thus, iron meteorites can be regarded as another viable option for in-space or Martian construction.

  18. Friction stir spot welding of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with SiC nanoparticles

    Paidar, Moslem; Sarab, Mahsa Laali [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with 1.6 mm thickness was investigated. The effects of the silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on the metallurgical and mechanical properties were discussed. The effects of particles on tension shear and wear tests were also investigated. The process was conducted at a constant rotational speed of 1000 rpm. Results showed that adding SiC nanoparticles to the weld during FSSW had a major effect on the mechanical properties. In fact, the addition of nanoparticles as barriers prevented grain growth in the Stir zone (SZ). The data obtained in the tensile-shear and wear tests showed that tensile-shear load and wear resistance increased with the addition of SiC nanoparticles, which was attributed to the fine grain size produced in the SZ.

  19. Microstructure and failure mechanisms of refill friction stir spot welded 7075-T6 aluminum alloy joints

    Shen, Zhikang; Yang, Xinqi; Zhang, Zhaohua; Cui, Lei; Li, Tielong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► There is a correlation between the void in the weld and the joint strength. ► The preferable mechanical properties can be obtained by lowering rotational speed. ► The alclad has an adverse effect on the mechanical properties. -- Abstract: In this paper, the microstructure and mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy joints joined by refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) were investigated. The keyhole was refilled successfully, and the microstructure of the weld exhibited variations in the grain sizes in the width and the thickness directions. There existed defects (hook, voids, bonding ligament, etc.) associated to the material flow in the weld. Mechanical properties of the joint have been investigated in terms of hardness and tensile/shear and cross-tension test, and the fracture mechanisms were observed by SEM (scanning electron microscope). The hardness profile of the weld exhibited a W-shaped appearance in the macroscopic level, which reached the minimum at the boundary of the sleeve and the clamping ring. The variation laws between tensile/shear and cross-tension strength and processing parameters were rather complicated. The void in the weld played an important role in determining the strength of the joint. On the whole, the preferable strength can be obtained at lower rotational speed. Shear fracture mode was observed under tensile–shear loadings, and nugget debonding, plug type fracture (on the upper sheet) and plug type fracture (on the lower sheet) modes were observed under cross-tension loadings. It was also observed that the main feature affecting the mechanical properties of the joint is the alclad between the upper and lower sheets and the connecting qualities between the stir zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone.

  20. The Role of Mechanical Connection during Friction Stir Keyholeless Spot Welding Joints of Dissimilar Materials

    Xiao Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Contrast experiments of lap joints among dissimilar AZ31B Mg alloy, Mg99.50, zinc-coated DP600 sheet, and non-zinc-coated DP600 sheet were made by friction stir keyholeless spot welding (FSKSW and vacuum diffusion welding (VDW, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS were used to investigate the microstructures and components of the joints welded. The experimental results show that the FSKSW bonding method is a kind of compound mode that contains a mechanical connection and element diffusion fusion connection, in which mechanical connection has the main decisive function on joints of Mg/steel. Elements diffusion exists in the interfacial region of the joints and the elements diffusion extent is basically the same to that of VDW. The elements’ diffusion in Mg/steel using FSKSW is defined in the reaction between small amounts elements of the base metal and zinc-coated metals. The intermetallic compounds and composite oxide perform some reinforcement on the mechanical connection strength.

  1. Material flow and microstructural evolution during friction stir spot welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Yuan, W.; Mishra, R.S.; Carlson, B.; Verma, R.; Mishra, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Material flow and local texture evolution during friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of AZ31 magnesium alloy was characterized by varying tool rotation rates. Texture at various locations of the welded region was measured using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Material flow is significantly influenced by tool rotation rate with a conical step spiral pin tool, and FSSW introduces a unique basal fiber texture in the welded region. Results indicate that local texture evolution is dominated by shear deformation through material flow. The tool shoulder applies both shear and compressive deformation to the upper region material; however, the rotating pin introduces only shear deformation to the adjacent material. As the tool rotation rate increases, the effect of both tool shoulder and pin becomes more prominent by introducing a higher degree of basal pole tilt with respect to the initial rolling texture at the periphery of the pin, but less tilt in the upper region beneath the tool shoulder undersurface. The equiaxed fine grain structure in the stir zone appears to result from the twinning-induced dynamic recrystallization and discontinuous dynamic recrystallization.

  2. Texture Development and Material Flow Behavior During Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding of AlMgSc

    Shen, Junjun; Lage, Sara B. M.; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Bolfarini, Claudemiro; dos Santos, Jorge F.

    2018-01-01

    The microstructural evolution during refill friction stir spot welding of an AlMgSc alloy was studied. The primary texture that developed in all regions, with the exception of the weld center, was determined to be 〈110〉 fibers and interpreted as a simple shear texture with the 〈110〉 direction aligned with the shear direction. The material flow is mainly driven by two components: the simple shear acting on the horizontal plane causing an inward-directed spiral flow and the extrusion acting on the vertical plane causing an upward-directed or downward-directed flow. Under such a complex material flow, the weld center, which is subjected to minimal local strain, is the least recrystallized. In addition to the geometric effects of strain and grain subdivision, thermally activated high-angle grain boundary migration, particularly continuous dynamic recrystallization, drives the formation of refined grains in the stirred zone.

  3. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot Welding Between St37 Steel and 304 Stainless Steel

    Khodadadi, Ali; Shamanian, Morteza; Karimzadeh, Fathallah

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, St37 low-carbon steel and 304 stainless steel were welded successfully, with the thickness of 2 mm, by a friction stir spot welding process carried out at the tool dwell time of 6 s and two different tool rotational speeds of 630 and 1250 rpm. Metallographic examinations revealed four different zones including SZ and HAZ areas of St37 steel and SZ and TMAZ regions of 304 stainless steel in the weld nugget, except the base metals. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy experiments were used to investigate the possible formation of such phases as chromium carbide. Based on these experiments, no chromium carbide precipitation was found. The recrystallization of the weld nugget in the 304 steel and the phase transformations of the weld regions in the St37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld joint. Hardness changes of joint were acceptable and approximately uniform, as compared to the resistance spot weld. In this research, it was also observed that the tensile/shear strength, as a crucial factor, was increased with the rise in the tool rotational speed. The bond length along the interface between metals, as an effective parameter to increase the tensile/shear strength, was also determined. At higher tool rotational speeds, the bond length was found to be improved, resulting in the tensile/shear strength of 6682 N. Finally, two fracture modes were specified through the fracture mode analysis of samples obtained from the tensile/shear test consisting of the shear fracture mode and the mixed shear/tensile fracture mode.

  4. Thermo-Mechanical Characterization of Friction Stir Spot Welded AA7050 Sheets by Means of Experimental and FEM Analyses.

    D'Urso, Gianluca; Giardini, Claudio

    2016-08-11

    The present study was carried out to evaluate how the friction stir spot welding (FSSW) process parameters affect the temperature distribution in the welding region, the welding forces and the mechanical properties of the joints. The experimental study was performed by means of a CNC machine tool obtaining FSSW lap joints on AA7050 aluminum alloy plates. Three thermocouples were inserted into the samples to measure the temperatures at different distance from the joint axis during the whole FSSW process. Experiments was repeated varying the process parameters, namely rotational speed, axial feed rate and plunging depth. Axial welding forces were measured during the tests using a piezoelectric load cell, while the mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated by executing shear tests on the specimens. The correlation found between process parameters and joints properties, allowed to identify the best technological window. The data collected during the experiments were used to validate a simulation model of the FSSW process, too. The model was set up using a 2D approach for the simulation of a 3D problem, in order to guarantee a very simple and practical solution for achieving results in a very short time. A specific external routine for the calculation of the thermal energy due to friction acting between pin and sheet was developed. An index for the prediction of the joint mechanical properties using the FEM simulations was finally presented and validated.

  5. Thermo-Mechanical Characterization of Friction Stir Spot Welded AA7050 Sheets by Means of Experimental and FEM Analyses

    Gianluca D’Urso

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate how the friction stir spot welding (FSSW process parameters affect the temperature distribution in the welding region, the welding forces and the mechanical properties of the joints. The experimental study was performed by means of a CNC machine tool obtaining FSSW lap joints on AA7050 aluminum alloy plates. Three thermocouples were inserted into the samples to measure the temperatures at different distance from the joint axis during the whole FSSW process. Experiments was repeated varying the process parameters, namely rotational speed, axial feed rate and plunging depth. Axial welding forces were measured during the tests using a piezoelectric load cell, while the mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated by executing shear tests on the specimens. The correlation found between process parameters and joints properties, allowed to identify the best technological window. The data collected during the experiments were used to validate a simulation model of the FSSW process, too. The model was set up using a 2D approach for the simulation of a 3D problem, in order to guarantee a very simple and practical solution for achieving results in a very short time. A specific external routine for the calculation of the thermal energy due to friction acting between pin and sheet was developed. An index for the prediction of the joint mechanical properties using the FEM simulations was finally presented and validated.

  6. Effect of Sleeve Plunge Depth on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding of 2198 Aluminum Alloy

    Yue, Yumei; Shi, Yao; Ji, Shude; Wang, Yue; Li, Zhengwei

    2017-10-01

    Refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) is a new spot welding technology, by which spot joint without keyhole can be obtained. In this work, RFSSW was used to join 2-mm-thick 2198-T8 aluminum alloy sheets and effects of the sleeve plunge depth on microstructure and lap shear properties of the joints were mainly discussed. Results showed that when using small plunge depths of 2.4 and 2.6 mm, joints showed good formation and no defects were observed. Incomplete refilling defect was observed with increasing plunge depth due to material loss during welding. Size of the grains at sleeve-affected zone (SAZ) is smaller than that at the pin-affected zone, and the size becomes bigger with increasing the plunge depth. More secondary phase particles can be observed at SAZ with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The lap shear failure load firstly increased and then decreased with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The maximum failure load of 9819 N was attained with plug fracture mode when using 2.6 mm. Fracture morphologies show ductile fracture mode.

  7. Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  8. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Spot Welded 2A12-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Huijie Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 2A12-T4 aluminum alloy was friction stir spot welded, and the microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. A softened microstructural region existed in the joint, and it consisted of stir zone (SZ, thermal mechanically affected zone (TMAZ, and heat affected zone (HAZ. The minimum hardness was located in TMAZ, and the average hardness value in SZ can be improved by appropriately increasing welding heat input. The area of complete bonding region at the interface increased with increasing welding heat input because more interface metals were mixed. In a certain range of FSSW parameters, the tensile shear failure load of the joint increased with increasing rotation speed, but it decreased with increasing plunge rate or decreasing shoulder plunging depth. Two kinds of failure modes, that is, shear fracture mode and tensile-shear mixed fracture mode, can be observed in the tensile shear tests, and the joint that failed in the tensile-shear mixed fracture mode possessed a high carrying capability.

  9. Friction stir welding tool

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  10. Friction welding method

    Ishida, Ryuichi; Hatanaka, Tatsuo.

    1969-01-01

    A friction welding method for forming a lattice-shaped base and tie plate supporter for fuel elements is disclosed in which a plate formed with a concavity along its edge is pressure welded to a rotating member such as a boss by longitudinally contacting the projecting surfaces remaining on either side of the concavity with the rotating member during the high speed rotation thereof in the presence of an inert gas. Since only the two projecting surfaces of the plate are fused by friction to the rotary member, heat expansion is absorbed by the concavity to prevent distortion; moreover, a two point contact surface assures a stable fitting and promotes the construction of a rigid lattice in which a number of the abovementioned plates are friction welded between rotating members to form any desired complex arrangement. The inert has serves to protect the material quality of the contacting surfaces from air during the welding step. The present invention thus provides a method in which even Zircaloy may be friction welded in place of casting stainless steel in the construction of supporting lattices to thereby enhance neutron economy. (K. J. Owens)

  11. Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum explains the friction stir welding process in terms of two basic concepts: the concentration of deformation in a shear surface enveloping the tool and the composition of the overall plastic flow field around the tool from simple flow field components. It is demonstrated how weld structure may be understood and torque, drag, and lateral tool forces may be estimated using these concepts. Some discrepancies between computations and accompanying empirical data are discussed in the text. This work is intended to be helpful to engineers in diagnosing problems and advancing technology.

  12. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  13. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of spot friction stir welded ultrafine grained 1050 Al and conventional grained 6061-T6 Al alloys

    Sun, Y.F.; Fujii, H.; Tsuji, N.

    2013-01-01

    The ultrafine grained (UFGed) 1050 Al plates with a thickness of 2 mm, which were produced by the accumulative roll bonding technique after 5 cycles, were spot friction stir welded to 2 mm thick 6061-T6 Al alloy plates at different rotation speeds. Although the UFGed 1050 Al plates were used as the lower plates in order to reduce the heat generation therein during the welding process, the initial nano-sized lamellar structure still transformed into an equiaxial grain structure with a grain size of about 5.9 µm in the stir zone of the joints. Simultaneously, coarsening of the precipitates and formation of large quantities of nano-sized subgrains were found in the stir zone of the 6061 Al alloy plates. Microstructural observation by high resolution transmission electron microscope showed that the two plates were bonded through a transitional layer with a thickness of about 15 nm, within which a lot of screw dislocations formed due to the frictional force between the two plates. A mechanical properties evaluation revealed that the maximum shear tensile load can reach about 4127 N and the joints fractured just outside the hook region in the lower 1050 Al plate

  15. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  16. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  17. Friction Stir Welding Process: A Green Technology

    Esther T. Akinlabi; Stephen A. Akinlabi

    2012-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented and patented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in the United Kingdom in 1991 for butt and lap welding of metals and plastics. This paper highlights the benefits of friction stir welding process as an energy efficient and a green technology process in the field of welding. Compared to the other conventional welding processes, its benefits, typical applications and its use in joining similar and dissimilar materia...

  18. Non-dimensional characterization of the friction stir/spot welding process using a simple Couette flow model part I: Constant property Bingham plastic solution

    Buck, Gregory A.; Langerman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A simplified model for the material flow created during a friction stir/spot welding process has been developed using a boundary driven cylindrical Couette flow model with a specified heat flux at the inner cylinder for a Bingham plastic material. Non-dimensionalization of the constant property governing equations identified three parameters that influence the velocity and temperature fields. Analytic solutions to these equations are presented and some representative results from a parametric study (parameters chosen and varied over ranges expected for the welding of a wide variety of metals) are discussed. The results also provide an expression for the critical radius (location of vanishing material velocity) as functions of the relevant non-dimensional parameters. A final study was conducted in which values for the non-dimensional heat flux parameter were chosen to produce peak dimensional temperatures on the order of 80% of the melting temperature for a typical 2000 series aluminum. Under these conditions it was discovered that the ratio of the maximum rate of shear work within the material (viscous dissipation) to the rate of energy input at the boundary due to frictional heating, ranged from about 0.0005% for the lowest pin tool rotation rate, to about 1.3% for the highest tool rotation rate studied. Curve fits to previous Gleeble data taken for a number of aluminum alloys provide reasonable justification for the Bingham plastic constitutive model, and although these fits indicate a strong temperature dependence for critical flow stress and viscosity, this work provides a simple tool for more sophisticated model validation. Part II of this study will present numerical solutions for velocity and temperature fields resulting from the non-linear coupling of the momentum and energy equations created by temperature dependent transport properties

  19. Laser based spot weld characterization

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  20. Friction Welding of Titanium and Carbon Steel

    Atsushi, HASUI; Yoichi, KIRA; Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University; Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd.

    1985-01-01

    Titanium-steel is a combination of dissimilar materials, which are difficult to weld in general, owing to inevitable formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. A prominent feature of friction welding process is ability to weld dissimilar materials in many kinds of combinations. This report deals with friction weldabilily of pure titanium and S25C steel, which are 12 mm in diameter. Main results are summarized as follows; (1) Suitable welding conditions to obtain a sound weld, which has a j...

  1. Effect of welding parameters (plunge depths of shoulder, pin geometry, and tool rotational speed) on the failure mode and stir zone characteristics of friction stir spot welded aluminum 2024-T3 sheets

    Paidar, Moslem; Sarab, Mahsa Lali; Taheri, Morteza; Khodabandeh, Alireza [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the failure mode and stir zone characteristics of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 joined by friction stir spot welding. The welding parameters in this work are tool rotational speed, plunge depths of shoulder, and pin geometry. In accordance with the methods of previous investigations, the rotational speeds were set to 630 rpm to 2000 rpm. Two pin geometries with concave shoulder were used: triangular and cylindrical. The plunge depths of the shoulder were 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 mm. The shoulder diameter and pin height for both geometries were 14 and 2.4 mm, respectively. The diameter of the cylindrical and triangular pins was 5 mm. Results show that the parameters mentioned earlier influence fracture mode under tension shear loading. Two different fracture modes were observed during the examinations. Low-penetration depths and low-rotational speeds lead to shear fracture, whereas high values of these factors cause the tension-shear fracture mode. Fracture of the lower sheet sometimes occurs at high rotational speeds.

  2. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  3. Friction welding; Magnesium; Finite element; Shear test.

    Leonardo Contri Campanelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction spot welding (FSpW is one of the most recently developed solid state joining technologies. In this work, based on former publications, a computer aided draft and engineering resource is used to model a FSpW joint on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets and subsequently submit the assembly to a typical shear test loading, using a linear elastic model, in order to conceive mechanical tests results. Finite element analysis shows that the plastic flow is concentrated on the welded zone periphery where yield strength is reached. It is supposed that “through the weld” and “circumferential pull-out” variants should be the main failure behaviors, although mechanical testing may provide other types of fracture due to metallurgical features.

  4. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Lesnjak, A.; Tusek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  5. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  6. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  7. Friction welded closures of waste canisters

    Klein, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste presently stored in underground tanks is to undergo a vitrifying process which will immobilize it into a solid form. This solid waste will be contained in a stainless steel canister. The canister opening requires a positive-seal weld, the properties and thickness of which must be at least equal to those of the canister material. All studies and tests performed in the work discussed in this paper have the inertia friction welding concept to be highly feasible in this application. This paper describes the decision to investigate the inertia friction welding process, the inertia friction welding process itself, and a proposed equipment design concept. This system would provide a positive, reliable, inspectable, and full-thickness seal weld while utilizing easily maintainable equipment. This high-quality weld can be achieved even in highly contaminated hot cell

  8. Friction welding of steel to ceramic

    Rombaut, Pieter; De Waele, Wim; Faes, Koenraad

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to give a clear summary of the literature review performed during the master thesis on friction welding on dissimilar materials. Of main interest for this work is the welding of steel to a ceramic material such as alumina (Al2O3). Because of the difficulties involved in producing a sound weld for this material combination, not a lot of literature is available on this topic. This paper starts with a discussion on the basics of friction welding and typical problems enc...

  9. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  10. Spot Welding Characterizations With Time Variable

    Abdul Hafid; Pinitoyo, A.; History; Paidjo, Andryansyah; Sagino, Sudarmin; Tamzil, M.

    2001-01-01

    For obtain spot welding used effective data, this research is made, so that time operational of machine increasing. Welding parameters are material classification, electrical current, and weld time. All of the factors are determined welding quality. If the plate more thick, the time must be longer when the current constant. Another factor as determined welding quality are surface condition of electrode, surface condition of weld material, and material classifications. In this research, the weld machine type IP32A2 VI (110 V), Rivoira trademark is characterized

  11. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  12. Experimental and simulated strength of spot welds

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bennedbæk, Rune A.K.; Larsen, Morten B.

    2014-01-01

    Weld strength testing of single spots in DP600 steel is presented for the three typical testing procedures, i.e. tensile-shear, cross-tension and peel testing. Spot welds are performed at two sets of welding parameters and strength testing under these conditions is presented by load......-elongation curves revealing the maximum load and the elongation at break. Welding and strength testing is simulated by SORPAS® 3D, which allows the two processes to be prepared in a combined simulation, such that the simulated welding properties are naturally applied to the simulation of strength testing. Besides...... the size and shape of the weld nugget, these properties include the new strength of the material in the weld and the heat affected zone based on the predicted hardness resulting from microstructural phase changes simulated during cooling of the weld before strength testing. Comparisons between overall...

  13. A fundamental study on the structural integrity of magnesium alloys joined by friction stir welding

    Rao, Harish Mangebettu

    The goal of this research is to study the factors that influence the physical and mechanical properties of lap-shear joints produced using friction stir welding. This study focuses on understanding the effect of tool geometry and weld process parameters including the tool rotation rate, tool plunge depth and dwell time on the mechanical performance of similar magnesium alloy and dissimilar magnesium to aluminum alloy weld joints. A variety of experimental activities were conducted including tensile and fatigue testing, fracture surface and failure analysis, microstructure characterization, hardness measurements and chemical composition analysis. An investigation on the effect of weld process conditions in friction stir spot welding of magnesium to magnesium produced in a manner that had a large effective sheet thickness and smaller interfacial hook height exhibited superior weld strength. Furthermore, in fatigue testing of friction stir spot welded of magnesium to magnesium alloy, lap-shear welds produced using a triangular tool pin profile exhibited better fatigue life properties compared to lap-shear welds produced using a cylindrical tool pin profile. In friction stir spot welding of dissimilar magnesium to aluminum, formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of the weld had a dominant effect on the weld strength. Lap-shear dissimilar welds with good material mixture and discontinues intermetallic compounds in the stir zone exhibited superior weld strength compared to lap-shear dissimilar welds with continuous formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone. The weld structural geometry like the interfacial hook, hook orientation and bond width also played a major role in influencing the weld strength of the dissimilar lap-shear friction stir spot welds. A wide scatter in fatigue test results was observed in friction stir linear welds of aluminum to magnesium alloys. Different modes of failure were observed under fatigue loading including crack

  14. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  15. Sustainability of Welding Process through Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Sued, M. K.; Samsuri, S. S. M.; Kassim, M. K. A. M.; Nasir, S. N. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    Welding process is in high demand, which required a competitive technology to be adopted. This is important for sustaining the needs of the joining industries without ignoring the impact of the process to the environment. Friction stir welding (FSW) is stated to be benefitting the environment through low energy consumption, which cannot be achieved through traditional arc welding. However, this is not well documented, especially for bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW). Therefore, an investigation is conducted by measuring current consumption of the machine during the BFSW process. From the measurement, different phases of BFSW welding process and its electrical demand are presented. It is found that in general total energy in BFSW is about 130kW inclusive of all identified process phases. The phase that utilise for joint formation is in weld phase that used the highest total energy of 120kWs. The recorded total energy is still far below the traditional welding technology and the conventional friction stir welding (CFSW) energy demand. This indicates that BFSW technology with its vast benefit able to sustain the joining technology in near future.

  16. Friction stir welding of single crystal aluminium

    Fonda, Richard Warren; Wert, John A.; Reynolds, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution...... of crystallographic texture around the tool in each weld. The extent of both dynamic recrystallisation and conventional recrystallisation varied considerably as a function of weld orientation. As the base plate begins to interact with the deformation field surrounding the tool, regions of the single crystal rotate...

  17. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  18. Orbital friction stir welding of aluminium pipes

    Engelhard, G.; Hillers, T.

    2002-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) was originally developed for flat plates. This contribution shows how it can be applied to the welding of aluminium pipes. Pipes made of AlMG 3 (EN5754), AlMg 4.5Mn (EN5083) and AlMgSi 0.5 (EN6106) with dimensions of Da 600 and 520 x 10-8 mm were welded. The FSW orbital system comprises an annular cage with integrated FSW head, a hydraulic system, and a control unit. The welds were tested successfully according to EN 288. The mechanical and technical properties of the welds were somewhat better than with the TIG orbital process, and welding times were about 40 percent shorter [de

  19. Weldability of AISI 304 to copper by friction welding

    Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Balalan, Zulkuf [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2013-06-01

    Friction welding is a solid-state welding method, which can join different materials smoothly and is excessively used in manufacturing industry. Friction welding method is commonly used in welding applications of especially cylindrical components, pipes and materials with different properties, for which other welding methods remain incapable. AISI 304 stainless steel and a copper alloy of 99.6 % purity were used in this study. This couple was welded in the friction welding machine. After the welding process, samples were analyzed macroscopically and microscopically, and their microhardness was measured. Tensile test was used to determine the bond strength of materials that were joined using the friction welding method. At the end of the study, it was observed that AISI 304 stainless steel and copper could be welded smoothly using the friction welding method and the bond strength is close to the tensile strength of copper. (orig.)

  20. Friction welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Tsujino, R.; Ochi, H. [Osaka Inst. of Tech., Osaka (Japan); Kawai, G. [Osaka Sangyo Univ., Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Ogawa, K. [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Osaka (Japan); Suga, Y. [Keio Univ., Kanagawa (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, for an acceleration of utilization of magnesium alloy which is being interested in recent years, friction welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy was carried out, and the joint performance was discussed in relation to the deformation heat input in the upset stage and upset loss as a evaluation factor. Where, the deformation heat input in the upset stage is mechanical work represented by the product of upset speed and axial pressure. As a result, it was made clear that the friction welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy was easy in the atmosphere, and good welded joints without a non- adhesion area at the weld interface could de obtained. Moreover, the evaluation factors discussed were possible to evaluate to joint performance. (orig.)

  1. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  2. Friction stir welding of 6061 aluminium alloy

    Abdel Rahman, M.A.M.S.

    2009-01-01

    6061 AA (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance such as marine frames, pipelines, storage tanks, and aircraft components [1]. It is also used for the manufacturing of fuel elements in the nuclear research reactors. Compared to many of the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural alloys, friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded is not melted and recast [2]. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding traverse speed, and tool profile play a major role in deciding the weld quality. Several FSW tools (differ from each other in pin angle, shoulder diameter, and shoulder concavity) have been used to fabricate a number of joints in order to obtain a tool with which a sound weld can be produced. It was found that the FSW tool with tapered cone pin, concave shoulder, and shoulder diameter equal to four times the welded plate thickness is suitable to produce a sound weld. The effect of the traverse speed on the global and local tensile properties of friction stir welded joints has been investigated in the 6061-T6 AA. The global tensile properties of the FSW joints were improved with increasing the traverse speed at constant rotation rate. It is found that the global tensile strength of the FSW joint is limited by the local tensile strength of the nearest region to the weld center at which the cross section is composed mainly of the HAZ. The effect of the initial butt surface on the formation of the zigzag line on the tensile properties of the welds was examined by using three types of welding samples differ in the preparation of the initial butt surface. The first type of samples welded without removing the oxide layer from the initial butt surface (uncleaned butt surfaces joint). In the second type of samples the oxide layer was removed from

  3. Thermomechanical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2009-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat...... generation and local material deformation (often referred to as flow) during the welding process itself. ii) Prediction of the residual stresses that will be present in the joint structure post to welding. While the former in general will call for a fully-coupled thermomechanical procedure, however...... for the FSW process at hand, the heat generation must either be prescribed analytically or based on a fully coupled analysis of the welding process itself. Along this line, a recently proposed thermal-pseudo-mechanical model is presented in which the temperature dependent yield stress of the weld material...

  4. Frictional properties of jointed welded tuff

    Teufel, L.W.

    1981-07-01

    The results of the experiments on simulated joints in welded tuff from the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff warrant the following conclusions: (1) The coefficient of friction of the joints is independent of normal stress at a given sliding velocity. (2) The coefficient of friction increases with both increasing time of stationary contact and decreasing sliding velocity. (3) Time and velocity dependence of friction is due to an increase in the real area of contact on the sliding surface, caused by asperity creep. (4) Joints in water-saturated tuff show a greater time and velocity dependence of friction than those in dehydrated tuff. (5) The enhanced time and velocity dependence of friction with water saturation is a result of increased creep at asperity contacts, which is in turn due to a reduction in the surface indentation hardness by hydrolytic weakening and/or stress corrosion cracking

  5. Visualization of Spot- welding Resistance

    Michal Černý

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution devotes to monitoring of processes running during joining of steel sheets by incadescent so called point welding using non-destructive trial method – acoustic emission (AE. The joining process is detailed described within experimental measuring from the point of view of metallurgic effects runnig during weld creation (records obtained by means of AE method. It takes into consideration quality of joined steels within welding data of steel producer. Steel welding (determined by chemical composition during mechanical verification and firmness of welds consider results of measurement AE and fracture effect of point joints. The measurement also demonstrates conclusion about connection of metallurgic processes with material wave effects (AE measurement and their impact on firmness of joint at steel with guaranteed welding, difficult welding and at their potential combination.

  6. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  7. Spot weld arrangement effects on the fatigue behavior of multi-spot welded joints

    Hassanifard, Soran; Zehsaz, Mohammad; Esmaeili, Firooz

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of spot weld arrangements in multi-spot welded joints on the fatigue behavior of the joints are studied. Three different four-spot welded joints are considered: one-row four-spot parallel to the loading direction, one-row four-spot perpendicular to the loading direction and two-row four-spot weld specimens. The experimental fatigue test results reveal that the differences between the fatigue lives of three spot welded types in the low cycle regime are more considerable than those in the high cycle regime. However, all kinds of spot weld specimens have similar fatigue strength when approaching a million cycles. A non-linear finite element analysis is performed to obtain the relative stress gradients, effective distances and notch strength reduction factors based on the volumetric approach. The work here shows that the volumetric approach does a very good job in predicting the fatigue life of the multi-spot welded joints

  8. FRICTION - WELDING MACHINE AUTOMATIC CONTROL CIRCUIT DESIGN AND APPLICATION

    Hakan ATEŞ; Ramazan BAYINDIR

    2003-01-01

    In this work, automatic controllability of a laboratory-sized friction-welding machine has been investigated. The laboratory-sized friction-welding machine was composed of motor, brake, rotary and constant samples late pliers, and hydraulic unit. In automatic method, welding parameters such as friction time, friction pressure, forge time and forge pressure can be applied sensitively using time relays and contactors. At the end of the experimental study it's observed that automatic control sys...

  9. Unstable Temperature Distribution in Friction Stir Welding

    Sadiq Aziz Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the friction stir welding process, a nonuniform and high generated temperature is undesirable. Unstable temperature and distribution affect thermal and residual stresses along the welding line, thus necessitating mitigation. This paper presents a simple method to prevent significant temperature difference along the welding line and also to help nullifying some defect types associated with this welding, such as end-hole, initial unwelded line, and deformed areas. In the experimental investigation, a heat and force thermocouple and dynamometer were utilized while couple-field thermomechanical models were used to evaluate temperature and its distribution, plastic strain, and material displacement. The suggested method generated uniform temperature distributions. Measurement results are discussed, showing a good correlation with predictions.

  10. Metal Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The plastic deformation field in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is compared to that in metal cutting. A shear surface around the FSW tool analogous to the metal cutting shear plane is identified and comprises the basis of the "rotating plug" flow field model and the "wiping" model of tool interaction with weld metal. Within the context of these models: The FSW shear rate is estimated to be comparable to metal cutting shear rates. The effect of tool geometry on the FSW shear surface is discussed and related to published torque measurements. Various FS W structural features are explained, including a difference in structure of bimetallic welds when alloys on the advancing and retreating sides of the weld seam are exchanged. The joining mechanism and critical parameters of the FSW process are made clear.

  11. Waste canister closure welding using the inertia friction welding process

    Klein, R.F.; Siemens, D.H.; Kuruzar, D.L.

    1986-02-01

    Liquid radioactive waste presently stored in underground tanks is to undergo a vitrifying process which will immobilize it in a solid form. This solid waste will be contained in a stainless steel canister. The canister opening requires a positive seal weld, the properties and thickness of which are at least equal to those of the canister material. This paper describes the inertia friction welding process and a proposed equipment design concept that will provide a positive, reliable, inspectable, and full thickness seal weld while providing easily maintainable equipment, even though the weld is made in a highly contaminated hot cell. All studies and tests performed have shown the concept to be highly feasible. 2 refs., 6 figs

  12. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  13. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  14. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e. , no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  15. Performance Improvement of Friction Stir Welds by Better Surface Finish

    Russell, Sam; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The as-welded friction stir weld has a cross section that may act as a stress concentrator. The geometry associated with the stress concentration may reduce the weld strength and it makes the weld challenging to inspect with ultrasound. In some cases, the geometry leads to false positive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) indications and, in many cases, it requires manual blending to facilitate the inspection. This study will measure the stress concentration effect and develop an improved phased array ultrasound testing (PAUT) technique for friction stir welding. Post-welding, the friction stir weld (FSW) tool would be fitted with an end mill that would machine the weld smooth, trimmed shaved. This would eliminate the need for manual weld preparation for ultrasonic inspections. Manual surface preparation is a hand operation that varies widely depending on the person preparing the welds. Shaving is a process that can be automated and tightly controlled.

  16. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  17. Experimental study of mechanical properties of friction welded AISI ...

    to their wide application in the manufacturing industry. For the first set of ... the friction welded joint; destructive testing and non-destructive testing. ..... hardness was found at the weld interfaces for almost every case, this might be attributed to.

  18. Automatic Gap Detection in Friction Stir Welding Processes (Preprint)

    Yang, Yu; Kalya, Prabhanjana; Landers, Robert G; Krishnamurthy, K

    2006-01-01

    .... This paper develops a monitoring algorithm to detect gaps in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processes. Experimental studies are conducted to determine how the process parameters and the gap width affect the welding process...

  19. Optimum welding condition of 2017 aluminum similar alloy friction welded joints

    Tsujino R.; Ochi, H. [Osaka Inst. of Tech., Osaka (Japan); Morikawa, K. [Osaka Sangyo Univ., Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Ogawa, K. [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Osaka (Japan); Fujishiro, Y.; Yoshida, M. [Sumitomo Metal Technology Ltd., Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Usefulness of the statistical analysis for judging optimization of the friction welding conditions was investigated by using 2017 aluminum similar alloy, where many samples under fixed welding conditions were friction welded and analyzed statistically. In general, selection of the optimum friction welding conditions for similar materials is easy. However, it was not always the case for 2017 aluminum alloy. For optimum friction welding conditions of this material, it is necessary to apply relatively larger upset pressure to obtain high friction heating. Joint efficiencies obtained under the optimum friction welding conditions showed large shape parameter (m value) of Weibull distribution as well as in the dissimilar materials previously reported. The m value calculated on the small number of data can be substituted for m value on the 30 data. Therefore, m value is useful for practical use in the factory for assuming the propriety of the friction welding conditions. (orig.)

  20. Friction weld ductility and toughness as influenced by inclusion morphology

    Eberhard, B.J.; Schaaf, B.W. Jr.; Wilson, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    Friction welding consistently provides high strength, freedom from fusion defects, and high productivity. However, friction welds in carbon steel exhibit impact toughness and bend ductility that are significantly lower than that of the base metal. The inclusion content and morphology were suspected to be major contributors to the reduction in weld ductility. For this reason, four electric furnace steels - three types of ASTM A516 Grade 70, and an ASTM A737 Grade B steel - were investigated. Friction welds were made by both the inertia and direct drive process variations and the welds evaluated. It was shown that friction welds of inclusion-controlled steels exhibited much improved toughness and bend ductility were demonstrated. Upper shelf impact energy was equivalent to or greater than that of the base metal in the short transverse direction. The transition temperature range for all four materials was shifted to higher temperatures for both types of friction welds. Under the conditions of this test, the direct drive friction welds showed a greater shift than the inertia friction welds. The ductility and toughness of welds in A737 Grade B steel were superior to welds in A516 Grade 70 steels, reflecting the superior properties of the base metal. Welds of the A737 material had usable Charpy V-notch impact toughness of 20 to 30 ft-lb (27 to 41 J) at temperatures as low as -40 0 F (-40 0 C). All the welds had an acicular structure. The differences in properties between the inertia and direct drive friction welds appear associated with microstructural variations. These variations resulted from the different heat inputs and cooling rates of the two process variations were demonstrated. The beneficial effects of inclusion control on toughness and ductility. In addition, it also indicates that additional improvements may be attainable through control of the as-welded microstructure by process manipulation

  1. Corrosion Behavior of Arc Weld and Friction Stir Weld in Al 6061-T6 Alloys

    Yoon, Byoung Hyun; Kim, Heung Ju; Chang, Woong Seong; Kweon, Young Gak

    2006-01-01

    For the evaluation of corrosion resistance of Al 6061-T6 Alloy, Tafel method and immersion test was performed with Friction Stir Weld(FSW) and Gas Metal Arc Weld(GMAW). The Tafel and immersion test results indicated that GMA weld was severely attacked compared with those of friction stir weld. It may be mainly due to the galvanic corrosion mechanism act on the GMA weld

  2. Improved simulation method of automotive spot weld failure with an account of the mechanical properties of spot welds

    Wu, H.; Meng, X. M.; Fang, R.; Huang, Y. F.; Zhan, S.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and mechanical properties of spot weld were studied, the hardness of nugget and heat affected zone (HAZ) were also tested by metallographic microscope and microhardness tester. The strength of the spot weld with the different parts' area has been characterized. According to the experiments result, CAE model of spot weld with HAZ structure was established, and simulation results of different lap-shear CAE models were analyzed. The results show that the spot weld model which contained the HAZ has good performance and more suitable for engineering application in spot weld simulation.

  3. Method for laser spot welding monitoring

    Manassero, Giorgio

    1994-09-01

    As more powerful solid state laser sources appear on the market, new applications become technically possible and important from the economical point of view. For every process a preliminary optimization phase is necessary. The main parameters, used for a welding application by a high power Nd-YAG laser, are: pulse energy, pulse width, repetition rate and process duration or speed. In this paper an experimental methodology, for the development of an electrooptical laser spot welding monitoring system, is presented. The electromagnetic emission from the molten pool was observed and measured with appropriate sensors. The statistical method `Parameter Design' was used to obtain an accurate analysis of the process parameter that influence process results. A laser station with a solid state laser coupled to an optical fiber (1 mm in diameter) was utilized for the welding tests. The main material used for the experimental plan was zinc coated steel sheet 0.8 mm thick. This material and the related spot welding technique are extensively used in the automotive industry, therefore, the introduction of laser technology in production line will improve the quality of the final product. A correlation, between sensor signals and `through or not through' welds, was assessed. The investigation has furthermore shown the necessity, for the modern laser production systems, to use multisensor heads for process monitoring or control with more advanced signal elaboration procedures.

  4. Process Model for Friction Stir Welding

    Adams, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new process being applied for joining of metal alloys. The process was initially developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The FSW process is being investigated at NASA/MSEC as a repair/initial weld procedure for fabrication of the super-light-weight aluminum-lithium shuttle external tank. The FSW investigations at MSFC were conducted on a horizontal mill to produce butt welds of flat plate material. The weldment plates are butted together and fixed to a backing plate on the mill bed. A pin tool is placed into the tool holder of the mill spindle and rotated at approximately 400 rpm. The pin tool is then plunged into the plates such that the center of the probe lies at, one end of the line of contact, between the plates and the shoulder of the pin tool penetrates the top surface of the weldment. The weld is produced by traversing the tool along the line of contact between the plates. A lead angle allows the leading edge of the shoulder to remain above the top surface of the plate. The work presented here is the first attempt at modeling a complex phenomenon. The mechanical aspects of conducting the weld process are easily defined and the process itself is controlled by relatively few input parameters. However, in the region of the weld, plasticizing and forging of the parent material occurs. These are difficult processes to model. The model presented here addresses only variations in the radial dimension outward from the pin tool axis. Examinations of the grain structure of the weld reveal that a considerable amount of material deformation also occurs in the direction parallel to the pin tool axis of rotation, through the material thickness. In addition, measurements of the axial load on the pin tool demonstrate that the forging affect of the pin tool shoulder is an important process phenomenon. Therefore, the model needs to be expanded to account for the deformations through the material thickness and the

  5. FRICTION - WELDING MACHINE AUTOMATIC CONTROL CIRCUIT DESIGN AND APPLICATION

    Hakan ATEŞ

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, automatic controllability of a laboratory-sized friction-welding machine has been investigated. The laboratory-sized friction-welding machine was composed of motor, brake, rotary and constant samples late pliers, and hydraulic unit. In automatic method, welding parameters such as friction time, friction pressure, forge time and forge pressure can be applied sensitively using time relays and contactors. At the end of the experimental study it's observed that automatic control system has been worked successfully.

  6. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    2013-08-01

    Sterling, R.J. Steel, C.-O. Pettersson. “Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel.” Mater...MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FRICTION STIR WELDED ALUMINUM-STEEL JOINTS By ERIN ELIZABETH PATTERSON A thesis submitted in...for his work producing the dissimilar weld samples used in this study. Without his work, this project would not have been possible. I would also

  7. Properties of Friction Welding of Dissimilar Metals WCu-Cu Weld for Electrical Contact Device

    An, Y. H.; Yoon, G. G. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (Korea); Min, T. K. [Chungnam National University (Korea); Han, B. S. [Chonbuk National University (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    A copper-tungsten sintered alloy(WCu) has been friction-welded to a tough pitch copper (Cu) in order to investigate friction weldability. The maximum tensile strength of the WCu-Cu friction welded joints had up to 96% of those of the Cu base metal under the condition of friction time 0.6sec, friction pressure 45MPa, upset pressure 125MPa and upset time 5.0sec. And it is confirmed that the tensile strength of friction welded joints are influenced highly by upset pressure rather than friction time. And it is considered that mixed layer was formed in the Cu adjacent side to the weld interface, W particles included in mixed layer induced fracture in the Cu adjacent side to the weld interface and also, thickness of mixed layer was reduced as upset pressure increase. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  8. Structure formation of 5083 alloy during friction stir welding

    Zaikina, A. A.; Kolubaev, A. V.; Sizova, O. V.; Ivanov, K. V.; Filippov, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of structures obtained by friction stir welding and sliding friction of 5083 Al alloy. Optical and electron microscopy reveals identical fine-grained structures with a grain size of ˜5 µm both in the weld nugget zone and subsurface layer in friction independently of the initial grain size of the alloy. It has been suggested that the grain boundary sliding is responsible for the specific material flow pattern in both techniques considered.

  9. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  10. Spot-Welding Gun With Adjustable Pneumatic Spring

    Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed spot-welding gun equipped with pneumatic spring, which could be bellows or piston and cylinder, exerts force independent of position along stroke. Applies accurate controlled force to joint welded, without precise positioning at critical position within stroke.

  11. Resistance Spot Welding with Middelfrequency-Inverter Weling Gun

    Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    The paper presents the results of investigations concerning the process stability and weldability lobes for uncoated sheets of 1.0 mm thickness when performing resistance spot welding with a middlefrequency-inverter welding gun......The paper presents the results of investigations concerning the process stability and weldability lobes for uncoated sheets of 1.0 mm thickness when performing resistance spot welding with a middlefrequency-inverter welding gun...

  12. Probing weld quality monitoring in friction stir welding through characterization of signals by fractal theory

    Das, Bipul; Bag, Swarup; Pal, Sukhomay [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam (India)

    2017-05-15

    Providing solutions towards the improvisation of welding technologies is the recent trend in the Friction stir welding (FSW) process. We present a monitoring approach for ultimate tensile strength of the friction stir welded joints based on information extracted from process signals through implementing fractal theory. Higuchi and Katz algorithms were executed on current and tool rotational speed signals acquired during friction stir welding to estimate fractal dimensions. Estimated fractal dimensions when correlated with the ultimate tensile strength of the joints deliver an increasing trend with the increase in joint strength. It is observed that dynamicity of the system strengthens the weld joint, i.e., the greater the fractal dimension, the better will be the quality of the weld. Characterization of signals by fractal theory indicates that the single-valued indicator can be an alternative for effective monitoring of the friction stir welding process.

  13. Probing weld quality monitoring in friction stir welding through characterization of signals by fractal theory

    Das, Bipul; Bag, Swarup; Pal, Sukhomay

    2017-01-01

    Providing solutions towards the improvisation of welding technologies is the recent trend in the Friction stir welding (FSW) process. We present a monitoring approach for ultimate tensile strength of the friction stir welded joints based on information extracted from process signals through implementing fractal theory. Higuchi and Katz algorithms were executed on current and tool rotational speed signals acquired during friction stir welding to estimate fractal dimensions. Estimated fractal dimensions when correlated with the ultimate tensile strength of the joints deliver an increasing trend with the increase in joint strength. It is observed that dynamicity of the system strengthens the weld joint, i.e., the greater the fractal dimension, the better will be the quality of the weld. Characterization of signals by fractal theory indicates that the single-valued indicator can be an alternative for effective monitoring of the friction stir welding process.

  14. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  15. Friction stir welding process to repair voids in aluminum alloys

    Rosen, Charles D. (Inventor); Litwinski, Edward (Inventor); Valdez, Juan M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an in-process method to repair voids in an aluminum alloy, particularly a friction stir weld in an aluminum alloy. For repairing a circular void or an in-process exit hole in a weld, the method includes the steps of fabricating filler material of the same composition or compatible with the parent material into a plug form to be fitted into the void, positioning the plug in the void, and friction stir welding over and through the plug. For repairing a longitudinal void (30), the method includes machining the void area to provide a trough (34) that subsumes the void, fabricating filler metal into a strip form (36) to be fitted into the trough, positioning the strip in the trough, and rewelding the void area by traversing a friction stir welding tool longitudinally through the strip. The method is also applicable for repairing welds made by a fusing welding process or voids in aluminum alloy workpieces themselves.

  16. Metallography of Battery Resistance Spot Welds

    Martinez, J. E.; Johannes, L. B.; Gonzalez, D.; Yayathi, S.; Figuered, J. M.; Darcy, E. C.; Bilc, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion cells provide an energy dense solution for systems that require rechargeable electrical power. However, these cells can undergo thermal runaway, the point at which the cell becomes thermally unstable and results in hot gas, flame, electrolyte leakage, and in some cases explosion. The heat and fire associated with this type of event is generally violent and can subsequently cause damage to the surrounding system or present a dangerous risk to the personnel nearby. The space flight environment is especially sensitive to risks particularly when it involves potential for fire within the habitable volume of the International Space Station (ISS). In larger battery packs such as Robonaut 2 (R2), numerous Li-ion cells are placed in parallel-series configurations to obtain the required stack voltage and desired run-time or to meet specific power requirements. This raises a second and less obvious concern for batteries that undergo certification for space flight use: the joining quality at the resistance spot weld of battery cells to component wires/leads and battery tabs, bus bars or other electronic components and assemblies. Resistance spot welds undergo materials evaluation, visual inspection, conductivity (resistivity) testing, destructive peel testing, and metallurgical examination in accordance with applicable NASA Process Specifications. Welded components are cross-sectioned to ensure they are free of cracks or voids open to any exterior surface. Pore and voids contained within the weld zone but not open to an exterior surface, and are not determined to have sharp notch like characteristics, shall be acceptable. Depending on requirements, some battery cells are constructed of aluminum canisters while others are constructed of steel. Process specific weld schedules must be developed and certified for each possible joining combination. The aluminum canisters' positive terminals were particularly difficult to weld due to a bi-metal strip that comes ultrasonically

  17. Friction stir welding sets sail in China

    Luan, Guohong

    2007-01-01

    Today, Friction Stir Welding has set sail in China. As the pioneer of FSW development in the China territory, China FSW Centre hes made outstanding achievements in FSW technique development, FSW engineering, FSW equipment and FSW product. But the real industrial applications of FSW in China are just begining. With the planned national long-term development programmes and huge market requirement in aerospace, aviation, shipbuilding, railway, power and energy industries, FSW will continue to develop rapidly in the next 10 years. FSW will continue to develop rapidly in the next 10 years. FSW not only raises the level of joining techniques in Chinese industrial companies, but also increase the competitive ability of the industrial products made in china

  18. Low temperature friction stir welding of P91 steel

    Prasad Rao Kalvala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bead-on-plate friction stir welds were made on P91 alloy with low and high rotational speeds (100 and 1000 RPM to study their effects on weld microstructural changes and impression creep behavior. Temperatures experienced by the stir zone were recorded at the weld tool tip. Different zones of welds were characterized for their microstructural changes, hardness and creep behavior (by impression creep tests. The results were compared with submerged arc fusion weld. Studies revealed that the stir zone temperature with 100 RPM was well below Ac1 temperature of P91 steel while it was above Ac3 with 1000 RPM. The results suggest that the microstructural degradation in P91 welds can be controlled by low temperature friction stir welding technique.

  19. Inspecting Friction Stir Welding using Electromagnetic Probes

    Kinchen, David G.

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the use of advanced electromagnetic probes to measure the dimensions, the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity, and related other properties of friction stir welds (FSWs) between parts made of the same or different aluminum alloy(s). The probes are of the type described in in another Tech Brief. To recapitulate: A probe of this type is essentially an eddy-current probe that includes a primary (driver) winding that meanders and multiple secondary (sensing) windings that meander along the primary winding. Electrical conductivity is commonly used as a measure of heat treatment and tempering of aluminum alloys, but prior to the development of these probes, the inadequate sensitivity and limited accuracy of electrical-conductivity probes precluded such use on FSWs between different aluminum alloys, and the resolution of those probes was inadequate for measurement of FSW dimensions with positions and metallurgical properties. In contrast, the present probes afford adequate accuracy and spatial resolution for the purposes of measuring the dimensions of FSW welds and correlating spatially varying electrical conductivities with metallurgical properties, including surface defects.

  20. Torque Control of Friction Stir Welding, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC and Vanderbilt University propose the innovation of torque control of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement to force control of...

  1. In-Space Friction Stir Welding Machine, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC, and Vanderbilt University propose an in-space friction stir welding (FSW) machine for joining complex structural aluminum components. The...

  2. Developments in welding and joining methods of metallic materials

    Pilarczyk, J.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of the welding technology on the economy development. The welding and joining methods review. The particular role of the laser welding and its interesting applications: with filler metal, twin spot laser welding, hybrid welding process, remote welding. The fiber lasers. The high intensity electron beams applications for surface modification. The TIG welding with the use of the active flux. Friction welding, friction stir welding and friction linear welding. (author)

  3. Friction stir welding (FSW of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    M. Bušić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and flexural strength for three-point bending test have been determined for samples taken from the welded joints. Results have confirmed anticipated effects of independent variables.

  4. Friction stir welding of Aluminium matrix composites – A Review

    Subramanya Prabhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is established as one of the prominent welding techniques to join aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. It is a solid state welding process, takes place well below the melting temperature of the material, eliminates the detrimental effects of conventional fusion welding process. Although the process is capable to join AMCs, challenges are still open that need to be fulfill to widen its applications. This paper gives the outline of the friction stir welding technique used to join AMCs. Effect of process variables on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints, behavior of reinforcing materials during welding, effect of tool profiles on the joint strength are discussed in detail. Few improvements and direction for future research are also proposed.

  5. Reliability of copper based alloys for electric resistance spot welding

    Jovanovicj, M.; Mihajlovicj, A.; Sherbedzhija, B.

    1977-01-01

    Durability of copper based alloys (B-5 and B-6) for electric resistance spot-welding was examined. The total amount of Be, Ni and Zr was up to 2 and 1 wt.% respectively. Good durability and satisfactory quality of welded spots were obtained in previous laboratory experiments carried out on the fixed spot-welding machine of an industrial type (only B-5 alloy was examined). Electrodes made of both B-5 and B-6 alloy were tested on spot-welding grips and fixed spot-welding machines in Tvornica automobila Sarajevo (TAS). The obtained results suggest that the durability of electrodes made of B-5 and B-6 alloys is more than twice better than of that used in TAS

  6. Defect Detectability Improvement for Conventional Friction Stir Welds

    Hill, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of defect detectability via phased array ultrasound technology in conventional friction stir welds by comparing conventionally prepped post weld surfaces to a machined surface finish. A machined surface is hypothesized to improve defect detectability and increase material strength.

  7. Cladding of Advanced Al Alloys Employing Friction Stir Welding

    van der Stelt, A.A.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler

  8. Weld defect identification in friction stir welding using power spectral density

    Das, Bipul; Pal, Sukhomay; Bag, Swarup

    2018-04-01

    Power spectral density estimates are powerful in extraction of useful information retained in signal. In the current research work classical periodogram and Welch periodogram algorithms are used for the estimation of power spectral density for vertical force signal and transverse force signal acquired during friction stir welding process. The estimated spectral densities reveal notable insight in identification of defects in friction stir welded samples. It was observed that higher spectral density against each process signals is a key indication in identifying the presence of possible internal defects in the welded samples. The developed methodology can offer preliminary information regarding presence of internal defects in friction stir welded samples can be best accepted as first level of safeguard in monitoring the friction stir welding process.

  9. Retractable Pin Tools for the Friction Stir Welding Process

    1998-01-01

    Two companies have successfully commercialized a specialized welding tool developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Friction stir welding uses the high rotational speed of a tool and the resulting frictional heat created from contact to crush, 'stir' together, and forge a bond between two metal alloys. It has had a major drawback, reliance on a single-piece pin tool. The pin is slowly plunged into the joint between two materials to be welded and rotated as high speed. At the end of the weld, the single-piece pin tool is retracted and leaves a 'keyhole,' something which is unacceptable when welding cylindrical objects such as drums, pipes and storage tanks. Another drawback is the requirement for different-length pin tools when welding materials of varying thickness. An engineer at the MSFC helped design an automatic retractable pin tool that uses a computer-controlled motor to automatically retract the pin into the shoulder of the tool at the end of the weld, preventing keyholes. This design allows the pin angle and length to be adjusted for changes in material thickness and results in a smooth hole closure at the end of the weld. Benefits of friction stir welding, using the MSFC retractable pin tool technology, include the following: The ability to weld a wide range of alloys, including previously unweldable and composite materials; provision of twice the fatigue resistance of fusion welds and no keyholes; minimization of material distortion; no creation of hazards such as welding fumes, radiation, high voltage, liquid metals, or arcing; automatic retraction of the pin at the end of the weld; and maintaining full penetration of the pin.

  10. Effect of welding speed on microstructural and mechanical properties of friction stir welded Inconel 600

    Song, K.H.; Fujii, H.; Nakata, K.

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate the properties of a friction stir welded Ni base alloy, Inconel 600 (single phase type) was selected. Sound friction stir welds without weld defect were obtained at 150 and 200 mm/min in welding speed, however, a groove like defect occurred at 250 mm/min. The electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) method was used to analyze the grain boundary character distribution. As a result, dynamic recrystallization was observed at all conditions, and the grain refinement was achieved in the stir zone, and it was gradually accelerated from 19 μm in average grain size of the base material to 3.4 μm in the stir zone with increasing the welding speed. It also has an effect on the mechanical properties so that friction stir welded zone showed 20% higher microhardness and 10% higher tensile strength than those of base material.

  11. Modelling the Thermomechanical Conditions in Friction Stir Welding

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich

    Friction Stir Welding is a solid-state welding process invented by TWI in 1991. The FSW process is unique in the sense that joining of un-weldable alloys readily can be made. The thermomechanical conditions present in the workpiece during the welding process are of great interest since...... these control the properties of the weld. In the present work, a set of experimental, analytical and numerical analyses are carried out in order to evaluate the thermomechanical conditions descriptive for welding of aluminium, in this case AA2024-T3, under a specific set of welding parameters. Despite...... these specific data, the developed models can be applied for other alloys and welding parameters as well. A detailed experiment is carried out which constitutes the basis for the development and validation of the numerical and analytical models presented in this work. The contact condition at the tool...

  12. Analysis and validation of laser spot weld-induced distortion

    Knorovsky, G.A.; Kanouff, M.P.; Maccallum, D.O.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1999-12-09

    Laser spot welding is an ideal process for joining small parts with tight tolerances on weld size, location, and distortion, particularly those with near-by heat sensitive features. It is also key to understanding the overlapping laser spot seam welding process. Rather than attempting to simulate the laser beam-to-part coupling (particularly if a keyhole occurs), it was measured by calorimetry. This data was then used to calculate the thermal and structural response of a laser spot welded SS304 disk using the finite element method. Five combinations of process parameter values were studied. Calculations were compared to experimental data for temperature and distortion profiles measured by thermocouples and surface profiling. Results are discussed in terms of experimental and modeling factors. The authors then suggest appropriate parameters for laser spot welding.

  13. Ultrasonic diagnosis of spot welding in thin plates

    Kim, No You; Hong, Min Sung

    2005-01-01

    Spot welding widely used in automotive and aerospace industries has made it possible to produce more precise and smaller electric part by robotization and systemization of welding process. The quality of welding depends upon the size of nugget between the overlapped steel plates. Recently, the thickness of the steel plates becomes much thinner and hence, it introduces the smaller size of nugget. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the criterion to evaluate the quality of weld in order to obtain the optimal welding conditions for the better performance. In this paper, a thin steel plates, 0.1 mm through 0.3 mm thickness, have been spot-welded at different welding conditions and the nugget sizes are examined by defocused scanning microscopy. The relationships between nugget sizes and weldability have been investigated experimentally. The result of ultrasonic technique shows the good agreement with that of the tensile test.

  14. Effects of Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Behaviors of AA2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Ales Steve Korakan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded joints of AA2024-T4 Al alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Tests were performed in an aerated 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 7 at 20±2°C. Corrosion rate and corrosion morphology of weld regions were evaluated and compared to those of the parent metal. The microstructure of weld nugget, thermomechanical affected zone, heated affected zone, and parent metal were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was observed that corrosion initiated at FSW related spots and the sizes of local corrosion increased with time.

  15. Unraveling the Processing Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is translated along a weld seam, literally stirring the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path or paths is required. In this study, various markers are used to trace the flow paths of the metal. X-ray radiographs record the segmentation and position of the wire. Several variations in the trajectories can be differentiated within the weld zone.

  16. Effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanic properties of friction welded AISI 1040/Duplex stainless steel

    İhsan Kırık

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on the characteristic microstructure and mechanic properties of friction time on the couple steels AISI 1040/AISI 2205 stainless steel joining with friction welding method was experimentally investigated. Friction welding experiment were carried out in privately prepared PLC controlled continuous friction welding machine by us. Joints were carried out under 1700 rpm rotation speed, with 30MPa process friction pressure, 60MPa forging pressure, 4 second forging pressure and under 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 second friction time, respectively. After friction welding, the bonding interface microstructures of the specimens were examined by SEM microscopy and EDS analysis. After weld microhardness and tensile strength of specimens were carried out. The result of applied tests and observations pointed out that the properties of microstructure were changed with friction time increased. The excellent tensile strength of joint observed on 1700 rpm rotation speed and 3 second friction time sample.

  17. Friction Stir Weld Restart+Reweld Repair Allowables

    Clifton, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A friction stir weld (FSW) repair method has been developed and successfully implemented on Al 2195 plate material for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank (ET). The method includes restarting the friction stir weld in the termination hole of the original weld followed by two reweld passes. Room temperature and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties exceeded minimum FSW design strength and compared well with the development data. Simulated service test results also compared closely to historical data for initial FSW, confirming no change to the critical flaw size or inspection requirements for the repaired weld. Testing of VPPA fusion/FSW intersection weld specimens exhibited acceptable strength and exceeded the minimum design value. Porosity, when present at the intersection was on the root side toe of the fusion weld, the "worst case" being 0.7 inch long. While such porosity may be removed by sanding, this "worst case" porosity condition was tested "as is" and demonstrated that porosity did not negatively affect the strength of the intersection weld. Large, 15-inch "wide panels" FSW repair welds were tested to demonstrate strength and evaluate residual stresses using photo stress analysis. All results exceeded design minimums, and photo stress analysis showed no significant stress gradients due to the presence of the restart and multi-pass FSW repair weld.

  18. Recent developments in Micro Friction Stir Welding: A review

    Sithole, Keydon; Rao, Veeredhi Vasudeva

    2016-01-01

    The advent of friction stir welding (FSW) in 1991 has been evolutionary in the joining of metals and related materials. Friction stir welding has enabled the joining of metals that could not be joined by other welding processes. Research has shown that dissimilar materials with very different properties, plastics, composites and even wood can be joined by FSW. Recent activities in the application of FSW has seen the development of micro friction stir welding (μFSW), which is the FSW of very thin sections of thickness 1000 μm (1 mm) or less. Micro friction stir welding further extends the applications of FSW to areas such as copper electrical contacts, tailor-welded blanks, wood. Though μFSW is relatively new development significant work has been done to date with interesting research findings being reported. This paper aims to review developments in μFSW to date. The focus of the paper will be on problems peculiar to μFSW due to downscaling to the micro scale and other practical considerations. (paper)

  19. Heat Control via Torque Control in Friction Stir Welding

    Venable, Richard; Colligan, Kevin; Knapp, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In a proposed advance in friction stir welding, the torque exerted on the workpiece by the friction stir pin would be measured and controlled in an effort to measure and control the total heat input to the workpiece. The total heat input to the workpiece is an important parameter of any welding process (fusion or friction stir welding). In fusion welding, measurement and control of heat input is a difficult problem. However, in friction stir welding, the basic principle of operation affords the potential of a straightforward solution: Neglecting thermal losses through the pin and the spindle that supports it, the rate of heat input to the workpiece is the product of the torque and the speed of rotation of the friction stir weld pin and, hence, of the spindle. Therefore, if one acquires and suitably processes data on torque and rotation and controls the torque, the rotation, or both, one should be able to control the heat input into the workpiece. In conventional practice in friction stir welding, one uses feedback control of the spindle motor to maintain a constant speed of rotation. According to the proposal, one would not maintain a constant speed of rotation: Instead, one would use feedback control to maintain a constant torque and would measure the speed of rotation while allowing it to vary. The torque exerted on the workpiece would be estimated as the product of (1) the torque-multiplication ratio of the spindle belt and/or gear drive, (2) the force measured by a load cell mechanically coupled to the spindle motor, and (3) the moment arm of the load cell. Hence, the output of the load cell would be used as a feedback signal for controlling the torque (see figure).

  20. Effect of Process Parameters on Friction Model in Computer Simulation of Linear Friction Welding

    A. Yamileva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The friction model is important part of a numerical model of linear friction welding. Its selection determines the accuracy of the results. Existing models employ the classical law of Amonton-Coulomb where the friction coefficient is either constant or linearly dependent on a single parameter. Determination of the coefficient of friction is a time consuming process that requires a lot of experiments. So the feasibility of determinating the complex dependence should be assessing by analysis of effect of approximating law for friction model on simulation results.

  1. Microstructure and microhardness of Ti6246 linear friction weld

    Guo, Yina; Jung, Taenam; Chiu, Yu Lung; Li, Hangyue; Bray, Simon; Bowen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The microhardness and microstructure of linear friction welded Ti–6Al–2Sn–4Zr–6Mo (Ti6246) alloys were studied, in both as-welded and post-weld heat-treated conditions. It has been found that the as-welded Ti6246 has a lower microhardness value of about 360 HV in the central weld zone than that of the base material of about 420 HV. Post-weld heat-treatment of the Ti6246 weld at 600 °C for 1 h has led to the hardness increase of about 180 HV at the central weld zone. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the microstructure at the central weld zone of the as-welded Ti6246 consists of fine grains with dense acicular orthorhombic α″ martensite. The soft α″ martensite is believed to account for the low hardness measured in the as-welded conditions. Phase transformation from orthorhombic α″ to hexagonal α occurred during the PWHT, resulting in the observed hardness increase.

  2. Microstructure and microhardness of Ti6246 linear friction weld

    Guo, Yina; Jung, Taenam [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Chiu, Yu Lung, E-mail: y.chiu@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Li, Hangyue [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bray, Simon [Rolls-Royce plc, PO Box 31, Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom); Bowen, Paul [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01

    The microhardness and microstructure of linear friction welded Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-6Mo (Ti6246) alloys were studied, in both as-welded and post-weld heat-treated conditions. It has been found that the as-welded Ti6246 has a lower microhardness value of about 360 HV in the central weld zone than that of the base material of about 420 HV. Post-weld heat-treatment of the Ti6246 weld at 600 Degree-Sign C for 1 h has led to the hardness increase of about 180 HV at the central weld zone. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the microstructure at the central weld zone of the as-welded Ti6246 consists of fine grains with dense acicular orthorhombic {alpha} Double-Prime martensite. The soft {alpha} Double-Prime martensite is believed to account for the low hardness measured in the as-welded conditions. Phase transformation from orthorhombic {alpha} Double-Prime to hexagonal {alpha} occurred during the PWHT, resulting in the observed hardness increase.

  3. Enabling high speed friction stir welding of aluminum tailor welded blanks

    Hovanski, Yuri

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding (FSW) has traditionally been applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  4. Weld nugget formation in resistance spot welding of new lightweight sandwich material

    Sagüés Tanco, J.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Chergui, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    Weldability of a new lightweight sandwich material, LITECOR®, by resistance spot welding is analyzed by experiments and numerical simulations. The spot welding process is accommodated by a first pulse squeezing out the non-conductive polymer core of the sandwich material locally to allow metal......–metal contact. This is facilitated by the use of a shunt tool and is followed by a second pulse for the actual spot welding and nugget formation. A weldability lobe in the time-current space of the second pulse reveals a process window of acceptable size for automotive assembly lines. Weld growth curves...... with experimental results in the range of welding parameters leading to acceptable weld nugget sizes. The validated accuracy of the commercially available software proves the tool useful for assisting the choice of welding parameters....

  5. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The ...

  6. Friction stir welding (FSW process of copper alloys

    M. Miličić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes the structure of the weld joint of technically pure copper, which is realized using friction stir welding (FSW. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical processes of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Parameters of the FSW welding technology influencing the zone of the seam material and the mechanical properties of the resulting joint were analyzed. The physical joining consists of intense mixing the base material along the joint line in the “doughy” phase. Substantial plastic deformations immediately beneath the frontal surface of tool provide fine-grained structure and a good quality joint. The optimum shape of the tool and the optimum welding regime (pressure force, rotation speed and the traverse speed of the tool in the heat affected zone enable the achievement of the same mechanical properties as those of the basic material, which justifies its use in welding reliable structures.

  7. Laser spot welding of cobalt-based amorphous metal foils

    Runchev, Dobre; Dorn, Lutc; Jaferi, Seifolah; Purbst, Detler

    1997-01-01

    The results concerning weldability of amorphous alloy (VAC 6025F) in shape of foils and the quality of laser-spot welded joints are presented in this paper. The aim of the research was the production of a high quality welding joint, by preserving the amorphous structure. The quality of the joint was tested by shear strength analysis and microhardness measuring. The metallographic studies were made by using optical microscope and SEM. The results show that (1) overlapped Co based amorphous metals foils can be welded with high-quality by a pulsed Nd: YAG-Laser, but only within a very narrow laser parameter window; (2) the laser welded spots show comparably high strength as the basic material; (3) the structure of the welded spot remains amorphous, so that the same characteristics as the base material can be achieved. (author)

  8. Experimental Study of Tensile Test in Resistance Spot Welding Process

    Lebbal Habib

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance spot welding (RSW is a widely used joining process for fabricating sheet metal assemblies in automobile industry .In comparison with other welding processes the RSW is faster and easier for automation. This process involves electrical, thermal and mechanical interactions. Resistance spot welding primarily takes place by localized melting spot at the interface of the sheets followed by its quick solidification under sequential control of pressure water-cooled electrode and flow of required electric current for certain duration. In this work the tensile tests were studied, the results obtained show that the type material, the overlap length, the angle of the rolling direction and the thickness of the sheet have an influence in resistance spot welding process.

  9. Evaluation of the Weldability in Spot Welding using Ultrasonic Technique

    Hong, Min Sung; Kim, No Hyu

    2005-01-01

    Spot welding is the most widely used in automotive and aerospace industries. The quality of weld depends upon the size of nugget between the overlapped steel plates. Recently, the thickness of the steel plates is much thinner and hence, it introduces the smaller size of nugget. Therefore, it is necessary not only to develop the criterion to evaluate the quality of weld but also to obtain the optimal welding conditions for the better performance. In this paper, the steel plates, 0.5 mm through 1.5 mm thickness, have been spot welded at different welding conditions and the nugget sizes are examined by ultrasonic technique (C-scan type). The relationships between the nugget sizes and the weldability have been investigated. The result of ultrasonic technique shows the good agreement with that of the tensile test

  10. Evaluation of the Weldability in Spot Welding using Ultrasonic Technique

    Hong, Min Sung [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, No Hyu [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    Spot welding is the most widely used in automotive and aerospace industries. The quality of weld depends upon the size of nugget between the overlapped steel plates. Recently, the thickness of the steel plates is much thinner and hence, it introduces the smaller size of nugget. Therefore, it is necessary not only to develop the criterion to evaluate the quality of weld but also to obtain the optimal welding conditions for the better performance. In this paper, the steel plates, 0.5 mm through 1.5 mm thickness, have been spot welded at different welding conditions and the nugget sizes are examined by ultrasonic technique (C-scan type). The relationships between the nugget sizes and the weldability have been investigated. The result of ultrasonic technique shows the good agreement with that of the tensile test

  11. Mechanical properties of dissimilar friction welded steel bars in relation to post weld heat treatment

    Kong, Yu Sik; Kim, Seon Jin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Dissimilar friction welding were produced using 15(mm) diameter solid bar in chrome molybedenum steel(KS SCM440) to carbon steel(KS S45C) to investigate their mechanical properties. The main friction welding parameters were selected to endure good quality welds on the basis of visual examination, tensile tests, Vickers hardness surveys of the bond of area and H.A.Z and microstructure investigations. The specimens were tested as-welded and Post-Weld Heat Treated(PWHT). The tensile strength of the friction welded steel bars was increased up to 100% of the S45C base metal under the condition of all heating time. Optimal welding conditions were n=2,000(rpm), P{sub 1}=60(MPa), P{sub 2}=100(MPa), t{sub 1}=4(s), t{sub 2}=5(s) when the total upset length is 5.4 and 5.7(mm), respectively. The peak of hardness distribution of the friction welded joints can be eliminated by PWHT. Two different kinds of materials are strongly mixed to show a well-combined structure of macro-particles without any molten material and particle growth or any defects.

  12. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Chetan Aneja; Amit Handa

    2016-01-01

    In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW) process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases w...

  13. Investigation of Thermal Stress Distribution in Laser Spot Welding Process

    Osamah F. Abdulateef

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the laser spot welding process of low carbon steel sheet. The investigations were based on analytical and finite element analyses. The analytical analysis was focused on a consistent set of equations representing interaction of the laser beam with materials. The numerical analysis based on 3-D finite element analysis of heat flow during laser spot welding taken into account the temperature dependence of the physical properties and latent heat of transf...

  14. Friction Stir Welding of Tapered Thickness Welds Using an Adjustable Pin Tool

    Adams, Glynn; Venable, Richard; Lawless, Kirby

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) can be used for joining weld lands that vary in thickness along the length of the weld. An adjustable pin tool mechanism can be used to accomplish this in a single-pass, full-penetration weld by providing for precise changes in the pin length relative to the shoulder face during the weld process. The difficulty with this approach is in accurately adjusting the pin length to provide a consistent penetration ligament throughout the weld. The weld technique, control system, and instrumentation must account for mechanical and thermal compliances of the tooling system to conduct tapered welds successfully. In this study, a combination of static and in-situ measurements, as well as active control, is used to locate the pin accurately and maintain the desired penetration ligament. Frictional forces at the pin/shoulder interface were a source of error that affected accurate pin position. A traditional FSW pin tool design that requires a lead angle was used to join butt weld configurations that included both constant thickness and tapered sections. The pitch axis of the tooling was fixed throughout the weld; therefore, the effective lead angle in the tapered sections was restricted to within the tolerances allowed by the pin tool design. The sensitivity of the FSW process to factors such as thickness offset, joint gap, centerline offset, and taper transition offset were also studied. The joint gap and the thickness offset demonstrated the most adverse affects on the weld quality. Two separate tooling configurations were used to conduct tapered thickness welds successfully. The weld configurations included sections in which the thickness decreased along the weld, as well as sections in which the thickness increased along the weld. The data presented here include weld metallography, strength data, and process load data.

  15. Assessment of Nugget Size of Spot Weld using Neutron Radiography

    Triyono

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW has been widely used for many years in the fabrication of car body structures, mainly due to the cost and time considerations. The weld quality as well as the nugget size is an issue in various manufacturing and processes due to the strong link between the weld quality and safety. It has led to the development of various destructive and non-destructive tests for spot welding such as peel testing, ultrasonic inspections, digital shearography, and infrared thermography. However, such methods cannot show spot weld nugget visually and the results are very operator’s skill dependent. The present work proposes a method to visualize the nugget size of spot welds using neutron radiography. Water, oil and various concentrations of gadolinium oxide-alcohol mixture were evaluated as a contrast media to obtain the best quality of radiography. Results show that mixture of 5 g gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 in 25 ml alcohol produces the best contrast. It provides the possibility to visualize the shape and size of the nugget spot weld. Furthermore, it can discriminate between nugget and corona bond. The result of neutron radiography evaluation shows reasonable agreement with that of destructive test.

  16. Friction stir weld tools having fine grain structure

    Grant, Glenn J.; Frye, John G.; Kim, Jin Yong; Lavender, Curt A.; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-03-15

    Tools for friction stir welding can be made with fewer process steps, lower cost techniques, and/or lower cost ingredients than other state-of-the-art processes by utilizing improved compositions and processes of fabrication. Furthermore, the tools resulting from the improved compositions and processes of fabrication can exhibit better distribution and homogeneity of chemical constituents, greater strength, and/or increased durability. In one example, a friction stir weld tool includes tungsten and rhenium and is characterized by carbide and oxide dispersoids, by carbide particulates, and by grains that comprise a solid solution of the tungsten and rhenium. The grains do not exceed 10 micrometers in diameter.

  17. Numerical optimisation of friction stir welding: review of future challenges

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, the combination of increasingly more advanced numerical simulation software with high computational power has resulted in models for friction stir welding (FSW), which have improved the understanding of the determining physical phenomena behind the process substantially....... This has made optimisation of certain process parameters possible and has in turn led to better performing friction stir welded products, thus contributing to a general increase in the popularity of the process and its applications. However, most of these optimisation studies do not go well beyond manual...

  18. A Survey on Friction Stir Welding Of Dissimilar Magnesium Alloys

    Unnikrishnan, M. A.; Raja, Dhas. J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    There is a consistent demand for superior materials in every industry. The areas on demand are automobile and aerospace sectors in major.. The most commonly used material in these fields is Aluminium.Though it possess all the properties up to some extent constant demand is pushing for alternate materials. Dissimilar alloys have been a relatively new approach towards these fields.. Friction stir welding dissimilar alloys is a big leap in Automobile sector. In this paper a detailed review of Friction stir welding of Dissimilar Magnesium alloys has been done. This work will serve as a reference to subsequent researchers.

  19. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  20. Damage tolerance reliability analysis of automotive spot-welded joints

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Ni Kan

    2003-01-01

    This paper develops a damage tolerance reliability analysis methodology for automotive spot-welded joints under multi-axial and variable amplitude loading history. The total fatigue life of a spot weld is divided into two parts, crack initiation and crack propagation. The multi-axial loading history is obtained from transient response finite element analysis of a vehicle model. A three-dimensional finite element model of a simplified joint with four spot welds is developed for static stress/strain analysis. A probabilistic Miner's rule is combined with a randomized strain-life curve family and the stress/strain analysis result to develop a strain-based probabilistic fatigue crack initiation life prediction for spot welds. Afterwards, the fatigue crack inside the base material sheet is modeled as a surface crack. Then a probabilistic crack growth model is combined with the stress analysis result to develop a probabilistic fatigue crack growth life prediction for spot welds. Both methods are implemented with MSC/NASTRAN and MSC/FATIGUE software, and are useful for reliability assessment of automotive spot-welded joints against fatigue and fracture

  1. Some studies on weld bead geometries for laser spot welding process using finite element analysis

    Siva Shanmugam, N.; Buvanashekaran, G.; Sankaranarayanasamy, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, a 2 kW Nd:YAG laser welding system is used to conduct laser spot welding trials. → The size and shape of the laser spot weld is predicted using finite element simulation. → The heat input is assumed to be a three-dimensional conical Gaussian heat source. → The result highlights the effect of beam incident angle on laser spot welds. → The achieved results of numerical simulation are almost identical with a real weldment. -- Abstract: Nd:YAG laser beam welding is a high power density welding process which has the capability to focus the beam to a very small spot diameter of about 0.4 mm. It has favorable characteristics namely, low heat input, narrow heat affected zone and lower distortions, as compared to conventional welding processes. In this study, finite element method (FEM) is applied for predicting the weld bead geometry i.e. bead length (BL), bead width (BW) and depth of penetration (DP) in laser spot welding of AISI 304 stainless steel sheet of thickness 2.5 mm. The input parameters of laser spot welding such as beam power, incident angle of the beam and beam exposure time are varied for conducting experimental trials and numerical simulations. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of AISI 304 stainless steel, the effect of latent heat of fusion, and the convective and radiative aspects of boundary conditions are considered while developing the finite element model. The heat input to the developed model is assumed to be a three-dimensional conical Gaussian heat source. Finite-element simulations of laser spot welding were carried out by using Ansys Parametric Design Language (APDL) available in finite-element code, ANSYS. The results of the numerical analysis provide the shape of the weld beads for different ranges of laser input parameters that are subsequently compared with the results obtained through experimentation and it is found that they are in good agreement.

  2. Fatigue and Damage Tolerance of Friction Stir Welded Joints for Aerospace Applications

    Lemmen, H.J.K.

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a young welding process with high potential to replace riveted joints in aerospace structures like the fuselage. Friction stir welding is a robust process and capable of welding high strength aluminum alloys. Therefore it can lead to both costs and weight savings. To

  3. The Influence of Friction Stir Weld Tool Form and Welding Parameters on Weld Structure and Properties: Nugget Bulge in Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Brendel, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Although friction stir welding (FSW) was patented in 1991, process development has been based upon trial and error and the literature still exhibits little understanding of the mechanisms determining weld structure and properties. New concepts emerging from a better understanding of these mechanisms enhance the ability of FSW engineers to think about the FSW process in new ways, inevitably leading to advances in the technology. A kinematic approach in which the FSW flow process is decomposed into several simple flow components has been found to explain the basic structural features of FSW welds and to relate them to tool geometry and process parameters. Using this modelling approach, this study reports on a correlation between the features of the weld nugget, process parameters, weld tool geometry, and weld strength. This correlation presents a way to select process parameters for a given tool geometry so as to optimize weld strength. It also provides clues that may ultimately explain why the weld strength varies within the sample population.

  4. The investigation of typical welding defects for 5456 aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    Chen Huabin; Yan Keng; Lin Tao; Chen Shanben; Jiang Chengyu; Zhao Yong

    2006-01-01

    The external factors on the friction stir welding defects are so abundant that the experiments of friction stir welding were conducted for 5456 aluminum alloy. With the changes of the tool tilt angle and material condition, defects can be generated. These defects can be conventional ones (lack of penetration or voids), or lazy S, which are unique to friction stir welding. However, the origin of the defects remains an area of uncertainty. In this study, an attempt has been made to investigate the formation of these defects. The typical welding defects of friction stir welding joint for 5456 aluminum alloy were analyzed and discussed, respectively, by using optical microscopy (OM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microscopic examination of the nugget zone and fracture location of the weld confirms that the tilt angle can change the plastic material flow patterns in the stir zone and accordingly control the weld properties. In addition, the oxide layer from the initial butt surface during FSW is dispersed at the grain boundary. These A1 2 O 3 particles are actually the major cause of failure of the joint

  5. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds in an Aluminum Alloy

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks. Self-reacting friction stir welding is one variation of the friction stir weld process being developed for manufacturing tanks. Friction pull plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential self-reacting friction stir weld. A friction plug weld placed in a self-reacting friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in an aluminum alloy friction plug weld will be presented.

  6. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  7. Pin Tool Geometry Effects in Friction Stir Welding

    Querin, J. A.; Rubisoff, H. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW) there is significant evidence that material can take one of two different flow paths when being displaced from its original position in front of the pin tool to its final position in the wake of the weld. The geometry of the pin tool, along with the process parameters, plays an important role in dictating the path that the material takes. Each flow path will impart a different thermomechanical history on the material, consequently altering the material microstructure and subsequent weld properties. The intention of this research is to isolate the effect that different pin tool attributes have on the flow paths imparted on the FSWed material. Based on published weld tool geometries, a variety of weld tools were fabricated and used to join AA2219. Results from the tensile properties and microstructural characterization will be presented.

  8. Corrosion resistance of «tube – tubesheet» weld joint obtained by friction welding

    RIZVANOV Rif Garifovich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are widely applied for implementation of various processes at ventures of fuel and energy complex. Cost of production and reliability of heat exchangers of this type is to a wide extent determined by corresponding characteristics of tube bundle, «tube – tubesheet» is its typical joint in particular when welding operations are used in order to attach tubes to tubesheet in addition to expansion. When manufacturing such equipment of heat-resistant chrome-bearing or chromium-molybdenum steels including steel 15H5M, the process of fixed joint manufacturing gets significantly more complicated and costly due to the necessity to use thermal treatment before, during and after welding (this problem is particularly applicable for manufacturing of large-size equipment. One of the options to exclude thermal treatment from manufacturing process is to use «non-arc» welding methods – laser welding, explosion welding as well as friction welding. Use of each of the welding methods mentioned above during production of heat-exchange equipment has its process challenges and peculiarities. This article gives a comparative analysis of weld structure and distribution of electrode potentials of welded joints and parent metal of the joints simulating welding of tube to tubesheet of steel 15H5M using the following welding methods: shielded manual arc welding, tungsten-arc inert-gas welding and friction welding. Comparative analysis of macro- and microstructures of specific zones of the studied welded joints showed that the joints produced by arc welding methods do not exhibit evident inhomogeneity of the structure after application of thermal treatment which is explained by the correctness of thermal treatment. Joints obtained via friction welding are characterized by structural inhomogeneity of the welded joint zone metal microstructure. The ultra-fine-grained structure obtained as a result of friction welding makes it possible to

  9. Laser beam welding and friction stir welding of 6013-T6 aluminium alloy sheet

    Braun, R.; Dalle Donne, C.; Staniek, G.

    2000-01-01

    Butt welds of 1.6 mm thick 6013-T6 sheet were produced using laser beam welding and friction stir welding processes. Employing the former joining technique, filler powders of the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si were used. Microstructure, hardness profiles, tensile properties and the corrosion behaviour of the welds in the as-welded condition were investigated. The hardness in the weld zone was lower compared to that of the base material in the peak-aged temper. Hardness minima were measured in the fusion zone and in the thermomechanically affected zone for laser beam welded and friction stir welded joints, respectively. Metallographic and fractographic examinations revealed pores in the fusion zone of the laser beam welds. Porosity was higher in welds made using the filler alloy Al-5%Mg than using the filler metal Al-12%Si. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the β '' (Mg 2 Si) hardening precipitates were dissolved in the weld zone due to the heat input of the joining processes. Joint efficiencies achieved for laser beam welds depended upon the filler powders, being about 60 and 80% using the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si, respectively. Strength of the friction stir weld approached over 80% of the ultimate tensile strength of the 6013-T6 base material. Fracture occurred in the region of hardness minima unless defects in the weld zone led to premature failure. The heat input during welding did not cause a degradation of the corrosion behaviour of the welds, as found in continuous immersion tests in an aqueous chloride-peroxide solution. In contrast to the 6013-T6 parent material, the weld zone was not sensitive to intergranular corrosion. Alternate immersion tests in 3.5% NaCl solution indicated high stress corrosion cracking resistance of the joints. For laser beam welded sheet, the weld zone of alternately immersed specimens suffered severe degradation by pitting and intergranular corrosion, which may be associated with galvanic coupling of filler metal and

  10. Effect on spot welding variables on nugget size and bond strength of 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Charde, Nachimani

    2012-01-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) has revolutionized mechanical assembly in the automotive industry since its introduction in the early 1970s. Currently, one mechanical assembly in five is welded using spot welding technology, with welding of stainless steel sheet becoming increasingly common. Consequently, this research paper examines the spot welding of 2 mm thick 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet. The size of a spot weld nugget is primarily determined by the welding parameters: welding current, welding time, electrode force and electrode tip diameter However, other factors such as electrode deformation, corrosion, dissimilar materials and material properties also affect the nugget size and shape. This paper analyzes only the effects of current, weld time and force variations with unchanged electrode tip diameter. A pneumatically driven 75kVA spot welder was used to accomplish the welding process and the welded samples were subjected to tensile, hardness and metallurgical testing to characterize the size and shape of the weld nugget and the bond strength.

  11. Finite element modelling and updating of friction stir welding (FSW joint for vibration analysis

    Zahari Siti Norazila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding of aluminium alloys widely used in automotive and aerospace application due to its advanced and lightweight properties. The behaviour of FSW joints plays a significant role in the dynamic characteristic of the structure due to its complexities and uncertainties therefore the representation of an accurate finite element model of these joints become a research issue. In this paper, various finite elements (FE modelling technique for prediction of dynamic properties of sheet metal jointed by friction stir welding will be presented. Firstly, nine set of flat plate with different series of aluminium alloy; AA7075 and AA6061 joined by FSW are used. Nine set of specimen was fabricated using various types of welding parameters. In order to find the most optimum set of FSW plate, the finite element model using equivalence technique was developed and the model validated using experimental modal analysis (EMA on nine set of specimen and finite element analysis (FEA. Three types of modelling were engaged in this study; rigid body element Type 2 (RBE2, bar element (CBAR and spot weld element connector (CWELD. CBAR element was chosen to represent weld model for FSW joints due to its accurate prediction of mode shapes and contains an updating parameter for weld modelling compare to other weld modelling. Model updating was performed to improve correlation between EMA and FEA and before proceeds to updating, sensitivity analysis was done to select the most sensitive updating parameter. After perform model updating, total error of the natural frequencies for CBAR model is improved significantly. Therefore, CBAR element was selected as the most reliable element in FE to represent FSW weld joint.

  12. Microstructures and electrochemical behaviors of the friction stir welding dissimilar weld.

    Shen, Changbin; Zhang, Jiayan; Ge, Jiping

    2011-06-01

    By using optical microscope, the microstructures of 5083/6082 friction stir welding (FSW) weld and parent materials were analyzed. Meanwhile, at ambient temperature and in 0.2 mol/L NaHS03 and 0.6 mol/L NaCl solutionby gravimetric test, potentiodynamic polarization curve test, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, the electrochemical behavior of 5083/6082 friction stir welding weld and parent materials were comparatively investigated by gravimetric test, potentiodynamic polarization curve test, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation. The results indicated that at given processing parameters, the anti-corrosion property of the dissimilar weld was superior to those of the 5083 and 6082 parent materials. Copyright © 2011 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bonding mechanisms in spot welded three layer combinations

    Moghadam, Marcel; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Seyyedian Choobi, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    this interface. It has been shown previously that such a joint can reach relatively high strength resulting in plug failure in tensileshear testing. Additional strength due to these bonding mechanisms is also obtained in common spot welds in the so-called corona band around the weld nugget.......The strength of a spot weld generally stems from fusion bonding of the metal layers, but other solid state bonding mechanisms also contribute to the overall strength. Metallographic analyses are presented to identify the phases formed near and across the weld interfaces and to identify...... the occurring bonding mechanisms. When welding a combination of three galvanized steel layers where one outer layer is a thin low-carbon steel it is a common challenge to obtain nugget penetration into the thin low-carbon steel. It therefore happens in real production that no nugget is formed across...

  14. Evaluation of tensile strength and fracture behavior of friction welded ...

    In the present study an attempt was made to join austenitic stainless steel ... Experimental details ... This test was carried out on the friction welded samples of .... phenomenon was observed to be true if the rotational speed was increased up to ...

  15. Effect of weld line shape on material flow during friction stir welding of aluminum and steel

    Yasui, Toshiaki; Ando, Naoyuki; Morinaka, Shinpei; Mizushima, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of weld line shape on material flow during the friction stir welding of aluminum and steel was investigated. The material flow velocity was evaluated with simulated experiments using plasticine as the simulant material. The validity of the simulated experiments was verified by the marker material experiments on aluminum. The circumferential velocity of material around the probe increased with the depth from the weld surface. The effect is significant in cases where the advancing side is located on the outside of curve and those with higher curvature. Thus, there is an influence of weld line shape on material flow

  16. Friction welding of A 6061 aluminum alloy and S45C carbon steel

    Shinoda, T. [Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Kawata, S. [Post Graduate Student, Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Many researches for friction welding of aluminum with either carbon steel or stainless steel have been carried out. From those results, it is concluded that the greatest problem is the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds at weld interface. However, it is not clearly demonstrated the effect of friction welding parameters on the formation of intermetallic compounds. This research purposes are to evaluate the formation of intermetallic compounds and to investigate the effect of friction welding parameters on the strength of welded joint. For these purposes, A6061 aluminum alloy and S45C carbon steel were used with a continuous drive vertical friction welding machine. Tensile test results revealed that the maximum tensile strength was achieved at extremely short friction time and high upset. The joint strength reached 92% of the tensile strength of A6061 base metal. Tensile strength of friction welding was increasing with increasing upset pressure when friction time 1sec. However, tensile properties were deteriorated with increasing friction time. It was observed that the amount of formed intermetallic compound was increasing with increasing friction time at weld interface. Partly formed intermetallic compound on weld interface were identified when friction time 1 sec. However, intermetallic compound layer were severely developed with longer friction time at weld interface. It was concluded that intermetallic compound layer deteriorated the tensile properties of weld joints. (orig.)

  17. Friction Welding of Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys with Steel

    Andrzej Ambroziak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our actual knowledge and experience in joining dissimilar materials with the use of friction welding method. The joints of aluminium and aluminium alloys with the different types of steel were studied. The structural effects occurring during the welding process were described. The mechanical properties using, for example, (i microhardness measurements, (ii tensile tests, (iii bending tests, and (iv shearing tests were determined. In order to obtain high-quality joints the influence of different configurations of the process such as (i changing the geometry of bonding surface, (ii using the interlayer, or (iii heat treatment was analyzed. Finally, the issues related to the selection of optimal parameters of friction welding process were also investigated.

  18. The Concept of Electrically Assisted Friction Stir Welding (EAFSW) and Application to the Processing of Various Metals

    Ferrando, William A

    2008-01-01

    This report introduces a novel variant of conventional friction stir welding (FSW). Since 1991, friction stir welding provides an alternative to arc welding as a metal joining method in numerous applications...

  19. EFFECTS OF ELECTRODE DEFORMATION OF RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WELD GEOMETRY

    Nachimani Charde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The resistance spot welding process is accomplished by forcing huge amounts of current flow from the upper electrode tip through the base metals to the lower electrode tip, or vice versa or in both directions. A weld joint is established between the metal sheets through fusion, resulting in a strong bond between the sheets without occupying additional space. The growth of the weld nugget (bond between sheets is therefore determined from the welding current density; sufficient time for current delivery; reasonable electrode pressing force; and the area provided for current delivery (electrode tip. The welding current and weld time control the root penetration, while the electrode pressing force and electrode tips successfully accomplish the connection during the welding process. Although the welding current and weld time cause the heat generation at the areas concerned (electrode tip area, the electrode tips’ diameter and electrode pressing forces also directly influence the welding process. In this research truncated-electrode deformation and mushrooming effects are observed, which result in the welded areas being inconsistent due to the expulsion. The copper to chromium ratio is varied from the tip to the end of the electrode whilst the welding process is repeated. The welding heat affects the electrode and the electrode itself influences the shape of the weld geometry.

  20. Friction Pull Plug and Material Configuration for Anti-Chatter Friction Pull Plug Weld

    Littell, Justin Anderson (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A friction pull plug is provided for use in forming a plug weld in a hole in a material. The friction pull plug includes a shank and a series of three frustoconical sections. The relative sizes of the sections assure that a central one of the sections defines the initial contact point between the hole's sides. The angle defined by the central one of the sections reduces or eliminates chatter as the plug is pulled into the hole.

  1. Fatigue life estimation considering welding residual stress and hot-spot stress of welded components

    Han, S. H.; Lee, T. K.; Shin, B. C.

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue life of welded joints is sensitive to welding residual stress and complexity of their geometric shapes. To predict the fatigue life more reasonably, the effects of welding residual stress and its relaxation have to be considered quantitatively which are equivalent to mean stress by external loads. The hot-spot stress concept should be also adopted which can be reduce the dependence of fatigue strengths for various welding details. Considering the factors mentioned above, a fatigue life prediction model using the modified Goodman's diagram was proposed. In this model, an equivalent stress was introduced which are composed of the mean stress based on the hot-spot stress concept and the relaxed welding residual stress. From the verification of the proposed model to real welding details, it is confirmed that this model can be applied to predict reasonably their fatigue lives

  2. Prolegomena to the Study of Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The literature contains many approaches toward modeling of the friction stir welding (FSW) process with varying treatments of the weld metal properties. It is worthwhile to consider certain fundamental features of the process before attempting to interpret FSW phenomena: Because of the unique character of metal deformation (as opposed to, say, viscous deformation) a velocity "discontinuity" or shear surface occurs in FSW and determines much of the character of the welding mechanism. A shear surface may not always produce a sound bond. Balancing mechanical power input against conduction and convection heat losses yields a relation, a "temperature index", between spindle speed and travel speed to maintain constant weld temperature. But many process features are only weakly dependent upon temperature. Thus, unlike modeling of metal forming processes, it may be that modeling the FSW process independently of the material conditions has some merit.

  3. Micro friction stir welding of copper electrical contacts

    D. Klobčar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of micro friction stir welding (μFSW of electrolytic tough pitch copper (CuETP in a lap and butt joint. Experimental plan was done in order to investigate the influence of tool design and welding parameters on the formation of defect free joints. The experiments were done using universal milling machine where the tool rotation speed varied between 600 and 1 900 rpm, welding speed between 14 and 93 mm/min and tilt angle between 3° and 5°. From the welds samples for analysis of microstructure and samples for tensile tests were prepared. The grain size in the nugget zone was greatly reduced compared to the base metal and the joint tensile strength exceeded the strength of the base metal.

  4. Fully Automatic Spot Welding System for Application in Automotive Industry

    Peter Puschner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A Virtual Machine has led to a fully automatic spot welding system. All necessary parameters are created by measuring systems and algorithms running in the Virtual Machine. A hybrid operating circuit allows the Virtual Machine to read the exact process voltage between the tips of the electrodes every 50 µs. Actual welding voltage and current allow for the first time reading process impedance, electric power and total energy being transferred to the spot weld. Necessary energy input is calculated by a calorimetric model after measuring the total thickness of the materials to be welded as soon as the welding gun is positioned at the workpiece. A precision potentiometer implemented in the gun delivers the total material thickness within the 0.1 mm range during the pre-pressure phases. The internal databank of the Virtual Machine controls all essential parameters to guide the total welding process. Special generator characteristics of the welding power unit are created by the Virtual Machine just during the upslope and the welding phases. So the process will be initialized in differentiating the kind of material, mild steel or high strengthen steel. This will affect the kind of energy input and current decrease during the upslope and downslope phases.

  5. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  6. Modelling of the temperature field that accompanies friction stir welding

    Nosal Przemysław

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal modelling of the Friction Stir Welding process allows for better recognition and understanding of phenomena occurring during the joining process of different materials. It is of particular importance considering the possibilities of process technology parameters, optimization and the mechanical properties of the joint. This work demonstrates the numerical modelling of temperature distribution accompanying the process of friction stir welding. The axisymmetric problem described by Fourier’s type equation with internal heat source is considered. In order to solve the diffusive initial value problem a fully implicit scheme of the finite difference method is applied. The example under consideration deals with the friction stir welding of a plate (0.7 cm thick made of Al 6082-T6 by use of a tool made of tungsten alloy, whereas the material subjected to welding was TiC powder. Obtained results confirm both quantitatively and qualitatively experimental observations that the superior temperature corresponds to the zone where the pin joints the shoulder.

  7. Characterization of friction welding for IN713LC and AISI 4140 steel

    Yeom, J.T.; Park, N.K.; Park, J.H.; Lee, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Friction welding of dissimilar materials, Ni-base superalloy IN713LC and oil-quench plus tempered AISI 4140 steel, was investigated. Friction welding was carried out with various process variables such as friction pressure and time. The quality of welded joints was tested by applying bending stresses in an appropriate jig. Microstructures of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) were investigated along with micro-hardness tests over the friction weld joints. DEFORM-2D FE code was used to simulate the effect of welding variables in friction welding process on the distributions of the state variables such as strain, strain rate and temperature. The formation of the metal burr during the friction welding process was successfully simulated, and the temperature distribution in the heat-affected zone indicated a good agreement with the variation of the microstructures in the HAZ. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of friction welding for IN713LC and AISI 4140 steel

    Yeom, J.T.; Park, N.K. [Dept. of Materials Processing, Korea Inst. of Machinery and Materials, Kyungnam (Korea); Park, J.H.; Lee, J.W. [ENPACO Co., Changwon (Korea)

    2004-07-01

    Friction welding of dissimilar materials, Ni-base superalloy IN713LC and oil-quench plus tempered AISI 4140 steel, was investigated. Friction welding was carried out with various process variables such as friction pressure and time. The quality of welded joints was tested by applying bending stresses in an appropriate jig. Microstructures of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) were investigated along with micro-hardness tests over the friction weld joints. DEFORM-2D FE code was used to simulate the effect of welding variables in friction welding process on the distributions of the state variables such as strain, strain rate and temperature. The formation of the metal burr during the friction welding process was successfully simulated, and the temperature distribution in the heat-affected zone indicated a good agreement with the variation of the microstructures in the HAZ. (orig.)

  9. Friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers

    Winiczenko, Radoslaw; Kaczorowski, Mieczyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The results of the study of the friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers are presented. → The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. → In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. → The process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the interface. -- Abstract: In this paper, ductile cast iron-austenitic stainless steel, ductile cast iron-pure Armco iron and ductile cast iron-low carbon steel interlayers were welded, using the friction welding method. The tensile strength of the joints was determined, using a conventional tensile test machine. Moreover, the hardness across the interface of materials was measured on metallographic specimens. The fracture surface and microstructure of the joints was examined using either light stereoscope microscopy as well as electron microscopy. In this case, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied. The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. It was concluded that the process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the ductile cast iron-stainless steel interface. This leads to increase in carbon concentration in stainless steel where chromium carbides were formed, the size and distribution of which was dependent on the distance from the interface.

  10. Microstructural evolution in friction stir welding of nanostructured ODS alloys

    Chen, C.-L.; Tatlock, G.J.; Jones, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-based alloys manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) are generally considered to be promising candidate materials for high-temperature applications up to at least 1100 o C because of their excellent creep strength and good oxidation resistance. However, a key issue with these alloys is the difficulty in using fusion welding techniques to join components due to oxide particle agglomeration and loss in the weld zone and the disruption and discontinuity in the grain structure introduced at the bond. In this study, the evolution of microstructure has been comprehensively studied in friction stir welds in a ferritic ODS alloy. Initially, electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) was used to analyze the grain orientation, the grain boundary geometries and recrystallization behaviour. It suggested that deformation heterogeneities were introduced during the friction stirring process which facilitated the onset of recrystallization. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to observe the effects of the friction stir welding (FSW) process on the grain structure and the distribution of Y 2 O 3 and other particles in the metal substrates in the FSW and adjacent regions, after the alloys had been recrystallized at temperatures up to 1380 o C for 1 h in air. The results show that fine-equiaxed grains and a uniform distribution of oxide particles were present in the friction stirred region but that the grain boundaries in the parent metal were pinned by particles. Friction stirring appeared to release these boundaries and allowed secondary recrystallization to occur after further heat treatment. The FSW process appears to be a promising technique for joining ferritic ODS alloys in the form of sheet and tube.

  11. Controlling Force and Depth in Friction Stir Welding

    Adams, Glynn; Loftus, Zachary; McCormac, Nathan; Venable, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Feedback control of the penetration force applied to a pin tool in friction stir welding has been found to be a robust and reliable means for controlling the depth of penetration of the tool. This discovery has made it possible to simplify depth control and to weld with greater repeatability, even on workpieces with long weld joints. Prior to this discovery, depths of penetration in friction stir welding were controlled by hard-tooled roller assemblies or by depth actuators controlled by feedback from such external sensors as linear variable-differential transformers or laser-based devices. These means of control are limited: A hard-tooled roller assembly confines a pin tool to a preset depth that cannot be changed easily during the welding process. A measurement by an external sensor is only an indirect indicative of the depth of penetration, and computations to correlate such a measurement with a depth of penetration are vulnerable to error. The present force-feedback approach exploits the proportionality between the depth and the force of penetration Unlike a depth measurement taken by an external sensor, a force measurement can be direct because it can be taken by a sensor coupled directly to the pin tool. The reading can be processed through a modern electronic servo control system to control an actuator to keep the applied penetration force at the desired level. In comparison with the older depth-control methods described above, this method offers greater sensitivity to plasticizing of the workpiece metal and is less sensitive to process noise, resulting in a more consistent process. In an experiment, a tapered panel was friction stir welded while controlling the force of penetration according to this method. The figure is a plot of measurements taken during the experiment, showing that force was controlled with a variation of 200 lb (890 N), resulting in control of the depth of penetration with a variation of 0.004 in. (0.1 mm).

  12. Effect of rotation speed and welding speed on Friction Stir Welding of AA1100 Aluminium alloy

    Raja, P.; Bojanampati, S.; Karthikeyan, R.; Ganithi, R.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum AA1100 is the most widely used grade of Aluminium due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high ductility and reflective finish, the selected material was welded with Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process on a CNC machine, using a combination of different tool rotation speed (1500 rpm, 2500 rpm, 3500 rpm) and welding speed (10 mm/min, 30 mm/min, 50 mm/min) as welding parameters. The effect of FSW using this welding parameter was studied by measuring the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints. A high-speed steel tool was prepared for welding the Aluminium AA1100 alloy having an 8mm shoulder diameter and pin dimension of 4mm diameter and 2.8 mm length. The welded joints were tested using the universal testing machine. It was found that Ultimate Tensile Strength of FSW specimen was highest with a value of 98.08 MPa when the weld was performed at rotation speed of 1500 RPM and welding speed of 50 mm/min.

  13. Friction welding of bulk metallic glasses to different ones

    Shoji, Takuo; Kawamura, Yoshihito; Ohno, Yasuhide

    2004-01-01

    For application of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) as industrial materials, it is necessary to establish the metallurgical bonding technology. The BMGs exhibit high-strain-rate superplasticity in the supercooled liquid state. It has been reported that bulk metallic glasses were successfully welded together by friction, pulse-current, explosion and electron-beam methods. In this study, friction welding of the BMGs to different ones were tried for Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 , Pd 40 Cu 30 P 20 Ni 10 , Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 and Zr 41 Be 23 Ti 14 Cu 12 Ni 10 BMGs. Successful welding was obtained in the combinations of the Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 and Pd 40 Cu 30 P 20 Ni 10 BMGs, and the Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 and Zr 41 Be 23 Ti 14 Cu 12 Ni 10 ones. No crystallization was observed and no visible defect was recognized in the interface. The joining strength of the welded BMGs was the same as that of the parent BMG or more. BMGs seem to be successfully welded to the different ones with a difference below about 50 K in glass transition temperature

  14. Improving friction stir welding of blanks of different thicknesses

    Fratini, L. [Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: abaqus@dtpm.unipa.it; Buffa, G. [Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Shivpuri, R. [Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2007-06-25

    Friction stir welding (FSW) appears to be a promising process even in the welding of blanks of different thicknesses. Actually, such particular tailor welded blanks (TWBs) are usually characterized by a reduction in ductility due to the utilized fusion welding process. In this paper the authors, starting from a preliminary feasibility study, investigate the possibility to improve the mechanical performances of friction stir welded blanks of aluminum alloy with different thicknesses. Both experiments and a FE analyses are developed for a few case studies with different thickness ratios between the blanks. The numerical investigations are performed with the aim to highlight the material temperature distribution during the process in order to determine process conditions for which an almost symmetric thermal flow is obtained in the two blanks of the joint. In this way, a few simple process design rules are derived and verified through experiments. In particular a thickness ratio up to 2 was considered and a joint resistance of about the 80% of the parent material ultimate tensile strength was observed.

  15. Improving friction stir welding of blanks of different thicknesses

    Fratini, L.; Buffa, G.; Shivpuri, R.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) appears to be a promising process even in the welding of blanks of different thicknesses. Actually, such particular tailor welded blanks (TWBs) are usually characterized by a reduction in ductility due to the utilized fusion welding process. In this paper the authors, starting from a preliminary feasibility study, investigate the possibility to improve the mechanical performances of friction stir welded blanks of aluminum alloy with different thicknesses. Both experiments and a FE analyses are developed for a few case studies with different thickness ratios between the blanks. The numerical investigations are performed with the aim to highlight the material temperature distribution during the process in order to determine process conditions for which an almost symmetric thermal flow is obtained in the two blanks of the joint. In this way, a few simple process design rules are derived and verified through experiments. In particular a thickness ratio up to 2 was considered and a joint resistance of about the 80% of the parent material ultimate tensile strength was observed

  16. Application of acoustic emission technique and friction welding for excavator hose nipple

    Kong, Yu Sik; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Friction welding is a very useful joining process to weld metals which have axially symmetric cross section. In this paper, the feasibility of industry application was determined by analyzing the mechanical properties of weld region for a specimen of tube-to-tube shape for excavator hose nipple with friction welding, and optimized welding variables were suggested. In order to accomplish this object, friction heating pressure and friction heating time were selected as the major process variables and the experiment was performed in three levels of each parameter. An acoustic emission(AE) technique was applied to evaluate the optimal friction welding conditions nondestructively. AE parameters of accumulative count and event were analyzed in terms of generating trend of AE signals across the full range of friction weld. The typical waveform and frequency spectrum of AE signals which is generated by friction weld were discussed. From this study the optimal welding variables could be suggested as rotating speed of 1300 rpm, friction heating pressure of 15 MPa, and friction heating time of 10 sec. AE event was a useful parameter to estimate the tensile strength of tube-to tube specimen with friction weld.

  17. Tensile Strength and Hardness Correlations with Microscopy in Friction welded Aluminium to Copper

    Satish, Rengarajan; Seshagiri Rao, Vaddi; Ananthapadmanaban, Dattaguru; Ravi, Balappa

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and copper are good conductors of heat and electricity, copper being the better conductor, is a costly metal indeed. On the other hand, aluminium is cheap, easily available and also has a lower density than copper. Hence, worldwide efforts are being made to partially replace copper wire. Solid state welding should be used to join aluminium to copper. This is because the use of fusion welding results in brittle phases formed in the weld interface. One of the solid state welding techniques used for joining aluminium to copper is friction welding. In this paper, an attempt has been made to join aluminium to copper by friction welding by varying the friction welding parameters, namely friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length and speed of rotation of the workpiece. Nine different friction welding parameter combinations were used during welding in accordance with ASTM standards and results have been reported. Tensile strength and hardness tests were carried out for each parameter combination. Optimum friction welding parameter combination was identified with respect to tensile strength. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron dispersive spectroanalysis were obtained to identify modes of fracture and presence of intermetallic phases for each friction welding combination with the aim to narrow down friction welding parameters that give good properties on the whole.

  18. Energy reduction for the spot welding process in the automotive industry

    Cullen, J D; Athi, N; Al-Jader, M A; Shaw, A; Al-Shamma'a, A I

    2007-01-01

    When performing spot welding on galvanised metals, higher welding force and current are required than on uncoated steels. This has implications for the energy usage when creating each spot weld, of which there are approximately 4300 in each passenger car. The paper presented is an overview of electrode current selection and its variance over the lifetime of the electrode tip. This also describes the proposed analysis system for the selection of welding parameters for the spot welding process, as the electrode tip wears

  19. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Welds of Al - Mg - Si Alloys After Different Modes of Impulse Friction Stir Welding

    Kondrat'ev, S. Yu.; Morozova, Yu. N.; Golubev, Yu. A.; Hantelmann, C.; Naumov, A. A.; Mikhailov, V. G.

    2018-03-01

    Welded joints of aluminum alloy 6082-T6 formed by the method of impulse friction stir welding are studied. The effect of the power and frequency of the pulses on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints is determined. Application of an additional pulse during the welding affects the surface quality and the shape of the weld, the distribution of the oxide layer and of particles of the hardening phase, and the grain size in the zone of dynamic recrystallization.

  20. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process.

    Fraser, Kirk A; St-Georges, Lyne; Kiss, Laszlo I

    2014-04-30

    Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges), being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS). A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed) is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  1. Process optimization of friction stir welding based on thermal models

    Larsen, Anders Astrup

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to apply optimization methods to numerical models of a friction stir welding process. The work is intended as a proof-of-concept using different methods that are applicable to models of high complexity, possibly with high computational cost, and without the possibility...... information of the high-fidelity model. The optimization schemes are applied to stationary thermal models of differing complexity of the friction stir welding process. The optimization problems considered are based on optimizing the temperature field in the workpiece by finding optimal translational speed....... Also an optimization problem based on a microstructure model is solved, allowing the hardness distribution in the plate to be optimized. The use of purely thermal models represents a simplification of the real process; nonetheless, it shows the applicability of the optimization methods considered...

  2. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding to Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and they have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high volumes. While friction-stir welding (FSW) has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than 1 m/min, high-volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost-sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low-to-moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high-speed linear FSW. Therefore, to facilitate production of high-volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of 3 m/min. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for postweld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. An evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum TWBs, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory-scale tests.

  3. Tensile Properties of Friction Stir Welded Joints of AA 2024-T6 Alloy at Different Welding Speeds

    Avula, Dhananjayulu; Devuri, Venkateswarlu; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Dwivedi, Dheerendra Kumar

    2018-03-01

    The influence of welding speed on the friction stir welded joint properties of hardness, tensile properties, defects and microstructure characterization are studied in the present study. The friction stir welding was conducted on AA2014-T6 heat treated alloy with 5 mm thickness plate in butt joint configuration. The welding speed was varied from 8 mm/min to 120 mm/min at the fixed travel speed and load conditions. It is observed that the welding speeds at higher rate with wide range can be possible to weld this alloy at higher rates of tool revolution suggesting that the inherent capability of friction stir welding technique for aluminum 2014 alloys. The strength of the joints gradually increases with enhancing of welding speed. The micro structural observations exhibited the formation of equiaxed grains in the stir zone and slightly in the thermo-mechanically affected zone. In addition, the size of the grains decreases with increase in welding speed owing to the presence of low heat input. Hence the hardness of the joints slightly increased in the stir zones over the other zones of the weld nugget. The joint strength initially increases with the welding speed and starts to decreases after reaching to the maximum value. The relationship between the welding conditions and friction stir welded joint properties has been discussed.

  4. Recent Developments and Research Progress on Friction Stir Welding of Titanium Alloys: An Overview

    Karna, Sivaji; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Venkateswarulu, D.; Srikanth, V.

    2018-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys are joined by various welding processes. However, Fusion welding of titanium alloys resulted solidification problems like porosity, segregation and columnar grains. The problems occurred in conventional welding processes can be resolved using a solid state welding i.e. friction stir welding. Aluminium and Magnesium alloys were welded by friction stir welding. However alloys used for high temperature applications such as titanium alloys and steels are arduous to weld using friction stir welding process because of tool limitations. Present paper summarises the studies on joining of Titanium alloys using friction stir welding with different tool materials. Selection of tool material and effect of welding conditions on mechanical and microstructure properties of weldments were also reported. Major advantage with friction stir welding is, we can control the welding temperature above or below β-transus temperature by optimizing the process parameters. Stir zone in below beta transus condition consists of bi-modal microstructure and microstructure in above β-transus condition has large prior β- grains and α/β laths present in the grain. Welding experiments conducted below β- transus condition has better mechanical properties than welding at above β-transus condition. Hardness and tensile properties of weldments are correlated with the stir zone microstructure.

  5. Joining of Cu-Mg-Mn Aluminum Alloy with Linear Friction Welding

    A. Medvedev; V. Bychkov; A. Selivanov; Yu. J. Ershova; B. Bolshakov; I.V. Alexаndrov; F. F. Musin

    2014-01-01

    Al-Cu-Mg-Mn alloy samples were joined together with linear friction welding in two conditions, as is, without pretreatment, and after etching the welding interface. The effect of the welding interface condition was evaluated based on microstructure analysis, microhardness and tensile testing at room temperature. Also, the temperature distribution during welding was estimated with an analytical one-dimensional heat conduction model of the welding process and welding process data

  6. Friction stir welding (FSW) of AA 6061 T6

    Cabot, Pedro; Monglioni, Alberto; Carella, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    The friction-stir process (FSW) developed by England's TWI in the last decade is a new concept in solid phase friction welding that is particularly appropriate for soldering aluminum and its alloys. It offers interesting aspects and can advantageously replace the usual arch processes. It is an automatic process that solders together long pieces by butt or lap welding and, therefore, overcomes the greater limitation of the conventional friction process that can be applied only to pieces with revolution symmetry. FSW is based essentially on the use of a cylindrical tool with a special profile, which is inserted between the surfaces where the materials meet to join them together at a certain rotation speed and under a specific force. The pieces must be rigidly butt bonded or overlapped to prevent movement when the tool moves forward along the joint producing the dispersion of oxides, local plastisizing of the material and the weld. Since its creation FSW has been the subject of many international publications, but until the present work there was no technologically relevant data about tools and procedures. For this reason, when its promising and novel nature was noticed, the CNEA began its own development project in 1997. The main characteristics of the tool are reviewed here and the results of tests carried out to evaluate the influence of the feed velocity on the mechanical properties of the butt joining of a 6.25 mm thick AA6061 T6 plate. Different accumulated aspects of the experience are discussed as well (cw)

  7. Designing aluminium friction stir welded joints against multiaxial fatigue

    L. Susmel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating multiaxial fatigue strength of aluminium friction stir (FS welded joints. Having developed a bespoke joining technology, circumferentially FS welded tubular specimens of Al 6082-T6 were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out using the experimental results have demonstrated that the MWCM applied in terms of nominal stresses, notch stresses, and also the Point Method is accurate in predicting the fatigue lifetime of the tested FS welded joints, with its use resulting in life estimates that fall within the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  8. Multiaxial fatigue of aluminium friction stir welded joints: preliminary results

    D. G. Hattingh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to check the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating the fatigue strength of friction stir (FS welded tubular joints of Al 6082-T6 subjected to in-phase and out-of-phase multiaxial fatigue loading. The welded samples being investigated were manufactured by equipping an MTS I-STIR process development system with a retracting tool that was specifically designed and optimised for this purpose. These specimens were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out by using the generated experimental results allowed us to prove that the MWCM (applied in terms of nominal stresses is highly accurate in predicting the fatigue strength of the tested FS welded joints, its usage resulting in estimates falling with the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  9. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  10. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  11. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Sedmak, A.; Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Tadić, S.; Djurdjević, A. A.; Čeković, I. R.; Dončeva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2016), s. 637-641 ISSN 0354-9836 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding * defect * heat input * maximum temperature Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.093, year: 2016 http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0354-9836/2016/0354-98361500147D.pdf

  12. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-01

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  13. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed

  14. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T. [Edison Welding Institute, 1250 Arthur E. Adams Drive, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  15. Microstructural evolution and mechanical performance of resistance spot welded DP1000 steel with single and double pulse welding

    Chabok, Ali; van der Aa, Ellen; De Hosson, Jeff; Pei, Yutao T.

    2017-01-01

    Two welding schemes of single and double pulse were used for the resistance spot welding of DP1000 dual phase steel. The changes in the mechanical performance and variant pairing of martensite under two different welding conditions were scrutinized. It is demonstrated that, although both welds fail

  16. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions

    2013-01-01

    REPORT Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...properties and of the attendant ballistic-impact failure mechanisms in prototypical friction stir welding (FSW) joints found in armor structures made of high...mechanisms, friction stir welding M. Grujicic, B. Pandurangan, A. Arakere, C-F. Yen, B. A. Cheeseman Clemson University Office of Sponsored Programs 300

  17. Implicit Geometry Meshing for the simulation of Rotary Friction Welding

    Schmicker, D.; Persson, P.-O.; Strackeljan, J.

    2014-08-01

    The simulation of Rotary Friction Welding (RFW) is a challenging task, since it states a coupled problem of phenomena like large plastic deformations, heat flux, contact and friction. In particular the mesh generation and its restoration when using a Lagrangian description of motion is of significant severity. In this regard Implicit Geometry Meshing (IGM) algorithms are promising alternatives to the more conventional explicit methods. Because of the implicit description of the geometry during remeshing, the IGM procedure turns out to be highly robust and generates spatial discretizations of high quality regardless of the complexity of the flash shape and its inclusions. A model for efficient RFW simulation is presented, which is based on a Carreau fluid law, an Augmented Lagrange approach in mapping the incompressible deformations, a penalty contact approach, a fully regularized Coulomb-/fluid friction law and a hybrid time integration strategy. The implementation of the IGM algorithm using 6-node triangular finite elements is described in detail. The techniques are demonstrated on a fairly complex friction welding problem, demonstrating the performance and the potentials of the proposed method. The techniques are general and straight-forward to implement, and offer the potential of successful adoption to a wide range of other engineering problems.

  18. Effect of process control mode on weld quality of friction stir welded plates

    Shazly, Mostafa; Sorour, Sherif; Alian, Ahmed R. [Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process which requires no filler material where the heat input is generated by frictional energy between the tool and workpiece. The objective of the present work is to conduct a fully coupled thermomechanical finite element analysis based on Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation for both 'Force-Controlled' and 'Displacement-Controlled' FSW process to provide more detailed insight of their effect on the resulting joint quality. The developed finite element models use Johnson- Cook material model and temperature dependent physical properties for the welded plates. Efforts on proper modeling of the underlying process physics are done focusing on the heat generation of the tool/workpiece interface to overcome the shortcomings of previous investigations. Finite elements results show that 'Force-Controlled' FSW process provides better joint quality especially at higher traveling speed of the tool which comes to an agreement with published experimental results.

  19. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    software ANSYS, a thermo-mechanical model is employed to predict the thermally induced stresses and strains during welding, while an in-house finite element code is used to study the plastic flow localization and failure in a subsequent structural analysis. The coupling between the two models is made......The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence......, showed the largest influence of the post-welding conditions, even though significant relaxation of the residual stress state was predicted....

  20. Identification of Damaged Spot Welds in a Complicated Joined Structure

    Yunus, M A; Rani, M N Abdul; Ouyang, H; Deng, H; James, S, E-mail: h.ouyang@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, Harrison Hughes Building, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-19

    In automotive engineering, spot welds on assembled structures such as Body in White (BiW) have a significant effect on the vehicles' dynamic characteristics. Understandably, imperfections in the spot welds will cause variations in the dynamic properties such as natural frequencies and mode shapes of the structure. In this paper, a complicated welded structure which is a simplified Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) platform is investigated. The structure fabricated from thin metal sheets consists of ten components. They are jointed together by a number of scattered spot welds. NASTRAN Solution 200 based on sensitivity analysis is used to identify the most sensitive parameters to natural frequencies. The numerical model of the undamaged structure is initially updated in order to minimise the discrepancies between the measured and numerical data using NASTRAN optimisation code. The initial updated model serves as a benchmark for the subsequent structural damage identification. The numerical data of the benchmark model is then compared with the measured data obtained from the damaged structure. The same updating procedure is applied to the benchmark model in order to bring the numerical data as close as possible to the measured data of the damaged structure. The disparity in certain parameter values from the parameter values used in the benchmark model shows a fault or damage in the location of a particular joint, depending on the severity of this disparity. The challenge in this work is to localise damaged area and quantify the damage of the complicated structure with multiple spot welds in the presence of uncertainty in the location and material properties of the welds.

  1. Identification of Damaged Spot Welds in a Complicated Joined Structure

    Yunus, M A; Rani, M N Abdul; Ouyang, H; Deng, H; James, S

    2011-01-01

    In automotive engineering, spot welds on assembled structures such as Body in White (BiW) have a significant effect on the vehicles' dynamic characteristics. Understandably, imperfections in the spot welds will cause variations in the dynamic properties such as natural frequencies and mode shapes of the structure. In this paper, a complicated welded structure which is a simplified Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) platform is investigated. The structure fabricated from thin metal sheets consists of ten components. They are jointed together by a number of scattered spot welds. NASTRAN Solution 200 based on sensitivity analysis is used to identify the most sensitive parameters to natural frequencies. The numerical model of the undamaged structure is initially updated in order to minimise the discrepancies between the measured and numerical data using NASTRAN optimisation code. The initial updated model serves as a benchmark for the subsequent structural damage identification. The numerical data of the benchmark model is then compared with the measured data obtained from the damaged structure. The same updating procedure is applied to the benchmark model in order to bring the numerical data as close as possible to the measured data of the damaged structure. The disparity in certain parameter values from the parameter values used in the benchmark model shows a fault or damage in the location of a particular joint, depending on the severity of this disparity. The challenge in this work is to localise damaged area and quantify the damage of the complicated structure with multiple spot welds in the presence of uncertainty in the location and material properties of the welds.

  2. Quantification of Microtexture at Weld Nugget of Friction Stir-Welded Carbon Steel

    Husain, Md M.; Sarkar, R.; Pal, T. K.; Ghosh, M.; Prabhu, N.

    2017-05-01

    Friction stir welding of C-Mn steel was carried out under 800-1400 rpm tool rotation. Tool traversing speed of 50 mm/min remained same for all joints. Effect of thermal state and deformation on texture and microstructure at weld nugget was investigated. Weld nugget consisted of ferrite + bainite/Widmanstatten ferrite with different matrix grain sizes depending on peak temperature. A texture around ( ϕ 2 = 0°, φ = 30°, ϕ 2 = 45°) was developed at weld nugget. Grain boundary misorientation at weld nugget indicated that continuous dynamic recrystallization influenced the development of fine equiaxed grain structure. Pole figures and orientation distribution function were used to determine crystallographic texture at weld nugget and base metal. Shear texture components D1, D2 and F were present at weld nugget. D1 shear texture was more prominent among all. Large number of high-angle grain boundaries ( 60-70%) was observed at weld nugget and was the resultant of accumulation of high amount of dislocation, followed by subgrain formation.

  3. Physics-based process model approach for detecting discontinuity during friction stir welding

    Shrivastava, Amber; Pfefferkorn, Frank E.; Duffie, Neil A.; Ferrier, Nicola J.; Smith, Christopher B.; Malukhin, Kostya; Zinn, Michael

    2015-02-12

    The goal of this work is to develop a method for detecting the creation of discontinuities during friction stir welding. This in situ weld monitoring method could significantly reduce the need for post-process inspection. A process force model and a discontinuity force model were created based on the state-of-the-art understanding of flow around an friction stir welding (FSW) tool. These models are used to predict the FSW forces and size of discontinuities formed in the weld. Friction stir welds with discontinuities and welds without discontinuities were created, and the differences in force dynamics were observed. In this paper, discontinuities were generated by reducing the tool rotation frequency and increasing the tool traverse speed in order to create "cold" welds. Experimental force data for welds with discontinuities and welds without discontinuities compared favorably with the predicted forces. The model currently overpredicts the discontinuity size.

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    He Peng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique–ultrasonic spot welding (USW–at different energy levels. An ultra-fine necklace-like equiaxed grain structure is observed along the weld line due to the occurrence of dynamic crystallization, with smaller grain sizes at lower levels of welding energy. The tensile lap shear strength, failure energy, and critical stress intensity of the welded joints first increase, reach their maximum values, and then decrease with increasing welding energy. The tensile lap shear failure mode changes from interfacial fracture at lower energy levels, to nugget pull-out at intermediate optimal energy levels, and to transverse through-thickness (TTT crack growth at higher energy levels. The fatigue life is longer for the joints welded at an energy of 1400 J than 2000 J at higher cyclic loading levels. The fatigue failure mode changes from nugget pull-out to TTT crack growth with decreasing cyclic loading for the joints welded at 1400 J, while TTT crack growth mode remains at all cyclic loading levels for the joints welded at 2000 J. Fatigue crack basically initiates from the nugget edge, and propagates with “river-flow” patterns and characteristic fatigue striations.

  5. Welding quality evaluation of resistance spot welding using the time-varying inductive reactance signal

    Zhang, Hongjie; Hou, Yanyan; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Jian

    2018-05-01

    In the spot welding process, a high alternating current is applied, resulting in a time-varying electromagnetic field surrounding the welder. When measuring the welding voltage signal, the impedance of the measuring circuit consists of two parts: dynamic resistance relating to weld nugget nucleation event and inductive reactance caused by mutual inductance. The aim of this study is to develop a method to acquire the dynamic reactance signal and to discuss the possibility of using this signal to evaluate the weld quality. For this purpose, a series of experiments were carried out. The reactance signals under different welding conditions were compared and the results showed that the morphological feature of the reactance signal was closely related to the welding current and it was also significantly influenced by some abnormal welding conditions. Some features were extracted from the reactance signal and combined to construct weld nugget strength and diameter prediction models based on the radial basis function (RBF) neural network. In addition, several features were also used to monitor the expulsion in the welding process by using Fisher linear discriminant analysis. The results indicated that using the dynamic reactance signal to evaluate weld quality is possible and feasible.

  6. Investigation and modelling of friction stir welded copper canisters

    Kaellgren, Therese

    2010-02-15

    This work has been focused on characterisation of FSW joints, and modelling of the process, both analytically and numerically. The Swedish model for final deposit of nuclear fuel waste is based on copper canisters as a corrosion barrier with an inner pressure holding insert of cast iron. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is the method to seal the copper canister, a technique invented by The Welding Institute (TWI). The first simulations were based on Rosenthal's analytical medium plate model. The model is simple to use, but has limitations. Finite element models (FEM) were developed, initially with a two-dimensional geometry. Due to the requirements of describing both the heat flow and the tool movement, three-dimensional models were developed. These models take into account heat transfer, material flow, and continuum mechanics. The geometries of the models are based on the simulation experiments carried out at TWI and at Swedish Nuclear Fuel Waste and Management Co (SKB). Temperature distribution, material flow and their effects on the thermal expansion were predicted for a full-scale canister and lid. The steady state solutions have been compared with temperature measurements, showing good agreement. In order to understand the material flow during welding a marker technique is used, which involves inserting dissimilar material into the weld zone before joining. Different materials are tested showing that brass rods are the most suitable material in these welds. After welding, the weld line is sliced, etched and examined by optical microscope. To understand the material flow further, and in the future predict the flow, a FEM is developed. This model and the etched samples are compared showing similar features. Furthermore, by using this model the area that is recrystallised can be predicted. The predicted area and the grain size and hardness profile agree well

  7. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  8. Effect of Trailing Intensive Cooling on Residual Stress and Welding Distortion of Friction Stir Welded 2060 Al-Li Alloy

    Ji, Shude; Yang, Zhanpeng; Wen, Quan; Yue, Yumei; Zhang, Liguo

    2018-04-01

    Trailing intensive cooling with liquid nitrogen has successfully applied to friction stir welding of 2 mm thick 2060 Al-Li alloy. Welding temperature, plastic strain, residual stress and distortion of 2060 Al-Li alloy butt-joint are compared and discussed between conventional cooling and trailing intensive cooling using experimental and numerical simulation methods. The results reveal that trailing intensive cooling is beneficial to shrink high temperature area, reduce peak temperature and decrease plastic strain during friction stir welding process. In addition, the reduction degree of plastic strain outside weld is smaller than that inside weld. Welding distortion presents an anti-saddle shape. Compared with conventional cooling, the reductions of welding distortion and longitudinal residual stresses of welding joint under intense cooling reach 47.7 % and 23.8 %, respectively.

  9. Upset Prediction in Friction Welding Using Radial Basis Function Neural Network

    Wei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the upset prediction problem of friction welded joints. Based on finite element simulations of inertia friction welding (IFW, a radial basis function (RBF neural network was developed initially to predict the final upset for a number of welding parameters. The predicted joint upset by the RBF neural network was compared to validated finite element simulations, producing an error of less than 8.16% which is reasonable. Furthermore, the effects of initial rotational speed and axial pressure on the upset were investigated in relation to energy conversion with the RBF neural network. The developed RBF neural network was also applied to linear friction welding (LFW and continuous drive friction welding (CDFW. The correlation coefficients of RBF prediction for LFW and CDFW were 0.963 and 0.998, respectively, which further suggest that an RBF neural network is an effective method for upset prediction of friction welded joints.

  10. Finite Element and Experimental Study of Shunting in Resistance Spot Welding

    Seyyedian Choobi, M.; Nielsen, C. V.; Bay, N.

    2015-01-01

    This research is focused on one of the problems frequently encountered in spot welding in industry. In many applications several spot welds are made close to each other. The spots made after the first spot may become smaller in size due to shunt effect. A numerical and experimental study has been...... conducted to investigate the effect of shunting on nugget size in spot welding of HSLA steel sheets. Different cases with different spacing between weld spots have been examined. The nugget sizes have been measured by metallographic examination and have been compared with 3D finite element simulations...

  11. Heat generation during plunge stage in friction stir welding

    Veljić Darko M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat generation in the Al alloy Al2024-T3 plate under different rotating speeds and plunge speeds during the plunge stage of friction stir welding (FSW. A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM is developed in the commercial code ABAQUS/Explicit using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, the Johnson-Cook material law and Coulomb’s Law of friction. The heat generation in FSW can be divided into two parts: frictional heat generated by the tool and heat generated by material deformation near the pin and the tool shoulder region. Numerical results obtained in this work indicate a more prominent influence from the friction-generated heat. The slip rate of the tool relative to the workpiece material is related to this portion of heat. The material velocity, on the other hand, is related to the heat generated by plastic deformation. Increasing the plunging speed of the tool decreases the friction-generated heat and increases the amount of deformation-generated heat, while increasing the tool rotating speed has the opposite influence on both heat portions. Numerical results are compared with the experimental ones, in order to validate the numerical model, and a good agreement is obtained.

  12. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P.D.; Parish, C.M.; Miller, M.K.; Meyer, H.M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  13. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Mazumder, B., E-mail: mazumderb@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Yu, X.; Edmondson, P.D.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Miller, M.K. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Meyer, H.M.; Feng, Z. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  14. Welding parameter optimization of alloy material by friction stir welding using Taguchi approach and design of experiments

    Karwande, Amit H.; Rao, Seeram Srinivasa

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) a welding process in which metals are joint by melting them at their solid state. In different engineering areas such as civil, mechanical, naval and aeronautical engineering beams are widely used of the magnesium alloys for different applications and that are joined by conventional inert gas welding process. Magnesium metal has less density and low melting point for that reason large heat generation in the common welding process so its necessity to adapt new welding process. FSW process increases the weld quality which observed under various mechanical testing by using different tool size.

  15. Effect of weld morphology on mechanical response and failure of friction stir welds in a naturally aged aluminium alloy

    Imam, Murshid; Biswas, Kajal; Racherla, Vikranth

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Friction stir welds of AA 6063-T4 are obtained using three tool pin profiles. ► Signature of weld defects in mechanical response of welds is investigated. ► Correlation between peak temperatures in HAZs and their hardness is studied. ► Reasons for strengthening of WNZ and softening of HAZs are found using TEM and XRD. ► A FEM model for the weld zone is developed and validated. -- Abstract: Friction stir butt welds in 6063-T4 aluminium alloy were obtained using square and two tapered tool pin profiles. Tensile tests at 0°, 45°, and 90° to the weld line, hardness contours in the weld cross-section, temperatures in the heat affected zones, cross-sectional macrographs, transmission electron micrographs, and X-ray diffraction studies were used to characterize the welds. In transverse weld specimen, tunnel defects appearing at higher weld speeds for tapered pin profiles, were found to result in mechanical instabilities, i.e. sharp drops in load–displacement curves, much before macroscopic necking occured. Further, in comparison to the base metal, a marked reduction in ductility was observed even in transverse specimen with defect free welds. Hardness contours in the weld cross-section suggest that loss in ductility is due to significant softening in heat affected zone on the retreating side. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrate that while recovery and overaging are responsible for softening in the heat affected zone, grain size refinement from dynamic recrystallization is responsible for strengthening of the weld nugget zone. X-ray diffraction studies in the three weld zones: weld nugget zone, heat affected zone, and the base metal corroborate these findings. A weld zone model, for use in forming simulations on friction stir welded plates of naturally aged aluminium alloys, was proposed based on mechanical characterization tests. The model was validated using finite element analysis.

  16. Effects of Laser Peening, and Shot Peening, on Friction Stir Welding

    Hatamleh, Omar; Hackel, Lloyd; Rankin, Jon; Truong, Chanh; Walter, Matt

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the effects of laser peening and shot peening on friction stir welding is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Friction Stir Welding (FSW); 3) Microstructure; 4) Laser & Shot Peening; 5) Residual Stresses; 6) Tensile Behavior; 7) Fatigue Life & Surface Roughness; 8) Crack Growth; and 9) Benefits.

  17. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Chetan Aneja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases with decreasing welding speed. Furthermore mechanical properties were also found to improve as the rotary speed increases and the same phenomenon was found to happen while using straight cylindrical threaded pin profile tool. The microstructure of the dissimilar joints revealed that at low welding speeds, the improved material mixing was observed. The similar phenomenon was found to happen at higher rotational speeds using straight cylindrical threaded tool.

  18. Hybrid friction stir welding for dissimilar materials through electro-plastic effect

    Liu, Xun; Lan, Shuhuai; Ni, Jun

    2018-05-29

    A hybrid Friction Stir Welding approach and device for dissimilar materials joining employing Electro-Plastic Effect. The approach and device include an introduction of high density, short period current pulses into traditional friction stir welding process, which therefore can generate a localized softened zone in the workpiece during plastic stirring without significant additional temperature increase. This material softened zone is created by high density current pulses based on Electro-Plastic Effect and will move along with the friction stir welding tool. Smaller downward force, larger processing window and better joint quality for dissimilar materials are expected to be achieved through this hybrid welding technique.

  19. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel

    Yano, Y.; Sato, Y.S.; Sekio, Y.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.; Ogawa, R.; Kokawa, H.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding was applied to the wrapper tube materials, 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel, designed for fast reactors and defect-free welds were successfully produced. The mechanical and microstructural properties of the friction stir welded steel were subsequently investigated. The hardness values of the stir zone were approximately 550 Hv (5.4 GPa) with minimal dependence on the rotational speed, even though they were much higher than those of the base material. However, tensile strengths and elongations of the stir zones were high at 298 K, compared to those of the base material. The excellent tensile properties are attributable to the fine grain formation during friction stir welding

  20. Some microstructural characterisations in a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel alloy

    Legendre, F.; Poissonnet, S.; Bonnaillie, P.; Boulanger, L.; Forest, L.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize microstructure of a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened alloy. The welded material is constituted by two sheets of an yttria-dispersion-strengthened PM 2000 ferritic steel. Different areas of the friction stir welded product were analyzed using field emission gun secondary electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electron microprobe whereas nanoindentation was used to evaluate mechanical properties. The observed microstructural evolution, including distribution of the yttria dispersoids, after friction stir welding process is discussed and a correlation between the microstructure and the results of nanoindentation tests is established.

  1. Mechanical Behaviour Investigation Of Aluminium Alloy Tailor Welded Blank Developed By Using Friction Stir Welding Technique

    Dwi Anggono, Agus; Sugito, Bibit; Hariyanto, Agus; Subroto; Sarjito

    2017-10-01

    The objective on the research was to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructure of tailor welded blank (TWB) made from AA6061-T6 and AA1100 using friction stir welding (FSW) process. Due to the dissimilar mechanical properties of the two aluminium alloys, microhardness test was conducted to measure the hardness distribution across the weld nugget. The mixing of two distinct materials was influenced by tool rotation speed. Therefore, microstructure analysis was carried out to investigate the grain size and shape. The grain size of AA6061-T6 has increased in the heat affected zone (HAZ) while for AA1100 has decreased. In the weld nugget, it has found a hook defects in the dissimilar aluminium joining. By using monotonic tensile load, the different weld line direction was observed with the expansion in tool rotation. The joints failure were consistently on the area of AA1100 series. Furthermore, two specimens were investigated, one through the dissimilar aluminium and the other through similiar material. Inspection of the weld nugget hardness was shown that nonhomogen material intermixing during the stiring process as confirmed by microhardness measurement.

  2. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminium alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Sedmak Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat input and maximum temperature developed during friction stir welding with different parameters. Aluminium alloy (AA 6061-T6 has been used for experimental and numerical analysis. Experimental analysis is based on temperature measurements by using infrared camera, whereas numerical analysis was based on empirical expressions and finite element method. Different types of defects have been observed in respect to different levels of heat input.

  3. The study on the properties of AISI 4140 and AISI 1040 steel rods welded by friction welding

    Thanee Toomprasen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed to investigate the properties of joint between AISI 4140 and AISI 1040 welded by friction welding. The specimens were prepared in round shape of 13 mm diameter and 100 mm long. They were welded by friction welding method under the following conditions; friction pressure of 183 MPa, friction time of 12 sec, upset pressure of 428 MPa, upset time of 7 sec. and rotational speed of 1400 rpm. The strength and hardness were tested on the welded area. The result showed finer grains. in the welded area. This is the result of friction pressure and upset pressure in the welding process. In addition, the observation result indicated some changes of Ferrite and Pearlite in welded zone. This phase change resulted in the increment of hardness in AISI 4140 at the contact area and adjacent. In part of AISI 1040, the portion of Pearlite and Ferrite are not significantly changed, therefore the value of hardness is almost constant.

  4. Mitigating Abnormal Grain Growth for Friction Stir Welded Al-Li 2195 Spun Formed Domes

    Chen, Po-Shou; Russell, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Formability and abnormal grain growth (AGG) are the two major issues that have been encountered for Al alloy spun formed dome development using friction stir welded blanks. Material properties that have significant influence on the formability include forming range and strain hardening exponent. In this study, tensile tests were performed for two 2195 friction stir weld parameter sets at 400 F to study the effects of post weld anneal on the forming range and strain hardening exponent. It was found that the formability can be enhanced by applying a newly developed post weld anneal to heat treat the friction stir welded panels. This new post weld anneal leads to a higher forming range and much improved strain hardening exponent. AGG in the weld nugget is known to cause a significant reduction of ductility and fracture toughness. This study also investigated how AGG may be influenced by the heating rate to the solution heat treatment temperature. After post-weld annealing, friction stir welds were strained to 15% and 39% by compression at 400 F before they were subjected to SHT at 950 F for 1 hour. Salt bath SHT is very effective in reducing the grain size as it helps arrest the onset of AGG and promote normal recrystallization and grain growth. However, heat treating a 18 ft dome using a salt bath is not practical. Efforts are continuing at Marshall Space Flight Center to identify the welding parameters and heat treating parameters that can help mitigate the AGG in the friction stir welds.

  5. Application of Taguchi approach to optimize friction stir welding parameters of polyethylene

    Bejaoui S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical results of butt friction stir welding of high density polyethylene. The FSW designed tool insulates the welded samples and preserves the heat gained from friction thus avoiding the appearance of blisters and splits after welding. The experimental tests, conducted according to combinations of process factors such as rotation speed, welding speed, pin diameter and hold time at beginning welding, were carried out according the Taguchi orthogonal table L27 in randomized way. Temperatures in the joint during the welding operation and flow stresses from the tensile tests of welded samples were measured and variances were analyzed. Identified models were used to simulate, by finite elements, the tensile tests performed on specimens having a weld cordon in their active area. The results show coherence between the numerical predictions and experimental observations in different cases of weld cordon mechanical behaviour.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Mechanical Property of Post Friction Stir Weld Artificial Ageing of Aluminum Alloy

    WAN Zhenyu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available KWN model was used to establish the precipitation evolution model of friction stir welding of Al-Mg-Si alloy. The yield strength was divided into three parts:the contribution from grain size, the contribution from solid solution and the contribution from the precipitations. Based on this model, the yield strength and hardness of friction stir weld was predicted. The effect of post weld artificial ageing on mechanical properties of friction stir weld was further investigated. The results indicate that longer holding time can be beneficial to the recovery of mechanical properties in the stirring zone. Higher temperature can lead to quick recovery of mechanical properties in the stirring zone, but when the holding temperature is higher than 200℃, longer holding time can lead the base metal softened, which is harmful to the service of friction stir welds. The mechanical property in the heat affected zone cannot be improved by post weld artificial ageing.

  7. Microstructure and properties of friction stir butt-welded AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Wang Xunhong; Wang Kuaishe

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for magnesium and aluminum alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this paper, an excellent friction stir weld of AZ31 magnesium alloy was obtained at proper parameter. In the friction stir zone (FSZ), the microstructure of the base material (BM) is replaced by fine grains and small particles of intermetallic compounds. The average microhardness of the friction stir zone is higher than that of the base material. The maximum tensile strength of joint can reach 93% that of the base material. And the failure locations are almost at the heating affected zone

  8. Linear friction welding for constructing and repairing rail for high speed and intercity passenger service rail : final report.

    2016-08-01

    This project developed a solid-state welding process based on linear friction welding (LFW) technology. While resistance flash welding or : thermite techniques are tried and true methods for joining rails and performing partial rail replacement repai...

  9. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    Chen Ying An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW, which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results were analyzed by means of tensile tests, Vickers microhardness, metallographic tests and SEM-EDX. The strength of the joints varied with increasing friction time and the use of different pressure values. Joints were obtained with superior mechanical properties of the AA1050 aluminum, with fracture occurring in the aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analysis by EDX at the interface of the junction showed that interdiffusion occurs between the main chemical components of the materials involved. The RFW proves to be a great method for obtaining joints between dissimilar materials, which is not possible by fusion welding processes.

  10. Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2007-08-01

    Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

  11. Friction Stir Welding of Copper Canisters for Nuclear Waste

    Kaellgren, Therese

    2005-07-01

    The Swedish model for final disposal of nuclear fuel waste is based on copper canisters as a corrosion barrier with an inner pressure holding insert of cast iron. One of the methods to seal the copper canister is to use the Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a method invented by The Welding Institute (TWI). This work has been focused on characterisation of the FSW joints, and modelling of the process, both analytically and numerically. The first simulations were based on Rosenthal's analytical medium plate model. The model is simple to use, but has limitations. Finite element models were developed, initially with a two-dimensional geometry. Due to the requirements of describing both the heat flow and the tool movement, three-dimensional models were developed. These models take into account heat transfer, material flow, and continuum mechanics. The geometries of the models are based on the simulation experiments carried out at TWI and at Swedish Nuclear Fuel Waste and Management Co (SKB). Temperature distribution, material flow and their effects on the thermal expansion were predicted for a full-scale canister and lid. The steady state solutions have been compared with temperature measurements, showing good agreement. Microstructure and hardness profiles have been investigated by optical microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) and Rockwell hardness measurements. EBSD visualisation has been used to determine the grain size distribution and the appearance of twins and misorientation within grains. The orientation maps show a fine uniform equiaxed grain structure. The root of the weld exhibits the smallest grains and many annealing twins. This may be due to deformation after recrystallisation. The appearance of the nugget and the grain size depends on the position of the weld. A large difference can be seen both in hardness and grain size between the start of the weld and when the steady state is reached.

  12. Resistance spot welding of a complicated joint in new advanced high strength steel

    Joop Pauwelussen; Nick den Uijl

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to investigate resistance spot welding of a complicated welding configuration of three sheets of dissimilar steel sheet materials with shunt welds, using simulations. The configuration used resembles a case study of actual welds in automotive applications. One of the

  13. Effect of process parameters on the residual stresses in AA5083-H321 friction stir welds

    Lombard, H. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Hattingh, D.G. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Steuwer, A. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); FaME38 at the ILL-ESRF, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steuwer@ill.fr; James, M.N. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    This paper investigates the effect of varying welding parameters on the residual stress profiles in friction stir welds of aluminium alloy AA5083-H321, which were created on a fully instrumented friction welding machine. The residual stresses were determined non-destructively using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The width and maximum of the residual stress profile show clear correlation with the heat input, and in particular feed rate, which was found to be the dominant parameter.

  14. Systematic investigation of the fatigue performance of a friction stir welded low alloy steel

    Toumpis, Athanasios; Galloway, Alexander; Molter, Lars; Polezhayeva, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The fatigue behaviour of a friction stir welded low alloy steel has been assessed. • The welds’ fatigue lives outperform the International Institute of Welding’s recommendations for fusion welds. • The slow weld exhibits the best fatigue performance of the investigated welds. • Fracture surface analysis shows that minor embedded flaws do not offer crack initiation sites. • Process-related surface breaking flaws have a significant effect on the fatigue life. - Abstract: A comprehensive fatigue performance assessment of friction stir welded DH36 steel has been undertaken to address the relevant knowledge gap for this process on low alloy steel. A detailed set of experimental procedures specific to friction stir welding has been put forward, and the consequent study extensively examined the weld microstructure and hardness in support of the tensile and fatigue testing. The effect of varying welding parameters was also investigated. Microstructural observations have been correlated to the weldments’ fatigue behaviour. The typical fatigue performance of friction stir welded steel plates has been established, exhibiting fatigue lives well above the weld detail class of the International Institute of Welding even for tests at 90% of yield strength, irrespective of minor instances of surface breaking flaws which have been identified. An understanding of the manner in which these flaws impact on the fatigue performance has been established, concluding that surface breaking irregularities such as these produced by the tool shoulder’s features on the weld top surface can be the dominant factor for crack initiation under fatigue loading

  15. Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Al/Al and Al/Non-Al Alloys: A Review

    Wang, Xiangbin; Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2018-05-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid-state welding technique that has many advantages over traditional fusion welding, and has been widely adopted in the aerospace and automotive industries. This article reviews research developments in friction stir welding of dissimilar alloys systems, including combinations of aluminum alloys with Mg alloys, Cu, and steel. Microstructural evolution, hardness, tensile and fatigue properties, residual stresses, and corrosion behavior of dissimilar welds will be reported. The effects of processing parameters such as tool rotation and traverse speeds, tool position, material position, and tool geometry on the weld quality are also presented. Discussions on future research directions in friction stir welding will also be provided in the context of existing literature and future high-integrity applications.

  16. Friction stir scribe welding technique for dissimilar joining of aluminium and galvanised steel

    Wang, Tianhao [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Sidhar, Harpreet [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Mishra, Rajiv S. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Hovanski, Yuri [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Upadhyay, Piyush [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Carlson, Blair [General Motors Technical Center, Warren, MI, USA

    2017-10-04

    Friction stir scribe technology, a derivative of friction stir welding, was applied for the dissimilar lap welding of an aluminum alloy and galvanized mild steel sheets. During the process, the rotating tool with a cobalt steel scribe first penetrated the top material — aluminum — and then the scribe cut the bottom material — steel. The steel was displaced into the upper material to produce a characteristic hook feature. Lap welds were shear tested, and their fracture paths were studied. Welding parameters affected the welding features including hook height, which turned out to be highly related to fracture position. Therefore, in this paper, the relationships among welding parameters, hook height, joint strength and fracture position are presented. In addition, influence of zinc coating on joint strength was also studied. Keywords: friction stir scribe technology; dissimilar material welding; zinc coating; hook height; joint strength; fracture position

  17. Microstructures and mechanical properties of friction stir welded dissimilar steel-copper joints

    Jafari, M.; Abbasi, M.; Poursina, D.; Gheysarian, A. [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, B. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Welding dissimilar metals by fusion welding is challenging. It results in welding defects. Friction stir welding (FSW) as a solid-state joining method can overcome these problems. In this study, 304L stainless steel was joined to copper by FSW. The optimal values of the welding parameters traverse speed, rotational speed, and tilt angle were obtained through Response surface methodology (RSM). Under optimal welding conditions, the effects of welding pass number on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the welded joints were investigated. Results indicated that appropriate values of FSW parameters could be obtained by RSM and grain size refinement during FSW mainly affected the hardness in the weld regions. Furthermore, the heat from the FSW tool increased the grain size in the Heat-affected zones (HAZs), especially on the copper side. Therefore, the strength and ductility decreased as the welding pass number increased because of grain size enhancement in the HAZs as the welding pass number increased.

  18. Anodising and corrosion resistance of AA 7050 friction stir welds

    Atz Dick, Pedro; Knörnschild, Gerhard H.; Dick, Luís F.P.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Sulphuric Anodizing films of AA7050 friction stir welds are 25% thinner on the nugget zone. • Semicoherent MgZn_2 precipitates locally pin the formation of anodic oxide film. • Coarse Al_7Cu_2Fe precipitates anodize irregularly and produces locally thicker films. • Localized corrosion occurs preferentially on the nugget zone and is related to the thinner oxide film and irregular anodizing on stirring voids. - Abstract: The influence of friction stir welding on the sulphuric anodising and corrosion of AA7050 was studied in 0.1 M NaCl by the scanning vibrating electrode technique under simultaneous polarization. The oxide films obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The porous oxide films are up to 25% thicker on the thermomechanically and heat affected zones and 25% thinner on the nugget. This thinner defective oxide film explains the lower pitting resistance of the nugget zone. Individual pit current transients were indirectly determined from current maps. However, the calculated values are lower than expected, due to underestimation of electrolyte conductivity near pits.

  19. Soldagem por ponto no estado sólido de ligas leves Solid state spot welding of lightweight alloys

    Leonardo Contri Campanelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A recente preocupação quanto às mudanças climáticas vem impulsionando pesquisas em eficiência energética dos meios de transportes no sentido de reduzir a emissão de gases. Uma das principais soluções consiste na redução do peso estrutural através da aplicação de novos materiais, como as ligas leves de alumínio e magnésio. Entretanto, novos usos ficam muitas vezes limitados pela dificuldade de união desses materiais. A técnica de soldagem por fricção e mistura (FSW é um processo de união no estado sólido que surge como uma alternativa viável para substituir ou complementar as tecnologias de união consagradas. Como uma junta contínua não é sempre a requisitada, duas tecnologias de união por ponto derivadas do FSW estão em desenvolvimento: soldagem por fricção e mistura por ponto (FSSW e soldagem por fricção por ponto (FSpW. Além de fornecerem juntas de elevada resistência e praticamente isentas de defeitos, estas técnicas apresentam alta eficiência energética, curto ciclo de soldagem, facilidade de automação e compatibilidade com o meio-ambiente, fazendo frente às técnicas convencionais de união por ponto, como a soldagem por resistência por ponto (RSW e a rebitagem.The recent concern about climate change has stimulated research into transport energy efficiency in order to reduce the emission of gases. One of the main solutions is to reduce the structural weight through the application of new materials, such as aluminum and magnesium lightweight alloys. However, new applications are often limited by the difficulty of joining these materials. Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid state joining technique that emerges as a viable alternative to replace or complement the established joining technologies. As a continuous weld is not always requested, two spot welding technologies derived from FSW are under development: Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW and Friction Spot Welding (FSpW. Besides providing

  20. Numerical Analysis of Crack Progress in Different Areas of a Friction Stir Welded Bead for an 5251 H14 Aluminum Alloy Specimen

    Y. Kambouz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The assemblies welded by Friction Stir Welding have a major advantage which is the absence of a metal filler. This process contributes to the welding of materials that are known to be difficult to weld using the conventional techniques often employed in the field of transport, for example in the automobile body by applying a spot welding. The numerical modeling of this type of process is complex, not only in terms of the variety of physical phenomena which must be considered, but also because of the experimental procedure that must be followed in order to verify and validate numerical predictions. In this work, a finite element model is proposed in order to simulate the crack propagation under monotonic loading in different areas of the weld seam of a strain hardening CT-50 aluminum alloy 5251H14 specimen.

  1. IR-based spot weld NDT in automotive applications

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2015-05-01

    Today's auto industry primarily relies on destructive teardown evaluation to ensure the quality of the resistance spot welds (RSWs) due to their criticality in crash resistance and performance of vehicles. The destructive teardown evaluation is labor intensive and costly. The very nature of the destructive test means only a few selected welds will be sampled for quality. Most of the welds in a car are never checked. There are significant costs and risks associated with reworking and scrapping the defective welded parts made between the teardown tests. IR thermography as a non-destructive testing (NDT) tool has its distinct advantage — its non-intrusive and non-contact nature. This makes the IR based NDT especially attractive for the highly automated assembly lines. IR for weld quality inspection has been explored in the past, mostly limited to the offline post-processing manner in a laboratory environment. No online real-time RSW inspection using IR thermography has been reported. Typically for postprocessing inspection, a short-pulse heating via xenon flash lamp light (in a few milliseconds) is applied to the surface of a spot weld. However, applications in the auto industry have been unsuccessful, largely due to a critical drawback that cannot be implemented in the high-volume production line - the prerequisite of painting the weld surface to eliminate surface reflection and other environmental interference. This is due to the low signal-to-noise ratio resulting from the low/unknown surface emissivity and the very small temperature changes (typically on the order of 0.1°C) induced by the flash lamp method. An integrated approach consisting of innovations in both data analysis algorithms and hardware apparatus that effectively solved the key technical barriers for IR NDT. The system can be used for both real-time (during welding) and post-processing inspections (after welds have been made). First, we developed a special IR thermal image processing method that

  2. On the Similarity of Deformation Mechanisms During Friction Stir Welding and Sliding Friction of the AA5056 Alloy

    Kolubaev, A. V.; Zaikina, A. A.; Sizova, O. V.; Ivanov, K. V.; Filippov, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2018-04-01

    A comparative investigation of the structure of an aluminum-manganese alloy is performed after its friction stir welding and sliding friction. Using the methods of optical and electron microscopy, it is shown that during friction identical ultrafine-grained structures are formed in the weld nugget and in the surface layer, in which the grains measure 5 μm irrespective of the initial grain size of the alloy. An assumption is made that the microstructure during both processes under study is formed by the mechanism of rotational plasticity.

  3. Parameters optimization for friction spot welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy by Taguchi method Otimização dos parâmetros de soldagem por fricção por ponto da liga de magnésio AZ31 pelo método de Taguchi

    Leonardo Contri Campanelli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction spot welding (FSpW is a solid state welding process suitable for producing spot-like joints, especially in lightweight materials, which are particularly interesting due to the weight saving potential. The plunging of an especially designed non-consumable and rotating tool creates a connection between overlapped sheets through frictional heat and plastic deformation. Minimum material loss is observed, and therefore a fully consolidated joint with flat surface (no keyhole is obtained. In the current study, the effect of FSpW parameters, such as rotational speed, plunge depth and dwell time, on lap shear strength of AZ31 magnesium alloy joints was investigated. The optimization of input process parameters was carried out through Taguchi approach of DOE. Analysis of variance was applied to determine the individual importance of each parameter. Main effect plots were used to indicate the best levels for maximizing lap shear strength. The results show that tool plunge depth has the higher effect on the weld strength, followed by rotational speed and dwell time.A soldagem por fricção por ponto (FSpW é um processo de soldagem no estado sólido adequado para a produção de juntas pontuais, especialmente em materiais leves, que são particularmente interessantes devido ao potencial de redução de peso. A penetração de uma ferramenta não-consumível e rotacional especialmente desenvolvida cria uma junção entre as placas sobrepostas através de calor por fricção e deformação plástica. A perda de material é mínima, obtendo-se, portanto, uma junta totalmente consolidada com superfície plana (sem furo. Neste trabalho, investigou-se o efeito dos parâmetros do FSpW, tais como velocidade de rotação, profundidade de penetração e tempo de residência, na resistência ao cisalhamento das juntas de liga de magnésio AZ31. A otimização dos parâmetros de entrada do processo foi realizada através do método de Taguchi de DOE. A an

  4. Study on the Joining Strength of Spot Welding using POMISPOT Device

    Mohd Azhar Ahmad; Siti Aiasah Hashim; Mohd Rizal Chulan

    2015-01-01

    Welding is a process to join metals. Spot welding is commonly used for specific purposes such joining in small areas or making temporary joints. POMISPOT is a spot welder that was designed and built by the ADC group, using capacitive resistance method. This study was made to obtain the welding strength that can be made by this spot welder. The study used stainless steel pieces of different thickness and by varying the applied voltage. The strength of welded pieces is tested by applying loads. The relationship between the thickness, voltage and welding strength will be used as the basis of specifications of this tool. (author)

  5. Counterrotating-Shoulder Mechanism for Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A counterrotating-shoulder mechanism has been proposed as an alternative to the mechanism and fixtures used in conventional friction stir welding. The mechanism would internally react most or all of the forces and torques exerted on the workpiece, making it unnecessary to react the forces and torques through massive external fixtures. In conventional friction stir welding, a rotating pin tool is inserted into, and moved along, a weld seam. As the pin tool moves, it stirs together material from the opposite sides of the seam to form the weld. A large axial plunge force must be exerted upon the workpiece through and by the pin tool and a shoulder attached above the pin tool in order to maintain the pressure necessary for the process. The workpiece is secured on top of an anvil, which supports the workpiece against the axial plunge force and against the torque exerted by the pin tool and shoulder. The anvil and associated fixtures must be made heavy (and, therefore, are expensive) to keep the workpiece stationary. In addition, workpiece geometries must be limited to those that can be accommodated by the fixtures. The predecessor of the proposed counterrotating-shoulder mechanism is a second-generation, self-reacting tool, resembling a bobbin, that makes it possible to dispense with the heavy anvil. This tool consists essentially of a rotating pin tool with opposing shoulders. Although the opposing shoulders maintain the necessary pressure without need to externally apply or react a large plunge force, the torque exerted on the workpiece remains unreacted in the absence of a substantial external fixture. Depending on the RPM and the thickness of the workpiece, the torque can be large. The proposed mechanism (see figure) would include a spindle attached to a pin tool with a lower shoulder. The spindle would be coupled via splines to the upper one of three bevel gears in a differential drive. The middle bevel gear would be the power-input gear and would be coupled to the

  6. Development of friction welding process of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    Shin, Hyung Seop; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2004-01-01

    Bulk Metallic Glasses(BMG) with good mechanical properties have problems that engineering application fields have been limited because of limitation of the alloy size. In order to solving this problem, the friction welding of BMG has been tried using the superplastic-like deformation behavior under the supercooled liquid region. The apparatus for friction welding test was designed and constructed using pneumatic cylinder and gripper based on a conventional lathe. Friction welding have been tried to combination of same BMG alloy and crystalline alloys. The results of welding test were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, measurement of hardness and mechanical properties test. In order to obtain the optimized welding test conditions the temperature of friction interface was measured using Infrared thermal imager

  7. Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A tool that would be useable in both conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding (FSW) has been proposed. The tool would embody both a prior tooling concept for self-reacting FSW and an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability developed previously as an augmentation for conventional FSW. Some definitions of terms are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed tool. In conventional FSW, depicted in Figure 1, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a rotating pin that protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. The main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional FSW is augmented with an APT capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or force-control system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding (SR-FSW), there are two rotating shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft, back into the FSW machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. A tool for SRFSW embodying this concept was reported in "Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding" (MFS-31914), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 53. In its outward appearance, the proposed tool (see Figure 2) would fit the above description of an SR

  8. Microstructures of friction welded joints of AZ31 to AM60 magnesium alloys

    Fukumoto, S.; Ono, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tsubakino, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Himeji Inst. of Tech., Hyogo (Japan); Tomita, T.; Aritoshi, M. [Hyogo Prefectural Inst. of Industrial Research, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Okita, K. [Inst. of Industrial Research, Osaka Sangyo Univ., Osaka (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    AZ31 magnesium alloy was friction-welded to AM60 and the microstructures and the friction welding process were studied. The microstructures changed near the weld interface. The AZ31 was refined to a grain size of several {mu}m near the weld interface. The nucleation occurred in the shear bands that were introduced during the welding process. On the other hand, the eutectic structure was deformed and the lamellar structure which was composed of {alpha}-Mg and Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} was formed near the weld interface in AM60 alloy. In the friction process, the adhesion and peel off occurred alternately between AZ31 and AM60. Eventually, bonding was completed during upset process. (orig.)

  9. Similar and dissimilar friction welding of Zr-Cu-Al bulk glassy alloys

    Shin, Hyung-Seop; Park, Jung-Soo; Jung, Yoon-Chul; Ahn, Jung-Ho; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Inoue, Akihisa

    2009-01-01

    The friction welding of three kinds of Zr-Cu-Al bulk glassy alloys (BGAs) which show eutectic or hypoeutectic compositions to similar and dissimilar BGAs and crystalline metals has been tried. The shape and volume of the protrusion formed at the weld interface were investigated. In order to characterize the friction welded interface, micrographic observation and X-ray diffraction analysis on the weld cross-section were carried out. A successful joining of Zr-Cu-Al bulk glassy alloys to similar and dissimilar BGAs was achieved without occurrence of crystallizations at the weld interface through the precise control of friction conditions. In addition, the joining of Zr 50 Cu 40 Al 10 BGA to crystalline alloys was tried, but it was only successful for specific material combinations. The residual strength after welding of dissimilar BGAs was evaluated by the four-point bending test.

  10. A preliminary study on the application of Friction Welding in structural repairs

    Pauly, D.; Santos, J.F. dos [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung; Blakemore, G.R. [Pressure Products Group, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Gibson, D. [National Hyperbaric Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    Friction Welding is characterised by the absence of a fusion zone associated with comparatively low temperatures in the weld. These features allow the application of this welding process in joining and repair of most engineering structures, especially in hazardous environments. This work presents a preliminary study on different friction welding processes, including the recently developed Friction Hydro-Pillar Processing (FHPP) and Friction Stitch Welding, as joining technologies for thick-walled structures. The use of these welding processes in different industrial applications, compared with the commonly used arc welding counterparts, as well as the influence of welding parameters on the weldment integrity are discussed. A brief description of a portable friction welding equipment and its possible implementation for FHPP are presented. Stud welds produced in the commissioning phase of this equipment have been analysed and tested to assess their quality. (orig.) [Deutsch] Da die Schweisszonentemperatur waehrend des Reibschweissvorganges vergleichsweise niedrig ist, bildet sich kein Schmelzbad aus. Anwendbar ist dieses Schweissverfahren zur Verbindung oder Reparatur der meisten Metallkonstruktionen, speziell in risikobehafteter Umgebung. Diese Arbeit enthaelt eine Vorstudie zu verschiedenen Reibschweissprozessen, einschliesslich der neu entwickelten Friction Hydro-Pillar Processing (FHPP)- und Friction Stitch Welding-Verfahren, als Fuegetechniken fuer dickwandige Strukturen. Die Anwendbarkeit dieser Schweissprozesse in verschiedenen Industrien, verglichen mit herkoemmlich verwendeten Lichtbogenschweissverfahren, sowie der Einfluss von Schweissparametern auf die Guete der Verbindung werden diskutiert. Praesentiert wird ausserdem eine tragbare Reibschweissmaschine und ihre moegliche Verwendung zum FHPP-Schweissen. Bolzenschweissungen, die waehrend der Inbetriebnahmephase dieser Maschine hergestellt wurden, sind zur Charakterisierung ihrer Qualitaet analysiert und

  11. A Review on Inertia and Linear Friction Welding of Ni-Based Superalloys

    Chamanfar, Ahmad; Jahazi, Mohammad; Cormier, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Inertia and linear friction welding are being increasingly used for near-net-shape manufacturing of high-value materials in aerospace and power generation gas turbines because of providing a better quality joint and offering many advantages over conventional fusion welding and mechanical joining techniques. In this paper, the published works up-to-date on inertia and linear friction welding of Ni-based superalloys are reviewed with the objective to make clarifications on discrepancies and uncertainties reported in literature regarding issues related to these two friction welding processes as well as microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of the Ni-based superalloy weldments. Initially, the chemical composition and microstructure of Ni-based superalloys that contribute to the quality of the joint are reviewed briefly. Then, problems related to fusion welding of these alloys are addressed with due consideration of inertia and linear friction welding as alternative techniques. The fundamentals of inertia and linear friction welding processes are analyzed next with emphasis on the bonding mechanisms and evolution of temperature and strain rate across the weld interface. Microstructural features, texture development, residual stresses, and mechanical properties of similar and dissimilar polycrystalline and single crystal Ni-based superalloy weldments are discussed next. Then, application of inertia and linear friction welding for joining Ni-based superalloys and related advantages over fusion welding, mechanical joining, and machining are explained briefly. Finally, present scientific and technological challenges facing inertia and linear friction welding of Ni-based superalloys including those related to modeling of these processes are addressed.

  12. Fine tuning of dwelling time in friction stir welding for preventing material overheating, weld tensile strength increase and weld nugget size decrease

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After successful welding, destructive testing into test samples from Al 2024-T351 friction stir butt welds showed that tensile strength of the weld improve along the joint line, while dimensions of the weld nugget decrease. For those welds, both the base material and the welding tool constantly cool down during the welding phase. Obviously, the base material became overheated during the long dwelling phase what made conditions for creation of joints with the reduced mechanical properties. Preserving all process parameters but varying the dwelling time from 5-27 seconds a new set of welding is done to reach maximal achievable tensile strength. An analytical-numerical-experimental model is used for optimising the duration of the dwelling time while searching for the maximal tensile strength of the welds

  13. Effect of friction time on the properties of friction welded YSZ‐alumina composite and 6061 aluminium alloy

    Uday M. Basheer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of alumina 0, 25, 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ composite and 6061 aluminium alloy joints formed by friction welding. The alumina-YSZ composites were prepared through slip casting in plaster of Paris molds (POP and subsequently sintered at 1600°C, while the aluminium rods were machined down using a lathe machine to the dimension required. The welding process was carried out under different rotational speeds and friction times, while friction force (0.5 ton-force was kept constant. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the interface of the joints structure. The experimental results showed that the friction time has a significant effect on joint structure and mechanical properties.

  14. Formation of Oxides in the Interior of Friction Stir Welds

    Schneider, Judy; Chen, Po; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSWing) the actual solid state joining takes place between the faying surfaces which form the weld seam. Thus the seam trace is often investigated for clues when the strength of the weld is reduced. Aluminum and its alloys are known to form a native, protective oxide on the surface. If these native surface oxides are not sufficiently broken up during the FSW process, they are reported to remain in the FSW interior and weaken the bond strength. This type of weld defect has been referred to as a lazy "S", lazy "Z", joint line defect, kissing bond, or residual oxide defect. Usually these defects are mitigated by modification of the process parameters, such as increased tool rotation rate, which causes a finer breakup of the native oxide particles. This study proposes that there may be an alternative mechanism for formation of oxides found within the weld nugget. As the oxidation rate increases at elevated temperatures above 400ºC, it may be possible for enhanced oxidation to occur on the interior surfaces during the FSW process from entrained air entering the seam gap. Normally, FSWs of aluminum alloys are made without a purge gas and it is unknown how process parameters and initial fit up could affect a potential air path into the interior during the processing. In addition, variations in FSW parameters, such as the tool rotation, are known to have a strong influence on the FSW temperature which may affect the oxidation rate if internal surfaces are exposed to entrained air. A series of FSWs were made in 3 different thickness panels of AA2219 (0.95, 1.27 and 1.56 cm) at 2 different weld pitches. As the thickness of the panels increased, there was an increased tendency for a gap to form in advance of the weld tool. If sufficient air is able to enter the workpiece gap prior to consolidation, the weld temperature can increase the oxidation rate on the interior surfaces. These oxidation rates would also be accelerated in areas of localized

  15. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints: A review

    Wanare, S. P.; Kalyankar, V. D.

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding is emerging as a promising technique for joining of lighter metal alloys due to its several advantages over conventional fusion welding processes such as low thermal distortion, good mechanical properties, fine weld joint microstructure, etc. This review article mainly focuses on analysis of microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints. Various microstructure characterization techniques used by previous researchers such as optical microscopes, x-ray diffraction, electron probe microscope, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscopes with electron back scattered diffraction, electron dispersive microscopy, etc. are thoroughly overviewed and their results are discussed. The effects of friction stir welding process parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, tool plunge depth, axial force, tool shoulder diameter to tool pin diameter ratio, tool geometry etc. on microstructure and mechanical properties of welded joints are studied and critical observations are noted down. The microstructure examination carried out by previous researchers on various zones of welded joints such as weld zone, heat affected zone and base metal are studied and critical remarks have been presented. Mechanical performances of friction stir welded joints based on tensile test, micro-hardness test, etc. are discussed. This article includes exhaustive literature review of standard research articles which may become ready information for subsequent researchers to establish their line of action.

  16. Development of friction welding method by electric servo motors; Dendo servo shiki masatsu assetsuho no kaihatsu

    Suzuki, H; Onuma, M; Hasegawa, T; Sakamoto, T [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The standard friction welding has two methods; the brake method and the inertia method. We have developed a new friction welding method with the electric servo motor system. The forming of plastic fluidity layers of interface is evaluated quantitatively with the feedback control characteristics. The new method has enabled to reduce the heat effect and the burr of friction welding. In the method, we could reduce the getting heat energy, from one-third to half less than the previous methods. 6 refs., 16 figs.

  17. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Weld Joints of Magnesium Alloy AZ31

    Nagasawa, T.; Otsuka, M.; Yokota, T.; Ueki, T.

    The applicability of friction stir welding to hot rolled sheet of commercial magnesium alloy AZ31 plates has been investigated. Friction stir weld joint showed mechanical strength comparable to that of base material, though the ductility remained at one half of that of the latter. The results are consistent with the microstructure which is characterized by a fine grained bond layer bounded by-intermediate grained base metals. It is found that both anodizing treatment and insertion of aluminum foil between batting faces do not degrade the joint properties at all. The results suggest that friction stir welding can be potentially applied to magnesium alloy.

  18. Effects of processing parameters on the friction stir spot joining of Al5083-O aluminum alloy to DP590 steel

    Sung, Back-Sub; Bang, Hee-Seon; Jeong, Su-Ok; Choi, Woo-Seong; Kwon, Yong-Hyuk; Bang, Han-Sur

    2017-05-01

    Two dissimilar materials, aluminum alloy Al5083-O and advanced high strength steel DP590, were successfully joined by using friction stir spot joining (FSSJ). Satisfactory joint strengths were obtained at a rotational speed of 300 rpm and a plunge depth of 0.7 mm. Resulting joints were welded without a non-welded zone. This may be attributed to the enhanced smooth material flow owing to sufficient stirring effect and tool down force between the upper Al5083-O side and the lower DP590 side. The maximum tensile shear strength was 6.5 kN, which was higher than the joint strength required by the conventional method of resistance spot welding. The main fracture mode was plug fracture in the tensile shear test of joints. An intermetallic compound (IMC) layer with material Al-Fe joints. Thus, the use of FSSJ to weld the dissimilar materials Al5083-O and DP590 resulted in mechanically and metallurgically sound joints.

  19. Ultrasonic Real-Time Quality Monitoring Of Aluminum Spot Weld Process

    Perez Regalado, Waldo Josue

    The real-time ultrasonic spot weld monitoring system, introduced by our research group, has been designed for the unsupervised quality characterization of the spot welding process. It comprises the ultrasonic transducer (probe) built into one of the welding electrodes and an electronics hardware unit which gathers information from the transducer, performs real-time weld quality characterization and communicates with the robot programmable logic controller (PLC). The system has been fully developed for the inspection of spot welds manufactured in steel alloys, and has been mainly applied in the automotive industry. In recent years, a variety of materials have been introduced to the automotive industry. These include high strength steels, magnesium alloys, and aluminum alloys. Aluminum alloys have been of particular interest due to their high strength-to-weight ratio. Resistance spot welding requirements for aluminum vary greatly from those of steel. Additionally, the oxide film formed on the aluminum surface increases the heat generation between the copper electrodes and the aluminum plates leading to accelerated electrode deterioration. Preliminary studies showed that the real-time quality inspection system was not able to monitor spot welds manufactured with aluminum. The extensive experimental research, finite element modelling of the aluminum welding process and finite difference modeling of the acoustic wave propagation through the aluminum spot welds presented in this dissertation, revealed that the thermodynamics and hence the acoustic wave propagation through an aluminum and a steel spot weld differ significantly. For this reason, the hardware requirements and the algorithms developed to determine the welds quality from the ultrasonic data used on steel, no longer apply on aluminum spot welds. After updating the system and designing the required algorithms, parameters such as liquid nugget penetration and nugget diameter were available in the ultrasonic data

  20. On the feasibility of BLISK produced by linear friction welding

    Mateo, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding technologies are solid-state processes that convert mechanical energy into heat at the joint to be welded. In the case of linear friction, interatomic diffusion takes place under compressive contact by rubbing one component across the face of the other. It is a relatively recent technology which has found important applications in the aeronautical sector. Specifically, it is applied by world leading aero-engine manufacturers for the fabrication of BLISK, a design where disk and blades are a single component. It is obvious that for such a critical function the reliability of linear friction welds must be totally guaranteed. The present work displays results concerning the characterization, both microstructural and mechanical, of a BLISK demonstrator designed for the intermediate pressure compressor of an aero-engine. Moreover, considering that the design constrains for disks and blades on the compressors are quite different, dissimilar titanium alloys were selected for each part in order to improve the BLISK in-service performance. The results establish that linear friction welding is a reliable process which can produce joints free of defects and with mechanical properties comparable to those of the corresponding base materials.Las técnicas de soldadura por fricción son procesos en estado sólido que convierten la energía mecánica en calor en la junta a soldar. En el caso de la soldadura por fricción lineal, la coalescencia tiene lugar bajo un contacto compresivo producido rozando un componente contra otro. Se trata de una tecnología relativamente reciente que ha encontrado importantes aplicaciones en el sector aeronáutico. En concreto, los mayores fabricantes mundiales de motores de aviones la emplean para la fabricación de BLISK, un diseño en que disco y álabes son una única pieza. Es obvio que para una función tan crítica la fiabilidad de las soldaduras debe estar totalmente garantizada. El presente trabajo

  1. Microstructural and mechanical properties of pure aluminum, 5083 and 7075 alloys joined by friction stir welding

    Yilmaz, Selim Sarper [Celal Bayar Univ., Manisa, Muradiye (Turkey)

    2012-07-01

    In this study, microstructural and mechanical properties of pure aluminum, 5083 and 7075 alloys joined by friction stir welding were investigated. Hardness, tensile, bending and impact tests were applied to the welded samples. In addition, optical and SEM tests were carried out. The effects of welding speed on microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated in these materials. Then, the optimal conditions for friction stir welding were determined for pure aluminum, 5083 and 7075 alloys. The maximum hardness was observed for 7075 while the minimum hardness was observed for pure aluminum. (orig.)

  2. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju

    2014-01-01

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si 3 N 4 tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  3. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  4. A continuum based fem model for friction stir welding-model development

    Buffa, G. [Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States) and Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)]. E-mail: g.buffa@dtpm.unipa.it; Hua, J. [Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)]. E-mail: hua.14@osu.edu; Shivpuri, R. [Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)]. E-mail: shivpuri.1@osu.edu; Fratini, L. [Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)]. E-mail: abaqus@dtpm.unipa.it

    2006-03-15

    Although friction stir welding (FSW) has been successfully used to join materials that are difficult-to-weld or unweldeable by fusion welding methods, it is still in its early development stage and, therefore, a scientific knowledge based predictive model is of significant help for thorough understanding of FSW process. In this paper, a continuum based FEM model for friction stir welding process is proposed, that is 3D Lagrangian implicit, coupled, rigid-viscoplastic. This model is calibrated by comparing with experimental results of force and temperature distribution, then is used to investigate the distribution of temperature and strain in heat affect zone and the weld nugget. The model correctly predicts the non-symmetric nature of FSW process, and the relationships between the tool forces and the variation in the process parameters. It is found that the effective strain distribution is non-symmetric about the weld line while the temperature profile is almost symmetric in the weld zone.

  5. A continuum based fem model for friction stir welding-model development

    Buffa, G.; Hua, J.; Shivpuri, R.; Fratini, L.

    2006-01-01

    Although friction stir welding (FSW) has been successfully used to join materials that are difficult-to-weld or unweldeable by fusion welding methods, it is still in its early development stage and, therefore, a scientific knowledge based predictive model is of significant help for thorough understanding of FSW process. In this paper, a continuum based FEM model for friction stir welding process is proposed, that is 3D Lagrangian implicit, coupled, rigid-viscoplastic. This model is calibrated by comparing with experimental results of force and temperature distribution, then is used to investigate the distribution of temperature and strain in heat affect zone and the weld nugget. The model correctly predicts the non-symmetric nature of FSW process, and the relationships between the tool forces and the variation in the process parameters. It is found that the effective strain distribution is non-symmetric about the weld line while the temperature profile is almost symmetric in the weld zone

  6. Experimental studies of parameters affecting the heat generation in friction stir welding process

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat generation is a complex process of transformation of a specific type of energy into heat. During friction stir welding, one part of mechanical energy delivered to the welding tool is consumed in the welding process, another is used for deformational processes etc., and the rest of the energy is transformed into heat. The analytical procedure for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding is very complex because it includes a significant number of variables and parameters, and many of them cannot be fully mathematically explained. Because of that, the analytical model for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding defines variables and parameters that dominantly affect heat generation. These parameters are numerous and some of them, e. g. loads, friction coefficient, torque, temperature, are estimated experimentally. Due to the complex geometry of the friction stir welding process and requirements of the measuring equipment, adequate measuring configurations and specific constructional solutions that provide adequate measuring positions are necessary. This paper gives an overview of the process of heat generation during friction stir welding, the most influencing parameters on heat generation, constructional solutions for the measuring equipment needed for these experimental researches and examples of measured values.

  7. Design of Friction Stir Welding Tool for Avoiding Root Flaws.

    Ji, Shude; Xing, Jingwei; Yue, Yumei; Ma, Yinan; Zhang, Liguo; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2013-12-12

    In order to improve material flow behavior during friction stir welding and avoid root flaws of weld, a tool with a half-screw pin and a tool with a tapered-flute pin are suggested. The effect of flute geometry in tool pins on material flow velocity is investigated by the software ANSYS FLUENT. Numerical simulation results show that high material flow velocity appears near the rotational tool and material flow velocity rapidly decreases with the increase of distance away from the axis of the tool. Maximum material flow velocity by the tool with the tapered-flute pin appears at the beginning position of flute and the velocity decreases with the increase of flow length in flute. From the view of increasing the flow velocity of material near the bottom of the workpiece or in the middle of workpiece, the tool with the half-screw pin and the tool with the tapered-flute pin are both better than the conventional tool.

  8. Mechanisms of joint and microstructure formation in high power ultrasonic spot welding 6111 aluminium automotive sheet

    Bakavos, D.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2010-01-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is difficult to apply to aluminium automotive alloys. High power ultrasonic spot welding (HP-USW) is a new alternative method which is extremely efficient, using ∼2% of the energy of RSW. However, to date there have been few studies of the mechanisms of bond formation and the material interactions that take place with this process. Here, we report on a detailed investigation where we have used X-ray tomography, high resolution SEM, and EBSD, and dissimilar alloy welds, to track the interface position and characterise the stages of weld formation, and microstructure evolution, as a function of welding energy. Under optimum conditions high quality welds are produced, showing few defects. Welding proceeds by the development and spread of microwelds, until extensive plastic deformation occurs within the weld zone, where the temperature reaches ∼380 deg. C. The origin of the weld interface 'flow features' characteristic of HP-USW are discussed.

  9. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of high-strength aluminum alloys is increasing in shipbuilding industry, particularly for the design and construction of war ships, littoral surface craft and combat ships, and fast passenger ships. While various welding methods are used today to fabricate aluminum ship structures, namely gas metallic arc welding (GMAW, laser welding and friction stir welding (FSW, FSW technology has been recognized to have many advantages for the construction of aluminum structures, as it is a low-cost welding process. In the present study, mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys are examined experimentally. Tensile testing is undertaken on dog-bone type test specimen for aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383. The test specimen includes friction stir welded material between identical alloys and also dissimilar alloys, as well as unwelded (base alloys. Mechanical properties of fusion welded aluminum alloys are also tested and compared with those of friction stir welded alloys. The insights developed from the present study are documented together with details of the test database. Part of the present study was obtained from the Ship Structure Committee project SR-1454 (Paik, 2009, jointly funded by its member agencies.

  10. Optimization of welding current waveform for dissimilar material with DP590 and Al5052 by Delta-spot welding process

    Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Young Gon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The automotive industry has a target goal to improve fuel consumption due to restricted exhaust gas regulation. For this reason, the applicability of lightweight material, Al alloys, Mg alloys is also being expanded. In this concept, high strength steel, DP590 and light alloy, AL5052 are joined in the right place of the car body. However, it is difficult to join to steel and aluminum by conventional fusion welding. Generally, in respect to dissimilar metal joining by fusion welding, intermetallic compound layer is formed at the joint interface, hot cracking is generated. In this study, the effect of the current waveform on the mechanical characteristics and microstructure in Delta spot welding process of dissimilar metal was investigated. As results, Intermetallic compound (IMC) layer was reduced from 2.355 μm to 1.09 μm by using Delta spot welding process; also the welding current range improved by 50% in the delta spot welding, higher than in the inverter resistance welding. To conclude, the delta spot welding process adopting the process tapes contributes to improving the welding quality for dissimilar metals (Al5052 and DP590) due to a decrease in IMC layer.

  11. Effects of Welding Parameters on Strength and Corrosion Behavior of Dissimilar Galvanized Q&P and TRIP Spot Welds

    Pasquale Russo Spena

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of the main welding parameters on mechanical strength and corrosion behavior of galvanized quenching and partitioning and transformation induced plasticity spot welds, which are proposed to assemble advanced structural car elements for the automotive industry. Steel sheets have been welded with different current, clamping force, and welding time settings. The quality of the spot welds has been assessed through lap-shear and salt spray corrosion tests, also evaluating the effects of metal expulsion on strength and corrosion resistance of the joints. An energy dispersive spectrometry elemental mapping has been used to assess the damage of the galvanized zinc coating and the nature of the corrosive products. Welding current and time have the strongest influence on the shear strength of the spot welds, whereas clamping force is of minor importance. However, clamping force has the primary effect on avoiding expulsion of molten metal from the nugget during the joining process. Furthermore, clamping force has a beneficial influence on the corrosion resistance because it mainly hinders the permeation of the corrosive environment towards the spot welds. Although the welded samples can exhibit high shear strength also when a metal expulsion occurs, this phenomenon should be avoided because it enhances the damage and vaporization of the protective zinc coating.

  12. Caratterizzazione microstrutturale e prove di resilienza su giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding di compositi a matrice metallica

    M. Merlin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In questo studio sono stati caratterizzati giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding su compositi a matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare ceramico. Il processo FSW è stato applicato a due compositi ottenuti con processo fusorio, quindi estrusi e trattati termicamente T6: AA6061/20%vol.Al2O3p e AA7005/10%vol.Al2O3p. I giunti LFW sono stati invece realizzati su un composito con matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare in carburo di silicio, ottenuto mediante metallurgia delle polveri, quindi forgiato e trattato termicamente T4: AA2124/25%vol.SiCp. Sono stati esaminati gli effetti della saldatura sullecaratteristiche microstrutturali dei giunti, avvalendosi di tecniche di microscopia ottica con analisi di immagine e di microscopia elettronica in scansione (SEM con microsonda a dispersione di energia (EDS. Sono state quindi condotte prove di resilienza con pendolo strumentato Charpy. Lo studio dei meccanismi di danneggiamento è stato effettuato mediante analisi al SEM delle superfici di frattura. Entrambi i processi di saldatura hanno portato a giunti sostanzialmente esenti da difetti. La microstruttura dei cordoni è risultata dipendente sia dalle caratteristiche microstrutturali iniziali dei compositi considerati, sia dalla tipologia di processo di saldatura. Nel caso dei compositi AA6061/20%Al2O3p e AA7005/10%Al2O3p saldati FSW si è osservato un sostanziale incremento di resilienza, rispetto al materiale base, in conseguenza dell’affinamento dei grani della matrice, della riduzione della dimensione media delle particelle di rinforzo e della loro spigolosità, indotte dal processo di saldatura. Il composito AA2124/25%SiCp saldato LFW ha presentato valori di resilienza confrontabili con quelli del materiale base, in conseguenza, soprattutto, dei limitati effetti della saldatura su dimensione e distribuzione delle particelle di rinforzo.

  13. Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic Method of Friction Stir Weld Assessment, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the project is demonstration of the feasibility of Friction Stir Weld (FSW) assessment by novel Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) method. Time...

  14. Stir zone microstructure of commercial purity titanium friction stir welded using pcBN tool

    Zhang Yu; Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Park, Seung Hwan C.; Hirano, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was applied to commercial purity titanium using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool, and microstructure and hardness in the weld were examined. Additionally, the microstructural evolution during friction stir welding was also discussed. The stir zone consisted of fine equiaxed α grains surrounded by serrate grain boundaries, which were produced through the β → α allotropic transformation during the cooling cycle of friction stir welding. The fine α grains caused higher hardness than that in the base material. A lath-shaped α grain structure containing Ti borides and tool debris was observed in the surface region of the stir zone, whose hardness was the highest in the weld

  15. Analysis of ripple formation in single crystal spot welds

    Rappaz, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Lab de Metallurgie Physique; Corrigan, D.; Boatner, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.

    1997-10-01

    Stationary spot welds have been made at the (001) surface of Fe-l5%Ni-15%Cr single crystals using a Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA). On the top surface of the spot welds, very regular and concentric ripples were observed after solidification by differential interference color microscopy. Their height (typically 1--5 {micro}m) and spacing (typically {approximately} 60 {micro}m) decreased with the radius of the pool. These ripples were successfully accounted for in terms of capillary-wave theory using the fundamental mode frequency f{sub 0} given by the first zero of the zero-order Bessel function. The spacing d between the ripples was then equated to v{sub s}/f{sub 0}, where v{sub s} is the solidification rate. From the measured ripple spacing, the velocity of the pool was deduced as a function of the radius, and this velocity was in good agreement with the results of a heat-flow simulation.

  16. An investigation on SA 213-Tube to SA 387-Tube plate using friction welding process

    Rajan, S. Pandia; Kumaraswamidhas, L. A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Jharkhand (India); Kumaran, S. Senthil [RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Tamil Nadu (India); Muthukumaran, S. [National Institute of Technology, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) is a relatively newer solid state welding process used for joining tube to tube plate of either similar or dissimilar materials with enhanced mechanical and metallurgical properties. In the present study, FWTPET has been used to weld SA 213 (Grade T12) tube with SA 387 (Grade 22) tube plate. The welded samples are found to have satisfactory joint strength and the Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that inter metallic compound is absent in the weld zone. The different weld joints have been identified and the phase composition is found using EDX and XRD. Microstructures have been analyzed using optical and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties such as hardness, compressive shear strength and peel test for different weld conditions are studied and the hardness survey revealed that there is increase in hardness at the weld interface due to grain refinement. The corrosion behavior for different weld conditions have been analyzed and the weld zone is found to have better corrosion resistance due to the influence of the grain refinement after FWTPET welding process. Hence, the present investigation is carried out to study the behavior of friction welded dissimilar joints of SA 213 tube and SA 387 tube plate joints and the results are presented. The present study confirms that a high quality tube to tube plate joint can be achieved using FWTPET process at 1120 rpm.

  17. Microstructure examination and microhardness of friction stir welded joint of (AA7020-O after PWHT

    Ghada M.F. Essa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the microstructure and microhardness of the welded joints of the annealed aluminum alloy AA7020-O produced by friction stir welding (FSW technique. The material was applied to post weld heat treatment (solution treatment and artificially aged, T6. The traverse speed and the rotational speed are the most important process parameters of FSW, and have great influence on the heat input of the welding operation which governs the welded joints quality. To investigate their effect, the welding operation was performed using three traverse speeds, 20, 40 and 60 mm/s with two rotational speeds of 1125 and 1400 rpm, and other welding parameters were kept constant to produce comparable joints. It was found that the two rotational speeds are accepted with lower traverse speeds to produce sound joints. Microstructure of the welded joints was significantly affected by the FSW process parameters, and slight effect was reported for the grain size. Microhardness examination showed high weld joint quality with respect to the base metal hardness, which proves the reprecipitation of the hardening phase in the weld zone. The microhardness profile was strongly dependant on the rotational speed, and the average values of the joints hardness have increased with the decrease in the rotational speed, where it have been slightly affected by the welding speed. Keywords: Friction stir welding, Aluminum alloy, Mechanical properties, Microstructures

  18. Friction welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Ray, Siba P.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor and a ceramic electrode body connected by a friction weld between a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect such a friction weld and a portion of the metal conductor.

  19. Microstructure, mechanical properties and microtexture of friction stir welded S690QL high yield steel

    Paillard, Pascal [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6205, Polytech Nantes, Site de la Chantrerie, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Bertrand, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.bertrand@univ-nantes.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6205, Polytech Nantes, Site de la Chantrerie, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Allart, Marion; Benoit, Alexandre [Institut de Recherche Technologique Jules Verne, Chemin du Chaffault, 44340 Bouguenais (France); Ruckert, Guillaume [DCNS Research, Technocampus Ocean, 5 rue de l' Halbrane, 44340 Bouguenais (France)

    2016-12-15

    Two try-out campaigns of friction stir welding (FSW) were performed with different friction parameters to join S690QL high yield strength steel. The welds were investigated at macroscopic and microscopic scales using optical and electronic microscopy and microhardness mapping. Welds of the second campaign exhibit microstructures and mechanical properties in accordance with requirements for service use. Microtexture measurements were carried out in different zones of welds by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). It is shown that that texture of the bottom of the weld is similar to that of the base metal, suggesting a diffusion bonding mechanism. Finally, the mechanical properties (tensile strength, resilience, bending) were established on the most promising welds. It is shown that it is possible to weld this high yield strength steel using FSW process with satisfactory geometric, microstructural and mechanical properties. - Highlights: •1000 mm ∗ 400 mm ∗ 8 mm S690QL steel plates are joined by friction stir welding (FSW). •Maximum hardness is reduced by optimization of process parameters. •Various microstructures are formed but no martensite after process optimization. •Texture is modified in mechanically affected zones of the weld. •Texture in the bottom of the weld is preserved, suggesting diffusion bonding.

  20. Mikrostruktur udvikling i trip-stål under frictionstir spot svejsning

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work the feasibility of joining TRIP steel by Friction Stir Spot Welding is investigated. The aim is to produce successful welds and to get a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring in the microstructure during welding. One of the primary parameters in Friction Stir Spot...

  1. Influence of Processing Parameters on the Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Schneider, J. A.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid phase welding process that unites thermal and mechanical aspects to produce a high quality joint. The process variables are rpm, translational weld speed, and downward plunge force. The strain-temperature history of a metal element at each point on the cross-section of the weld is determined by the individual flow path taken by the particular filament of metal flowing around the tool as influenced by the process variables. The resulting properties of the weld are determined by the strain-temperature history. Thus to control FSW properties, improved understanding of the processing parameters on the metal flow path is necessary.

  2. Microstructure and fatigue properties of Mg-to-steel dissimilar resistance spot welds

    Liu, L.; Xiao, L.; Chen, D.L.; Feng, J.C.; Kim, S.; Zhou, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mg/steel dissimilar spot weld had the same fatigue strength as Mg/Mg similar weld. ► Crack propagation path of Mg/Mg and Mg/steel welds was the same. ► Penetration of Zn into the Mg base metal led to crack initiation of Mg/steel weld. ► HAZ weakening and stress concentration led to crack initiation of Mg/Mg weld. -- Abstract: The structural application of lightweight magnesium alloys in the automotive industry inevitably involves dissimilar welding with steels and the related durability issues. This study was aimed at evaluating the microstructural change and fatigue resistance of Mg/steel resistance spot welds, in comparison with Mg/Mg welds. The microstructure of Mg/Mg spot welds can be divided into: base metal, heat affected zone and fusion zone (nugget). However, the microstructure of Mg/steel dissimilar spot welds had three different regions along the joined interface: weld brazing, solid-state joining and soldering. The horizontal and vertical Mg hardness profiles of Mg/steel and Mg/Mg welds were similar. Both Mg/steel and Mg/Mg welds were observed to have an equivalent fatigue resistance due to similar crack propagation characteristics and failure mode. Both Mg/steel and Mg/Mg welds failed through thickness in the magnesium sheet under stress-controlled cyclic loading, but fatigue crack initiation of the two types of welds was different. The crack initiation of Mg/Mg welds was occurred due to a combined effect of stress concentration, grain growth in the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the presence of Al-rich phases at HAZ grain boundaries, while the penetration of small amounts of Zn coating into the Mg base metal stemming from the liquid metal induced embrittlement led to crack initiation in the Mg/steel welds.

  3. Failure mode transition in AHSS resistance spot welds. Part I. Controlling factors

    Pouranvari, M.; Marashi, S.P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Interfacial to pullout failure mode transition for AHSS RSWs is studied. → An analytical mode is proposed to predict failure mode of AHSS RSWs. → Hardness characteristics of RSWs plays key role in the failure mode transition. - Abstract: Failure mode of resistance spot welds is a qualitative indicator of weld performance. Two major types of spot weld failure are pull-out and interfacial fracture. Interfacial failure, which typically results in reduced energy absorption capability, is considered unsatisfactory and industry standards are often designed to avoid this occurrence. Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) spot welds exhibit high tendency to fail in interfacial failure mode. Sizing of spot welds based on the conventional recommendation of 4t 0.5 (t is sheet thickness) does not guarantee the pullout failure mode in many cases of AHSS spot welds. Therefore, a new weld quality criterion should be found for AHSS resistance spot welds to guarantee pull-out failure. The aim of this paper is to investigate and analyze the transition between interfacial and pull-out failure modes in AHSS resistance spot welds during the tensile-shear test by the use of analytical approach. In this work, in the light of failure mechanism, a simple analytical model is presented for estimating the critical fusion zone size to prevent interfacial fracture. According to this model, the hardness ratio of fusion zone to pull-out failure location and the volume fraction of voids in fusion zone are the key metallurgical factors governing type of failure mode of AHSS spot welds during the tensile-shear test. Low hardness ratio and high susceptibility to form shrinkage voids in the case of AHSS spot welds appear to be the two primary causes for their high tendency to fail in interfacial mode.

  4. Fatigue behaviour of friction welded medium carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel dissimilar joints

    Paventhan, R.; Lakshminarayanan, P.R.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Fusion welding of dissimilar metals is a problem due to difference in properties. → Solid state welding process such as friction welding is a solution for the above problem. → Fatigue life of friction welded carbon steel and stainless steel joints are evaluated. → Effect of notch on the fatigue life of friction welded dissimilar joints is reported. → Formation of intermetallic is responsible for reduction in fatigue life of dissimilar joints. -- Abstract: This paper reports the fatigue behaviour of friction welded medium carbon steel-austenitic stainless steel (MCS-ASS) dissimilar joints. Commercial grade medium carbon steel rods of 12 mm diameter and AISI 304 grade austenitic stainless steel rods of 12 mm diameter were used to fabricate the joints. A constant speed, continuous drive friction welding machine was used to fabricate the joints. Fatigue life of the joints was evaluated conducting the experiments using rotary bending fatigue testing machine (R = -1). Applied stress vs. number of cycles to failure (S-N) curve was plotted for unnotched and notched specimens. Basquin constants, fatigue strength, fatigue notch factor and notch sensitivity factor were evaluated for the dissimilar joints. Fatigue strength of the joints is correlated with microstructure, microhardness and tensile properties of the joints.

  5. The effect of welding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welded AA2024-T351

    Jariyaboon, M; Davenport, A.J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of welding parameters (rotation speed and travel speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welds in the high strength aluminium alloy AA2024-T351 was investigated. It was found that rotation speed plays a major role in controlling the location of corrosion attack. Localised...... intergranular attack was observed in the nugget region for low rotation speed welds, whereas for higher rotation speed welds, attack occurred predominantly in the heat-affected zone. The increase in anodic reactivity in the weld zone was due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries leading to intergranular...... attack. Enhancement of cathodic reactivity was also found in the nugget as a result of the precipitation of S-phase. The results were compared with samples of AA2024-T351 that had been heat treated to simulate the thermal cycle associated with welding, and with samples that had been exposed to high...

  6. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended

  7. Characteristics of Laser Beam and Friction Stir Welded AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2012-04-01

    This article presents the comparative evaluation of microstructural features and mechanical properties of friction stir welded (solid-state) and laser beam welded (high energy density fusion welding) AISI 409M grade ferritic stainless steel joints. Optical microscopy, microhardness testing, transverse tensile, and impact tests were performed. The coarse ferrite grains in the base material were changed to fine grains consisting duplex structure of ferrite and martensite due to the rapid cooling rate and high strain induced by severe plastic deformation caused by frictional stirring. On the other hand, columnar dendritic grain structure was observed in fusion zone of laser beam welded joints. Tensile testing indicates overmatching of the weld metal relative to the base metal irrespective of the welding processes used. The LBW joint exhibited superior impact toughness compared to the FSW joint.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel

    Sato, Y.S.; Nelson, T.W.; Sterling, C.J.; Steel, R.J.; Pettersson, C.-O.

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir (FS) welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel were examined. High-quality, full-penetration welds were successfully produced in the super duplex stainless steel by friction stir welding (FSW) using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) tool. The base material had a microstructure consisting of the ferrite matrix with austenite islands, but FSW refined grains of the ferrite and austenite phases in the stir zone through dynamic recrystallisation. Ferrite content was held between 50 and 60% throughout the weld. The smaller grain sizes of the ferrite and austenite phases caused increase in hardness and strength within the stir zone. Welded transverse tensile specimen failed near the border between the stir zone and TMAZ at the retreating side as the weld had roughly the same strengths as the base material

  9. Neural Network-Based Resistance Spot Welding Control and Quality Prediction

    Allen, J.D., Jr.; Ivezic, N.D.; Zacharia, T.

    1999-07-10

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of neural network-based systems for industrial resistance spot welding process control and weld quality assessment. The developed systems utilize recurrent neural networks for process control and both recurrent networks and static networks for quality prediction. The first section describes a system capable of both welding process control and real-time weld quality assessment, The second describes the development and evaluation of a static neural network-based weld quality assessment system that relied on experimental design to limit the influence of environmental variability. Relevant data analysis methods are also discussed. The weld classifier resulting from the analysis successfldly balances predictive power and simplicity of interpretation. The results presented for both systems demonstrate clearly that neural networks can be employed to address two significant problems common to the resistance spot welding industry, control of the process itself, and non-destructive determination of resulting weld quality.

  10. An analytical model for the heat generation in friction stir welding

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper; Wert, John

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to establish an analytical model for heat generation by friction stir welding (FSW), based on different assumptions of the contact condition between the rotating tool surface and the weld piece. The material flow and heat generation are characterized by the contact...

  11. An investigation of the dynamic separation of spot welds under plane tensile pulses

    Ma, Bohan; Fan, Chunlei; Chen, Danian; Wang, Huanran; Zhou, Fenghua

    2014-01-01

    We performed ultra-high-speed tests for purely opening spot welds using plane tensile pulses. A gun system generated a parallel impact of a projectile plate onto a welded plate. Induced by the interactions of the release waves, the welded plate opened purely under the plane tensile pulses. We used the laser velocity interferometer system for any reflector to measure the velocity histories of the free surfaces of the free part and the spot weld of the welded plate. We then used a scanning electron microscope to investigate the recovered welded plates. We found that the interfacial failure mode was mainly a brittle fracture and the cracks propagated through the spot nugget, while the partial interfacial failure mode was a mixed fracture comprised ductile fracture and brittle fracture. We used the measured velocity histories to evaluate the tension stresses in the free part and the spot weld of the welded plate by applying the characteristic theory. We also discussed the different constitutive behaviors of the metals under plane shock loading and under uniaxial split Hopkinson pressure bar tests. We then compared the numerically simulated velocity histories of the free surfaces of the free part and the spot weld of the welded plate with the measured results. The numerical simulations made use of the fracture stress criteria, and then the computed fracture modes of the tests were compared with the recovered results

  12. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: ivkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A., E-mail: eak@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, Andrey I., E-mail: dmitr@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G., E-mail: sp@ms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  13. MICROSTRUCTURE AND FATIGUE PROPERTIES OF DISSIMILAR SPOT WELDED JOINTS OF AISI 304 AND AISI 1008

    Nachimani Charde

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon steel and stainless steel composites are being more frequently used for applications requiring a corrosion resistant and attractive exterior surface and a high strength structural substrate. Spot welding is a potentially useful and efficient jointing process for the production of components consisting of these two materials. The spot welding characteristics of weld joints between these two materials are discussed in this paper. The experiment was conducted on dissimilar weld joints using carbon steel and 304L (2B austenitic stainless steel by varying the welding currents and electrode pressing forces. Throughout the welding process; the electrical signals from the strain sensor, current transducer and terminal voltage clippers are measured in order to understand each and every millisecond of the welding process. In doing so, the dynamic resistances, heat distributions and forging forces are computed for various currents and force levels within the good welds’ regions. The other process controlling parameters, particularly the electrode tip and weld time, remained constant throughout the experiment. The weld growth was noted for the welding current increment, but in the electrode force increment it causes an adverse reaction to weld growth. Moreover, the effect of heat imbalance was clearly noted during the welding process due to the different electrical and chemical properties. The welded specimens finally underwent tensile, hardness and metallurgical testing to characterise the weld growth.

  14. Characteristics of Resistance Spot Welded Ti6Al4V Titanium Alloy Sheets

    Xinge Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ti6Al4V titanium alloy is applied extensively in the aviation, aerospace, jet engine, and marine industries owing to its strength-to-weight ratio, excellent high-temperature properties and corrosion resistance. In order to extend the application range, investigations on welding characteristics of Ti6Al4V alloy using more welding methods are required. In the present study, Ti6Al4V alloy sheets were joined using resistance spot welding, and the weld nugget formation, mechanical properties (including tensile strength and hardness, and microstructure features of the resistance spot-welded joints were analyzed and evaluated. The visible indentations on the weld nugget surfaces caused by the electrode force and the surface expulsion were severe due to the high welding current. The weld nugget width at the sheets’ faying surface was mainly affected by the welding current and welding time, and the welded joint height at weld nugget center was chiefly associated with electrode force. The maximum tensile load of welded joint was up to 14.3 kN in the pullout failure mode. The hardness of the weld nugget was the highest because of the coarse acicular α′ structure, and the hardness of the heat-affected zone increased in comparison to the base metal due to the transformation of the β phase to some fine acicular α′ phase.

  15. Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys

    2011-01-01

    structures in Finland; (b) manufacture of Al-Mg-Si-based alloy 181 FSW-joined bullet- train cabins in Japan; (c) fabrication of 182 Al-Cu-based alloy...Simonsen, Visualisation of Material 857Flow in an Autogenous Friction Stir Weld, Proc. 1st International 858Symp. FSW, Thousand Oaks, CA, 1999 85928...A.P. Reynolds, Visualization of Material Flow in an Autogenous 860Friction Stir Weld, Sci. Technol. Weld. Join., 2000, 5, p 120–124 86129. T.U. Seidel

  16. Effect of Water Cooling on the Performances of Friction Stir Welding Heat-Affected Zone

    Zhang, H. J.; Liu, H. J.; Yu, L.

    2012-07-01

    The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is generally the intrinsic weakest location of the normal friction stir welded precipitate hardened aluminum alloys. In order to improve the mechanical properties of the HAZ by controlling the temperature level, underwater friction stir welding (FSW) of an Al-Cu aluminum alloy was conducted in the present study. The results indicate that the hardness of the HAZ can be improved through underwater FSW. Microstructural analysis reveals that the hardness improvement is attributed to the lowering of precipitate coarsening level and the narrowing of precipitate free zone, which are essentially induced by the variations of welding thermal cycles under the cooling effect of water.

  17. Inertia and friction welding of aluminum alloy 1100 to type 316 stainless steel

    Perkins, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inertia and friction-welding processes were evaluated for joining aluminum alloy 1100-H14 and Type 316 vacuum-induction melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VIM VAR) stainless steel. While both processes consistently produced joints in which the strength exceeded the strength of the aluminum base metal, 100 percent bonding was not reliably achieved with inertia welding. The deficiency points out the need for development of nondestructive testing techniques for this type of joint. Additionally, solid-state volume diffusion did not appear to be a satisfactory explanation for the inertia and friction-welding bonding mechanism

  18. Microstructure evolution in dissimilar AA6060/copper friction stir welded joints

    Kalashnikova, T. A.; Shvedov, M. A.; Vasilyev, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Friction stir welding process has been applied for making a dissimilar copper/aluminum alloy joint. The grain microstructure and mechanical properties of the obtained joint were studied. The structure of the cross-section of the FSW compound was analyzed. The microstructural evolution of the joint was examined using optical microscopy. The mechanical properties of the intermetallic particles were evaluated by measuring the microhardness according to the Vickers method. The microhardness of the intermetallic particles was by a factor of 4 lower than that of the particles obtained by fusion welding. The results of the investigations enable using friction stir welding for making dissimilar joints.

  19. Structural Phase Evolution in Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    Eliseev, A. A.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-10-01

    The authors examined the structural and phase state of fixed joints produced by method of friction stir welding (FSW) and ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding (UAFSW) from extruded profile of aluminum alloy AA2195. In order to identify the role of ultrasonic application in the course of welding, such characteristics, as volume fraction and average size of secondary particles are compared in the base material and stir zones of FSW and UAFSW joints. By applying the methods of SEM and TEM analysis, researchers established the complex character of phase transitions as a result of ultrasonic application.

  20. Prediction of mechanical properties in friction stir welds of pure copper

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Saeid, T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Range of parameters for defect-free friction stir welded pure copper was reached. • Models were developed for predicting UTS, TE and hardness of pure copper joints. • Analysis of variance was used to validate the developed models. • Effect of welding parameters on mechanical behavior of welded joints was explored. • The microstructure and fracture surface of welded joints were investigated. - Abstract: This research was carried out to predict the mechanical properties of friction stir welded pure copper joints. Response surface methodology based on a central composite rotatable design with three parameters, five levels, and 20 runs, was used to conduct the experiments and to develop the mathematical regression model by using of Design-Expert software. The three welding parameters considered were rotational speed, welding speed, and axial force. Analysis of variance was applied to validate the predicted models. Microstructural characterization and fractography of joints were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Also, the effects of the welding parameters on mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the developed models were reasonably accurate. The increase in welding parameters resulted in increasing of tensile strength of the joints up to a maximum value. Elongation percent of the joints increased with increase of rotational speed and axial force, but decreased by increasing of welding speed, continuously. In addition, hardness of the joints decreased with increase of rotational speed and axial force, but increased by increasing of welding speed. The joints welded at higher heat input conditions revealed more ductility fracture mode

  1. Weld Growth Mechanisms and Failure Behavior of Three-Sheet Resistance Spot Welds Made of 5052 Aluminum Alloy

    Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Luo, Zhen; Chao, Y. J.; Ao, Sansan; Cui, Xuetuan

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the weld nugget formation in three-sheet aluminum alloy resistance spot welding. The nugget formation process in three equal thickness sheets and three unequal thickness sheets of 5052 aluminum alloy were studied. The results showed that the nugget was initially formed at the workpiece/workpiece interfaces (i.e., both upper interface and lower interface). The two small nuggets then grew along the radial direction and axial direction (welding direction) as the welding time increased. Eventually, the two nuggets fused into one large nugget. During the welding process, the Peltier effect between the Cu-Al caused the shift of the nugget in the welding direction. In addition, the mechanical strength and fracture mode of the weld nuggets at the upper and lower interfaces were also studied using tensile shear specimen configuration. Three failure modes were identified, namely interfacial, mixed, and pullout. The critical welding time and critical nugget diameter corresponding to the transitions of these modes were investigated. Finally, an empirical failure load formula for three-sheet weld similar to two-sheet spot weld was developed.

  2. Thermomechanical conditions and stresses on the friction stir welding tool

    Atthipalli, Gowtam

    Friction stir welding has been commercially used as a joining process for aluminum and other soft materials. However, the use of this process in joining of hard alloys is still developing primarily because of the lack of cost effective, long lasting tools. Here I have developed numerical models to understand the thermo mechanical conditions experienced by the FSW tool and to improve its reusability. A heat transfer and visco-plastic flow model is used to calculate the torque, and traverse force on the tool during FSW. The computed values of torque and traverse force are validated using the experimental results for FSW of AA7075, AA2524, AA6061 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The computed torque components are used to determine the optimum tool shoulder diameter based on the maximum use of torque and maximum grip of the tool on the plasticized workpiece material. The estimation of the optimum tool shoulder diameter for FSW of AA6061 and AA7075 was verified with experimental results. The computed values of traverse force and torque are used to calculate the maximum shear stress on the tool pin to determine the load bearing ability of the tool pin. The load bearing ability calculations are used to explain the failure of H13 steel tool during welding of AA7075 and commercially pure tungsten during welding of L80 steel. Artificial neural network (ANN) models are developed to predict the important FSW output parameters as function of selected input parameters. These ANN consider tool shoulder radius, pin radius, pin length, welding velocity, tool rotational speed and axial pressure as input parameters. The total torque, sliding torque, sticking torque, peak temperature, traverse force, maximum shear stress and bending stress are considered as the output for ANN models. These output parameters are selected since they define the thermomechanical conditions around the tool during FSW. The developed ANN models are used to understand the effect of various input parameters on the total

  3. Resistance spot welding of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel: Phase transformations and mechanical properties

    Alizadeh-Sh, M.; Marashi, S.P.H.; Pouranvari, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Phase transformations during RSW of AISI430 are detailed. • Grain growth, martensite formation and carbide precipitation are dominant phase transformations. • Failure mode of AISI430 resistance spot welded joints are analyzed. • Larger FZ size provided improved load bearing capacity and energy absorption capability. - Abstract: The paper aims at investigating the process–microstructure–performance relationship in resistance spot welding of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel. The phase transformations which occur during weld thermal cycle were analyzed in details, based on the physical metallurgy of welding of the ferritic stainless steels. It was found that the microstructure of the fusion zone and the heat affected zone is influenced by different phenomena including grain growth, martensite formation and carbide precipitation. The effects of welding cycle on the mechanical properties of the spot welds in terms of peak load, energy absorption and failure mode are discussed

  4. Assessment of microstructure and tensile behavior of continuous drive friction welded titanium tubes

    Palanivel, R.; Dinaharan, I.; Laubscher, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    Friction welding process has been applied to join Grade 2 titanium alloy tubes of outer diameter 60 mm and wall thickness 3.9 mm. In this research work, five different friction times (24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 s) were used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and microstructure of welded tubes. Recording of the process parameters during welding was done. Optical microscopy, electron back scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the microstructure. The results showed that the friction time had a significant influence on the microstructure and UTS. The rate of deformation increased with friction time and refined the grains in the weld zone. Coarse grain structure was observed from the center of the weld zone towards the flash. Identical grain structure was observed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the parent metal. It was found that a maximum joint efficiency of 98.3% was achieved at a friction time of 32 s.The details of microhardness, failure location and fracture surface of the welded tubes were reported.

  5. Boundary element analysis of stress singularity in dissimilar metals by friction welding

    Chung, N. Y.; Park, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Friction welded dissimilar metals are widely applied in automobiles, rolling stocks, machine tools, and various engineering fields. Dissimilar metals have several advantages over homogeneous metals, including high strength, material property, fatigue endurance, impact absorption, high reliability, and vibration reduction. Due to the increased use of these metals, understanding their behavior under stress conditions is necessary, especially the analysis of stress singularity on the interface of friction-welded dissimilar metals. To establish a strength evaluation method and a fracture criterion, it is necessary to analyze stress singularity on the interface of dissimilar metals with welded flashes by friction welding under various loads and temperature conditions. In this paper, a method analyzing stress singularity for the specimens with and without flashes set in friction welded dissimilar metals is introduced using the boundary element method. The stress singularity index (λ) and the stress singularity factor (Γ) at the interface edge are computed from the stress analysis results. The shape and flash thickness, interface length, residual stress, and load are considered in the computation. Based on these results, the variations of interface length (c) and the ratio of flash thickness (t2 t1) greatly influence the stress singularity factors at the interface edge of friction welded dissimilar metals. The stress singularity factors will be a useful fracture parameter that considers stress singularity on the interface of dissimilar metals

  6. Assessment of microstructure and tensile behavior of continuous drive friction welded titanium tubes

    Palanivel, R., E-mail: rpalanivelme@gmail.com; Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com; Laubscher, R.F., E-mail: rflaubscher@uj.ac.za

    2017-02-27

    Friction welding process has been applied to join Grade 2 titanium alloy tubes of outer diameter 60 mm and wall thickness 3.9 mm. In this research work, five different friction times (24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 s) were used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and microstructure of welded tubes. Recording of the process parameters during welding was done. Optical microscopy, electron back scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the microstructure. The results showed that the friction time had a significant influence on the microstructure and UTS. The rate of deformation increased with friction time and refined the grains in the weld zone. Coarse grain structure was observed from the center of the weld zone towards the flash. Identical grain structure was observed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the parent metal. It was found that a maximum joint efficiency of 98.3% was achieved at a friction time of 32 s.The details of microhardness, failure location and fracture surface of the welded tubes were reported.

  7. Wear Resistance Analysis of A359/SiC/20p Advanced Composite Joints Welded by Friction Stir Welding

    O. Cuevas Mata

    Full Text Available Abstract Advancement in automotive part development demands new cost-effective materials with higher mechanical properties and improved wear resistance as compared to existing materials. For instance, Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMC shows improved mechanical properties as wear and abrasion resistance, high strength, chemical and dimensional stability. Automotive industry has focused in AMC for a variety of applications in automotive parts in order to improve the fuel economy, minimize vehicle emissions, improve design options, and increase the performance. Wear resistance is one of the most important factors in useful life of the automotive components, overall in those components submitted to mechanical systems like automotive brakes and suspensions. Friction Stir Welding (FSW rises as the most capable process to joining AMC, principally for the capacity to weld without compromising their ceramic reinforcement. The aim of this study is focused on the analysis of wear characteristics of the friction-stir welded joint of aluminum matrix reinforced with 20 percent in weight silicon carbide composite (A359/SiC/20p. The experimental procedure consisted in cut samples into small plates and perform three welds on these with a FSW machine using a tool with 20 mm shoulder diameter and 8 mm pin diameter. The wear features of the three welded joints and parent metal were analyzed at constant load applying 5 N and a rotational speed of 100 rpm employing a Pin-on - Disk wear testing apparatus, using a sapphire steel ball with 6 mm diameter. The experimental results indicate that the three welded joints had low friction coefficient compared with the parent metal. The results determine that the FSW process parameters affect the wear resistance of the welded joints owing to different microstructural modifications during welding that causes a low wear resistance on the welded zone.

  8. Parameter design and analysis in continuous drive friction welding of Al6061/SiCp composites

    Adalrasan, R. [Saveetha Engineering College, Chennai (India); Sundaram, A. Shanmuga [Sree Sastha Institute of Engineering and Technology, Chennai (India)

    2015-02-15

    Continuous drive friction welding (FW) had found profound industrial applications as an economical solid state joining process. The welding parameters such as frictional pressure, upset pressure, burn off length and rotational speed were found to influence the quality of joints. In the present study, Al6061/SiC{sub p} rods were joined by friction welding. The welding trials were designed by using Taguchi's L{sub 9} orthogonal array. Tensile strength and micro hardness of the joints were observed as the quality characteristics after each trial. The urge for parameter design had prompted the disclosure of a new integrated methodology based on technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) and grey relational analysis (GRA). The effectiveness of the proposed approach of T-GRA was validated by conducting a confirmation test and the field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images of the fractured surface were also examined.

  9. Finite element modelling and characterization of friction welding on UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel joints

    Mohammed Asif. M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid state joining techniques are increasingly employed in joining duplex stainless steel materials due to their high integrity. Continuous drive friction welding is a solid state welding technique which is used to join similar and dissimilar materials. This joining technique is characterized by short cycle time, low heat input and narrow heat affected zones. The simulation becomes an important tool in friction welding because of short welding cycle. In the present work, a three dimensional non-linear finite element model was developed. The thermal history and axial shortening profiles were predicted using ANSYS, a software tool. This numerical model was validated using experimental results. The results show that the frictional heating stage of the process has more influence on temperature and upsetting stage has more impact on axial shortening. The knowledge of these parameters would lead to optimization of input parameters and improvement of design and machine tools.

  10. Evaluating location specific strain rates, temperatures, and accumulated strains in friction welds through microstructure modeling

    Javed Akram

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A microstructural simulation method is adopted to predict the location specific strain rates, temperatures, grain evolution, and accumulated strains in the Inconel 718 friction welds. Cellular automata based 2D microstructure model was developed for Inconel 718 alloy using theoretical aspects of dynamic recrystallization. Flow curves were simulated and compared with experimental results using hot deformation parameter obtained from literature work. Using validated model, simulations were performed for friction welds of Inconel 718 alloy generated at three rotational speed i.e., 1200, 1500, and 1500 RPM. Results showed the increase in strain rates with increasing rotational speed. These simulated strain rates were found to match with the analytical results. Temperature difference of 150 K was noticed from center to edge of the weld. At all the rotational speeds, the temperature was identical implying steady state temperature (0.89Tm attainment. Keywords: Microstructure modeling, Dynamic recrystallization, Friction welding, Inconel 718, EBSD, Hot deformation, Strain map

  11. Tensile behavior of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Khodaverdizadeh, H.; Mahmoudi, A.; Nazari, E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Range of parameters for defect-free friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 was reached. ► A model was developed for predicting UTS and EL of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4. ► The maximum values of UTS and EL of joints were estimated by developed model. ► The optimum values of FSW process parameters were determined. -- Abstract: In this investigation response surface methodology based on a central composite rotatable design with three parameters, five levels and 20 runs, was used to develop a mathematical model predicting the tensile properties of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints at 95% confidence level. The three welding parameters considered were tool rotational speed, welding speed and axial force. Analysis of variance was applied to validate the predicted model. Microstructural characterization and fractography of joints were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Also, the effects of the welding parameters on tensile properties of friction stir welded joints were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the optimum parameters to get a maximum of tensile strength were 920 rev/min, 78 mm/min and 7.2 kN, where the maximum of tensile elongation was obtained at 1300 rev/min, 60 mm/min and 8 kN.

  12. Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes

    Feng, Zhili [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan [Harriman, TN

    2010-07-27

    Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

  13. Magnetic property effect on transport processes in resistance spot welding

    Wei, P S [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 80424 (China); Wu, T H, E-mail: pswei@mail.nsysu.edu.tw, E-mail: wux0064@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yung Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, Pintong, Taiwan 909 (China)

    2011-08-17

    This study investigates the effects of the Curie temperature and magnetic permeability on transport variables, solute distribution and nugget shapes during resistance spot welding. The Curie temperature is the temperature below which a metal or alloy is ferromagnetic with a high magnetic permeability, and above which it is paramagnetic with a small magnetic permeability. The model proposed here accounts for electromagnetic force, heat generation and contact resistance at the faying surface and electrode-workpiece interfaces and bulk resistance in workpieces. Contact resistance includes constriction and film resistances, which are functions of hardness, temperature, electrode force and surface condition. The computed results show that transport variables and nugget shapes can be consistently interpreted from the delay of response time and jump of electric current density as a result of finite magnetic diffusion, rather than through the examination of the variations of dynamic electrical resistance with time. The molten nugget on the faying surface is initiated earlier with increasing magnetic permeability and Curie temperature. A high Curie temperature enhances convection and solute mixing, and readily melts through the workpiece surface near the electrode edge. Any means to reduce the Curie temperature or magnetic permeability, such as adjusting the solute content, can be a good way to control weld quality. This study can also be applied to interpret the contact problems encountered in various electronics and packaging technologies, and so on.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of the Friction Weld Process on 2195/2219 Grade Aluminum

    Suits, Michael W.; Clark, Linda S.; Cox, Dwight E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center began an ambitious program designed to find alternative methods of repairing conventional TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welds and VPPA (Variable Polarity Plasma Arc) welds on the Space Shuttle External Tank without producing additional heat-related anomalies or conditions. Therefore, a relatively new method, invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, England, called Friction Stir Welding (FSW), was investigated for use in this application, as well as being used potentially as an initial weld process. As with the conventional repair welding processes, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) plays a crucial role in the verification of these repairs. Since it was feared that conventional NDE might have trouble with this type of weld structure (due to shape of nugget, grain structure, etc.) it was imperative that a complete study be performed to address the adequacy of the NDE process. This paper summarizes that process.

  15. Microstructural evolution and properties of friction stir welded aluminium alloy AA2219

    Gupta, R. K.; Biju, S.; Ghosh, B. R.; Sinha, P. P.

    2007-01-01

    Low weld strength of fusion welded joints of aluminium alloy AA2219 is a concern in fabrication of pressure vessels and is attributable to the presence of weld defects, as well as various metallurgical factors. Friction stir welding (FSW), being a solid state joining process has obvious advantages over fusion welding. Results of preliminary FSW experiments conducted on 10 mm thick plate using a particular tool configuration are presented here. Microscopic studies show the presence of very fine equiaxed recrystallised grain at the weld nugget and a flow pattern of grains due to heavy deformation in defect-free weld coupons. Mechanical properties are correlated with the microstructure and process variables. Fractographic analysis complements the observations of optical microscopy and mechanical properties

  16. Material Flow and Oxide Particle Distributions in Friction-Stir Welded F/M-ODS Sheets

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Jin, Hyun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion in ODS(Oxide dispersion strengthened) steel. However, these advantages will disappear while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. There is only limited literature available on the joining of ODS steels. Friction stir welding (FSW) is considered to be the best welding technique for welding ODS steels as the technique helps in retaining the homogeneous nano-oxide particles distributions in matrix. FSW is a solid.state, hot.shear joining process in which a rotating tool with a shoulder and terminating in a threaded pin, moves along the butting surfaces of two rigidly clamped plates placed on a backing plate. Heat generated by friction at the shoulder and to a lesser extent at the pin surface, softens the material being welded. Severe plastic deformation and flow of this plasticised metal occurs as the tool is translated along the welding direction. Material is transported from the front of the tool to the trailing edge where it is forged into a joint. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels. This study found that, during FSW, the forward movement of the tool pin results in loose contact between the tool pin and the receding material on the advancing side.

  17. Residual stresses analysis of friction stir welding using one-way FSI simulation

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon; Song, Ha Cheol

    2015-01-01

    When certain mechanisms, such as plastic deformations and temperature gradients, occur and are released in a structure, stresses remain because of the shape of the structure and external constraints. These stresses are referred to as residual stresses. The base material locally expands during heating in the welding process. When the welding is completed and cooled to room temperature, the residual stresses are left at nearly the yield strength level. In the case of friction stir welding, the maximum temperature is 80% to 90% of the melting point of the materials. Thus, the residual stresses in the welding process are smaller than those in other fusion welding processes; these stresses have not been considered previously. However, friction stir welding residual stresses are sometimes measured at approximately 70% or above. These residual stresses significantly affect fatigue behavior and lifetime. The present study investigates the residual stress distributions in various welding conditions and shapes of friction stir welding. In addition, the asymmetric feature is considered in temperature and residual stress distribution. Heat transfer analysis is conducted using the commercial computational fluid dynamics program Fluent, and results are used in the finite element structural analysis with the ANSYS Multiphysics software. The calculated residual stresses are compared with experimental values using the X-ray diffraction method.

  18. Effect of cryogenic cooling on corrosion of friction stir welded AA7010-T7651

    Jariyaboon, Manthana; Davenport, A. J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to study how cryogenic CO2 cooling during the welding process affects corrosion behaviour of friction stir welding (FSW) AA7010-T7651. Design/methodology/approach - Friction stir welded AA7010-17651 was produced with a rotation speed of 288 rpm and a travel...... speed of 58 mm/min. The liquid CO2 was sprayed onto the weld centre line immediately after the toolpiece. The microstructures of welds in different regions were observed using Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscope (FEG-SEM). The effect on the corrosion susceptibility was investigated using...... a gel visualisation test and potentiodynamic polarisation measurements using a micro-electrochemical technique. Findings - The main corrosion region for both FSWs AA7010-T7651 produced with and without cryogenic CO2 cooling is in the HAZ region, which exhibited intergranular attack. Cryogenic cooling...

  19. A review of literature from the First International Conference on Friction Stir Welding

    Bowyer, W.H.

    2000-06-01

    The papers from the first international conference on Friction Stir Welding (FSW) have been reviewed. Taken together the papers provide a very optimistic picture for the development and application of friction stir welding in general and to the case of the copper canister in particular. Whilst a considerable development effort is in progress the process has been industrialised for joining of aluminium sheet and it is accepted by Lloyds register for this purpose. Development of procedures and equipment to weld thicker materials and a wider range of materials is progressing ahead of the research activity to aid the understanding of the process at this stage. Nevertheless, well-established weld assessment procedures are being applied to experimental welds with very encouraging results. Summaries of the key papers are presented in an appendix

  20. On use of weld zone temperatures for online monitoring of weld quality in friction stir welding of naturally aged aluminium alloys

    Imam, Murshid; Biswas, Kajal; Racherla, Vikranth

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • FSWs for 6063-T4 AA are done at different process parameters and sheet thicknesses. • Weld nugget zone and heat affected zone temperatures are monitored for each case. • Microstructural and mechanical characterisation of welds is done in all cases. • Weld ductility is found to be particularly sensitive to weld zone temperatures. • Strong correlation is found between WNZ and HAZ temperatures and weld properties. - Abstract: 6063-T4 aluminium alloy sheets of 3 and 6 mm thicknesses were friction stir butt welded using a square tool pin at a wide range of tool rotational speeds. Properties of obtained welds were characterised using tensile tests, optical micrographs, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Shape, size, and distribution of precipitates in weld zones, and strength and ductility of welds were seen to directly correlate with peak temperatures in weld nugget and heat affected zones, independent of sheet thickness. In addition, fluctuations in measured temperature profiles, for 3 mm sheets, were seen to correlate with an increase in scatter of weld nugget zone properties for 3 mm sheets. Optimal weld strength and ductility were obtained for peak weld nugget zone temperatures of around 450 °C and corresponding peak heat affected zone temperatures of around 360–380 °C. Results obtained suggest that, at least for naturally aged aluminium alloys, nature of temperature evolution and magnitudes of peak temperatures in weld nugget and heat affected zones provide information on uniformity of properties in weld zones, overaging of heat affected zones, and formation of tunnel defects from improper material mixing at low weld zone temperatures

  1. Development of a process envelope for friction stir welding of DH36 steel – A step change

    Toumpis, Athanasios; Galloway, Alexander; Cater, Stephen; McPherson, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The friction stir welding speed on DH36 steel has been substantially increased. • Excellent quality welds offering potential economic advantages are obtained. • Friction stir welding of steel generates a very complex metallurgical system. • Slow and intermediate welding speed tensile samples fractured in the parent material. • Increasing traverse speed is seen to improve the impact toughness of the weld. - Abstract: Friction stir welding of steel presents an array of advantages across many industrial sectors compared to conventional fusion welding techniques. However, the fundamental knowledge of the friction stir welding process in relation to steel remains relatively limited. A microstructure and property evaluation of friction stir welded low alloy steel grade DH36 plate, commonly used in ship and marine applications has been undertaken. In this comprehensive study, plates of 2000 × 200 × 6 mm were butt welded together at varying rotational and traverse speeds. Samples were examined microscopically and by transverse tensile tests. In addition, the work was complemented by Charpy impact testing and micro-hardness testing in various regions of the weld. The study examined a wide range of process parameters; from this, a preliminary process parameter envelope has been developed and initial process parameter sets established that produce commercially attractive excellent quality welds through a substantial increase in the conventionally recognised weld traverse speed

  2. Microstructural evolution during friction stir welding of AlSi1MgMn alloy

    M. Janjić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the research of the infl uence of geometric and kinematic parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of welded joint of aluminum alloy AlSi1MgMn (6082-T6 obtained through the Friction Stir Welding (FSW process. The experiment parameters were welding speed, rotation speed, angle of pin slope, pin diameter and shoulder diameter. On the obtained welded workpieces the dynamic testing on the impact toughness, and determination of microstructural zones were carried out.

  3. Nondestructive online testing method for friction stir welding using acoustic emission

    Levikhina, Anastasiya

    2017-12-01

    The paper reviews the possibility of applying the method of acoustic emission for online monitoring of the friction stir welding process. It is shown that acoustic emission allows the detection of weld defects and their location in real time. The energy of an acoustic signal and the median frequency are suggested to be used as informative parameters. The method of calculating the median frequency with the use of a short time Fourier transform is applied for the identification of correlations between the defective weld structure and properties of the acoustic emission signals received during welding.

  4. Identification of the Quality Spot Welding used Non Destructive Test-Ultrasonic Testing: (Effect of Welding Time)

    Sifa, A.; Endramawan, T.; Badruzzaman

    2017-03-01

    Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) is frequently used as one way of welding is used in the manufacturing process, especially in the automotive industry [4][5][6][7]. Several parameters influence the process of welding points. To determine the quality of a welding job needs to be tested, either by damaging or testing without damage, in this study conducted experimental testing the quality of welding or identify quality of the nugget by using Non-Destructive Test (NDT) -Ultrasonic Testing (UT), in which the identification of the quality of the welding is done with parameter thickness of worksheet after welding using NDT-UT with use same material worksheet and have more thickness of worksheet, the thickness of the worksheet single plate 1mm, with the capability of propagation Ultrasonic Testing (UT) standard limited> 3 mm [1], welding process parameters such as the time difference between 1-10s and the welding current of 8 KV, visually Heat Affected Zone ( HAZ ) have different results due to the length of time of welding. UT uses a probe that is used with a frequency of 4 MHz, diameter 10 mm, range 100 and the couplant used is oil. Identification techniques using drop 6dB, with sound velocity 2267 m / s of Fe, with the result that the effect of the Welding time affect the size of the HAZ, identification with the lowest time 1s show results capable identified joined through NDT - UT.

  5. Friction-Stir Welding - Heavy Inclusions in Bi-metallic welds of Al 2219/2195

    Rietz, Ward W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy Inclusions (HI) were detected for the first time by radiographic examination in aluminum alloy 2219forging/2195plate (advancing/retreating side) Friction Sir Welds (FSW) for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Program. Radiographic HI indications appear as either small (approx.0.005"-0.025") individual particles or clusters of small particles. Initial work was performed to verify that the HI was not foreign material or caused by FSW pin tool debris. That and subsequent elemental analysis determined that the HI were large agglomerations of Al2Cu (theta phase), which is the strengthening precipitate in Al2219. A literature search on that subject determined that the agglomeration of phase has also been found in Al2219 bead on plate FSW [Ref. 1]. Since this was detected in ET space flight hardware, an investigative study of the effect of agglomerated theta phase particles in FSW Al2219f/2195p was performed. Numerous panels of various lengths were welded per ET weld procedures and radiographically inspected to determine if any HI was detected. Areas that had HI were sampled for room temperature and cyclic cryogenic (-423F) tensile testing and determined no significant adverse affect on mechanical properties when compared to test specimens without HI and historical data. Fracture surface examination using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) revealed smaller phase agglomerations undetectable by radiographic inspection dispersed throughout the Al2219f/2195p FSW. This indicates that phase agglomeration is inherent to the Al2219f/2195p FSW process and only rarely creates agglomerations large enough to be detected by radiography. HI has not been observed in FSW of plate to plate material for either Al2219 or AL2195.

  6. Prediction and optimization of friction welding parameters for super duplex stainless steel (UNS S32760) joints

    Udayakumar, T.; Raja, K.; Afsal Husain, T.M.; Sathiya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion resistance and impact strength – predicted by response surface methodology. • Burn off length has highest significance on corrosion resistance. • Friction force is a strong determinant in changing impact strength. • Pareto front points generated by genetic algorithm aid to fix input control variable. • Pareto front will be a trade-off between corrosion resistance and impact strength. - Abstract: Friction welding finds widespread industrial use as a mass production process for joining materials. Friction welding process allows welding of several materials that are extremely difficult to fusion weld. Friction welding process parameters play a significant role in making good quality joints. To produce a good quality joint it is important to set up proper welding process parameters. This can be done by employing optimization techniques. This paper presents a multi objective optimization method for optimizing the process parameters during friction welding process. The proposed method combines the response surface methodology (RSM) with an intelligent optimization algorithm, i.e. genetic algorithm (GA). Corrosion resistance and impact strength of friction welded super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) (UNS S32760) joints were investigated considering three process parameters: friction force (F), upset force (U) and burn off length (B). Mathematical models were developed and the responses were adequately predicted. Direct and interaction effects of process parameters on responses were studied by plotting graphs. Burn off length has high significance on corrosion current followed by upset force and friction force. In the case of impact strength, friction force has high significance followed by upset force and burn off length. Multi objective optimization for maximizing the impact strength and minimizing the corrosion current (maximizing corrosion resistance) was carried out using GA with the RSM model. The optimization procedure resulted in

  7. Experimental investigations of tungsten inert gas assisted friction stir welding of pure copper plates

    Constantin, M. A.; Boșneag, A.; Nitu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Welding copper and its alloys is usually difficult to join by conventional fusion welding processes because of high thermal diffusivity of the copper, alloying elements, necessity of using a shielding gas and a clean surface. To overcome this inconvenience, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state joining process that relies on frictional heating and plastic deformation, is used as a feasible welding process. In order to achieve an increased welding speed and a reduction in tool wear, this process is assisted by another one (WIG) which generates and adds heat to the process. The aim of this paper is to identify the influence of the additional heat on the process parameters and on the welding joint properties (distribution of the temperature, hardness and roughness). The research includes two experiments for the FSW process and one experiment for tungsten inert gas assisted FSW process. The outcomes of the investigation are compared and analysed for both welding variants. Adding a supplementary heat source, the plates are preheated and are obtain some advantages such as reduced forces used in process and FSW tool wear, faster and better plasticization of the material, increased welding speed and a proper weld quality.

  8. Structure of Ti-6Al-4V nanostructured titanium alloy joint obtained by resistance spot welding

    Klimenov, V. A., E-mail: klimenov@tpu.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Kurgan, K. A., E-mail: kirill-k2.777@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Chumaevskii, A. V., E-mail: tch7av@gmail.com [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/4 Akademicheskii pr., Tomsk, 634021 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, A. A., E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Gnyusov, S. F., E-mail: gnusov@rambler.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The structure of weld joints of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V in the initial ultrafine-grained state, obtained by resistance spot welding, is studied using the optical and scanning electron microscopy method and the X-ray structure analysis. The carried out studies show the relationship of the metal structure in the weld zone with main joint zones. The structure in the core zone and the heat affected zone is represented by finely dispersed grains of needle-shaped martensite, differently oriented in these zones. The change in the microhardness in the longitudinal section of the weld joint clearly correlates with structural changes during welding.

  9. Special grain boundaries in the nugget zone of friction stir welded AA6061-T6 under various welding parameters

    Tao, Wang [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Yong, Zou, E-mail: yzou@sdu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Xuemei, Liu [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Matsuda, Kenji [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2016-08-01

    The age hardenable AA6061-T6 plate was butt welded by friction stir welding. The total heat input, generated by friction between the tool and work piece and plastic deformation, results in a consumption of meta-stable phases in the nugget zone. Precipitation phenomena were closely related to the diffusion of the solute atoms. The existence of special grain boundaries like Σ1a and Σ3 will increase the difficulty in diffusion, which will improve the hardness in the nugget zone. Furthermore, the formation of Σ3 grain boundaries can result from an impingement of re-crystallized grains coming from texture components in twin relationship already. An appropriate strain level may benefit the development of the twin components with a similar intensity. The welding parameters have an effect on heat source mode and the strain level. Then, the type of dynamic re-crystallization and distribution of the special grain boundaries was altered by changing the parameters.

  10. The Simulation of Precipitation Evolutions and Mechanical Properties in Friction Stir Welding with Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    Zhang, Z.; Wan, Z. Y.; Lindgren, L.-E.; Tan, Z. J.; Zhou, X.

    2017-12-01

    A finite element model of friction stir welding capable of re-meshing is used to simulate the temperature variations. Re-meshing of the finite element model is used to maintain a fine mesh resolving the gradients of the solution. The Kampmann-Wagner numerical model for precipitation is then used to study the relation between friction stir welds with post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and the changes in mechanical properties. Results indicate that the PWHT holding time and PWHT holding temperature need to be optimally designed to obtain FSW with better mechanical properties. Higher precipitate number with lower precipitate sizes gives higher strength in the stirring zone after PWHT. The coarsening of precipitates in HAZ are the main reason to hinder the improvement of mechanical property when PWHT is used.

  11. Joint properties of dissimilar Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy/Ti–6%Al–4%V titanium alloy by gas tungsten arc welding assisted hybrid friction stir welding

    Bang, HanSur; Bang, HeeSeon; Song, HyunJong; Joo, SungMin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Hybrid friction stir welding for Al alloy and Ti alloy joint has been carried out. • Mechanical strength of dissimilar joint by HFSW and FSW has been compared. • Microstructure of dissimilar joint by HFSW and FSW has been compared. - Abstract: Hybrid friction stir butt welding of Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy plate to Ti–6%Al–4%V titanium alloy plate with satisfactory acceptable joint strength was successfully achieved using preceding gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) preheating heat source of the Ti alloy plate surface. Hybrid friction stir welding (HFSW) joints were welded completely without any unwelded zone resulting from smooth material flow by equally distributed temperature both in Al alloy side and Ti alloy side using GTAW assistance for preheating the Ti alloy plate unlike friction stir welding (FSW) joints. The ultimate tensile strength was approximately 91% in HFSW welds by that of the Al alloy base metal, which was 24% higher than that of FSW welds without GTAW under same welding condition. Notably, it was found that elongation in HFSW welds increased significantly compared with that of FSW welds, which resulted in improved joint strength. The ductile fracture was the main fracture mode in tensile test of HFSW welds

  12. Stir Friction Welding Used in Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The panels are subjected to confidence tests in which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  13. INVESTIGATION OF SINGLE-PASS/DOUBLE-PASS TECHNIQUES ON FRICTION STIR WELDING OF ALUMINIUM

    N.A.A. Sathari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the effects of single-pass/ double-pass techniques on friction stir welding of aluminium. Two pieces of AA1100 with a thickness of 6.0 mm were friction stir welded using a CNC milling machine at rotational speeds of 1400 rpm, 1600 rpm and 1800 rpm respectively for single-pass and double-pass. Microstructure observations of the welded area were studied using an optical microscope. The specimens were tested by using a tensile test and Vickers hardness test to evaluate their mechanical properties. The results indicated that, at low rotational speed, defects such as ‘surface lack of fill’ and tunnels in the welded area contributed to a decrease in mechanical properties. Welded specimens using double-pass techniques show increasing values of tensile strength and hardness. From this investigation it is found that the best parameters of FSW welded aluminium AA1100 plate were those using double-pass techniques that produce mechanically sound joints with a hardness of 56.38 HV and 108 MPa strength at 1800 rpm compared to the single-pass technique. Friction stir welding, single-pass/ double-pass techniques, AA1100, microstructure, mechanical properties.

  14. Tensile behavior of dissimilar friction stir welded joints of aluminium alloys

    Shanmuga Sundaram, N.; Murugan, N.

    2010-01-01

    The heat treatable aluminium alloy AA2024 is used extensively in the aircraft industry because of its high strength to weight ratio and good ductility. The non-heat treatable aluminium alloy AA5083 possesses medium strength and high ductility and used typically in structural applications, marine, and automotive industries. When compared to fusion welding processes, friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process which is best suitable for joining these alloys. The friction stir welding parameters such as tool pin profile, tool rotational speed, welding speed, and tool axial force influence the mechanical properties of the FS welded joints significantly. Dissimilar FS welded joints are fabricated using five different tool pin profiles. Central composite design with four parameters, five levels, and 31 runs is used to conduct the experiments and response surface method (RSM) is employed to develop the model. Mathematical regression models are developed to predict the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and tensile elongation (TE) of the dissimilar friction stir welded joints of aluminium alloys 2024-T6 and 5083-H321, and they are validated. The effects of the above process parameters and tool pin profile on tensile strength and tensile elongation of dissimilar friction stir welded joints are analysed in detail. Joints fabricated using Tapered Hexagon tool pin profile have the highest tensile strength and tensile elongation, whereas the Straight Cylinder tool pin profile have the lowest tensile strength and tensile elongation. The results are useful to have a better understanding of the effects of process parameters, to fabricate the joints with desired tensile properties, and to automate the FS welding process.

  15. Effect of Local Post Weld Heat Treatment on Tensile Properties in Friction Stir Welded 2219-O Al Alloy

    Chu, Guannan; Sun, Lei; Lin, Caiyuan; Lin, Yanli

    2017-11-01

    To improve the formability of the aluminum alloy welds and overcome the size limitation of the bulk post weld heat treatment (BPWHT) on large size friction stir welded joints, a local post weld heat treatment method (LPWHT) was proposed. In this method, the resistance heating as the moving heat source is adopted to only heat the weld seam. The temperature field of LPWHT and its influence on the mechanical properties and formability of FSW 2219-O Al alloy joints was investigated. The evaluation of the tensile properties of FSW samples was also examined by mapping the global and local strain distribution using the digital image correlation methodology. The results indicated that the formability was improved greatly after LPWHT, while the hardness distribution of the FSW joint was homogenized. The maximum elongation can reach 1.4 times that of as-welded joints with increase the strength and the strain of the nugget zone increased from 3 to 8% when annealing at 300 °C. The heterogeneity on the tensile deformation of the as-welded joints was improved by the nugget zone showing large local strain value and the reason was given according to the dimple fracture characteristics at different annealing temperatures. The tensile strength and elongation of LPWHT can reach 93.3 and 96.1% of the BPWHT, respectively. Thus, the LPWHT can be advantageous compared to the BPWHT for large size welds.

  16. Strain hardening and damage in 6xxx series aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    Simar, Aude; Nielsen, Kim Lau; de Meester, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    A friction stir weld in 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy has been prepared and analyzed by micro-hardness measurements, tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The locations of the various weld zones were determined by micro-hardness indentation measurements. The flow behavior of the various...... zones of the weld was extracted using micro-tensile specimens cut out parallel to the welding direction. The measured material properties and weld topology were then introduced in a fully coupled micro-mechanical finite element model, accounting for nucleation and growth of voids as well as void shape...... evolution. The model shows satisfactory preliminary results in predicting the tensile behaviour of the weld and the true strain at fracture....

  17. The effect of tensioning and sectioning on residual stresses in aluminium AA7749 friction stir welds

    Altenkirch, J.; Steuwer, A.; Peel, M.; Richards, D.G.; Withers, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Using synchrotron X-ray diffraction the residual stress distribution has been measured in a series of AA7449-W51 aluminium friction stir welds that had been tensioned to different loads during welding. By modifying the stress accumulation path, the application of a tensioning stress has reduced the tensile magnitude of the final residual weld stresses. In the present case the residual stresses were minimised when the applied load is ∼35% of the room temperature yield stress of the parent material. Subsequent sectioning of the weld into shorter test lengths, as might be necessary for weld testing, resulted in a progressive and significant relaxation of the residual stress field. The effect of tensioning on the weld component distortion also has been investigated

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Characterization of Friction-Stir-Welded Dual-Phase Brass

    Ramesh, R.; Dinaharan, I.; Akinlabi, E. T.; Murugan, N.

    2018-03-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an ideal process to join brass to avoid the evaporation of zinc. In the present investigation, 6-mm-thick dual-phase brass plates were joined efficiently using FSW at various tool rotational speeds. The microstructures were studied using optical microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The optical micrographs revealed the evolution of various zones across the joint line. The microstructure of the heat-affected zone was similar to that of base metal. The weld zone exhibited finer grains due to dynamic recrystallization. The recrystallization was inhomogeneous and the inhomogeneity reduced with increased tool rotational speed. The dual phase was preserved in the weld zone due to the retention of zinc. The severe plastic deformation created a lot of dislocations in the weld zone. The weld zone was strengthened after welding. The role of tool rotational speed on the joint strength is further reported.

  19. Optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding based on residual stress analysis: a feasibility study

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2010-01-01

    The present paper considers the optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding (FSW). More specifically, the choices of rotational speed and traverse welding speed have been investigated using genetic algorithms. The welding process is simulated in a transient, two......-dimensional sequentially coupled thermomechanical model in ANSYS. This model is then used in an optimisation case where the two objectives are the minimisation of the peak residual stresses and the maximisation of the welding speed. The results indicate that the objectives for the considered case are conflicting......, and this is presented as a Pareto optimal front. Moreover, a higher welding speed for a fixed rotational speed results, in general, in slightly higher stress levels in the tension zone, whereas a higher rotational speed for a fixed welding speed yields somewhat lower peak residual stress, however, a wider tension zone...

  20. Strengthening mechanisms in an inertia friction welded nickel-base superalloy

    Tiley, J.S., E-mail: Jaimie.Tiley@us.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Mahaffey, D.W. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Alam, T.; Rojhirunsakool, T. [Department of Materials Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Senkov, O.; Parthasarthy, T. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); UES, Inc., Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Banerjee, R. [Department of Materials Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2016-04-26

    This research investigated the strengthening mechanisms associated with the as-welded microstructure developed during inertia friction welding of dissimilar superalloys LHSR and Mar-M247. The weld interface and heat affected regions of the sample were analyzed using hardness indentation techniques and subsequently characterized using SEM, TEM and advanced atom probe tomography. The yield strength of the welded joint was modeled to determine the impact of the gradients in the as-welded microstructure on strengthening mechanisms within the LSHR material. Characterization centered on formation of γ′, γ grain size and chemical segregation within the heat affected regions. Results indicate an increased hardness in the vicinity of the weld interface, resulting from the refined dispersion of γ′ and γ grains.

  1. The combined theoretical and experimental approach to arrive at optimum parameters in friction stir welding

    Jagadeesha, C. B.

    2017-12-01

    Even though friction stir welding was invented long back (1991) by TWI England, till now there has no method or procedure or approach developed, which helps to obtain quickly optimum or exact parameters yielding good or sound weld. An approach has developed in which an equation has been derived, by which approximate rpm can be obtained and by setting range of rpm ±100 or 50 rpm over approximate rpm and by setting welding speed equal to 60 mm/min or 50 mm/min one can conduct FSW experiment to reach optimum parameters; one can reach quickly to optimum parameters, i.e. desired rpm, and welding speed, which yield sound weld by the approach. This approach can be effectively used to obtain sound welds for all similar and dissimilar combinations of materials such as Steel, Al, Mg, Ti, etc.

  2. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    Switzner, Nathan

    Friction welding, a solid-state joining method, is presented as a novel alternative process step for lining mild steel pipe and forged components internally with a corrosion resistant (CR) metal alloy for petrochemical applications. Currently, fusion welding is commonly used for stainless steel overlay cladding, but this method is costly, time-consuming, and can lead to disbonding in service due to a hard martensite layer that forms at the interface due to partial mixing at the interface between the stainless steel CR metal and the mild steel base. Firstly, the process parameter space was explored for inertia friction butt welding using AISI type 304L stainless steel and AISI 1018 steel to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties effects. A conceptual model for heat flux density versus radial location at the faying surface was developed with consideration for non-uniform pressure distribution due to frictional forces. An existing 1 D analytical model for longitudinal transient temperature distribution was modified for the dissimilar metals case and to account for material lost to the flash. Microstructural results from the experimental dissimilar friction welds of 304L stainless steel to 1018 steel were used to discuss model validity. Secondly, the microstructure and mechanical property implications were considered for replacing the current fusion weld cladding processes with friction welding. The nominal friction weld exhibited a smaller heat softened zone in the 1018 steel than the fusion cladding. As determined by longitudinal tensile tests across the bond line, the nominal friction weld had higher strength, but lower apparent ductility, than the fusion welds due to the geometric requirements for neck formation adjacent to a rigid interface. Martensite was identified at the dissimilar friction weld interface, but the thickness was smaller than that of the fusion welds, and the morphology was discontinuous due to formation by a mechanism of solid

  3. Multi-objective Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters using Grey Relational Analysis for Joining Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite

    Sreenivasan KONGANAPURAM SUNDARARAJAN

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium metal matrix composites has gained importance in recent time because of its improved mechanical and metallurgical properties. The welding of aluminium metal matrix composites using conventional welding process has got many demerits so in order to overcome them a solid state welding process is to be employed. To achieve a good strength weld in the aluminium metal matrix composite bars an efficient and most preferred technique is friction welding. In this work the aluminium metal matrix composite AA7075 + 10 % vol SiC-T6 is selected and friction welded. The combination of friction welding process parameters such as spindle speed, friction pressure, upset pressure and burn-off- length for joining the AA7075 + 10 % vol SiCP-T6 metal matrix composite bars are selected by Taguchi’s design of experiment. The optimum friction welding parameters were determined for achieving improved ultimate tensile strength and the hardness using grey relational analysis. A combined grey relational grade is found from the determined grey relational coefficient of the output responses and the optimum friction welding process parameters were obtained as spindle speed – 1200 rpm, friction pressure – 100 MPa, upset pressure – 250 MPa, Burn-off-Length – 2 mm. Analysis of variance (ANOVA performed shows that the friction pressure is the most significant friction welding parameter that influences the both the ultimate tensile strength and hardness of friction welded AA7075 + 10 % volSiCP-T6 joints. The fractured surface under microstructure study also revealed good compliance with the grey relational grade result. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.24.2.17725

  4. Immersed friction stir welding of ultrafine grained accumulative roll-bonded Al alloy

    Hosseini, M.; Danesh Manesh, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this research, ultrafine grained strips of commercial pure strain hardenable aluminum (AA1050) were produced by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) technique. These strips were joined by friction stir welding (FSW) in immersed (underwater) and conventional (in-air) conditions to investigate the effect of the immersion method on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint, aiming to reduce the deterioration of the mechanical properties of the joint. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses were used to evaluate the microstructure, showing smaller grains and subgrains in the stir zone of the immersed FSW condition with respect to the conventional FSW method. The hardness and tensile properties of the immersed friction stir welded sample and ARBed base metal show more similarity compared to the conventional friction stir welded sample. Moreover, the aforementioned method can result in the enhancement of the superplasticity tendency of the material.

  5. Modeling of the fracture behavior of spot welds using advanced micro-mechanical damage models

    Sommer, Silke

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling of deformation and fracture behavior of resistance spot welded joints in DP600 steel sheets. Spot welding is still the most commonly used joining technique in automotive engineering. In overloading situations like crash joints are often the weakest link in a structure. For those reasons, crash simulations need reliable and applicable tools to predict the load bearing capacity of spot welded components. Two series of component tests with different spot weld diameters have shown that the diameter of the weld nugget is the main influencing factor affecting fracture mode (interfacial or pull-out fracture), load bearing capacity and energy absorption. In order to find a correlation between nugget diameter, load bearing capacity and fracture mode, the spot welds are simulated with detailed finite element models containing base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal in lap-shear loading conditions. The change in fracture mode from interfacial to pull-out or peel-out fracture with growing nugget diameter under lap-shear loading was successfully modeled using the Gologanu-Leblond model in combination with the fracture criteria of Thomason and Embury. A small nugget diameter is identified to be the main cause for interfacial fracture. In good agreement with experimental observations, the calculated pull-out fracture initiates in the base metal at the boundary to the heat affected zone.

  6. Single-sided sheet-to-tube spot welding investigated by 3D numerical simulations

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Chergui, Azeddine; Zhang, Wenqi

    The single-sided resistance spot welding process is analyzed by a 3D numerical study of sheet-to-tube joining. Finite element simulations are carried out in SORPAS® 3D. Two levels of electrode force and five levels of welding current are simulated. The overall effects of changing current and force...

  7. Investigation on dissimilar underwater friction stir lap welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy to pure copper

    Zhang, Jingqing; Shen, Yifu; Yao, Xin; Xu, Haisheng; Li, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 6061-T6 Al and pure Cu were successfully underwater friction stir lap welded. • The underwater weld was analyzed via comparing with the classical weld. • The oxidation of Cu was prevented via the external water. • The amount of Al–Cu intermetallic was decreased by the external water. • The thickness of Al–Cu diffusion interlayer was decreased by the external water. - Abstract: Friction stir welding (classical FSW) is considered to offer advantages over the traditional fusion welding techniques in terms of dissimilar welding. However, some challenges still exist in the dissimilar friction stir lap welding of the aluminum/copper (Al/Cu) metallic couple, among which the formation of the Al–Cu intermetallic compounds is the major problem. In the present research, due to the fact that the formation and growth of the intermetallic are significantly controlled by the thermal history, the underwater friction stir welding (underwater FSW) was employed for fabricating the weld, and the weld obtained by underwater FSW (underwater weld) was analyzed via comparing with the weld obtained under same parameters by classical FSW (classical weld). In order to investigate the effect of the external water on the thermal history, the K-type thermocouple was utilized to measure the weld temperature, and it is found that the water could decrease the peak temperature and shorten the thermal cycle time. The XRD results illustrate that the interface of the welds mainly consist of the Al–Cu intermetallic compounds such as CuAl 2 and Cu 9 Al 4 together with some amounts of Al and Cu, and it is also found that the amount of the intermetallic in the underwater weld is obvious less than in the classical weld. The SEM images and the EDS line scan results also illustrate that the Al–Cu diffusion interlayer at the Al–Cu interface of the underwater weld was obviously thinner than that of the classical weld

  8. Microstructure and microtexture studies of a friction stir welded Al 6061 alloy

    Kumbhar, N.T.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Bhanumurthy, K.; Sahoo, S.K.; Samajdar, I.

    2009-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state joining technique used extensively for the joining of various metals and alloys and also has been applied to the joining of steels. The friction stir welding of Al and its alloys has been extensively delt with over a period exceeding the last decade and a half due to its numerous advantages over other conventional fusion welding techniques in terms of weld quality, efficiency, cost effectiveness etc. to name a few. This technique is being increasingly seeked by industries in mass production/engineering such as the railways, marine and aerospace industries. The friction stir welding of a precipitation hardened Al 6061 alloy plates of 6 mm. thickness was performed at various tool rotation speeds and tool traverse speeds with a constant tilt of 3 deg using a high strength steel (HSS) tool of appropriate dimensions. The cross section of the weld perpendicular to the welding direction was analyzed for a detailed microstructural investigation using electron probe microanalysis, orientation imaging microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Various microstructural changes are observed in the various regions of the friction stir welded AA 6061. The nugget region which is highly deformed is characterized by the dissolution and reprecipitation of the coarse precipitates, grain size refinement and recrystallization. The adjoining regions near the nugget viz the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ) also show heterogeneous microstructure in terms of grain size and precipitation which is mainly attributed to the heating cycle experienced during welding. This heterogeneity is also evident from the plot of microhardness distribution across the cross section of the weld region. However, the electron probe microanalysis studies do not show any significant pickup of oxygen in the weld interior as compared to a little oxygen pickup upto 30 μm from the top surface. Further, using orientation imaging

  9. Multiple Crack Growth Prediction in AA2024-T3 Friction Stir Welded Joints, Including Manufacturing Effects

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Citarella, Roberto; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2016-01-01

    A great deal of attention is currently paid by several industries toward the friction stir welding process to realize lightweight structures. Within this aim, the realistic prediction of fatigue behavior of welded assemblies is a key factor. In this work an integrated finite element method - dual...... boundary element method (FEM-DBEM) procedure, coupling the welding process simulation to the subsequent crack growth assessment, is proposed and applied to simulate multiple crack propagation, with allowance for manufacturing effects. The friction stir butt welding process of the precipitation hardened AA...... on a notched specimen. The whole procedure was finally tested comparing simulation outcomes with experimental data. The good agreement obtained highlights the predictive capability of the method. The influence of the residual stress distribution on crack growth and the mutual interaction between propagating...

  10. Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties in naturally aged 7050 and 7075 Al friction stir welds

    Fuller, Christian B., E-mail: christian.fuller@yahoo.com [Rockwell Scientific, 1049 Camino Dos Rios, Thousand Oaks, CA 93021 (United States); Mahoney, Murray W., E-mail: murraymahoney@comcast.net [Rockwell Scientific, 1049 Camino Dos Rios, Thousand Oaks, CA 93021 (United States); Calabrese, Mike [Rockwell Scientific, 1049 Camino Dos Rios, Thousand Oaks, CA 93021 (United States); Micona, Leanna [The Boeing Company, P.O. Box 3707 MC 19-HP, Seattle, WA 98124 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The microstructural and mechanical property evolution of friction stir welded 7050-T7651 and 7075-T651 Al alloys were examined as a function of room temperature (natural) aging for up to 67,920 h. During the range of aging times studied, transverse tensile strengths continuously increased, and are still increasing, with improvements of 24% and 29% measured for the 7050-T7651 and 7075-T651 Al alloy friction stir welds, respectively. Microstructural evolution within the weld nugget and heat-affected zone was evaluated with both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Formation of a high volume fraction of GP(II) zones produced a majority of the strength improvement within the weld nugget and HAZ regions. The rational for the microstructural changes are discussed in light of the mechanical properties.

  11. Microstructure of friction stir welded joints of 2017A aluminium alloy sheets.

    Mroczka, K; Dutkiewicz, J; Pietras, A

    2010-03-01

    The present study examines a friction stir welded 2017A aluminium alloy. Transmission electron microscope investigations of the weld nugget revealed the average grain size of 5 microm, moderate density of dislocations as well as the presence of nanometric precipitates located mostly in grains interiors. Scanning electron microscope observations of fractures showed the presence of ductile fracture in the region of the weld nugget with brittle precipitates in the lower part. The microhardness analysis performed on the cross-section of the joints showed fairly small changes; however, after the artificial ageing process an increase in hardness was observed. The change of the joint hardness subject to the ageing process indicates partial supersaturation in the material during friction stir welding and higher precipitation hardening of the joint.

  12. A Study on Tooling and Its Effect on Heat Generation and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints in Friction Stir Welding

    Tikader, Sujoy; Biswas, Pankaj; Puri, Asit Baran

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been the most attracting solid state welding process as it serves numerous advantages like good mechanical, metallurgical properties etc. Non weldable aluminium alloys like 5XXX, 7XXX series can be simply joined by this process. In this present study a mathematical model has been developed and experiments were successfully performed to evaluate mechanical properties of FSW on similar aluminium alloys i.e. AA1100 for different process parameters and mainly two kind of tool geometry (straight cylindrical and conical or cylindrical tapered shaped pin with flat shoulder). Tensile strength and micro hardness for different process parameters are reported of the welded plate sample. It was noticed that in FSW of similar alloy with tool made of SS-310 tool steel, friction is the major contributor for the heat generation. It was seen that tool geometry, tool rotational speed, plunging force by the tool and traverse speed have significant effect on tensile strength and hardness of friction stir welded joints.

  13. Microstructures and mechanical properties of magnesium alloy and stainless steel weld-joint made by friction stir lap welding

    Wei, Yanni; Li, Jinglong; Xiong, Jiangtao; Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Friction stir lap welding technology with cutting pin was successfully employed to form lap joint of magnesium and steel. → The cutting pin made the lower steel participate in deformation and the interface was no longer flat. → A saw-toothed structure formed due to a mechanical mixing of the magnesium and steel was found at the interface. → A high-strength joint was produced which fractured in the magnesium side. -- Abstract: Friction stir lap welding was conducted on soft/hard metals. A welding tool was designed with a cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide, which makes the stirring pin possible to penetrate and cut the surface layer of the hard metal. Magnesium alloy AZ31 and stainless steel SUS302 were chosen as soft/hard base metals. The structures of the joining interface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The joining strength was evaluated by tensile shear test. The results showed that flower-like interfacial morphologies were presented with steel flashes and scraps, which formed bonding mechanisms of nail effect by long steel flashes, zipper effect by saw-tooth structure and metallurgical bonding. The shear strength of the lap joint falls around the shear strength of butt joint of friction stir welded magnesium alloy.

  14. Development of niobium alloy/stainless steel joint by friction welding, (1)

    Kikuchi, Taiji; Kawamura, Hiroshi.

    1988-08-01

    The niobium alloy and stainless steel have been jointed by the nicrobrazing method generally. However the strength of the jointed part is weaker than that of the mother material. Therefore we developed the niobium alloy(Nb-1 % Zr)/stainless steel(SUS 304) transition joint by the friction welding method. As the tests for the development. We conducted the mechanical tests (tensile test at room temperature, 300 deg C, 500 deg C and 700 deg C, torsion fatigue test and burst test), metallographical observation and electron prove X-ray microanalysis observation. Those tests proved jointed part by the friction welding had enough properties for general uses. (author)

  15. A framework for shear driven dissolution of thermally stable particles during friction stir welding and processing

    Palanivel, S. [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute, Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Arora, A. [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Palaj, Gandhinagar 382355, Gujarat (India); Doherty, K.J. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Science Division, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Mishra, R.S., E-mail: Rajiv.Mishra@unt.edu [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute, Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A framework is proposed to explain the dissolution and fragmentation of particles during friction stir welding and processing. Two major mechanisms dissolve the particle during the process: (i) thermally activated diffusion, and (ii) dislocation and grain boundary sweeping of atoms. We use a three-dimensional coupled viscoplastic flow and heat transfer model to quantify these mechanisms. For illustration purposes, calculations were done on a thermally stable Mg{sub 2}Y intermetallic that dissolved during processing. The framework is universal and applies to any second phase dissolution and fragmentation during friction stir welding and processing, thus enabling a science-based approach to tailor microstructures.

  16. TEM analysis of a friction stir-welded butt joint of Al-Si-Mg alloys

    Cabibbo, M.; Meccia, E.; Evangelista, E.

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure evolution of a joint of Al-Si-Mg alloys A6056-T4 and A6056-T6 has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Metallurgical investigations, hardness and mechanical tests were also performed to correlate the TEM investigations to the mechanical properties of the produced friction stir-welded butt joint. After friction stir-welding thermal treatment has been carried out at 530 deg. C followed by ageing at 160 deg. C (T6). The base material (T4) and the heat-treated one (T6) were put in comparison showing a remarkable ductility reduction of the joint after T6 treatment

  17. The Role of Friction Stir Welding in Nuclear Fuel Plate Fabrication

    Burkes, D.; Medvedev, P.; Chapple, M.; Amritkar, A.; Wells, P.; Charit, I

    2009-01-01

    The friction bonding process combines desirable attributes of both friction stir welding and friction stir processing. The development of the process is spurred on by the need to fabricate thin, high density, reduced enrichment fuel plates for nuclear research reactors. The work seeks to convert research and test reactors currently operating on highly enriched uranium fuel to operate on low enriched uranium fuel without significant loss in reactor performance, safety characteristics, or significant increase in cost. In doing so, the threat of global nuclear material proliferation will be reduced. Feasibility studies performed on the process show that this is a viable option for mass production of plate-type nuclear fuel. Adapting the friction stir weld process for nuclear fuel fabrication has resulted in the development of several unique ideas and observations. Preliminary results of this adaptation and process model development are discussed

  18. Metallurgical characterization of pulsed current gas tungsten arc, friction stir and laser beam welded AZ31B magnesium alloy joints

    Padmanaban, G.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the influences of welding processes such as friction stir welding (FSW), laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) on mechanical and metallurgical properties of AZ31B magnesium alloy. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-Ray diffraction technique were used to evaluate the metallurgical characteristics of welded joints. LBW joints exhibited superior tensile properties compared to FSW and PCGTAW joints due to the formation of finer grains in weld region, higher fusion zone hardness, the absence of heat affected zone, presence of uniformly distributed finer precipitates in weld region.

  19. An experimental study on joining of severe plastic deformed aluminium materials with friction welding method

    Sahin, Mumin [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)], E-mail: mumins@trakya.edu.tr; Erol Akata, H.; Ozel, Kaan [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, 5083 aluminium alloys, which were exposed to severe plastic deformation, were joined with friction welding method and the variation in mechanical properties of the joints was experimentally investigated. Severe plastic deformation methods can be classified as equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) (in other words, equal cross section lateral extrusion - ECSLE) and cyclic extrusion-compression. Aluminium alloy as test material 5083 and square cross-sectional equal channel angular pressing die for severe plastic deformation were used in the study. Firstly 5083 alloys, as purchased, were joined with friction welding method. The optimum parameters for friction time, upset time, friction pressure and upset pressure, which are necessary for welding, were obtained. Afterwards, 5083 aluminium materials as purchased were prepared as square cross-section and then 1-pass severe plastic deformation was applied to specimen by equal channel angular pressing die. The obtained parts as square form were prepared as cylindrical form by machining and then the parts were joined by continuous drive friction welding equipment that was designed and produced in laboratory conditions before. Later, the tensile strengths of the parts, obtained at optimum conditions, were compared with those of the joined parts as purchased form. Then, hardness variations and microstructures of joints were examined. Finally, the obtained results were commented on.

  20. Use of Friction Stir Welding and Friction Stir Processing for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Joining Applications

    J. I. Cole; J. F. Jue

    2006-01-01

    Application of the latest developments in materials technology may greatly aid in the successful pursuit of next generation reactor and transmutation technologies. One such area where significant progress is needed is joining of advanced fuels and materials. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for joining traditionally difficult to join materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology, first developed in 1991, has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. An overview of the FSW technology is provided and two specific nuclear fuels and materials applications where the technique may be used to overcome limitations of conventional joining technologies are highlighted

  1. Influence of Welding Time on Tensile-Shear Strength of Linear Friction Welded Birch (Betula pendula L. Wood

    Jussi Ruponen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to determine the optimal welding time for linear friction welding of birch (Betula pendula L. wood while keeping the other parameters constant and at similar levels compared to other species in a similar density range. Specimens with dimensions of 20 × 5 × 150 mm3 were welded together, and the influence of welding time (2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 s on the mechanical properties of the specimens was determined. The studies included a tensile-shear strength test as well as visual estimation of wood failure percentage (WFP. Additionally, X-ray microtomographic imaging was used to investigate and characterise the bond line properties as a non-destructive testing method. The highest mean tensile-shear strength, 7.9 MPa, was reached with a welding time of 3.5 s. Generally, all four result groups showed high, yet decreasing proportional standard deviations as the welding time increased. X-ray microtomographic images and analysis express the heterogeneity of the weld line clearly as well. According to the averaged group-wise results, WFP and tensile-shear strength correlated positively with an R2 of 0.93. An extrapolation of WFP to 65% totals a tensile-shear strength of 10.6 MPa, corresponding to four common adhesive bonds determined for beech.

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded and laser welded high entropy alloy CrMnFeCoNi

    Jo, Min-Gu; Kim, Han-Jin; Kang, Minjung; Madakashira, Phaniraj P.; Park, Eun Soo; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Kim, Dong-Ik; Hong, Sung-Tae; Han, Heung Nam

    2018-01-01

    The high entropy alloy CrMnFeCoNi has been shown to have promising structural properties. For a new alloy to be used in a structural application it should be weldable. In the present study, friction stir welding (FSW) and laser welding (LW) techniques were used to butt weld thin plates of CrMnFeCoNi. The microstructure, chemical homogeneity and mechanical behavior of the welds were characterized and compared with the base metal. The tensile stress-strain behavior of the welded specimens were reasonable when compared with that of the base metal. FSW refined the grain size in the weld region by a factor of ˜14 when compared with the base metal. High-angle annular dark field transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed chemical inhomogeneity between dendritic and interdendritic regions in the fusion zone of LW. Large fluctuations in composition (up to 15 at%) did not change the crystal structure in the fusion zone. Hardness measurements were carried out in the weld cross section and discussed in view of the grain size, low angle grain boundaries and twin boundaries in FSW specimens and the dendritic microstructure in LW specimens.

  3. Predicting tensile strength of friction stir welded AA6061 aluminium alloy joints by a mathematical model

    Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.

    2009-01-01

    AA6061 aluminium alloy (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. Compared to the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural aluminium alloys, friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force etc., and tool pin profile play a major role in deciding the joint strength. An attempt has been made to develop a mathematical model to predict tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA6061 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. Four factors, five levels central composite design has been used to minimize number of experimental conditions. Response surface method (RSM) has been used to develop the model. Statistical tools such as analysis of variance (ANOVA), student's t-test, correlation co-efficient etc. have been used to validate the developed model. The developed mathematical model can be effectively used to predict the tensile strength of FSW joints at 95% confidence level

  4. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    Noh, Sanghoon, E-mail: shnoh@kaeri.re.kr [Fusion Structural Materials Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Fusion Structural Materials Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  5. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    Noh, Sanghoon; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  6. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    Hu, Z.L.; Wang, X.S.; Pang, Q.; Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming

  7. Microstructural and mechanical behavior of friction welds in a high creep resistance magnesium alloy

    Pinheiro, G.A.; Olea, C.A.W.; dos Santos, J.F.; Kainer, K.U. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Institute for Materials Research, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Friction weldability of Mg based alloys has been worldwide discussed. Within this context the aim of this study was to investigate rotational friction welding of an Aluminum-Rare Earth based high creep resistance Mg alloy AE42HP from the viewpoint of thermo cycle-microstructure-performance relationships to evaluate the potential use of FW in joining modern Mg-alloys. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation on under-water friction stir welding of armour grade AA2519-T87 aluminium alloy

    Sree Sabari, S.; Malarvizhi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madusudhan Reddy, G.

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising welding process that can join age hardenable aluminium alloys with high joint efficiency. However, the thermal cycles experienced by the material to be joined during FSW resulted in the deterioration of mechanical properties due to the coarsening and dissolution of strengthening precipitates in the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ). Under water friction stir welding (UWFSW) is a variant of FSW process which can maint...

  9. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Haghshenas, M., E-mail: mhaghshe@uwaterloo.ca [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Nguyen, T. [Mechanical Systems Engineering, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Galloway, J. [Welding Engineering Technology, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  10. Global and Local Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Friction Stir Welds with Dissimilar Materials and/or Thicknesses

    Zadpoor, A.A.; Sinke, J.; Benedictus, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article studies the properties of a wide range of friction-stir-welded joints with dissimilar aluminum alloys or thicknesses. Two aluminum alloys, namely, 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study and are welded in ten different combinations of alloys and thicknesses. The welding

  11. Effect of Interfacial Reaction on the Mechanical Performance of Steel to Aluminum Dissimilar Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Li; Chen, Ying-Chun; Robson, Joe D.; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) have been investigated in dissimilar aluminum to steel welds, manufactured by high power (2.5 kW) ultrasonic spot welding (USW). To better understand the influence of alloy composition, welds were produced between a low-carbon steel (DC04) and two different aluminum alloys (6111 and 7055). The joint strengths were measured in lap shear tests and the formation and growth behavior of IMCs at the weld interface were characterized by electron microscopy, for welding times from 0.2 to 2.4 seconds. With the material combinations studied, the η (Fe2Al5) intermetallic phase was found to form first, very rapidly in the initial stage of welding, with a discontinuous island morphology. Continuous layers of η and then θ (FeAl3) phase were subsequently seen to develop on extending the welding time to greater than 0.7 second. The IMC layer formed in the DC04-AA7055 combination grew thicker than for the DC04-AA6111 welds, despite both weld sets having near identical thermal histories. Zinc was also found to be dissolved in the IMC phases when welding with the AA7055 alloy. After post-weld aging of the aluminum alloy, fracture in the lap shear tests always occurred along the joint interface; however, the DC04-AA6111 welds had higher fracture energy than the DC04-AA7055 combination.

  12. The Mechanism of Ultrasonic Vibration on Grain Refining and Degassing in GTA Spot Welding of Copper Joints.

    Al-Ezzi, Salih; Quan, Gaofeng; Elrayah, Adil

    2018-05-07

    This paper examines the effect of ultrasonic vibration (USV) on grain size and interrupted porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) spot-welded copper. Grain size was refined by perpendicularly attaching a transducer to the welded sheet and applying USV to the weld pool for a short time (0, 2, 4, and 6 s) in addition improvements to the degassing process. Results illustrate a significant reduction of grain size (57%). Notably, USV provided interaction between reformations (fragmentation) and provided nucleation points (detaching particles from the fusion line) for grains in the nugget zone and the elimination of porosity in the nugget zone. The GTA spot welding process, in conjunction with USV, demonstrated an improvement in the corrosion potential for a copper spot-welded joint in comparison to the joint welded without assistance of USV. Finally, welding of copper by GTA spot welding in conjunction with ultrasound for 2 s presented significant mechanical properties.

  13. The Effect of Tool Pin Shape of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) on Polypropylene

    Nik, Z. C.; Ishak, M.; Othman, N. H.

    2017-09-01

    This experiment deals with similar joining of polypropylene (PP) with thickness of 3 mm was carried out by using friction stir welding (FSW) technique. The process parameters, rotational speed, welding speed and tilt angle were fixed of experiments. The tool geometry shapes were the main parameters which were taken into consideration. The optimum designs of tool geometry shape were determined with reference to tensile strength of the joint. During the tensile testing experiment, the results show that all fractured occurs in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) on the polypropylene (PP). Results show that the optimum design can be obtained with same rotational speed, welding speed and tilt angle.

  14. Optimization of the Process Parameters for Controlling Residual Stress and Distortion in Friction Stir Welding

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, numerical optimization of the process parameters, i.e. tool rotation speed and traverse speed, aiming minimization of the two conflicting objectives, i.e. the residual stresses and welding time, subjected to process-specific thermal constraints in friction stir welding......, is investigated. The welding process is simulated in 2-dimensions with a sequentially coupled transient thermo-mechanical model using ANSYS. The numerical optimization problem is implemented in modeFRONTIER and solved using the Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA-II). An engineering-wise evaluation or ranking...

  15. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of friction stir welded joints in 2219-O aluminum alloy thick plate

    Xu Weifeng; Liu Jinhe

    2009-01-01

    Effect of welding parameters on the microstructure and pitting corrosion of different positions along the thickness of weld nugget zone in friction stir welded 2219-O aluminum alloy plate was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarization experiment and electrochemical impedance tests (EIS). It was found that the material presents significant passivation and the top has best corrosion resistance compared to the bottom and base material. Corrosion resistance decreases with the increase of traverse speed from 60 to 100 mm/min at rotary speed 400 rpm. Corrosion resistance at rotary speed 600 rpm is lower than that at 500 rpm.

  16. Microscopic analysis of the morphology of seams in friction stir welded polypropylene

    Z. Kiss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Supermolecular structure of welded seams prepared by friction stir welding (FSW of polypropylene sheets has been studied by optical and electron microscopy. It has been shown that in the central parts of the seam spherulitic structures similar to that of the base material are formed, while at the borderline of the seam, a complex supermolecular structure could be identified. Lower welding rotation speed resulted in a border transition zone of more complex feature than the higher rotation speed during FSW. This was accompanied by reduced joint efficiency.

  17. Friction Stir Welding: Standards and Specifications in Today's U.S. Manufacturing and Fabrication

    Ding, Robert Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    New welding and technology advancements are reflected in the friction stir welding (FSW) specifications used in the manufacturing sector. A lack of publicly available specifications as one of the reasons that the FSW process has not propagate through the manufacturing sectors. FSW specifications are an integral supporting document to the legal agreement written between two entities for deliverable items. Understanding the process and supporting specifications is essential for a successful FSW manufacturing operation. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of current FSW standards in the industry and discusses elements common to weld specifications.

  18. Elemental segregation during resistance spot welding of boron containing advanced high strength steels

    Amirthalingam, M.; Van der Aa, E.M.; Kwakernaak, C.; Hermans, M.J.M.; Richardson, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    The partitioning behaviour of carbon, phosphorous and boron during the solidification of a resistance spot weld pool was studied using experimental simulations and a phase field model. Steels with varying carbon, phosphorous and boron contents were designed and subjected to a range of resistant spot

  19. A Rotating Plug Model of Friction Stir Welding Heat Transfer

    Raghulapadu J. K.; Peddieson, J.; Buchanan, G. R.; Nunes, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    A simplified rotating plug model is employed to study the heat transfer phenomena associated with the fiction stir welding process. An approximate analytical solution is obtained based on this idealized model and used both to demonstrate the qualitative influence of process parameters on predictions and to estimate temperatures produced in typical fiction stir welding situations.

  20. Bearing Capacity of Resistance Spot Welding Under Conditions of Europe, Indonesia

    Miroslav Müller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A common attribute of production companies is a requirement for a bond creation. A resistance spot welding is a prospective method of bonding. An effect determination of environmental influences on mechanical properties of resistance spot welded bonds is necessary owing to export activities of particular companies. The operating conditions and degradation processes influence were examined in Central Europe, southeast Indonesia and laboratory during 2, 4 and 6 months. From the results the simulation was worked out serving for the prediction of the welded bond bearing capacity for longer time interval. The simulation was verified by the parametric testing during 80 months (Central Europe. The experimental determination of the climatic and geographic different environment influence on the bearing capacity of the resistance spot welded bonds was the aim of the laboratory testing. Considering the globalized society and the export possibilities the knowledge of the experimental study will be used for further testing.

  1. Experimental and computer simulation results of the spot welding process using SORPAS software

    Al-Jader, M A; Cullen, J D; Athi, N; Al-Shamma'a, A I

    2009-01-01

    The highly competitive nature of the automotive industry drives demand for improvements and increased precision engineering in resistance spot welding. Currently there are about 4300 weld points on the average steel vehicle. Current industrial monitoring systems check the quality of the nugget after processing 15 cars, once every two weeks. The nuggets are examined off line using a destructive process, which takes approximately 10 days to complete causing a long delay in the production process. This paper presents a simulation of the spot welding growth curves, along with a comparison to growth curves performed on an industrial spot welding machine. The correlation of experimental results shows that SORPAS simulations can be used as an off line measurement to reduce factory energy usage. The first section in your paper

  2. Mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of ODS steel friction stir welds at variable temperatures

    Dawson, H., E-mail: huwdawson@gmail.com [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Serrano, M.; Hernandez, R. [Structural Materials Division, Technology Department, CIEMAT, Avda de la Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cater, S. [Friction and Forge Processes Department, Joining Technologies Group, TWI Technology Centre (Yorkshire), Advanced Manufacturing Park, Wallis Way, Catcliffe, Rotherham S60 5TZ (United Kingdom); Jimenez-Melero, E. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-02

    We have assessed the microstructure and the temperature-dependent mechanical behaviour of five bead-on-plate friction stir welds of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steel, produced using systematic changes to the tool rotation and traverse speed. Friction stir welding can potentially retain the fine dispersion of nanoparticles, and therefore also the high-temperature strength and radiation damage resistance of these materials. Tensile testing was carried out on the MA956 base material at a range of temperatures, from room temperature up to 750 °C. The mechanical properties of the welds were investigated via tensile testing at room temperature and at 500 °C, together with micro-hardness testing. The welds exhibited similar strength and ductility to the base material at both testing temperatures as welding caused a partial loss of particle strengthening, alongside an increase in grain boundary strengthening due to a greatly refined grain size in the stir zones. The micro-hardness data revealed a trend of increasing hardness with increasing tool traverse speed or decreasing rotation speed. This was attributed to the smaller grain size and lower nanoparticle number density in the welds created with these parameters. At 500 °C, the yield stress and ultimate tensile stress of the base material and the welds decreased, due to a progressive reduction in both the Orowan-type particle strengthening and the grain boundary strengthening.

  3. Emission of nanoparticles during friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminium alloys.

    Gomes, J F; Miranda, R M; Santos, T J; Carvalho, P A

    2014-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is now well established as a welding process capable of joining some different types of metallic materials, as it was (1) found to be a reliable and economical way of producing high quality welds, and (2) considered a "clean" welding process that does not involve fusion of metal, as is the case with other traditional welding processes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the emission of particles during FSW in the nanorange of the most commonly used aluminum (Al) alloys, AA 5083 and AA 6082, originated from the Al alloy itself due to friction of the welding tool against the item that was being welded. Another goal was to measure Al alloys in the alveolar deposited surface area during FSW. Nanoparticles dimensions were predominantly in the 40- and 70-nm range. This study demonstrated that microparticles were also emitted during FSW but due to tool wear. However, the biological relevance and toxic manifestations of these microparticles remain to be determined.

  4. Microstructure and mechanical characterization of friction stir welded high strength low alloy steels

    Ramesh, R., E-mail: rameshsmit@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004, Tamilnadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006, Gauteng (South Africa); Kumar, Ravi, E-mail: nvrk@iitm.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, Tamilnadu (India); Akinlabi, E.T., E-mail: etakinlabi@uj.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006, Gauteng (South Africa)

    2017-02-27

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising technique to join HSLA steels without the problems encountered during fusion based welding processes. In the present work, 3 mm thick HSLA plates were successfully welded using FSW. A tool made of tungsten-rhenium alloy was used in this work. The relationship between microstructure and tensile strength was studied under various welding conditions i.e. change in traverse speed (57–97 mm/min). The microstructure of the weld nugget revealed the presence of upper bainite and fine ferrite phases. The amount of upper bainite reduced with increase in traverse speed. EBSD images showed a reducing trend for grain size. The details of hardness, tensile strength and bending test were reported.

  5. Mechanical evaluation of linear friction welds in titanium alloys through indentation experiments

    Corzo, M.; Casals, O.; Alcala, J.; Mateo, A.; Anglada, M.

    2005-01-01

    This article shows the results of a project that focuses on the characterization of the weld interface region of dissimilar joints between titanium alloys for aeronautical applications, specifically Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-6Mo with Ti-6Al-4V, and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-6Mo with Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo. The uniaxial flow stress and hardening response of the material containing the weld were analyzed following the finite elements simulations and mathematical formulations to correlate hardness and the amount of pile-up and sinking-in phenomena around sharp indenters with uniaxial mechanical properties. This allows to accurately stablishing the influence that welding process has on the mechanical response of the parts. Tests performed on these friction-welded specimens showed that the fine grained microstructures in the welds exhibited better properties than the base materials. (Author) 12 refs

  6. Microstructure and mechanical characterization of friction stir welded high strength low alloy steels

    Ramesh, R.; Dinaharan, I.; Kumar, Ravi; Akinlabi, E.T.

    2017-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising technique to join HSLA steels without the problems encountered during fusion based welding processes. In the present work, 3 mm thick HSLA plates were successfully welded using FSW. A tool made of tungsten-rhenium alloy was used in this work. The relationship between microstructure and tensile strength was studied under various welding conditions i.e. change in traverse speed (57–97 mm/min). The microstructure of the weld nugget revealed the presence of upper bainite and fine ferrite phases. The amount of upper bainite reduced with increase in traverse speed. EBSD images showed a reducing trend for grain size. The details of hardness, tensile strength and bending test were reported.

  7. Pengaruh waktu kontak terhadap kualitas sambungan hasil las gesek (Friction Welding Magnesium AZ-31

    Solihin Solihin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Pengelasan merupakan salah suatu proses penyambungan dua atau lebih bahan teknik, dengan atau tanpa peroses pencairan logam dasarnya. Teknologi Las Gesek (Friction Welding, FW merupakan salah satu teknik pengelasan padat atau pengelasan tanpa proses pencairan (solid-state welding. Pembangkitan panas dalam proses FW dihasilkan dengan cara menggesekkan permukaan material las (base metal hingga mencapai temperatur penyambungannya (semi-solid temperature atau sekitar 80% dari temperature cair bahan, dan dalam hal Magnesium AZ31 adalah sekitar temperatur 5500C. Setelah bahan mencapai temperatur semi-solid tersebut, kemudian diberi tekanan agar terjadi proses penyambungan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh variasi proses terhadap kualitas hasil pengelasan gesek, yang meliputi: kekuatan tarik, struktur makro, dan nilai kekerasan bahan hasil las. Parameter pengujiannya adalah variasi waktu kontak las, yaitu selama 3, 5, dan 10 menit. Kecepatan putar spindle selama proses pengelasan ditetapkan 1400 rpm. Hasil pengelasan menunjukkan bahwa waktu kontak gesek 3 menit menghasilkan kekuatan tarik tertinggi (16,78 MPa, bila dibandingkan dengan dua parameter lain. Hasil uji keras pada daerah las (stir zone menunjukkan angka kekerasan rata-rata yang relative konsisten, atau sebesar 60 HRE untuk semua parameter, sedangkan angka kekerasan rata-rata di daerah terpengaruh panas (heat affected zone, HAZ untuk waktu kontak gesek 3, 5 dan 10 menit secara berturut-turut adalah sebesar 69,6; 64,6; dan 60,6 HRE. Hasil penelitian awal ini memberikan potensi studi lanjutan pada berbagai parameter pengelasan lain agar didapatkan kualitas sambungan las gesek yang optimum untuk proses pengelasan gesek Magnesium AZ-31. Kata Kunci: Las gesek, Magnesium AZ-31, struktur makro, cacat void. Abstract: Welding is a process technology aiming to join two or more materials. Friction Welding (FW is including in a solid-state technology cluster, where the heat is

  8. Friction Stir Weld Application and Tooling Design for the Multi-purpose Crew Vehicle Stage Adapter

    Alcorn, John

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), commonly known as the Orion capsule, is planned to be the United States' next manned spacecraft for missions beyond low earth orbit. Following the cancellation of the Constellation program and creation of SLS (Space Launch System), the need arose for the MPCV to utilize the Delta IV Heavy rocket for a test launch scheduled for 2014 instead of the previously planned Ares I rocket. As a result, an adapter (MSA) must be used in conjunction with the MPCV to account for the variation in diameter of the launch vehicles; 5.5 meters down to 5.0 meters. Prior to ight article fabrication, a path nder (test article) will be fabricated to ne tune the associated manufacturing processes. The adapter will be comprised of an aluminum frustum (partial cone) that employs isogrid technology and circumferential rings on each end. The frustum will be fabricated by friction stir welding (FSW) three individual panels together on a Vertical Weld Tool (VWT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Subsequently, each circumferential ring will be friction stir welded to the frustum using a Robotic Weld Tool (RWT). The irregular geometry and large mass of the MSA require that extensive tooling preparation be put into support structures for the friction stir weld. The tooling on the VWT will be comprised of a set of conveyors mounted on pre-existing stanchions so that the MSA will have the ability to be rotated after each of the three friction stir welds. The tooling requirements to friction stir weld the rings with the RWT are somewhat more demanding. To support the mass of the MSA and resist the load of the weld tool, a system of mandrels will be mounted to stanchions and assembled in a circle. The goal of the paper will be to explain the design, fabrication, and assembly of the tooling, to explain the use of friction stir welding on the MSA path nder, and also to discuss the lessons learned and modi cations made in preparation for ight article fabrication

  9. Predicting failure response of spot welded joints using recent extensions to the Gurson model

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-01-01

    The plug failure modes of resistance spot welded shear-lab and cross-tension test specimens are studied, using recent extensions to the Gurson model. A comparison of the predicted mechanical response is presented when using either: (i) the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model (GTN-model), (ii...... is presented. The models are applied to predict failure of specimens containing a fully intact weld nugget as well as a partly removed weld nugget to address the problems of shrinkage voids or larger weld defects. All analysis are carried out by full 3D finite element modelling....

  10. Tensile strength and fatigue strength of 6061 aluminum alloy friction welded joints

    Ochi, H.; Tsujino, R. [Osaka Inst. of Tech., Asahi-ku Osaka (Japan); Sawai, T. [Osaka Sangyo Univ., Daito (Japan); Yamamoto, Y. [Setsunan Univ., Neyagawa (Japan); Ogawa, K. [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai (Japan); Suga, Y. [Keio Univ., Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Friction welding of 6061 aluminum alloy was carried out in order to examine the relationship between deformation heat input in the upset stage and joint performance. The joint performance was evaluated by tensile testing and fatigue testing. Stabilized tensile strength was obtained when the deformation heat input in the upset stage exceeded 200 J/s. Weld condition at the weld interface and the width of softened area affected fatigue strength more than tensile strength. That is, when the weld condition at the weld interface is good and the softened area is wide, fatigue strength increases. On the other hand, when the weld condition at the weld interface is good and the softened area is narrow, and when the weld condition at the weld interface is somewhat poor in spite of the wide softened area, fatigue strength decreases. The fatigue limit obtained by the fatigue testing revealed that, when the deformation heat input in the upset stage exceeded a certain value, sound joints could be produced. (orig.)

  11. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  12. Constitutive model of friction stir weld with consideration of its inhomogeneous mechanical properties

    Zhang, Ling; Min, Junying; Wang, Bin; Lin, Jianping; Li, Fangfang; Liu, Jing

    2016-03-01

    In practical engineering, finite element(FE) modeling for weld seam is commonly simplified by neglecting its inhomogeneous mechanical properties. This will cause a significant loss in accuracy of FE forming analysis, in particular, for friction stir welded(FSW) blanks due to the large width and good formability of its weld seam. The inhomogeneous mechanical properties across weld seam need to be well characterized for an accurate FE analysis. Based on a similar AA5182 FSW blank, the metallographic observation and micro-Vickers hardness analysis upon the weld cross-section are performed to identify the interfaces of different sub-zones, i.e., heat affected zone(HAZ), thermal-mechanically affected zone(TMAZ) and weld nugget(WN). Based on the rule of mixture and hardness distribution, a constitutive model is established for each sub-zone to characterize the inhomogeneous mechanical properties across the weld seam. Uniaxial tensile tests of the AA5182 FSW blank are performed with the aid of digital image correlation(DIC) techniques. Experimental local stress-strain curves are obtained for different weld sub-zones. The experimental results show good agreement with those derived from the constitutive models, which demonstrates the feasibility and accuracy of these models. The proposed research gives an accurate characterization of inhomogeneous mechanical properties across the weld seam produced by FSW, which provides solutions for improving the FE simulation accuracy of FSW sheet forming.

  13. A Finite Element Model to Simulate Defect Formation during Friction Stir Welding

    Zhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model is developed to predict and analyze the defect formation during friction stir welding based on coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method. The model is validated by comparing the estimated welding temperature, processed zone shape and void size with those obtained experimentally. The results compared indicate that the simulated temperature and the data measured are in good agreement with each other. In addition, the model can predict the plasticized zone shape and the presence of a void in the weld quite accurately. However, the void size is overestimated. The effects of welding parameters and tool pin profile are also analyzed. The results reveal that welding at low welding speed or high tool rotational speed could produce a smaller void. Moreover, compared to a smooth tool pin, a featured tool pin can enhance plastic flow in the weld and achieve defect-free weldment. The results are helpful for the optimization of the welding process and the design of welding tools.

  14. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    Al-Sarraf, Z; Lucas, M

    2012-01-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  15. An online real time ultrasonic NDT system for the quality control of spot welding in the automotive industry

    Athi, N; Wylie, S R; Cullen, J D; Al-Jader, M; Al-Shamma'a, A I; Shaw, A

    2009-01-01

    Resistance spot welding is the main joining technique used for the fabrication of body-in-white structures in the automotive industry. The quality of the welds depends on the profile of the spot welding electrode cap. The increased use of zinc coated steel in the industry increases wear rate of the caps, making quality control more difficult. This paper presents a novel online real time ultrasonic NDE system for resistance spot welding which evaluates every weld as it is formed. SEM results are presented to show the alloying of the electrode caps.

  16. An online real time ultrasonic NDT system for the quality control of spot welding in the automotive industry

    Athi, N.; Wylie, S. R.; Cullen, J. D.; Al-Jader, M.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Shaw, A.

    2009-07-01

    Resistance spot welding is the main joining technique used for the fabrication of body-in-white structures in the automotive industry. The quality of the welds depends on the profile of the spot welding electrode cap. The increased use of zinc coated steel in the industry increases wear rate of the caps, making quality control more difficult. This paper presents a novel online real time ultrasonic NDE system for resistance spot welding which evaluates every weld as it is formed. SEM results are presented to show the alloying of the electrode caps.

  17. Improving the particle distribution and mechanical properties of friction-stir-welded composites by using a smooth pin tool

    Liu, Huijie; Hu, Yanying; Zhao, Yunqiang; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a very promising technique for joining particle-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (PRAMCs), but with increase in the volume fraction of reinforcing particles, their distribution in welds becomes inhomogeneous. This leads to an inconsistent deformation of welds and their destruction at low stresses. In order to improve the weld microstructure, a smooth pin tool was used for the friction stir welding of AC4A + 30 vol.% SiC particle-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. The present work describes the effect of welding parameters on the characteristics of particle distribution and the mechanical properties of welds. The ultimate strength of weld reached, 309 MPa, was almost 190% of that of the basic material. The mechanism of SiC particle conglomeration is clearly illustrated by means of schematic illustrations.

  18. Influence of the welding temperature and the welding speed on the mechanical properties of friction stir welds in EN AW-2219-T87

    Bachmann, A.; Krutzlinger, M.; Zaeh, M. F.

    2018-06-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an innovative joining technique, which has proven to produce high quality joints in high strength aluminum alloys. Consequently, it is commonly used to manufacture lightweight aerospace structures with stringent requirements. For these structures, it is necessary to ensure a high ultimate tensile strength (UTS). Various studies have reported that the UTS is significantly influenced by the welding parameters. Samples welded with different parameter sets showed a considerably different UTS, despite being free from detectable welding defects (e.g. tunnel defect, voids, or lack of penetration). Based on the observations in the literature, a hypothesis was posed. The welding temperature along with the welding speed determine the UTS of the weld. This study aims to prove this hypothesis experimentally by using temperature-controlled FSW to join plates of EN AW-2219-T87 in butt joint configuration. The welded samples were examined using visual inspection, metallography, X-ray imaging, and uniaxial tensile tests. Finally, a statistical analysis was conducted. Hereby, the hypothesis was confirmed.

  19. Ductile damage development in friction stir welded aluminum (AA2024) joints

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2008-01-01

    Ductile damage development in a friction stir welded aluminum joint subjected to tension is analyzed numerically by FE-analysis, based on a total Lagrangian formulation. An elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation that accounts for nucleation and growth of microvoids is applied. Main focus...

  20. Friction stir weld-bonding defect inspection using phased array ultrasonic testing

    Fortunato, J.; Anand, C.; Braga, Daniel F.O.; Groves, R.M.; Moreira, P. M.G.P.; Infante, V

    2017-01-01

    Weight reduction is an important driver of the aerospace industry, which encourages the development of lightweight joining techniques to substitute rivet joints. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process that enables the production of lighter joints with a small performance reduction

  1. Friction stir welding of AA6082-T6 sheets: Numerical analysis and experimental tests

    Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.

    2004-01-01

    3D numerical simulation of the Friction Stir Welding process is developed with the aim to highlight the process mechanics in terms of metal flux and temperature, strain and strain rate distributions. The numerical results have been validated though a set of experimental tests

  2. An analysis to optimize the process parameters of friction stir welded ...

    The friction stir welding (FSW) of steel is a challenging task. Experiments are conducted here, with a tool having a conical pin of 0.4mm clearance. The process parameters are optimized by using the Taguchi technique based on Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array. Experiments have been conducted based on three process ...

  3. Structure and properties of fixed joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted friction-stir welding

    Fortuna, S. V., E-mail: s-fortuna@ispms.ru; Ivanov, K. V., E-mail: ikv@ispms.ru; Eliseev, A. A., E-mail: alan@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials ScienceTomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Tarasov, S. Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru; Ivanov, A. N., E-mail: ivan@ispms.ru; Rubtsov, V. E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru; Kolubaev, E. A., E-mail: eak@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials ScienceTomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    This paper deals with structure and properties of aluminum alloy 7475 and its joints obtained by friction stir welding including under ultrasonic action. Microhardness measurements show that ultrasonic action increases strength properties of the joints. Optical and transmission electron microscopy reveals that this effect is related to the precipitation of tertiary coherent S-and T-phase particles.

  4. Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding – Initial Studies Using a Space Mapping Technique

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process. The optimization is performed using a space mapping technique in which an analytical model is used along with the FEM model to be optimized. The results are compared to traditional gradient based optimization...

  5. Robust Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding Using Manifold Mapping Techniques

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Lahaye, Domenico; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a friction stir welding process taking robustness into account. The optimization problems are formulated with the goal of obtaining desired mean responses while reducing the variance of the response. We restrict ourselves to a thermal model of the process...

  6. Wear characteristics and defects analysis of friction stir welded joint of aluminium alloy 6061-t6

    Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Krolczyk, G.; Legutko, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), s. 128-135 ISSN 1507-2711 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Friction stir welding (FSW) * grinding machine * Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.145, year: 2016 http://www.ein.org.pl/2016-01-17

  7. In temperature forming of friction stir lap welds in aluminium alloys

    Bruni, Carlo; Cabibbo, Marcello; Greco, Luciano; Pieralisi, Massimiliano

    2018-05-01

    The objective of such investigation is the study in depth of the forming phase of welds realized on three sheet metal blanks in aluminium alloys by friction stir lap welding. Such forming phase was performed by upsetting at different constant forming temperatures varying from 200°C to 350°C with constant ram velocities of 0.01 and 0.1 mm/s. The temperature values were obtained by the use of heating strips applied on the upper tool and on the lower tool. It was observed an increase in the friction factor, acting at the upsetting tool-workpiece interface, with increasing temperature that is very useful in producing the required localized deformation with which to improve the weld. It was also confirmed that the forming phase allows to realize a required thickness in the weld area allowing to neglect the surficial perturbation produced by the friction stir welding tool shoulder. The obtained thickness could be subjected to springback when too low temperatures are considered.

  8. Ultrasonic evaluation of friction stud welded AA 6063/AISI 1030 steel joints

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Nagaraj, P.; Sujana, J. Angela Jennifa

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Friction stud welding of AA 6063 and AISI 1030 was done successfully. • Ultrasonic evaluation of interfacial properties. • EDX analysis confirms intermetallic compound (FeAl) in the interfacial region. - Abstract: Friction stud welding is a promising technique in many applications related to oil and gas industries. It is used to attach grating to offshore oil platforms in areas where arc welding is not permitted because of the risk of causing a fire or explosion. Attachment of anodes inside seawater discharge pipelines in a gas processing plant is performed by this process. This solid state joining process permits metal combinations such as welding of aluminum studs to steel which would be problematic with arc welding because of the formation of thick and brittle inter-metallic compounds. In the present work, AA 6063 is joined to AISI 1030 steel using friction stud welding machine. Properties that are of interest to manufacturing applications such as Young’s modulus, longitudinal velocity, bulk modulus and shear modulus are evaluated by means of an ultrasonic flaw detector. At the interface of the joint, there is an increase of 4.4%, 1.8%, 1.15% and 4.42% is observed for the properties Young’s modulus, longitudinal velocity, bulk modulus and shear modulus respectively. This is due to the formation of intermetallic compound and increase in hardness at the interfacial region. Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis confirms the presence of FeAl as the intermetallic compound. Scanning Electron Microscope evaluation shows the presence of an unbound zone at the center of the inner region which is due to the minimum rotational speed and low axial load experienced at that point. In the unbound zone, there is an incomplete bond between dissimilar metals and it is detrimental to joint strength. Optimum value of friction time and usage of pure aluminum interlayer during the friction stud welding process hinders the formation of unbound zone and enhances the

  9. On Post-Weld Heat Treatment of a Single Crystal Nickel-Based Superalloy Joint by Linear Friction Welding

    T. J. Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three types of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT, i.e. solution treatment + primary aging + secondary aging (I, secondary aging (II, and primary aging + secondary aging (III, were applied to a single crystal nickel-based superalloy joint made with linear friction welding (LFW. The results show that the grains in the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ coarsen seriously and the primary γ' phase in the TMAZ precipitates unevenly after PWHT I. The primary γ' phase in the TMAZ and weld zone (WZ precipitates insufficiently and fine granular secondary γ' phase is observed in the matrix after PWHT II. After PWHT III, the primary γ' phase precipitates more sufficiently and evenly compared to PWHTs I and II. Moreover, the grains in the TMAZ have not coarsened seriously and fine granular secondary γ' phase is not found after PWHT III. PWHT III seems more suitable to the LFWed single crystal nickel-based superalloy joints when performing PWHT.

  10. Spatially resolved ultrasonic attenuation in resistance spot welds: implications for nondestructive testing.

    Mozurkewich, George; Ghaffari, Bita; Potter, Timothy J

    2008-09-01

    Spatial variation of ultrasonic attenuation and velocity has been measured in plane parallel specimens extracted from resistance spot welds. In a strong weld, attenuation is larger in the nugget than in the parent material, and the region of increased attenuation is surrounded by a ring of decreased attenuation. In the center of a stick weld, attenuation is even larger than in a strong weld, and the low-attenuation ring is absent. These spatial variations are interpreted in terms of differences in grain size and martensite formation. Measured frequency dependences indicate the presence of an additional attenuation mechanism besides grain scattering. The observed attenuations do not vary as commonly presumed with weld quality, suggesting that the common practice of using ultrasonic attenuation to indicate weld quality is not a reliable methodology.

  11. Heat transfer and fluid flow during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    He, X; Debroy, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and velocity fields during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel was studied using a transient, heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the weld pool. The weld pool geometry, weld thermal cycles and various solidification parameters were calculated. The fusion zone geometry, calculated from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model, was in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values for various welding conditions. Dimensional analysis was used to understand the importance of heat transfer by conduction and convection and the roles of various driving forces for convection in the weld pool. During solidification, the mushy zone grew at a rapid rate and the maximum size of the mushy zone was reached when the pure liquid region vanished. The solidification rate of the mushy zone/liquid interface was shown to increase while the temperature gradient in the liquid zone at...

  12. Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Tubes by Means of Tube Bulge Test

    D'Urso, G.; Longo, M.; Giardini, C.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints are generally evaluated by means of conventional tensile test. This testing method might provide insufficient information because maximum strain obtained in tensile test before necking is small; moreover, the application of tensile test is limited when the joint path is not linear or even when the welds are executed on curved surfaces. Therefore, in some cases, it would be preferable to obtain the joints properties from other testing methods. Tube bulge test can be a valid solution for testing circumferential or longitudinal welds executed on tubular workpieces. The present work investigates the mechanical properties and the formability of friction stir welded tubes by means of tube bulge tests. The experimental campaign was performed on tubular specimens having a thickness of 3 mm and an external diameter of 40 mm, obtained starting from two semi-tubes longitudinally friction stir welded. The first step, regarding the fabrication of tubes, was performed combining a conventional forming process and friction stir welding. Sheets in Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy AA6060 T6 were adopted for this purpose. Plates having a dimension of 225x60 mm were bent (with a bending axis parallel to the main dimension) in order to obtain semi-tubes. A particular care was devoted to the fabrication of forming devices (punch and die) in order to minimize the springback effects. Semi-tubes were then friction stir welded by means of a CNC machine tool. Some preliminary tests were carried out by varying the welding parameters, namely feed rate and rotational speed. A very simple tool having flat shoulder and cylindrical pin was used. The second step of the research was based on testing the welded tubes by means of tube bulge test. A specific equipment having axial actuators with a conical shape was adopted for this study. Some analyses were carried out on the tubes bulged up to a certain pressure level. In particular, the burst pressure and the

  13. Thermal Management in Friction-Stir Welding of Precipitation-Hardening Aluminum Alloys

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Reynolds, Anthony

    2015-05-25

    Process design and implementation in FSW is mostly dependent on empirical information gathered through experience. Basic science of friction stir welding and processing can only be complete when fundamental interrelationships between process control parameters and response variables and resulting weld microstructure and properties are established to a reasonable extent. It is known that primary process control parameters like tool rotation and translation rate and forge axis force have complicated and interactive relationships to the process response variables such as peak temperature, time at temperature etc. Of primary influence to the other process response parameters are temperature and its gradient at the deformation and heat affected zones. Through review of pertinent works in the literature and some experimental results from boundary condition work performed in precipitation hardening aluminum alloys this paper will partially elucidate the nature and effects of temperature transients caused by variation of thermal boundaries in Friction Stir Welding.

  14. Microstructure and anisotropic mechanical behavior of friction stir welded AA2024 alloy sheets

    Zhang, Zhihan [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Li, Wenya, E-mail: liwy@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Li, Jinglong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Chao, Y.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Vairis, A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, TEI of Crete, Heraklion, Crete 71004 (Greece)

    2015-09-15

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSW) AA2024-T3 alloy joints were investigated based on the uniaxial tensile tests. The joint microstructure was examined by using electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Results show that the evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in the FSW joints. With the increase of loading angle from 0° to 90° the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the specimens consistently decrease, or at first decrease and then increase, depending on the FSW process parameters. The specimen cut from the weld direction, i.e. a loading angle of 0°, exhibits the highest strength and elongation. - Highlights: • Microstructure and anisotropy of friction stir welded joints were studied. • The evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in joints. • The lowest yield stress and UTS are at 45° and 60° loadings, respectively. • Rotation speed heavily impact on the anisotropy of joints.

  15. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    Han, Wentuo; Kimura, Akihiko; Tsuda, Naoto; Serizawa, Hisashi; Chen, Dongsheng; Je, Hwanil; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Ha, Yoosung; Morisada, Yoshiaki; Noto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  16. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    Han, Wentuo, E-mail: hanwentuo@hotmail.com [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tsuda, Naoto [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Serizawa, Hisashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Chen, Dongsheng [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ha, Yoosung [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Noto, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  17. Microstructure and anisotropic mechanical behavior of friction stir welded AA2024 alloy sheets

    Zhang, Zhihan; Li, Wenya; Li, Jinglong; Chao, Y.J.; Vairis, A.

    2015-01-01

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSW) AA2024-T3 alloy joints were investigated based on the uniaxial tensile tests. The joint microstructure was examined by using electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Results show that the evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in the FSW joints. With the increase of loading angle from 0° to 90° the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the specimens consistently decrease, or at first decrease and then increase, depending on the FSW process parameters. The specimen cut from the weld direction, i.e. a loading angle of 0°, exhibits the highest strength and elongation. - Highlights: • Microstructure and anisotropy of friction stir welded joints were studied. • The evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in joints. • The lowest yield stress and UTS are at 45° and 60° loadings, respectively. • Rotation speed heavily impact on the anisotropy of joints

  18. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects.

    Hain, Karin; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pikart, Philip; Böni, Peter

    2010-04-01

    A friction stir welded (FSW) Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk.

  19. A study on heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding on a rotation affected zone

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon; Kim, Jae Woong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, as interest in environmental protection and energy conservation rose, technological development for lightweight efficiency of transport equipment, such as aircrafts, railcars, automobiles and vessels, have been briskly proceeding. This has led to an expansion of the application of lightweight alloys such as aluminum and magnesium. For the welding of these lightweight alloys, friction stir welding has been in development by many researchers. Heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding is one such research. The flow and energy equation is solved using the computational fluid dynamic commercial program 'Fluent'. In this study, a rotation affected zone concept is imposed. The rotation affected zone is a constant volume. In this volume, flow is rotated the same as the tool rotation speed and so plastic dissipation occurs. Through this simulation, the temperature distribution results are calculated and the simulation results are compared with the experimental results.

  20. Friction stir welding - an alternative method for sealing nuclear waste storage canisters

    Andrews, R.E. [TWI Ltd, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    When welding 50 mm thick copper a very high heat input is required to combat the high thermal diffusivity and only the Electron Beam Welding (EBW) process had this capability when this copper canister concept was conceived. Despite the encouraging results achieved using EBW with thick section copper, SKB felt that it would be prudent to assess other joining methods. This assessment concluded that friction welding, could also provide very high quality welds to satisfy the service life requirements of the SKB canister design. A friction welding variant called Friction Stir Welding (FSW) was shown to have the capability of welding 3 mm thick copper sheet with excellent integrity and reproducibility. This later provided sufficient encouragement for SKB to consider the potential of FSW as a method for joining thick section copper, using relatively simple machine tool based technology. It was thought that FSW might provide an alternative or complementary method for welding lids, or bases to canisters. In 1997 an FSW development programme started at TWI, focussed on the feasibility of welding 10 mm thick copper plate. Once this task was successfully completed, work continued to demonstrate that progressively thicker plate, up to 50 mm thick, could be joined. At this stage, with process viability established, a full size experimental FSW canister machine was designed and built. Work with this machine finished in January 2003, when it had been shown that FSW could definitely be used to weld lids to full size canisters. This report summarises the TWI development of FSW for SKB from 1997 to January 2003. It also highlights the important aspects of the process and the project milestones that will help to ensure that SKB has a welding technology that can be used with confidence for production fabrication of copper waste storage canisters in the future. The overall conclusion to this FSW development is that there is no doubt that the FSW process could be used to produce full

  1. Friction stir welding - an alternative method for sealing nuclear waste storage canisters

    Andrews, R.E.

    2004-12-01

    When welding 50 mm thick copper a very high heat input is required to combat the high thermal diffusivity and only the Electron Beam Welding (EBW) process had this capability when this copper canister concept was conceived. Despite the encouraging results achieved using EBW with thick section copper, SKB felt that it would be prudent to assess other joining methods. This assessment concluded that friction welding, could also provide very high quality welds to satisfy the service life requirements of the SKB canister design. A friction welding variant called Friction Stir Welding (FSW) was shown to have the capability of welding 3 mm thick copper sheet with excellent integrity and reproducibility. This later provided sufficient encouragement for SKB to consider the potential of FSW as a method for joining thick section copper, using relatively simple machine tool based technology. It was thought that FSW might provide an alternative or complementary method for welding lids, or bases to canisters. In 1997 an FSW development programme started at TWI, focussed on the feasibility of welding 10 mm thick copper plate. Once this task was successfully completed, work continued to demonstrate that progressively thicker plate, up to 50 mm thick, could be joined. At this stage, with process viability established, a full size experimental FSW canister machine was designed and built. Work with this machine finished in January 2003, when it had been shown that FSW could definitely be used to weld lids to full size canisters. This report summarises the TWI development of FSW for SKB from 1997 to January 2003. It also highlights the important aspects of the process and the project milestones that will help to ensure that SKB has a welding technology that can be used with confidence for production fabrication of copper waste storage canisters in the future. The overall conclusion to this FSW development is that there is no doubt that the FSW process could be used to produce full

  2. Analysis and Modelling of Electrode Wear in Resistance Spot Welding

    Madsen, Anders; Pedersen, Kim; Friis, Kasper Storgaard

    2010-01-01

    A model describing electrode wear as a function of weld number, initial tip diameter, truncated cone angle, welding current and electrode force is proposed. Excellent agreement between the model and experimental results is achieved, showing that the model can describe the change in electrode tip...... diameter with increasing weld number at different weld settings. Furthermore a method for measuring the worn tip diameter in a fast and robust manner is developed. The method relies on a well-known technique for capturing the electrode tip area by the use of carbon imprints and a new developed image...... a central cavity is formed and one where smaller pits are formed randomly across the electrode face. The influence of these two types of surface pits on the nugget size are investigated using the FE code SORPAS, revealing ring welds and undersized weld nuggets....

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel relative to different heat input

    Aydin, Hakan, E-mail: hakanay@uludag.edu.tr [Engineering and Architecture Faculty, Mechanical Engineering Department, Uludag University, 16059 Gorukle-Bursa (Turkey); Nelson, Tracy W. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, 435 CTB, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of the hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel at different heat inputs. Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness. Heat input during friction stir welding process had a significant influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the hard zone along the advancing side of the weld nugget. Based on the results, the linear relationships between heat input and post-weld microstructures and mechanical properties in the hard zone of friction stir welded X80 steels were established. It can be concluded that with decrease in heat input the bainitic structure in the hard zone becomes finer and so hard zone strength increases.

  4. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel relative to different heat input

    Aydin, Hakan; Nelson, Tracy W.

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of the hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel at different heat inputs. Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness. Heat input during friction stir welding process had a significant influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the hard zone along the advancing side of the weld nugget. Based on the results, the linear relationships between heat input and post-weld microstructures and mechanical properties in the hard zone of friction stir welded X80 steels were established. It can be concluded that with decrease in heat input the bainitic structure in the hard zone becomes finer and so hard zone strength increases

  5. Microstructural variation through weld thickness and mechanical properties of peened friction stir welded 6061 aluminum alloy joints

    Abdulstaar, Mustafa A., E-mail: mustafa.abdulstaar@gmail.com [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Clausthal University of Technology, Agricolastr. 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Al-Fadhalah, Khaled J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering & Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Wagner, Lothar [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Clausthal University of Technology, Agricolastr. 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The current study examined the effect of microstructure variation on the development of mechanical properties in friction stir welded joints of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, which were subsequently processed by shot peening (SP). Following to FSW, fatigue specimens were extracted perpendicularly to the welding direction. Surface Skimming to 0.5 mm from crown and root sides of the joint was made and SP was later applied on the two sides using ceramic shots of two different Almen intensities of 0.18 mmA and 0.24 mmA. Microstructural examination by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) indicated variation in the grain refinement of the weld zone, with coarsest grains (5 μm) at the crown side and finest grains (2 μm) at the root side. Reduction of microhardness to 60 HV occurred in the weld zone for samples in FSW condition. Application of SP promoted significant strain hardening at the crown side, with Almen intensities of 0.24 mmA providing maximum increase in microhardness to 120 HV. On the contrary, only a maximum microhardness of 75 HV was obtained at the root side. The difference in strain hardening capability at the two sides was strongly dependent on grain size. The two Almen intensities produced similar distribution of compressive residual stresses in the subsurface regions that led to enhance the fatigue strength to the level of base metal for N ≥ 10{sup 5} cycles. Yet, the increase in fatigue strength was more pronounced with increasing Almen intensity to 0.24 mmA, demonstrating further enhancement by strain hardening. - Highlights: • Grain refinement was observed after friction stir welding of AA 6061-T6. • Reduction in microhardness and fatigue strength were obtained after welding. • Variation in grain refinement led to different hardening behavior after peening. • Shot peening induced beneficial compressive residual stresses. • Shot peening and surface skimming markedly improved the fatigue performance.

  6. Microstructural and mechanical properties on friction welding of dissimilar metals used in motor vehicles

    Jesudoss Hynes, N. Rajesh; Shenbaga Velu, P.

    2018-02-01

    In the last two decades, major car manufacturing companies are exploring the possibilities of joining magnesium with aluminium, via friction welding technique for many crucial automotive applications. Our primary objective, is to carry out an experimental investigation in order to study the behaviour of dissimilar joints. The microscopic structure at the welded joint interface was analysed using an optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope. It was found that, by increasing the value of friction time, the value of the tensile strength increases and the result of tensile strength is found to be 120 MPa at a friction time of 10 s. Micro hardness was found to be higher at the interface of the weldment due to the development of a brittle intermetallic compound. Micro structural studies using SEM reveals, distinct zones such as an unaffected parent metal zone, the heat affected zone, a thermo-mechanically affected zone and a fully deformed plasticised zone.

  7. Effect of microstructural variation on the Cu/CK45 carbon steel friction weld joint

    Lee, W.B.; Jung, S.B. [Advanced Materials and Process Research Center for IT, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Gyounggi-do (Korea)

    2003-12-01

    The mechanical properties of friction-welded pure Cu/CK45 carbon steel joints have been studied. The joint strength increased with increasing upset pressure till it reached a critical value. However, the joint strength was fixed at a low strength with increasing friction time, compared to that of the Cu base metal. The hardness near the interface at the Cu side was softer than that of the base metal due to the dynamically recrystallized and annealed grain. The width of the softened region became wider with increasing friction time and decreasing upset pressure. But the hardness of the CK45 carbon steel side showed a slightly higher value than that of the base metal. This result was explained by the formation of martensite structure at the CK45 carbon steel side during the welding process. (orig.)

  8. Optimizing friction stir weld parameters of aluminum and copper using conventional milling machine

    Manisegaran, Lohappriya V.; Ahmad, Nurainaa Ayuni; Nazri, Nurnadhirah; Noor, Amirul Syafiq Mohd; Ramachandran, Vignesh; Ismail, Muhammad Tarmizizulfika; Ahmad, Ku Zarina Ku; Daruis, Dian Darina Indah

    2018-05-01

    The joining of two of any particular materials through friction stir welding (FSW) are done by a rotating tool and the work piece material that generates heat which causes the region near the FSW tool to soften. This in return will mechanically intermix the work pieces. The first objective of this study is to join aluminum plates and copper plates by means of friction stir welding process using self-fabricated tools and conventional milling machine. This study also aims to investigate the optimum process parameters to produce the optimum mechanical properties of the welding joints for Aluminum plates and Copper plates. A suitable tool bit and a fixture is to be fabricated for the welding process. A conventional milling machine will be used to weld the aluminum and copper. The most important parameters to enable the process are speed and pressure of the tool (or tool design and alignment of the tool onto the work piece). The study showed that the best surface finish was produced from speed of 1150 rpm and tool bit tilted to 3°. For a 200mm × 100mm Aluminum 6061 with plate thickness of 2 mm at a speed of 1 mm/s, the time taken to complete the welding is only 200 seconds or equivalent to 3 minutes and 20 seconds. The Copper plates was successfully welded using FSW with tool rotation speed of 500 rpm, 700 rpm, 900 rpm, 1150 rpm and 1440 rpm and with welding traverse rate of 30 mm/min, 60 mm/min and 90 mm/min. As the conclusion, FSW using milling machine can be done on both Aluminum and Copper plates, however the weld parameters are different for the two types of plates.

  9. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: ► FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. ► The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. ► The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. ► The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  10. Twin-spot laser welding of advanced high-strength multiphase microstructure steel

    Grajcar, Adam; Morawiec, Mateusz; Różański, Maciej; Stano, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The study addresses the results concerning the laser welding of TRIP (TRansformation Induced Plasticity) steel using a beam focused at two spots (also referred to as twin-spot laser welding). The analysis involved the effect of variable welding thermal cycles on the properties and microstructure of welded joints. The tests were performed using a linear energy of 0.048 and 0.060 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 50%:50%, 60%:40% and 70%:30%. The tests also involved welding performed using a linear energy of 0.150 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 70%:30%. In addition, the research included observations of the microstructure of the fusion zone, heat affected zone and the transition zone using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The fusion zone was composed of blocky-lath martensite whereas the HAZ (heat-affected zone) was characterised by the lath microstructure containing martensite, bainite and retained austenite. The distribution of twin-spot laser beam power significantly affected the microstructure and hardness profiles of welded joints. The highest hardness (480-505 HV), regardless of welding variants used, was observed in the HAZ.

  11. Effect of Pin Geometry on the Mechanical Strength of Friction-Stir-Welded Polypropylene Composite Plates

    Kordestani, F.; Ashenai Ghasemi, F.; Arab, N. B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process, which has successfully been applied in aerospace and automotive industries for joining materials. The friction stir tool is the key element in the FSW process. In this study, the effect of four different tool pin geometries on the mechanical properties of two types of polypropylene composite plates, with 30% glass and carbon fiber, respectively, were investigated. For this purpose, four pins of different geometry, namely, a threaded-tapered pin, square pin, four-flute threaded pin, and threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer were made and used to carry out the butt welding of 5-mm-thick plates. The standard tensile and Izod impact tests were performed to evaluate the tensile strength and impact toughness of welded specimens. The results indicated that the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer produced welds with a better surface appearance and higher tensile and impact strengths. The tests also showed that, with the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer, the impact strength of the glass- and carbon-fiber composite welds were about 40 and 50%, respectively, of that of the base materials.

  12. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    Abbasi, Mahmoud [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Behrouz [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keivani, Rasoul [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  13. The Effect of Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V

    Nasresfahani, Ali Reza; Soltanipur, Abdol Reza; Farmanesh, Khosro; Ghasemi, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Fusion welding can deteriorate corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. However, the use of friction stir welding leads to a more appropriate corrosion resistance. In this study, the corrosion resistance of welded zones of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using friction stir welding technique is evaluated. For these purposes, the study of structural characteristics using SEM and FESEM equipped with EDS micro-analyses was conducted. Micro-hardness test was also employed to estimate the hardness of welded zones. Corrosion behavior was investigated by a potentiostat instrument. SEM micrographs, EDS and XRD analyses confirmed non-uniformity of chemical composition within the welded zones. The results reveal that the stir zone contains typical alpha and prior beta phases. Nevertheless, thermomechanical zone included equiaxed and bimodal lamellae structure. Furthermore, the presence of different types of phases and microstructure in the thermomechanical zone led to reduced corrosion resistance. The corresponding values of corrosion current density in the stir zone, thermomechanical zone and base metal were 0.048, 0.55 and 0.032 µA, respectively. Corresponding corrosion potential for these zones was estimated as -207, -110 and -157 mV. Evidently, the results show that corrosion resistance of thermomechanical zone is less than that of the stir zone and both zones have lower value than the base metal.

  14. Mechanical properties and microstructural evaluation of AA1100 to AZ31 dissimilar friction stir welds

    Azizieh, M., E-mail: azizieh@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ahvaz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi Alavijeh, A. [School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering, Simon Fraser University, 250-13450 102 Avenue, Surrey, BC V3T 0A3 (Canada); Abbasi, M. [High Temperature Energy Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Balak, Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ahvaz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kim, H.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar friction stir welds of AA1100 and AZ31 were investigated to understand the effects of rotational and travel speed as well as pin position. The tensile results of welded samples revealed that the sound welds were formed when the stirring pin deviated from the centreline to the AZ31 side. The X-ray diffraction shows that Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} and Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} intermetallics formation occurs in the stir zone during the welding process. High hardness of these intermetallic phases increased the hardness of the stir zone to 110 Hv. The best tensile results were obtained in the sample processed in the range of 28–32 (rev/mm) rotational to travel speed ratio. - Highlights: • For Al to Mg friction stir welding, tool offset must be to Mg side. • There is an optimum rotational speed for obtain the highest strength. • Intermetallics form in any welding condition. • The volume fraction of intermetallic is directly related to FSW peak temperature.

  15. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    Abbasi, Mahmoud; Bagheri, Behrouz; Keivani, Rasoul

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  16. Corrosion Properties of Cryorolled AA2219 Friction Stir Welded Joints Using Different Tool Pin Profiles

    Kamal Babu, K.; Panneerselvam, K.; Sathiya, P.; Noorul Haq, A.; Sundarrajan, S.; Mastanaiah, P.; Srinivasa Murthy, C. V.

    The purpose of this paper is to present the corrosion behavior of the Cryorolled (CR) material and its Friction Stir Welded joints. Due to the thermal cycles of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process, the corrosion behavior of the material gets affected. Here, the cryorolling process was carried out on AA2219 alloy and CR material was joined by FSW process using four different pin tool profiles such as cylindrical, threaded cylindrical, square and hexagonal pin. The FSW joints were analyzed by corrosion resistance with the help of potentiodynamic polarization test with 3.5% NaCl solution. From the analysis, it is found that CR AA2219 material exhibits good corrosion resistance compared to the base AA2219 material, and also a hexagonal pin profile FSW joint exhibits high corrosion resistance. Among the weld joints created by four different tools, the lowest corrosion resistance was found in the cylindrical pin tool FSW welds. Further, the corroded samples were investigated through metallurgical investigations like OM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). It was found that the amount of dissolution of Al2Cu precipitate was present in the weld nugget. The amount of dissolution of Al2Cu precipitate is higher in the weld nugget produced by hexagonal pin tool. This is due to the enhancement of the corrosion resistance.

  17. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of DSS–Cu joints

    Shokri, V., E-mail: v.shokri@modares.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, A. [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, M.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-02

    Dissimilar joining of copper to duplex stainless steel (DSS) is challenging at high temperatures of fusion welding owing to the large difference in physical properties of the base metals. To reduce negative effects of welding at high temperatures, solid state welding at lower temperatures has been proposed. To study different effects of welding parameters (rotation speed, travel speed and tool offset) on weld zone microstructure and mechanical properties butt joints of a copper alloy and duplex stainless steel (DSS) were produced by friction stir welding (FSW). It has been found that heat input generated by the interaction of different welding conditions has a significant effect on the formation of a brittle intermetallic at the interface and eventually the final mechanical properties. At low heat inputs, mixing of the two sides is insufficient and metallurgical bonding is weak; while at high heat inputs, the thickness of the formed intermetallic is too thick which causes stress concentration at the interface and premature failure. An optimum welding condition was found (rotation speed of 1200 rpm, travel speed of 30 mm/min and tool offset of 0.5 mm) which almost reached the mechanical properties of the Cu-alloy monolayer.

  18. Numerically Based Phase Transformation Maps for Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys Joined by Friction Stir-Welding

    Carter Hamilton

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheets of aluminum 2017A-T451 and 7075-T651 were friction stir-welded in a butt-weld configuration. An existing computational model of the welding process for temperature distribution and material flow was adapted to estimate the phase transformations that occur across the weld zone. Near the weld center, process temperatures are sufficient to fully dissolve the equilibrium η phase in 7075 and partially dissolve the equilibrium S phase in 2017A. Upon cooling, Guinier–Preston (GP and Guinier–Preston–Bagaryatsky (GPB zones re-precipitate, and hardness recovers. Due to the more complete dissolution of the equilibrium phase in 7075, the hardness recovery skews toward whichever side of the weld, i.e., the advancing or retreating side, represents the 7075 workpiece. Phase transformation maps generated by the numerical simulation align not only with the hardness profiles taken across the weld zone, but also with positron lifetimes obtained through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS. Boundaries between the aluminum matrix and the secondary phases provide open volumes to trap positrons; therefore, positron lifetimes across the weld correspond with the phase transformations that occur in 7075 and 2017A during processing.

  19. Friction Stir Welding of three dissimilar aluminium alloy used in aeronautics industry

    Boşneag, A.; Constantin, M. A.; Niţu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an innovative solid-state joining process. This process was, in first time, develop to join the similar aluminum plates but now the technology can be used to weld a large area of materials similar or dissimilar. Taking these into account FSW process, for dissimilar materials are increasingly required, more than traditional arc welding, in industrial environment. More than that FSW is used in aeronautics industry because of very good result and very good weldability between aluminum alloy used at building of airplanes, where the body of airplane are 20% aluminum alloy and this percent can be increaser in future. In this paper is presented an experimental study which includes welding three dissimilar aluminum alloy, with different properties, used in aeronautics industry, this materials are: AA 2024, AA6061 and AA7075. After welding with different parameters, the welding join and welding process will be analyzed considering process temperature, process vertical force, and roughnessof welding seams, visual aspect and microhardness.

  20. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    Ilija KOVACEVIC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Presented are the basic analytical formulations for the definition of temperature fields. Analysis of influential parameters of welding FSW technology at the zone of the weld material and mechanical properties of the realized joint was performed. Influential welding parameters were defined based on tool geometry, technological parameters of processing and the axial load of tool. Specific problems with the FSW process are related to gaps (holes left behind by a tool at the end of the process and inflexibility of welding regarding the degree of variation of material thickness. Numerical simulation of process welding FSW proceeding was carried out on the example of Aluminum Alloy (AA 2219 using the ANSYS Mechanical ADPL (Transient Thermal software package. The defined was the temperature field in the welding process at specified time intervals.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10022

  1. Influences of Laser Spot Welding on Magnetic Property of a Sintered NdFeB Magnet

    Baohua Chang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser welding has been considered as a promising method to join sintered NdFeB permanent magnets thanks to its high precision and productivity. However, the influences of laser welding on the magnetic property of NdFeB are still not clear. In the present paper, the effects of laser power on the remanence (Br were experimentally investigated in laser spot welding of a NdFeB magnet (N48H. Results show that the Br decreased with the increase of laser power. For the same welding parameters, the Br of magnets, that were magnetized before welding, were much lower than that of magnets that were magnetized after welding. The decrease in Br of magnets after laser welding resulted from the changes in microstructures and, in turn, the deterioration of magnetic properties in the nugget and the heat affected zone (HAZ in a laser weld. It is recommended that the dimensions of nuggets and HAZ in laser welds of a NdFeB permanent magnet should be as small as possible, and the magnets should be welded before being magnetized in order to achieve a better magnetic performance in practical engineering applications.

  2. Thermo-Mechanical Calculations of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding at Equal Diameter Copper Bars and Effects of Essential Parameters on Dependent Special Variables

    Parsa, M. H.; Davari, H.; Hadian, A. M.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2007-01-01

    Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding is a modified type of common rotary friction welding processes. In this welding method parameters such as pressure, angular velocity and time of welding control temperature, stress, strain and their variations. These dependent factors play an important rule in defining optimum process parameters combinations in order to improve the design and manufacturing of welding machines and quality of welded parts. Thermo-mechanical simulation of friction welding has been carried out and it has been shown that, simulation is an important tool for prediction of generated heat and strain at the weld interface and can be used for prediction of microstructure and evaluation of quality of welds. For simulation of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding, a commercial finite element program has been used and the effects of pressure and rotary velocity of rotary part on temperature and strain variations have been investigated

  3. Thermo-Mechanical Calculations of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding at Equal Diameter Copper Bars and Effects of Essential Parameters on Dependent Special Variables

    Parsa, M. H.; Davari, H.; Hadian, A. M.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2007-05-01

    Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding is a modified type of common rotary friction welding processes. In this welding method parameters such as pressure, angular velocity and time of welding control temperature, stress, strain and their variations. These dependent factors play an important rule in defining optimum process parameters combinations in order to improve the design and manufacturing of welding machines and quality of welded parts. Thermo-mechanical simulation of friction welding has been carried out and it has been shown that, simulation is an important tool for prediction of generated heat and strain at the weld interface and can be used for prediction of microstructure and evaluation of quality of welds. For simulation of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding, a commercial finite element program has been used and the effects of pressure and rotary velocity of rotary part on temperature and strain variations have been investigated.

  4. An investigation on thermal and friction effect produced by friction welding of SA 213 tube to SA 387 tube plate

    S. Pandia Rajan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the effect of thermal and friction produced in the tube to tube plate during the friction welding process by using a Tungsten carbide external tool. In this process, the fictional welding of SA 213 tube and SA 387 tube plate was done by using an external tool. Modeling of tool and wok piece is done by using Solid works and to study the thermal and frictional effect by using Ansys. In this research work, joining of SA 213 tube to SA 387 tube plate was done by using two different techniques such as with hole [WH] and without hole [WOH]. The stress value of with hole and without hole such as 18,782 MPa and 10,486 MPa respectively and the ultimate heat flux generated with hole and without hole such as 0.80475 W/mm2 and 1.1344 W/mm2 respectively were observed.

  5. Aluminum 6060-T6 friction stir welded butt joints: fatigue resistance with different tools and feed rates

    Baragetti, S.; D'Urso, G.

    2014-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of AA6060-T6 friction stir welded butt joints was investigated. The joints were produced by using both a standard and a threaded tri-flute cylindrical-tool with flat shoulder. The friction stir welding process was carried out using different feed rates. Preliminary tensile tests, micrograph analyses and hardness profile measurements across the welds were carried out. Welded and unwelded fatigue samples were tested under axial loading (R = 0.1) with upper limits of 10 4 and 10 5 cycles, using threaded and unthreaded (standard) tools at different feed rates. The best tensile and fatigue performance was obtained using the standard tool at low feed rate.

  6. Impact of friction stir welding on the microstructure of ODS steel

    Dawson, H., E-mail: huwdawson@gmail.com [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Serrano, M. [Structural Materials Division, Technology Department, CIEMAT, Avda de la Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cater, S.; Iqbal, N. [Friction and Forge Processes Department, Joining Technologies Group, TWI Technology Centre, Advanced Manufacturing Park, Wallis Way, Catcliffe, Rotherham S60 5TZ (United Kingdom); Almásy, L. [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Tian, Q. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Jimenez-Melero, E. [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Moor Row CA24 3HA (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    We have assessed the impact of the welding parameters on the nano-sized oxide dispersion and the grain size in the matrix of an ODS steel after friction stir welding. Our results, based on combined small angle neutron scattering and electron microscopy, reveal a decrease in the volume fraction of the particles smaller than 80 nm in the welds, mainly due to particle agglomeration. The increase in tool rotation speed or decrease in transverse speed leads to a higher reduction in nano-sized particle fraction, and additionally to the occurrence of particle melting. The dependence of the average grain size in the matrix on the particle volume fraction follows a Zener pinning-type relationship. This result points to the principal role that the particles have in pinning grain boundary movement, and consequently in controlling the grain size during welding.

  7. Creep testing and creep loading experiments on friction stir welds in copper at 75 deg C

    Andersson, Henrik C.M.; Seitisleam, Facredin; Sandstroem, Rolf

    2007-08-01

    Specimens cut from friction stir welds in copper canisters for nuclear waste have been used for creep experiments at 75 deg C. The specimens were taken from a cross-weld position as well as heat affected zone and weld metal. The parent metal specimens exhibited longer creep lives than the weld specimens by a factor of three in time. They in turn were longer than those for the crossweld and HAZ specimens by an order of magnitude. The creep exponent was in the interval 50 to 69 implying that the material was well inside the power-law breakdown regime. The ductility properties expressed as reduction in area were not significantly different and all the rupture specimens demonstrated values exceeding 80%. Experiments were also carried out on the loading procedure of a creep test. Similar parent metal specimens and test conditions were used and the results show that the loading method has a large influence on the strain response of the specimen

  8. Effect of microstructure on properties of friction stir welded Inconel Alloy 600

    Sato, Y.S.; Arkom, P.; Kokawa, H.; Nelson, T.W.; Steel, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been widely used to metals with moderate melting temperatures, primarily Al alloys. Recently, tool materials that withstand high stresses and temperatures necessary for FSW of materials with high melting temperatures have been developed. In the present study, polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) tool was used for partially penetrated FSW of Inconel Alloy 600, and a defect-free weld was successfully produced. Microstructural characteristics, mechanical and corrosion properties in the weld were examined. The weld had better mechanical properties than the base material due to formation of fine grain structure in the stir zone, but exhibited slightly the lower corrosion resistance in a part of the stir zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ)

  9. Impact of friction stir welding on the microstructure of ODS steel

    Dawson, H.; Serrano, M.; Cater, S.; Iqbal, N.; Almásy, L.; Tian, Q.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2017-04-01

    We have assessed the impact of the welding parameters on the nano-sized oxide dispersion and the grain size in the matrix of an ODS steel after friction stir welding. Our results, based on combined small angle neutron scattering and electron microscopy, reveal a decrease in the volume fraction of the particles smaller than 80 nm in the welds, mainly due to particle agglomeration. The increase in tool rotation speed or decrease in transverse speed leads to a higher reduction in nano-sized particle fraction, and additionally to the occurrence of particle melting. The dependence of the average grain size in the matrix on the particle volume fraction follows a Zener pinning-type relationship. This result points to the principal role that the particles have in pinning grain boundary movement, and consequently in controlling the grain size during welding.

  10. Creep testing and creep loading experiments on friction stir welds in copper at 75 deg C

    Andersson, Henrik C.M.; Seitisleam, Facredin; Sandstroem, Rolf [Corrosion an d Metals Research Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    Specimens cut from friction stir welds in copper canisters for nuclear waste have been used for creep experiments at 75 deg C. The specimens were taken from a cross-weld position as well as heat affected zone and weld metal. The parent metal specimens exhibited longer creep lives than the weld specimens by a factor of three in time. They in turn were longer than those for the crossweld and HAZ specimens by an order of magnitude. The creep exponent was in the interval 50 to 69 implying that the material was well inside the power-law breakdown regime. The ductility properties expressed as reduction in area were not significantly different and all the rupture specimens demonstrated values exceeding 80%. Experiments were also carried out on the loading procedure of a creep test. Similar parent metal specimens and test conditions were used and the results show that the loading method has a large influence on the strain response of the specimen.

  11. Friction stir welding of dissimilar AA2024 and AA7075 aluminum alloys

    Khodir, Saad Ahmed; Shibayanagi, Toshiya

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on the microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints of 2024-T3 Al alloy to 7075-T6 Al alloy produced by friction stir welding. Effects of welding speed and fixed location of base metals on microstructures, hardness distributions, and tensile properties of the welded joints were investigated. SEM-EDS analysis revealed that the stir zone contains a mixed structure and onion ring pattern with a periodic change of grain size as well as a heterogeneous distribution of alloying elements. The maximum tensile strength of 423.0 MPa was achieved for the joint produced at welding speed of 1.67 mm/s when 2024 Al alloy was located on the advancing side

  12. Study of Dissimilar Welding AA6061 Aluminium Alloy and AZ31B Magnesium Alloy with ER5356 Filler Using Friction Stir Welding

    Mahamud, M. I. I.; Ishak, M.; Halil, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper is to study of dissimilar welding AA6061 aluminium alloy and AZ31B magnesium alloy with ER5356 filler using friction stir welding. 2 mm thick plates of aluminium and magnesium were used. Friction stir welding operations were performed at different rotation and travel speeds and used the fixed tilt angle which is 3°. The rotation speeds varied from 800 to 1100 rpm, and the travel speed varied from 80 to 100 mm/min. In the range rotation speed of 800 to 1000 rpm and welding speed of 80 to 100 mm/min there are no defect at the weld. Tensile test show the higher tensile strength is 198 MPa and the welding efficiency is about 76%.

  13. Dissimilar Joining of ODS and F/M Steel Tube by Friction Stir Welding

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Oxide Dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides Dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the Dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and

  14. Dissimilar Joining of ODS and F/M Steel Tube by Friction Stir Welding

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Oxide Dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides Dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the Dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and

  15. Grey relational and neural network approach for multi-objective optimization in small scale resistance spot welding of titanium alloy

    Wan, Xiaodong; Wang, Yuanxun; Zhao, Dawei [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2016-06-15

    The prediction and optimization of weld quality characteristics in small scale resistance spot welding of TC2 titanium alloy were investigated. Grey relational analysis, neural network and genetic algorithm were applied separately. Quality characteristics were selected as nugget diameter, failure load, failure displacement and failure energy. Welding parameters to be optimized were set as electrode force, welding current and welding time. Grey relational analysis was conducted for a rough estimation of the optimum welding parameters. Results showed that welding current played a key role in weld quality improvement. Different back propagation neural network architectures were then arranged to predict multiple quality characteristics. Interaction effects of welding parameters were analyzed with the proposed neural network. Failure load was found more sensitive to the change of welding parameters than nugget diameter. Optimum welding parameters were determined by genetic algorithm. The predicted responses showed good agreement with confirmation experiments.

  16. Microstructural transformations and mechanical properties of cast NiAl bronze: Effects of fusion welding and friction stir processing

    Fuller, M.D.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhilyaev, A.P.; McNelley, T.R.

    2007-01-01

    A plate of as-cast NiAl bronze (NAB) material was sectioned from a large casting. A six-pass fusion weld overlay was placed in a machined groove; a portion of the weld reinforcement was removed by milling and a single friction stir processing (FSP) pass was conducted in a direction transverse to the axis of and over the weld overlay. A procedure was developed for machining of miniature tensile samples and the distributions of strength and ductility were evaluated for the fusion weld metal; for the stir zone (SZ) produced by the friction stir processing; and for a region wherein friction stir processing had taken place over the fusion weld. A region of low ductility in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the fusion weld and in the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) of friction stir processed material was attributed to partial reversion of an equilibrium lamellar eutectoid constituent upon local heating above ∼800 deg. C and formation of non-equilibrium transformation products upon subsequent cooling. The adverse effect on ductility is worse in the heat affected zone of the fusion weld than in the thermomechanically affected zone of friction stir processing due to the lower heat input of the latter process. The implications of this work to engineering applications of friction stir processing are discussed

  17. Microstructure Stability During Creep of Friction Stir Welded AA2024-T3 Alloy

    Regev, Michael; Rashkovsky, Tal; Cabibbo, Marcello; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The poor weldability of the AA2024 aluminum alloy limits its use in industrial applications. Because friction stir welding (FSW) is a non-fusion welding process, it seems to be a promising solution for welding this alloy. In the current study, FSW was applied to butt weld AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy plates. Creep tests were conducted at 250 and at 315 °C on both the parent material and the friction stir welded specimens. The microstructures of the welded and non-welded AA2024-T3 specimens before and after the creep tests were studied and compared. A comprehensive transmission electron microscopy study together with a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy study and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis was conducted to investigate the microstructure stability. The parent material seems to contain two kinds of Cu-rich precipitates—coarse precipitates of a few microns each and uniformly dispersed fine nanosized precipitates. Unlike the parent material, the crept specimens were found to contain the two kinds of precipitates mentioned above together with platelet-like precipitates. In addition, extensive decoration of the grain boundaries with precipitates was clearly observed in the crept specimens. Controlled aging experiments for up to 280 h at the relevant temperatures were conducted on both the parent material and the welded specimens in order to isolate the contribution of exposure to high temperatures to the microstructure changes. TEM study showed the development of dislocation networks into a cellular dislocation structure in the case of the parent metal. Changes in the dislocation structure as a function of the creep strain and the FSW process were recorded. A detailed creep data analysis was conducted, taking into account the instability of the microstructure.

  18. Kekuatan Geser dan Pola Patahan Loop Space Maintainer yang Dibuat dengan Teknik Spot Welding Elektrik

    Elin Karlina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the effect of spot variations on shear strength of spot welds in an electric loop space maintainer. Stainless steel wire of 0.8 mm diameter and nickel chromium crwon for lower second molar of temporary teeth were used. A loop 1 cm wide, made of 3.5 cm stainless steel wire, was welded with 3 dots on the crown using an electric spot welder. Each dot for each group took different spot variations from 1 X – 4 X. A loop space maintainer made with the usual materials and techniques as applied at the IKGA FKG UI Clinic was used as a control, with a torch as heat source. Ten specimens each were prepared for shear testing and three spesimens each for metallography. Universal testing machine was used for shear strength testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min, and SEM/EDS was used for metallography and fractography. The data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA at p = 0.05, and Tukey post hoc test. The results show that the shear strength of the welded loop space maintainer was higher than that of a soldered loop space maintainer, although the difference was not statistically significant with spot variation 1 X. SEM/EDS analysis suggests that a new alloy forms at the contact area of welded and soldered loop space maintainer. Fractography of the joints suggests that welds are better than soldered joints, with higher ductility and toughness, as can be seen from the dimpled pattern of the welded joint and cleavage patterns in the control joints. In conclusion, the loop space maintainer is better made by welding than by soldering.

  19. Improvement of Weldment Properties by Hot Forming Quenching of Friction Stir Welded TWB Sheet

    Dae-Hoon Ko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to improve the mechanical properties and formability of friction stir welded tailor-welded blanks (TWBs of Al6061 alloy with a new forming method called hot forming quenching (HFQ in which solid-solution heat-treated aluminum sheets are formed at elevated temperature. Forming and quenching during HFQ are simultaneously performed with the forming die for the solid-solution heat-treated sheet. In this study, specimens of aluminum TWBs were prepared by friction stir welding (FSW with a butt joint. The effectiveness of FSW joining was evaluated by observation of the macrostructure for different sheet thicknesses. In order to evaluate the formability of TWBs by HFQ, a hemisphere dome stretching test of the limit dome height achieved without specimen failure was performed with various tool temperatures. A Vickers test was also performed to measure weldment hardness as a function of position. The formability and mechanical properties of products formed by HFQ are compared with those formed by conventional forming methods, demonstrating the suitability of HFQ for sheet metal forming of friction stir welded TWBs.

  20. Microstructural characterizations and mechanical properties in underwater friction stir welding of aluminum and magnesium dissimilar alloys

    Zhao, Yong; Lu, Zhengping; Yan, Keng; Huang, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum and magnesium alloys were joined by underwater friction stir welding. • Underwater FSW was conducted to improve properties of joint with lower heat input. • Microstructures and mechanical properties of dissimilar joint were investigated. • Intermetallic compounds developed in the fracture interface were analyzed. • Fracture features of the tensile samples were analyzed. - Abstract: Formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of dissimilar welds affects the mechanical properties of the joints significantly. In order to reduce heat input and control the amount and morphological characteristics of brittle intermetallic compounds underwater friction stir welding of 6013 Al alloy and AZ31 Mg alloy was carried out. Microstructures, mechanical properties, elements distribution, and the fracture surface of the joints were analyzed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, etc. The result shows that sound dissimilar joint with good mechanical properties can be obtained by underwater friction stir welding. Al and Mg alloys were stirred together and undergone the process of recrystallization, forming complex intercalated flow patterns in the stir zone. Tensile strength of the dissimilar joint was up to 152.3 MPa. Maximum hardness (142HV) appeared in the middle of the centerline of the specimen. Intermetallic compounds layer consisting of Al 3 Mg 2 and Mg 17 Al 12 formed in the Al/Mg interface and resulted in the fracture of the joint

  1. Characterization and Strain-Hardening Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Sharma, Gaurav; Dwivedi, Dheerendra Kumar; Jain, Pramod Kumar

    2017-12-01

    In this study, friction stir-welded joint of 3-mm-thick plates of 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS) was characterized in light of microstructure, x-ray diffraction analysis, hardness, tensile strength, ductility, corrosion and work hardening properties. The FSW joint made of ferritic stainless steel comprises of three distinct regions including the base metal. In stir zone highly refined ferrite grains with martensite and some carbide precipitates at the grain boundaries were observed. X-ray diffraction analysis also revealed precipitation of Cr23C6 and martensite formation in heat-affected zone and stir zone. In tensile testing of the transverse weld samples, the failure eventuated within the gauge length of the specimen from the base metal region having tensile properties overmatched to the as-received base metal. The tensile strength and elongation of the longitudinal (all weld) sample were found to be 1014 MPa and 9.47%, respectively. However, in potentiodynamic polarization test, the corrosion current density of the stir zone was highest among all the three zones. The strain-hardening exponent for base metal, transverse and longitudinal (all weld) weld samples was calculated using various equations. Both the transverse and longitudinal weld samples exhibited higher strain-hardening exponents as compared to the as-received base metal. In Kocks-Mecking plots for the base metal and weld samples at least two stages of strain hardening were observed.

  2. Microstructural Evolution in Friction Stir Welding of Ti-6Al-4V

    Rubisoff, H.; Querin, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a thermo-mechanical process that utilizes a nonconsumable rotating pin tool to consolidate a weld joint. In the conventional FSW process, the pin tool is responsible for generating both the heat required to soften the material and the forces necessary to deform and combine the weld seam. As such, the geometry of the pin tool is important to the quality of the weld and the process parameters required to produce the weld. Because the geometry of the pin tool is limitless, a reduced set of pin tools was formed to systematically study their effect on the weldment with respect to mechanical properties and resultant microstructure. In this study 0deg, 15deg, 30deg, 45deg, and 60deg tapered, microwave sintered, tungsten carbide (WC) pin tools were used to FSW Ti-6Al-4V. Transverse sections of the weld were used to test for mechanical properties and to document the microstructure using optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was also used to characterize the microstructure in the welds. FSW results for the 45deg and 60deg pin tools are reported in this paper.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded 18Cr–2Mo ferritic stainless steel thick plate

    Han, Jian; Li, Huijun; Zhu, Zhixiong; Barbaro, Frank; Jiang, Laizhu; Xu, Haigang; Ma, Li

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We focus on friction stir welding of 18Cr–2Mo ferritic stainless steel thick plate. • We produce high-quality joints with special tool and optimised welding parameters. • We compare microstructure and mechanical properties of steel and joint. • Friction stir welding is a method that can maintain the properties of joint. - Abstract: In this study, microstructure and mechanical properties of a friction stir welded 18Cr–2Mo ferritic stainless steel thick plate were investigated. The 5.4 mm thick plates with excellent properties were welded at a constant rotational speed and a changeable welding speed using a composite tool featuring a chosen volume fraction of cubic boron nitride (cBN) in a W–Re matrix. The high-quality welds were successfully produced with optimised welding parameters, and studied by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and standard hardness and impact toughness testing. The results show that microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints are affected greatly, which is mainly related to the remarkably fine-grained microstructure of equiaxed ferrite that is observed in the friction stir welded joint. Meanwhile, the ratios of low-angle grain boundary in the stir zone regions significantly increase, and the texture turns strong. Compared with the base material, mechanical properties of the joint are maintained in a comparatively high level

  4. Investigation of Hardness Change for Spot Welded Tailored Blank in Hot Stamping Using CCT and Deformation-CCT Diagrams

    Yogo, Yasuhiro; Kurato, Nozomi; Iwata, Noritoshi

    2018-04-01

    When an outer panel of a B-pillar is manufactured with the hot stamping process, reinforcements are spot welded on its inner side. Before reinforcements are added, the microstructure of the outer panel is martensite. However, reheating during spot welding changes the martensite to ferrite, which has a lower hardness in the heat-affected zone than in other areas. If spot welding is conducted before hot stamping for making a spot welded tailored blank, the microstructure in the spot welded tailored blank after hot stamping is martensite. This sequence of processes avoids hardness reduction due to spot welding. In this study, the hardness and microstructure around spot welded parts of the tailored blank were investigated. The results clearly showed that areas close to the spot welded parts are severely stretched during hot stamping. In addition, stretching suppresses the martensitic phase transformation and reduces the hardness. To characterize this phenomenon, a simulation was conducted that considered the effects of pre-strain on the phase transformation. A continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram and a deformation continuous cooling transformation (DCCT) diagram were made in order to quantify the effect of the cooling rate and pre-strain on the phase transformation and hardness. The hardness was then calculated using the experimentally measured CCT and DCCT diagrams and the finite element analysis results. The calculated hardness was compared with the experimental hardness. Good agreement was found between the calculated and experimental results.

  5. Investigation of Hardness Change for Spot Welded Tailored Blank in Hot Stamping Using CCT and Deformation-CCT Diagrams

    Yogo, Yasuhiro; Kurato, Nozomi; Iwata, Noritoshi

    2018-06-01

    When an outer panel of a B-pillar is manufactured with the hot stamping process, reinforcements are spot welded on its inner side. Before reinforcements are added, the microstructure of the outer panel is martensite. However, reheating during spot welding changes the martensite to ferrite, which has a lower hardness in the heat-affected zone than in other areas. If spot welding is conducted before hot stamping for making a spot welded tailored blank, the microstructure in the spot welded tailored blank after hot stamping is martensite. This sequence of processes avoids hardness reduction due to spot welding. In this study, the hardness and microstructure around spot welded parts of the tailored blank were investigated. The results clearly showed that areas close to the spot welded parts are severely stretched during hot stamping. In addition, stretching suppresses the martensitic phase transformation and reduces the hardness. To characterize this phenomenon, a simulation was conducted that considered the effects of pre-strain on the phase transformation. A continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram and a deformation continuous cooling transformation (DCCT) diagram were made in order to quantify the effect of the cooling rate and pre-strain on the phase transformation and hardness. The hardness was then calculated using the experimentally measured CCT and DCCT diagrams and the finite element analysis results. The calculated hardness was compared with the experimental hardness. Good agreement was found between the calculated and experimental results.

  6. Effect of shoulder to pin ratio on magnesium alloy Friction Stir Welding

    Othman, N. H.; Ishak, M.; Shah, L. H.

    2017-09-01

    This study focuses on the effect of shoulder to pin diameter ratio on friction stir welding of magnesium alloy AZ31. Two pieces of AZ31 alloy with thickness of 2 mm were friction stir welded by using conventional milling machine. The shoulder to pin diameter ratio used in this experiment are 2.25, 2.5, 2.75, 3, 3.33, 3.66, 4.5, 5 and 5.5. The rotational speed and welding speed used in this study are 1000 rpm and 100 mm/min, respectively. Microstructure observation of welded area was studied by using optical microscope. Equiaxed grains were observed at the TMAZ and stir zone indicating fully plastic deformation. The grain size of stir zone increased with decreasing shoulder to pin ratio from ratio 3.33 to 5.5 due to higher heat input. It is observed that, surface galling and faying surface defect is produced when excessive heat input is applied. To evaluate the mechanical properties of this specimen, tensile test was used in this study. Shoulder to pin ratio 5.5 shows lowest tensile strength while shoulder to pin diameter ratio 3.33 shows highest tensile strength with weld efficiency 91 % from based metal.

  7. Rotary friction welding of dissimilar joints and bonding interface characterization by EDX and XPS

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Dollinger, Christian Avila [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Marcuzzo, Jossano Saldanha; Baldan, Mauricio Ribeiro; Toledo, Rafael Cardoso; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying, E-mail: eder.padua@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Welding of dissimilar materials has been a challenge to engineering. The study and development of new union processes that meet the requirements of projects in the aerospace, nuclear and aviation sector are of great importance to the scientific and productive means. The Rotary friction welding process (RFW) is a process of union that occurs in the solid state, without occurrence of fusion between the parties, and that have like the main bonding mechanisms the diffusion and mechanical mixture. This work has as objective the obtaining of dissimilar joints involving AA 6351-T6 alloy and stainless steel AISI 304l for applications in the aerospace area. The joints obtained by RFW who had procedures and qualified welding process have undergone the techniques of Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) for analysis of the bonding interface. Were obtained joints with superior mechanical properties the AA 6351-T6 alloy, with the fracture occurring in aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analyses carried out by EDX and XPS have shown the occurrence of interdiffusion among the main elements of the materials involved. The Rotary friction welding process proved to be a great method for obtaining of joints between dissimilar materials that are not possible by fusion welding processes. (author)

  8. Rotary friction welding of dissimilar joints and bonding interface characterization by EDX and XPS

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Dollinger, Christian Avila; Marcuzzo, Jossano Saldanha; Baldan, Mauricio Ribeiro; Toledo, Rafael Cardoso; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Welding of dissimilar materials has been a challenge to engineering. The study and development of new union processes that meet the requirements of projects in the aerospace, nuclear and aviation sector are of great importance to the scientific and productive means. The Rotary friction welding process (RFW) is a process of union that occurs in the solid state, without occurrence of fusion between the parties, and that have like the main bonding mechanisms the diffusion and mechanical mixture. This work has as objective the obtaining of dissimilar joints involving AA 6351-T6 alloy and stainless steel AISI 304l for applications in the aerospace area. The joints obtained by RFW who had procedures and qualified welding process have undergone the techniques of Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) for analysis of the bonding interface. Were obtained joints with superior mechanical properties the AA 6351-T6 alloy, with the fracture occurring in aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analyses carried out by EDX and XPS have shown the occurrence of interdiffusion among the main elements of the materials involved. The Rotary friction welding process proved to be a great method for obtaining of joints between dissimilar materials that are not possible by fusion welding processes. (author)

  9. Numerical Simulations on the Laser Spot Welding of Zirconium Alloy Endplate for Nuclear Fuel Bundle Assembly

    Satyanarayana, G.; Narayana, K. L.; Boggarapu, Nageswara Rao

    2018-03-01

    In the nuclear industry, a critical welding process is joining of an end plate to a fuel rod to form a fuel bundle. Literature on zirconium welding in such a critical operation is limited. A CFD model is developed and performed for the three-dimensional non-linear thermo-fluid analysis incorporating buoyancy and Marnangoni stress and specifying temperature dependent properties to predict weld geometry and temperature field in and around the melt pool of laser spot during welding of a zirconium alloy E110 endplate with a fuel rod. Using this method, it is possible to estimate the weld pool dimensions for the specified laser power and laser-on-time. The temperature profiles will estimate the HAZ and microstructure. The adequacy of generic nature of the model is validated with existing experimental data.

  10. Comparison of Metallurgical and Ultrasonic Inspections of Galvanized Steel Resistance Spot Welds

    Potter, Timothy J.; Ghaffari, Bita; Mozurkewich, George; Reverdy, Frederic; Hopkins, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Metallurgical examination of galvanized steel resistance spot welds was used to gauge the capabilities of two ultrasonic, non-destructive, scanning techniques. One method utilized the amplitude of the echo from the weld faying surface, while the other used the spectral content of the echo train to map the fused area. The specimens were subsequently sectioned and etched, to distinguish the fused, zinc-brazed, and non-fused areas. The spectral maps better matched the metallurgical maps, while the interface-amplitude method consistently overestimated the weld size

  11. Ultrasonic spot welding of Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets

    Macwan, A.; Patel, V.K.; Jiang, X.Q.; Li, C.; Bhole, S.D.; Chen, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The optimal welding condition is achieved at 100 J and 0.1 s. • Failure load first increases and then decreases with increasing welding energy. • The highest failure load after welding is close to that of the clad sheets. • At low energy levels failure occurs in the mode of interfacial failure. • At high energy levels failure takes place at the edge of nugget region. - Abstract: Solid-state ultrasonic spot welding (USW) was used to join Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets, aiming at exploring weldability and identifying failure mode in relation to the welding energy. It was observed that the application of a low welding energy of 100 J was able to achieve the optimal welding condition during USW at a very short welding time of 0.1 s for the tri-layered clad sheets. The optimal lap shear failure load obtained was equivalent to that of the as-received Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets. With increasing welding energy, the lap shear failure load initially increased and then decreased after reaching a maximum value. At a welding energy of 25 J, failure occurred in the mode of interfacial failure along the center Al/Al weld interface due to insufficient bonding. At a welding energy of 50 J, 75 J and 100 J, failure was also characterized by the interfacial failure mode, but it occurred along the Al/Mg clad interface rather than the center Al/Al weld interface, suggesting stronger bonding of the Al/Al weld interface than that of the Al/Mg clad interface. The overall weld strength of the Al/Mg/Al tri-layered clad sheets was thus governed by the Al/Mg clad interface strength. At a welding energy of 125 J and 150 J, thinning of weld nugget and extensive deformation at the edge of welding tip caused failure at the edge of nugget region, leading to a lower lap shear failure load

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction welded AISI 1040/AISI 304L steels before and after electrochemical corrosion

    Sarsilmaz, Furkan [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey). Dept. of Mechatronics Engineering; Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Ozdemir, Niyazi [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of welding parameters both on the electrochemical corrosion behavior and tensile strength of pre- and post-electrochemical corrosion of friction welded dissimilar steels. The microstructural changes of AISI 1040/AISI 304L friction welded couples and also parent materials were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of AISI1040/AISI304L joints were comparatively investigated by potentiodynamic polarization curve test and by electrochemical impedance spectra. Moreover, tensile strength experiments were carried out determining the behavior of friction welded joints of pre- and post-electrochemical corrosion and results indicated that the maximum tensile test value of the dissimilar welded pre-electrochemical corrosion was higher than those of post-electrochemical corrosion and was also very close to AISI 1040 parent material value.

  13. A Study on the Optimal Conditions of friction Welding for JLF and STS304 Using AE Technique

    Yoon, Han Ki; Lee, Sang Pil; Kong, Yu Sik; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2003-01-01

    Japanese low activation terrific steel(JLF) is a good material for the parts of heat exchanger such as blanket and diverter. At first, JLF was developed as a candidate for structural materials in nuclear fusion applications. However, the development of the jointing technique of JLF steel to other materials is important for wide applications of this material to the industry fields. Recently the jointing technologies including diffusion bonding, brazing, roll bonding, explosive bonding and hot iso-static pressing have been studied for the heterogeneous materials of JLF-1 steel(Fe-9Cr-2W-V-Ta) and stainless steel(STS304). Friction welding is one of the most popular welding methods for two different kinds of materials. In this paper, the JLF-1 steel was jointed to SIS304 by friction welding method and the optimal conditions of the friction welding discussed. Acoustic emission was used as a nondestructive technique to evaluate the weld quality in processing

  14. Three-dimensional simulations of resistance spot welding

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Zhang, Wenqi; Perret, William

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws from the fundamentals of electro-thermo-mechanical coupling to the main aspects of finite element implementation and three-dimensional modelling of resistance welding. A new simulation environment is proposed in order to perform three-dimensional simulations and optimization...... of resistance welding together with the simulations of conventional and special-purpose quasi-static mechanical tests. Three-dimensional simulations of resistance welding consider the electrical, thermal, mechanical and metallurgical characteristics of the material as well as the operating conditions...... of the welding machines. Simulations of the mechanical tests take into account material softening due to the accumulation of ductile damage and cover conventional tests, such as tensile–shear tests, cross-tension test and peel tests, as well as the possibility of special-purpose tests designed by the users...

  15. Analisa Kekuatan Sambungan Pipa Baja Karbon dan Besi Cor Berbasis Teknologi Las Gesek (Friction Welding

    Nur Husodo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Adanya kesulitan yang akan terjadi manakala dilakukan proses penyambungan dua buah logam yang berbedakomposisi. Namun ada alternative metode proses penyambungan logam baja yang berbeda komposisi dengan metodelas gesek. Selain itu metode las gesek ini mempunyai banyak keunggulan antara lain waktu proses cepat, tidak perlulogam pengisi, panas yang terjadi tidak sampai logam mencair, panas yang terjadi tidak terlalu tinggi juga mudahditerapkan karena dapat memanfaatkan mesin perkakas. Oleh karena itu perlu dilakukan proses penyambungan denganmetode las gesek untuk alternative proses pembuatan produk stang sepeda motor. Penelitian dilakukan denganmemvariasi tekanan tempa sebesar 375, 437,5 dan 500 kgf/cm2 , tekanan gesek 62,5 kgf/cm2 dan durasi waktu gesek120 detik. Sampel uji yang dihasilkan dilakukan pengujian struktur mikro dengan metallografi sedangkan sifat mekanikdilakukan dengan pengujian kekerasan dan kekuatan tarik. Analisa dilakukan untuk mengetahui peluang las gesekdipakai sebagai alternative proses produksi produk stang sepeda motor. Dapat ditarik kesimpulan bahwa metode lasgesek dapat digunakan menyambung dua buah logam baja yang berbeda kompisi yaitu pipa baja karbon rendah denganbesi cor. Kekuatan las akan meningkat ketika tekanan tempa juga meningkat. Kekuatan sambungan tertinggi sebesar546,66 N/mm2.Kata kunci: Las gesek, pipa baja karbon rendah, besi cor, tekanan tempa, tekanan gesek Abstract: The difficulties that will occur when the process of joining two pieces made of different metal compositions. However,there are alternative methods of process connection of different steel metal composition with friction welding method.Besides this friction welding method has many advantages such as faster processing time, do not need filler metal, theheat does not occur until the metal melts, heat is happening is not too high is also easy to implement because it can takeadvantage of machine tools. Therefore, it is necessary to the

  16. Multi-objective Optimization of Process Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    The objective of this paper is to investigate optimum process parameters in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) to minimize residual stresses in the work piece and maximize production efficiency meanwhile satisfying process specific constraints as well. More specifically, the choices of tool rotational...... speed and traverse welding speed have been sought in order to achieve the goals mentioned above using an evolutionary multi-objective optimization (MOO) algorithm, i.e. non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II), integrated with a transient, 2- dimensional sequentially coupled thermo...

  17. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  18. On the Prediction of Hot Tearing in Al-to-Steel Welding by Friction Melt Bonding

    Jimenez-Mena, N.; Jacques, P. J.; Drezet, J. M.; Simar, A.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum alloy AA6061 was welded to dual-phase steel 980 (DP980) by the friction melt bonding (FMB) process. Hot tears have been suppressed by controlling the thermomechanical cycle. In particular, the welding speed and the thermal conductivity of the backing plate have been optimized. A finite-element thermomechanical model coupled with the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) criterion has been used to explain these experimental observations. The hot tear susceptibility has been reduced with large thermal gradients and with the formation of a cellular microstructure. Both effects are favored by a backing plate made of a material with high thermal conductivity, such as copper.

  19. Through thickness property variations in a thick plate AA7050 friction stir welded joint

    Canaday, Clinton T.; Moore, Matthew A.; Tang, Wei; Reynolds, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, moderately thick (32 mm) AA7050 plates were joined by friction stir welding (FSW). Various methods were used to characterize the welded joints, including nugget grain size measurements at different locations through the thickness, micro-hardness indentation through nugget, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and heat affected zone (HAZ) at different cross section heights, and residual stress measurement using the cut compliance method with full thickness and partial thickness specimens. All testing results are consistent with the presence of a strong gradient in peak temperature through the plate thickness during FSW.

  20. Pitting corrosion of friction stir welded aluminum alloy thick plate in alkaline chloride solution

    Xu Weifeng; Liu Jinhe; Zhu Hongqiang

    2010-01-01

    The pitting corrosion of different positions (Top, Middle and Bottom) of weld nugget zone (WNZ) along thickness plate in friction stir welded 2219-O aluminum alloy in alkaline chloride solution was investigated by using open circuit potential, cyclic polarization, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The results indicate that the material presents significant passivation, the top has highest corrosion potential, pitting potential and re-passivation potential compared with the bottom and base material. With the increase of traverse speed from 60 to 100 mm/min or rotary speed from 500 to 600 rpm, the corrosion resistance decreases.

  1. The microstructure and microhardness of friction stir welded dissimilar copper/Al-5% Mg alloys

    Kalashnikova, T. A.; Shvedov, M. A.; Vasilyev, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    A friction stir welded joint between copper and aluminum alloy has been investigated and characterized for the microstructure and microhardness number distribution. The microstructural evolution of the joint is studied using optical microscopy and microhardness. The mechanical characteristics in structural zones of FSW joints are determined by Vickers microhardness measurements. Samples were cut across the cross section. It is shown that intermetallic Cu/Al particles are formed at interfaces. The intermetallics microhardness in the dissimilar aluminum/cooper FSW joint differs from that of the joint produced by fusion welding. The grain structures obtained in different dissimilar joint zones are examined.

  2. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in ODS Steel MA956

    2013-06-01

    dispersion strengthened - Eurofer steel ,” J. Nucl. Mater., vol. 416 , pp. 2229, Sep 1, 2011. [10] H. J. K. Lemmen and K. J. Sudmeijer, I, “Laser beam...Reynolds and W. Tang, “Structure, properties, and residual stress of 304L stainless steel friction stir welds,” Scr. Mater., vol. 48, pp. 12891294...OF RESIDUAL STRESS AS A FUNCTION OF FRICTION STIR WELDING PARAMETERS IN ODS STEEL MA956 by Martin S. Bennett June 2013 Thesis Advisor

  3. In-situ neutron diffraction measurements of temperature and stresses during friction stir welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; Brown, D.W.; Clausen, B.; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R.; David, Stan A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and thermal stresses during friction stir welding of Al6061-T6 was investigated by means of in-situ, time-resolved neutron diffraction technique. A method is developed to deconvolute the temperature and stress from the lattice spacing changes measured by neutron diffraction. The deep penetration capability of neutrons made it possible for the first time to obtain the temperature and thermal stresses inside a friction stir weld

  4. Effect of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on the Mechanical and Microstructure Properties of the Al-Cu Butt Joint

    Sare Celik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid-state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. FSW is especially suitable to join sheet Al alloys, and this technique allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 Al alloys and commercially pure Cu were produced at three different tool rotation speeds (630, 1330, 2440 rpm and three different tool traverse speeds (20, 30, 50 mm/min with four different tool position (0, 1, 1.5, 2 mm by friction stir welding. The influence of the welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was investigated. Tensile and bending tests and microhardness measurements were used to determine the mechanical properties. The microstructures of the weld zone were investigated by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM and were analyzed in an energy dispersed spectrometer (EDS. Intermetallic phases were detected based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis results that evaluated the formation of phases in the weld zone. When the welding performance of the friction stir welded butt joints was evaluated, the maximum value obtained was 89.55% with a 1330 rpm tool rotational speed, 20 mm/min traverse speed and a 1 mm tool position configuration. The higher tensile strength is attributed to the dispersion strengthening of the fine Cu particles distributed over the Al material in the stir zone region.

  5. Low cycle fatigue behavior of electron beam and friction welded joints of an α-β titanium alloy

    Mohandas, T.; Varma, V.K.; Banerjee, D.; Kutumbarao, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Fusion welds in titanium alloys, with intermediate β stabilizing additions, show poor mechanical properties due to large fusion zone grain size coupled with a brittle plate martensitic microstructure and hydrogen induced microporosity. These problems, associated with fusion welding, have been reported to be overcome by friction welding. The alloy used in this study is a Soviet composition (VT9) of the α-β class with the nominal chemical composition Ti-6.5Al-3.3Mo-1.6Zr-0.3 Si (in weight percent), intended to be used as discs and blades in compressor stages of gas turbine engine where low cycle fatigue (LCF) loading is experienced. Electron beam welding of the alloy was largely unsuccessful for the reasons described above. Fatigue properties of such welds had large scatter due to the presence of microporosity. A continuous drive friction welding technique was investigated to overcome this problem These welds showed encouraging results in that microporosity, a problem in the electron beam welding, was not observed and the mechanical properties were at par or better than those of the base metal. This paper deals with the study of stress controlled LCF behavior of friction welds and electron beam welds of the α-β titanium alloy at ambient temperature and the results are compared with those of base metal

  6. Mechanical and Microstructural Properties of Friction Welded AISI 304 Stainless Steel to AISI 1060 Steel AISI 1060

    Ates H.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rotary Friction welding is one of the most popular methods of joining similar and dissimilar materials. It is widely used with metals and thermoplastics in a wide variety of aviation, transport and aerospace industrial component designs. This study investigates the influence of friction and upsetting pressures on the hardness, tensile properties and microstructure of the welds. The experimental results showed that as the friction and upsetting pressures increased, the hardness and tensile strength values increased, as well. The tensile fracture of welded joint occurred in the AISI 1060 side. The friction processed joints were evaluated for their integrity and quality aspects by optical and scanning electron microscopy. For the perfect interfacial bonding, sufficient upsetting and friction pressures are necessary to reach the optimal temperature and severe plastic deformation to bring these materials within the attraction range.

  7. Fatigue strength evaluation of friction stir welded aluminium joints using the nominal and notch stress concepts

    Barsoum, Z.; Khurshid, M.; Barsoum, I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fatigue testing and evaluation of friction stir welded butt and overlap joints. ► Evaluation based on nominal and effective notch stress concept. ► Comparison with different design recommendations and codes. ► Higher fatigue strength and SN-slopes is observed. ► New fatigue design recommendations proposed for FSW joints. -- Abstract: In this study the fatigue strength is investigated for Friction Stir Welded (FSW) overlap and butt welded joints in different thicknesses based on nominal and effective notch stress concepts. The fatigue test results are compared with fatigue strength recommendations according to EN 1999-1-3 and International Institute of Welding (IIW). The results are also compared with available published data and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is carried out to investigate the effect of plate thickness and nugget size on the fatigue strength of overlap joints. 3–3 mm butt welded joints shows the highest fatigue strength in comparison with 3–5 mm butt welded and overlap joints. Slopes of the SN-curves for two different joint types differ from the slope recommended by IIW. A specific failure trend is observed in overlap FSW joints. However, the slopes of the SN-curves are in close agreement with slopes found in EN 1999-1-3. The slopes of various published results and test results presented in this study are in good agreement with each other. The suggested fatigue design curves for the nominal and effective notch stress concept have a higher slope than given for fusion welds by IIW.

  8. Optimization of resistance spot welding on the assembly of refractory alloy 50Mo-50Re thin sheet

    Xu, Jianhui [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 Anderson Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Jiang, Xiuping [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 Anderson Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Zeng, Qiang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 Anderson Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Zhai, Tongguang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 Anderson Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)]. E-mail: tzhai0@engr.uky.edu; Leonhardt, Todd [Rhenium Alloys Inc., Elyria, OH 44036 (United States); Farrell, John [Semicon Associates, 695 Laco Drive, Lexington, KY 40510 (United States); Umstead, Williams [Semicon Associates, 695 Laco Drive, Lexington, KY 40510 (United States); Effgen, Michael P. [Semicon Associates, 695 Laco Drive, Lexington, KY 40510 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) was employed to pre-join refractory alloy 50Mo-50Re (wt%) sheet with a 0.127 mm gage. Five important welding parameters (hold time, electrode, ramp time, weld current and electrode force) were adjusted in an attempt to optimize the welding quality. It was found that increasing the hold time from 50 ms to 999 ms improved the weld strength. Use of rod-shaped electrodes produced symmetric nugget and enhanced the weld strength. Use of a ramp time of 8 ms minimized electrode sticking and molten metal expulsion. The weld strength continuously increased with increasing the weld current up to 1100 A, but the probabilities of occurrence of electrode sticking and molten metal expulsion were also increased. Electrode force was increased from 4.44 N to 17.8 N, in order to reduce the inconsistency of the welding quality. Welding defects including porosities, columnar grains and composition segregation were also studied.

  9. Load-Displacement Curves of Spot Welded, Bonded, and Weld-Bonded Joints for Dissimilar Materials and Thickness

    E.A. Al-Bahkali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional finite element models of spot welded, bonded and weld-bonded joints are developed using ABAQUS software. Each model consists of two strips with dissimilar materials and thickness and is subjected to an axial loading. The bonded and weld-bonded joints have specific adhesive thickness. A detailed experimental plan to define many properties and quantities such as, the elastic - plastic properties, modulus of elasticity, fracture limit, and properties of the nugget and heat affected zones are carried out. Experiments include standard testing of the base metal, the adhesive, the nugget and heat affected zone. They also include employing the indentation techniques, and ductile fracture limits criteria, using the special notch tests. Complete load-displacement curves are obtained for all joining models and a comparison is made to determine the best combination.

  10. Model development for mechanical properties and weld quality class of friction stir welding using multi-objective Taguchi method and response surface methodology

    Mohamed, Mohamed Ackiel; Manurung, Yupiter HP; Berhan, Mohamed Nor

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the effect of the governing parameters in friction stir welding (FSW) on the mechanical properties and weld quality of a 6mm thick 6061 T651 Aluminum alloy butt joint. The main FSW parameters, the rotational and traverse speed were optimized based on multiple mechanical properties and quality features, which focus on the tensile strength, hardness and the weld quality class using the multi-objective Taguchi method (MTM). Multi signal to noise ratio (MSNR) was employed to determine the optimum welding parameters for MTM while further analysis concerning the significant level determination was accomplished via the well-established analysis of variance (ANOVA). Furthermore, the first order model for predicting the mechanical properties and weld quality class is derived by applying response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the experimental confirmation test, the proposed method can effectively estimate the mechanical properties and weld quality class which can be used to enhance the welding performance in FSW or other applications.

  11. Model development for mechanical properties and weld quality class of friction stir welding using multi-objective Taguchi method and response surface methodology

    Mohamed, Mohamed Ackiel [University Kuala Lumpur Malaysia France Institute, Bandar Baru Bangi (Malaysia); Manurung, Yupiter HP; Berhan, Mohamed Nor [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia)

    2015-06-15

    This study presents the effect of the governing parameters in friction stir welding (FSW) on the mechanical properties and weld quality of a 6mm thick 6061 T651 Aluminum alloy butt joint. The main FSW parameters, the rotational and traverse speed were optimized based on multiple mechanical properties and quality features, which focus on the tensile strength, hardness and the weld quality class using the multi-objective Taguchi method (MTM). Multi signal to noise ratio (MSNR) was employed to determine the optimum welding parameters for MTM while further analysis concerning the significant level determination was accomplished via the well-established analysis of variance (ANOVA). Furthermore, the first order model for predicting the mechanical properties and weld quality class is derived by applying response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the experimental confirmation test, the proposed method can effectively estimate the mechanical properties and weld quality class which can be used to enhance the welding performance in FSW or other applications.

  12. Metallurgical and Corrosion Characterization of POST Weld Heat Treated Duplex Stainless Steel (uns S31803) Joints by Friction Welding Process

    Asif M., Mohammed; Shrikrishna, Kulkarni Anup; Sathiya, P.

    2016-02-01

    The present study focuses on the metallurgical and corrosion characterization of post weld heat treated duplex stainless steel joints. After friction welding, it was confirmed that there is an increase in ferrite content at weld interface due to dynamic recrystallization. This caused the weldments prone to pitting corrosion attack. Hence the post weld heat treatments were performed at three temperatures 1080∘C, 1150∘C and 1200∘C with 15min of aging time. This was followed by water and oil quenching. The volume fraction of ferrite to austenite ratio was balanced and highest pit nucleation resistance were achieved after PWHT at 1080∘C followed by water quench and at 1150∘C followed by oil quench. This had happened exactly at parameter set containing heating pressure (HP):40 heating time (HT):4 upsetting pressure (UP):80 upsetting time (UP):2 (experiment no. 5). Dual phase presence and absence of precipitates were conformed through TEM which follow Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. PREN of ferrite was decreasing with increase in temperature and that of austenite increased. The equilibrium temperature for water quenching was around 1100∘C and that for oil quenching was around 1140∘C. The pit depths were found to be in the range of 100nm and width of 1.5-2μm.

  13. Friction Stir Welding of Al-Cu Bilayer Sheet by Tapered Threaded Pin: Microstructure, Material Flow, and Fracture Behavior

    Beygi, R.; Kazeminezhad, M.; Kokabi, A. H.; Loureiro, A.

    2015-06-01

    The fracture behavior and intermetallic formation are investigated after friction stir welding of Al-Cu bilayer sheets performed by tapered threaded pin. To do so, temperature, axial load, and torque measurements during welding, and also SEM and XRD analyses and tensile tests on the welds are carried out. These observations show that during welding from Cu side, higher axial load and temperature lead to formation of different kinds of Al-Cu intermetallics such as Al2Cu, AlCu, and Al4Cu9. Also, existence of Al(Cu)-Al2Cu eutectic structures, demonstrates liquation during welding. The presence of these intermetallics leads to highly brittle fracture and low strength of the joints. In samples welded from Al side, lower axial load and temperature are developed during welding and no intermetallic compound is observed which results in higher strength and ductility of the joints in comparison with those welded from Cu side.

  14. Friction stir welding: multi-response optimisation using Taguchi-based GRA

    Jitender Kundu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In present experimental work, friction stir welding of aluminium alloy 5083- H321 is performed for optimisation of process parameters for maximum tensile strength. Taguchi’s L9 orthogonal array has been used for three parameters – tool rotational speed (TRS, traverse speed (TS, and tool tilt angle (TTA with three levels. Multi-response optimisation has been carried out through Taguchi-based grey relational analysis. The grey relational grade has been calculated for all three responses – ultimate tensile strength, percentage elongation, and micro-hardness. Analysis of variance is the tool used for obtaining grey relational grade to find out the significant process parameters. TRS and TS are the two most significant parameters which influence most of the quality characteristics of friction stir welded joint. Validation of predicted values done through confirmation experiments at optimum setting shows a good agreement with experimental values.

  15. Metallurgical Effects of Shunting Current on Resistance Spot-Welded Joints of AA2219 Sheets

    Jafari Vardanjani, M.; Araee, A.; Senkara, J.; Jakubowski, J.; Godek, J.

    2016-08-01

    Shunting effect is the loss of electrical current via the secondary circuit provided due to the existence of previous nugget in a series of welding spots. This phenomenon influences on metallurgical aspects of resistance spot-welded (RSW) joints in terms of quality and performance. In this paper RSW joints of AA2219 sheets with 1 mm thickness are investigated metallurgically for shunted and single spots. An electro-thermal finite element analysis is performed on the RSW process of shunted spot and temperature distribution and variation are obtained. These predictions are then compared with experimental micrographs. Three values of 5 mm, 20 mm, and infinite (i.e., single spot) are assumed for welding distance. Numerical and experimental results are matching each other in terms of nugget and HAZ geometry as increasing distance raised nugget size and symmetry of HAZ. In addition, important effect of shunting current on nugget thickness, microstructure, and Copper segregation on HAZ grain boundaries were discovered. A quantitative analysis is also performed about the influence of welding distance on important properties including ratio of nugget thickness and diameter ( r t), ratio of HAZ area on shunted and free side of nugget ( r HA), and ratio of equivalent segregated and total amount of Copper, measured in sample ( r Cu) on HAZ. Increasing distance from 5 mm to infinite, indicated a gain of 111.04, -45.55, and -75.15% in r t, r HA, and r Cu, respectively, while obtained ratios for 20 mm welding distance was suitable compared to single spot.

  16. The inhomogeneous microstructure and deformation of similar and dissimilar Al-Zn containing Mg friction stir welds

    Hiscocks, Jessica

    The magnesium-based aluminum-zinc alloys have excellent stiffness to weight ratios, and may be combined by friction stir welding to expand the possible applications. The high aluminum alloy AZ80 in particular has the advantage of being relatively stiff but still extrudable. However limited friction stir welding research is available for this alloy and extrapolation from the extensive work in aluminum alloys is impractical due differences in precipitation behaviour, and magnesium's high plastic anisotropy and tendency to form strong textures during friction stir welding. This work investigates the correlations between local friction stir welded microstructures, textures, residual strains, and the local deformation behaviour based on strain mapping during tensile tests. Covering bead-on-plate and butt configurations, joining of similar and dissimilar materials, and a range of processing conditions, many findings of interest for deformation modelling and industrial applications are presented. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of an entire friction stir weld was used to determine texture, residual strain and dislocation density data from a single experiment. A number of unique findings were made, mainly related to the asymmetric distribution of properties both between sides of the weld and through the depth. Particularly in the case of strain measurements, features not detectable at coarser measurement spacing or by line scan are presented and compared for multiple processing conditions. Investigation of the longitudinal material flow during welding showed that even when periodicity in grain size, precipitate distribution, or texture was not observed, periodic changes in texture intensity resulting from compaction of material behind the tool were present, providing evidence that movement of nugget material remained periodic. Strain localisation and fracture behaviour were found to be completely different between good quality similar and dissimilar friction stir welds

  17. Rotary Bending Fatigue Characteristics According to Optimal Friction Welding of SF45 to SM45C Steel Bars

    Kong, Yu Sik; Park, Young Whan [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    A study on dissimilar friction-welded joints was performed for cam shaft applications using solid bar samples, 20mm in diameter, of forging steel(SF45) and carbon steel(SM45C). The main parameters of friction welding such as tensile tests, Vickers hardness surveys of the bond of area, the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the observation of microstructure were investigated to ensure a good quality of friction welding through visual observations. The specimens were tested as-welded and post weld heat treatment(PWHT). This paper deals with optimizing the welding conditions and analyzing various rotary bending fatigue test(RBFT) properties about heat-treated base metal(BM), as-welded and PWHT. Consequently, two materials for friction welding are strongly mixed with a well-combined structure of micro-particles without any molten material, particle growth, or any defect. Moreover, the fatigue limit of BM(SF45) and PWHT for the RBFT were observed as 180MPa and 250MPa, respectively. It was confirmed that the PWHT causes approximately 40% improvement in the fatigue limit when compared to the BM(SF45).

  18. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Rajendrana C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE, analysis of variance (ANOVA, response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  19. Optimization of friction stir welding using space mapping and manifold mapping-an initial study of thermal aspects

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process by finding optimal welding parameters. The optimization is performed using space mapping and manifold mapping techniques in which a coarse model is used along with the fine model to be optimized. Different...

  20. Rotary Bending Fatigue Characteristics According to Optimal Friction Welding of SF45 to SM45C Steel Bars

    Kong, Yu Sik; Park, Young Whan

    2017-01-01

    A study on dissimilar friction-welded joints was performed for cam shaft applications using solid bar samples, 20mm in diameter, of forging steel(SF45) and carbon steel(SM45C). The main parameters of friction welding such as tensile tests, Vickers hardness surveys of the bond of area, the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the observation of microstructure were investigated to ensure a good quality of friction welding through visual observations. The specimens were tested as-welded and post weld heat treatment(PWHT). This paper deals with optimizing the welding conditions and analyzing various rotary bending fatigue test(RBFT) properties about heat-treated base metal(BM), as-welded and PWHT. Consequently, two materials for friction welding are strongly mixed with a well-combined structure of micro-particles without any molten material, particle growth, or any defect. Moreover, the fatigue limit of BM(SF45) and PWHT for the RBFT were observed as 180MPa and 250MPa, respectively. It was confirmed that the PWHT causes approximately 40% improvement in the fatigue limit when compared to the BM(SF45).