WorldWideScience

Sample records for sport social support

  1. SOCIAL ASPECTS OF SPORT

    OpenAIRE

    YETİM, Azmi

    2000-01-01

    Sport is themost effective and common social institute of modern societies. The mostimportant element of societies is individual. Societies in which individualshealthy, well educated, social and cultured could be thought as modern basicaim of sport is to support the development of human in terms of physical mentaland social. And also sport is very effective phenomenon to create a modernsociety. In addition personel benefits and missions sport has very importantsocial effects. In this age, it ...

  2. Athlete social support, negative social interactions and psychological health across a competitive sport season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFreese, J D; Smith, Alan L

    2014-12-01

    Social support and negative social interactions have implications for athlete psychological health, with potential to influence the links of stress-related experiences with burnout and well-being over time. Using a longitudinal design, perceived social support and negative social interactions were examined as potential moderators of the temporal stress-burnout and burnout-well-being relationships. American collegiate athletes (N = 465) completed reliable and valid online assessments of study variables at four time points during the competitive season. After controlling for dispositional and conceptually important variables, social support and negative social interactions did not moderate the stress-burnout or burnout-well-being relationships, respectively, but did simultaneously contribute to burnout and well-being across the competitive season. The results showcase the importance of sport-related social perceptions to athlete psychological outcomes over time and inform development of socially driven interventions to improve the psychological health of competitive athletes.

  3. The effect of social support and school- and community-based sports on youth physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurc, Andrew R; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2009-01-01

    To examine how social support, participation in intramurals, varsity and community sports are associated with physical activity among Ontario secondary school students, and explore gender differences in the prevalence of physical activity and participation in school- and community-based sports. Data from 25,416 students (grades 9-12) attending 76 Ontario secondary schools were collected using the School Health Action, Planning, and Evaluation System (SHAPES). Logistic regression analyses examined how social support and school- and community-based sports participation were associated with physical activity. Males and females with low social support for physical activity were less likely to be active than their lower-risk peers (males: OR 0.61; females: OR 0.72). Males and females were more likely to be active if they participated in intramural activities (males: OR 1.92; females: OR 1.55), varsity sports (males: OR 1.93; females: OR 1.77), or community sports (males: OR 2.84; females: OR 2.90). Since students with low social support for physical activity were less likely to be active, interventions to increase support and engagement in physical activity should be targeted to these students. In addition, considering that participation in school- and community-based sports increases the likelihood that students were active, practitioners should seek to enhance opportunities for participation in and access to these programs in order to increase the level of activity obtained by students.

  4. Effects of a new sports companion on received social support and physical exercise: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackow, Pamela; Scholz, Urte; Hornung, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    The role of social support in physical exercise is well documented. However, the majority of studies that investigate the associations between social support and physical exercise target perceived instead of received social support. Moreover, most studies investigate the effects of received social support using a descriptive correlational design. Thus, our study aimed at investigating the effects of received social support by conducting an intervention study. Participants were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 118) or control group (n = 102). The intervention comprised regularly exercising with a new sports companion for eight weeks. To investigate the time course of physical exercise and received social support, growth curve modelling was employed. Generally, both groups were able to improve their physical exercise. However, the control group tended to decrease again during the final point of measurement. Received social support, however, decreased slightly in the control group, but remained stable in the intervention group. The intervention was suitable to sustain received social support for physical exercise across a two-month interval. Overall, these findings highlight the importance of further investigating social support for physical exercise applying an experimental approach. © 2014 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  5. Practicing What We Preach: Investigating the Role of Social Support in Sport Psychologists’ Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Hannah M.; MacIntyre, Tadhg E.; O’Shea, Deirdre; Campbell, Mark J.; Igou, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Well-being and mental health of psychologists and their clients can be strongly linked to the psychologists’ experience of work. We know from general theories of occupational health psychology that certain work factors will have a greater impact on well-being than others. Work engagement is positively related with occupational health, while burnout and workaholic tendencies relate negatively. An individual’s resources can buffer against these negative effects. Specifically, the environmental resource of social support can impede the impact and instance of workaholism and has a positive influence on burnout. Social support is often encouraged by sport psychologists in protecting an athlete’s well-being. Drawing on theory and research from work and organizational, health and social psychology we explore the lived experiences of burnout and work engagement among applied sport psychologists, investigating their perceptions of how these experiences impact their well-being. Thirty participants from five countries were asked, using semi-structured interviews, to recall specific incidents when feelings of work engagement and burnout occurred. We examined the influence of social support and its impact on these incidents. Thematic analysis revealed that burnout is frequently experienced despite high levels of work engagement. Sources of social support differ between groups of high burnout versus low burnout, as does reference to the dimensions of work engagement. Avenues for future research including investigating the role of mindfulness and therapeutic lifestyle changes for practitioners are outlined. PMID:26696923

  6. Practicing what we preach: Investigating the role of social support in sport psychologists well-being.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eMcCormack

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Well-being and mental health of psychologists and their clients can be strongly linked to the psychologists’ experience of work. We know from general theories of occupational health psychology that certain work factors will have a greater impact on well-being than others. Work engagement is positively related with occupational health, while burnout and workaholic tendencies relate negatively. An individual’s resources can buffer against these negative effects. Specifically, the environmental resource of social support can impede the impact and instance of workaholism and has a positive influence on burnout. Social support is often encouraged by sport psychologists in protecting an athlete’s well-being. Drawing on theory and research from work and organisational, health and social psychology we explore the lived experiences of burnout and work engagement among applied sport psychologists, investigating their perceptions of how these experiences impact their well-being. Thirty participants from five countries were asked, using semi-structured interviews, to recall specific incidents when feelings of work engagement and burnout occurred. We examined the influence of social support and its impact on these incidents. Thematic analysis revealed that burnout is frequently experienced despite high levels of work engagement. Sources of social support differ between groups of high burnout versus low burnout, as does reference to the dimensions of work engagement. Avenues for future research including investigating the role of mindfulness and therapeutic lifestyle changes for practitioners are outlined.

  7. [Effects of social support on the adjustment to extracurricular sports activities among junior high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshi, Ryoko; Sekizawa, Keiko

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that when students received and/or provided either support for skill improvement or support for interpersonal relations, their overall adjustment level in extracurricular activities would be higher than for students who received and/or provided neither support. Data were analyzed from 475 junior high school students (female 175, male 300) who were taking extracurricular sports activities, out of 743 research participants. The results were as follows. Students who received support mainly for skill improvement showed a statistically equivalent adjustment level as students who received support mainly for interpersonal relations. Students who received either support showed higher adjustment levels than students who received neither. Additionally, providing support showed the same results. The exchange of different types of social support showed equivalent effects on the adjustment level as the exchange of the same type of social support. These results suggest that even though the types of social support are different for skill improvement or interpersonal relations, the exchange of support positively contributes to junior high school students' adjustment level in extracurricular activities.

  8. Sport and Social Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Howard L., II

    Sport is examined in relation to a number of basic aspects of social organization. Each of the seven sections includes a brief clarification of the key sociological concepts used for analysis, a consideration of various applications of those concepts to sport, and a review and discussion of what is known about specific aspects of sport in relation…

  9. Sport and Social Inequalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaaij, R.; Farquharson, K.; Marjoribanks, T.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent research on the relationship between sport and social inequalities, focusing on gender, race, nation and social mobility. Through an engagement with these areas of research, we highlight how sport reflects and reinforces broader hierarchical structures; how it serves as a

  10. [Investigation on occupational stress, social support and job burnout of the staffs in sport goods chain stores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H Y; Wei, W

    2018-02-20

    Objective: To understand the relationship between occupational stress, social support and job burnout, and to explore the moderating role of social support for occupational stress and job burnout. Methods: 256 employees were conveniently chosen to engage in a survey, including occupational stress indicator (OSI) , social support rating scale (SSRS) as well as maslach burnout inventory-general survey (MBI-GS) from March to June in 2017. Results: The occupational stress score of the stafls in sport goods Chain stores was 55.5 ± 11.7, the score of social support was 28.2 ± 7.6, and the score of job burnaut was 41.3 ± 11.6. Occupational stress was positively correlated with job burnout ( r =0.425, P stress was negatively related to objective support, subjective support and support utilization ( r values were-0.182, -0.227, and-0.208, P stress and subjective support and support utilization were statistically significant ( β values were-0.069 and-0.077, P stress and job burnout, especially in subjective support and support utilization.

  11. Social Support and Recovery from Sport Injury: Elite Skiers Share Their Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Theresa

    2001-01-01

    Interviewed elite skiers who had recovered from serious injuries about stress associated with injury and the role of social support in recovery. Skiers needed various types of emotional, informational, and tangible support from the occurrence of injury through the return to full activity. Treatment team members, ski team members and home support…

  12. Socialization via Sport - Process of Re - socialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yılmaz KAPLAN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Socialization is a process that a part of a specific culture and a specific member of society. The aim of this study is to discuss how sport effects to socialization of children and young, and re - socialization of adults.The study is a descriptive, theoretical and conceptive study. Acc ording to some studies that sport is an obtained gain in socialization process. Sport, especially team sports learned to children and young that how to behave in social group and how to control their behaviors. According a study, young people who after the start of sportive activities, its seen that “they evaluate their leisure time more beneficially” (98.6%, “they understand the importance of team working” (95.8%, “they are aware of their responsibility” (97.2% and “they gain planning study habit” (94,4 %. In addition to sport effected socialization that “understanding the importance of division of labor and solidarity” (93%, “be aware and be more careful of social rules” (92.3%, and “be tolerant of others idea and beliefs” (88.7% (Bulgu&Akcan, 2003;1 57 - 159. If the sportive activities be on children and young life, it’s an important and effective communication tools. Sport, improves social relationship and decrease social distance. Sport requires feel empathy with someone and improves the empathy hab it. Sport contributes the children and young for self - expression to be truer and better. Sport is an effective tool for to be important and meaningful part of group. Sport contributes the children and young for become integrated with a group. Also sport pl aying important role for reinforcement to solidarity and to gain the habit of obey the rules. Sport makes a major contribute socialization and re - socialization of children and young. Accordingly these results, sport has to play active role in social life a nd instructional program.

  13. Parental attachment as a mediator between parental social support and self-esteem as perceived by Korean sports middle and high school athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sangwook; Jeon, Hyunsoo; Kwon, Sungho; Park, Seungha

    2015-02-01

    This study examined whether parental attachment mediates the relationship between parental social support and self-esteem in Korean middle and high school athletes. 591 sports athletes attending middle and high schools that specialize in sport volunteered. Parental social support and parental attachment had a significant positive effect on self-esteem; parental attachment had a greater effect on self-esteem. In the structural relationship, direct effects of parental social support on self-esteem were weak, but indirect effects through parental attachment were strong. Therefore, parental attachment complementally mediated the relationship between parental social support and self-esteem. Metric invariance was supported for groups categorized by sex, region, and school level, confirming that the model could be applied to various groups.

  14. Sports participation as a protective factor against depression and suicidal ideation in adolescents as mediated by self-esteem and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiss, Lindsay A; Gangwisch, James E

    2009-10-01

    Participation in sports has been shown to be protective against depression and suicidal ideation, but little is known about what factors mediate these relationships. No previous studies examined potential mediators between sports participation and suicidal ideation and only one study explored possible mediators between sports participation and depression. Increased sports participation could protect against depression and suicidal ideation by increasing endogenous endorphin levels, boosting self-esteem, improving body image, increasing social support, and affecting substance abuse. Multivariate hierarchical logistic regression analyses of Add Health data to explore whether increased participation in sports (none, 1-2, 3-4, or 5 or more times per week) is associated with depression and suicidal ideation and whether exercise, self-esteem, body weight, social support, and substance abuse mediate these relationships. As sports participation increases, the odds of suffering from depression decreases by 25% (OR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.70-0.82) and the odds of having suicidal ideation decreases by 12% (OR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.83-0.93) after controlling for sex, age, race/ethnicity, public assistance, and physical limitations. Substance abuse, body weight, and exercise did not mediate these associations. Consistent with self-esteem and social support acting as mediators of these relationships, the inclusion of these variables in the multivariate models attenuated the associations for depression (OR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.75-0.91) and suicidal ideation (OR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.88-0.99). Adolescents should be offered ample opportunity and encouragement to participate in sports, which can protect against depression and suicidal ideation by boosting self-esteem and increasing social support.

  15. Sport supporting act: terminology issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Vlček

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The text deals with terminology issues from an interdisciplinary point of view. It is based on two different disciplines, law and kinanthropology, in an area of their overlap. AIM: The aim of the author is to point out some possible legislative problems, which could arise due to the current reading of the sport supporting act (Act no. 115/2001. The second aim of the author is to contribute to the discussion of kinantropologists (possibly also the educational researchers and lawyers and to stress the importance of the systematic approach to terminology formulation. METHODS: The author uses the method of language interpretation. We also use the basic analytical methods, induction and deduction, while we stress the systematic approach to the term formulation. RESULTS: The analysis of the sport supporting act terminology shows some specific legislative problems, which could arise due to the definition of sport in the sport supporting act. The author discusses a possible alternative solution. CONCLUSION: According to the opinion of the author, clear, obvious and unified terminology of kinantropologists as specialists in their discipline should represent a source, from which other sciences could derive their terminology. Defined and inexpert terminology used in other disciplines should not be used as an argument for its adopting in kinanthropology.

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility through Education and Sport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Eugenia Iamandi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the need to tackle in a sustainable way the new economic and social requirements particularly induced by the recent financial crisis, corporate social responsibility (CSR is one envisaged solution at community and organizational level, because of its win-win strategic potential. More than that, acknowledging the economic impact of strongly supporting social domains like education and sport, the European Union (EU has designed new measures for developing the human potential during 2014-2020 period. Following these two rationales, the main research objective is to emphasize the relationship between CSR and corporate support for educational and sport projects of top performing companies in Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia in the post-crisis period. Four main issues are investigated in detail regarding the corporate support for education and sport areas through CSR initiatives, namely existence of corporate involvement, forms of commitment, reasons for engagement, and main beneficiaries of implication. The research methodology focuses on empirical and analytical perspectives, while the results show new facets and implications of CSR initiatives in education and sport domains, but also a set of similarities and differences between the analysed EU countries. Economic and social impacts are also examined, as well as future research directions.

  17. ‘That is like a 24 hours-day tournament!’: using social media to further an authentic sport experience within sport education

    OpenAIRE

    Luguetti, C; Goodyear, VA; Andre, MH

    2017-01-01

    Several studies demonstrate that Sport Education supports the development of an authentic experience of sport. Social media has the potential to further the development of an authentic sport experience since it is a key aspect of contemporary sport culture and can be a space for individuals to interact during the Sport Education. Yet the evidence-base on the use of social media within Sport Education is limited. The purpose of this study was to explore how social media supports the developmen...

  18. Creating social impact with sport events

    OpenAIRE

    Hover, P.; Dijk, B.; Breedveld, K.; Eekeren, F.J.A. van; Slender, H.

    2016-01-01

    All over the world, sport events are seen as significant tools for creating positive social impact. This is understandable, as sport events have the power to attract enthusiastic participants, volunteers and to reach large audiences of visitors and followers via (social) media. Outbursts of excitement, pleasure and feelings of camaraderie are experienced among millions of people in the case of mega events. Still, a fairly large section of the population does not care that much for sports. Som...

  19. Creating social impact with sport events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hover, P.; Dijk, B.; Breedveld, K.; Eekeren, F.J.A. van; Slender, H.

    2016-01-01

    All over the world, sport events are seen as significant tools for creating positive social impact. This is understandable, as sport events have the power to attract enthusiastic participants, volunteers and to reach large audiences of visitors and followers via (social) media. Outbursts of

  20. Organizational socialization in team sport environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A J; Evans, M B; Eys, M A

    2016-04-01

    Socialization tactics are often used to manage initial group member interactions in a way that facilitates transition experiences. Although this process is heavily researched in organizational contexts, we sought to extend this line of inquiry to sport by examining the nature of socialization tactics used to integrate new members into existing teams. Interviews were conducted with 12 coaches and 12 athletes from several Canadian Interuniversity Sport teams to explore the nature of socialization and the circumstances underscoring why certain approaches are taken over others. A key process involved establishing congruency of role expectations between incoming athletes and group leaders, and socialization processes balanced expectations of conformity with encouragement of individual personalities within the group. A conceptual basis to examine socialization into team sport environments is discussed in relation to the extant organizational theories, and the practical implications of delineating sport socialization tactics are forwarded. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Selected Sports Bras: Overall Comfort and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, LaJean; Lorentzen, Deana

    This study evaluated currently marketed sports bras on subjective measures of comfort and support both within an entire group of women and within cup sizes, correlated the subjective measures of comfort and support with previously reported biomechanical findings of support on the same bras, and further developed empirically based guidelines for…

  2. Impact of social media in sports marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Gadiraju, Gaurav Kumar

    2016-01-01

    JEL: M1 - Business Administration; M31 – Marketing; M37 - Advertising The purpose of this research is to evaluate the impact of social media in the field of sports marketing. This is carried out through an in-depth analysis on sports marketing and the rising popularity of social media marketing for sports brands in the world. One such brand is Nike, Inc. This company has shifted its focus to digital marketing. As social media marketing started to explode, the traditional marketing methods ...

  3. Sport, public relations and social media

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Raymond; Haynes, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This chapter examines the disruptive nature of social media as it alters the relationship between sports journalism and public relations. It looks at some key examples and argues that while much is changing, some aspects of the relationship between the media and sports also remain constant.

  4. Social neighborhood environment and sports participation among Dutch adults: does sports location matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D; Stronks, K; Maas, J; Wingen, M; Kunst, A E

    2015-04-01

    Studies on the relation between the social neighborhood environment and sports participation have produced inconsistent results. Use of generic sports outcomes may have obscured associations only apparent for sports at certain locations. This study aims to assess the association between the social neighborhood environment and three location-specific sports outcomes. Repeated cross-sectional data on sports participation (any type of sports, sports at indoor sports clubs, sports at outdoor sports clubs, sports on streets) were obtained from 20 600 adults using the Dutch national health survey 2006-2009. Data on neighborhood social safety and social capital were obtained using the Dutch Housing Research 2006. Over 40% of Dutch adults participated in any type of sports. Indoor sports clubs were most popular. Multilevel logistic regression analyses revealed that neighborhood social safety was positively associated with sports at indoor sports clubs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.48), but not with the other sports outcomes. Contrary, neighborhood social capital was positively associated with sports on streets only (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.17-2.44). The results suggest that a positive social neighborhood environment enhances sports participation, but that this impact depends on the location of the sports activity. This study highlights the importance of using location-specific sports outcomes when assessing environmental determinants. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. An Examination of Reciprocal Influences in Sport Socialization

    OpenAIRE

    海老原, 修; 横山, 文人; 宮下, 充正

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to clarify reciprocal influences in sport socialization. Parent-effects were assessed by their sport involvement before their child participated in organized sport, whereas child-effects were measured by a parent's attitudinal and behavioral changes of sport involvement caused by a child's participation. Eight indicators of sport involvement were selected as follows: 3 types of interest in sport involvement such as activities, sport consumption, and sport activity in o...

  6. Sport and Social Change. Socialist Feminist Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Catherine

    1988-01-01

    Though the number of women in sport and the productive labor force have increased, the lower levels of support and pay indicate devaluing by a capitalist patriarchal society. A socialist feminist theory of sport participation by women foresees the possibility of a nonpatriarchal capitalist society. (JD)

  7. ASPECTS OF SOCIAL INTEGRATION OF MENTALLY DISABLED PEOPLE THROUGH SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Dan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Practiced in educational institutions but also in leisure, sport became a profession requiring not only active involvement but also participation to the show offered by him, thus having a large social area. Purpose. Emphasizing the importance of sport as a primary approach of social integration for people with mental disabilities. Methods. We analyzed the specialized literature using bibliographic study and we identified a total of 23 references from which we selected a number of 12 bibliographic materials that were representative to bring an additional argument to the importance of sport as a primary approach of social integration of persons with mental disabilities. In terms of form documents were consulted books and journals, various graphic and electronic information sources (internet. Results. Bibliographic references cited support the idea of the importance of social integration of people with mental disabilities through sports and they are addressing different aspects that together provide an overview of the complexity of this process, emphasizing the necessity to develop the right environment, both in terms of material and human resources, to achieve this goal in optimal conditions. Discussions. Scientific research results and practical experience have shown the importance of exercise practice in general, and sport, especially for people with disabilities, which leads to the idea that the state, society must give more importance to the role of sport in his social policy and strategy regarding the protection of persons with disabilities.

  8. The social impact of sport: cross-cultural perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaaij, R.

    2011-01-01

    1. Introduction: The Social Impact of Sport: Diversities, Complexities and Contexts Ramon Spaaij Part 1: Sport development and social change: intended and unanticipated consequences 2. The Transnational View of Sport and Social Development: The Case of Dominican Baseball Alan Klein 3. The Glue that

  9. Striving for fairness in Paralympic sport - Support from applied sport ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1948, Sir Ludwig Guttmann organised a sports competition involving World War II veterans with spinal cord injuries in Stoke Mandeville, England. Dr Guttmann worked towards rehabilitating World War II soldiers by involving them in competitive sports. Four years later, competitors from the Netherlands joined the games ...

  10. Social neighborhood environment and sports participation among Dutch adults: does sports location matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, D.; Stronks, K.; Maas, J.; Wingen, M.; Kunst, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the relation between the social neighborhood environment and sports participation have produced inconsistent results. Use of generic sports outcomes may have obscured associations only apparent for sports at certain locations. This study aims to assess the association between the social

  11. Social neighborhood environment and sports participation among Dutch adults: Does sports location matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, D.; Stronks, K.; Maas, J.; Wingen, M.; Kunst, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the relation between the social neighborhood environment and sports participation have produced inconsistent results. Use of generic sports outcomes may have obscured associations only apparent for sports at certain locations. This study aims to assess the association between the social

  12. A Social Identity Approach to Sport Psychology: Principles, Practice, and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Tim; Alexander Haslam, S; Coffee, Pete; Lavallee, David

    2015-08-01

    Drawing on social identity theory and self-categorization theory, we outline an approach to sport psychology that understands groups not simply as features of sporting contexts but rather as elements that can be, and often are, incorporated into a person's sense of self and, through this, become powerful determinants of their sport-related behavior. The underpinnings of this social identity approach are outlined, and four key lessons for sport that are indicative of the analytical and practical power of the approach are presented. These suggest that social identity is the basis for sports group (1) behavior, (2) formation and development, (3) support and stress appraisal, and (4) leadership. Building on recent developments within sport science, we outline an agenda for future research by identifying a range of topics to which the social identity approach could fruitfully contribute.

  13. Social inequalities in young children's sports participation and outdoor play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I. Wijtzes (Anne); W. Jansen (Wilma); S.H. Bouthoorn (Selma); N. Pot (Niek); A. Hofman (Albert); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); H. Raat (Hein)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractResearch on social inequalities in sports participation and unstructured physical activity among young children is scarce. This study aimed to assess the associations of family socioeconomic position (SEP) and ethnic background with children's sports participation and outdoor play.

  14. Social inequalities in young children's sports participation and outdoor play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, A.I.; Jansen, W.; Bouthoorn, S.H.; Pot, J.N.; Hofman, A.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Raat, H.

    2014-01-01

    Research on social inequalities in sports participation and unstructured physical activity among young children is scarce. This study aimed to assess the associations of family socioeconomic position (SEP) and ethnic background with children's sports participation and outdoor play. Methods: We

  15. THE SOCIAL DRAMATURGY OF SPORT: TOWARDS AN INTEGRATIVE GOFFMANIAN MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA-LUIZA DUMITRIU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the social field of sports within the general frame of social dramaturgy, by using three metaphors that are grounded on Goffman’s conceptual field: sport as play, sport as game and sport as ritual. After discussing “what”, “how” and “to what extent” can Goffman’s concepts be re-contextualized in understanding the dynamics of the sport acts, I went further and integrated the three metaphors into a more comprehensive analytic model. The multidimensional model of sport dramaturgy that I have built around Goffman’s hard-core concepts covers: the dramaturgical dimension, the strategic dimension and the ritual dimension of sport acting as complementary elements that can provide an integrative perspective upon the sport dynamics. Every dimension of this interactional model implies a specific definition for the competitive situation, for the sport actor and for his dispositional orientation when faced with a competitive situation

  16. The challenges of playing abroad: How to support sports expatriates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Bakel, Marian; Salzbrenner, Susan

    Professional athletes moving abroad for their career is a novel phenomenon in IHRM. This exploratory paper charts the motives of sports expatriates to move abroad to play, as well as integration support and challenges. A survey was conducted with 108 sports expatriates in nine different sports....... Our paper contributes to the literature because it is one of the first studies focusing on sports expatriates from an international HR perspective. Our study provides information on a vulnerable group of expatriates; they are young and live under extreme performance pressure. Sports expatriates need...

  17. Sport as an Instrument for Social Cohesion in Nigeria | Jeroh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was recommended that governments from federal to local should encourage mass participation in sports by providing sports infrastructures nationwide. Physical and sport education should be mandatory at all levels of education. Keywords: Meritocratric; Federal character; Chauvinists; Social transformation; Over-aged; ...

  18. Maternal and paternal beliefs, support and parenting as determinants of sport participation of adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggelman, Dana; van de Ven, Monique O M; van Schayck, Onno C P; Engels, Rutger C M E; van Sluijs, Esther M F

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have examined determinants of physical activity in patients with chronic illnesses, like asthma. The aim of this study was to examine whether baseline maternal and paternal beliefs, support and parenting were associated with changes in sport participation of adolescents with asthma, and investigate the moderating effect of sex. In a population-based cohort study, during home visits in 2012 and 2013, 253 adolescents completed a questionnaire assessing their sport participation. Both parents reported their sport-specific parenting (support, general and asthma-specific beliefs, self-efficacy to encourage sport participation). The collected data was described using descriptive statistics. Path and multi-group analyses were used to examine whether baseline parental factors predicted change in adolescent sport participation, multi-group analyses examined the moderating effect of sex. For all analyses probability p value less than the accepted level of significance α = 0.05 (p sport participation of the adolescents, sex did not moderate the associations. In the fully adjusted models, only maternal asthma-specific beliefs about sport participation were significantly positively associated with change in adolescent sport participation. Sport-specific parenting does not appear to be a determinant of sport participation in adolescents with asthma. Future research should consider other individual, social and environmental determinants to inform intervention development.

  19. Social cohesion, sexuality, homophobia and women's sport in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the post-Apartheid era sport has been consistently celebrated as an avenue for fostering social change, curing various social ills, and uniting South Africans across the divides of race, class, gender and geography. The argument for using sport to foster social cohesion in South Africa rests on two main assumptions: firstly, ...

  20. Stress and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqutayan, Shadiya

    2011-01-01

    This is an experimental study and it discusses the effectiveness of social support in managing academic stress among students. The purpose of this study is to understand the importance of social support in managing stress. Simple random sampling was assigned to a number of 120 students, equally divided into an experimental and a control group. Classes on social support as coping mechanisms were given to the experimental group only. The accumulated data were then analyzed, descriptive statistics were used to interpret and evaluate the prevalence of academic stress, and social support. Correlation analysis was employed in the examination of the relationship between stress and social support. The findings of this study indicate that there are significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in relation to stress and social support. Eventually, the experimental group proved to cope with academic stress better than the control group, and they were satisfied with their academic performance during the experimentation. Hence, it is highly advisable to encourage the students to use social support as coping mechanisms.

  1. Education of Social Responsibility among Sports Schools Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Romualdas K.; Juodsnukis, Dalius R.

    2017-01-01

    Research aim was to analyze peculiarities of education of social responsibility among football sports school students. We hypothesized that after the educational program sport school students will have more developed social responsibility. The total sample comprised 52 male students. Experimental group consisted of 26 and the control group of 26…

  2. [A quantitative approach to sports training-adapted social determinants concerning sport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis-Gómez, Martina K; Neira-Tolosa, Nury A

    2013-01-01

    Identifying and quantitatively analysing social determinants affecting disabled teenagers' inclusion/exclusion in high-performance sports. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study involving 19 12- to 19-year-old athletes suffering physical and sensory disability and 17 staff from the District Institute of Recreation and Sport. Likert-type rating scales were used, based on four analysis categories, i.e. social structure, socio-economic, educational and living condition determinants. Social inequity pervades the national paralympic sports' system. This is because 74 % of individuals only become recognised as sportspeople when they have obtained meritorious results in set competition without appropriate conditions having been previously provided by such paralympic sports institution to enable them to overcome structural and intermediate barriers. The social structure imposed on district-based paralympic sport stigmatises individuals regarding their individual abilities, affects their empowerment and freedom due to the discrimination experienced by disabled teenagers regarding their competitive achievements.

  3. The comparison of social skill levels of team sports athletes and individual sport athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Çepikkurt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study is to compare the level of social skills scores of undergraduate students at Mersin University School of Physical Education and Sports according to sport types, gender and class levels. Material and Methods: To test the main hypothesis, a total of 112 student- athletes (47 female and 65 male, performing individual and team sports from the Mersin University School of Physical Education and Sports were involved in this study. Data were collected by ‘Social Skills Inventory” developed by Riggio (1986, 1989 and adapted to Turkish by Yüksel (1998. Results: T -test results showed that the mean scores of 6 sub-dimensions of social skills scale does not change with regard to types of sports. But, there were significant differences of mean scores of social control changes with respect to gender and this score was higher for female athletes compared to male counterparts. Moreover, the results of Kruskal Wallis Analysis indicated that there was a significant difference in all sub dimensions except emotional awareness subscale compared to class level. First year students had the highest scores in terms of emotional expressivity, emotional control, social expressivity, social awareness, and social control. Conclusion: It could be stated that women are more successful in social skills, although the level of social skills of student-athletes does not differ according to sport.

  4. Are neighbourhood social capital and availability of sports facilities related to sports participation among Dutch adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Richard G; Mohnen, Sigrid M; van Lenthe, Frank J; Brug, Johannes; Oenema, Anke

    2012-07-31

    The aim of this study is to explore whether availability of sports facilities, parks, and neighbourhood social capital (NSC) and their interaction are associated with leisure time sports participation among Dutch adolescents. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted on complete data from the last wave of the YouRAction evaluation trial. Adolescents (n = 852) completed a questionnaire asking for sports participation, perceived NSC and demographics. Ecometric methods were used to aggregate perceived NSC to zip code level. Availability of sports facilities and parks was assessed by means of geographic information systems within the zip-code area and within a 1600 meter buffer. Multilevel logistic regression analyses, with neighborhood and individual as levels, were conducted to examine associations between physical and social environmental factors and leisure time sports participation. Simple slopes analysis was conducted to decompose interaction effects. NSC was significantly associated with sports participation (OR: 3.51 (95%CI: 1.18;10.41)) after adjustment for potential confounders. Availability of sports facilities and availability of parks were not associated with sports participation. A significant interaction between NSC and density of parks within the neighbourhood area (OR: 1.22 (90%CI: 1.01;1.34)) was found. Decomposition of the interaction term showed that adolescents were most likely to engage in leisure time sports when both availability of parks and NSC were highest. The results of this study indicate that leisure time sports participation is associated with levels of NSC, but not with availability of parks or sports facilities. In addition, NSC and availability of parks in the zip code area interacted in such a way that leisure time sports participation is most likely among adolescents living in zip code areas with higher levels of NSC, and higher availability of parks. Hence, availability of parks appears only to be important for leisure time

  5. Are neighbourhood social capital and availability of sports facilities related to sports participation among Dutch adolescents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Prins (Remco); S.M. Mohnen (Sigrid); F.J. van Lenthe (Frank); J. Brug (Hans); A. Oenema (Anke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The aim of this study is to explore whether availability of sports facilities, parks, and neighbourhood social capital (NSC) and their interaction are associated with leisure time sports participation among Dutch adolescents.Methods: Cross-sectional analyses were conducted on

  6. Are neighbourhood social capital and availability of sports facilities related to sports participation among Dutch adolescents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, R.G.; Mohnen, S.M.; van Lenthe, F.; Brug, J.; Oenema, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to explore whether availability of sports facilities, parks, and neighbourhood social capital (NSC) and their interaction are associated with leisure time sports participation among Dutch adolescents.Methods: Cross-sectional analyses were conducted on complete

  7. Generalization of social anxiety to sporting and athletic situations: gender, sports involvement, and parental pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, P J; Burns, J A; Hope, D A; Bauer, B K

    2000-01-01

    Although researchers have documented that social anxiety may occur in a wide range of interpersonal and performance situations, little attention has been paid to the potential influence of social anxiety on participation in athletics or physical activity. The performance demands of sport and potential social evaluative nature of exercise make it likely that social anxiety would generalize to these situations. Given the physical and psychological benefits of engaging in regular physical activity, avoidance of such activities by socially anxious individuals may have profound health consequences. One-hundred and eighty undergraduate university students completed a battery of standardized social anxiety measures, and a series of 5-point Likert-type questions examining fear and avoidance of sporting and athletic situations. Results indicated that social anxiety and fear of negative evaluation were generally related to social-evaluative fears in sporting or athletic situations, particularly for women. Furthermore, social anxiety was positively correlated with avoidance of individual sporting activities, but not with avoidance of team activities. Further analyses revealed social anxiety did not differ by competition level. However, for men, familial pressure to play sports during high school was associated with higher fear of negative evaluation. Implications for the assessment and treatment of social anxiety disorder are discussed.

  8. Which wider social roles? : An analysis of social roles ascribed to voluntary sports clubs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waardenburg, M.

    2016-01-01

    It has long been established that voluntary sports clubs (VSCs) are ascribed a prominent social role by governments. Several scholars highlight the ascribed social values in sport policy to voluntary sports clubs and their possible implications for these voluntary organizations. Most of these

  9. The Application of Social Network Analysis to Team Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusher, Dean; Robins, Garry; Kremer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews how current social network analysis might be used to investigate individual and group behavior in sporting teams. Social network analysis methods permit researchers to explore social relations between team members and their individual-level qualities simultaneously. As such, social network analysis can be seen as augmenting…

  10. Online social support networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neil; Atreja, Ashish

    2015-04-01

    Peer support groups have a long history and have been shown to improve health outcomes. With the increasing familiarity with online social networks like Facebook and ubiquitous access to the Internet, online social support networks are becoming popular. While studies have shown the benefit of these networks in providing emotional support or meeting informational needs, robust data on improving outcomes such as a decrease in health services utilization or reduction in adverse outcomes is lacking. These networks also pose unique challenges in the areas of patient privacy, funding models, quality of content, and research agendas. Addressing these concerns while creating patient-centred, patient-powered online support networks will help leverage these platforms to complement traditional healthcare delivery models in the current environment of value-based care.

  11. [Social support after traumatism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maercker, A; Heim, E; Hecker, T; Thoma, M V

    2017-01-01

    The classical concept of social support has recently become of relevance again, particularly in the context of traumatized patient groups, which include refugees and migrants. This article summarizes the evidence from social support research, e. g. different types of positive effects as well as context, gender and cultural aspects. These aspects are highlighted by means of studies stemming from applied healthcare research and thus describe a wide range of health effects, e.g. increased well-being and reduced depressive symptoms, improved functional abilities, better immune status and longevity. Two new trauma-specific differentiations of the social support concept are introduced: societal acknowledgement as a trauma survivor and disclosure of traumatic experiences. Against this background several implications for working with refugees arise: promotion of self-efficacy and posttraumatic maturation as well as the treatment of mental disorders show considerable benefits from focusing on social support. Finally, possibilities emerging from digital communication media are discussed, which are particularly relevant in this context.

  12. Sport psychology group consultation using social networking web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Frederick; Shipherd, Amber M; Gershgoren, Lael; Filho, Edson Medeiros; Basevitch, Itay

    2012-08-01

    A social networking Web site, Facebook, was used to deliver long-term sport psychology consultation services to student-athletes (i.e., soccer players) in 30- to 60-min weekly sessions. Additional short-term team building, group cohesion, communication, anger management, injury rehabilitation, mental toughness, commitment, and leadership workshops were provided. Cohesion and overall relationships between both the student-athletes and the sport psychology consultants benefited from this process. Social networking Web sites offer a practical way of providing sport psychology consulting services that does not require use of major resources. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Social network analysis applied to team sports analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Clemente, Filipe Manuel; Mendes, Rui Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Explaining how graph theory and social network analysis can be applied to team sports analysis, This book presents useful approaches, models and methods that can be used to characterise the overall properties of team networks and identify the prominence of each team player. Exploring the different possible network metrics that can be utilised in sports analysis, their possible applications and variances from situation to situation, the respective chapters present an array of illustrative case studies. Identifying the general concepts of social network analysis and network centrality metrics, readers are shown how to generate a methodological protocol for data collection. As such, the book provides a valuable resource for students of the sport sciences, sports engineering, applied computation and the social sciences.

  14. Scorebox extraction from mobile sports videos using Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonjun; Park, Jimin; Kim, Changick

    2008-08-01

    Scorebox plays an important role in understanding contents of sports videos. However, the tiny scorebox may give the small-display-viewers uncomfortable experience in grasping the game situation. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to extract the scorebox from sports video frames. We first extract candidates by using accumulated intensity and edge information after short learning period. Since there are various types of scoreboxes inserted in sports videos, multiple attributes need to be used for efficient extraction. Based on those attributes, the optimal information gain is computed and top three ranked attributes in terms of information gain are selected as a three-dimensional feature vector for Support Vector Machines (SVM) to distinguish the scorebox from other candidates, such as logos and advertisement boards. The proposed method is tested on various videos of sports games and experimental results show the efficiency and robustness of our proposed method.

  15. Enhancing life prospects of socially vulnerable youth through sport participation: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Super, Sabina; Hermens, Niels; Verkooijen, Kirsten; Koelen, Maria

    2014-07-09

    stakeholders in the sport context. The results of this study can support efforts of youth care organisations and local sport clubs to improve the life prospects of socially vulnerable youth through sport participation. Trialregister.nl NTR4621 Date of Registration: 2 June 2014.

  16. Sports, Global Politics, and Social Value Change: A Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rensmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite their important role in forging, constructing and self-ascribing social identities and shaping popular culture, sports have long been a marginalized subject of social science inquiry, cultural studies, and research on international politics. Only in recent years this has begun to change. The article seeks to advance the still nascent but emerging cross-disciplinary field of research on sports and global politics in two ways: first, by addressing largely unexplored issues of sports, politics, and social conflicts, putting the spotlight on sociopolitical arenas beyond commercialized sports mega events, which have attracted most scholarly attention in contemporary research; and second, by generating hypotheses on the indirect political effects of sports cultures, in particular on the relationship between local social identities—reinforced through sports—and cosmopolitan value change. These interlinked spatial and substantive claims ground a new critical research framework and agenda: it examines sports as profoundly embedded in socioeconomic, cultural and political forms of rule and domination but also seeks to disclose sports’ emancipatory and subversive potential in advancing globalization from below.

  17. Sport er hverken sundt eller social

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tem Frank

    2013-01-01

    Jeg deler ikke Lasch og Kayser Nielsens konklusioner, selvom jeg er meget enig i, at sport er dirty business. Min analyse peger i den retning, at sporten i sin organiserede form ikke er eller kan fungere som leverandør af nogen ”pakkeløsning”. Men sport kan sagtens bidrage med brudstykker til noget...... meningsfuldt, for det enkelte menneske, eller det enkelte lokalsamfund. Sporten kan ikke længere, hvis den skal fremstå som noget ideal, levere en hel pakke, en fuldstændig myte med tilhørende ritualer. Sport kan imidlertid som projekt fortsat godt levere stof til den meningsskabende fortælling om identitet...

  18. Social inequalities in young children's sports participation and outdoor play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijtzes, Anne I; Jansen, Wilma; Bouthoorn, Selma H; Pot, Niek; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Raat, Hein

    2014-12-16

    Research on social inequalities in sports participation and unstructured physical activity among young children is scarce. This study aimed to assess the associations of family socioeconomic position (SEP) and ethnic background with children's sports participation and outdoor play. We analyzed data from 4726 ethnically diverse 6-year-old children participating in the Generation R Study. Variables were assessed by parent-reported questionnaires when the child was 6 years old. Low level of outdoor play was defined as outdoor play p p p p p research, including qualitative studies, is needed to explore more in detail the pathways relating family SEP and ethnic background to children's sports participation and outdoor play.

  19. SOCIAL MARKETING APPROACH AS A TOOL FOR DISSEMINATION SPORT (FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF SPORT FOR ALL)

    OpenAIRE

    Akyildiz, Muge

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, organizations about “sport for all” and leisure sectors use marketing strategies and techniques to influence a target audience to voluntary participate in leisure activities. They should apply new marketing technologies and methods to endure in the developing and changing environment. One marketing strategy emphasizing the social welfare and health is social marketing. Social marketing is an application of marketing approaches from the business world to planning and management of so...

  20. Impact of Sport Context and Support on the Use of a Self-Report Measure for Athlete Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Anna E.; Main, Luana C.; Gastin, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Athlete self-report measures (ASRM) are a popular method of athlete monitoring in high-performance sports. With increasing recognition and accessibility, ASRM may potentially be utilized by athletes from diverse sport contexts. The purpose of the present study was to improve understanding of ASRM implementation across different sport contexts by observing uptake and compliance of a newly implemented ASRM over 16 weeks, and investigating the perceived roles and factors influencing implementation. Athletes (n=131) completed an electronic survey at baseline and week 16 on their perceptions and experiences with ASRM implementation respectively. Despite initial interest, only 70 athletes attempted to use the ASRM. Of these athletes, team sport athletes who were supported by their coach or sports program to use the ASRM were most compliant (p sport athletes was 28 ± 40 % and 8 ± 18 % respectively. Self-directed athletes were motivated to monitor themselves, and rated desired content and minimal burden as key factors for initial and ongoing compliance. Supported athletes were primarily motivated to comply for the benefit of their coach or sports program rather than themselves, however rated data output as a key factor for their continued use. Factors of the measure outweighed those of the social environment regardless of sport context, however the influence of social environmental factors should not be discounted. The findings of the present study demonstrate the impact of sport context on the implementation of an ASRM and the need to tailor implementation strategies accordingly. Key points Athletes perceive ASRM and the factors influencing implementation differently. Therefore, to encourage compliance, it is important to tailor implementation strategies to the athlete and their sport context to increase appeal and minimize unappealing factors. Athletes using an ASRM on their own accord typically favor a measure which meets their needs and interests, with minimal burden

  1. Sports medical app support the health and fitness of workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sietske van Berkel; Jaap Stomphorst; Hilco Prins; Marike Hettinga; Wasim Alsaqaf

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and first version of an eHealth system for sports physicians who support employees in improving their health and fitness. Regular physical activity improves quality of life and has various health benefits. Companies have an interest in the health and

  2. Social support, oxytocin, and PTSD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Miranda; Koch, Saskia B. J.; Nawijn, Laura; Frijling, Jessie L.; van Zuiden, Mirjam; Veltman, Dick J.

    2014-01-01

    A lack of social support and recognition by the environment is one of the most consistent risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and PTSD patients will recover faster with proper social support. The oxytocin system has been proposed to underlie beneficial effects of social support as

  3. Interrelation of Sport Participation, Physical Activity, Social Capital and Mental Health in Disadvantaged Communities: A SEM-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Marlier

    Full Text Available The Health through Sport conceptual model links sport participation with physical, social and psychological outcomes and stresses the need for more understanding between these outcomes. The present study aims to uncover how sport participation, physical activity, social capital and mental health are interrelated by examining these outcomes in one model.A cross-sectional survey was conducted in nine disadvantaged communities in Antwerp (Belgium. Two hundred adults (aged 18-56 per community were randomly selected and visited at home to fill out a questionnaire on socio-demographics, sport participation, physical activity, social capital and mental health. A sample of 414 adults participated in the study.Structural Equation Modeling analysis showed that sport participation (β = .095 and not total physical activity (β = .027 was associated with better mental health. No association was found between sport participation and community social capital (β = .009 or individual social capital (β = .045. Furthermore, only community social capital was linked with physical activity (β = .114, individual social capital was not (β = -.013. In contrast, only individual social capital was directly associated with mental health (β = .152, community social capital was not (β = .070.This study emphasizes the importance of sport participation and individual social capital to improve mental health in disadvantaged communities. It further gives a unique insight into the functionalities of how sport participation, physical activity, social capital and mental health are interrelated. Implications for policy are that cross-sector initiatives between the sport, social and health sector need to be supported as their outcomes are directly linked to one another.

  4. Interrelation of Sport Participation, Physical Activity, Social Capital and Mental Health in Disadvantaged Communities: A SEM-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, Mathieu; Van Dyck, Delfien; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Babiak, Kathy; Willem, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Background The Health through Sport conceptual model links sport participation with physical, social and psychological outcomes and stresses the need for more understanding between these outcomes. The present study aims to uncover how sport participation, physical activity, social capital and mental health are interrelated by examining these outcomes in one model. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in nine disadvantaged communities in Antwerp (Belgium). Two hundred adults (aged 18–56) per community were randomly selected and visited at home to fill out a questionnaire on socio-demographics, sport participation, physical activity, social capital and mental health. A sample of 414 adults participated in the study. Results Structural Equation Modeling analysis showed that sport participation (β = .095) and not total physical activity (β = .027) was associated with better mental health. No association was found between sport participation and community social capital (β = .009) or individual social capital (β = .045). Furthermore, only community social capital was linked with physical activity (β = .114), individual social capital was not (β = -.013). In contrast, only individual social capital was directly associated with mental health (β = .152), community social capital was not (β = .070). Conclusion This study emphasizes the importance of sport participation and individual social capital to improve mental health in disadvantaged communities. It further gives a unique insight into the functionalities of how sport participation, physical activity, social capital and mental health are interrelated. Implications for policy are that cross-sector initiatives between the sport, social and health sector need to be supported as their outcomes are directly linked to one another. PMID:26451731

  5. Interrelation of Sport Participation, Physical Activity, Social Capital and Mental Health in Disadvantaged Communities: A SEM-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, Mathieu; Van Dyck, Delfien; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Babiak, Kathy; Willem, Annick

    2015-01-01

    The Health through Sport conceptual model links sport participation with physical, social and psychological outcomes and stresses the need for more understanding between these outcomes. The present study aims to uncover how sport participation, physical activity, social capital and mental health are interrelated by examining these outcomes in one model. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in nine disadvantaged communities in Antwerp (Belgium). Two hundred adults (aged 18-56) per community were randomly selected and visited at home to fill out a questionnaire on socio-demographics, sport participation, physical activity, social capital and mental health. A sample of 414 adults participated in the study. Structural Equation Modeling analysis showed that sport participation (β = .095) and not total physical activity (β = .027) was associated with better mental health. No association was found between sport participation and community social capital (β = .009) or individual social capital (β = .045). Furthermore, only community social capital was linked with physical activity (β = .114), individual social capital was not (β = -.013). In contrast, only individual social capital was directly associated with mental health (β = .152), community social capital was not (β = .070). This study emphasizes the importance of sport participation and individual social capital to improve mental health in disadvantaged communities. It further gives a unique insight into the functionalities of how sport participation, physical activity, social capital and mental health are interrelated. Implications for policy are that cross-sector initiatives between the sport, social and health sector need to be supported as their outcomes are directly linked to one another.

  6. Prevalence and social-environmental correlates of sports team participation among alternative high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen E; Kubik, Martha Y; McMorris, Barbara J

    2011-07-01

    Alternative high school (AHS) students have low levels of physical activity (PA) and high rates of overweight/obesity. Sports team participation, a specific form of PA, is associated with increased PA and decreased overweight/obesity in general adolescent populations. However, little is known about the prevalence and correlates of sports team participation among AHS students. In 2006, students (n = 145; mean age = 17 years; 52% male; 61% minorities; 64% low-income) attending 6 AHS in Minneapolis/St. Paul completed self-administered surveys. Mixed model logistic regression was used to examine cross-sectional associations between sports team participation and school staff support for PA, friend support for PA, and perceived barriers to PA. Among students, 40% participated on ≥ 1 sports teams. Odds of participating on a sports team were positively associated with support for PA from school staff (OR = 1.12, P = .014) and friends (OR = 1.15, P = .005), but inversely associated with perceived barriers to PA (OR = 0.95, P = .014). Results suggest that efforts to increase sports team participation among AHS students should target social-environmental factors. Further study is warranted.

  7. Social Cognitive Correlates of Young Adult Sport Competitors' Sunscreen Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nadine C.; O'Riordan, David L.; Winkler, Elisabeth; McDermott, Liane; Spathonis, Kym; Owen, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Young adults participating in outdoor sports represent a high-risk group for excessive sun exposure. The purpose of this study was to identify modifiable social cognitive correlates of sunscreen use among young adult competitors. Participants aged 18 to 30 years who competed in soccer (n = 65), surf-lifesaving (n = 63), hockey (n = 61), and tennis…

  8. Private support and social security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, F

    1998-01-01

    "The issue is addressed whether assistance to persons in need can be left to the ¿family' and the ¿community'. In that case people depend on their social networks. The support a person receives through a given network of social ties is examined. However, ties are diverse and subject to change. By means of a model of the dynamics of social ties, the conditions for adequate private support are analyzed. The sustainability of private support over time is examined by incorporating the impact on social ties of lending and receiving support. It is shown that support is only an effective alternative in a limited number of situations." excerpt

  9. Sports and soccer in the social formation of Brazilian people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marizabel Kowalski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to map the codes of behaviors and manners in social relations and in the recent changes in sport organization in Brazil. Ideological, social, cultural, political and economic dimensions are given relevance here as a methodology in that they organize statements. In bibliographical sources interpreting sociologic discourses and in the outline of Brazilian society development and evolution we observe several characteristics pertaining to self-restraint and emotion control through sport. In the economic sphere, we evidence an explanation of social changes resulting from Brazil’s late development process. However, drawing from the empirical theory, preliminary results show the recent sociocultural phenomenon of soccer as a factor to be considered in the formation of Brazilian social behavior.

  10. The Consistent Support System in The Society for Lifelong Sports : From a View Point of Self-Organization of Sports Club and Support

    OpenAIRE

    長岡, 雅美; 赤松, 喜久; Masami, Nagaoka; Yoshihisa, Akamatsu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the concept of Guidance and Support on community sports and to specify the directionality of organization and support for achievement of the sports society through life. The authors have stressed that it is necessary for achievement of the society for longlife sports,to cooperate with other groups and to construct a consistent support system. This study is also to explore the condition of community sports club management through analyzing the Japan Juni...

  11. The Special Olympics: Sporting or Social Event?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Carolyn; McDonald, Meghan L.

    2008-01-01

    Storey (2008), in his eloquent and timely critique of the Special Olympics and his call to close it down, focuses on the failure of the Special Olympics to achieve the goal of social integration and sustained social interaction among people with intellectual disabilities and their peers without a disability label. The authors wholeheartedly agree…

  12. Integrating Collegiate Sports into Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Emmett L., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Every week there is a national news story involving a collegiate student-athlete, and oftentimes the tale relates to a social work education issue. There are 731 social work programs, yet none offers coursework in student-athlete behavior and their environment. Student-athletes experience the same developmental challenges as nonathletes, and…

  13. Medical support of children’s sports: Topical problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Balykova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the most topical issues of medical support of children and adolescents engaged in physical exercises and sports. Much attention is paid to different views on the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and principles of therapy of pathological transformation of the heart in child athletes. The problem of sudden cardiac death in sports and the possibility of a relationship between connective tissue dysplasia and its development are touched upon. Electrocardiographic and morphological criteria for cardiac maladaptation in athletes are discussed. The problem of early and accessible diagnosis and Russia’s tactics for the diagnosis of health changes in athletes and approaches to their prevention and treatment are covered. Different ways to prevent the pathological transformation of the cardiovascular system in athletes and sudden cardiac death as its extreme manifestation are discussed.

  14. Sports Management for Sports Massification Planned and Executed by Social Organizations. Critics to Models, Experiences and Proposal Methodological Accompaniment

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenza Antonia Reyes de Duran

    2016-01-01

    The proposal analysis, interpretation, disassembly, self-criticism and guidance is born and comes from work experience planned mass sports and social organizations opposed-not in the conventional sense comparative-private business models and sport, state and management. The contribution made by the sports management experience from positions of power, either state or business are undeniable and its impact is difficult to express in numbers for its humanistic value, which is incalculable. Howe...

  15. Trends and topics in sports research in the Social Science Citation Index from 1993 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Li-Shiue

    2013-02-01

    This descriptive study evaluated behavioral and social science research on sport for 1993 through 2008, examined the characteristics of sport research, and identified mainstream issues appearing during these 16 years. Based on the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) database from 1993 to 2008, 7,655 articles referring to sport or sports were available. The publication analyses showed that 13 core journals published the most articles in the behavioral sciences of sport. By analyzing all titles, author keywords, and KeyWords Plus, the results showed that physical education, athlete performance, and sports participation were the mainstream issues of sport research in the 16-year study period. The words adolescent, youth, and children frequently appeared, indicating that the emphasis of sport research focused on these participant groups. This bibliometric study reviewed global sports research in SSCI, and described certain patterns or trends in prior research on sport.

  16. Sport as a vehicle for social mobility and regulation of disadvantaged urban youth: lessons from Rotterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaaij, R.

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses sport's contribution to social mobility of disadvantaged urban youth through an analysis of the Sport Steward Program in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Sport-based social intervention programs are conceptualized as potential vehicles for the creation of different forms of capital

  17. Physical Activity and Social Support in Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Gerfeson; Cheng, Luanna Alexandra; Mélo, Edilânea Nunes; de Farias, José Cazuza, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically synthesize the results of original studies on the association between physical activity and social support in adolescents, published until April 2011. Searches were carried out in Adolec, ERIC, Lilacs, Medline, SciELO, Scopus, SportsDiscus and Web of Science electronic databases and the reference…

  18. [Sport coaching for psychological and social recovery after hematological cancer: An innovative perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, Sarah; Blaise, Didier; Ben Soussan, Patrick; Cuvelier, Sarah; Cicut, Nicolas; Caymaris, Laurence; Arnault, Yolande; Onesta, Claude; Dantin, Pierre; Viens, Patrice

    2017-10-01

    This study is a first step towards the transfer of knowledge and practices between psychological support and performance in elite sport and a patient's "social recovery" in oncology. This proposal brings together people engaged in a variety of healthcare and relationship support roles, and aims to set up a support system beyond the hospital context. It questions the ability of elite sport management and its main actors, the "Great Coaches", to contribute to the support of patients in cancer remission through an onco-coaching approach. This innovative proposal is initiated by a life coaching pilot study designed for hematologic cancer patients in remission after a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Social Support Helps People Grow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, James T.; Dias, Katica L.

    2002-01-01

    Social support, a key factor in determining physical and mental health, strongly predicted changes in outdoor adventure participants' psychological resilience. The support received from the least supportive person best predicted gains in resilience. Outdoor education programs should provide a learning environment that is both challenging and…

  20. Correlates of social support receipt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel-Schetter, C; Folkman, S; Lazarus, R S

    1987-07-01

    Psychological correlates of social support receipt were examined in an investigation of stress and coping among 150 middle-aged community residents. Subjects were interviewed monthly for 6 months, each time concerning a specific stressful situation in the previous month. Social support received and methods of coping were assessed each time, as well as other variables. Factors hypothesized to be associated with support receipt were person predispositions, appraisal patterns with regard to specific stressful encounters, and coping strategies used. Each was most strongly associated with a particular type of social support. Person predispositions related most strongly to emotional support received, appraisal factors related most strongly to aid, and coping strategies related most to informational support received. Furthermore, of the three sets of variables, the individual's ways of coping appeared to be most strongly associated with all types of social support received. Two implications are explored. First, we suggest that the three types of social support studied represent different constructs with different antecedents and consequences. Second, we argue that coping behavior provides interpersonal cues regarding what is wanted or needed in a stressful situation and that the members of the social environment respond accordingly.

  1. Impact of Sport Context and Support on the Use of a Self-Report Measure for Athlete Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Saw, Luana C. Main, Paul B. Gastin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Athlete self-report measures (ASRM are a popular method of athlete monitoring in high-performance sports. With increasing recognition and accessibility, ASRM may potentially be utilized by athletes from diverse sport contexts. The purpose of the present study was to improve understanding of ASRM implementation across different sport contexts by observing uptake and compliance of a newly implemented ASRM over 16 weeks, and investigating the perceived roles and factors influencing implementation. Athletes (n=131 completed an electronic survey at baseline and week 16 on their perceptions and experiences with ASRM implementation respectively. Despite initial interest, only 70 athletes attempted to use the ASRM. Of these athletes, team sport athletes who were supported by their coach or sports program to use the ASRM were most compliant (p < 0.001 with a mean compliance of 84 ± 21 %. Compliance for self-directed individual and team sport athletes was 28 ± 40 % and 8 ± 18 % respectively. Self-directed athletes were motivated to monitor themselves, and rated desired content and minimal burden as key factors for initial and ongoing compliance. Supported athletes were primarily motivated to comply for the benefit of their coach or sports program rather than themselves, however rated data output as a key factor for their continued use. Factors of the measure outweighed those of the social environment regardless of sport context, however the influence of social environmental factors should not be discounted. The findings of the present study demonstrate the impact of sport context on the implementation of an ASRM and the need to tailor implementation strategies accordingly.

  2. Prioritizing social and economic effects of sport places on Urban Environment (A case study: Yazd City)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Soltanhosseini; M.Salimi; M. Salimi; M. Lotfi

    2013-01-01

    Extended Abstract1- IntroductionSport facilities and sport places as one of important land uses in urban environment can have positive and negative effects on their surroundings, of which the most important can be addressed to economic and social ones. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify, assess and prioritize the social and economic effects of sport places on the urban environment. Based on these objectives, five typical sport places (Shahid Sadoughi, Shahid Paak Nejad, Shahid Na...

  3. Sports Management for Sports Massification Planned and Executed by Social Organizations. Critics to Models, Experiences and Proposal Methodological Accompaniment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Antonia Reyes de Duran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The proposal analysis, interpretation, disassembly, self-criticism and guidance is born and comes from work experience planned mass sports and social organizations opposed-not in the conventional sense comparative-private business models and sport, state and management. The contribution made by the sports management experience from positions of power, either state or business are undeniable and its impact is difficult to express in numbers for its humanistic value, which is incalculable. However, it is urgent to emphasize the products and results achieved by some social organizations related to sport; as are the reference cases in Higuerón and the municipality Independence of Yaracuy state. From a dialectical analysis of reality, we try to understand the complex system that involves high-level sports management and performance, we introduce in the praxical notions of sporting activity and associated approach applied to social and community work. As opening and closing action research processes, we will make a proposal to accompany sports management concerning overcrowding by and from social organizations. This proposal is constructed from an innovative, flexible, open, inclusive and social, community and organizational curriculum relevance.

  4. Team sport and coaching - a dynamic interplay supporting development of self-concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryom, Knud Eske; Wikman, Johan Michael; Stelter, Reinhard

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and experience of a team sport and coaching intervention upon self-concept in a sample of male school students with primarily migrant background. A convergent parallel mixed method design was used to compare and relate a questionnaire study ...... and more supportive social environment, as the result of their participation. Implications of the presented results are discussed, as well as strategies for working with team sport and coaching in a school setting in deprived areas or beyond.......The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and experience of a team sport and coaching intervention upon self-concept in a sample of male school students with primarily migrant background. A convergent parallel mixed method design was used to compare and relate a questionnaire study...... (SDQ-II & YSEQ) and an interview study in a quasi-experimental design. A two-year intervention period was conducted with students in 7th, 8th and 9th grade. The interventions were a two-stringed effort with team sport and group coaching introduced to the participants. Quantitative results showed...

  5. HUMANIST VALUES OF SPORT AND THE PROBLEMS OF SOCIAL GLOBALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov SHEREMET

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the consideration of sport activity under the perspective of social philosophy, with special attention given to core values of the contemporary sport manifested particularly by the Olympic movement. It is argued that the main intellectual source of the Olympism is the translation of liberal ideology into the sphere of sport, with the idea of dialogue as a norm of interpersonal relation serving as a pivotal in socio-cultural foundations of the contemporary Olympic movement. The current crisis of sport is described in the paper in terms of further commercialization and professionalization that corrupts its immanent original ideal used to manifest the humanistic and universal values of sport for all the humankind in general. The contemporary market economy is demonstrated as the one which has transformed sport into means for achieving business success, individualistic ‘record’ prestige and anthropological representation. It is stated that the denoted trend could be opposed by the humanization of sport, its main criterion being the role of the dialogue: sport is humane as far as it is discursive. The author argues that to preserve discourse in sport is to perform the task for humanism movement best defined by the principle ‘sport for human person, and not human person for sport’. VALORILE UMANISTE ALE SPORTULUI ŞI PROBLEMELE GLOBALIZĂRII SOCIALEAcest articol are ca subiect activitatea sportivă cercetată din perspectiva filosofiei sociale, o atenţie deosebită fiind acordată valorilor de bază ale sportului contemporan manifestate, în special, în mişcarea olimpică. Se susţine că sursa intelectua­lă de bază a olimpismului este ideologia liberală implementată în sfera sportului, promovând ideea că dialogul, ca o normă a relaţiilor inter­personale, serveşte în calitate de fundaţie socioculturală a mişcării olimpice contemporane. Criza actuală a sportului este descrisă în lucrare

  6. Telecommuting: stress and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J T; Smith, A L; Wood, D L

    1994-06-01

    Occupational stress and social support were measured in adults, 15 working as telecommuters, 9 working at home, and 14 working in a company office. Analysis showed telecommuters and office workers perceived more support than those working at home. Telecommuters also reported less stress and a stronger preference for this new work option.

  7. A social perspective on sport-related trends and careers | Hollander ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Practices in the sports industry, sports management and the sociological study of sport are seldom integrated to provide an integrated theoretical framework for analysis and contextualization. The aim of this explorative academic enquiry was to develop a social conceptual framework for the analysis, explanation and ...

  8. Who's Joining the Club? Participation of Socially Vulnerable Children and Adolescents in Club-Organised Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermeerschen, Hanne; Vos, Steven; Scheerder, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Sport is often considered as a promising instrument for reaching a wide array of policy objectives. Social inclusion is one of the goals frequently mentioned. Though one can argue about the feasibility of the many claims made, sport can only reasonably be expected to play a role if the targeted population is effectively taking part in sports. This…

  9. Going abroad to play: Motivations, challenges, and support of sports expatriates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Bakel, Marian; Salzbrenner, Susan

    Professional athletes moving abroad for their career is a novel phenomenon in IHRM. This exploratory paper charts the motives of sports expatriates to move abroad to play, as well as adjustment challenges and support. A survey was conducted with 108 sports expatriates in 12 different sports....... Our paper contributes to the literature because it is one of the first studies focusing on sports expatriates from an international HR perspective. Our study provides information on a vulnerable group of expatriates; they are young in age and under extreme performance pressure. Sports expatriates need...

  10. [Social support and physicians' health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltmer, Edgar; Spahn, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decades, social support (SU) has proved to be an important psychological health resource in the prevention of mental and physical illness as well as for the promotion and restoration of general health. This study evaluates the relevance of social support for the health and well-being of physicians. This is a systematic literature review using PubMed from 1970 to 2007 with the keywords "social support", "physicians", "physician's role", and respectively "medical staff, hospital" from medical subheadings (MeSH). From the retrieved articles the additionally relevant keywords "marriage", "spouse", "friends", and "self-help groups" (MeSH) were identified and researched. Social support with distinct effects on physician's health could be shown in the areas of colleagues and professional network (30 sources), marriage/spouse (47), friends (3), and support groups (13). Female physicians appeared to seek and profit more from SU than did male physicians. Informal friendships have yet to be evaluated thoroughly. In the light of a physician's daily stress, SU appears to be a jeopardized resource that could significantly contribute to the prevention of burnout or other profession-related symptoms or illnesses.

  11. Are sports overemphasized in the socialization process of African American males? A qualitative analysis of former collegiate athletes' perception of sport socialization .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamon, Krystal K

    2010-01-01

    Scholars have noted that an elevated level of sports socialization in the family, neighborhood, and media exists within the African American community, creating an overrepresentation of African American males in certain sports. As a result, African American males may face consequences that are distinctly different from the consequences of those who are not socialized as intensively toward athletics, such as lower levels of academic achievement, higher expectations for professional sports careers as a means to upward mobility, and lower levels of career maturity. This study examines the sport socialization of African American male former collegiate athletes through in-depth ethnographic interviews. The results show that the respondents' perceptions were that their socializing agents and socializing environment emphasized athletics above other roles, other talents, and the development of other skills.

  12. Concurrent Bursty Behavior of Social Sensors in Sporting Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, Yuki; Sasahara, Kazutoshi; Suzuki, Reiji; Arita, Takaya

    2015-01-01

    The advent of social media expands our ability to transmit information and connect with others instantly, which enables us to behave as "social sensors." Here, we studied concurrent bursty behavior of Twitter users during major sporting events to determine their function as social sensors. We show that the degree of concurrent bursts in tweets (posts) and retweets (re-posts) works as a strong indicator of winning or losing a game. More specifically, our simple tweet analysis of Japanese professional baseball games in 2013 revealed that social sensors can immediately react to positive and negative events through bursts of tweets, but that positive events are more likely to induce a subsequent burst of retweets. We confirm that these findings also hold true for tweets related to Major League Baseball games in 2015. Furthermore, we demonstrate active interactions among social sensors by constructing retweet networks during a baseball game. The resulting networks commonly exhibited user clusters depending on the baseball team, with a scale-free connectedness that is indicative of a substantial difference in user popularity as an information source. While previous studies have mainly focused on bursts of tweets as a simple indicator of a real-world event, the temporal correlation between tweets and retweets implies unique aspects of social sensors, offering new insights into human behavior in a highly connected world.

  13. Supporting the paralympic athlete: focus on wheeled sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of wheelchair sports provides the scientist with a unique challenge. There are two major components that contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance: the athlete and the chair. It is the interaction of these two components that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. This article will describe three discrete case studies on how sport scientists have worked with Great Britain coaches and practitioners to help optimise training leading to a major competition through evidence base practise. A fourth area will describe on-going work designed to address the optimisation of wheelchair configurations for wheelchair court sports. It will focus on four sports: wheelchair racing, wheelchair tennis, wheelchair basketball and wheelchair rugby. The first topic will discuss the concept of pushing economy and mechanical efficiency of wheelchair propulsion. The second topic will show how technology assists the coaching process. The third topic will illustrate the concept of sports classification, and show how training volume 'in terms of basketball shooting' may need to be individually assigned and finally future research within wheelchair team sports and chair configurations will be examined.

  14. Challenge of Sport Towards Social Inclusion and Awareness-Raising Against Any Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marivoet Salomé

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sport presents itself as a social configuration that enhances social inclusion by promoting tolerance, respect for others, cooperation, loyalty and friendship, and values associated with fair play, the most important ethical principles of sport. However, intolerance and exclusion can also be expressed in sport, certainly even more so the bigger the social inequalities and the ethnic, religious, gender, disability, and sexual orientation prejudices are in society. The processes of social exclusion, integration, and inclusion are research areas in the social sciences with consolidated knowledge, namely in the study of the problems of poverty, social inequalities, racial and ethnic discrimination, disability, and education. However, it is necessary to discuss the existing theoretical approaches and conceptions seen as explanatory principles of the reality of these fields of analysis, look at how they can frame the reality on the sports field, and then confirm them through empirical research in order to produce knowledge based on the reality of social facts. Despite the broad consensus on the potential of sport in promoting social inclusion, in this paper I stress that this potential can only become real if the orientation of sport includes strategies aimed at achieving these goals. I intend to show how the –social issue‖ in the field of sports has gained relevance in the institutional context, and thereby a new field of research for the social science of sport has been opened and needs to be deepened.

  15. Playing together: the role of sport organisations in supporting migrants’ integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Borgogni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research methodology and the main findings of the study carried out to monitor and assess the UISP –the largest sport for all Italian association– national project named Diritti in campo (Rights in the field. The project had the overall goals to use sport-based programs to support the process of integration of migrants living in eight selected Italian cities. The aims of the research study were: the assessment of the impact of the project on migrants’ social inclusion; the identification of specific determinants for success of a program using sport as main mean of intervention; the proposition of a qualitative methodological approach in the domain of migration studies in Italy. The research methodology was based on the case-study paradigm (Yin, 2009 and combined several tools interpolating direct observations, semi-structured and in-depth interviews, focus groups, and documentary analysis. Based on the main findings of the study, eight specific determinants for success as well as four general organizational determinants were highlighted: the relevance of ludodiversity (Renson, 2004, the changes needed in the organizational culture, the requirement of an entire system of integration built as a network, the management of the spaces.

  16. IMPACT OF THE GOVERNMENT’S SOCIAL POLICY ON SPORTS DEVELOPMENT IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail S. Nosov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on interrelation between the government’s social policy and the level of sports development. This paper presents the comparative analysis of the average salary data in the countries worldwide and in Russia (by regions and reports the level of teenage incidence.The article draws attention to the main reasons of low level of sports business in Russia and proposes important directions of social policy in the field of physical culture and sport.

  17. Reasons of Being Supporter of Soccer Clubs With Regard to Sports Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    MUTLU, Çiğdem; ŞAHİN, Tuba

    2014-01-01

    Sports marketing, both with regard to recognition of countries and sport branches worldwide and providing required source of income as a requirement of competition, appears to us as an important concept. At this study, basically it is aimed to reveal how sports marketing has a role at becoming supporter of a sports club and that which factors affects supporters most in this regard. 1800 students continuing education at Düzce University Akçakoca School of Tourism and Hotel Management and Akçak...

  18. The influence of socio-demographic indicators economic determinants and social recognition on sport participation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Kirstin; Breuer, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses sport participation using a demographic-economic model which was extended by the construct 'social recognition'. Social recognition was integrated into the model on the understanding that it is the purpose of each individual to maximise his or her utility. A computer-assisted telephone interview survey was conducted in the city of Rheinberg, Germany, producing an overall sample of n=1934. Regression analyses were performed to estimate the impact of socio-demographic, economic determinants, and social recognition on sport participation. The results suggest that various socio-economic factors and social recognition are important determinants of sport participation on the one hand, and on sport frequency on the other. Social recognition plays a significant yet different role for both sport participation and sport frequency. While friends' involvement with sport influences one's sport participation, parents' involvement with sport influences one's sport frequency.

  19. Education for Social Change? A Freirean Critique of Sport for Development and Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaaij, Ramón; Jeanes, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Background: The previous two decades have witnessed an increasing number of policymakers and practitioners using sport programmes to achieve broader social development aims, particularly in countries in the Global South. A core element of these programmes has been the use of sport as a context to provide young people with social, personal and…

  20. Exposing the Dark Side, an Exploration of the Influence Social Capital Has upon Parental Sports Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Colin Grant; Holland-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the influence social capital had over parental sports volunteers who are considered to be of paramount importance in the delivery of UK sports initiatives. A review of the relevant literature identifies and discusses the complexities within the debate to define social capital while human and cultural capital emerge as an…

  1. Stress, Social Support and Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    provided advice and assistance in conducting this project. we wish to thank especially Eric Gunderson, James LaRocco, Ross Vickers and Harold Ward...accounting for a great variety of volitional behaviors such as drinking (Schlegel et al., 1977), family planning (Davidson & Jaccard , 1979), drug use...1976. Cobb, S. Social support as a moderator of life stress. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1976, 38, 300-314. Davidson, A., & Jaccard , J. Variables that

  2. Social exclusion and Austerity policies in England: the role of sports in a new area of social polarisation and inequality?

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Mike; Haudenhuyse, Rein

    2015-01-01

    Poverty still counts as the core of social exclusion from sport and many other domains of people's lives. In the first part of this paper, we shortly describe the recent poverty trends in England, and identify groups that are more at-risk of being poor and socially excluded. We then focus on the relationship between poverty, social exclusion and leisure/sports participation, and describe a case study that addresses young people's social exclusion through the use of sports (i.e., Positive Futu...

  3. Role of public support in sports fan formation processes: Approach by cultural transmission model

    OpenAIRE

    FUKUYAMA, Hirofumi; 福山, 博文

    2016-01-01

    As described in this paper, we use a cultural transmission model to elucidate the formation process that transforms people into sports lovers. The cultural transmission model is useful for judging when people become sports lovers and how the sports lover share of a population changes because this model can analyze the process by which a naïve child receives various influences that form preferences. Moreover, we examine how public support of a sports team in one region affects the share of spo...

  4. Autonomy support and motivational responses across training and competition in individual and team sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, P.K.C. van de; Kavussanu, M.; Kompier, M.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined: (a) whether athletes’ (N = 348) perceived autonomy support (i.e., showing interest in athletes’ input and praising autonomous behavior) differs across contexts (training vs. competition) and sport types (individual vs. team sports), and (b) whether the relationships between

  5. Generalisation of the Clark and Wells Cognitive Model of Social Anxiety to Children's Athletic and Sporting Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Brouzos, Andreas; Moberly, Nicholas J.; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Tziouma, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown that social anxiety generalises to sporting and athletic situations. The present study explored the applicability of the Clark and Wells model of social anxiety--and its metacognitive extension--to sport anxiety. Participants were 290 students aged 11-13 years, who completed measures of sport anxiety, social anxiety, depression…

  6. MODERN SPORT AND TOURISM AS TWO MUTUAL SUPPORTIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukan Vujović

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of the relationship between sport and tourism started yet in Ancient Greece and are continuing through the various forms and types in a sub¬sequent epochs and last to these days. The twentieth century was a period of unpre¬cedented general socio-economic development, and thus the development of sport and tourism. Democratization, the rise of social standards, and social modernization have led to an increasing number of members of the world community which has the oppor¬tu¬nity to participate in a various sports-recreational activities. Sport increasingly more represents a distinctive and very important social segment of the activities connected with the rest and relaxation. The interdependence of sport and tourism has not been yet fully elucidated. Sports tourism, in practice, has become extremely important and re¬pre¬sents a particular segment of tourism and tourist offer. The aim of this paper is to consider and point out to some aspects of their mutual dependence and conditionality, by analysis of the impact of some dominant sports on development and modernization of tourism resources, through customizing of the offered tourism facilities to the better and more quality sports-recreational de¬sti¬nation, and to the impact and importance of tourism resources in the affirmation of some new sports disciplines. Task of the paper is to show the complexity of the sports tourism impact on the wider community, in the form of development as an economic sector, factor of impro¬ve¬ment and enrichment of the site offering, with undeniable impact on the increase of the general cultural level of the population and increasing of life quality under the slogan: "training is a health."

  7. Stressors, social support, and tests of the buffering hypothesis: effects on psychological responses of injured athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ian; Evans, Lynne; Rees, Tim; Hardy, Lew

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine the main and stress-buffering effect relationships between social support and psychological responses to injury. The article presents two studies, both of which matched social support types with injury stressors. Study 1 used measures of stressors, perception of social support availability, and psychological responses of injured athletes. Study 2 utilized measures of stressors, received social support, and psychological responses of injured athletes. During physiotherapy clinic visits, injured athletes (Study 1, N = 319; Study 2, N = 302) completed measures of stressors, social support, and psychological responses to injury. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and moderated hierarchical regression were used to analyse the data. In both studies, CFA suggested adequate model fit for measures of social support and psychological responses to injury. Moderated hierarchical regression analyses in Study 1 revealed significant (p social support in relation to injury stressors and psychological responses; that is, the relationships between social support, stressors, and psychological responses to sport injury may differ with regard to received or perceived available support. The findings have important implications for the design of social support interventions with injured athletes aimed at alleviating the detrimental effects of injury stressors. What is already known on this subject? The health, social, and sport-injury related research suggests that social support has the potential to moderate (i.e., buffer) those psychological responses to stress that are detrimental to health and well-being. Despite what is a growing body of empirical research that has explored the role of social support in a sport injury context, there has been a paucity of research that has examined how social support functions in relation to injury-related stressors and psychological responses, particularly with regard to the effect of perceived and received

  8. [Spanish adaptation of a perceived Social Support Scale in sportspeople].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Ignacio; García-Cueto, Eduardo; Suárez-Álvarez, Javier; Pérez Sánchez, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Social support is a variable that has a great influence in the sport context. In fact, this variable not only affects the athlete's performance but it has also shown to be related to psychological disorders such as Burnout Syndrome. The aim of this paper was to illustrate the Spanish adaptation of a social support scale in the sport context. The normative group who took part in the final version of the research was composed of 397 athletes aged between 13 and 64 years old (mean= 19.23 and standard deviation= 6.67). The scale shows: adequate factorial and construct validity, acceptable fit indexes (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin= 0.785, Root Mean Square Residual= 0.078; Kelly's criterion= 0.075), a negative correlation with the dimensions of burnout and no relationship with respect to self-esteem. In addition, it also shows high reliability (a= 0.88). Furthermore, statistically significant differences have been found in relation to genders - where women require greater social support. In contrast, males tend to display a lower level of social support with team players and international athletes. Moreover, differential item functioning (DIF) was carried out to explore sex bias, however, none of the items exhibit DIF problems.

  9. A Systematic Review of Life Skill Development Through Sports Programs Serving Socially Vulnerable Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermens, Niels; Super, Sabina; Verkooijen, Kirsten T; Koelen, Maria A

    2017-12-01

    Despite the strong belief in sports programs as a setting in which socially vulnerable youth can develop life skills, no overview exists of life skill development in sports programs serving this youth group. Therefore, the present systematic review provides an overview of the evidence on life skill development in sports programs serving socially vulnerable youth and, insofar as it was investigated in the included studies, of the conditions conducive to life skill development in these sports programs. Potentially relevant studies published during 1990 to 2014 were identified by a search in 7 electronic databases. The search combined terms relating to (a) sport, (b) youth AND socially vulnerable, and (c) life skills. Eighteen of the 2,076 unique studies met the inclusion criteria. Each included study reported that at least 1 life skill improved in youth who participated in the studied sports program. Improvements in cognitive and social life skills were more frequently reported than were improvements in emotional life skills. Only a few of the included studies investigated the conditions in the studied sports programs that made these programs conducive to life skill development. Sports programs have the potential to make a difference in the life skill development of socially vulnerable youth. This conclusion needs to be treated with some caution, because the studies experienced many challenges in reducing the risk for bias. Several alternative research strategies are suggested for future studies in this field.

  10. Social Media Usage In European Clubs Football Industry. Is Digital Reach Better Correlated With Sports Or Financial Performane?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor Dima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Social media is likely the marketing and communication channel which grew fastest from "unique and modern" to "mandatory". Presented as a solution for the future, usage of media channels has already become a key part of any brand promoting campaign or business expansion effort. And football clubs line up with this trend. Development of the new media elements solves two fundamental needs for business units specialized in sports: the need for faster and more efficient communication with fans - a true two-way relationship - and the need to expand the base of supporters using marketing tools. This paper presents the usage of social media networks in European club football industry, the mix of channels used and the increase of digital supporters for the top teams. This academic approach also examines the correlation between the digital reach of the richest clubs in the world and their sports and financial results. This study shows the growing importance that social media plays in the sports industry, initiating a debate on the relationship between the digital expansion of a football club and its sports and financials indicators.

  11. Differences in the Intensity and Duration of Adolescents' Sports and Exercise across Physical and Social Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Berrigan, David; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Perna, Frank; Graubard, Barry I.; Atienza, Audie A.

    2012-01-01

    We used data from the American Time Use Survey (years 2003-06) to analyze whether the intensity and duration of high school students' (ages 15-18 years) sports and exercise bouts differed across physical and social environments. Boys' sports and exercise bouts were more likely to reach a vigorous intensity when taking place at school and with…

  12. Education for Social Change? A Freirean Critique of Sport for Development and Peace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaaij, R.; Jeanes, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The previous two decades have witnessed an increasing number of policymakers and practitioners using sport programmes to achieve broader social development aims, particularly in countries in the Global South. A core element of these programmes has been the use of sport as a context to

  13. Ties That Bond: Youth Sport as a Vehicle for Social Identity and Positive Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Mark W.; Balish, Shea M.; Forrest, Christopher; Brown, Sarah; Webber, Kristine; Gray, Emily; McGuckin, Matthew; Keats, Melanie R.; Rehman, Laurene; Shields, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    An emerging area of research has focused on understanding how the group dynamics of a sport team influence positive youth development (PYD). The identities that youth form through their membership in sport teams (i.e., social identities) have been found to influence teammate behavior and team performance. Yet, minimal work exists on social…

  14. A Systematic Review of Life Skill Development Through Sports Programs Serving Socially Vulnerable Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, Niels; Super, Sabina; Verkooijen, Kirsten T.; Koelen, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the strong belief in sports programs as a setting in which socially vulnerable youth can develop life skills, no overview exists of life skill development in sports programs serving this youth group. Therefore, the present systematic review provides an overview of the evidence on life skill

  15. A Systematic Review of Life Skill Development Through Sports Programs Serving Socially Vulnerable Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, N.J.; Super, Sabina; verkooijen, kirsten; Koelen, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the strong belief in sports programs as a setting in which socially vulnerable youth can develop life skills, no overview exists of life skill development in sports programs serving this youth group. Therefore, the present systematic review provides an overview of the evidence on

  16. Exploring the interrelationship between sport, health and social outcomes in the UK: implications for health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downward, Paul; Hallmann, Kirstin; Rasciute, Simona

    2018-02-01

    Policy agencies are now re-visiting early aspirations that sport, as a form of physical activity, can be an instrument to foster general health and also subjective well-being (SWB). Both of these concepts capture physical and mental health states. SWB also encompasses broader psychological and life satisfaction as well as mood and affect. Past and current policies also identify a link between sport, social capital and SWB. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) is undertaken on data from the UK's Taking Part survey to investigate the interrelationships between sport, general health, social capital and SWB. The SEM shows a simultaneous relationship between sport and SWB. The effect is mediated through general health. The results also show that there is no relationship between social capital and sport but a clear relationship between SWB and social capital. From a health policy perspective there should be an emphasis on encouraging greater sport participation, despite the difficulties that this poses, because there is a potential 'multiplier' effect on SWB and on general health through mediation. The multiplier effect occurs because once someone engages in sport and has their general health and SWB enhanced, then even further sport participation becomes likely, and subsequent general health and SWB, which would comprise both physical and mental health benefits. To target traditional non participants the research suggests that physical activity should be promoted for enjoyment, with health benefits subsequently following. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancing life prospects of socially vulnerable youth through sport participation: a mixed method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Super, S.; Hermens, N.J.; Verkooijen, K.T.; Koelen, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sport participation has been associated with improved life prospects such as academic performance and employability prospects. As such, promoting sport participation might be a way to increase life prospects, especially for socially vulnerable youth because they are less physically active

  18. Beyond the playing field: experiences of sport, social capital and integration among Somalis in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaaij, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the role of recreational sport as a means and marker of social integration by analysing the lived experiences of Somali people from refugee backgrounds with sport. Drawing on a three-year multi-sided ethnography, the paper examines the extent to and ways in which participation in

  19. An examination of how alcohol brands use sport to engage consumers on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, Kate; Stavros, Constantino; Smith, Aaron C T; Munro, Geoff; Argus, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    To examine how alcohol brands use sport in their communication activities on social media. Despite extensive research exploring alcohol advertising and sponsorship through sport, minimal attention has been given to digital platforms. This study undertakes a qualitative content analysis to examine the social media activity of alcohol brands sponsoring the three largest spectator sports in Australia: Australian rules football, rugby league and cricket. Four sport-related social media strategies are identified through which alcohol brands solicit interaction with consumers, often involving co-creation of content and social activation. These strategies act as 'calls to action' and through the association of sport and alcohol encourage consumers to engage in competition, collaboration, celebration and consumption. These strategies are further strengthened by communications which draw upon themes of identity and camaraderie to resonate with the consumer. Sport-linked social media strategies utilised by alcohol brands extend beyond just promoting their product. They seek higher levels of engagement with the consumer to amplify and augment the connection between alcohol and the sport spectator experience. The discussion highlights the powerful combination of sport and social media as a mechanism by which these brands seek to interact with consumers and encourage them to both create and promote content to their social networks. These strategies allow alcohol brands to extend their marketing efforts in a manner which can elude alcohol codes and prove difficult for regulators to identify and control. [Westberg K, Stavros C, Smith ACT, Munro G, Argus K. An examination of how alcohol brands use sport to engage consumers on social media. Drug Alcohol Rev 2018;37:28-35]. © 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  20. The old age and the sport like object of social representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Javier Ruiz Cazorla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we analyzed the social function of the Physical Education and the sport with respect to the elderly people. One is a relation hyped by the social representations that the implied agents own on the old age, the body, the health and the sport, nonfree of stereotypes and prejudices that condition their social practices. It constitutes a social problem and simultaneously a challenge for institutions to eradicate the social practices of exclusion to that they give rise. For it two steps are essential. In the first place to denounce the contents of the social representations on the sport old age and activities physical that favor the social exclusion, especially from the Educative System and mass media. Secondly to promote the average materials and necessary structural conditions for the social change.

  1. PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT AND PARENTS ADJUSTMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Patrizia VELOTTI

    2008-01-01

    Social networks often provide an important source of support for new parents. General, parent support programs sustain social-emotional development of children. Different aspects could impact both the quantity and quality of the sources of social support and the perception that parents would had. This study examines the role of social support in the couples of new-parents and assesses the influence of attachment models on it. The Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) and the Multidimensional Scale...

  2. Peer social support training in UK prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Warren; Lovely, Rachel

    2017-10-11

    To undertake a service evaluation to assess the effect of peer social support training using two separate learning programmes, which were designed to assist prisoners to support older prisoners and prisoners with disabilities. The service evaluation used an action research approach to support planning, delivery and data collection. Eleven interviews with nine prisoners who had undertaken the peer social support training programmes and two members of prison staff (one nurse manager and one prison officer) were recorded and transcribed by the researchers. This data was coded and thematically analysed to evaluate the findings. Recommendations were made regarding the format and content of the training. The training was well received by the peer social support worker trainees and had several positive outcomes, including increased peer social support, improved relationships between peer social support workers and older prisoners and prisoners with disabilities, increased self-esteem, measured as 'social capital', among peer social support workers, and effective teamworking. The peer social support training programmes were considered to be a positive intervention and were effective in supporting peer social support roles. Recommendations for future training of prisoner peer support workers include involving existing peer social support workers in training and recruitment, and enhancing the role of peer social support workers in prisons by providing them with job descriptions. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  3. Assessing corporate social responsibility in China's sports lottery administration and its influence on consumption behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai; Zhang, James J; Mao, Luke Lunhua; Min, Sophia D

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and examine consumer perception of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in China's sports lottery industry, and the effect of perceived CSR initiatives on sports lottery consumption behavior. Research participants (N = 4,980), selected based on a computer-generated, randomly stratified multistage sampling process, comprised Chinese residents who had purchased sports lottery tickets in the past 12 months. They completed a questionnaire that was derived from a qualitative research process. A factor analysis extracted two factors associated with perceptions of CSR in China's sports lottery administration: Regulatory and Prevention Responsibilities and Product Development Responsibility. Logistic regression analyses revealed that these two factors were influential of consumer behavior (i.e., relative and absolute expenditure, purchasing frequency, and time commitment). This study represents an initial effort to understand the dimensions of perceived CSR associated with Chinese sports lottery. The findings signify the importance of enforcing CSR in sports lottery administration.

  4. [Handicapped patients and leisure sports--a chance for social integration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, U

    2000-10-01

    Organizing leisure time in an active way with lots of experiences is getting more and more important in western society. Accordingly, sports activities and travelling as well as their combination, holiday sports activities, are in great demand. A general idea of the literature in that field with regard to the possibilities and difficulties of handicapped persons is that holiday sports activities are considered apt to offer outstanding prerequisites for handicapped and nonhandicapped people getting closer to each other. Starting out on this basis, this survey is mainly dedicated to the following questions: What is the situation for handicapped persons in holiday sports activities? Is holiday sporting in a position to meet the expectations of social integration, and to what extent? A questionnaire about these items was answered by wheelchair users, making it clear, on the one hand, that there are hardly any offers for disabled people to take part in holiday sporting activities. On the other hand, the survey confirms that holiday sports activities are well suited to answer major demands of the integration issue, i.e., communication and interaction as well as other factors conducive to social integration. Subsequently, the author formulates the request that access to and participation in holiday sporting activities be made easier for disabled people so that greater use can be made of these special opportunities for social integration.

  5. TACKLED - THE IMMERSION OF SOCIAL WORK PROFESSION INTOTHE REALM OF HIGH COLLISION SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffanie-Victoria Jones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Imagine a day when social work is tackled by high collision sports. Athletesactually seek services from social workers becausesocial work profession isthoroughly immersed in the realm of these sports.Presently, that image is justthat – a remote idea that, if realized, would alterthe landscape of the field ofmental health, for the benefit of professional athletes who play high collisionsports. Undergirding this paper is a case study ofa professional athlete whoexperienced the worst case of sports-related braindamage presently documented.This paper includes a detailed analysis of social work core values as applied toathletes. As well, mental illness and psychosocialfactors, specific to athletes isanalyzed. Ultimately, this paper seeks to explorethe social workers’ role inserving the mental health needs of an unconventional clientele – professionalathletes in high collision sports.

  6. Sport participation and its association with social and psychological factors known to predict substance use and abuse among youth: A scoping review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heather J.; Camiré, Martin; Wade, Terrance J.; Cairney, John

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article presents the results of a scoping review of the sport literature (2000–2014) on psychological and social outcomes relevant to youth alcohol and illicit drug use. Prior reviews report that sport is related to increased alcohol use and reduced illicit drug use among youth, yet provide little guidance regarding the mechanisms that can explain this relationship. We reviewed the literature on sport participation and psychological and social outcomes to identify factors that could help explain this link. Psychological and social factors were selected as they play a paramount role in understanding youth alcohol and drug use. Fifty-nine articles were identified and included in the review. The literature generally supported connections between sport and positive psychological and social outcomes, including self-esteem, self-regulation, general life skills, and pro-social behaviour. Yet limitations in the methods and measures limit the ability to draw conclusions from the literature. In addition, the diversity of youth and sport was generally ignored in the literature. This article suggests a number of directions for future research that might improve our understanding of how sport impacts psychological and social outcomes along with alcohol and illicit drug use. PMID:26692895

  7. Sport participation and its association with social and psychological factors known to predict substance use and abuse among youth: A scoping review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heather J; Camiré, Martin; Wade, Terrance J; Cairney, John

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a scoping review of the sport literature (2000-2014) on psychological and social outcomes relevant to youth alcohol and illicit drug use. Prior reviews report that sport is related to increased alcohol use and reduced illicit drug use among youth, yet provide little guidance regarding the mechanisms that can explain this relationship. We reviewed the literature on sport participation and psychological and social outcomes to identify factors that could help explain this link. Psychological and social factors were selected as they play a paramount role in understanding youth alcohol and drug use. Fifty-nine articles were identified and included in the review. The literature generally supported connections between sport and positive psychological and social outcomes, including self-esteem, self-regulation, general life skills, and pro-social behaviour. Yet limitations in the methods and measures limit the ability to draw conclusions from the literature. In addition, the diversity of youth and sport was generally ignored in the literature. This article suggests a number of directions for future research that might improve our understanding of how sport impacts psychological and social outcomes along with alcohol and illicit drug use.

  8. Social Anxiety and Social Support in Romantic Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Eliora; Chambless, Dianne L

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the quality of socially anxious individuals' romantic relationships. In the present study, we examine associations between social anxiety and social support in such relationships. In Study 1, we collected self-report data on social anxiety symptoms and received, provided, and perceived social support from 343 undergraduates and their romantic partners. One year later couples were contacted to determine whether they were still in this relationship. Results indicated that men's social anxiety at Time 1 predicted higher rates of breakup at Time 2. Men's and women's perceived support, as well as men's provided support, were also significantly predictive of breakup. Social anxiety did not interact with any of the support variables to predict breakup. In Study 2, a subset of undergraduate couples with a partner high (n=27) or low (n=27) in social anxiety completed two 10-minute, lab-based, video-recorded social support tasks. Both partners rated their received or provided social support following the interaction, and trained observers also coded for support behaviors. Results showed that socially anxious individuals received less support from their partners during the interaction according to participant but not observer report. High and lower social anxiety couples did not differ in terms of the target's provision of support. Taken together, results suggest that social anxiety is associated with difficulties even in the context of established romantic relationships. Clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Ties That Bond: Youth Sport as a Vehicle for Social Identity and Positive Youth Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Mark W; Balish, Shea M; Forrest, Christopher; Brown, Sarah; Webber, Kristine; Gray, Emily; McGuckin, Matthew; Keats, Melanie R; Rehman, Laurene; Shields, Christopher A

    2017-06-01

    An emerging area of research has focused on understanding how the group dynamics of a sport team influence positive youth development (PYD). The identities that youth form through their membership in sport teams (i.e., social identities) have been found to influence teammate behavior and team performance. Yet, minimal work exists on social identity and PYD in youth sport. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social identity and PYD in sport. Youth engaged in recreational sport (N = 219; M age  = 11.61 years, SD = 1.39 years) completed measures of social identity and PYD in sport. The social identity measure assessed 3 dimensions including ingroup ties (IGT; perceptions of similarity, bonding, belongingness), cognitive centrality (importance of being a team member), and ingroup affect (IGA; feelings associated with group membership). A regression analysis was performed separately for 4 PYD outcomes (personal and social skills, goal setting, initiative, negative experiences) with the 3 dimensions of social identity entered as predictors. Regression analyses revealed that IGT and IGA were positively associated with personal and social skills (R 2 Adj. = .29). Further, IGT predicted initiative (R 2 Adj. = .16), whereas IGA was positively associated with goal setting (R 2 Adj. = .17) and negatively associated with negative experiences (R 2 Adj. = .08). The findings extend previous research highlighting the benefits of social identity on teammate behavior and team performance and demonstrate how social identity may contribute to PYD through sport.

  10. Problematizing Social Justice in Health Pedagogy and Youth Sport: Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, and Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagkas, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    Social justice education recognizes the discrepancies in opportunities among disadvantaged groups in society. The purpose of the articles in this special topic on social justice is to (a) provide a critical reflection on issues of social justice within health pedagogy and youth sport of Black and ethnic-minority (BME) young people; (b) provide a…

  11. Energy cost models for air supported sports hall in cold climates considering energy efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Nord, Natasa; Mathisen, Hans Martin; Cao, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop models for energy planning for an air supported sports hall by analyzing different energy efficiency possibilities. This is a very specific building type suitable for sport activities in cold climates. The observed hall was operated when outdoor temperature was under 5 °C, while the most common measured indoor air temperature was 8 °C during the year. Neither indoor nor outdoor temperature influenced the overpressure. Based on the measurements, the specific...

  12. Psychobiology of social support: the social dimension of stress buffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzen, Beate; Heinrichs, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Social integration and social support have a substantial influence on individual health and longevity, an effect assumed to be mediated through reduced stress reactivity in support recipients. However, considerable variability in individual responses to social support has been documented, suggesting that the beneficial effect of social support interacts with early experiences, genetically influenced differences in biological systems mediating social behavior, personality traits, and psychopathology. Here we outline the historical background of social support research, including epidemiological studies, laboratory studies, and field studies on the subject of social support and health, with regard to different psychobiological effector systems. Most recent research has focused on brain mechanisms which link social integration or social support with reduced neural threat responses. As numerous mental disorders are associated with considerable social impairment, understanding the potentially underlying mechanisms of neural plasticity in relation to social support, stress buffering and health in these disorders can help tailor new diagnostic and treatment strategies. Thus, theories of socially-driven emotional learning and memory, as presented in this review, might eventually lead to psychobiology-based treatment concepts for mental disorders involving social deficits.

  13. Social relations: network, support and relational strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, P; Holstein, B; Lund, Rikke

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a conceptual framework with social relations as the main concept and the structure and the function of social relations as subconcepts. The structure of social relations covers aspects of formal relations and social network. The function of social relations covers social support......,011. The postal questionnaires were answered by a random sample in each of the age groups. The results show marked age and gender differences in both the structure and the function of social relations. The social network, measured as weekly contacts, weakens with age and so does instrumental support. Emotional...... support is unrelated to this decline in contact frequency and appears to be at the same level for younger and older individuals. Relational strain, measured as conflicts, declines with age for all kinds of social relations. The weakening of the social network with age does not seem to affect the level...

  14. Sport tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Schwartzhoffová

    2010-01-01

    Sport tourism is one specific type of travel and tourism. The goal of this article is to introduce the definition and importance of sport tourism to academic and sports professionals. At present, sport tourism is a diverse social, economic and cultural phenomenon arising from the unique interaction of activity, people and place. The second part of this article reports about sports events as an important part of sport tourism.

  15. [Sport as a profession: medical and social aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmerov, N F

    2011-01-01

    The author analyses possible use of methods and achievements of industrial medicine in solving problems of acme in sports. The article covers theoretic, methodologic and practical basis for possible integration of industrial medicine and sports medicine. Mechanisms of such interdisciplinary integration include current legal basis, scientific research (mostly, concept of occupational risk, norm and pathology concept, doctrine of preventive medicine, etc), practical experience accumulated in this country and abroad. Some aspects of public health preservation in contemporary Russia are also tackled.

  16. Promoting social inclusion through Unified Sports for youth with intellectual disabilities: a five-nation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, R; Dowling, S; Hassan, D; Menke, S

    2013-10-01

    Although the promotion of social inclusion through sports has received increased attention with other disadvantaged groups, this is not the case for children and adults with intellectual disability who experience marked social isolation. The study evaluated the outcomes from one sports programme with particular reference to the processes that were perceived to enhance social inclusion. The Youth Unified Sports programme of Special Olympics combines players with intellectual disabilities (called athletes) and those without intellectual disabilities (called partners) of similar skill level in the same sports teams for training and competition. Alongside the development of sporting skills, the programme offers athletes a platform to socialise with peers and to take part in the life of their community. Unified football and basketball teams from five countries--Germany, Hungary, Poland, Serbia and Ukraine--participated. Individual and group interviews were held with athletes, partners, coaches, parents and community leaders: totalling around 40 informants per country. Qualitative data analysis identified four thematic processes that were perceived by informants across all countries and the two sports to facilitate social inclusion of athletes. These were: (1) the personal development of athletes and partners; (2) the creation of inclusive and equal bonds; (3) the promotion of positive perceptions of athletes; and (4) building alliances within local communities. Unified Sports does provide a vehicle for promoting the social inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities that is theoretically credible in terms of social capital scholarship and which contains lessons for advancing social inclusion in other contexts. Nonetheless, certain limitations are identified that require further consideration to enhance athletes' social inclusion in the wider community. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  17. Practice of a support of sports medicine and training science in Kendo training camp of a high school

    OpenAIRE

    齋藤, 実; 小澤, 聡

    2006-01-01

    Sports training camp is carried out for player reinforcement frequently in a high school.Recently, Importance of sports medicine and training science were pointed out, and itincreased that the trainer which supported sports medicine and training science took atraining camp along. On the other hand, introduction of sports medicine and training science is late in Kendo because its training is executed mainly on a Japanese traditional lesson method. In the physical education union of a high scho...

  18. Social Support and Emocional Stability in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zuzana Mičková

    2014-01-01

    The issue of anticipation social support is actual topic because of detection important factors for positive development of personality. Emotional bonds are getting stronger with perception of social support. Subjective feeling of positive emotions and relationships is manifest with higher range of social and mental functioning, emotional - willing stability of personality. Emotional basement of personality is emotional stability, which represent relationship with the anticipated social suppo...

  19. Responsibility for child and adolescent's psychosocial support associated with severe sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Charlotte; Fitzgerald, Ulrika Tranaeus; Alricsson, Marie

    2016-12-01

    The manner in which health professionals and coaches act and decide on treatment and prognosis can influence athletes in a way that not only strengthens them, but it can also reduce their confidence in their own ability. The purpose was to determine who has the responsibility for child and adolescent psychosocial support needed in connection with a severe sports injury as well as investigate whether coaches, physiotherapists and parents are aware of the support that is needed. Qualitative interviews with coaches, parents and physiotherapists with experience of serious sports injuries in young people aged 12 to 16 years old from different sports were analysed using content analysis. The study showed that all actors independently imparted communication as being the major problem and indicated that the role of a coordinator was missing. They imparted cognitive, emotional and behavioural reactions in children, which were considered to be more common in younger children as indicated in previous studies. Coaches felt they had lack of education and time; parents described their disappointment in caregivers and personality changes in their children in connection with the injury. Physiotherapists felt that rehabilitation was often served as a substitute for the sport and that they therefore had greater responsibility for the child than they had been educated for. Results should be communicated to participants who are involved in children's and adolescent's sports to increase their knowledge and thus allow them to be able to give our children the best possibility, regardless of whether they return to the sport or not.

  20. Perceived Social Support among Mentally Ill Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bandana Pokharel; Anupama Pokharel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Social support is the perception that one is cared for, has assistance available from significant others and its benefit is by buffering stress by influencing the ability to adjust and live with illness. Social support can uplift the quality and subjective wellbeing of people. The objective of this study was to examine the perceived social support and factors influencing it among mentally ill patients. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out. Ninety cas...

  1. Is alcohol and community sport a good mix? Alcohol management, consumption and social capital in community sports clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Bosco C; Wolfenden, Luke; Gillham, Karen; Kingsland, Melanie; Richardson, Ben; Wiggers, John

    2015-06-01

    Community sports clubs provide an important contribution to the health and wellbeing of individuals and the community; however, they have also been associated with risky alcohol consumption. This study assessed whether a club's alcohol management strategies were related to risky alcohol consumption by members and levels of social capital, as measured in terms of participation in and perceived safety of the club. A total of 723 sports club members from 33 community football clubs in New South Wales, Australia, completed a computer assisted telephone interview (CATI) and a management representative from each club also completed a CATI. The club representative reported on the club's implementation of 11 alcohol management practices, while club members reported their alcohol consumption and perceived levels of safety at the club and participation in the club. A structural equation model identified having the bar open for more than four hours; having alcohol promotions; and serving intoxicated patrons were associated with increased risky alcohol consumption while at the club; which in turn was associated with lower levels of perceived club safety and member participation. The positive contribution of community sports clubs to the community may be diminished by specific inadequate alcohol management practices. Changing alcohol management practices can reduce alcohol consumption, and possibly increase perceived aspects of social capital, such as safety and participation. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  2. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR SUPPORTING MOTOR AND SOCIAL COMPETENCE OF PRESCHOOLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu ÖZYÜREK

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Satisfying the need of physical activity of children and promoting their social skills beginning from early childhood have importance by reason of providing a basis for following years. In this study, establishing process of the training program within the scope of “ Examination the Effects of Physical Education and Sports Activities to the Basic Psychomotor skills and Social Skills for Preschool Children ” named project supported by Karabuk University Coordinatorship of Scientific Research Projects has been mentioned. The training program has been intended to promote the motor and social competence of the children aged 48 months and older. In the study it has been given wide publicity to the stages of literature review, educational attainments and indicators fit for purpose, and taking an expert’s opinion. Commentary on practicing the training program integrated with preschool education program and their importances have been discussed.

  3. Social Identification in Sports Teams: The Role of Personal, Social, and Collective Identity Motives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William E; Brown, Rupert; Easterbrook, Matthew J; Vignoles, Vivian L; Manzi, Claudia; D'Angelo, Chiara; Holt, Jeremy J

    2017-04-01

    Based on motivated identity construction theory (MICT; Vignoles, 2011), we offer an integrative approach examining the combined roles of six identity motives (self-esteem, distinctiveness, belonging, meaning, continuity, and efficacy) instantiated at three different motivational levels (personal, social, and collective identity) as predictors of group identification. These identity processes were investigated among 369 members of 45 sports teams from England and Italy in a longitudinal study over 6 months with four time points. Multilevel change modeling and cross-lagged analyses showed that satisfaction of four personal identity motives (individuals' personal feelings of self-esteem, distinctiveness, meaning, and efficacy derived from team membership), three social identity motives (individuals' feelings that the team identity carries a sense of belonging, meaning, and continuity), and one collective identity motive (a shared belief in group distinctiveness) significantly predicted group identification. Motivational processes underlying group identification are complex, multilayered, and not reducible to personal needs.

  4. Social Support and Social Conflict as Predictors of Prenatal Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westdahl, Claire; Milan, Stephanie; Magriples, Urania; Kershaw, Trace S.; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Ickovics, Jeannette R.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate how social support and social conflict relate to prenatal depressive symptoms and to generate a brief clinical tool to identify women at increased psychosocial risk. METHODS This is a prospective study following 1,047 pregnant women receiving care at two university-affiliated clinics from early pregnancy through 1 year postpartum. Structured interviews were conducted in the second trimester of pregnancy. Hierarchical and logistic regressions were used to examine potential direct and interactive effects of social support and conflict on prenatal depressive symptoms measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. RESULTS Thirty-three percent of the sample reported elevated levels of depressive symptoms predicted from sociodemographic factors, social support, and social conflict. Social support and conflict had independent effects on depressive symptoms although social conflict was a stronger predictor. There was a “dose–response,” with each increase in interpersonal risk factor resulting in consequent risk for probable depression based on symptom reports (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Scale greater than or equal to 16). A composite of one social support and three conflict items were identified to be used by clinicians to identify interpersonal risk factors for depression in pregnancy. Seventy-six percent of women with a composite score of three or more high-risk responses reported depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION Increased assessment of social support and social conflict by clinicians during pregnancy can identify women who could benefit from group or individual interventions to enhance supportive and reduce negative social interactions. PMID:17601908

  5. Social support for diabetes illness management: supporting adolescents and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idalski Carcone, April; Ellis, Deborah A; Weisz, Arlene; Naar-King, Sylvie

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this research study was to examine the relationship between 4 sources of social support (support for the adolescent from family, support for the adolescent from friends, support for the caregiver from another adult, and support to the family from the health care provider) and adolescents' diabetes outcomes (illness management behavior and health status) using a diverse sample of urban adolescents. One hundred forty-one adolescents with insulin-managed diabetes and their primary caregivers completed questionnaires assessing social support and illness management behavior. Glucose meters were downloaded and hemoglobin A1c assays were obtained. Structural equation modeling was used to test a model social support informed by social ecological theory. The results of the structural equation modeling indicated that support for the caregiver from another adult was directly and positively related to support for the adolescent from family and indirectly related to better illness management. Support for the adolescent from family was directly related to better diabetes management and, through better management, to better diabetes health. Support to the family from the health care provider was not related to support for the adolescent and support to the adolescent from friends was not related to illness management, as hypothesized. This study identifies a novel target for social support intervention to improve adolescents' illness management behavior-the caregivers of adolescents with diabetes. By enhancing the social support caregivers receive from other adults in their lives, caregivers' ability to support their adolescent children with diabetes might also be improved which, in turn, improves adolescents' illness outcomes.

  6. Social Psychological Support of Students with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aismontas B.B.,

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we study the main goals, objectives, functions and mechanisms of social psychological support of students with disabilities and special needs in higher education. We describe the experience in providing such support at the Department of Distance Learning of the Moscow State University of Psychology and Education. We show that social psychological support of students with disabilities is a specially organized process involving the creation of an optimally accessible and nurturing environment which contributes to the development of general cultural, professional competencies as well as to healthy personality development in individuals. Macro social, psychological and pedagogical features of the environment play a key role in social psychological support. Psychological and educational support of students with disabilities involves several types of assistance, each with its own tasks and features, however only the optimal combination of these forms embodies social psychological support as a whole.

  7. A Capability Approach to Understanding Sport for Social Inclusion: Agency, Structure and Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Suzuki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the global diffusion of the term social inclusion, as well as the use of sport to promote it, questions have been raised regarding the extent to which sport is able to contribute to transforming the exclusive nature of the social structure. The lack of analytical clarity of the concept has not helped to address these questions. This article proposes a conceptual framework based on Amartya Sen’s capability approach, considering social exclusion as the denial of social relations that leads to serious deprivation of important capabilities. A person’s capabilities could potentially be improved through micro-, meso-, and macro-level social processes. At the micro level, sport-based social inclusion programmes could offer such social relations to varying degrees, though sport’s values are only relative to other leisure activities. The scale of impact depends primarily on the meso-level processes, in which the size and quality of each programme can be improved through organisational learning, and secondarily on the macro-level processes whereby the organisational population is institutionalised. It is argued that more research needs to be done on the meso and macro levels, as they are concerned with the ultimate potential of sport to facilitate structural transformation towards more socially inclusive society.

  8. Reduced Spanish Version of Participation Motives Questionnaire for Exercise and Sport: Psychometric Properties, Social/Sport Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Pilar Vílchez, Cristina De Francisco

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the motives that influence physical activity participation is important in order to orientate physical activity promotion and increase physical activity levels of practice of the population. Although many instruments been created and validated to measure motives to perform physical activity, one of the most frequently used scales during years is the Participation of Motives Questionnaire (PMQ by Gill et al. (1983. Unfortunately, despite being so used and translated into many languages, there is no psychometric support for some factors about due to a low internal consistency. The purpose of this research was to present a reduced model of the Spanish version of the PMQ and to analyze the motives for sports participation. The Spanish version of PMQ was applied to participants of both sexes with ages between 12 and 60 years (M = 19.20; SD = 6.37. Factorial validity of the questionnaire was checked using exploratory and confirmatory analyses. Analysis of items and internal consistency of the factors were carried out. Reduced version measures seven dimensions (competition, status, teamwork, energy release, family/peers, skill development and health/fitness with good values of validity and reliability (Cronbach’s Alpha were between 0.713 and 0.879. Different reasons for exercise and sport by sociodemographic variables were found. For example, females practice for exercise and sports for competition and teamwork than males Elite athletes practice more exercise and sport also for teamwork, skills development and health/fitness than amateurs. Finally those who have more experience, practice more physical activity and sport for competition, status and health/fitness.

  9. Social support and adjustment to a novel social environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, T; Sarason, I G; Sarason, B R

    1998-01-01

    The present article aims to examine the ways in which social support may affect the adaptation of individuals to a novel social environment. A distinctive feature of this research was the assessment of social support both before and after entering a completely new network of social relationships. A cohort of international exchange high school students (N = 242) was administered a battery of self-report questionnaires dealing with personality traits, perceived social support, coping behaviors and emotional distress before leaving Japan and six months after living with a host family in a foreign community. Perceived social support abroad contributed to less emotional distress. This health-promoting effect of social support was found to be mediated by adaptive coping behaviours, and was not due to confounding by personality traits. Perceived social support at home was predictive of more emotional distress abroad. Subjects who reported high levels of social support at home were particularly vulnerable when they entered the completely new environment and found that such support was no longer available.

  10. Social Cultural Factors Influencing Women's Participation in Sports ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the socio-cultural factors influencing women's participation in sports as perceived by female undergraduates in the University of Ilorin. Two hundred female undergraduate students residing in school halls of residence were involved in the study. These were selected using simple randomsampling.

  11. Are Children's Competitive Team Sports Socializing Agents for Corporate America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlage, Gai Ingham

    In a study of the similarities between childrens' competitive team sports and the typical corporate or business environment, two research questions were posed: (1) Does the structural organization of childrens' soccer and ice hockey organizations resemble that of American corporations?; and (2) Are the values of childrens' competitive sports…

  12. Boundary Spanners as supports of social capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Boundary Spanners are important agenets of supporting the capacity building of local neighbourhoods and of sustainable social captial the article focuses on the skills and competnces adn role of Boundary Spanners.......Boundary Spanners are important agenets of supporting the capacity building of local neighbourhoods and of sustainable social captial the article focuses on the skills and competnces adn role of Boundary Spanners....

  13. Pedagogical Support Components of Students' Social Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Vera K.; Simonova, Galina I.; Soleymani, Nassim

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem stated in the article is caused by the need of pedagogical support of students' social adaptation on the basis of systematicity, which is achieved if we correctly define the components of the process. The aim of the article is to determine the pedagogical support components of students' social adaptation. The leading…

  14. Social Support, Treatment Adherence and Outcome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-02

    Jun 2, 2017 ... SUMMARY. Objectives: To evaluate available and desired sources and types of social-support among hypertensive and type-2- diabetes (T2D) patients. Associations of medication adherence and clinical outcome with access to most available social-support and medicine affordability were subsequently ...

  15. Incidence of Parental Support and Pressure on Their Children's Motivational Processes towards Sport Practice Regarding Gender.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Amado

    Full Text Available Grounded in Self-Determination Theory, structural equation modeling (SEM with the aim of examining how parental support/pressure could influence their children´s motivational processes in sport was conducted, as well as the models´ differences in operability regarding gender. The sample size was 321 children ranging in age from 10 to 16 years old who were athletes from Extremadura, and 321 parents (included only the father or mother more involved with the sport of his or her child. 175 participants were male and 146 were female from individual (n = 130, and team sports (n=191. A questionnaire was conducted to assess parental perception of support/pressure and another questionnaire was conducted to measure satisfaction of basic psychological needs, type of motivation and enjoyment/boredom showed by their children towards sport practice. Results revealed that parental pressure negatively predicted satisfaction of the basic psychological needs. It also emerged as a strong positive predictor of intrinsic motivation and negative predictor of amotivation. Moreover, intrinsic motivation emerged as positive predictor of enjoyment and a negative predictor of boredom, whereas amotivation positively predicted boredom and negatively predicted enjoyment. Furthermore, results showed there were mean differences by gender: male athletes perceived greater parental pressure. Hence, it is necessary to decrease parental pressure towards their children in sport, with the aim of making them more motivated and enjoy, promoting positive consequences.

  16. An actor-based model of social network influence on adolescent body size, screen time, and playing sports.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Shoham

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that obesity may be "contagious" between individuals in social networks. Social contagion (influence, however, may not be identifiable using traditional statistical approaches because they cannot distinguish contagion from homophily (the propensity for individuals to select friends who are similar to themselves or from shared environmental influences. In this paper, we apply the stochastic actor-based model (SABM framework developed by Snijders and colleagues to data on adolescent body mass index (BMI, screen time, and playing active sports. Our primary hypothesis was that social influences on adolescent body size and related behaviors are independent of friend selection. Employing the SABM, we simultaneously modeled network dynamics (friendship selection based on homophily and structural characteristics of the network and social influence. We focused on the 2 largest schools in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health and held the school environment constant by examining the 2 school networks separately (N = 624 and 1151. Results show support in both schools for homophily on BMI, but also for social influence on BMI. There was no evidence of homophily on screen time in either school, while only one of the schools showed homophily on playing active sports. There was, however, evidence of social influence on screen time in one of the schools, and playing active sports in both schools. These results suggest that both homophily and social influence are important in understanding patterns of adolescent obesity. Intervention efforts should take into consideration peers' influence on one another, rather than treating "high risk" adolescents in isolation.

  17. Teaching Sport as History, History through Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Robert F.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate history course based on two themes: sport as a reflection of society and sport as a socializing agent affecting society. The course focuses on sports and industrialization, traditional and modern sports, political and economic aspects of sport, and inequality and discrimination in sports. (Author/JK)

  18. CREATION AND EXPLOITATION OF POSITIVE IMAGE OF SPORT IN SOCIAL AWARENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bogdanova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available А positive image of sport working on purpose of its institutional reproduction is being created based on the analysis carried out by mass media. The attention is paid to the fact that the society is not properly informed about the existential problems that a sportsman faces; costs are not revealed – mostly human (physical and psychical health, life, material welfare – concerning those who create sport – sportsmen and trainers. Sport is mostly considered as an important means of ensuring and developing culture, supporting national authority, creating people’s unity, a way of manifesting personal heroism.

  19. Social Support and Social Networks in COPD: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Christopher; Effing, Tanya W; Cafarella, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A scoping review was conducted to determine the size and nature of the evidence describing associations between social support and networks on health, management and clinical outcomes amongst patients with COPD. Searches of PubMed, PsychInfo and CINAHL were undertaken for the period 1966-December 2013. A descriptive synthesis of the main findings was undertaken to demonstrate where there is current evidence for associations between social support, networks and health outcomes, and where further research is needed. The search yielded 318 papers of which 287 were excluded after applying selection criteria. Two areas emerged in which there was consistent evidence of benefit of social support; namely mental health and self-efficacy. There was inconsistent evidence for a relationship between perceived social support and quality of life, physical functioning and self-rated health. Hospital readmission was not associated with level of perceived social support. Only a small number of studies (3 articles) have reported on the social network of individuals with COPD. There remains a need to identify the factors that promote and enable social support. In particular, there is a need to further understand the characteristics of social networks within the broader social structural conditions in which COPD patients live and manage their illness.

  20. Emplotment, Embodiment, Engagement: Narrative Technology in Support of Physical Education, Sport and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tony

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a keynote lecture delivered at the International Association of Physical Education in Higher Education 2011 Conference, University of Limerick, on the sub theme: "Technologies in Support of Physical Education, Sport, and Physical Activity." The paper outlines and illustrates a framework: narrative technology, which can be…

  1. Social Tourism Support in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouřilová Jana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social tourism is a form of tourism that takes into account the participation of physically or socially handicapped individuals, and at the same time the social tourism activities are in accordance with the environmental sustain-ability of the territory. in the czech republic the social tourism has been supported at the national level since 2010 by the National tourism support Programme. this paper is aimed at the evaluation of social tourism support in the czech republic in the period of 2010-2012. The evaluation is performed by regions and target groups (families with children, young people under 26 years, seniors and the disabled. the other aim is to identify which model of social tourism was implemented in the czech republic during the period of 2010-2012.

  2. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for adults: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The definition of health incorporates the physical, social and mental domains, however the Physical Activity (PA) guidelines do not address social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by adults. Secondly, the information arising from the systematic review has been used to develop a conceptual model of Health through Sport. Methods A systematic review of 14 electronic databases was conducted in June 2012, and studies published since 1990 were considered for inclusion. Studies that addressed mental and/or social health benefits from participation in sport were included. Results A total of 3668 publications were initially identified, of which 11 met the selection criteria. There were many different psychological and social health benefits reported, with the most commonly being wellbeing and reduced distress and stress. Sport may be associated with improved psychosocial health in addition to improvements attributable to participation in PA. Specifically, club-based or team-based sport seems to be associated with improved health outcomes compared to individual activities, due to the social nature of the participation. Notwithstanding this, individuals who prefer to participate in sport by themselves can still derive mental health benefits which can enhance the development of true-self-awareness and personal growth which is essential for social health. A conceptual model, Health through Sport, is proposed. The model depicts the relationship between psychological, psychosocial and social health domains, and their positive associations with sport participation, as reported in the literature. However, it is acknowledged that the capacity to determine the existence and direction of causal links between participation and health is

  3. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for adults: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eime, Rochelle M; Young, Janet A; Harvey, Jack T; Charity, Melanie J; Payne, Warren R

    2013-12-07

    The definition of health incorporates the physical, social and mental domains, however the Physical Activity (PA) guidelines do not address social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by adults. Secondly, the information arising from the systematic review has been used to develop a conceptual model of Health through Sport. A systematic review of 14 electronic databases was conducted in June 2012, and studies published since 1990 were considered for inclusion. Studies that addressed mental and/or social health benefits from participation in sport were included. A total of 3668 publications were initially identified, of which 11 met the selection criteria. There were many different psychological and social health benefits reported, with the most commonly being wellbeing and reduced distress and stress. Sport may be associated with improved psychosocial health in addition to improvements attributable to participation in PA. Specifically, club-based or team-based sport seems to be associated with improved health outcomes compared to individual activities, due to the social nature of the participation. Notwithstanding this, individuals who prefer to participate in sport by themselves can still derive mental health benefits which can enhance the development of true-self-awareness and personal growth which is essential for social health. A conceptual model, Health through Sport, is proposed. The model depicts the relationship between psychological, psychosocial and social health domains, and their positive associations with sport participation, as reported in the literature. However, it is acknowledged that the capacity to determine the existence and direction of causal links between participation and health is limited by the cross

  4. Social Inclusion Through Para sport: A Critical Reflection on the Current State of Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Swartz, Leslie

    2018-05-01

    Medicine has played an integral role in both the inception and development of the Paralympic Games. Sports physicians are well positioned to continue to influence the development of the paralympic movement and to help focus the movement on its agenda to promote social inclusion. This article looks critically at some of the key challenges that the paralympic movement faces in its quest to promote social inclusion, and considers the role of sports medicine in this process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Social support for schoolchildren at risk of social exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanauskiene V.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Social exclusion is a wider concept than poverty and includes not only material conditions but also inability to participate in economic, social, political and cultural life. The essence of social exclusion is social relationships (more exactly breaking off relationships, which may mean not only pushing away some members of the society, but also breaking off relationships with the society from the side of a person himself/herself. The reasons of origin of social exclusion may be legal, political, economical, social and cultural. Nowadays social exclusion is predetermined by social-economic factors. According to Poviliūnas (2001, the problems of children’s social exclusion may be solved ensuring proper education, care of public health, safety and minimal life standard. Growing aggression and violence of schoolchildren and their social exclusion are nowadays an important issue of political debate and media reports. Often schoolchildren face the risk of social exclusion at school during the period of adolescence. The risk also depends on the social status of their family in the society and the relationship of the family members. The aim of the article is to identify characteristic features of schoolchildren at risk of social exclusion and analyze social support provided for them. A quantitative research was carried out to achieve the aim. The method of data collection is a questionnaire. 105 teachers working in 3 secondary schools in Lithuania participated in the research. The research results revealed that most often schoolchildren face the risk of social exclusion at school during adolescence period. They are characterized as incommunicative, unsociable, passive, and shy, do not trust others, are vulnerable, have learning problems and avoid collaborative activities. These schoolchildren usually come from families of social risk or single parent families. The support provided at school by teachers to schoolchildren at risk of social exclusion

  6. Participation in Team Sports Can Eliminate the Effect of Social Loafing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Stanisław H; Szmajke, Andrzej; Kruger, Ankebé; Kübler, Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    The effect known as Ringelmann effect states that as group size increases, individual behavior may be less productive. If this decrease in productivity in groups is attributed to a decrement in individual motivation, it is called social loafing. We tested hypotheses that the collectivism associated with participation in team sports would reduce the level of social loafing compared to people who were not involved in team sports. In one experiment, participants (n = 72; M age = 21.7 years, SD = 2.0) had to pull a rope individually and collectively. Groups of two, three, four, and six persons were formed from among individuals with no previous sports experience, and of those who had engaged in individual and team sports. For each team, the sum of individual achievements of the individuals constituting a team was computed. This sum served as the anticipated result (expected value). The expected values were later compared to the actual achievements, i.e., the value achieved by the whole team. The results of the study suggested that previous experience in collective (team) sports eliminated the effect of social loafing. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Psychosocial Influences on children’s identification with sports teams: a case study of Australian Rules football supporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaaij, R.; Anderson, A.

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the socialization of children into identification with a sports team. It presents a sociological approach which extends the insights obtained from research into psychological aspects of sports team identification. A conceptual model is presented which proffers an explanation of

  8. Development of physical education and sports of the region in the context of social entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Viktorovich Maslov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the development of ideas on social entrepreneurship, which is defined as a legally enforceable activity on production of goods and (or services aimed at the solution or mitigation of social problems through sustainable and financially successful organizational innovation, providing the further spread of the experience of social impact. The characteristics on the foreign experience of this phenomenon are given. Points of social entrepreneurship impact in the Russian society are defined. It is suggested to consider entrepreneurial activity in the sphere of physical culture and sports as a form of social entrepreneurship. It is proved that the characteristics of entrepreneurship in the sphere of physical culture and sport are appropriate to be provided in the context of general issues and trends in the development of this sector in a particular region. On the example of Sverdlovsk region as a region with good sporting tradition, common trends and factors of development of entrepreneurship in the sphere of physical culture and sports of the Russian regions are identified. Ways of solving existing problems are proposed.

  9. Responsibility for child and adolescent’s psychosocial support associated with severe sports injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Charlotte; Fitzgerald, Ulrika Tranaeus; Alricsson, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The manner in which health professionals and coaches act and decide on treatment and prognosis can influence athletes in a way that not only strengthens them, but it can also reduce their confidence in their own ability. The purpose was to determine who has the responsibility for child and adolescent psychosocial support needed in connection with a severe sports injury as well as investigate whether coaches, physiotherapists and parents are aware of the support that is needed. Qualitative interviews with coaches, parents and physiotherapists with experience of serious sports injuries in young people aged 12 to 16 years old from different sports were analysed using content analysis. The study showed that all actors independently imparted communication as being the major problem and indicated that the role of a coordinator was missing. They imparted cognitive, emotional and behavioural reactions in children, which were considered to be more common in younger children as indicated in previous studies. Coaches felt they had lack of education and time; parents described their disappointment in caregivers and personality changes in their children in connection with the injury. Physiotherapists felt that rehabilitation was often served as a substitute for the sport and that they therefore had greater responsibility for the child than they had been educated for. Results should be communicated to participants who are involved in children’s and adolescent’s sports to increase their knowledge and thus allow them to be able to give our children the best possibility, regardless of whether they return to the sport or not. PMID:28119882

  10. Explaining the Number of Social Media Fans for North American and European Professional Sports Clubs with Determinants of Their Financial Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Scelles

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to investigate the explanatory variables of the number of Facebook fans and Twitter followers for professional sports clubs based on the financial value literature. Such explanatory variables are related to local market conditions and on-field and off-field performance. Based upon a sample of North American major league clubs and the most valuable European soccer clubs as evaluated by Forbes over the 2011–2013 period (423 observations, our results indicate a range of variables with a significant positive impact on the number of social media fans: population, no competing team in the market, current sports performance, historical sports performance, facility age, attendance, operating income, expenses/league mean, and being an English football club. An improved understanding of the effectiveness of clubs’ social media presence is important for contemporary sport managers in terms of enhancing supporter communication, involvement, and accountability, as well as maximizing clubs’ revenue generation possibilities. Our findings could help sport managers to realize their clubs’ social media potential in pursuit of these objectives, specifically to understand which variables are under-exploited and why some clubs over-perform, which will allow managers to prioritize decisions to increase their number of social media fans and financial value.

  11. Social Support and Emocional Stability in Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Mičková

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The issue of anticipation social support is actual topic because of detection important factors for positive development of personality. Emotional bonds are getting stronger with perception of social support. Subjective feeling of positive emotions and relationships is manifest with higher range of social and mental functioning, emotional - willing stability of personality. Emotional basement of personality is emotional stability, which represent relationship with the anticipated social support. The lack of social support make a negative influence on personality development and personality traits. Positive emotional relationsthips with parents are important for healthy growth of personality (Filadelfiová, 2001; Arrive, 2004; Vágnerová, 2000; Langmeier & Křejčířová, 2006; Grun, 2011; Kraus & Poláčková, 2001; Matulník, 2002; Matějček & Dytrych, 2002. The meaning of social support and partner's love is confirmed with research. The meaning of social support in adolescence is replaced from parents to life partner. Strong emotional relationship motivates, integrates and regulates (Vágnerová, 2000. Absence of positive and permanent emotional relationship hold the positive soul steadiness. The signs of soul unsteadiness are destruction of self-esteem and self-image which manifest unstable emotionality. Subjective survival of emotional and social disharmony influence mental problems - neurotic disorders, problems with adaptation, emotional and social problems (Kondáš, 2002. The goal of research was find out relationship of social support regarding with emotional-willing stability and adolescence relationships in their family. We were interested in level of social support and level of emotional- willing stability and perception of quality family relationships regarding with gender and actual partnership. The research sample contained with N= 120 respondents (men = 33, women = 87 in age 19 - 24 years old, M = 23, 97. The next criterium of

  12. ETHICS AND BUSINESS IN SPORT-CONTRIBUTION OF SOCIAL RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Marinković

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available History of human society confirm that responsibility is one of basic principles, of key importance in all ages, an all forms of political and economic organisation of society. Also, in history, and contemporary age we can find different understanding and definitions of responsibility, dependentlly of social circumstances, or social position of some social groups or individuals. Very important role in the frame of social responsible business isssue have be a sport whose development is one of the main pillars of alla of society. From that reason, in accordance with globalisation process, sport became to pic of interesto of international organisations which define rools and standards which is important for sport development in each country in the world. Hovewer, in contemporary society is visible there is direct proportion between level of resposibility and level of democracy, human rights and freedoms, economic developement and quallity of life Social responsible bussines, may be defined as collection of principles which oblige participants of economic life to take care not only about individual interests, bal also about interests of society in whole. In other words, social responsible bussines is applied etic in the field of economy, first of all in managing with capital and human resources.In that poent of view, social responsible bussines is esentially conected with other civilisation approaches – freedom,equallity, social justice.

  13. Problematizing Social Justice in Health Pedagogy and Youth Sport: Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, and Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagkas, Symeon

    2016-09-01

    Social justice education recognizes the discrepancies in opportunities among disadvantaged groups in society. The purpose of the articles in this special topic on social justice is to (a) provide a critical reflection on issues of social justice within health pedagogy and youth sport of Black and ethnic-minority (BME) young people; (b) provide a framework for the importance of intersectionality research (mainly the intersection of social class, race, and ethnicity) in youth sport and health pedagogy for social justice; and (c) contextualize the complex intersection and interplay of social issues (i.e., race, ethnicity, social classes) and their influence in shaping physical culture among young people with a BME background. The article argues that there are several social identities in any given pedagogical terrain that need to be heard and legitimized to avoid neglect and "othering." This article suggests that a resurgence of interest in theoretical frameworks such as intersectionality can provide an effective platform to legitimize "non-normative bodies" (diverse bodies) in health pedagogy and physical education and sport by voicing positionalities on agency and practice.

  14. Research to support social interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard de Zeeuw

    2010-06-01

    In deze bijdrage wordt een type onderzoek geconcipieerd dat gebruik maakt van beide bijdragen zonder het onderscheid daartussen te laten vervallen. Het gaat om een hybride type. Er wordt betoogd dat dit voldoende gelijkenis vertoont met traditionele vormen van onderzoek om als onderzoek te worden erkend en dat het helpt om sociale interventies op dezelfde manier te ondersteunen als traditioneel onderzoek technische interventies ondersteunt. Een korte geschiedenis laat zien hoe dit hybride type past in de ontwikkeling van onderzoek en tevens dat het ontwerponderzoek en benaderingen zoals de al genoemde effectief ondersteunt (via een meer uitputtende behandeling van oordelen dan daarin gebruikelijk. Er wordt gerefereerd aan een academische discipline (“andragologie” waarin zulk onderzoek centraal heeft gestaan. Dit type wordt gezien als het “naastgelegen gebied van ontwikkeling” van onderzoek.

  15. Policy, Sport and Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Sine; Sørensen, Jan Kahr

    2010-01-01

    in sport, although sports clubs do get economic support and are seen as having the potential to solve crucial social issues. The purpose of this article is to analyse and discuss the ways in which the political assumption that sport can enhance social integration is reflected in the practical governance......Increased public funding, more governmental involvement and an emphasis on the instrumental values of physical activities have in general become characteristic of Western nations’ policies towards sport. Denmark is, however, a little different in that there is still little political intervention...... of integration issues in particular in sports clubs. The article is based on a local field study in which we interviewed 10 talented football players with ethnic minority backgrounds and eight coaches and club leaders from six different football clubs. Distinguishing between integration and assimilation...

  16. Research design of decision support system for team sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Mohammad Zukuwwan Zainol; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Kasim, Maznah Mat

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a suitable research procedure that can be referred to while conducting a Decision Support System (DSS) study, especially when the development activity of system artifacts becomes one of the research objectives. The design of the research procedure was based on the completion of a football DSS development that can help in determining the position of a player and the best team formation to be used during a game. After studying the relevant literature, we found that it is necessary to combine the conventional rainfall System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) approach with Case Study approach to help in structuring the research task and phases, which can contribute to the fulfillment of the research aim and objectives.

  17. "Let Them See a Different Path": Social Attitudes towards Sport, Education and Development in Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwauk, Christina Ting

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on ethnographic data collected over 12 months of field research, this paper contributes to the growing body of literature on sport for development (SFD) by giving voice to alternative constructions of the educative potential of SFD. It does this by exploring the social attitudes of youth, educators, community leaders and government…

  18. Rape as Spectator Sport and Creepshot Entertainment: Social Media and the Valorization of Lack of Consent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lack of consent is valorized within popular culture to the point that sexual assault has become a spectator sport and creepshot entertainment on social media. Indeed, the valorization of nonconsensual sex has reached the extreme where sex with unconscious girls, especially accompanied by photographs as trophies, has become a goal of some boys and men.

  19. Using recreational sport for social mobility of urban youth: practices, challenges and dilemmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaaij, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article critically examines some of the major challenges and dilemmas faced by sport-based intervention programs that aim to achieve social mobility of urban youth. Drawing on case studies from Brazil, Australia and The Netherlands, the author proposes and illustrates a typology for analysing

  20. Can a Sport Organization Monitor Its Employees' and Athletes' Use of Social Media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peter; Dodds, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    In "Pietrylo v. Hillstone Restaurant Group," the plaintiff filed a wrongful-discharge claim against his employer after he was fired for content he had posted about the employer on a social media web site. This article discusses the implications of the court's decision on athletes in the sport industry.

  1. Hybridising Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility to Include Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Jose Ignacio; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the impact of the combination of two pedagogical models, Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility, for learners with disabilities experiencing a contactless kickboxing learning unit. Twelve secondary education students agreed to participate. Five had disabilities (intellectual and…

  2. Connection between participation in sport and pro-social orientation and aggression of adolescents: Differences according to gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gašić-Pavišić Slobodanka Ž.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Former researches on the contribution of organized sport to antisocial and pro-social behavior of the young have yielded discordant and contradictory results. However, in the majority of researches, it was determined that active practice of sport has a different effect on psycho-social development of male and female participants. We have undertaken the research with the aim of examining whether there is a connection between the participation of the pupils of secondary school age in organized sport activities and their pro-social value orientation and aggressiveness, and, if there is, whether there are gender differences in that connection. The sample consisted of 300 pupils of secondary school (Mathematical High School in Belgrade, out of which 150 (49 female and 101 male regularly practice sport for more than two years, and 150 pupils (84 male and 66 female do not practice organized sport. The indicators of practicing sport are: the length of practicing sport activities, regularity and intensity of training, participation in contests and the kind of sport (individual or team sport. The following variables of pro-social orientation were examined: readiness for cooperation, caring for other people, social responsibility and empathy. Aggressiveness was examined through aggressive tendencies towards others. All variables were examined by the application of appropriate questionnaires and evaluation scales which were answered by the pupils themselves. The results have shown significant (although low, positive correlations between practicing sport and pro-social values, as well as the negative (low correlation between practicing sport and aggression, for both genders of students. Statistically significant differences were found between boys and girls regarding pro-social orientation (higher level in girls, as well as aggressiveness (higher levels in boys. Significant correlations were lower and more numerous in male than in female respondents.

  3. Cognitive Processes in Perceptions of Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankowski, Eric S.; Wyer, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    Though research is exploratory, it suggests ways in which individuals' a priori beliefs in available social support might affect their reactions to new information and the mechanisms that could underlie the maintenance of these beliefs in light of that information. Evaluates implications for the stability of perceived support availability. (LSR)

  4. [Maturation, separation and social integration. Some developmental psychology aspects of childhood sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, Michael

    2002-04-01

    The unfolding of motorical and social experiences with one's own body is a core element of ego-development and identity in childhood and adolescence. This paper describes essential elements of this process in different age stages. Especially in adolescence, the maturational and separational development are determined by the complex interaction between integration into the peer group and separation from adults, between search for appreciation and oppositional tendencies. On the one hand sport plays an important role for many adolescents during this process. On the other hand adolescent conflicts have a great impact on practising sport. These considerations are illustrated by two case vignettes.

  5. Social Support Predicts Hearing Aid Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurjit; Lau, Sin-Tung; Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the current research were to determine: (1) whether there is a relationship between perceived social support and hearing aid satisfaction, and (2) how well perceived social support predicts hearing aid satisfaction relative to other correlates previously identified in the literature. In study 1, 173 adult ((Equation is included in full-text article.)age = 68.9 years; SD = 13.4) users of hearing aids completed a survey assessing attitudes toward health, hearing, and hearing aids, as well as a questionnaire assessing Big-Five personality factors (Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism) either using paper and pencil or the Internet. In a follow-up study designed to replicate and extend the results from study 1, 161 adult ((Equation is included in full-text article.)age = 32.8 years; SD = 13.3) users of hearing aids completed a similar survey on the Internet. In study 2, participants also completed a measure of hearing aid benefit and reported the style of their hearing aid. In studies 1 and 2, perceived social support was significantly correlated with hearing aid satisfaction (respectively, r = 0.34, r = 0.51, ps hearing aid satisfaction scores was predicted by perceived social support, satisfaction with one's hearing health care provider, duration of daily hearing aid use, and openness. In study 2, 43% of the variance in hearing aid satisfaction was predicted by perceived social support, hearing aid benefit, neuroticism, and hearing aid style. Overall, perceived social support was the best predictor of hearing aid satisfaction in both studies. After controlling for response style (i.e., acquiescence or the tendency to respond positively), the correlation between perceived social support and hearing aid satisfaction remained the same in study 1 (r = 0.34, p hearing aids, a finding that was replicated in a different sample of participants investigated in study 2. A significant relationship between perceived

  6. Support-vector-machine tree-based domain knowledge learning toward automated sports video classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guoqiang; Jiang, Yang; Song, Gang; Jiang, Jianmin

    2010-12-01

    We propose a support-vector-machine (SVM) tree to hierarchically learn from domain knowledge represented by low-level features toward automatic classification of sports videos. The proposed SVM tree adopts a binary tree structure to exploit the nature of SVM's binary classification, where each internal node is a single SVM learning unit, and each external node represents the classified output type. Such a SVM tree presents a number of advantages, which include: 1. low computing cost; 2. integrated learning and classification while preserving individual SVM's learning strength; and 3. flexibility in both structure and learning modules, where different numbers of nodes and features can be added to address specific learning requirements, and various learning models can be added as individual nodes, such as neural networks, AdaBoost, hidden Markov models, dynamic Bayesian networks, etc. Experiments support that the proposed SVM tree achieves good performances in sports video classifications.

  7. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for children and adolescents: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There are specific guidelines regarding the level of physical activity (PA) required to provide health benefits. However, the research underpinning these PA guidelines does not address the element of social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by children and adolescents. Secondly, the information arising from the systematic review has been used to develop a conceptual model. Methods A systematic review of 14 electronic databases was conducted in June 2012, and studies published since 1990 were considered for inclusion. Studies that addressed mental and/or social health benefits from participation in sport were included. Results A total of 3668 publications were initially identified, of which 30 met the selection criteria. There were many different psychological and social health benefits reported, with the most commonly being improved self-esteem, social interaction followed by fewer depressive symptoms. Sport may be associated with improved psychosocial health above and beyond improvements attributable to participation in PA. Specifically, team sport seems to be associated with improved health outcomes compared to individual activities, due to the social nature of the participation. A conceptual model, Health through Sport, is proposed. The model depicts the relationship between psychological, psychosocial and social health domains, and their positive associations with sport participation, as reported in the literature. However, it is acknowledged that the capacity to determine the existence and direction of causal links between participation and health is limited by the fact that the majority of studies identified (n=21) were cross-sectional. Conclusion It is recommended that community sport participation is advocated as a

  8. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for children and adolescents: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eime, Rochelle M; Young, Janet A; Harvey, Jack T; Charity, Melanie J; Payne, Warren R

    2013-08-15

    There are specific guidelines regarding the level of physical activity (PA) required to provide health benefits. However, the research underpinning these PA guidelines does not address the element of social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by children and adolescents. Secondly, the information arising from the systematic review has been used to develop a conceptual model. A systematic review of 14 electronic databases was conducted in June 2012, and studies published since 1990 were considered for inclusion. Studies that addressed mental and/or social health benefits from participation in sport were included. A total of 3668 publications were initially identified, of which 30 met the selection criteria. There were many different psychological and social health benefits reported, with the most commonly being improved self-esteem, social interaction followed by fewer depressive symptoms. Sport may be associated with improved psychosocial health above and beyond improvements attributable to participation in PA. Specifically, team sport seems to be associated with improved health outcomes compared to individual activities, due to the social nature of the participation. A conceptual model, Health through Sport, is proposed. The model depicts the relationship between psychological, psychosocial and social health domains, and their positive associations with sport participation, as reported in the literature. However, it is acknowledged that the capacity to determine the existence and direction of causal links between participation and health is limited by the fact that the majority of studies identified (n=21) were cross-sectional. It is recommended that community sport participation is advocated as a form of leisure time PA for children

  9. Social physique anxiety and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors in adolescents: moderating effects of sport, sport-related characteristics, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Marie-Christine; Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Therme, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of adolescents presenting high levels of social physique anxiety (SPA) in sport practice has been hypothesized as potentially problematic in terms of being associated with disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors (DEAB). Indeed, sport practice itself has been reported to be associated with higher levels of SPA and DEAB, and sport settings may sometimes promote unhealthy life habits. Nevertheless, current studies are few and present several limitations. The objective of the present study was to examine these relationships among adolescents involved or not in various types (i.e., leanness and individual) and contexts (i.e., organized and competitive) of sport practice. The sample included 766 French adolescents (337 boys and 429 girls), aged between 11 and 18 years, involved (n = 335) or not (n = 431) in sport practice. SPA and DEAB were assessed using French adaptations of the SPA scale and the Eating Attitudes Test-26. The results reveal a significant and positive association between SPA and the DEAB scales. Furthermore, they show a positive relationship between SPA and (a) vomiting-purging behaviors in adolescents involved in individual sports and (b) generic DEAB (i.e., a subscale covering fear of getting fat, food preoccupation, and eating-related guilt), particularly in adolescents involved in individual sports. The relationship between SPA and DEAB does not differ according to adolescents' involvement in sport practice or according to their involvement in organized, competitive, or leanness sport practice more specifically. However, higher levels of SPA and DEAB were observed in adolescents involved in individual sports.

  10. Psychological support for sport coaches: an exploration of practitioner psychologist perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sarah; Thelwell, Richard; Barker, Jamie B; Harwood, Chris G

    2018-01-04

    In the present study we add to the literature by exploring the degree to which UK practitioner psychologists perceive themselves able to support sport coaches, and how professional training prepares psychologists for coach work across performance domains. Ten participants comprising seven sport and exercise psychologists with Health Care Professions Council (HCPC) practitioner psychologist status and three trainee psychologists studying towards the British Psychological Society (BPS) qualification in sport and exercise psychology (QSEP) were individually interviewed. All participants reported prior experience of working with coaches across all performance domains. We explored: practitioner's understanding of the challenges coaches face within their job; practitioner's experiences of coach work; perspectives about the ways in which practitioners could and should support coaches; and, the degree to which professional training prepares practitioners for coach work. Using recommended procedures of Connelly and Peltzer, content analysis revealed practitioners perceived the challenges faced by coaches are different at grassroots level compared to those working with elite athletes, and that practitioners require skills to provide one-to-one coach support and group-based interventions. All practitioners perceived that training programmes do not adequately equip trainees with skills required for coach work. We discuss the implications for enhancing practitioner training in the UK.

  11. College athletes' perceptions of social support provided by their coach before injury and after it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, R

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate athletes' perceptions of social support provided by their coach before injury and after it. Participants were 29 high school athletes with minor to severe injuries, who were forced to sit out practice or competition for at least 3 days due to their injury. Male (n=17) and female (n=12) team sport and individual sport athletes ranged in age from 18 to 25 years (mean: 21.18; standard deviation: 1.26). Eight subjects (28%) had major injuries, 12 (41%) had moderate injuries, and 9 (29%) had minor injuries. Twenty-nine high school athletes completed a modified version of the Social Support Survey. Data were collected on who provides each of 6 types of social support, how satisfied the high school athletes are with the amount and type of support they received, and the perceived effect of support on their well-being. With two exceptions, results indicated no differences between preinjury and postinjury satisfaction with the support provided by coaches. The exceptions were for task challenge support and emotional challenge support. Results indicated no differences in the perceived importance to their well-being of support provided by coaches before injury and after it. The exceptions were for listening support and emotional support. These findings confirm the possible positive effects of coaches' listening and emotional support on injured high school athletes' recovery efforts.

  12. The Effect of Social Marketing on Increasing Sport Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet KARGÜN; Mehmet DALKILIÇ; Aytekin ALPULLU; Adem PALA

    2015-01-01

    In today's world of rapidly evolving technology and innovation organizations brought about by increased production and marketing possibilities. Increase in the production and marketing opportunities for organizations, intense competitive environment brought about. Both organizations have to think about the benefit of society as well as their products are required to bring to the fore. The concept of social marketing come to the fore in such an environment. Social marketing is a new marke...

  13. SOCIAL EXPERIENTIAL FEATURES OF CHILDREN SWIMMERS AND THEIR SUCCESS IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojinović Jugoslav

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to perceive a mutual connection of social - experien- tial features of children swimmers on one hand, and their success in sport on the other hand. According to the available methods and possibilities of their application, for this research the most relevant is empirical – unexperimental method or Survey method. An access in the obtained results shows that higher education of parents leads to less suc- cess of children in swimming. One more interesting social psychological category is a connection of parents’ pleasure and sports success. Here is also a connection negative – bigger parents’ pleasure leads more rare to sports success than less parents’ satisfac- tion (33,3 % versus 48,5 % . Probably it is being discussed about children swimmers of those parents who have more striking ambitions when the sports success of their children is concerned. Namely, their children are successful but they would like that they are mo- re successful. The reason for that attitude of those parents probably lies in the fact that all those things that they didn’t achieve in sport in their youth, they want to achieve and compensate through their children. Or vice versa, parents who are more prominently satisfied with the behaviour of their children do not have such great expectations when the success of their children in swimming is concerned. They are cheerful because their children do some sport and because they are not exposed to all those well-known temp- tations of young people today.

  14. Social support of mentally retarded persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Zwolinska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this work is to assess the relationship between the environment and mentally retarded persons. Material and methods: Information referring to social support of mentally retarded persons is a source material collected on the base of the data included in the Polish and foreign literature. The issues under discussion related to the following problems: social integration of persons with intellectual disabilities in a family and local environment, social functioning of people with mild intellectual disability, social rehabilitation of people with moderate, severe and profound intellectual disability and specific contact with people with disabilities. Results: For a person with an intellectual disability, the family is the source of acquisition of basic social skills that give him the opportunity for further development and performing certain social roles in a sense of safety. Full acceptance of the intellectually disabled, may dismiss their sense of shame and fear, and instill the satisfaction of belonging to a social community. Conclusions: Full social acceptance of people with intellectual disabilities is the basis for their assimilation and social functioning.

  15. Using Social Media to Support Clinical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer

    2017-12-01

    Social media has been used increasingly as part of nursing education. Nurse educators at a large, multisite teaching hospital used social media to support clinical teaching. A series of educational images was created by nurse educators and shared across Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. This campaign coincided with in-unit clinical education. Nurse educators can consider using social media as an adjunct to clinical teaching, especially in large hospital settings. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(12):541-542. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for adults: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport

    OpenAIRE

    Eime, Rochelle M; Young, Janet A; Harvey, Jack T; Charity, Melanie J; Payne, Warren R

    2013-01-01

    Background The definition of health incorporates the physical, social and mental domains, however the Physical Activity (PA) guidelines do not address social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by adults. Secondly, the information arising from the systematic revi...

  17. Recreational game and social sport as law policy. Its relationship with childhood in socially and economically deprived communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianina Tuñón

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, it is widely known that sports, exercise and recreational physical activities have benefits for human and social development as well as for their establishment as a human right within different legal activities. This right to sport and recreational game during childhood is made explicit in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN, 1989, and the National Education Act, and the Integral Protection Act (Law 26.061. The aim of this article is to analyze the implementation of public policies through a case study in La Matanza, in three socio-residential areas of slums or urban settlements, with children from 4 to 14 years old as the target population. Adopting qualitative perspectives, we carried out the analysis of the theoretical and methodological approach together with objective field practices. The results show that programs oriented towards sport as a social practice have limitations when it comes to translating the essence of human development from a rights approach into concrete practice, as well as covering, constructing and implementing educational offers in the field of game and recreational sport.

  18. Examination of Socialization Level of University Students Engaged in Sports Activities According to Their Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Mehmet; Karagözoglu, Cengiz; Dervent, Fatih; Arslantas, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the university students who participate in sports have been examined in terms of their socialization relative to the participation in sport activities and the locus of control. Students are thought to be engaged in many activities in addition to their lessons during their student tenure at higher education institutions. Their…

  19. The Relations between the Organizational Happiness and the Organizational Socialization Perceptions of Teachers: The Sample of Physical Education and Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosten, Rasim; Avci, Yunus Emre; Sahin, Erhan

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between levels of organizational happiness and organizational socialization of physical education and sport teachers. The research is quantitative and correlational model. The population of the research is composed of 257 physical education and sports teachers working in Siirt…

  20. Who’s joining the club? Participation of socially vulnerable children and adolescents in club-organised sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanne Vandermeerschen; Jeroen Scheerder; Steven Vos

    2013-01-01

    Sport is often considered as a promising instrument for reaching a wide array of policy objectives. Social inclusion is one of the goals frequently mentioned. Though one can argue about the feasibility of the many claims made, sport can only reasonably be expected to play a role if the targeted

  1. Childhood Social Anxiety and Social Support-Seeking: Distinctive Links with Perceived Support from Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeves, Sylvia; Banerjee, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Social support-seeking is recognised as an important strategy used by children to cope with negative emotions. However, there are important gaps in our knowledge about children's perceptions of different sources of social support, and the associations that these perceptions have with individual differences in socio-emotional functioning. The…

  2. Toward Predicting Social Support Needs in Online Health Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min-Je; Kim, Sung-Hee; Lee, Sukwon; Kwon, Bum Chul; Yi, Ji Soo; Choo, Jaegul; Huh, Jina

    2017-08-02

    While online health social networks (OHSNs) serve as an effective platform for patients to fulfill their various social support needs, predicting the needs of users and providing tailored information remains a challenge. The objective of this study was to discriminate important features for identifying users' social support needs based on knowledge gathered from survey data. This study also provides guidelines for a technical framework, which can be used to predict users' social support needs based on raw data collected from OHSNs. We initially conducted a Web-based survey with 184 OHSN users. From this survey data, we extracted 34 features based on 5 categories: (1) demographics, (2) reading behavior, (3) posting behavior, (4) perceived roles in OHSNs, and (5) values sought in OHSNs. Features from the first 4 categories were used as variables for binary classification. For the prediction outcomes, we used features from the last category: the needs for emotional support, experience-based information, unconventional information, and medical facts. We compared 5 binary classifier algorithms: gradient boosting tree, random forest, decision tree, support vector machines, and logistic regression. We then calculated the scores of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) to understand the comparative effectiveness of the used features. The best performance was AUC scores of 0.89 for predicting users seeking emotional support, 0.86 for experience-based information, 0.80 for unconventional information, and 0.83 for medical facts. With the gradient boosting tree as our best performing model, we analyzed the strength of individual features in predicting one's social support need. Among other discoveries, we found that users seeking emotional support tend to post more in OHSNs compared with others. We developed an initial framework for automatically predicting social support needs in OHSNs using survey data. Future work should involve nonsurvey

  3. Social appearance anxiety of staff in youth services and sport provincial directorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Faruk YAZICI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the social appearance anxiety of staff in Youth Services and Sport Provincial Directorate. Material and Methods: Totally 300 staff who were working in Youth Services and Sport Provincial Directorates of Malatya, Trabzon and Istanbul had participated to the study. As data collection tools; “Social Appearance Anxiety Scale” which developed by Hart et al. (2008 and modified to Turkish with reliability and validity study by Doğan (2010 and “Personal Data Form” created by the researchers were used. In analyzing the data; descriptive analysis, t-test and one way Anova were used. Results: Social anxiety concerns of personnel has been found to be the low level. After the analysis it was determined that there was a significant difference in age, income, doing sports and city that working according to the staff’s social appearance anxiety. Conclusion: In this context, the studies should be included in studying of staff in other cities.

  4. Understanding the Consequences of Newcomer Integration Processes: The Sport Team Socialization Tactics Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Alex J; Eys, Mark

    2017-02-01

    The ways in which newcomers are integrated into sport teams may have broad consequences for the athletes entering the group, as well as for the existing team members. Drawing from organizational socialization theory, the current research developed a questionnaire to assess athletes' perceptions of how newcomers are socialized into their group. Across four studies, think-aloud interviews (N = 8), an expert panel review (N = 6), cross-sectional tests of the factor structure (N Study 2  = 197; N Study 3  = 460), and a two-wave correlational design (N Study 4  = 194) were used to evaluate the construct validity and the internal consistency of the Sport Team Socialization Tactics Questionnaire (STSTQ). Collectively, these efforts identified a three-factor structure underlying the STSTQ and provided preliminary evidence for its validity. The STSTQ enables researchers to systematically examine the individual- and group-level consequences associated with the socialization tactics implemented in sport teams.

  5. Social and task cohesion and the relationship with team sport ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been a resurgence of interest on the influence of social and task cohesion and academic performance of students in order to find a systematic relationship between cohesion and performance. The transition from high school to university can be stressful for those who are in the phase of emerging adulthood.

  6. Willingness of sport fans to participate in socially responsible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has gained increased research interest in recent years. It has evolved globally from a charitable activity into a strategic tool for organisations to protect their reputation, develop brand loyalty and foster competitive advantage. The aim of this study was to develop and empirically test a ...

  7. Using Online Social Networking to Enhance Social Connectedness and Social Support for the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Suparna;Köbler, Felix;Leimeister, Jan Marco;Krcmar, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Social integration is crucial for the overall well-being of the elderly who are more prone to social exclusion because of the natural aging process. We propose online social networking as means to enhance social connectedness and social support ? two aspects of social networks that have significant implications for the well-being of elderly. While prior research investigating the benefits of online social networking has primarily focused on user groups such as teenagers and college students, ...

  8. Using Online Social Networking to Enhance Social Connectedness and Social Support for the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Suparna; Köbler, Felix; Leimeister, Jan Marco; Krcmar, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Social integration is crucial for the overall well-being of the elderly who are more prone to social exclusion because of the natural aging process. We propose online social networking as means to enhance social connectedness and social support – two aspects of social networks that have significant implications for the well-being of elderly. While prior research investigating the benefits of online social networking has primarily focused on user groups such as teenagers and college students, ...

  9. Coach autonomy support and quality of sport engagement in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, María Sol; Balaguer, Isabel; Castillo, Isabel; Duda, Joan L

    2009-05-01

    Based on the self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000), this study tested a model of the assumed sequential relationships between perceived autonomy support, psychological need satisfaction, self-determined motivation, and enjoyment/boredom. The hypothesized mediational roles of psychological need satisfaction and self-determined motivation were also studied. In a sample of 370 young male soccer players, path analysis results offered support for the proposed model. Total mediation was supported in the case of the psychological need satisfaction in the relationship between autonomy support and self-determined motivation, and partial mediation for self-determined motivation in the links between psychological need satisfaction and enjoyment (positive) and boredom (negative). Implications of autonomy-supportive behaviors provided by coaches for the quality of sport involvement among young athletes are discussed.

  10. Teacher Stress and Social Support Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristen; Mang, Colin; Frost, Lorraine

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how the frequency of utilization of social supports is related to teacher demographics, stress factors, job satisfaction, career intent, career commitment, and the perception of a stigma attached to teacher stress. Using data from self-report questionnaires (N = 264) from teachers in northern Ontario, we found that…

  11. Supporting Student Transition through Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Carolyn; Meredith, CaAtherine

    2012-01-01

    Views about the role of Facebook and other social networking sites in education are extremely varied. Facebook threatens academic success and yet "certain kinds of Facebook use" can support study; indeed, Facebooking students may perform better than their unwired peers (Ellison, Steinfield, and Lampe 2007). Facebook is emphatically a…

  12. Social support predicts survival in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thong, Melissa S. Y.; Kaptein, Adrian A.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Social support is a consistent predictor of survival, as evidenced in empirical studies in patients with cancer or cardiovascular disease. In the area of renal diseases, this topic has not yet been studied extensively. This study, therefore, aimed to investigate the association between

  13. Sport commitment and adherence: A social-cognitive analysis. (Compromiso deportivo y adherencia: Un análisis cognitivo social.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério M. Lukwu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available ResumenStatement of problem: This study aimed to analyse the ability of a model based on achievement motivation and self-determination theories to predict adherence to competitive sport. This model incorporated commitment as predictor of adherence. A prospective study was performed with a sample of 302 handball players aged between 14 and 18 years. Structural equation modelling gave support to the model proposed. It was verified the sequence of relationships between perceptions of coach-created mastery climate, psychological needs, self-determined motivation, commitment, and adherence. The major contribution of the study was to confirm a motivational model of adherence based on social-cognitive theories, considering commitment as a predictor of adherence.ResumenEste trabajo analizó la capacidad de un modelo basado en las teorías de la motivación d logro y de la autodeterminación para predecir la adherencia al deporte competitivo. Este modelo incorporó el compromiso como un predictor de la adherencia. La muestra estuvo compuesta por 302 jugadores de balomnano, con edades comprendidas entre los 14 y 18 años. El análisis mediante ecuaciones estructurales (Structural Equation Modelling confirmó el modelo propuesto. Se verificó la secuencia de relaciones entre la percepción de clima de maestría creado por el entrenador, necesidades psicológicas, motivación autodeterminada, compromiso y adherencia. La principal aportación del estudio fue confirmar un modelo motivacional de la adherencia basado en teorías cognitivo-sociales, considerando el compromiso como un predictor de ésta.

  14. The Use of Social Media Supporting Studying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify the degree to which social media influence or support the learning process among students. The research was complex, involving three international panels, comprising students from Poland, China and Romania. Although intercultural differences between the three countries are evident, the attitudes and perceptions of the usefulness of social media in learning activities tend to be homogeneous, revealing not just the extensive use of this worldwide phenomenon amongst young people, but also its significance. Social media have impacted greatly on the way people relate, both positively and negatively. This research focuses on the analysis of the use of social networking in the process of training and self-training in youth education.

  15. Social support and health among elderly Kuwaitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kandari, Yagoub Y; Crews, Douglas E

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in several aspects of health between Kuwaiti men and women aged 60 years and over across three age categories (60-69, 70-79, 80+ years). The relationships between several social support variables, somatic symptoms and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were examined. A total of 1427 adult men (472) and women (955) aged 60 years and over representing all six governorates were selected. Data were collected during 2008-2009 by interview and completion of a questionnaire by participants in their own homes, after obtaining their informed consent. The Social Support Scale (SSS), Frequency of Contact Scale (FOC), Strength of Relations (SOR), Somatic Symptoms Inventory (SSI) and self-rated scales of general health were included. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured. The data show that self-rated health and health in the last year differ significantly across age groups. Glycaemia differed significantly across the three age groups for the total sample. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were higher in older respondents than younger ones, but no significant differences were observed between men and women. No significant differences in somatic symptoms were observed across the three age groups. Strength of relationship, frequency of contact, social support and children living with an elderly adult were all associated with fewer somatic symptoms, and all, except social support, were associated with lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Having children, the perception of social support, frequency of contact with, and strength of, relationships with kin are important modulators of somatic symptoms and blood pressure among elderly Kuwaitis.

  16. Peculiarities of Social Competence of Future Specialists of Physical Education and Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romualdas K. Malinauskas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the peculiarities of social competence of future specialists of physical education and sports. To solve the objectives, the poll has been carried out. 263 student have been selected (135 future teachers of physical culture and 128 future coaches. The results show that future teachers of physical education have higher level of responsiveness (the ability to console, the ability to help than future coaches. Future teachers of physical education have higher level of ability to avoid insult

  17. Social Factors, Social Support And Condom Use Behavior Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study explored condom use behaviour, specifically the extent to which beliefs, self efficacy, risk perception and perceived social support act as predictors of use or non-use of condoms among sexually active young people aged 15-24 years. Methods: Data was obtained from sexually active 448 boys and 338 girls, who were ...

  18. Osteogenesis imperfecta: Level of independence and of social, recreational and sports participation among adolescents and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Celin, Mercedes; Fano, Virginia

    2016-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a group of hereditary connective tissue disorders that cause bone fragility, with a wide clinical variability resulting in varying degrees of motor disability. To describe the level of independence and of social, recreational and sports participation among adolescents with osteogenesis imperfecta. Descriptive, analytical and crosssectional study conducted in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta older than 15 years old attending the Skeletal Dysplasia Office of Hospital "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan" (May 2013 through December 2014). Self-administered survey. Short stature was an outcome measure that indicated severity. There were 18 patients; age: 19.17 (±3.4 sDE); 83% had moderate-severe forms of OI; median height: -7.9 sDE; 50% used a wheelchair. Average education years: 12.2; 56% participated in sporting activities; and 78% were involved in recreational and social activities. A high level of independence was observed. We found a correlation between short stature and use of wheelchair (r: -0.77) and between short stature and participation in sporting activities (r: 0.66). No correlation was observed with years of education (r: -0.15), participation in social activities (r: -0.22) or recreational activities (r: 0.35). Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  19. The Online Social Networking of Cyberspace: A Study on the Development of an Online Social Network Project and the Sport Industry's Perception of Its Relative Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptrap, Timothy John

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory case study examined online social networking (OSN), and the perceptions of Sport Marketing students and sport industry professional as to the relative advantage of the OSN tools in the marketplace. The conceptual framework for this study was based on Boyer's (1990) concepts of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), and the…

  20. It is compatible the sport in scholar age with other social roles? A study through Self-Determination Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Amado Alonso, Diana; Leo Marcos, Francisco Miguel; Sánchez Oliva, David; González Ponce, Inmaculada; López Chamorro, José María

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the relationship between perception of conflict or utility of the sport regarding other social roles and self-determination level in young athletes, focusing on differences among these variables with respect to sex. Hence, we used a sample size of 1897 players from different sport modalities, 1378 male and 519 female. Participants filled a questionnaire to assess self-determination level and other to measure conflict between social roles. Results show...

  1. Sport in Germany. Basis-Info: Social Policy. In-Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitz, Steffen

    This report describes sports in Germany, explaining that sport is part of Germany's culture. Popular sports are enjoyed by both the public and private sector. Germany has a well-developed club and association sector. One in three Germans belongs to a sports organization. A major feature of sport in Germany is its autonomy. Popular sports begin in…

  2. Social networks, social support and psychiatric symptoms: social determinants and associations within a multicultural community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Natasha; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about how social networks and social support are distributed within diverse communities and how different types of each are associated with a range of psychiatric symptoms. This study aims to address such shortcomings by: (1) describing the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of social networks and social support in a multicultural population and (2) examining how each is associated with multiple mental health outcomes. Data is drawn from the South East London Community Health Study; a cross-sectional study of 1,698 adults conducted between 2008 and 2010. The findings demonstrate variation in social networks and social support by socio-demographic factors. Ethnic minority groups reported larger family networks but less perceived instrumental support. Older individuals and migrant groups reported lower levels of particular network and support types. Individuals from lower socioeconomic groups tended to report less social networks and support across the indicators measured. Perceived emotional and instrumental support, family and friend network size emerged as protective factors for common mental disorder, personality dysfunction and psychotic experiences. In contrast, both social networks and social support appear less relevant for hazardous alcohol use. The findings both confirm established knowledge that social networks and social support exert differential effects on mental health and furthermore suggest that the particular type of social support may be important. In contrast, different types of social network appear to impact upon poor mental health in a more uniform way. Future psychosocial strategies promoting mental health should consider which social groups are vulnerable to reduced social networks and poor social support and which diagnostic groups may benefit most.

  3. Applying the Team Identification-Social Psychological Health Model to older sport fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wann, Daniel L; Rogers, Kelly; Dooley, Keith; Foley, Mary

    2011-01-01

    According to the Team Identification-Social Psychological Health Model (Wann, 2006b), team identification and social psychological health should be positively correlated because identification leads to important social connections which, in turn, facilitate well-being. Although past research substantiates the hypothesized positive relationship between team identification and well-being, earlier studies focused solely on college student populations. The current study extended past work in this area by investigating the team identification/well-being relationship among older sport fans. A sample of older adults (N = 96; M age = 70.82) completed scales assessing demographics, identification with a local college basketball team, and measures of social psychological well-being. As hypothesized, team identification accounted for a significant proportion of unique variance in two measures of social psychological health (collective self-esteem and loneliness).

  4. Promoting Social Inclusion through Sport for Refugee-Background Youth in Australia: Analysing Different Participation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Block

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sports participation can confer a range of physical and psychosocial benefits and, for refugee and migrant youth, may even act as a critical mediator for achieving positive settlement and engaging meaningfully in Australian society. This group has low participation rates however, with identified barriers including costs; discrimination and a lack of cultural sensitivity in sporting environments; lack of knowledge of mainstream sports services on the part of refugee-background settlers; inadequate access to transport; culturally determined gender norms; and family attitudes. Organisations in various sectors have devised programs and strategies for addressing these participation barriers. In many cases however, these responses appear to be ad hoc and under-theorised. This article reports findings from a qualitative exploratory study conducted in a range of settings to examine the benefits, challenges and shortcomings associated with different participation models. Interview participants were drawn from non-government organisations, local governments, schools, and sports clubs. Three distinct models of participation were identified, including short term programs for refugee-background children; ongoing programs for refugee-background children and youth; and integration into mainstream clubs. These models are discussed in terms of their relative challenges and benefits and their capacity to promote sustainable engagement and social inclusion for this population group.

  5. Social support from the athletic trainer and symptoms of depression and anxiety at return to play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingzhen; Schaefer, Julie T; Zhang, Ni; Covassin, Tracey; Ding, Kele; Heiden, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Few empirical studies have examined social support from athletic trainers (ATs) and its buffering effect during injury recovery. To examine the effect of social support received from ATs during injury recovery on reported symptoms of depression and anxiety at return to play among a cohort of collegiate athletes. Cohort study. Two Big 10 Conference universities. A total of 594 injuries sustained by 387 collegiate athletes (397 injuries by 256 males, 197 injuries by 131 females) on 9 sports teams. Data were collected during the 2007-2011 seasons. Social support was measured using the 6-item Social Support Questionnaire. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Anxiety was measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. We used generalized estimation equation regression models to examine the effect of the social support from ATs on the odds of symptoms of depression and anxiety at return to play. In 84.3% (n = 501) of injury events, injured athletes received social support from ATs during their recovery. Of these, 264 (53.1%) athletes reported being very satisfied with this social support. Whether or not athletes received social support from ATs during recovery did not affect the symptoms of depression or anxiety experienced at return to play. However, compared with athletes who were dissatisfied with the social support received from ATs, athletes who were very satisfied or satisfied with this social support were 87% (95% confidence interval = 0.06, 0.30) and 70% (95% confidence interval = 0.13, 0.70) less likely to report symptoms of depression at return to play, respectively. Similar results were observed for anxiety. Our findings support the buffering effect of social support from ATs and have important implications for successful recovery in both the physical and psychological aspects for injured athletes.

  6. Private support and social securityPrivate support and social security

    OpenAIRE

    Frans van Dijk

    1998-01-01

    The issue is addressed whether assistance to persons in need can be left to the `family' and the `community'. In that case people depend on their social networks. The support a person receives through a given network of social ties is examined. However, ties are diverse and subject to change. By means of a model of the dynamics of social ties, the conditions for adequate private support are analyzed. The sustainability of private support over time is examined by incorporating the impact on so...

  7. Athletes' perceptions of anti-doping sanctions: the ban from sport versus social, financial and self-imposed sanctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overbye, Marie Birch; Elbe, Anne-Marie; Knudsen, Mette Lykke

    2015-01-01

    athletes from 40 sports (N = 645; response rate, 43%). Results showed that 78% of athletes regarded the ban as a deterrent. Older male athletes, however, did so to a lesser degree. Seventy-seven per cent, regardless of gender, age, sport type and previous experience of doping testing, viewed social......Today the main doping deterrence strategy is to ban athletes from sport if caught. This study examines whether Danish elite athletes perceive the ban as a deterrent and how they evaluate social, self-imposed and financial sanctions compared with the ban. Questionnaires were emailed to elite...

  8. Modern Social Support Structures: Online Social Networks and their Implications for Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kala Chakradhar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mapping and assessing social networks and the quality of their social support is a valuable intervention strategy for social workers. These networks have now spread onto the digital realm in the form of Online Social Networks (OSNs. This study investigated the nature of social support provided by such networks to their users in a rural mid-South University (USA and explored parallels with the current understanding of social support in conventional social networks. A web-based survey administered to college students revealed that users of these online networks were predominantly undergraduate first year students, female, single, unemployed and from a variety of academic disciplines. The examination of the components of OSNs appears to mirror those of offline networks. They also seem to complement the effects of each other while contributing to an individual's support system. The paper concludes with critical implications of such online social networking for University students and social workers in practice and education.

  9. Sporting Clube de Portugal, a social media benchmark in the football clubs’ sector

    OpenAIRE

    Saúde, Miguel Lages Ribeiro de Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Master in Marketing / JEL Classification System: M31 – Marketing; L83 – Sports In today’s world, it is becoming more prominent the importance that Internet and social media have been having in society and in the lives of each individuals who compose it. With the exponential increase in the number of users and with the emergence of new social networks, football clubs have seen in these platforms the possibility to communicate in a not very expensive way to an audience of thousan...

  10. Progressor: social navigation support through open social student modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, I.-Han; Bakalov, Fedor; Brusilovsky, Peter; König-Ries, Birgitta

    2013-06-01

    The increased volumes of online learning content have produced two problems: how to help students to find the most appropriate resources and how to engage them in using these resources. Personalized and social learning have been suggested as potential ways to address these problems. Our work presented in this paper combines the ideas of personalized and social learning in the context of educational hypermedia. We introduce Progressor, an innovative Web-based tool based on the concepts of social navigation and open student modeling that helps students to find the most relevant resources in a large collection of parameterized self-assessment questions on Java programming. We have evaluated Progressor in a semester-long classroom study, the results of which are presented in this paper. The study confirmed the impact of personalized social navigation support provided by the system in the target context. The interface encouraged students to explore more topics attempting more questions and achieving higher success rates in answering them. A deeper analysis of the social navigation support mechanism revealed that the top students successfully led the way to discovering most relevant resources by creating clear pathways for weaker students.

  11. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for children and adolescents: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport

    OpenAIRE

    Eime, Rochelle M; Young, Janet A; Harvey, Jack T; Charity, Melanie J; Payne, Warren R

    2013-01-01

    Background There are specific guidelines regarding the level of physical activity (PA) required to provide health benefits. However, the research underpinning these PA guidelines does not address the element of social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by childr...

  12. PREDICTION OF SPORT ADHERENCE THROUGH THE INFLUENCE OF AUTONOMY-SUPPORTIVE COACHING AMONG SPANISH ADOLESCENT ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomé J. Almagro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test a motivational model of the coach-athlete relationship, based on self-determination theory and on the hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. The sample comprised of 608 athletes (ages of 12-17 years completed the following measures: interest in athlete's input, praise for autonomous behavior, perceived autonomy, intrinsic motivation, and the intention to be physically active. Structural equation modeling results demonstrated that interest in athletes' input and praise for autonomous behavior predicted perceived autonomy, and perceived autonomy positively predicted intrinsic motivation. Finally, intrinsic motivation predicted the intention to be physically active in the future. The results are discussed in relation to the importance of the climate of autonomy support created by the coach on intrinsic motivation and adherence to sport by adolescent athletes. Further, the results provide information related to the possible objectives of future interventions for the education of coaches, with the goal of providing them with tools and strategies to favor the development of intrinsic motivation among their athletes. In conclusion, the climate of autonomy support created by the coach can predict the autonomy perceived by the athletes which predicts the intrinsic motivation experienced by the athletes, and therefore, their adherence to athletic practice. Key words: Autonomy support, perceived autonomy, intrinsic motivation, sport adherence

  13. Extracurricular Sport Activities and their Importance in Children Socialization and Integration Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomohaci Marcel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of sports activities nowadays is showing their effects on the future development of children, extracurricular activities come in the help of the physical education teacher with benefits on children's development. Our study focuses on revealing the importance of extracurricular sports activities in the process of children's socialization and integration. The research sample was formed from two different groups, the experimental group was formed by 25 students (age 10 ± 2.1 years, 13 boys, and 12 girls, that practiced 2 hours a week physical education and other 2 hours a week extracurricular activities like basketball and volleyball; and the sample group formed by 24 students (age 10 ± 1.8 years, 12 boys and 12 girls, that practiced 2 hours a week classic physical education. The results showed us that extracurricular activities have a good impact on children's socialization and integration, the experimental group improved their coefficient of group cohesion from 0.04 at the initial testing to 0.06 at the final test, and the index of cohesion from 0.02 at the initial test to 0.05 at the final testing. Significant differences were found within the experimental group both in the initial and in the final tests (p < 0.05, also significant differences were discovered between the experimental and the sample group in the final measurement (p < 0.05. Conclusions of this research presented that the experimental group had good improvements of cohesion and social integration of children, showing that extracurricular sport activities have a positive impact on improving socialization, developing cohesion and integrate the marginalized children in the social group.

  14. The integrative power of sport: Imagined and real effects of sport events on multicultural integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, F.; van Zoonen, L.; de Roode, L.

    2008-01-01

    Despite a lack of supporting empirical evidence, the belief that sport participation can be used to address a wide range of social problems remains popular. In this study we explored ways in which the social-integration value of sport participation was constructed by participants in an Amsterdam

  15. Maternal expectations of postpartum social support: validation of the postpartum social support questionnaire during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Angela M.; Hogue, Carol J.; Knight, Bettina T.; Stowe, Zachary N.; Newport, D. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Thirteen percent of women experience postpartum depression. Prenatal screening for anticipated postpartum social support, a postpartum depression risk factor, may allow for early intervention. We sought to validate use of a modified version of the Postpartum Social Support Questionnaire (PSSQ) in pregnant women at increased risk for postpartum depression. Factor analysis using orthogonal varimax rotation was used. The modified PSSQ, administered during pregnancy, yields similar loading patter...

  16. Postinjury Anxiety and Social Support Among Collegiate Athletes: A Comparison Between Orthopaedic Injuries and Concussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covassin, Tracey; Crutcher, Bryan; Bleecker, Alisha; Heiden, Erin O.; Dailey, Alexander; Yang, Jingzhen

    2014-01-01

    Context: When an athlete is injured, the primary focus of the sports medicine team is to treat the physical effects of the injury. However, many injured athletes experience negative psychological responses, including anxiety, regarding their injury. Objective: To compare the anxiety and social support of athletes with concussions and a matched group of athletes with orthopaedic injuries. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic training room. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 525 injuries among athletes from 2 Big Ten universities were observed. Of these, 63 concussion injuries were matched with 63 orthopaedic injuries for the athlete's sex, sport, and time loss due to injury. Main Outcome Measure(s): Clinical measures included the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (which measures both state and trait anxiety) and the modified 6-item Social Support Questionnaire. Results: The group with concussions relied on their family for social support 89% of the time, followed by friends (78%), teammates (65%), athletic trainers (48%), coaches (47%), and physicians (35%). The group with orthopaedic injuries relied on their family for social support 87% of the time, followed by friends (84%), teammates (65%), athletic trainers (57%), coaches (51%), and physicians (36%). We found no differences for the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (t = −1.38, P = .193) between the concussed and orthopaedic-injury groups. Social Support Questionnaire scores were significant predictors for postinjury state anxiety. Specifically, increased scores were associated with decreased postinjury state anxiety (β = −4.21, P = .0001). Conclusions: Both the concussed athletes and those with orthopaedic injuries experienced similar state and trait anxiety and relied on similar sources of social support postinjury. However, athletes with orthopaedic injuries reported greater satisfaction with support from all sources compared with concussed athletes. In contrast, concussed athletes showed

  17. Postinjury anxiety and social support among collegiate athletes: a comparison between orthopaedic injuries and concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covassin, Tracey; Crutcher, Bryan; Bleecker, Alisha; Heiden, Erin O; Dailey, Alexander; Yang, Jingzhen

    2014-01-01

    When an athlete is injured, the primary focus of the sports medicine team is to treat the physical effects of the injury. However, many injured athletes experience negative psychological responses, including anxiety, regarding their injury. To compare the anxiety and social support of athletes with concussions and a matched group of athletes with orthopaedic injuries. Cross-sectional study. Athletic training room. A total of 525 injuries among athletes from 2 Big Ten universities were observed. Of these, 63 concussion injuries were matched with 63 orthopaedic injuries for the athlete's sex, sport, and time loss due to injury. Clinical measures included the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (which measures both state and trait anxiety) and the modified 6-item Social Support Questionnaire. The group with concussions relied on their family for social support 89% of the time, followed by friends (78%), teammates (65%), athletic trainers (48%), coaches (47%), and physicians (35%). The group with orthopaedic injuries relied on their family for social support 87% of the time, followed by friends (84%), teammates (65%), athletic trainers (57%), coaches (51%), and physicians (36%). We found no differences for the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (t = -1.38, P = .193) between the concussed and orthopaedic-injury groups. Social Support Questionnaire scores were significant predictors for postinjury state anxiety. Specifically, increased scores were associated with decreased postinjury state anxiety (β = -4.21, P = .0001). Both the concussed athletes and those with orthopaedic injuries experienced similar state and trait anxiety and relied on similar sources of social support postinjury. However, athletes with orthopaedic injuries reported greater satisfaction with support from all sources compared with concussed athletes. In contrast, concussed athletes showed more significant predictor models of social support on state anxiety at return to play.

  18. Self-Efficacy and social support of Academy cricketers | Cowan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... This article aims to provide an initial insight into the role that South African provincial cricket academies play in talent development of cricketers by reflecting on possible changes in academy cricketers' self-efficacy and perceived social ...

  19. Social support mediates loneliness and depression in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Gou, Zhenggang; Zuo, Junnan

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of loneliness on depression and further tested the mediating effect of social support. A total of 320 elderly persons completed the Emotional and Social Loneliness Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and Self-Rating Depression Scale. Results revealed that loneliness and social support significantly correlated with depression. Structural Equation Modeling indicated that social support partially mediates loneliness and depression. The final model illustrated a significant path from loneliness to depression through social support. This study sheds light on the concurrent effects of loneliness and social support on depression, providing evidence on how to reduce depression among the elderly. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. An investigation into breast support and sports bra use in female runners of the 2012 London Marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicola; White, Jennifer; Brasher, Amanda; Scurr, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Although it is acknowledged that appropriate breast support during exercise is important, no published literature has assessed breast support usage in a cohort of female marathon runners. This study aimed to identify sport bra use and perceived importance of sports bra use in female marathon runners. Bra satisfaction, incidence of bra related issues and factors that influence the appropriateness of sports bras were also investigated. A 4-part, 30-question survey was administered to 1397 female runners at the 2012 London marathon registration and via an online survey. In total 1285 surveys were completed. Sports bra use and its perceived importance was high, however was lower in moderate compared to vigorous activity, and lower in participants with smaller breasts. Seventy-five per cent of participants reported bra fit issues. The most common issues were chaffing and shoulder straps digging in, with a higher incidence of issues reported by participants with larger breasts. Use of professional bra fitting was low, and perceived knowledge of breast health was poor. Engagement with sports bra use is high although sports bra design could be improved to alleviate bra fit issues experienced by female runners. Educational initiatives are needed to ensure females are informed regarding the importance of breast support and appropriate bra fit during activity.

  1. Social functioning and self-esteem in young people with disabilities participating in adapted competitive sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinomais, M; Gambart, G; Bruneau, A; Bontoux, L; Deries, X; Tessiot, C; Richard, I

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate social functioning quality of life and self-esteem in young people with disabilities taking part in adapted competitive sport. A sample of 496 athletes (mean age 16 years 4 months, range: 9 years to 20 years 9 months) was obtained from the 540 participants (91.8%) involved in a French national championship. The main outcome measurements were a social functioning inventory (PedsQL 4.0 social functioning) and a self-esteem inventory in physical areas (physical self inventory 6 PSI-6). The mean PedsQL SF score was 74.6 (SD: 17.7). Comparisons of PedsQL SF according to gender, age, self mobility and training revealed no significant differences between the groups. PedsQL SF was weakly but significantly correlated with all subscales of the PSI-6 in the total population. PSI-6 scores were significantly different between boys and girls, with better self-esteem for boys on general self-esteem (7.7 vs. 6.9, P=0.018), physical condition (6.8 vs. 6.0, P=0.023) and attractive body subscores (6.5 vs. 5.1, Pself-concept, social functioning quality of life and participation in adapted sport activities require further studies. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  2. Self-determination in sport commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahariadis, Panayotis; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Alexandris, Konstantinos

    2006-04-01

    The study tested utility of self-determination and sport commitment theories to understanding young athletes' sport commitment. 343 young athletes (M= 13.5 yr., SD= +/- 1.1) from soccer, basketball, volleyball, handball, and water polo teams volunteered to participate. All completed the Sport Motivation Scale and the Sport Commitment Questionnaire. Pearson correlations showed a strong relationship between commitment and intrinsic motivation scores. In contrast, extrinsic motivation scores were not significantly correlated to commitment, whereas amotivation scores showed a negative correlation to commitment. Path analysis resulted in strong positive association of intrinsic motivation and commitment. Amotivation had small negative relation to commitment. According to the model tested, social constraints and involvement opportunities were not significant contributors to sport commitment. An alternative model supported the mediating role of enjoyment to psychological commitment. The results showed that high self-determination is supportive of sport commitment, whereas low self-determination reduces sport commitment.

  3. [Organisational pre-requisites for the improvement of the social integration of disabled children by means of sport (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innenmoser, J

    1975-11-01

    Physical education of physically handicapped and sensorily imparied children - with its general goals and, especially, its efforts to improve social integration - is understood as an essential part of rehabilitation. The pre-requisites, possibilities and limits of setting up sports teams are discussed on the basis of the types of disabilities suffered by the team members. In addition to homogenous and non-homogenous teams, sports teams should be developed in which the disabled are active alonside the non-disabled. More than ever, sports will be for those disabled who are able to participate - a means of enlarging social contacts. The personality of the sports teacher, who must have a broad knowledge of the methods applied in sports for the disabled, is considered a decisive factor on whom success or failure depends. The given examples are based on experiences gained by the author and his colleagues. The setting up of such sports teams should be followed by new approaches in the clubs and associations activities, as well as in the financing of sports for the disabled. Suggestions are made on how this can be realised.

  4. The Influence of the Social Environment Context in Stress and Coping in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdijk, Carlijn; van der Kamp, John; Polman, Remco

    2016-01-01

    Lazarus (1999) model of stress and coping is based on the reciprocal interaction between the person and the environment. The aim of this study therefore was to examine whether the social environment (significant others) are of influence on the stress and coping of team athletes. The study consisted of two separate studies in which a total of 12 team athletes participated. First, six field hockey players (two males, four females) aged 18-29 years (M = 23.0 years) participated in a diary study. Second, six team athletes of different sports (two males, four females) aged 24-29 years (M = 25.8 years) were interviewed. The results showed that in particular teammates are important for the appraisal of stress and coping in team sports. For over half (i.e., 51.5%) of the reported stressors in the diary study the participants felt that others were of influence on their coping. Team athletes experienced the highest stress intensity during competition, or when they appraised the situation as a threat. When others were of influence the team athletes were most likely to appraise the situation as a challenge and use problem- or emotion-focused coping strategies. These finding might provide a new portal for intervention to enhance coping with stress in sport and enhance performance and satisfaction.

  5. Social support and social network as intermediary social determinants of dental caries in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanini, Humberto; Marshman, Zoe; Vettore, Mario

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between intermediary social determinants, namely social support and social network with dental caries in adolescents. An adapted version of the WHO social determinants of health conceptual framework was used to organize structural and intermediary social determinants of dental caries into six blocks including perceived social support and number of social networks. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a representative sample of 542 students between 12 and 14 years of age in public schools located in the city of Dourados, Brazil in 2012. The outcome variables were caries experience (DMFT ≥ 1) and current dental caries (component D of DMFT ≥ 1) recorded by a calibrated dentist. Individual interviews were performed to collect data on perceived social support and numbers of social networks from family and friends and covariates. Multivariate Poisson regressions using hierarchical models were conducted. The prevalence of adolescents with caries experience and current dental caries was 55.2% and 32.1%, respectively. Adolescents with low numbers of social networks and low levels of social support from family (PR 1.47; 95% CI = 1.01-2.14) were more likely to have DMFT ≥ 1. Current dental caries was associated with low numbers of social networks and low levels of social support from family (PR 2.26; 95% CI = 1.15-4.44). Social support and social network were influential psychosocial factors to dental caries in adolescents. This finding requires confirmation in other countries but potentially has implications for programmes to promote oral health. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An Activist Approach to Sport Meets Youth From Socially Vulnerable Backgrounds: Possible Learning Aspirations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luguetti, Carla; Oliver, Kimberly L; Dantas, Luiz Eduardo Pinto Basto Tourinho; Kirk, David

    2017-03-01

    This study was a 2-phase activist research project aimed at co-creating a prototype pedagogical model for working with youth from socially vulnerable backgrounds in a sport context. This article addresses the learning aspirations (learning outcomes) that emerged when we created spaces for youth to develop strategies to manage the risks they face in their community. This study took place in a socially and economically disadvantaged neighborhood in a Brazilian city where we worked with a group of 17 boys aged 13 to 15 years old, 4 coaches, a pedagogic coordinator, and a social worker. During a 6-month period, we collected multiple sources of data including field journal entries/observations (38) and audio records of youth work sessions (18), coaches' work sessions (16), combined coaches and youth work sessions (3), and meetings between the lead and the 2nd author for debriefing and planning sessions (36). By using an activist approach, 4 learning aspirations emerged: becoming responsible/committed, learning from mistakes, valuing each other's knowledge, and communicating with others. Findings suggest there is a need for more sports programs that start from young people's concrete needs and life situations and look to create places for youth to see alternative possibilities and take action.

  7. Framing Design to support Social Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morelli, Nicola; Aguilar, Marc; Concilio, Grazia

    2017-01-01

    In the recent years, new forms of organisation have emerged, that have a disruptive power over the existing social and economic system. This phenomenon is challenging the traditional design approach, based on the idea that designers could design services for citizens and public administrations....... In the new processes designers and service provider are simply mediating the process of co-creation and supporting the ecosystem for the value creation process. This paper will propose a logical framework for the design action, according to a multi-level structure that includes the value-creation level......, in which design is a prerogative of the stakeholders participating in the value-creation action; the level of infrastructuring in which designers use their expert knowledge to support the interaction in the value-creation phase; and the level of governance, in which designers must figure out the structure...

  8. The Correlation of Social Support and Social Participation of Older Adults in Bandar Abbas, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhosravi, Neda; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Lotfi, Mohammad-Sajjad; Hosseinian, Masoumeh

    2015-06-01

    Social participation is a criterion for successful aging. Research has shown that social participation decreases in older adults. However, the role of social support on older adults' social participation has received little attention, especially in eastern countries, such as Iran. Using the Social Participation Questionnaire, the relationship between social support and social participation was investigated in 525 Iranian older adults. A correlation was found between social support and social participation of older adults. Older adult women were found to have less social support and social participation compared with men. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Changing people’s lives for the better? Social mobility through sport-based intervention programmes: opportunities and constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaaij, R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper critically examines the capacity of sport-based intervention programmes to facilitate upward social mobility for disadvantaged young people. Social mobility is seen to comprise both objective and subjective dimensions, which are studied concurrently. The paper draws on a mixed methods

  10. At-Risk Boys' Social Self-Efficacy and Physical Activity Self-Efficacy in a Summer Sports Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron E.; Liu, Jiling; Thornton, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined at-risk boys' social self-efficacy and physical activity self-efficacy within Bandura's self-efficacy framework. A total of 97 boys, aged between 10 and 13 years, attending a summer sports camp completed questionnaires assessing their social self-efficacy, physical activity self- efficacy, prosocial behaviors, and effort.…

  11. Physical activity and social support in adolescents: analysis of different types and sources of social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Gerfeson; Júnior, José Cazuza de Farias

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of different types and sources of social support on physical activity in adolescents. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between physical activity and different types and sources of social support in adolescents. The sample consisted of 2,859 adolescents between 14-19 years of age in the city of João Pessoa, in Northeastern Brazil. Physical activity was measured with a questionnaire and social support from parents and friends using a 10-item scale five for each group (type of support: encouragement, joint participation, watching, inviting, positive comments and transportation). Multivariable analysis showed that the types of support provided by parents associated with physical activity in adolescents were encouragement for females (P adolescents between 14-16 years of age (P = 0.003), and transportation (P = 0.014) and comments (P = 0.037) for males. The types of social support provided by friends were: joint participation in male adolescents (P physical activity varies according to its source, as well as the gender and age of the adolescents.

  12. It is compatible the sport in scholar age with other social roles? A study through Self-Determination Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amado Alonso, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to examine the relationship between perception of conflict or utility of the sport regarding other social roles and self-determination level in young athletes, focusing on differences among these variables with respect to sex. Hence, we used a sample size of 1897 players from different sport modalities, 1378 male and 519 female. Participants filled a questionnaire to assess self-determination level and other to measure conflict between social roles. Results showed that utility of sport was positive and significantly associated with self-determined motivation, whereas conflict between roles was related with amotivation. Moreover, male athletes showed higher scores in all types of motivation that refer Self-Determination Theory, being the group that perceived the greater incompatibility between sport and other social roles according to their growth age. As a conclusion, we emphasize the necessity to promote intrinsic motives of practice in both sex to increase commitment with the sport activity, and avoid sport dropout that might be happened because of the demands of other contexts that surround young athletes.

  13. La cultura física y el deporte: fenómenos sociales /Physical culture and sport: social phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana A. Camargo R

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available La cultura física y el deporte son categorías que se han relacionado con la actividad física y la educación física a lo largo del tiempo, retomando diferentes paradigmas de conocimiento; sin embargo, el paradigma imperante ha sido el empírico-analítico, que reduce la mirada a los fenómenos medibles y observables. Objetivo: identificar las concepciones y enfoques de la cultura física y el deporte en los diferentes momentos de la historia, planteados desde la lógica del modelo de la determinación social propio de la epidemiología crítica. Metodología: revisión sistemática que permite reconocer los conceptos, teorías y modelos planteados nacional e internacionalmente alrededor de las categorías cultura física y deporte, tomando como modelo de análisis la determinación social. Resultados: la cultura física es un concepto relacionado con el cuerpo, la cultura y el movimiento que no se reconoce en las bases de datos; por el contrario, se relaciona con términos de búsqueda como deporte, recreación y actividad física. No obstante, en algunos países la cultura física se considera como un conjunto de programas y acciones desarrollados desde las áreas del deporte, la recreación y la actividad física, la cual se incluye dentro de las políticas públicas y planes de gobierno. Discusión: en Colombia no hay claridad sobre el significado y la implementación de la cultura física, por esto, se hace necesario revisar este concepto, el cual se ha utilizado dentro los procesos de formación de los profesionales de cultura física, el deporte y la recreación. -- Physical culture and sport are categories that have been associated with physical activity and physical education throughout time while picking up different paradigms of knowledge. However, the prevailing paradigm has been the empirical and analytical view, which focuses only on measurable and observable phenomena. Objective: to identify the concepts and approaches

  14. Social support, health, and illness: a complicated relationship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, R

    2011-01-01

    .... A useful resource for clinical practitioners and researchers, Social Support, Health, and Illness addresses the effects of intimate support on a wide variety of medical and psychiatric conditions...

  15. Postpartum Depression and Social Support in China: A Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Zhu, Ruijuan; Zhang, Xueying

    2016-09-01

    This study explored how Chinese culture affects the relationship between social support and postpartum depression. In-depth interviews with 38 mothers in mainland China showed that discrepancies between expected and perceived available social support and conflicts among social support providers are two major contributors to the stress associated with postpartum depression. These dynamics are deeply rooted in the context of Chinese culture with its distinctive gender roles and family dynamics. These cultural norms further prevent women from seeking social support.

  16. Stress, Social Support, and Psychosocial Functioning of Ethnically Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Michelle; Langrehr, Kimberly J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the stress-buffering role of social support on indicators of psychosocial functioning among a combined and split sample of ethnically diverse college students. Although high social support significantly moderated 2 relationships in the combined sample, high and low levels of social support significantly reduced the effect of…

  17. Perceived Social Support and Markers of Heart Failure Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT AND MARKERS OF...Date 11 iii Abstract Title of Thesis: PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT AND MARKERS OF HEART FAILURE SEVERITY Thesis Advisor: David S. Krantz, Ph.D... PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT AND MARKERS OF HEART FAILURE SEVERITY By Amanda E. Berg Masters Thesis submitted to the faculty of the

  18. A Multilevel Framework for Increasing Social Support in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapin, Sally L.; Sulkowski, Michael L.; Lazarus, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    In school contexts, social support refers to the overall perception one has of feeling included and cared for in a community of peers, teachers, caregivers, and others. Social support is critical for promoting positive academic and psychosocial outcomes for students. Conversely, a lack of perceived social support may be associated with increased…

  19. Unemployment, Social Support, Individual Resources, and Job Search Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebarska, Katarzyna; Moser, Klaus; Gunnesch-Luca, George

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the relation between the social support received by unemployed individuals (N = 104) and their job search behavior. A moderated mediation model demonstrated that the effect of social support on job search behaviors was mediated by self-esteem but only if adequacy of social support was perceived as low. In addition, the…

  20. Incidence of Parental Support and Pressure on Their Children’s Motivational Processes towards Sport Practice Regarding Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Grounded in Self-Determination Theory, structural equation modeling (SEM) with the aim of examining how parental support/pressure could influence their children´s motivational processes in sport was conducted, as well as the models´ differences in operability regarding gender. The sample size was 321 children ranging in age from 10 to 16 years old who were athletes from Extremadura, and 321 parents (included only the father or mother more involved with the sport of his or her child). 175 participants were male and 146 were female from individual (n = 130), and team sports (n=191). A questionnaire was conducted to assess parental perception of support/pressure and another questionnaire was conducted to measure satisfaction of basic psychological needs, type of motivation and enjoyment/boredom showed by their children towards sport practice. Results revealed that parental pressure negatively predicted satisfaction of the basic psychological needs. It also emerged as a strong positive predictor of intrinsic motivation and negative predictor of amotivation. Moreover, intrinsic motivation emerged as positive predictor of enjoyment and a negative predictor of boredom, whereas amotivation positively predicted boredom and negatively predicted enjoyment. Furthermore, results showed there were mean differences by gender: male athletes perceived greater parental pressure. Hence, it is necessary to decrease parental pressure towards their children in sport, with the aim of making them more motivated and enjoy, promoting positive consequences. PMID:26039062

  1. Beyond antidoping and harm minimisation: a stakeholder-corporate social responsibility approach to drug control for sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanov, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Debate about the ethics of drug control in sport has largely focused on arguing the relative merits of the existing antidoping policy or the adoption of a health-based harm minimisation approach. A number of ethical challenges arising from antidoping have been identified, and a number of, as yet, unanswered questions remain for the maturing ethics of applying harm minimisation principles to drug control for sport. This paper introduces a 'third approach' to the debate, examining some implications of applying a stakeholder theory of corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the issue of doping in sport. The introduction of the stakeholder-CSR model creates an opportunity to challenge the two dominant schools by enabling a different perspective to contribute to the development of an ethically robust drug control for sport. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Influence of perceived social support on health and socio-economic differences in social support in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gecková, A.; Pudelsky, M.; van Dijk, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of perceived social support on health and socio-economic differences in social support were investigated in sample of adolescents (n = 2616, including 1370 boys, mean age 15 years). The perceived social support was studied in five spheres: school, interpersonal relations, serious

  3. The Biomechanical Support of Eight Selected Sports Bras for Small, Medium and Large Breasted Women while Jogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Deana; Lawson, LaJean

    This study compared the biomechanical support offered by eight presently marketed sports bras for small-, medium-, and large-breasted women while jogging. Fifty-nine subjects were filmed while jogging on a treadmill in each of the bras and in the nude condition. The vertical displacement of the breast relative to the body during one average…

  4. The longitudinal effect of parental support during adolescence on the trajectory of sport participation from adolescence through young adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Gun Lee

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study contributed to the literature by providing important information on the longitudinal effect of parental support during adolescence on the trajectory of sport participation from adolescence through young adulthood using a nationally representative sample of participants transitioning from adolescence to young adulthood.

  5. The concepts of "Sport Culture" and "Sport Habitus": Distancing and approximations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Sviesk Moreira

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with two concepts which serve as a support for studies on sport: "sport culture" and "sport habitus". We aim to identify points of intersection and differences between them in the Brazilian field of Physical Education. We conclude that sport culture concept corresponds to the descriptive and structural dimensions of culture conformation in relation to sport in contemporary society, marked by the phenomenon of economic globalization. This concept refers to the symbolic conception of culture that understands the meanings and directions assigned to the sport phenomenon and to its practice by different individuals and social groups. The sport habitus gradually acquired through the exposure of social agents to the logic of the sport field, corresponds to a willingness to think, to make sense and to act in this space. Not everything that is culturally produced in sports is incorporated in the form of sport habitus, but the habitus is based on aspects of culture. That is, the sport culture has a plurality of manifestations that are not always incorporated in the form of a habitus. The aspect that differentiates the manipulation of concepts of culture and sport habitus is the analytical focus of each, working with both in a complementary manner might become a theoretical and methodological option that contributes to the enlargement of the analysis.

  6. When Using Facebook to Avoid Isolation Reduces Perceived Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Ju; Cho, Eugene

    2018-01-01

    A survey (N = 316) examined how other-directed Facebook use driven by fear of social isolation affects users' perception of social support they possess. As predicted, those higher on fear of isolation were more likely to (a) closely monitor others' activities for self-evaluation (i.e., social comparison) and (b) regulate their self-presentation to garner social approval (i.e., other-directed self-presentation), but less likely to (c) express their true inner feelings and thoughts (i.e., inner-directed self-presentation) on Facebook. Social comparison, in turn, lowered perceived social support among heavy Facebook users, whereas inner-directed self-presentation heightened it. Other-directed self-presentation had no significant effect on perceived social support. Results indicate that the desire to avoid social isolation may paradoxically diminish perceived social support by promoting social comparison, while suppressing the expression of true self on Facebook.

  7. The relationships among sport self-perceptions and social well-being in athletes with physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Deborah R; Martin, Jeffery J

    2014-01-01

    Peer relationships account for a significant motivational influence on sport participation among youth athletes with and without disabilities. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if the quality of friendships, physical self-perceptions and general self-worth predicted close friendship, loneliness and social acceptance among 46 athletes with physical disabilities (males = 35, female = 11) between the ages of 12 and 21 (M age = 15.37, SD = 2.45). Second, this study examined descriptive information on the quality of friendships inside and outside of an adapted sport setting, feelings of loneliness, social acceptance, close friendships, athletic competence, physical appearance, and self-worth among youth athletes with physical disabilities. Participants completed the Sport Friendship Quality Scale (SFQS), a Loneliness Rating Scale and the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents (SPPA). Three regression analyses used positive and negative aspects of non-sport friendship quality, positive aspects of sport friendship quality, physical appearance, athletic competence, and self-worth as predictors and accounted for 57%, 41%, and 31% of the variance in loneliness, close friendships, and social acceptance, respectively. Athletic competence and self-worth were the most important predictors of loneliness and close friendships with significant (p social acceptance. Negative and positive elements of friendship quality were not important predictors. These findings highlight the importance of global psychological (i.e., self-worth) and sport specific psychological (i.e., athletic competence) constructs in predicting important social well-being indices (i.e., close friendships & loneliness). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Maturational and social factors contributing to relative age effects in school sports: Data from the London Youth Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, K E; Parry, D A; Sandercock, G R H

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have investigated whether relative age effects (RAEs) exist in school sport. None have sought to test the competing maturational and social-agent hypotheses proposed to explain the RAE. We aimed to determine the presence of RAEs in multiple school sports and examine the contribution of maturational and social factors in commonplace school sports. We analyzed birth dates of n=10645 competitors (11-18 years) in the 2013 London Youth Games annual inter-school multisport competition and calculated odds ratio (OR) for students competing based on their yearly birth quarter (Q1-Q4). Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the relative contribution of constituent year (Grade) and relative age in netball and football which used multiyear age groupings. In girls, RAEs were present in the team sports including hockey, netball, rugby union, cricket and volleyball but not football. In boys, RAEs were stronger in common team sports (football, basketball cricket) as well as athletics and rowing. In netball and football teams with players from two constituent years, birth quarter better-predicted selection than did constituent year. Relatively older players (Q1) from lower constituent years were overrepresented compared with players from Q3 and Q4 of the upper constituent years. RAEs are present in the many sports commonplace in English schools. Selection of relatively older players ahead of chronologically older students born later in the selection year suggests social agents contribute to RAEs in school sports. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Role of Community Sports Coaches in Creating Optimal Social Conditions for Life Skill Development and Transferability--A Salutogenic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Super, Sabina; Verkooijen, Kirsten; Koelen, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Sport is widely recognised as having the potential to enhance the personal development of socially vulnerable youth, yet there is very limited knowledge on how community sports coaches can create optimal social conditions for life skill development and transferability. We adopt a salutogenic approach in order to study whether and how community…

  10. Psychological and Physical Implications of Highly Competitive Sports for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ed.; Kleiber, Douglas

    There is a growing movement toward highly structured, competitive sports for children aged 7-12, who are at a crucial stage of physical and psychological development. Social play and gemes have important socialization and identity-formation functions. One argument supporting highly competitive sports for children is that they provide additional…

  11. The Relationship between Social-Emotional Learning Ability and Perceived Social Support in Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogurlu, Üzeyir; Sevgi-Yalin, Hatun; Yavuz-Birben, Fazilet

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between social-emotional learning skills and perceived social support of gifted students. Based on this relationship, the authors also examined to what extent social and emotional learning skills were predictive of social support. In addition, gender variables were compared in social and emotional…

  12. Understanding social capital in sports clubs: participation, duration and social trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmose-Østerlund, Karsten; Van der Roest, Jan-Willem

    2017-01-01

    A central claim in Robert Putnam’s theory of social capital is that participation in voluntary organizations can foster social trust among members that are active and engaged. Based on this claim, this article examines how duration of membership and member participation impacts upon levels...

  13. Online Social Support for Young People: Does It Recapitulate In-person Social Support; Can It Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David A; Nick, Elizabeth A; Zelkowitz, Rachel L; Roeder, Kathryn M; Spinelli, Tawny

    2017-03-01

    As social media websites have grown in popularity, public concern about online victimization has grown as well; however, much less attention has focused on the possible beneficial effects of online social networks. If theory and research about in-person social networks pertain, then online social relationships may represent an important modern source of or vehicle for support. In a study of 231 undergraduates, three major findings emerged: (1) for people with weaker in-person social support, social media sites provide a source of social support that is less redundant of the social support they receive in person; (2) in ways that were not redundant of each other, both online and in-person social support were associated with lower levels of depression-related thoughts and feelings, and (3) the beneficial effects of online social support (like in-person social support) offset some of the adverse effects of peer victimization. The study suggests that augmenting social relations via strategic use of social media can enhance young people's social support systems in beneficial ways.

  14. Metacognition and action: a new pathway to understanding social and cognitive aspects of expertise in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Tadhg E; Igou, Eric R; Campbell, Mark J; Moran, Aidan P; Matthews, James

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, psychologists have investigated the mental processes of expert performers - people who display exceptional knowledge and/or skills in specific fields of human achievement. Since the 1960s, expertise researchers have made considerable progress in understanding the cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie such exceptional performance. Whereas the first modern studies of expertise were conducted in relatively formal knowledge domains such as chess, more recent investigations have explored elite performance in dynamic perceptual-motor activities such as sport. Unfortunately, although these studies have led to the identification of certain domain-free generalizations about expert-novice differences, they shed little light on an important issue: namely, experts' metacognitive activities or their insights into, and regulation of, their own mental processes. In an effort to rectify this oversight, the present paper argues that metacognitive processes and inferences play an important if neglected role in expertise. In particular, we suggest that metacognition (including such processes as "meta-attention," "meta-imagery" and "meta-memory," as well as social aspects of this construct) provides a window on the genesis of expert performance. Following a critique of the standard empirical approach to expertise, we explore some research on "metacognition" and "metacognitive inference" among experts in sport. After that, we provide a brief evaluation of the relationship between psychological skills training and metacognition and comment on the measurement of metacognitive processes. Finally, we summarize our conclusions and outline some potentially new directions for research on metacognition in action.

  15. Using Sport Education to Teach an Autonomy-Supportive Fitness Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluder, J. Brandon; Buchanan, Alice M.; Sinelnikov, Oleg A.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a fitness curriculum grounded in the sport education model. The curriculum consists of 18 lessons that were taught to fifth-grade students at a rural school in the South. All features of sport education--team affiliation, season, formal competition, culminating events, record keeping, and festivity--were preserved. The…

  16. The social support and social network characteristics of smokers in methadone maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Marcel Alejandro; Stanton, Cassandra A; Caviness, Celeste M; Niaura, Raymond; Stein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown social support and social network variables to be important factors in smoking cessation treatment. Tobacco use is highly prevalent among individuals in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). However, smoking cessation treatment outcomes in this vulnerable subpopulation have been poor and social support and social network variables may contribute. The current study examined the social support and social network characteristics of 151 MMT smokers involved in a randomized clinical trial of smoking cessation treatments. Participants were 50% women and 78% Caucasian. A high proportion (57%) of MMT smokers had spouses or partners who smoke and over two-thirds of households (68.5%) included at least one smoker. Our sample was characterized by relatively small social networks, but high levels of general social support and quitting support. The number of cigarettes per day was found to be positively associated with the number of smokers in the social network (r = .239, p social support and social networks of smokers in MMT.

  17. Age Moderates the Relationship between Social Support and Psychosocial Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segrin, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Examines the association between social support from various sources and psychosocial problems, and how these associations vary over the life span. Finds that perceived social support and contact with social network members appears to have beneficial effects for all participants, as evidenced through reduced symptoms of depression and loneliness.…

  18. Social networks as ICT collaborative and supportive learning media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper investigated the social networks as ICT collaborative and supportive learning media utilisation within the Nigerian educational system. The concept of ICT was concisely explained vis-à-vis the social network concept, theory and collaborative and supportive learning media utilisation. Different types of social ...

  19. Social Support and Successful Aging in Assisted Living Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, Laura Odell; Troutman-Jordan, Meredith; Newman, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Successful aging has been associated with adequate social support. However, impaired functionality, increased dependence, multiple comorbidities, and reduced social interactions place older assisted living community (ALC) residents at risk for poorer social support and less successful aging. This cross-sectional descriptive study used the revised…

  20. Modern history of women in sports. Twenty-five years of Title IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopiano, D A

    2000-04-01

    The impact of federal anti-discrimination laws such as Title IX and the Amateur Sports Act have opened the doors of sport participation opportunity to girls and women in sports over the last 25 years. Such participation has created new and more lucrative consumer markets for sporting goods manufactures, as well as college and professional sports teams. The prospect of economic gain has created significant social changes: Women are now being encouraged to participate in sports and embrace the resulting benefits, and the general public is showing increased support for gender equity in sports.

  1. District heating versus local heating - Social supportability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matei, Magdalena; Enescu, Diana; Varjoghie, Elena; Radu, Florin; Matei, Lucian

    2004-01-01

    District heating, DH, is an energy source which can provide a cost-effective, environmentally friendly source of heat and power for cities, but only in the case of well running systems, with reasonable technological losses. The benefits of DH system are well known: environmental friendly, energy security, economic and social advantages. DH already covers 60% of heating and hot water needs in transition economies. Today, 70 % of Russian, Latvian and Belarus homes use DH, and heating accounts for one-third of total Russian energy consumption. Yet a large number of DH systems in the region face serious financial, marketing or technical problems because of the policy framework. How can DH issues be best addressed in national and local policy? What can governments do to create the right conditions for the sustainable development of DH while improving service quality? What policies can help capture the economic, environmental and energy security benefits of co-generation and DH? To address these questions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) hosted in 2002 and 2004 conference focusing on the crucial importance of well-designed DH policies, for exchanging information on policy approaches. The conclusions of the conference have shown that 'DH systems can do much to save energy and boost energy security, but stronger policy measures are needed to encourage wise management and investment. With a stronger policy framework, DH systems in formerly socialist countries could save the equivalent of 80 billion cubic meters of natural gas a year through supply side efficiency improvements. This is greater than total annual natural gas consumption in Italy'. More efficient systems will also decrease costs, reducing household bills and making DH competitive on long-term. This paper presents the issues: -Theoretical benefits of the district heating and cooling systems; - Municipal heating in Romania; - Technical and economic problems of DH systems and social supportability; - How

  2. Elements of Social Learning Supporting Transformative Change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The body of literature on social learning is enormous, with differently framed ontologies and epistemologies aligned to multiple perspectives of learning in a social context. These have grown out of the many academic disciplines which have seen the value of social learning. This paper highlights the need to be aware of ...

  3. Social Support Among Substance Using Women with Criminal Justice Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, John M.; Salina, Doreen D.; Jason, Leonard A.

    2016-01-01

    Social support types (abstinence, appraisal, belonging, tangible) were analyzed among a sample of women with criminal justice involvement and substance use disorders (n = 200). Hierarchical linear regression was conducted to examine social support types in relation to changes in abstinence self-efficacy while controlling for incarceration histories. Only abstinence social support and tangible social support predicted significant increases in abstinence self-efficacy, with tangible support accounting for more variance in the analytic model. Findings suggest women with criminal justice involvement who have substance use disorders have basic needs that if met would have an indirect effect on their recovery. Implications for treatment and research are discussed. PMID:26949443

  4. Sports Participation and Social Personality Variable of Students in Secondary Schools in Central Senatorial District of Cross River State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edim, M. E.; Odok, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The main thrust of this study was to investigate sports participation and social personality variable of students in secondary schools in Central Senatorial District of Cross River State, Nigeria. To achieve the purpose of this study, one hypothesis was formulated to guide the study. Literature review was carried out according to the variable of…

  5. Comparison of Loneliness and Social Skill Levels of Children with Specific Learning Disabilities in Terms of Participation in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Atike; Kirimoglu, Hüseyin; Soyer, Fikret

    2018-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to compare loneliness and social skill levels of children with specific learning disabilities in terms of participation in sports. For this study, a screening model was used. The study group was composed of 56 children who were aged between 7 and 14 years and diagnosed with a specific learning disability (30 boys…

  6. Teachers and Students' Perceptions of a Hybrid Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility Learning Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rio, Javier; Menendez-Santurio, Jose Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess students and teachers' perceptions concerning their participation in an educational kickboxing learning unit based on a hybridization of two pedagogical models: Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility. Method: Seventy-one students and three physical education teachers…

  7. Recovery strategies implemented by sport support staff of elite rugby players in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Van Wyk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main aim of this study was to determine strategies used toaccelerate recovery of elite rugby players after training and matches, asused by medical support staff of rugby teams in South A frica. A  secondaryaim was to focus on specifics of implementing ice/cold water immersion asrecovery strategy. Design: A  Questionnaire-based cross sectional descriptive survey was used.Setting and Participants: Most (n=58 of the medical support staff ofrugby teams (doctors, physiotherapists, biokineticists and fitness trainerswho attended the inaugural Rugby Medical A ssociation conference linked to the South A frican Sports MedicineA ssociation Conference in Pretoria (14-16th November, 2007 participated in the study. Results: Recovery strategies were utilized mostly after matches. Stretching and ice/cold water immersion were utilized the most (83%. More biokineticists and fitness trainers advocated the usage of stretching than their counter-parts (medical doctors and physiotherapists. Ice/Cold water immersion and A ctive Recovery were the top two ratedstrategies. A  summary of the details around implementation of ice/cold water therapy is shown (mean as utilized bythe subjects: (i The time to immersion after matches was 12±9 min; (ii The total duration of one immersion sessionwas 6±6 min; (iii 3 immersion sessions per average training week was utilized by subjects; (iv The average water temperature was 10±3 ºC.; (v Ice cubes were used most frequently to cool water for immersion sessions, and(vi plastic drums were mostly used as the container for water. Conclusion: In this survey the representative group of support staff provided insight to which strategies are utilizedin South A frican elite rugby teams to accelerate recovery of players after training and/or matches.

  8. SPORTS WATCHING CULTURE AMONG MALAYSIANS

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    Gunathevan Elumalai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ardent sports watching will lead an individual to engage in sports and recreational activities continuously, while it also creates a sports culture among Malaysians. Sports watching culture is actually an intellectual activity. It is capable of evaluating behaviour, moral values and the level of appreciation of every spectator. Methods: This survey was conducted to identify the sports viewing culture among Malaysians. A cluster sampling method was used to select 6000 respondents from 30 million Malaysian population. Respondents were selected from urban (50% and rural areas (50%. Ethnically 56% were Malays, Sarawak and Sabah natives were 11%, Chinese 25% and finally Indians 7%. The respondents age categories were 12 to 19 years (30%, 20 to 25 years (50%, 56 and above (20%. A questionnaire developed by the research team was used to collect data. The quantitative data were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 21.0 for windows. Results: The findings indicate that from 5864 respondents who answered the questionnaire in full, a total of 4553 people or 77.6% watch sporting events, while a total of 1311 people or 22.4% have stated not watching any sports activities. Comparison by gender showed that 85.2% of the 2482 males watch sports events while among the female 70.2% of the 2071 watch sports events. In the category of those who do not watch, the female are higher at 29.8% than the males at 14.8%. In terms of ethnicity the Malays 80.2%. Chinese 64.6%, Indians 81.9%, natives of Sabah 94.0%, natives of Sarawak 77.6% like to watch sports events. Residential locations showed no significant differences as 78.7% of urban respondents watch sports events compared to 76.8% of rural communities. Conclusion: The findings indicated that majority of Malaysians having fun in watching sports activities. Gender still plays a role in the involvement and enjoyment of sports events either as a player or supporter. Ethnicity

  9. Communicating Social Support to Grieving Clients: The Veterinarians' View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgram, Mary D.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines veterinarians' perceptions of how they offer social support to grieving clients. Because many clients cannot find the social support they would like from other sources when grieving the death of a pet, the role of the vet in offering support becomes increasingly important. The results indicate that vets perceive…

  10. Impact of social support on participation after stroke in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Onabajo, Grace Oluwatitofunmi; Ihaza, Louis Oselene; Usman Ali, Muhammad; Ali Masta, Mamman; Majidadi, Rebecca; Modu, Ali; Umeonwuka, Chuka

    2016-10-01

    Participation which entails involvement in life situations and represents a higher level of functioning can be severely restricted after a stroke. This study investigated the impact of social support on participation of stroke survivors in Nigeria. Ninety-six community-residing stroke survivors were recruited from physiotherapy outpatient departments of two tertiary care hospitals in Northern Nigeria. Socio-demographic, clinical, participation (London Handicap Scale), and social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support) data were obtained. The impact of social support on global and domain-specific participation was examined using bivariate analyses and multiple regression analyses. Mean (SD) age of the stroke survivors was 56.6 (12.0) years. Social support was a significant (β = 0.41, p participation (p Social support, however, had no independent effect on overall participation and the other participation domains namely mobility, physical independence, occupation, social integration, and orientation. The impact of social support was significant only in the economic self-sufficiency domain of participation with higher availability of social support related to better economic self-sufficiency. This finding provides additional information on the importance of social support post-stroke.

  11. The importance of supporting adolescents' autonomy in promoting physical-sport exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Murcia, Juan Antonio; Hernández, Elisa Huéscar

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted toward the objective of analyzing certain factors that influence physical activity in Spanish adolescent students using self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985; 2000) as a framework. Participants included 698 physical education students whose perception of the autonomy support provided by their teachers was assessed in and out of the class context. Also assessed were social goals of responsibility and relationship with others, basic psychological needs, and intrinsic motivation, which is part of self-determination theory (SDT). Finally, the "intention" factor posited by the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and students' rate of exercise in the last twelve months were considered. The results of structural equations modeling suggest autonomy education, autonomy support, and social goals positively predicted certain psychological mediators, which in turn positively predicted students' intrinsic motivation, which was a positive predictor of intention, and that of rate of exercise. The results also highlight the benefit of promoting autonomy to enhance students' physical exercise practice.

  12. Dynamics of Corporates and Stakeholders Perspective of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Case of Sports Goods Industry Meerut

    OpenAIRE

    R. K. Tyagi

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The Corporate Social Responsibility concerns got global attention in large scale industries but the SMEs which are no less prone to create critical problems for the human, social and natural environments inimical to the society as a whole and survival at large, have not attracted the required attention. The case focuses on the dynamics of the corporate and stakeholder perspective on CSR in Sports Goods Industry Meerut. Approach: This study examined the corporate and stakeho...

  13. Religious Beliefs About Mental Illness Influence Social Support Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselmann, Eric D; Day, Magin; Graziano, William G; Doherty, Eileen F

    2015-01-01

    Research demonstrates that social support facilitates recovery from a mental illness. Stigma negatively impacts the social support available to persons with mental illness (PWMIs). We investigated how religious beliefs about mental illness influenced the types of social support individuals would be willing to give PWMIs. Christian participants indicated their denominational affiliation and their religious beliefs about mental illness. We then asked participants to imagine a situation in which their friend had depression. Participants indicated their willingness to give secular and spiritual social support (e.g., secular: recommending medication; spiritual: recommending prayer). Christians' beliefs that mental illness results from immorality/sinfulness and that mental illnesses have spiritual causes/treatments both predicted preference for giving spiritual social support. Evangelical Christians endorsed more beliefs that mental illnesses have spiritual causes/treatments than Mainline Protestant and Roman Catholic Christians, and they endorsed more preference for giving spiritual social support than Roman Catholic Christians.

  14. Social support and performance anxiety of college music students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Erin; Chesky, Kris

    2011-09-01

    This study characterized perceived social support and performance anxiety of college music students, compared characteristics to those of non-music majors, and explored the relationships between social support and performance anxiety. Subjects (n = 609) completed a questionnaire that included demographics, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and visual analog scale measures of performance anxiety. Results showed that music majors perceived significantly lower levels of social support from significant others when compared to non-music majors. Perceived social support was significantly correlated with measures of performance anxiety. Students with greater perceived social support reported less frequent anxiety and lower levels of impact of anxiety on ability to perform. These findings may have practical implications for schools of music and conservatories.

  15. Coworking Spaces: A Source of Social Support for Independent Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdenitsch, Cornelia; Scheel, Tabea E; Andorfer, Julia; Korunka, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Coworking spaces are shared office environments for independent professionals. Such spaces have been increasing rapidly throughout the world, and provide, in addition to basic business infrastructure, the opportunity for social interaction. This article explores social interaction in coworking spaces and reports the results of two studies. Study 1 (N = 69 coworkers) finds that social interaction in coworking spaces can take the form of social support. Study 2 further investigates social support among coworkers (N = 154 coworkers) and contrasts these results with those of social support among colleagues in traditional work organizations (N = 609). A moderated mediation model using time pressure and self-efficacy, based on the conservation of resources theory, is tested. Social support from both sources was positively related to performance satisfaction. Self-efficacy mediated this relationship in the employee sample, while in the coworking sample, self-efficacy only mediated the relationship between social support and performance satisfaction if time pressure was high. Thus, a mobilization of social support seems necessary in coworking spaces. We conclude that coworking spaces, as modern social work environments, should align flexible work infrastructure with well-constructed opportunities for social support.

  16. Coworking Spaces: A Source of Social Support for Independent Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eGerdenitsch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Coworking spaces are shared office environments for independent professionals. Such spaces have been increasing rapidly throughout the world, and provide, in addition to basic business infrastructure, the opportunity for social interaction. This article explores social interaction in coworking spaces and reports the results of two studies. Study 1 (N = 69 coworkers finds that social interaction in coworking spaces can take the form of social support. Study 2 further investigates social support among coworkers (N = 154 coworkers and contrasts these results with those of social support among colleagues in traditional work organizations (N = 609. A moderated mediation model using time pressure and self-efficacy, based on the conservation of resources theory, is tested. Social support from both sources was positively related to performance satisfaction. Self-efficacy mediated this relationship in the employee sample, while in the coworking sample, self-efficacy only mediated the relationship between social support and performance satisfaction if time pressure was high. Thus, a mobilization of social support seems necessary in coworking spaces. We conclude that coworking spaces, as modern social work environments, should align flexible work infrastructure with well-constructed opportunities for social support.

  17. Association between perceived social support and anxiety in pregnant adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Patrícia J; de Mola, Christian L; de Matos, Mariana B; Coelho, Fábio M; Pinheiro, Karen A; da Silva, Ricardo A; Castelli, Rochele D; Pinheiro, Ricardo T; Quevedo, Luciana A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the association between perceived social support and anxiety disorders in pregnant adolescents. We conducted a cross-sectional study with a sample of 871 pregnant women aged 10 to 19 years who received prenatal care in the national public health care system in the urban area of Pelotas, state of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. We assessed perceived social support and anxiety disorders using the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. A self-report questionnaire was used to obtain sociodemographic information. The prevalence of any anxiety disorder was 13.6%. Pregnant adolescents with an anxiety disorder reported less perceived social support in all domains (affectionate, emotional, tangible, informational, and positive social interaction). Older teenagers reported lower perceived support in the emotional, informational, and positive social interaction domains, whereas those with low socioeconomic status reported lower perceived social support in the material domain. Women who did not live with a partner had less perceived social support in the affectionate and positive social interaction domains. Perceived social support seems to be a protective factor against anxiety disorders in pregnant adolescents, with a positive effect on mental health.

  18. The Investigation of Social Problem Solving Abilities of University Students in Terms of Perceived Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tras, Zeliha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze of university students' perceived social support and social problem solving. The participants were 827 (474 female and 353 male) university students. Data were collected Perceived Social Support Scale-Revised (Yildirim, 2004) and Social Problem Solving (Maydeu-Olivares and D'Zurilla, 1996) translated and…

  19. Social support and child protection: Lessons learned and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ross A

    2015-03-01

    Social support has been a topic of research for nearly 50 years, and its applications to prevention and intervention have grown significantly, including programs advancing child protection. This article summarizes the central conclusions of the 1994 review of research on social support and the prevention of child maltreatment prepared for the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, and surveys advances in the field since its publication. Among the lessons learned twenty years ago are (a) the diversity of the social support needs of at-risk families and their association with child endangerment, (b) the need to supplement the emotionally affirmative aspects of social support with efforts to socialize parenting practices and monitor child well-being, (c) the desirability of integrating formal and informal sources of social support for recipients, and (d) the importance of considering the complex recipient reactions to receiving support from others. The lessons we are now learning derive from research exploring the potential of online communication to enhance social support, the neurobiology of stress and its buffering through social support, and the lessons of evaluation research that are identifying the effective ingredients of social support interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Association Between Perceived Social Support and Depression in Postmenopausal Women

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    Tadayon Najafabadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The most common symptom in early menopausal women is depression. Depression is a type of chronic disease that impacts on postmenopausal women’s life. Social support plays a protective role for women and enables them to solve their life problems and thus, feel less depressed. Objectives We assessed depression as a chronic disease and evaluated the association between perceived social support and depression in postmenopausal women. Patients and Methods This correlation-analytic study was conducted on 321 postmenopausal women using 2-stage cluster sampling in Ahvaz in 2014. Data collecting instruments were comprised of a demographic questionnaire, a depression scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, and a social support questionnaire (PRQ 85-Part 2. Data analysis was done using SPSS, version 20. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between perceived social support and depression, and the χ2 test was employed to assess the relationship between perceived social support and demographic characteristics. Results The Spearman correlation test revealed a significant reverse relationship between perceived social support and depression (r = -0.468; P = 0.001. There were significant relationships between perceived social support and some personal variables such as marital status, education level, and job status (P 0.05. Conclusions We found a reverse relationship between perceived social support and depression in postmenopausal women. Raising awareness in society apropos the relationship between social support and depression in postmenopausal women can enhance their quality of life.

  1. AMERICAN SPORT AND THE SPORTS HEROES OF THE ROARING TWENTIES

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    Michał Mazurkiewicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to show the role of sport in American society against the background of a very important—for many reasons—period of great social transformation in the United States, one which visibly gathered pace in the 1920s. The author presents different aspects of popular culture, which was in full bloom on account of the following factors: the joy after World War I, a sense of optimism, the development of the economy and industry, the growth of big cities, and the greater affluence of the citizens. The analysis of that unusual decade corroborates the role of sport and its great power of influence on society. In an age when technology and mass production had robbed experiences and objects of their uniqueness, sports provided some of the unpredictability and drama that people craved when looking for romance and adventure. The reasons for the popularity of sport in the USA are presented, as well as the major sports diciplines and heroes of American sport who, in a time when mass production seemed to be making individuals less significant, met with a favorable response—people clung to the heroic personalities of sports figures. The analysis of the beginnings of professionalism in sport, the beginnings of organized support, and sports broadcasting, leaves no doubt as to the significance of the period. As the article demonstrates, it was a time of rapid and profound transformation in the realm of sport. Every serious examination of phenomena in contemporary American sport—and this is also true in the case of other countries—without a knowledge of the specificity of sport in the 1920s, would be far from perfect.

  2. Grandparents as a source of social support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geckova, Andrea; Simova, E.; van Dijk, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of grandparents in life of their grandchildren is generally accepted but only very rarely also studied as a problem. The representation of grandparents in the social network of their adolescent grandchildren and the relations of incorporation of grandparents into the social network

  3. Prof. Dr. Dusko Bjelica's Articles Published in Sport Mont Journal: A Content Analysis

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    Ivan Vukovic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sport Mont Journal (SMJ is a print and electronic scientific journal aims to present easy access to the scientific knowledge for sport-conscious individuals using contemporary methods. SMJ is published three times a year by the Montenegrin sport academy (MSA, in february, june and october of each year. SMJ publishes original scientific papers, review papers, editorials, short reports, peer review - fair review, as well as invited papers and award papers in the fields of sports science and medicine, as well as it can function as an open discussion forum on significant issues of current interest. SMJ covers all aspects of sports science and medicine, all clinical aspects of exercise, health, and sport, exercise physiology and biophysical investigation of sports performance, sports biomechanics, sports nutrition, rehabilitation, physiotherapy, sports psychology, sports pedagogy, sports history, sports philosophy, sports sociology, sports management and all aspects of scientific support of the sports coaches from the natural, social and humanistic side. Professor Bjelica is the editor-in-chief of this reputable magazine. He has also published works on it from 2004 to 2017 and published 65 papers. They are from various fields from the sphere of sports sciences. Among them he mostly dealt with football, sports training, biomechanics, physical education of children, nutrition and many others. This professor has obtained a lot of awards because of his great and hard work.

  4. The "Inverse Relationship" between Social Capital and Sport: A Qualitative Exploration of the Influence of Social Networks on the Development of Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Edoardo G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Sport players' likelihood to fulfil their career expectations is influenced by both technical and non-technical aspects, including self-drive, self-confidence and access to high-quality coaching and to positive learning environments. Among other factors, belonging in the "right" social networks may help players to gain access to critical…

  5. Psychosocial Determinants of Parental Support Behaviours Enabling Sport Participation among Children with a Physical Impairment: A Literature Review and Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazipour, Celina H.; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Children with physical impairments have low rates of physical activity when compared to children without impairments. Given the benefits that result from sport, improving participation rates among children with physical impairments is essential. Parents have a critical role in supporting their child's involvement in sport. The purpose of this…

  6. Metacognition and action: A new pathway to understanding social and cognitive aspects of expertise in sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadhg Eoghan Macintyre

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For over a century, psychologists have investigated the mental processes of expert performers - people who display exceptional knowledge and/or skills in specific fields of human achievement. Since the 1960s, expertise researchers have made considerable progress in understanding the cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie such exceptional performance. Whereas the first modern studies of expertise were conducted in relatively formal knowledge domains such as chess, more recent investigations have explored elite performance in dynamic perceptual-motor activities such as sport. Unfortunately, although these studies have led to the identification of certain domain-free generalizations about expert-novice differences, they shed little light on an important issue: namely, experts’ metacognitive activities or their insights into, and regulation of, their own mental processes. In an effort to rectify this oversight, the present paper argues that metacognitive processes and inferences play an important if neglected role in expertise. In particular, we suggest that metacognition (including such processes as ‘meta-attention’, ‘meta-imagery’ and ‘meta-memory’, as well as social aspects of this construct provides a window on the genesis of expert performance. Following a critique of the standard empirical approach to expertise, we explore some research on ‘metacognition’ and ‘metacognitive inference’ among experts in sport. After that, we provide a brief evaluation of the relationship between psychological skills training and metacognition and comment on the measurement of metacognitive processes. Finally, we summarize our conclusions and outline some potentially new directions for research on metacognition in action.

  7. Metacognition and action: a new pathway to understanding social and cognitive aspects of expertise in sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Tadhg E.; Igou, Eric R.; Campbell, Mark J.; Moran, Aidan P.; Matthews, James

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, psychologists have investigated the mental processes of expert performers – people who display exceptional knowledge and/or skills in specific fields of human achievement. Since the 1960s, expertise researchers have made considerable progress in understanding the cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie such exceptional performance. Whereas the first modern studies of expertise were conducted in relatively formal knowledge domains such as chess, more recent investigations have explored elite performance in dynamic perceptual-motor activities such as sport. Unfortunately, although these studies have led to the identification of certain domain-free generalizations about expert-novice differences, they shed little light on an important issue: namely, experts’ metacognitive activities or their insights into, and regulation of, their own mental processes. In an effort to rectify this oversight, the present paper argues that metacognitive processes and inferences play an important if neglected role in expertise. In particular, we suggest that metacognition (including such processes as “meta-attention,” “meta-imagery” and “meta-memory,” as well as social aspects of this construct) provides a window on the genesis of expert performance. Following a critique of the standard empirical approach to expertise, we explore some research on “metacognition” and “metacognitive inference” among experts in sport. After that, we provide a brief evaluation of the relationship between psychological skills training and metacognition and comment on the measurement of metacognitive processes. Finally, we summarize our conclusions and outline some potentially new directions for research on metacognition in action. PMID:25360126

  8. Perceived Stress in Online Prostate Cancer Community Participants: Examining Relationships with Stigmatization, Social Support Network Preference, and Social Support Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Camella J; Bol, Nadine; Burke-Garcia, Amelia; Rains, Stephen; Wright, Kevin B

    2017-06-01

    Men with prostate cancer often need social support to help them cope with illness-related physiological and psychosocial challenges. Whether those needs are met depends on receiving support optimally matched to their needs. This study examined relationships between perceived stress, prostate cancer-related stigma, weak-tie support preference, and online community use for social support in a survey of online prostate cancer community participants (n = 149). Findings revealed a positive relationship between stigma and perceived stress. This relationship, however, was moderated by weak-tie support preference and online community use for social support. Specifically, stigma was positively related to perceived stress when weak-tie support was preferred. Analyses also showed a positive relationship between stigma and perceived stress in those who used their online community for advice or emotional support. Health communication scholars should work collaboratively with diagnosed men, clinicians, and online community administrators to develop online interventions that optimally match social support needs.

  9. Social Network Supported Process Recommender System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanming Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Process recommendation technologies have gained more and more attention in the field of intelligent business process modeling to assist the process modeling. However, most of the existing technologies only use the process structure analysis and do not take the social features of processes into account, while the process modeling is complex and comprehensive in most situations. This paper studies the feasibility of social network research technologies on process recommendation and builds a social network system of processes based on the features similarities. Then, three process matching degree measurements are presented and the system implementation is discussed subsequently. Finally, experimental evaluations and future works are introduced.

  10. Social network supported process recommender system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yanming; Yin, Jianwei; Xu, Yueshen

    2014-01-01

    Process recommendation technologies have gained more and more attention in the field of intelligent business process modeling to assist the process modeling. However, most of the existing technologies only use the process structure analysis and do not take the social features of processes into account, while the process modeling is complex and comprehensive in most situations. This paper studies the feasibility of social network research technologies on process recommendation and builds a social network system of processes based on the features similarities. Then, three process matching degree measurements are presented and the system implementation is discussed subsequently. Finally, experimental evaluations and future works are introduced.

  11. Motivational and social cognitive predictors of doping intentions in elite sports: an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkoukis, V; Lazuras, L; Tsorbatzoudis, H; Rodafinos, A

    2013-10-01

    Doping use is an important issue in both competitive and non-competitive sports, and poses potentially irreversible health consequences to users. Scholars increasingly call for theory-driven studies on the psychosocial processes underlying doping use that will inform subsequent policy-making and prevention interventions. The aim of the study was to implement an integrative theoretical model to assess the direct and indirect effects of motivational variables, moral orientations, and social cognitions on doping intentions. A randomly selected and representative sample of 750 elite athletes anonymously completed a battery of questionnaires on motivational and moral constructs, and social cognitions related to doping. Hierarchical linear regression analysis and multiple mediation modeling were used. The effects of achievement goals and moral orientations were significantly mediated by attitudinal, normative, and self-efficacy beliefs, in both lifetime ever and never doping users. Moral orientations indirectly predicted the doping intentions of never users, but did not predict ever users' doping intentions. Achievement goals and sportspersonship orientations influence doping intentions indirectly, through the effects of attitudes and self-efficacy beliefs. Sportspersonship (moral) orientations were relevant to doping intentions among athletes with no prior experiences with doping, while achievement goals and situational temptation were relevant to both lifetime never and ever dopers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Report on Sport 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Koen Breedveld; Rob Goossens; Maarten van Bottenburg; Wil Ooijendijk; Vincent Hildebrandt; Maarten Stiggelbout; Jo Lucassen; Hugo van der Poel

    2003-01-01

    Original title: Rapportage Sport 2003. There has been a huge increase in the interest in sport in recent decades. The number of people taking part in sport has grown strongly and more sport is broadcast on television than ever before. The government has invested a great deal in sport, not least because of the growing awareness of the positive effect that sport can have on health, social cohesion and the economy. Sport is now an integral part of society and has developed into the biggest infor...

  13. The use of counselling principles and skills to develop practitioner-athlete relationships by practitioners who provide sport psychology support

    OpenAIRE

    Longstaff, Fran; Gervis, Misia

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how practitioners who provide sport psychology support use counselling principles and skills to develop practitioner-athlete relationships. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with thirteen competent practitioners (Mean age = 41.2 ± 10.9 years old, five men, eight women). Thematic analysis revealed that the participants used a range of counselling principles to develop practitioner-athlete relationships including: the facilitative conditions, self-disclosure, counsel...

  14. Assessed and Experimentally Provided Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-18

    social skills training. In J. D. Wine & M. D. Srnye Sjjj Compatence New York: Guilford Press, 1981, 261-286. Bowlby , John . Attachment &d k , Vol. I...Attachment. New York: Basic Books, 1969. Bowlby , John . Attachmen d A Lass , Vol. 3 Loss: Sadness and Depression. New York, Basic Books, 1980. Friedman, M.J...Developmental and social psychological theories have stimulated much of this work. One of the most 2 influential theorists bas been John Boviby, whose ideas

  15. The association between perceived social support and amygdala structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Kubota, Yasutaka; Uono, Shota; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2016-05-01

    The subjective perception of social support plays a crucial role in human well-being. However, its structural neural substrates remain unknown. We hypothesized that the amygdala, specifically its laterobasal and superficial subregions, which have been suggested to serve social functions, could be associated with the level of perceived social support. To test this hypothesis, we assessed perceived social support using the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. In addition, we measured the volume and shape of the amygdala using structural magnetic resonance imaging in 49 healthy participants. Global amygdala volume in the left hemisphere was positively associated with the perceived social support score after adjusting for total cerebral volume, sex, age, intelligence, and five-factor personality domains. The local shape of the laterobasal and superficial subregions of the left amygdala showed the same association with perceived social support. These data suggest that the social subregions of the left amygdala are associated with the implementation of perceived social support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. "Transformation Tuesday": Temporal context and post valence influence the provision of social support on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Erin A; Rose, Jason P; Crane, Chantal

    2017-10-12

    Social network sites (SNSs) such as Facebook have become integral in the development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. Users of SNSs seek social support and validation, often using posts that illustrate how they have changed over time. The purpose of the present research is to examine how the valence and temporal context of an SNS post affect the likelihood of other users providing social support. Participants viewed hypothetical SNS posts and reported their intentions to provide social support to the users. Results revealed that participants were more likely to provide social support for posts that were positive and included temporal context (i.e., depicted improvement over time; Study 1). Furthermore, this research suggests that visual representations of change over time are needed to elicit social support (Study 2). Results are discussed in terms of their practical implications for SNS users and theoretical implications for the literature on social support and social media.

  17. Analysis and Support of Lifestyle via Emotions Using Social Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breda, Ward; Treur, Jan; van Wissen, Arlette

    2012-01-01

    Using recent insights from Cognitive, Affective and Social Neuroscience this paper addresses how affective states in social interactions can be used through social media to analyze and support behaviour for a certain lifestyle. A computational model is provided integrating mechanisms for the impact

  18. The Social Support Act: the story so far

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirjam de Klerk; Rob Gilsing; Joost Timmermans

    2010-01-01

    Original title: Op weg met de Wmo. The Social Support Act (Wet maatschappelijke ondersteuning - Wmo) came into force in the Netherlands on 1 January 2007. The aim of the Act is to promote people's social and life skills and ability to participate, and to strengthen social cohesion and quality

  19. Social Support in Inclusive Schools: Student and Teacher Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavri, Shireen; Monda-Amaya, Lisa

    2001-01-01

    Thirty students with learning disabilities (LD) in inclusive third-to fifth-grade classrooms and 60 educators were interviewed regarding social support at school. While students with LD felt part of a social network, many reported socially related loneliness. Results indicate a discrepancy between students' and teachers' choices of preferred…

  20. Gender, Social Support, and Depression in Criminal Justice Involved Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jennifer E.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Miranda, Robert; Rizzo, Christie J.; Justus, Alicia N.; Clum, George

    2010-01-01

    Knowing where criminal justice involved teens look for support and whether those supports reduce depression has important and possibly gender-specific treatment implications for this vulnerable population. This study examines the relationships between social support and depression in a mixed-gender sample of 198 incarcerated adolescents. Greater support from families and overall and greater satisfaction with supports predicted lower depression for boys and girls. Support from siblings and ext...

  1. The Use of Online Social Support by Foster Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Jerry; Kerman, Ben

    2004-01-01

    The extent to which foster families utilize social support on the Internet is examined in a sample of 34 foster families in a digital divide intervention program and a comparison sample of 30 foster families who were not part of the program. In spite of increased Internet access, the frequency of using online social support is low. A minority of…

  2. Social Support and Risk of Sexual Assault Revictimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Gillian E.; Ullman, Sarah; Long, Susan E.; Long, LaDonna; Starzynski, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Limited research on revictimization has examined the role of social support, which is known to affect sexual assault survivors' psychological recovery. Measuring social support also provides a more ecological approach to understanding revictimization, as it assesses the possible role of those in the survivors' environment. The current study…

  3. Experience of Social Support among Working Mothers: A Concept Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, A. Young; Lee, Ki-Hak

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify, categorize, and provide a model for the understanding of social support among Korean working mothers. The participants were interviewed and asked what kind of social support they received that allowed them to maintain work and family life. Using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering analysis…

  4. Perceived social support from parents and teachers' influence on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    literature that supportive social relationships influence students' self-beliefs. Keywords .... Callingham, 2014; OECD, 2013), and they affect the choices students make about educational and career paths ... 2013, p. 1029). Perceived social support has also been characterized as individuals' confidence that adequate.

  5. Parenting Beliefs, Parental Stress, and Social Support Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respler-Herman, Melissa; Mowder, Barbara A.; Yasik, Anastasia E.; Shamah, Renee

    2012-01-01

    The present study built on prior research by examining the relationship of parental stress and social support to parenting beliefs and behaviors. A sample of 87 parents provided their views concerning the importance of parenting characteristics as well as their level of parental stress and perceived social support. These parents completed the…

  6. Social Support and Stress among University Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M.; Dawani, Hania A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perception of social support and perceived stress among university students in Jordan. A sample of 241 university students from private and government universities in Jordan answered self-report questionnaires including the perceived social support scale and perceived stress scale.…

  7. Social Support Seeking and Early Adolescent Depression and Anxiety Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, Clorinda E.; Krause, Elizabeth D.; McKinnon, Allison; Brunwasser, Steven M.; Freres, Derek R.; Abenavoli, Rachel M.; Gillham, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how social support seeking and rumination interacted to predict depression and anxiety symptoms 6 months later in early adolescents (N = 118; 11-14 years at baseline). We expected social support seeking would be more helpful for adolescents engaging in low rather than high levels of rumination. Adolescents self-reported on all…

  8. Social support and the psychological wellbeing of people living with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The current study sought to investigate the association between age, gender, social support and the psychological wellbeing of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLHA) in Ghana. Method: Cross-sectional data containing information on demographics, social support and psychological well-being (stress, ...

  9. Social Support Questionnaire for Children: Development and Initial Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon-Hollingsworth, Arlene T.; Thompson, Julia E.; Geary, Meghan A.; Schexnaildre, Mark A.; Lai, Betty S.; Kelley, Mary Lou

    2016-01-01

    The Social Support Questionnaire for Children (SSQC) is a 50-item scale that assesses children's social support from parents, relatives, nonrelative adults, siblings, and peers. The SSQC demonstrates good psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency, factorial validity). Furthermore, the SSQC appears to be an ethnically sensitive measure of…

  10. Perceived Social Support and Mental Health: Cultural Orientations as Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Andrew J.; Wang, Chiachih D. C.; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated unique and shared effects of social support and cultural orientation on mental health indicators (depressive and anxiety symptoms, stress, and life satisfaction) of 896 college students. Results indicated that perceived social support predicted mental health variables and that cultural orientation variables (independent and…

  11. ROLE AND PLACE OF SPORT AND PHYSICAL CULTURE IN SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga P. Kokoulina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The causal connection of the emergence and development of sport and its history were considered in thisarticle, and the analysis of the nature of sport andphysical culture in the modern society was made. Substantiated the necessity and importance of sports andphysical education at the present stage of the societydevelopment. Some factors that prevent globalizationand widespread dissemination of sport and physicalculture were introduced. Possible ways of solvingthese problems were put forward, highlighted motivational sphere on the formation of the active positionin the field of healthy lifestyle. The author conducted the study, which analyzed the following factors: how often respondents are engaged in sports and physicalculture, and that gives them the sport in addition to thegood physical form - data systematized and presented.

  12. Social support, social conflict, and immigrant women's mental health in a Canadian context: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruge, S; Thomson, M S; George, U; Chaze, F

    2015-11-01

    Social support has positive and negative dimensions, each of which has been associated with mental health outcomes. Social networks can also serve as sources of distress and conflict. This paper reviews journal articles published during the last 24 years to provide a consolidated summary of the role of social support and social conflict on immigrant women's mental health. The review reveals that social support can help immigrant women adjust to the new country, prevent depression and psychological distress, and access care and services. When social support is lacking or social networks act as a source of conflict, it can have negative effects on immigrant women's mental health. It is crucial that interventions, programmes, and services incorporate strategies to both enhance social support as well as reduce social conflict, in order to improve mental health and well-being of immigrant women. Researchers have documented the protective role of social support and the harmful consequences of social conflict on physical and mental health. However, consolidated information about social support, social conflict, and mental health of immigrant women in Canada is not available. This scoping review examined literature from the last 24 years to understand how social support and social conflict affect the mental health of immigrant women in Canada. We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Healthstar, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications focusing on mental health among immigrant women in Canada. Thirty-four articles that met our inclusion criteria were reviewed, and are summarized under the following four headings: settlement challenges and the need for social support; social support and mental health outcomes; social conflict and reciprocity; and social support, social conflict, and mental health service use. The results revealed that social support can have a positive effect on immigrant women's mental health and well-being, and facilitate social inclusion and the use of

  13. "Is Social Inclusion through PE, Sport and PA Still a Rhetoric?" Evaluating the Relationship between Physical Education, Sport and Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagkas, Symeon

    2018-01-01

    This Special Issue is part of "Educational Review's" Hall of Fame, comprising the journal's most read and highly cited papers. As part of this I will be critiquing a milestone paper within the field(s) of Sport, PE and (I will extend to) PA by Professor Richard Bailey. The paper (see EJ691124) has been amongst the most-cited in the…

  14. Promoting social inclusion through sport for refugee-background youth in Australia: analysing different participation models

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbs, Lisa; Block, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Sports participation can confer a range of physical and psychosocial benefits and, for refugee and migrant youth, may even act as a critical mediator for achieving positive settlement and engaging meaningfully in Australian society. This group has low participation rates however, with identified barriers including costs; discrimination and a lack of cultural sensitivity in sporting environments; lack of knowledge of mainstream sports services on the part of refugee-background settlers; inadeq...

  15. Perceived Social Support Among People With Physical Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Setareh Forouzan, Ameneh; Mahmoodi, Abolfazl; Jorjoran Shushtari, Zahra; Salimi, Yahya; Sajjadi, Homeira; Mahmoodi, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Background Disability is more based on social, rather than medical aspects. Lack of attention and social support may impact on participation of people with physical disability in various aspects and their return to normal life in the society. Objectives This study was conducted to determine perceived social support and related factors among physically disabled in the city of Tehran. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study by using simple random sampling was conducted on 136 people wit...

  16. Social Support Scale for Family Caregivers of Elder Mexicans

    OpenAIRE

    Domínguez Guedea, Miriam Teresa; Universidad de Sonora; Mandujano Jaquez, María Fernanda; Universidad de Sonora; Quintero Valenzuela, Marcela Georgina; Universidad de Sonora; Sotelo Quiñonez, Teresa Iveth; Universidad de Sonora; Gaxiola Romero, José Concepción; Universidad de Sonora; Valencia Maldonado, Jesús Ernesto; Universidad de Sonora

    2012-01-01

    Using exploratory and confirmatory analysis factor, was validated the Social Support Scale for Family Caregivers of Older Adults. 23 items with factor loadings ≥ 0.51, grouped into four factors it explain 63% of the variance of the construct, with Cronbach’s alpha values ≥ 0.85; was shown that social support has a positive and significant causal relationship with material support (β = 0.66), practical support (β = 0.69), emotional support (β = 0.6), and counseling support (β = 0.81), the mode...

  17. Social network, social support, and risk of incident stroke: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Mako; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Iso, Hiroyasu; Mosley, Thomas H; Rose, Kathryn M; Lutsey, Pamela L

    2014-10-01

    Having a small social network and lack of social support have been associated with incident coronary heart disease; however, epidemiological evidence for incident stroke is limited. We assessed the longitudinal association of a small social network and lack of social support with risk of incident stroke and evaluated whether the association was partly mediated by vital exhaustion and inflammation. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study measured social network and social support in 13 686 men and women (mean, 57 years; 56% women; 24% black; 76% white) without a history of stroke. Social network was assessed by the 10-item Lubben Social Network Scale and social support by a 16-item Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-Short Form. During a median follow-up of 18.6 years, 905 incident strokes occurred. Relative to participants with a large social network, those with a small social network had a higher risk of stroke (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.44 [1.02-2.04]) after adjustment for demographics, socioeconomic variables, marital status, behavioral risk factors, and major stroke risk factors. Vital exhaustion, but not inflammation, partly mediated the association between a small social network and incident stroke. Social support was unrelated to incident stroke. In this sample of US community-dwelling men and women, having a small social network was associated with excess risk of incident stroke. As with other cardiovascular conditions, having a small social network may be associated with a modestly increased risk of incident stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Social support in the workplace for physicians in specialization training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Leena; Suutala, Elina; Parviainen, Heli

    2018-12-01

    When becoming a specialist, learning-through-service plays a significant role. The workplace affords good opportunities for learning, but the service-learning period may also impose stress on phycisians in specialization training. In medical work, social support has proved to be a very important factor in managing stress. Social support may afford advantages also for learning and professional identity building. However, little was known about how social support is perceived by doctors in specialization training. This study aimed to understand the perceptions of physicians in specialization training regarding social support communication in their workplace during their learning-through-service period. The study was conducted qualitatively by inductively analyzing the physicians' descriptions of workplace communication. The dataset included 120 essays, 60 each from hospitals and primary healthcare centres. Physicians in specialization training explained the need of social support with the responsibilities and demands of their clinical work and the inability to control and manage their workloads. They perceived that social support works well for managing stress, but also for strengthening relational ties and one's professional identity. A leader's support was perceived as being effective, and both senior and junior colleagues were described as an important source of social support. Also co-workers, such as the individual nurse partner with whom one works, was mentioned as an important source of social support. The results of this study indicate that social support works at the relational and identity levels, which is due to the multi-functional nature of workplace communication. For example, consultation functions as situational problem-solving, but also the tone of social interaction is meaningful. Thus, strengthening one's professional identity or collegial relationships requires further attention to workplace communication. Abbreviations PiST: Physician in

  19. Institutional Support : Economic and Social Research Foundation ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF) is an independent research organization that was registered in Tanzania in October 1992. Recent uncertainty regarding the delivery modality of its principal source of funding (the African Capacity Building Foundation) led to a massive departure of senior researchers, ...

  20. Normalization, Social Bonding, and Emotional Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær Minke, Linda

    2017-01-01

    setting, and participants revealed that the dog improved social relations between inmates and between staff and inmates. Finally, the dog provided comfort to the incarcerated women when they had to deal with difficult personal feelings. A recommendation for policy makers and prison officials arising from...

  1. Direct and Indirect Pathways From Social Support to Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seoyoun; Thomas, Patricia A

    2017-07-04

    We aimed to investigate potential direct and indirect pathways linking social support and health, while considering mental health and chronic inflammation as inter-related outcomes. The study also contributes to the literature through testing potential bidirectional relationships between social support, mental health, and chronic inflammation. This study uses Structural Equation Modeling and two waves of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP), including 1,124 community-living older adults aged 57-85 years at Wave 1 (2005). Analyses show that social support influenced mental health indirectly through better self-esteem. Moreover, social support was associated with lower levels of chronic inflammation but chronic inflammation did not influence social support. The growing number of older adults with an aging population urgently calls for a greater understanding of factors influencing their physical and mental health. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of social support in older adults' health, while specifically focusing on understudied indirect pathways from social support to health. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The power of social connection and support in improving health: lessons from social support interventions with childbearing women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Rhonda; Taft, Angela J; Brown, Stephanie J

    2011-11-25

    Social support interventions have a somewhat chequered history. Despite evidence that social connection is associated with good health, efforts to implement interventions designed to increase social support have produced mixed results. The aim of this paper is to reflect on the relationship between social connectedness and good health, by examining social support interventions with mothers of young children and analysing how support was conceptualised, enacted and valued, in order to advance what we know about providing support to improve health. CONTEXT AND APPROACH: First, we provide a brief recent history of social support interventions for mothers with young children and we critically examine what was intended by 'social support', who provided it and for which groups of mothers, how support was enacted and what was valued by women. Second, we examine the challenges and promise of lay social support approaches focused explicitly on companionship, and draw on experiences in two cluster randomised trials which aimed to improve the wellbeing of mothers. One trial involved a universal approach, providing befriending opportunities for all mothers in the first year after birth, and the other a targeted approach offering support from a 'mentor mother' to childbearing women experiencing intimate partner violence. Interventions providing social support to mothers have most often been directed to women seen as disadvantaged, or 'at risk'. They have also most often been enacted by health professionals and have included strong elements of health education and/or information, almost always with a focus on improving parenting skills for better child health outcomes. Fewer have involved non-professional 'supporters', and only some have aimed explicitly to provide companionship or a listening ear, despite these aspects being what mothers receiving support have said they valued most. Our trial experiences have demonstrated that non-professional support interventions raise myriad

  3. Social networks, social support mechanisms, and quality of life after breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Ergas, Isaac J.; Wright, Jaime D.; Caan, Bette J.; Hershman, Dawn; Kushi, Lawrence H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined mechanisms through which social relationships influence quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Methods This study included 3,139 women from the Pathways Study who were diagnosed with breast cancer from 2006-2011 and provided data on social networks (presence of spouse or intimate partner, religious/social ties, volunteering, and numbers of close friends and relatives), social support (tangible, emotional/informational, affection, positive social interaction), and quality of life (QOL), measured by the FACT-B, approximately two months post-diagnosis. We used logistic models to evaluate associations between social network size, social support, and lower vs. higher than median QOL scores. We further stratified by stage at diagnosis and treatment. Results In multivariate-adjusted analyses, women who were characterized as socially isolated had significantly lower FACT-B (OR=2.18, 95%CI:1.72-2.77), physical well-being (WB) (OR=1.61, 95%CI:1.27-2.03), functional WB (OR=2.08, 95%CI:1.65-2.63), social WB (OR=3.46, 95%CI:2.73-4.39), and emotional WB (OR=1.67, 95%CI:1.33-2.11) scores and higher breast cancer symptoms (OR=1.48, 95%CI:1.18-1.87), compared with socially integrated women. Each social network member independently predicted higher QOL. Simultaneous adjustment for social networks and social support partially attenuated associations between social networks and QOL. The strongest mediator and type of social support that was most predictive of QOL outcomes was “positive social interaction”. However, each type of support was important depending on outcome, stage, and treatment status. Conclusions Larger social networks and greater social support were related to higher QOL after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Effective social support interventions need to evolve beyond social-emotional interventions and need to account for disease severity and treatment status. PMID:23657404

  4. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenov, Kaloyan; Cabello, Maria; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Cieza, Alarcos; Sabariego, Carla; Raggi, Alberto; Anczewska, Marta; Pitkänen, Tuuli; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness) and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality.

  5. Social support and cardiovascular risk factors among black adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Daphne C; Reitzel, Lorraine R; Wetter, David W; McNeill, Lorna H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors are prevalent among Black adults. Studies have demonstrated that functional social support buffers CVD risk. The objective of our study is to assess whether specific types of functional social support or their cumulative total buffers CVD risk factors among a convenience sample of Black adults, and whether these associations differ by sex or partner status. Cross-sectional study using self-reported survey data. Large church in Houston, TX. A total of 1,381 Black adults reported their perceived social support using appraisal, belonging, and tangible subscales of the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12. A cumulative score was created based on the three subscales. Participants also reported on a number of sociodemographic characteristics. Three self-reported CVD risk factors: diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol (yes vs no). A series of multivariate logistic regressions controlling for sociodemographic characteristics were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for CVD risk factors. Cumulative social support, rather than any specific type of social support, was significantly related to diabetes and high blood pressure. Higher cumulative social support was associated with lower odds of experiencing diabetes (aOR = .97, 95% CI = .94, .99) and high blood pressure (aOR = .98, 95% CI = .95, .99). Neither sex nor partner status moderated associations. In a high risk population for CVD, increasing all types of social support--appraisal, belonging, and tangible--might be useful in preventing or delaying the onset of CVD.

  6. Bridging social capital through sports: an explorative study on (improving inter-ethnic contact at two soccer clubs in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn Verhagen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bridging social capital through sports: an explorative study on (improving inter-ethnic contact at two soccer clubs in the NetherlandsIn the Netherlands, the social integration of minorities has been the subject of much debate in recent years. Historical events such as the murders of politician Pim Fortuyn and writer Theo van Gogh, and more recently the emergence of organizations such as Islamic State (IS, have had a major impact on public debate in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, belief in the socially integrative role of sport has increased. Sport, especially formal participation in sport, is expected to contribute positively to social cohesion and the social integration of minorities. Nonetheless, existing research shows that policymakers overestimate the impact of sport on social integration in society. Sport is no panacea. Sport can include people, but it can also exclude them by bringing together those who “look alike”. In this article we explore whether (and how sport, and in particular soccer, can lead to bridging social capital, despite the fact that people generally prefer to congregate with “equals”. We base our results on questionnaires and a limited number of additional interviews at two soccer clubs in the city of Utrecht in the Netherlands. We conclude that although sport can reinforce segregation, formal participation in sport also has the ability to enhance social inclusion and inter-ethnic contacts. The research indicates that measures could be taken in order to promote understanding and respect.Overbruggend sociaal kapitaal door middel van sport: Een exploratief onderzoek naar (het verbeteren van inter-etnische contacten bij twee voetbalverenigingen in NederlandIn Nederland staat de sociale integratie van minderheden de laatste jaren ter discussie. Gebeurtenissen uit het verleden, zoals de moord op politicus Pim Fortuyn en publicist Theo van Gogh, en meer recent de opmars van internationale organisaties als Islamitische

  7. Loneliness, Stress, and Social Support in Young Adulthood: Does the Source of Support Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Yuan Steven; Goldstein, Sara E

    2016-03-01

    Social support protects individuals against adversity throughout the lifespan, and is especially salient during times of intense social change, such as during the transition to adulthood. Focusing on three relationship-specific sources of social support (family, friends, and romantic partners), the current study examined the stress-buffering function of social support against loneliness and whether the association between social support and loneliness with stress held constant would vary by its source. The role of gender in these associations was also considered. The sample consisted of 636 ethnically diverse college youth (age range 18-25; 80 % female). The results suggest that the stress-buffering role of social support against loneliness varies by its source. Only support from friends buffered the association between stress and loneliness. Further, when stress was held constant, the association between social support and loneliness differed by the sources, in that support from friends or romantic partners (but not from family) was negatively associated with loneliness. Regarding gender differences, the adverse impact of lower levels of familial or friends' support on loneliness was greater in females than in males. This research advances our understanding of social support among college-aged youth; implications of the findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  8. Developmental Change of Perceived Availability of Social Support

    OpenAIRE

    嶋田, 洋徳

    1996-01-01

    A lot of studies have been achieved on the effects of social support on psychological stress or psychological well-being. Few of them, however, have focused their attention on the interactive influences by various support resources. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of developmental change of perceived availability of social support from parents, friends (boys and girls were separated) and teachers on psychological stress responses in junior high school students, high s...

  9. Sports Physicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sports Physicals KidsHealth / For Teens / Sports Physicals What's in ... beginning of your sports season. What Is a Sports Physical? In the sports medicine field, the sports ...

  10. The correlates of sports participation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downward, Paul; Lera-López, Fernando; Rasciute, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Eurobarometer data from 2009 (N = 26,788), this paper investigates the correlates of sports participation. In addition to examining standard socio-demographic, economic and lifestyle factors, the paper also focuses on the impact of motivational factors, the availability of sports infrastructure and government support, for the first time collectively at the European level. A further contribution of the paper is that it simultaneously investigates both the decision to participate in sport and the frequency of sports participation in this context. This is made possible through the application of a Zero-Inflated Ordered Probit estimator. This estimator also takes into account two types of non-participants: those who have never participated in sport and those who did not participate at the time of the survey. The results show that the decision to participate in sports and the frequency of sports participation of males and females are affected by different factors, therefore distinct government policies should be applied to attract new, and retain the existing, participants. For example, women are affected more by a need to improve self-esteem, while the men to produce social integration. The provision of sports facilities is of more importance for males, which may indicate a male-oriented nature of the sports facilities, for example, the gym. However, the number of adults and the number of children in the household reduce the probability of sports participation by females. Therefore, higher provision of childcare may be important if female participation is to be increased.

  11. Social support and depression of adults with visual impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos; Papakonstantinou, Doxa; Montgomery, Anthony; Solomou, Argyro

    2014-07-01

    Relatively little research exists with regard to the relationship between social support and depression among adults with visual impairments. Such a gap is noteworthy when one considers that individuals become more dependent on others as they enter middle and late adulthood. The present research will examine the association between social networks, social support and depression among adults with visual impairments. Seventy-seven adults with visual impairments participated in the study. Depression, social network and emotional/practical social support were measured with self-report measures. Additionally, the degree to which emotional/practical social support received were positive or negative and the ability of respondents to self-manage their daily living were assessed. Less than a third of respondents scored above the threshold for depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were not related to gender or vision status. Depression was correlated with age, educational level, less positive practical support, more negative practical support and more negative emotional support, with lower perceptions of self-management representing the most robust predictor of depression. Age moderated the relationship between depression and self-management, and between depression and negative emotional support. Lower perceptions of self-management and negative emotional support were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Suicide ideation in higher education students: influence of social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Amadeu; Sequeira, Carlos; Duarte, João; Freitas, Paula

    2014-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of students' suicidal ideation and to assess its connection with social support. Quantitative, descriptive and exploratory study on a sample of 1074 students from a higher education institution in Portugal. The data was collected through an online platform that included a questionnaire regarding the sociodemographic and academic profile of the students, the Social/Familiar Support Satisfaction Scale1 and the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire2. Students' ages varies between 17 and 49 (X¯=23,9 years old ± 6,107 sd), with the great majority (64.7%) being females. Results show that the presence/severity of suicidal thoughts is low (X¯=13.84; ± 20.29 SD) on a scale from 0 to 180 and cut-off point > 41 for values that suggest potential suicide risk, identifying 84 students at risk (7.8%). We verified significant connections between suicidal ideation and some dimensions of social support: social activities (r=-0.305; P=.000), intimacy (r=-0.272; P=.000) and overall social support (r=-0.168; P=.002). Suicidal ideation severity is higher on students who are far from home and living alone; students with weak social/familiar support networks (less involvement on social activities and intimate relationships). These results allow us to conclude that a frail social support network positively associates with ideation and suicidal risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Physical Activity/Sport in Tackling Youth Disaffection and Anti-Social Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Rachel A.; Duncombe, Rebecca; Armour, Kathy M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the existing evidence about the impact of sport/physical activity programmes on positive youth development in the context of education. The issue of youth disaffection is topical and a number of authors and policy makers have acknowledged that physical activity/sport may be an effective way of helping to…

  14. Social psychological-pedagogical support of singleparent family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslana Kazhuk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the definition of the concept of "incomplete family", describes the typology of single-parent families, the necessity of special social psychological and pedagogical support for children from such families and their parents has been proved. The analysis of various concepts of ―support‖has been made. The idea of psychological and pedagogical support of modern incomplete families has been determined. Key words: incomplete family, types of single-parent families, support, social support, psychological and pedagogical support of single-parent families.

  15. Social support moderates caregiver life satisfaction following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergh, Tanya C; Hanks, Robin A; Rapport, Lisa J; Coleman, Renee D

    2003-12-01

    Social support is an important determinant of adjustment following traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained by a family member. The present study examined the extent to which social support moderates the influence of characteristics of the person with injury on caregiver subjective well-being. Sixty pairs of individuals who had sustained a moderate to severe TBI and their caregivers (N=120) participated. Years postinjury ranged from 0.3 to 9.9 ( M=4.8, SD=2.6). Cognitive, functional, and neurobehavioral functioning of participants with TBI were assessed using neuropsychological tests and rating scales. Caregiver life satisfaction and perceived social support were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Results indicated that time since injury was unrelated to life satisfaction. Neurobehavioral disturbances showed an inverse relation with life satisfaction. Social support emerged as an important moderator of life satisfaction. Only among caregivers with low social support was cognitive dysfunction adversely related to life satisfaction. Similarly, a trend suggested that patient unawareness of deficit was associated with caregiver life dissatisfaction only among caregivers with low social support. In contrast, these characteristics were unrelated to life satisfaction among caregivers with adequate social support.

  16. Comparison of Loneliness and Social Skill Levels of Children with Specific Learning Disabilities in Terms of Participation in Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atike Yılmaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to compare loneliness and social skill levels of children with specific learning disabilities in terms of participation in sports. For this study, a screening model was used. The study group was composed of 56 children who were aged between 7 and 14 years and diagnosed with a specific learning disability (30 boys and 26 girls. “Personal Information Form”, “Children’s Loneliness Scale”, “Matson Evaluation of Social Skills with Youngsters (MESSY” were used in this study. For the data processes and data analyses, SPSS 22 was used. According to the test of normality, non-parametric tests were employed for those data that did not follow a normal distribution and the correlations among variables were tested with correlation analysis at p < 0.05 while differences among variables were tested with Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis tests at p < 0.05. According to the findings obtained in this study, there were no significant differences in terms of sex, the number of family members and the number of brothers and sisters while there were significant correlations in terms of age, sports status, MESSY-subscales and loneliness. In sum, it may be concluded that sports played a positive role in social skill and loneliness levels among children with specific learning disabilities.

  17. Institutional and Policy Support for Tourism Social Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    and operation of social enterprises as part of an inclusive and sustainable tourism system, and they can assist in the creation of institutional conditions that encourage, legitimize and synergize social entrepreneurship. The chapter offers concrete considerations for policy makers in terms of making...... the characteristics of supportive institutional and policy environments for tourism social entrepreneurship. It argues that governments can contribute in two broad ways to creating the conditions for tourism social entrepreneurship to flourish: they can develop policies that support and encourage the development...

  18. Social networks, support and early psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer-Anderson, C; Morgan, C

    2013-06-01

    Background. There is strong evidence that those with a long-standing psychotic disorder have fewer social contacts and less social support than comparison groups. There is less research on the extent of social contacts and support prior to or at the onset of psychosis. In the light of recent evidence implicating a range of social experiences and contexts at the onset of psychosis, it is relevant to establish whether social networks and support diminished before or at the time of onset and whether the absence of such supports might contribute to risk, either directly or indirectly. We, therefore, conducted a systematic review of this literature to establish what is currently known about the relationship between social networks, support and early psychosis. Methods. We identified all studies investigating social networks and support in first episode psychosis samples and in general population samples with measures of psychotic experiences or schizotype by conducting systematic searches of electronic databases using pre-defined search terms and criteria. Findings were synthesized using non-quantitative approaches. Results. Thirty-eight papers were identified that met inclusion criteria. There was marked methodological heterogeneity, which limits the capacity to draw direct comparisons. Nonetheless, the existing literature suggests social networks (particularly close friends) and support diminished both among first episode samples and among non-clinical samples reporting psychotic experiences or with schizotype traits, compared with varying comparison groups. These differences may be more marked for men and for those from minority ethnic populations. Conclusions. Tentatively, reduced social networks and support appear to pre-date onset of psychotic disorder. However, the substantial methodological heterogeneity among the existing studies makes comparisons difficult and suggests a need for more robust and comparable studies on networks, support and early psychosis.

  19. Fathers' Autonomy Support and Social Competence of Sons and Daughters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwyn, Robert F.; Bradley, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Relations between paternal autonomy support and four aspects of adolescent social competence and responsibility at age 16 were examined using data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. With controls on maternal autonomy support, significant relations were observed between paternal autonomy support and three of the four…

  20. Intelligent Configuration of Social Support Networks around Depressed Persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aziz, A.A.; Klein, M.C.A.; Treur, J.

    2011-01-01

    Helping someone who is depressed can be very important to the depressed person. A number of supportive family members or friends can often make a big difference. This paper addresses how a social support network can be formed, taking the needs of the support recipient and the possibilities of the

  1. Social support and outcome of alcoholism treatment: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, B M; Russell, D W; Soucek, S; Laughlin, P R

    1992-01-01

    Social support is becoming recognized as a positive influence on health and health maintenance. Forms of support which bolster the patient's sense of personal efficacy should enhance the alcoholic's ability to cope with a specific stressor (i.e., overcoming his or her addiction). Patients reporting higher levels of social support during alcoholism treatment, especially support that enhances his or her self-esteem, should therefore demonstrate improved outcome compared to patients with lower levels. Sixty-one consecutive admissions to an inpatient alcoholism treatment program at a rural midwestern medical center completed an assessment of six forms of social support (Guidance, Reliable Alliance, Reassurance of Worth, Opportunity for Nurturance, Attachment, and Social Integration) in terms of support obtained from family and friends and from the treatment environment. For each patient, additional information concerning age, marital status, financial support, and previous alcohol-related hospitalizations was also obtained. Outcome of treatment was measured by readmission for an alcohol-related diagnosis within 1 year of discharge. Survival analysis found that reassurance of worth from family and friends and number of previous hospitalizations were independent and significant predictors of time to readmission. Higher levels of reassurance of worth or esteem support significantly lengthened time to readmission, with the reverse relationship found for number of previous hospitalizations. These results suggest that specific sources (family and friends) and forms (reassurance of worth) of social support are important to the recovering alcoholic and that the effect of social support on treatment outcome is independent of the alcoholic's history of prior treatment failure. Interventions or program modifications should be designed specifically to bolster these facets of social support rather than addressing more general forms of support.

  2. Social support and ambulatory blood pressure in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Martínez, Mercedes; López-García, Esther; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar; Cruz, Juan J; Orozco, Edilberto; García-Esquinas, Esther; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Banegas, José R

    2016-10-01

    Social support has been associated with greater nocturnal decline (dipping) in blood pressure (BP) in younger and middle-aged individuals. However, it is uncertain if aggregated measures of social support are related to ambulatory SBP in older adults, where high SBP is frequent and clinically challenging. We studied 1047 community-living individuals aged at least 60 years in Spain. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP was determined under standardized conditions. Social support was assessed with a seven-item questionnaire on marital status, cohabitation, frequency of contact with relatives, or with friends and neighbors, emotional support, instrumental support, and outdoor companionship. A social support score was built by summing the values of the items that were significantly associated with SBP variables, such that the higher the score, the better the support. Participants' mean age was 71.7 years (50.8% men). Being married, cohabiting, and being accompanied when out of home were the support items significantly associated with SBP variables. After adjustment for sociodemographic (age, sex, education), behavioral (BMI, alcohol, tobacco, salt consumption, physical activity, Mediterranean diet score), and clinical variables [sleep quality, mental stress, comorbidity, BP medication, and ambulatory BP levels and heart rate (HR)], one additional point in the social support score built with the abovementioned three support variables, was associated with a decrease of 0.93 mmHg in night-time SBP (P = 0.039), totaling 2.8 mmHg decrease for a score of 3 vs. 0. The three-item social support score was also inversely associated with the night/day SBP ratio (β = -0.006, P = 0.010). In older adults, social support is independently associated with lower nocturnal SBP and greater SBP dipping. Further research is needed in prospective studies to confirm these results.

  3. Exercise dependence, social physique anxiety, and social support in experienced and inexperienced bodybuilders and weightlifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, R.; Hale, B.; Smith, D.; Collins, D.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To investigate psychological correlates of exercise dependence in experienced and inexperienced bodybuilders and weightlifters. Secondary objectives included measuring social physique anxiety, bodybuilding identity, and social support among bodybuilders and weightlifters. Methods—Thirty five experienced bodybuilders, 31 inexperienced bodybuilders, and 23 weightlifters completed the bodybuilding dependence scale, a bodybuilding version of the athletic identity measurement scale, the social physique anxiety scale, and an adapted version of the social support survey-clinical form. Results—A between subjects multivariate analysis of variance was calculated on the scores of the three groups of lifters for the four questionnaires. Univariate F tests and follow up tests indicated that experienced bodybuilders scored significantly higher than inexperienced bodybuilders and weightlifters on bodybuilding dependence (pbodybuilding identity (pbodybuilders exhibit more exercise dependence, show greater social support behaviour, and experience less social physique anxiety than inexperienced bodybuilders and weightlifters. Key Words: bodybuilding; exercise dependence; social physical anxiety; social support; athletic identity PMID:11131230

  4. Educating Immigrant Women Through Social Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementine M. Msengi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this case study was to describe a single multicultural women’s support program known as the Women of Care Project. The program was conducted in a community in the Midwest region of the United States and began in 2005 with a grant from the Open Meadows Foundation. Participants were volunteers who were recruited for the program through pre-existing access points to the Bosnian, African, and Hispanic communities, such as ethnic churches, markets, and key contacts within these communities. The support group format for the Women of Care Program was an open group format in which participants were encouraged to invite their friends to join. The initial support group consisted of women from various cultural origins, including Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania, Russia, Sierra Leone, Brazil, China, Taiwan, India, Nepal, Bosnia, Mexico, and the United States. This case study was based on focus group discussions, as well as observations and completion of evaluation forms. To analyze data, the focus group discussion notes and summaries were rearranged into recurring themes. The evaluation provided further feedback from the discussions to cement these themes. Findings suggested immigrants, especially women, benefit from support groups. Group involvement could empower women and increase their general sense of well-being in overcoming barriers they may face in transitioning into a new environment. It is recommended that host communities have integration programs which benefit both the host community and the immigrant: a win–win situation.

  5. Stroke, social support and the partner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, WJ

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common conditions with about 45,000 people suffering a first stroke in the Netherlands each year. Although survival after stroke has increased in recent decades, a substantial part of the survivors of stroke remain physically or cognitively impaired and in need of support

  6. Non-resident Fathers' Social Networks: The Relationship between Social Support and Father Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jason T; Sarver, Christian M

    2012-12-01

    Literature and research examining non-resident fathers' involvement with their chidren has focused primarily on the fathers' relationship with their child's mother. Receiving limited attention in the literature has been the inclusion of examining non-resident fathers' social support networks, the function of these social networks-perceived and received social support, and how these social support networks affect non-resident fathers' involvement with their children. Using data from Wave One of the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study, this study examined the social support networks non-resident fathers (n = 895) utilized in their involvement with their children. Results of the regression analyses indicate that non-resident fathers' relationship with their child's mother and perceived social support from their social networks contributed positively to their involvement with their children. Policy and practice implications are discussed.

  7. Non-resident Fathers’ Social Networks: The Relationship between Social Support and Father Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jason T.; Sarver, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    Literature and research examining non-resident fathers’ involvement with their chidren has focused primarily on the fathers’ relationship with their child’s mother. Receiving limited attention in the literature has been the inclusion of examining non-resident fathers’ social support networks, the function of these social networks—perceived and received social support, and how these social support networks affect non-resident fathers’ involvement with their children. Using data from Wave One of the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study, this study examined the social support networks non-resident fathers (n = 895) utilized in their involvement with their children. Results of the regression analyses indicate that non-resident fathers’ relationship with their child’s mother and perceived social support from their social networks contributed positively to their involvement with their children. Policy and practice implications are discussed. PMID:23288998

  8. Evaluating Restorative Justice Circles of Support and Accountability: Can Social Support Overcome Structural Barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohmert, Miriam Northcutt; Duwe, Grant; Hipple, Natalie Kroovand

    2018-02-01

    In a climate in which stigmatic shaming is increasing for sex offenders as they leave prison, restorative justice practices have emerged as a promising approach to sex offender reentry success and have been shown to reduce recidivism. Criminologists and restorative justice advocates believe that providing ex-offenders with social support that they may not otherwise have is crucial to reducing recidivism. This case study describes the expressive and instrumental social support required and received, and its relationship to key outcomes, by sex offenders who participated in Circles of Support and Accountability (COSAs), a restorative justice, reentry program in Minnesota. In-depth interviews with re-entering sex offenders and program volunteers revealed that 75% of offenders reported weak to moderate levels of social support leaving prison, 70% reported receiving instrumental support in COSAs, and 100% reported receiving expressive support. Findings inform work on social support, structural barriers, and restorative justice programming during sex offender reentry.

  9. The predictors of perceived social support among former foster youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Andrew; Palmer, Ashley N; Nam, Eunji

    2017-10-01

    Based on a 5-wave panel survey of 732 foster youth, the current study examined the respective relationships between foster youths' individual characteristics, youths' social connections with individuals and formal institutions, and the development of perceived social support across the transition to adulthood. Several youth characteristics - including self-reported delinquency and attachment insecurity - were found to be statistically significantly associated with perceived social support. Attachment insecurity also appeared to mediate the relationships between social support and several other youth-level characteristics, including prior placement disruptions and placement with relatives. Social connections with different types of individuals - including caregivers, relatives, natural mentors, and romantic partners - were found to be associated with additive increases in perceived social support. However, some types of connections (e.g., romantic partners, natural mentors) appeared to be associated with much larger increases in social support than other connections (e.g., school or employment). Collectively, the findings help inform agencies' efforts to bolster foster youths' social connections as they transition to adulthood. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Resilience amid Academic Stress: The Moderating Impact of Social Support among Social Work Students

    OpenAIRE

    Scott E. Wilks

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between academic stress and perceived resilience among social work students, and to identify social support as a protective factor of resilience on this relationship. A conceptual model of moderation was used to test the role of social support as protective. Methods: The sample consisted of 314 social work students (BSW=144; MSW=170) from three accredited schools/programs in the southern United States. Voluntary survey data we...

  11. Analysis of the Financial Support by the Croatian Ministry of Science, Education and Sports to Croatian Scientific Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macan, B.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ministry of Science, Education and Sports (MSES provides financial support for publishing scientific and scientific/professional journals . The journals should satisfy the following conditions: regular publishing, coherence with the “Notes for editing primary scientific publications”, inclusion in at least one international bibliographic database relevant for the specific scientific field, review procedure, existence of a web page with at least basic information about the journal and a table of contents of the latest issue. The MSES also provides financial help for publishing journals dedicated to promoting science, which is awarded by special decision of the Commission for publishing.2In the year 2007, the MSES financially supported 220 Croatian scientific, scientific/professional journals, and journals for the promotion of science from the fields of humanities, natural, technical, biotechnical, social, biomedical and health care sciences with 15 million Croatian kunas in total.5 More than 50 % of the supported journals are from humanities and social sciences, while only 20 of the titles (9 % belong to biotechnical journals (Fig. 1. Distribution of financial support by scientific fields is similar (Fig. 2. The average financial support is HRK 68,181.82 per journal.The highest average amount per journal is given to journals from biomedical and health care sciences (HRK 83,758.42, while the lowest support is given to humanities journals (HRK54,138.20 (Fig. 3.If we divide the amount of MSES financial support in 2007 into 5 classes, each class being HRK 50,000 , it is obvious that the majority of journals (122 titles or 55.45 % was supported with less than HRK 50,000; about a quarter of the journals with an amount between HRK 50,000 and HRK 100,000; and 11 journals with more than HRK 200,000 (Fig. 4.In order to compare the criteria for scientific advancement (papers published in journals covered by Thomson Scientific databases is given

  12. [Esthetics and social support, aids for oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keime, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Socio-aesthetic care is increasingly being offered to patients suffering from long-term illnesses such as cancer. Combined with support care, it is performed by a socio-aesthetician having received specific training and can be offered as soon as the diagnosis is announced and until the end of the treatment or the end of life. This comfort care helps patients to reclaim a body transformed by the disease and treatments.

  13. The Role of Sport in Reducing Racism and Its Relation to Social Acceptance in the Movie the Blind Side

    OpenAIRE

    Siwi, Galih Ratna

    2013-01-01

    Film is the example of literary works which reflects the social issues that occur in a society. The writer is interested to analyze the social issue in The Blind Side. In this case, the writer intends to examine the role of sport in reducing racism that occur to an African American who lives in Tennessee, The United States of America. It also concerns his existence in the Whie American society in which its people have different skin colors. The writer uses two elements to analyze this thesis....

  14. Perceived social support among students of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Alavijeh, Freshteh; Dehkordi, Fatemeh Raeesi; Shahry, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Social support is emotional and instrumental assistance from family, friends or neighbors, and has an important but different impact on individuals, mainly depending on contextual factors. To determine the status of perceived social support and related personal and family characteristics of medical sciences students in Ahvaz, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the target population included the students of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in the second semester of 2013-2014, of whom 763 were selected by cluster random sampling method. The study tool was a two-part questionnaire containing 48 self-administered questions including 25 questions of measurements of personal and family characteristics and a Persian modified version of Vaux's social support scale (Cronbach's α=0.745). Data were analyzed with T test, ANOVA and chi-square and using SPSS version 16 and 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. The mean score of the perceived social support was 17.06±3.6 and 60.3% of them reported low social support. There was a significant relationship among the perceived social support and sex (p=0.02), faculty (p<0.0001), ethnicity (p=0.034) and the duration of weekly residence in dormitory (p=0.031). But no significant relationship was found between this variable and other individual and familial characteristics. Based on students' low social support and importance of social support in reducing stress and academic failure, the planners need to provide efficient supportive interventions for students.

  15. La socialisation à l'œuvre dans l'univers fédéral, élément déterminant de la régulation sociale de l'organisation sportive. Contribution à la politique sociale du service des sports de la ville de Nice

    OpenAIRE

    Massiera, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Title : The socialization at work in the federal universe, the determining element of the social regulation of the sports organization. Contribution to the social politics of the sport service of Nice city Abstract : This study postulates the existence of certain specific cultural determinism in the social regulation of the sports organization. It leans on a work of inquiry which concerns 148 agents of the municipal service of the sports of the Nice city. The investigation puts in evidence a ...

  16. Peace education and psychosocial support for social cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Simpson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from psychosocial support-based peace education work with young displaced Syrians shows that addressing trauma is critical in overcoming psychological barriers to social cohesion.

  17. Compare Self-Esteem and Social Support among Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Khodaabakhshi-Koolaee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare the self-esteem and social support of the elderly residing in boarding centers and living in their homes. Materials and Methods: In this causal-comparative study, 120 elderly individuals residing in boarding facilities and living he their homes in the city of Shiraz were selected through available sampling and responded to demographic, social support, and self-esteem questionnaires.Results: The findings show that there was a significant difference between self-esteem and social support in both groups of the elderly residing in their homes and those living in boarding centers.Conclusion: The elderly living at home have greater self-esteem and social support than the elderly residing in boarding facilities.

  18. Contributions of perfectionism and social support to the prediction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family Conflict Scale (a = .87); Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (a = .78), and Almost Perfect Scale (α= .84). Pearson Product Moment Correlation (PPMC) and multiple regression statistics were used to analyse data.

  19. Immediate psycho-social support for disaster survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berliner, Peter; Navarro Gongóra, José; Espaillat, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    . The support was centered on (1) providing information; (2) facilitating social regulation of emotions; (3) supporting a social support network for the patient; (4) focusing coping efforts; and (5) normalization of reactions. Finally it is described how the crisis made values of caring, compassion......The article describes how psychosocial support in the immediate and mid-term disaster response for Haitian earthquake survivors in hospitals in the Dominican Republic could ameliorate some of the suffering and prevent the crisis from becoming crystallized into symptoms and complex grief...

  20. From Social Integration to Social Isolation: The Relationship Between Social Network Types and Perceived Availability of Social Support in a National Sample of Older Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasemiw, Oksana; Newall, Nancy; Shooshtari, Shahin; Mackenzie, Corey; Menec, Verena

    2017-01-01

    It is well-documented that social isolation is detrimental to health and well-being. What is less clear is what types of social networks allow older adults to get the social support they need to promote health and well-being. In this study, we identified social network types in a national sample of older Canadians and explored whether they are associated with perceived availability of different types of social support (affectionate, emotional, or tangible, and positive social interactions). Data were drawn from the baseline questionnaire of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging for participants aged 65-85 (unweighted n = 8,782). Cluster analyses revealed six social network groups. Social support generally declined as social networks became more restricted; however, different patterns of social support availability emerged for different social network groups. These findings suggest that certain types of social networks place older adults at risk of not having met specific social support needs.

  1. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Economic and Social Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Economic and Social Research Foundation. This funding will help strengthen the Economic and Social Research Foundation's (ESRF) role as a credible public policy institution in Tanzania by enhancing its ability to provide high-quality, influential, and policy-relevant research. About the ...

  2. Institutional Support : Consortium for Economic and Social Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Institutional Support : Consortium for Economic and Social Research (CRES) Sénégal. The Consortium pour la recherche économique et sociale (CRES) is an association of a multidisciplinary team of researchers based in Dakar, Sénégal. Its activities are organized under five departments: growth, poverty and equity; local ...

  3. Psychology of Social Support on Individuals and Society | Balogun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... not only to the Yorubas but to most if not all societies. In other words, social support can been seen as a universal phenomenon. This cocept is what is expoused in the present paper with its relevance to the societal well being in general. African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Vol.7(1) 2004: 131-139 ...

  4. Finnish and Russian Teachers Supporting the Development of Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väyrynen, Sai; Kesälahti, Essi; Pynninen, Tanja; Siivola, Jenny; Flotskaya, Natalia; Bulanova, Svetlana; Volskaya, Olga; Usova, Zoya; Kuzmicheva, Tatyana; Afonkina, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    We argue that a key aspect of inclusive pedagogy is the interaction between the learners, their teachers and the environment. For effective interaction, learners need to develop social competence. This study explores how teachers support the development of the key social skills in schools in Finland and in Russia. The data were collected by…

  5. Counselling Intervention in the Provision of Psycho-Social Support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Everyone needs adjustment to get along or survive ones social and physical environment. The widows in this part of the world need it more than anyone due to the hardship culture has placed on them. The study examined the psychological and social support being rendered to the widows for adjustment. One hundred and ...

  6. Relationship between family and social support and adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A physical examination was done to determine their blood pressure, questionnaires were administered to elicit sociodemographic characteristics, Family APGAR, Social support and adherence scores. Data collected was analyzed with Statistical Program for Social Sciences (SPSS)-15. Results: A total of 120 data sets were ...

  7. Social Support and Heart Failure: Differing Effects by Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-11

    dissertation committee chair Dr. Tracy Sbrocco, and members, Dr. Jeffrey Goodie and Dr. Cara Olsen for their incredible encouragement and input into...73. Pilisuk M, & Froland C. 1978. Kinship, social networks, social support and health. Soc. Sci. & Med. 128: 273-80 74. Plant EA, Sach -Ericsson N

  8. drinking and depression as predictors of social support and quality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J MUGUMBATE

    amongst college students. I believe that this will be the case with ex- combatants and civilians, in keeping with social learning theory. In view of the above discussion, I hypothesized as follows: H1: Drinking will be negatively correlated to Social. Support and Quality of Life. Drinking and Depression. Few studies investigated ...

  9. Association Between Perceived Social Support and Depression in Postmenopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    Tadayon Najafabadi; Kalhori; Javadifar; Hosein Haghighizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Background The most common symptom in early menopausal women is depression. Depression is a type of chronic disease that impacts on postmenopausal women’s life. Social support plays a protective role for women and enables them to solve their life problems and thus, feel less depressed. Objectives We assessed depression as a chronic disease and evaluated the association between perceived social support and depression in postmenopau...

  10. Depression and Perceived Social Support in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Bakhtiyari; Mehregan Emaminaeini; Hossein Hatami; Soheila Khodakarim; Robab Sahaf

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the study was to determine depression and perceived social support and some related factors among the elderly people in urban areas of Tehran in the area of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Methods & Materials A cross-sectional study was conducted with 580 elderly of Tehran in Shahid Beheshti University using a multistage systematic sampling method. Data were collected by trained questioners. Standard Beck depression, Zimet perceived social support ...

  11. Social support among releasing men prisoners with lifetime trauma experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    High rates of lifetime trauma experiences exist among men incarcerated in US state and federal prisons. Because lifetime trauma experiences have been linked to problematic behavioral and psychiatric outcomes for incarcerated populations, trauma-informed interventions could improve post-release well-being of releasing men prisoners with trauma histories. Social support has consistently been found to have a positive impact on trauma-related outcomes in non-incarcerated populations. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that social support may be an important intervention component for releasing men prisoners with trauma experiences; yet, the relationship between trauma experiences, psychiatric and behavioral factors, and social support has received almost no attention in research with men prisoners. Using a probability sample of 165 soon-to-be-released men, the present study examined differences in certain demographic, criminal justice history, mental health, substance abuse, and social support (type, quality, amount, and source) variables between releasing men prisoners with and without lifetime trauma experiences. Results indicate that men with trauma histories had more negative social support experiences and fewer positive social support resources before prison than their counterparts. Men with trauma histories also had more lifetime experiences with mental health and substance use problems. On further investigation of the subsample of men with trauma histories, those who were older, had substance use disorders, and histories of mental health problems anticipated fewer post-release social support resources. Study findings underscore the nuances of social support for men prisoners with trauma experiences and point to implications for future directions in targeted trauma-informed intervention development for releasing men prisoners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress, social support and problem drinking among women in poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, Nina; Schmidt, Laura; Bond, Jason; Jacobs, Laurie; Korcha, Rachael

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have found that stress contributes to problem drinking, while social support can buffer its effects. However, these studies are confined largely to middle-class and general populations. We extend what is known by examining how the unique stressors and forms of social support experienced by women in poverty impact alcohol problems over a 4-year time-period. This prospective study used generalized estimating equations (GEE) transition modeling and four annual waves of survey data from 392 American mothers receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in a large Northern California county. We examined the effects of neighborhood disorder, stressful life events and economic hardship on psychological distress and problem drinking over time, and whether social support moderated these relationships for women in poverty. Neighborhood disorder and stressful life events increased significantly the risk for problem drinking, largely through their effect on psychological distress. We found little evidence, however, that social support buffers poor women from the effects of these stressors. Women in poverty are exposed to severe, chronic stressors within their communities and immediate social networks which increase vulnerability to psychological distress and problem drinking. The finding that social support does not buffer stress among these women may reflect their high level of exposure to stressors, as well as the hardships and scarce resources within their networks. If the 'private safety net' of the social network fails to provide a strong buffer, more effective environmental interventions that reduce exposure to stressors may be needed to prevent alcohol problems in poor women's lives.

  13. The social support and social network characteristics of smokers in methadone-maintenance treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Marcel A.; Stanton, Cassandra A.; Caviness, Celeste M.; Niaura, Raymond; Stein, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown social support and social network variables to be important factors in smoking cessation treatment. Tobacco use is highly prevalent among individuals in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). However, smoking cessation treatment outcomes in this vulnerable subpopulation have been poor and social support and social network variables may contribute. The current study examined the social support and social network characteristics of 151 MMT smokers involved in a randomized clinical trial of smoking cessation treatments. Participants were 50% women and 78% Caucasian. A high proportion (57%) of MMT smokers had spouses or partners who smoke and over two-thirds of households (68.5%) included at least one smoker. Our sample was characterized by relatively small social networks, but high levels of general social support and quitting support. The number of cigarettes per day was found to be positively associated with the number of smokers in the social network (r = .239, p < .05) and quitting self-efficacy was negatively associated with partner smoking (r = −.217, p < .001). Findings are discussed in the context of developing smoking cessation interventions that address the influential role of social support and social networks of smokers in MMT. PMID:22571553

  14. Personality predicts perceived availability of social support and satisfaction with social support in women with early stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Oudsten, Brenda L; Van Heck, Guus L; Van der Steeg, Alida F W; Roukema, Jan A; De Vries, Jolanda

    2010-04-01

    This study examines the relationships between personality, on the one hand, and perceived availability of social support (PASS) and satisfaction with received social support (SRSS), on the other hand, in women with early stage breast cancer (BC). In addition, this study examined whether a stressful event (i.e., diagnosis) is associated with quality of life (QOL), when controlling for PASS and SRSS. Women were assessed on PASS and SRSS (World Health Organization QOL assessment instrument-100) before diagnosis (time 1) and 1 (time 2), 3 (time 3), 6 (time 4), 12 (time 5), and 24 months (time 6) after surgical treatment. Personality (neuroticism extraversion openness five-factor inventory and state trait anxiety inventory-trait scale) and fatigue (fatigue assessment scale) were assessed at time 1. Agreeableness and fatigue predicted PASS and SRSS at time 5 and time 6. Trait anxiety had a negative effect on SRSS (ss = -0.22, p personality factors substantially influence the way women with early stage BC perceive social support. Knowledge about these underlying mechanisms of social support is useful for the development of tailor-made interventions. Professionals should be aware of the importance of social support. They should check whether patients have sufficient significant others in their social environment and be sensitive to potential discrepancies patients might experience between availability and adequacy of social support.

  15. Women’s football. Notes for a social history of women’s sport in Spain, 1900-1936

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Torrebadella-Flix

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of demands by the European feminist movement at the beginning of the 20th century, in Spain women’s sport flagged up aspirations to what were considered to be male practices. The first experiences of women in football stand out because of their use of the media to appear as a symbol of social transformation to modernity in the 20th century. It was not in vain that women’s football highlighted the demands of the feminist movements, although it did come up against male disapproval from an opposing group. The research sets out from a bibliographical and media review of specialist press and sports news of the time. Other current studies have also been considered in order to place it in a social and historical focus on sport. This has enabled us to highlight that football in Spain was established as an unequivocal space for (re producing male hegemony where women were relegated to the representation of a symbolic ritual in a scenario of accessory and condescension.

  16. Perceived social support predicts increased conscientiousness during older adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick L; Payne, Brennan R; Jackson, Joshua J; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L; Roberts, Brent W

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether perceived social support predicted adaptive personality change in older adulthood, focusing on the trait of conscientiousness. We tested this hypothesis both at the broad domain level and with respect to the specific lower order facets that comprise conscientiousness: order, self-control, industriousness, responsibility, and traditionalism. A sample of 143 older adults (aged 60-91) completed measures of conscientiousness and social support during 2 assessments 7 months apart. Social support and conscientiousness were positively correlated among older adults. Moreover, older adults who perceived greater social support at baseline were more likely to gain in conscientiousness over time. The magnitude of this effect was relatively similar across the order, self-control, and industriousness facets. Perceived social support provides multiple benefits later in life, and the current results add to this literature by showing that it also promotes conscientiousness. As conscientiousness is linked to a variety of positive outcomes later in life, including health, future research should examine whether conscientiousness change may be an important mechanism through which social support enhances resilience in older adulthood. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Social networks and social support for healthy eating among Latina breast cancer survivors: implications for social and behavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, Danielle M; Shelton, Rachel C; Tehranifar, Parisa; Aycinena, Corina; Gaffney, Ann Ogden; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel R; Greenlee, Heather

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about Latina breast cancer survivors' social networks or their perceived social support to achieve and maintain a healthy diet. This paper describes the social networks and perceived support for healthy eating in a sample of breast cancer survivors of predominantly Dominican descent living in New York City. Spanish-speaking Latina breast cancer survivors enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a culturally tailored dietary intervention. Social networks were assessed using Cohen's Social Network Index and a modified General Social Survey Social Networks Module that included assessments of shared health promoting behaviors. Perceived social support from family and friends for healthy, food-related behaviors was assessed. Participants' networks consisted predominantly of family and friends. Family members were more likely than other individuals to be identified as close network members. Participants were more likely to share food-related activities than exercise activities with close network members. Perceived social support for healthy eating was high, although perceived support from spouses and children was higher than support from friends. Despite high levels of perceived support, family was also identified as a barrier to eating healthy foods by nearly half of women. Although friends are part of Latina breast cancer survivors' social networks, spouses and children may provide greater support for healthy eating than friends. Involving family members in dietary interventions for Latina breast cancer survivors may tap into positive sources of support for women, which could facilitate uptake and maintenance of healthy eating behaviors.

  18. Impact of Supported Housing on Social Relationships Among Homeless Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Maria J; Kasprow, Wesley J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2017-02-01

    This study examined social network structure and function among a sample of 460 homeless veterans who participated in an experimental trial of the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program. Participants were randomly assigned to HUD-VASH (housing subsidies and case management), case management only, or standard care. Mixed-model longitudinal analysis was used to compare treatment groups on social network outcomes over 18 months. Veterans in HUD-VASH reported significantly greater increases in social support than veterans in the two other groups, as well as greater frequency of contacts, availability of tangible and emotional support, and satisfaction with nonkin relationships over time. These gains largely involved relationships with providers and other veterans encountered in treatment. Supported housing may play a pivotal role in fostering constructive new relationships with persons associated with service programs but may have a more limited impact on natural support networks.

  19. Computer support for social awareness in flexible work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, S.; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    on which to base further design. We present these analyses and suggest that the metaphors work because of their ability to map experiences from the physical space into conceptual experiences. We conclude that social awareness in flexible work must be constructed indirectly, presenting itself as an option...... How do we conceptualize social awareness, and what support is needed to develop and maintain social awareness in flexible work settings? The paper begins by arguing the relevance of designing for social awareness in flexible work. It points out how social awareness is suspended in the field...... of tension that exists between the ephemerality and continuity of social encounters, exploring ways to construct identity through relationships by means of social encounters - notably those that are accidental and unforced. We probe into this issue through design research: In particular, we present three...

  20. Health Blogging and Social Support: A 3-Year Panel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, David M; Rains, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    The reported study explored the implications of informal computer-mediated social support for the well-being of individuals coping with illness over the course of 3 years. A panel study was conducted in which respondents--bloggers writing about their experiences living with a health condition--reported on their perceptions of social support and well-being during 2010 and again during 2013. Among respondents who completed both questionnaires (n = 49), increases in support availability from family and friends were related to improvements in bloggers' health self-efficacy as well as improvements in bloggers' loneliness, particularly among those who also experienced increased support availability from blog readers. Increased blog reader support availability was associated with improvements in bloggers' health-related uncertainty. Among respondents who completed the initial questionnaire (N = 121), a survival analysis showed that neither support available from family and friends nor support from blog readers predicted continued health blogging over the 3-year period.

  1. Social support in later life: family, friends and community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Josefina Arias

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to carry out an analysis of the importance of social support and participation in old age. Contributions are presented first that various international agencies concerned with old age and aging have been made to strengthen this support and increased participation of older people. Different sources of social support are described: formal and informal interventions that can be made with varied promotion and preventive-wellness-care objectives and action at various levels-individual, group, family, organizational and community-and is made an analysis of the impact on the well-being have the resources of social support available to older people. Finally we reflect on Certain negative assumptions about the availability of support and social participation of older people in relation to recent research findings on the subject. Problematize the importance of these negative stereotypes about aging in general and on the participation and the availability of social support in particular in order to achieve more supportive environments that promote the development of the potential of older persons is concluded.

  2. Synthetic social support: Theorizing lay health worker interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Nicola K; Kenyon, Sara; MacArthur, Christine; Jolly, Kate; Hope, Lucy

    2018-01-01

    Levels of social support are strongly associated with health outcomes and inequalities. The use of lay health workers (LHWs) has been suggested by policy makers across the world as an intervention to identify risks to health and to promote health, particularly in disadvantaged communities. However, there have been few attempts to theorize the work undertaken by LHWs to understand how interventions work. In this article, the authors present the concept of 'synthetic socialsupport' and distinguish it from the work of health professionals or the spontaneous social support received from friends and family. The authors provide new empirical data to illustrate the concept based on qualitative, observational research, using a novel shadowing method involving clinical and non-clinical researchers, on the everyday work of 'pregnancy outreach workers' (POWs) in Birmingham, UK. The service was being evaluated as part of a randomized controlled trial. These LHWs provided instrumental, informational, emotional and appraisal support to the women they worked with, which are all key components of social support. The social support was 'synthetic' because it was distinct from the support embedded in spontaneous social networks: it was non-reciprocal; it was offered on a strictly time-limited basis; the LHWs were accountable for the relationship, and the social networks produced were targeted rather than spontaneous. The latter two qualities of this synthetic form of social support may have benefits over spontaneous networks by improving the opportunities for the cultivation of new relationships (both strong and weak ties) outside the women's existing spontaneous networks that can have a positive impact on them and by offering a reliable source of health information and support in a chaotic environment. The concept of SSS can help inform policy makers about how deploying lay workers may enable them to achieve desired outcomes, specify their programme theories and evaluate

  3. Perceived social support from parents and teachers' influence on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    1Emmanuel Adu-Tutu Bofah works at Department of Mathematics and ICT Education, University of. University ... Studies have shown that students' social support such as parental and teacher support predict their academic .... mediation model (TM) and associated competing models tested in the present study are presented.

  4. Effects of Social Support on Professors' Work Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Christin; Chung-Yan, Greg A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how various types of workplace social support from different support sources interact with occupational stressors to predict the psychological well-being of university professors. Design/method/approach: A total of 99 full-time professors participated via an online or paper questionnaire. Findings:…

  5. Social Support, Environmental Condition and Nutritional Status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The elderly should be encouraged by the nutritionists and dieticians to take fruits and vegetable regularly, while policy makers in Nigeria should render adequate welfare support to improve the standard of living and the quality of life of the elderly. Key words: Social support, Environmental condition, Nutritional status, elderly ...

  6. Social support, locus of control, and psychological well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, KI; Buunk, BP; Sanderman, R

    1997-01-01

    Social support seems to be positively related to psychological well-being. Studies have shown that individual differences exist in the ability to mobilize and use sources of support. The current study focused on locus of control as a personality factor that might be related to this ability, In 2

  7. Social Support and Social Network Ties among the Homeless in a Downtown Atlanta Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzes, Donald C.; Crimmins, Timothy J.; Yarbrough, Johanna; Parker, Josie

    2011-01-01

    This study applies a typology of social support with 3 categories of social networks to investigate social ties and their benefits for homeless people. Data were derived from a 2-year long series of participant observations of homeless or precariously housed people who came regularly to a downtown Atlanta public park. The findings are as follows:…

  8. Social Relationships, Prosocial Behaviour, and Perceived Social Support in Students from Boarding Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Jens P.; Pinquart, Martin; Krick, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Social development may vary depending on contextual factors, such as attending a day school or a boarding school. The present study compares students from these school types with regard to the achievement of specific social goals, perceived social support, and reported prosocial behaviour. A sample of 701 students was examined. Students from…

  9. Burnout in Social Workers Treating Children as Related to Demographic Characteristics, Work Environment, and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Liat

    2012-01-01

    This study examined sense of burnout among 126 social workers who directly treat children and adolescents within the human service professions. Burnout was investigated in relation to social workers' demographic characteristics (age, family status, education, and seniority at work), extrinsic and intrinsic work conditions, and social support by…

  10. Social Competence, Social Support, and Academic Achievement in Minority, Low-Income, Urban Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Maurice J.; Haynes, Norris M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite living in disadvantaged urban communities experiencing social and economic hardships, many children emerge with positive outcomes. Social-emotional competence and social support were hypothesized to have strong influences on academic trajectories during the critical period of academic skill acquisition. Participants were 282 third-grade…

  11. Social Support Strategies for Immigrants: The Context of Social Work Practice in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aistė Bartkevičienė

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Intensification of migration flows makes Lithuania one of the immigrants host countries which, like other European Union countries, faces the challenge of integration of immigrants and in this process an important role has a social worker. The aim of research was to reveal the social support strategies used by social workers in solving social problems of immigrants during the process of their integration. The qualitative research using semi-structured interview method and content analysis method was done. The survey results suggest that immigrants during the process of integration face these social problems: the search for housing, employment, legal, financial, lack of access to relevant information. The results revealed that social workers, solving the social problems of immigrants, evaluate their nature and level and then apply the appropriate level of intervention. Social workers apply these micro level interventions: information and consultancy of immigrants, mediation and emotional support, which include individual social assistance. Social workers, solving the social problems of immigrants, apply these mezzo level interventions: development of social network of immigrants, organization of socio-cultural events, organization and coordination of volunteer activities. Social workers providing social assistance to immigrants' integration process, use the following macro level interventions: dissemination of information onimmigrantissues, conduction and dissemination of researches based on immigrant integration issues, dissemination of best practice of social workers.

  12. Childhood adversity, social support, and telomere length among perinatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amanda M; Kowalsky, Jennifer M; Epel, Elissa S; Lin, Jue; Christian, Lisa M

    2018-01-01

    Adverse perinatal health outcomes are heightened among women with psychosocial risk factors, including childhood adversity and a lack of social support. Biological aging could be one pathway by which such outcomes occur. However, data examining links between psychosocial factors and indicators of biological aging among perinatal women are limited. The current study examined the associations of childhood socioeconomic status (SES), childhood trauma, and current social support with telomere length in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a sample of 81 women assessed in early, mid, and late pregnancy as well as 7-11 weeks postpartum. Childhood SES was defined as perceived childhood social class and parental educational attainment. Measures included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and average telomere length in PBMCs. Per a linear mixed model, telomere length did not change across pregnancy and postpartum visits; thus, subsequent analyses defined telomere length as the average across all available timepoints. ANCOVAs showed group differences by perceived childhood social class, maternal and paternal educational attainment, and current family social support, with lower values corresponding with shorter telomeres, after adjustment for possible confounds. No effects of childhood trauma or social support from significant others or friends on telomere length were observed. Findings demonstrate that while current SES was not related to telomeres, low childhood SES, independent of current SES, and low family social support were distinct risk factors for cellular aging in women. These data have relevance for understanding potential mechanisms by which early life deprivation of socioeconomic and relationship resources affect maternal health. In turn, this has potential significance for intergenerational transmission of telomere length. The predictive value of

  13. Social Support Networks Among Diverse Sexual Minority Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David M.; Meyer, Ilan H.; Schwartz, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the function and composition of social support networks among diverse lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) men and women (n = 396) in comparison to their heterosexual peers (n = 128). Data were collected using a structured social support network matrix in a community sample recruited in New York City. Our findings show that gay and bisexual men may rely on “chosen families” within LGBT communities more so than lesbian and bisexual women. Both heterosexuals and LGBs relied less on family and more on other people (e.g., friends, co-workers) for everyday social support (e.g., recreational and social activities, talking about problems). Providers of everyday social support were most often of the same sexual orientation and race/ethnicity as participants. In seeking major support (e.g., borrowing large sums of money), heterosexual men and women along with lesbian and bisexual women relied primarily on their families, but gay and bisexual men relied primarily on other LGB individuals. Racial/ethnic minority LGBs relied on LGB similar others at the same rate at White LGBs but, notably, racial/ethnic minority LGBs reported receiving fewer dimensions of support. PMID:26752447

  14. Continuous use of intermittent bladder catheterization - can social support contribute?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjoyre Anne Lindozo Lopes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to investigate the factors affecting the adequate continuous use of intermittent catheterization and its relation with social support.METHOD: sectional, descriptive and correlational study involving 49 patients with neuropathic bladder caused by spinal cord injury.RESULTS: almost all (92% participants continued the intermittent catheterization, but 46.9% made some changes in the technique. The complications (28.6% of the sample were mainly infection and vesicolithiasis. There were high scores for social support in relation to people that were part of the patient's social support.CONCLUSION: All of them noticed great support from the family, but not from the society in general. The difficulties were related to the lack of equipment and inadequate infrastructure, leading to changes that increased urologic complications.

  15. [Care of disabled children: social support accessed by mothers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Maria Angélica Marcheti; Pettengill, Myriam Aparecida Mandetta; Farias, Theara Lopes; Lemes, Lucyana Conceição

    2009-09-01

    The functioning of a disabled child's family is modified because of the pile up of demands over the family, especially the mother. This study had as objective to understand how as the disabled children's mother, assisted in a rehabilitation institution, identifies and accesses the sources of social support to assist her son's needs and of her family. The concepts of social support, and Qualitative Analysis of Content, were used as theoretical and methodological frameworks to guide data collection and analysis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six mothers. It emerged six thematic categories that explain the mother's movement to access the social support. It was ended that the families need adequate support programs to allow their empowerment.

  16. Predicting performance and performance satisfaction: mindfulness and beliefs about the ability to deal with social barriers in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecharz, Jan; Luszczynska, Aleksandra; Scholz, Urte; Schwarzer, Ralf; Siekanska, Malgorzata; Cieslak, Roman

    2014-05-01

    This research investigates the role of beliefs about the ability to deal with specific social barriers and its relationships to mindfulness, football performance, and satisfaction with one's own and team performance. Study 1 aimed at eliciting these social barriers. Study 2 tested (i) whether self-efficacy referring to social barriers would predict performance over and above task-related self-efficacy and collective efficacy and (ii) the mediating role of self-efficacy to overcome social barriers in the relationship between mindfulness and performance. Participants were football (soccer) players aged 16-21 years (Study 1: N=30; Study 2: N=101, longitudinal sample: n=88). Study 1 resulted in eliciting 82 social barriers referring to team, peer leadership, and coaches. Study 2 showed that task-related self-efficacy and collective efficacy explained performance satisfaction at seven-month follow-up, whereas self-efficacy referring to social barriers explained shooting performance at seven-month follow-up. Indirect associations between mindfulness and performance were found with three types of self-efficacy referring to social barriers, operating as parallel mediators. Results provide evidence for the role of beliefs about the ability to cope with social barriers and show a complex interplay between different types of self-efficacy and collective efficacy in predicting team sport performance.

  17. Validation of the short form-36 health survey supported with isokinetic strength testing after sport knee injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marn-Vukadinovic, Dusa; Jamnik, Helena

    2011-08-01

    Valid patient-based outcome instruments are necessary for comprehensive patient care that focuses on all aspects of health, from impairments to participation restrictions. To validate the Slovenian translation of Medical Outcome Survey (MOS) Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and to assess relations among various knee measurements, activity tested with Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and health-related quality of life as estimated with SF-36 domains. Descriptive validation study. Isokinetic laboratory in outpatient rehabilitation unit. 101 subjects after unilateral sport knee injury. All subjects completed the SF-36 and OKS, and isokinetic knee-muscle strength output at 60°/s was determined in 78 participants. Within a 3-d period, 43 subjects completed the SF-36 and OKS questionnaires again. Reliability testing included internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Correlations between SF-36 subscales and OKS were calculated to assess construct validity, and correlation between SF-36 subscales and muscle strength was calculated to assess concurrent validity. Chronbach α was above .78 for all SF-36 subscales. ICCs ranged from .80 to .93. The correlation between OKS and the physical-functioning subscale, showing convergent construct validity, was higher (r = .83, P social-functioning (r = -.43, P sport knee injury were established.

  18. Social support and nocturnal blood pressure dipping: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortmann, Addie L; Gallo, Linda C

    2013-03-01

    Attenuated nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping is a better predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality than resting BP measurements. Studies have reported associations between social support, variously defined, and BP dipping. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to investigate associations of functional and structural social support with nocturnal BP dipping assessed over a minimum of 24 hours. A total of 297 articles were identified. Of these, 11 met criteria for inclusion; all studies were cross-sectional in design and included adult participants only (mean age = 19 to 72 years). Evidence was most consistent for an association between functional support and BP dipping, such that 5 of 7 studies reported statistically (or marginally) significant positive associations with BP dipping. Statistically significant functional support-BP dipping associations were moderate (standardized effect size (d) = 0.41) to large (d = 2.01) in magnitude. Studies examining structural support were fewer and relatively less consistent; however, preliminary evidence was observed for associations of marital status and social contact frequency with BP dipping. Statistically significant structural support findings were medium (d = 0.53) to large (d = 1.13) in magnitude. Overall, findings suggest a link between higher levels of functional support and greater nocturnal BP dipping; preliminary evidence was also observed for the protective effects of marriage and social contact frequency. Nonetheless, the relatively small number of studies conducted to date and the heterogeneity of findings across meaningful subgroups suggest that additional research is needed to substantiate these conclusions.

  19. Perceived stress in online prostate cancer community participants: Examining relationships with stigmatization, social support network preference, and social support seeking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rising, C.J.; Bol, N.; Burke-Garcia, A.; Rains, S.; Wright, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    Men with prostate cancer often need social support to help them cope with illness-related physiological and psychosocial challenges. Whether those needs are met depends on receiving support optimally matched to their needs. This study examined relationships between perceived stress, prostate

  20. OXFORD DICTIONARY OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kent

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine provides reliable definitions of sports science and medicine terms. It provides an invaluable reference book for anyone interested in the captivating subject of sport. PURPOSE This dictionary aims to include almost every sports science, anatomy, physiology, biomechanical, injuries description, and psychological term as related to sports medicine and science and support the explanations by illustrations wherever necessary. AUDIENCE As a comprehensive dictionary of sports science and medicine, it will be of particular help to medical specialists and general practitioners, as well as students of PE, coaches, and athletes who need to understand the anatomical structures and physiological processes which affect athletic performance. Any member of public interested in health and fitness; exercise and sport or wants to understand what the obscure terms mean, like jogger's nipple, social loafing, and Zatopek phenomenon will also benefit from this book. FEATURES The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine features terms in A to Z fashion at all the major areas of sports science and medicine including: anatomy, physiology/exercise physiology, biomechanics, training principles and techniques, nutrition, sports psychology and sociology, sports injuries and rehabilitation. A team of prominent contributors and advisers put together this dictionary in the first edition. The third edition includes around 8000 cross-referenced terms which have been updated or added since the first edition. There are plenty of illustrations wherever appropriate to make the terms easily understandable. ASSESSMENT A must-have dictionary for all medics practising in sports and exercise medicine, as well as students of medicine, physical education, nursing and physiotherapy. Even coaches, trainers, biomechanical experts; in fact anyone who has a special interest in this area will find this dictionary useful.

  1. Social support and support groups among people with HIV/AIDS in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrefa-Gyan, Tina; Wu, Liyun; Lewis, Marilyn W

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS, a chronic burden in Ghana, poses social and health outcome concerns to those infected. Examining the Medical Outcome Study Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS) instrument among 300 Ghanaians from a cross-sectional design, Principal Component Analysis yielded four factors (positive interaction, trust building, information giving, and essential support), which accounted for 85.73% of the total variance in the MOS-SSS. A logistic regression analysis showed that essential support was the strongest predictor of the length of time an individual stayed in the support group, whereas positive interaction indicated negative association. The study's implications for policy, research, and practice were discussed.

  2. Social support and mental health among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    This study is the first, to our knowledge, to evaluate the relationship between mental health and social support in a large, random sample of college students. A Web-based survey was administered at a large, public university, with 1,378 students completing the measures in this analysis (response rate = 57%). The results support our hypothesis that students with characteristics differing from most other students, such as minority race or ethnicity, international status, and low socioeconomic status, are at greater risk of social isolation. In addition, the authors found that students with lower quality social support, as measured by the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, were more likely to experience mental health problems, including a sixfold risk of depressive symptoms relative to students with high quality social support. These results may help administrators and health providers to identify more effectively the population of students at high risk for mental illness and develop effective interventions to address this significant and growing public health issue. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. FUNDRAISING IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Radović

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Fundrising is the kind of marketing strategy, which the main gool is to provide the money and the other resources. It is the moust important tasks of nonprofit organizacio( sport organiyation and the other organiyation which need money for development project. Fundraising is independent and sistematical way of compilation the financial resource and anather keind of help in nonprofit organization from the private persone, the enterprice, the associate ect.Fundraising enable the activity and realization projects. Aim of this working paper is to givs contibution these important problem of menagement, to explain it and apply it in sport. Today it we haven`t enought the financial resourceies, without activity to provide it, we will very quickly loss sympathy and support who could help as. Financial problems are present not only in the sport organization , but in the culture, social, eco, education and other organizations. Todey there is strong competition at the fundraising market. Sport has advantages in the mass actions frequently and in his places in the psyche and body development people in all of growth, rather then the another nonprofit organization. Fundraising provide a lot of many and create pozitive image in public environment

  4. Social management in the system of physical education and sports of employees of internal affairs of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babenko V.G.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The main forms, principles and methods of the physical training’s management of the Internal Affairs Agencies’s staff are considered. Reveals its consistency and conceptual approach to the mechanism of targeted and effective operation of the system under different conditions of the employees police. Determined that the system of physical training and sports of bodies and organs of internal affairs of Ukraine, except for departmental purposes, partly related to the overall social and cultural life of modern society, and the management of this system is social in nature and depends on the level of socialization of its top performers and other regional representatives. It is set that optimization of correction foresees subsequent purposeful realization of the planned complex of measures which answer certain terms and real possibilities of operating control the system.

  5. Social Networks, Interpersonal Social Support, and Health Outcomes: A Health Communication Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the development, impact, and several major research findings of studies in the area of social network support and health outcomes. The review focuses largely on the development of online social support networks and the ways in which they may interact with face-to-face support networks to influence physical and psychological health outcomes. The manuscript discusses this area, and it presents a research agenda for future work in this area from an Associate Editor’s pe...

  6. Expatriate support and success : A systematic review of organization-based sources of social support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laken, P.A.; van Engen, M.L.; van Veldhoven, M.J.P.M.; Paauwe, J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review empirical research on the relationship between organization-based social support and the success of international assignments (IAs). Design/methodology/approach Four search engines were used to obtain empirical studies relating organization-based social

  7. The Relationship Between Use of Social Network Sites, Online Social Support, and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Existing work on the effects of social network sites (SNS) on well-being has often stressed that SNS can help people gain social support from their online networks, which positively affects their well-being. However, the majority of studies in this area have been cross-sectional in nature and/or relied on student samples. Using data from six waves of a longitudinal study with a representative sample of Dutch Internet users, we first examined whether users and nonusers of SNS differ in online social support and well-being (as indicated by life satisfaction and stress). In a second step, we investigated in more detail how SNS use – more specifically, asking for advice and the number of strong ties on these SNS – are related to online social support, stress, and satisfaction with life. Overall, our results provide no evidence for SNS use and online social support affecting either stress or life satisfaction. SNS users reported more online social support than nonusers did, but also higher levels of stress; the two groups did not differ in overall life satisfaction. With regard to the underlying processes, we found positive cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between asking for advice on SNS and online social support, indicating that SNS can be an effective tool for receiving social support. However, online social support was not related to higher life satisfaction or reduced stress 6 months later; instead, it seems that SNS users with lower life satisfaction and/or higher stress seek more social support online by asking for advice on SNS. PMID:29147141

  8. The power of social connection and support in improving health: lessons from social support interventions with childbearing women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Small Rhonda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective Social support interventions have a somewhat chequered history. Despite evidence that social connection is associated with good health, efforts to implement interventions designed to increase social support have produced mixed results. The aim of this paper is to reflect on the relationship between social connectedness and good health, by examining social support interventions with mothers of young children and analysing how support was conceptualised, enacted and valued, in order to advance what we know about providing support to improve health. Context and approach First, we provide a brief recent history of social support interventions for mothers with young children and we critically examine what was intended by ‘social support’, who provided it and for which groups of mothers, how support was enacted and what was valued by women. Second, we examine the challenges and promise of lay social support approaches focused explicitly on companionship, and draw on experiences in two cluster randomised trials which aimed to improve the wellbeing of mothers. One trial involved a universal approach, providing befriending opportunities for all mothers in the first year after birth, and the other a targeted approach offering support from a ‘mentor mother’ to childbearing women experiencing intimate partner violence. Results Interventions providing social support to mothers have most often been directed to women seen as disadvantaged, or ‘at risk’. They have also most often been enacted by health professionals and have included strong elements of health education and/or information, almost always with a focus on improving parenting skills for better child health outcomes. Fewer have involved non-professional ‘supporters’, and only some have aimed explicitly to provide companionship or a listening ear, despite these aspects being what mothers receiving support have said they valued most. Our trial

  9. Social Support and Work Stress: A Mixed Method Analysis

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    Vânia Lúcia Pereira de Andrade

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Occupational stress and coping strategies have increasingly become the focus of research for their applied feature. The aim of this study was to investigate how social support has helped people deal with stressful situations in the workplace. In order to reach this aim an exploratory mixed method embedded research design was conducted. Study 1, quantitative, described the level of satisfaction with social support and perceived organizational support by employing a scale that summarized factors of the perceived organizational support. Study 2, a qualitative one, sought to describe the stressors in the workplace environment, to whom the workers resorted to, and the kind of perceived social support. The group interview script was based on the dimensions proposed by Folkman e Lazarus (1985 model. Fifty-one volunteer workers participated in the study. Results showed a lack of social support in the workplace: incivility of colleagues and managers, psychological contract breach and conflict of values. Investments in personal development that stimulate urbanity in organizations and a listening space for employees are suggested actions that can benefit affective dimensions of work.

  10. Is overprotection a different construct of social support?

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    Victoria Permuy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to contribute to a better definition of the overprotection construct. More specifically, it aims at establishing whether or not it can be considered just an excess of social support. To do this, two instruments, OPSA and UCLA-SSI, developed from different perspectives on the issue, were translated and adapted from English into Spanish. Analysis performed on a diverse sample of 436 subjects show a good reliability of scores obtained with the Spanish versions, as much on the OPSA test (α = .82 with the full format and α = .81 with the short one as on the two selected subscales of the UCLA-SSI test (α = .88 with Need/ Want Support subscale, and α = .90 with the Support Received subscale. The relationship among the different measurements was analyzed in a typical sample of 50 recent myocardial infarction patients, as usual in this field. Results suggest that overprotection differs both in quality and quantity from given social support, but it is however related to needed social support. This new finding seems to indicate that those individuals who are more in need of social support could indeed be the more overprotected ones. Clinical and educational implications of the results are discussed.

  11. Group Ties Protect Cognitive Health by Promoting Social Identification and Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Catherine; Cruwys, Tegan; Milne, Matilda; Kan, Chi-Hsin; Haslam, S Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Social relationships are protective of cognitive health as we age and recent findings show that social group ties (e.g., with community and peer groups) are especially important. The present research examines this relationship further to explore (a) the contribution of group, relative to interpersonal, ties and (b) underlying mechanism. Two cross-sectional survey studies were conducted. Study 1 was conducted online (N = 200) and Study 2 involved face-to-face interviews (N = 42). The findings confirmed group ties as a stronger predictor of cognitive health than individual ties. It also supported our proposed sequential mediation model suggesting that the benefits of group ties arise from their capacity to enhance a sense of shared social identification and this, in turn, provides the basis for effective social support. Both studies provided evidence consistent with claims that group ties were especially beneficial because they cultivated social identification that provided the foundation for social support. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. The management of social problems talk in a support group

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    Andrezza Gomes Peretti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of the health-disease process from a multifactorial perspective has allowed important transformations in the healthcare practices. In this article, we discuss the use of the support group as a resource for mental health care, analyzing how conversations about social issues are managed in this context. Based on contributions from the social constructionist movement, we analyzed the transcripts of the conversations developed in meetings of a support group offered to patients of a mental health outpatient clinic. The analysis of the process of meaning making indicates that the discourse of the social influence on mental health is not legitimized, due to a predominant individualistic discourse, which psychologizes care and is centered on the emotional analysis of the problems of the quotidian. We argue that this mode of management brings limits to the construction of the group as a device for promoting autonomy and encouraging the social transformation processes.

  13. [Social support and health: standpoints from the social and human sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesqui, Ana Maria; Barsaglini, Reni Aparecida

    2012-05-01

    This article analyses the themes and conceptual-theoretical approaches of the social support in the literature from important international journals about social sciences and medicine, and in from 1983 to 2005 are analyzed. 259 international and 57 national abstracts was reading for the identification and computing the relations of the social support with health/disease/care. A deeper conceptual analysis about social support and the theories of social science were reported in an intentional sample of 56 international and 18 national texts. The international literature is based on the social psychology, in the several trends of the sociology and of the political science and less in the anthropology. The national literature dialogues less with the psychosocial theories and more with the sociological and anthropological theories. In this latter literature the social support approaches are concerned with social network theories; reciprocity, exchanges and cultural values. It is concluded that different trends guide the conceptual-theoretical analyses of the social support, being the international literature older, wider, more diversified and empirical, but with scarce anthropological production. The national literature is more reflexive them empirical.

  14. Social Network Characteristics, Social Support, and Cigarette Smoking among Asian/Pacific Islander Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Fagan, Pebbles; Cassel, Kevin; Trinidad, Dennis R; Kaholokula, Joseph Keawe'aimoku; Herzog, Thaddeus A

    2016-06-01

    Cigarette smoking may be one of the factors contributing to the high levels of cancer-related mortality experienced by certain Asian/Pacific Islander (A/PI) subgroups (e.g., Native Hawaiian). Given the collectivist cultural orientation attributed to A/PI groups, social strategies are recommended for substance abuse or smoking cessation treatment among A/PI. However, research examining how social network characteristics and social support relate to smoking across A/PI subgroups has been lacking. This study investigated the associations between social network characteristics (e.g., size, composition), perceived social support, and recent cigarette use across Native Hawaiian, Filipino, and East Asian (e.g., Japanese, Chinese) young adults (18-35 year old). Cross-sectional, self-report data were collected from N = 435 participants (M age = 25.6, SD = 8.3; 61% women). Ethnic differences were found in a number of pathways linking social network characteristics, perceived social support, and cigarette smoking. Larger network size was strongly associated with higher perceived social support and lower recent cigarette smoking among Native Hawaiians but not Filipinos or East Asians. Higher perceived social support was associated with lower recent smoking among East Asians and Filipinos but not Native Hawaiians. Implications are discussed with regard to smoking prevention and cessation among A/PI. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  15. The effect of social networking sites on the relationship between perceived social support and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Matthew A; Walsh, Michael; Wattier, Kristina; Knigge, Ryan; Miller, Lindsey; Stevermer, Michalene; Fogas, Bruce S

    2016-12-30

    This study examined whether Social Networking Sites (SNSs) have a negative moderator effect on the established relationship between perceived social support and depression in psychiatric inpatients. Survey instruments assessing for depression, perceived social support, and SNS use, were filled out by 301 psychiatric inpatients. Additional data on age, gender, and primary psychiatric diagnosis were collected. A step-wise multiple regression analysis was performed to determine significant interactions. There was no significant interaction of SNS use on the relationship between perceived social support and depression when measured by Social Media Use Integration Scale or by hours of SNS use per day. There was a significant negative relationship between perceived social support and depression, and a significant positive relationship between hours of SNS use per day and depression, measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Limitations include a gender discrepancy among participants, generalizability, recall bias, and SNS measurement. This is the first study to look at SNS use and depression in psychiatric inpatients. SNS use did not affect perceived social support or the protective relationship between perceived social support and depression. Hours of SNS use per day were correlated with depression scores. Future studies between SNS use and depression should quantify daily SNS use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Support network and social support for children with special health care need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Araújo Barbosa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand and identify the support network and social support from the perspective of families of children with chronic conditions. Methods: a qualitative study, with content analysis of 134 records, followed by ten semi-structured interviews. Results: the analysis has revealed that the primary caregiver, the mother, participates in a network of limited support, only with the help of her husband, children, grandparents and the child´s godparents. They also have a social network through a multidisciplinary team, which in some cases is not effective. Conclusion: families have a deficient and limited support network and the demand for care rely only on the support of the husband, grandparents, children, and godparents. Social networking refers to the philanthropic institutions, while the aid of public service, basic health unit is basic.

  17. Du sport aux activités physiques de loisir : des formes culturelles et sociales bigarrées

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    Éric Dugas

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available L'espace ludique des formes sociales des pratiques physiques accepte maintes variations. Du jeu informel et libre aux activités physiques institutionnelles (les sports, plusieurs catégories de situations motrices, distinctes des unes des autres, jalonnent l'espace des jeux sportifs. Après avoir défini et délimité, dans un premier temps, les contours et la richesse de l'univers des pratiques physiques ludiques, nous essayons, dans un second temps de mettre au jour le type de pratiques qui coïncident le mieux aux aspirations des pratiquants du xxie siècle. On s'aperçoit actuellement que malgré l'hégémonie du sport au sein de l'espace médiatique et économique, il se dessine néanmoins une tendance forte : la prédominance d’activités physiques ludiques de plus en plus autocontrôlées qui laissent l'initiative aux pratiquants et dans lesquelles les institutions sportives ne sont plus totalement ou pas du tout maître du jeu.From sport to leisure physical activities: mixed cultural and social formsThe game space of physical activities' social forms accepts many variations. From informal and free games to institutional physical activities (sports, several motor situation categories, distinct from each other, punctuate the space of physical games. After having specified and delimited the contours and richness of the world of playful physical activities, we will try to bring to light the kind of practices which coincide best with the 21st century's players or sports (women. Currently, we can see that in spite of sport's hegemony within the media and the economic spheres, a strong tendency is becoming apparent: the predominance of more and more self-controlled playful physical activities, which leave the initiative to players and in which governing bodies are not totally or not at all in command any more.Del deporte a las actividades de ocio: una mezcolanza en las formas culturales y socialesEl espacio lúdico de las formas sociales de

  18. World war II veterans, social support, and veterans' associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, N; Robbins, I

    2001-05-01

    People use many different coping strategies to deal with their traumatic recollections. Twenty-five British World War II veterans were interviewed regarding the ways they used social support both during the war and in the years afterwards. The findings demonstrate that social support is used in fundamentally different ways. During the war comradeship was particularly important and even fifty years after the war comrades are still a valuable resource for discussing war experiences, and dealing with the emotional content of traumatic recollections. Veterans rely on wives and families to help deal with the more physical and practical elements of coping, but tend not to discuss their traumatic memories with them. The findings show that social support is an important lifelong coping strategy for World War II veterans.

  19. Associations Between Social Support and Postpartum Depression in Puerperal Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Alvarenga

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the relationship between social support and maternal depression in puerperal mothers in the first month postpartum. Participants were 77 puerperal mothers divided into two groups. The clinical group comprised 39 mothers with considerable levels of depressive symptomatology according to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. The non-clinical group comprised mothers with a minimum level according to the BDI. Mothers also completed the Medical Outcomes Study social support scale. Significant differences were found between the two groups on all factors of the MOS social support scale, with the clinical group scoring lower than the non-clinical group on all of them, showing consistency with other literature findings.

  20. Age Differences in Cancer Treatment Decision Making and Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Palmer-Wackerly, Angela L; Dailey, Phokeng M; Wojno, Julianne C; Krieger, Janice L

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the decision-making (DM) styles of younger (18-39 years), middle-aged (40-59 years), and older (≥60 years) cancer survivors, the type and role of social support, and patient satisfaction with cancer treatment DM. Adult cancer survivors ( N = 604) were surveyed using Qualtrics online software. Older adults reported significantly lower influence of support on DM than younger adults. The most common DM style for the age groups was collaborative DM with their doctors. Younger age was a significant predictor of independent ( p social support in cancer treatment DM, older adults were more satisfied with their DM than younger and middle-aged adults. Health care workers should be aware of different DM styles and influence of social networks to help facilitate optimal patient DM and satisfaction.

  1. Social Support, Parenting, and Social Emotional Development in Young Mexican and Dominican American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Villar, Maria; Huang, Keng-Yen; Calzada, Esther J

    2017-08-01

    This study focused on social support and its association with child developmental outcomes, indirectly through parenting practices, in families of 4-5 year old Latino children. Data were collected from mothers and teachers of 610 Mexican American (MA) and Dominican American (DA) children. Mothers reported on perceived social support, parenting practices and children's problem and adaptive behavior functioning at home, and teachers reported on mothers' parent involvement and children's problem and adaptive behavior functioning in the classroom. Results showed that support received from family was higher than support received from school networks for both ethnic groups. Moreover, familial support was associated with child behavior, mediated by positive parenting practices, whereas support from school networks was not associated with child outcomes. During early childhood, social support from family members may be an important protective factor that can promote positive behavioral functioning among Latino children.

  2. Dyadic dynamics of perceived social support in couples facing infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, M V; Peterson, B D; Almeida, V; Mesquita-Guimarães, J; Costa, M E

    2014-01-01

    Is perceived social support from partner, family, and friends associated with increased infertility-related stress? While men's perceived support did not seem to influence their partners' stress, women's perceptions of spousal and familial support can affect the way men deal with the challenge of infertility. Previous studies showed that low levels of social support are associated with poor psychosocial adjustment and treatment termination in women and men. Studies examining the impact of social support using the couple as unit of analysis are lacking. A cross-sectional sample of 613 Portuguese patients participated in the research, online over a 3-month period, and in a public fertility clinic over 11 months. The final sample comprised 213 married or cohabiting couples (191 from the fertility clinic) who were actively attempting to have a child, were seeking infertility treatment and had not undergone previous preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Perceived social support was assessed through the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and infertility-related stress was assessed with the fertility problem inventory. Hypotheses were tested by applying the actor-partner interdependence model using structural equation modeling. Couples had been living together for an average (±SD) of 6 ± 3.5 years, and attempting a pregnancy for 3.8 ± 2.6 years. Nearly half of the couples had undergone infertility treatment (41.3%). Infertility stress was found to be associated with low family support for women (β = -0.27, P = .003), and low partner support for both men (β = -0.29, P = .001) and women (β = -0.45, P = .006). Both women and men's perceived friend support were not significantly related to male or female infertility stress. Men infertility stress was also associated with their partners low levels of partner (β = -0.24, P = .049) and family support (β = -0.23, P perception of infertility-specific supportive behaviors was not assessed and differential

  3. Mothers' group participation: associations with social capital, social support and mental well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Cecily; Bremner, Alexandra; Fisher, Colleen; Howat, Peter; Wood, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationships between participation in mothers' groups and social capital, social support and mental well-being measures for mothers whose oldest child was 0-5 years. Evaluations of facilitated mothers' groups have found positive benefits for information sharing and support. Mothers' groups often continue as parent-led groups; however, little is known about the potential benefits of ongoing participation compared with non-participation. Cross-sectional survey. Data were collected through a survey from March 2013-January 2014 in Perth, Western Australia. The data from a subgroup of mothers (N = 313) whose oldest child was 0-5 years of age were analysed using multivariable regression. Participation in mothers' groups in the previous 12 months was investigated for associations with social capital {Neighbourhood Cohesion Index (NCI); Families, Social Capital and Citizenship Survey (FSCCS) and Reciprocity}; social support {Medical Outcomes Study-Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS) and Parent Support Outside Home Scale (PSOHS)}; and mental well-being {Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (WEMWBS)}. Participation was measured as three groups - locally, outside area of residence and non-participation. Mothers who participated in mothers' groups locally scored significantly higher than those who had not participated in mothers' group for 'social capital' (NCI, FSCCS, Reciprocity), 'social support' (MOS-SSS, PSOHS) and 'mental well-being' (WEMWBS). Mothers who participated in mothers' group outside the area scored significantly higher than those who had not participated in mothers' groups for one measure of 'social support' (PSOHS). Participation in mothers' group locally may provide support and social capital benefits for mothers of children aged 0-5 years, which may influence mental well-being. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. FAMILY SOCIAL SUPPORT REDUCES POST JUDEGEMENTAL STRESS IN TEENAGERS

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    Nursalam Nursalam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Justicial proceeding is able to make any stress or anxiety for everyone that through on it, especially if the process happens on teenagers. The stressor which can make stress in justicial proceeding are the justicial proceeding that doesn’t go along with UU RI No. 3 tahun 1997, i. e. children justicial process, fearness of parents and friend lost, worried about his future, and new neighborhood that is not appropriate with the child’s psychology development. The presence of family is very important to give a social support to the arrested teenagers.The objective of this study was to know the correlation between family social support and post judegement stress in teenagers and  the factors of stress in teenagers. Method: This study use Cross Sectional design. Population had taken from teenagers from 13 until 17 years old. Sample was comprised in to 12 individuals who fit with the inclusion criteria. The independent variable in this study was family social support and factors of stress in teenagers, and the dependent variable was post judgement stress in teenagers. Data was collected by  measurement using Mood and Feeling Questionnaire (MFQ for stress, questionnaire of family social support, and interviewed. They were analyzed by Spearman’s test with significance level  α<0.05 and content analysis for interview result. Result: The result showed that there is a correlation between family social support and post judgement stress in teenagers with significance level p=0.013. Analysis: It means, Content analysis’ results showed that the factors which related with stress in teenagers are environment, caring type, interfamily member’s relationship, bad event, and characteristic of children. Discussion: Higher family social support makes  teenagers have higher self esteem and more optimistic view, so the teenagers will able to face their problem.

  5. Older marijuana users: Life stressors and perceived social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Namkee G; DiNitto, Diana M; Marti, C Nathan

    2016-12-01

    Given increasing numbers of older-adult marijuana users, this study examined the association of marijuana use and marijuana use disorder with life stressors and perceived social support in the 50+ age group. Data came from the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (N=14,715 respondents aged 50+). Life stressors were measured with 12 items related to interpersonal, legal, and financial problems and being a crime victim. Perceived social support was measured with the 12-item Interpersonal Support Evaluation List. Using principal component analysis (PCA), we identified four components of life stressors. Linear regression analyses was used to test associations of past-year marijuana use and use disorder with PCA scores of each component and perceived social support. Of the 50+ age group, 3.89% were past-year marijuana users and 0.68% had marijuana use disorder. Marijuana users, especially those with marijuana use disorder (17.54% of past-year users), had high rates of mental and other substance use disorders. Controlling for other potential risk factors for stress, including health status and mental and other substance use disorders, marijuana use and use disorder were still significantly associated with more life stressors and lower perceived social support, possibly from low levels of social integration. A substantial proportion of older-adult marijuana users need help with mental health and substance use problems. Further examination of older marijuana users' life stressors and social support networks may aid in developing more systematic intervention strategies to address needs and reduce marijuana use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychiatry: life events and social support in late life depression

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    Clóvis Alexandrino-Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the association of life events and social support in the broadly defined category of depression in late life. INTRODUCTION: Negative life events and lack of social support are associated with depression in the elderly. Currently, there are limited studies examining the association between life events, social support and late-life depression in Brazil. METHODS: We estimated the frequency of late-life depression within a household community sample of 367 subjects aged 60 years or greater with associated factors. ''Old age symptomatic depression'' was defined using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 1.1 tool. This diagnostic category included only late-life symptoms and consisted of the diagnoses of depression and dysthymia as well as a subsyndromal definition of depression, termed ''late subthreshold depression''. Social support and life events were assessed using the Comprehensive Assessment and Referral Evaluation (SHORT-CARE inventory. RESULTS: ''Old age symptomatic depression'' occurred in 18.8% of the patients in the tested sample. In univariate analyses, this condition was associated with female gender, lifetime anxiety disorder and living alone. In multivariate models, ''old age symptomatic depression'' was associated with a perceived lack of social support in men and life events in women. DISCUSSION: Social support and life events were determined to be associated with late-life depression, but it is important to keep in mind the differences between genders. Also, further exploration of the role of lifetime anxiety disorder in late-life depression may be of future importance. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that this study helps to provide insight into the role of psychosocial factors in late-life depression.

  7. The medical social centres in support of Roma in Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrioti, Despena; Kotrotsou, Christina; Tsakatara, Vanta

    2013-01-01

    Roma people form the largest ethnic-minority group in Europe. They account for around 10 to 12 million people, and they face racism, discrimination and social exclusion in most countries. The Roma population of Greece currently numbers around 250 000 individuals. They have Greek nationality...... and enjoy the same rights, privileges and responsibilities as any other Greek citizens. Nevertheless, Roma in Greece face multiple inequalities and social exclusion in terms of housing, employment, education, and health and social services. In this report we present the outcome of a bestpractice initiative....... Medical social centres operate in 33 Roma settlements all over the country. These centres provide vaccination, health promotion, disease prevention and health education services, as well as support in issuing documents and making appointments with health and social services. We recommend that the National...

  8. Social Support and Personal Agency in At-Risk Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Rodrigo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated: a mothers´ use and satisfaction with informal and formal supports in at-risk psychosocial contexts, and b the relationships between satisfaction with help and the mothers´ perception of their role (personal agency. Self-report data about the use and satisfaction with sources of help, and levels of internal control, self-efficacy, couple agreement, role difficulty and motivation for change were obtained from 519 mothers referred by Social Services and 519 non-referred mothers. Results indicated that at-risk mothers relied less upon close informal support and more on formal support than non atrisk mothers. They were also more satisfied with the formal sources of support and had lower levels of personal agency. There were beneficial effects of satisfaction with informal help and school support on several aspects of personal agency for both groups. However, satisfaction with school and social services support had a detrimental effect on couple agreement in the at-risk group. Implications of the results for providing social support to at-risk families are discussed.

  9. Sport as Social Formation and Specialist Education: Discursive and Ritualistic Aspects of Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agergaard, Sine

    2006-01-01

    This article is based on ethnographic fieldwork carried out at two Danish sports colleges that aim to educate voluntary leaders and elite coaches respectively. Methodologically, a model of analysis is built through supplementing Foucault's concept 'orders of discourse" with Robert Wuthnow's studies of not only written and spoken but also…

  10. Social Reproduction of Gender Hierarchies in Sports through Schooling in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Hazir; Skelton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines a neglected aspect of gender equality debate--how knowledge about gender and sports is organized in school textbooks in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK). It examines the contradictions that exist between government rhetoric of eliminating gender biases from school textbooks and the prevalence of the same in the current school…

  11. Influence of Occupational Socialization on Two Preservice Teachers' Interpretation and Delivery of the Sport Education Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stran, Margaret; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) examine how two preservice teachers (PTs) interpreted and delivered the sport education (SE) model during their student teaching and (b) discover factors that led to the their interpreting and delivering the model in the ways they did. The theoretical framework used to guide data collection and analysis was…

  12. Influence of Caring Youth Sport Contexts on Efficacy-Related Beliefs and Social Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gano-Overway, Lori A.; Newton, Maria; Magyar, T. Michelle; Fry, Mary D.; Kim, Mi-Sook; Guivernau, Marta R.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding what factors influence positive youth development has been advocated by youth development researchers (P. L. Benson, 2006; J. S. Eccles & J. A. Gootman, 2002). Consequently, the purpose of this study was to examine whether perceptions of a caring youth sport context influenced prosocial and antisocial behavior through…

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GOAL-ORIENTATIONS AND SPORT COMMITMENT AMONG ATHLETES

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    Noshin Benar.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present study was exploring of relationship between goal-orientations and sport commitment among athletes and comparison of goal-orientations and sport commitment and their constructs based on gender and type of sports. Participants were 108 Iranian athlete (40 female and 68 male, who responded to Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (T.E.O.S.Q and Sport Commitment Model (SCM questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient, Independent-Samples t-test, and One-way ANOVA at P=0.05. The findings indicated that there were positively and significantly association between constructs, including sport enjoyment, personal investment, social constraints, involvement opportunities, and social support, whereas, involvement alternatives and task-orientation had negatively and significantly association with sport commitment. Also, team and open-skilled sport athletes had sport commitment and ego-orientation more than individual and closed-skilled sport athletes. As well as, female's athletes had sport enjoyment and social support more than male's athletes. It is possible that task-oriented players are elite and expert athletes, because extend and develop their fundamental skills in one's sport by their task-orientate characteristic, and probably these players with these characteristics tendency to turnover until experience more situations. Thus, these players had a less sport commitment than amateur athletes. Also, gender and type of sport differences can be results of individual differences and nature of sports skills. Implications for goal-orientations and sport commitment and their impacts on athletes as well as future research directions are further discussed.

  14. Sports and Technology. Resources in Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Fred W.

    1993-01-01

    Technology is making a significant impact in all areas of sports and recreation. New equipment and computer training methods in spectator sports have had a major social and economic impact, and individual sports have reaped the benefits of technology. (JOW)

  15. Homophobia in physical education and sport: the role of physical/sporting identity and attributes, authoritarian aggression, and social dominance orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kerry S; Shovelton, Heather; Latner, Janet D

    2013-01-01

    We examined levels of, and reasons for, anti-gay and anti-lesbian prejudice (homophobia) in pre-service physical education (PE) and non-physical education (non-PE) university students. Participants (N = 409; 66% female; N = 199 pre-service physical educators) completed questionnaires assessing anti-gay and lesbian prejudice, authoritarianism, social dominance orientation (SDO), physical/athletic identity and self-concept, and physical attributes. ANCOVAs revealed that PE students had higher levels of anti-gay (p = .004) and lesbian prejudice than non-PE students (p = .008), respectively. Males reported greater anti-gay prejudice (p Authoritarian aggression was positively associated with greater anti-gay (β = .49) and lesbian prejudice (β = .37) among male participants. Among females, higher authoritarian aggression and SDO was associated with greater anti-gay (β = .34 and β = .25, respectively) and lesbian (β = .26 and β = .16, respectively) prejudice. The physical identity-related constructs of athletic self-concept (β = .-15) and perceived upper body strength (β = .39) were associated with anti-gay attitudes among male participants. Physical attractiveness (β = -.29) and upper body strength (β = .29) were also associated with male participants' anti-lesbian prejudice. Regression analyses showed that the differences between PE and non-PE students in anti-gay and lesbian prejudice were largely mediated by authoritarianism and SDO. The present study is the first to examine the relationship between investment in physical/sporting identity and attributes and anti-gay and lesbian prejudice in PE/sport participants. In the present sample, anti-gay and lesbian prejudice was greater in pre-service PE students than non-PE students, but these differences appear to be explained by differences in conservative ideological traits. Additionally, physical identity and athletic attributes based around masculine

  16. Studying the intended uses of the social networks by the students of the department of physical education and sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eynur Baybars Recep

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to study the intended uses of the social networks by the students of the Department of Physical Education and Sport (DPES. A total of 407 DPES students have been participated into the research; 25,6% of them were women and 74.4% were men. The data collection tool used for the study was the Scale for the Intended Uses of the Social Networks. With regard to the research statistics, the independent variable t-test and ANOVA have been used; and in order to evaluate the diversity of the subgroups, Bonferroni and Tamhane (α=0,05 have been used. The analysis has revealed that on the basis of the social networking sites for which the males show a higher usage tendency according to the gender variable (p0,05. It has been seen that the Twitter users show a higher tendency in terms of the research and content subdimensions (p<0,05; and that the Instagram and other social network users show a higher tendency in terms of keeping in touch and content sharing (p<0,05. The research has revealed that the intended social network uses by the students arises mostly from the social network services, besides certain cultural influence.

  17. Child maltreatment, bullying in school and social support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    supportive significant others have developed resilience with a strengthened self. The study confirms that social support for a great many of the young adults reduces the risk of low self-esteem and suicidal ideations even when they have experienced poor parenting with the destructiveness of psychological...... maltreatment and sexual abuse. While being offer for bullying increases the risk of suicidal thoughts and low self-esteem, when accounted for other risk factors....

  18. Some Sports Managers' Views about Values Education through Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Velittin; Erdeveciler, Övünç

    2017-01-01

    The indirect aim of this study is to ensure that sports and participation in sports are seen as new tools for values education. From this indirect goal, it was aimed to analyse the views of some Amateur Sports Club managers and supporters who were supposed to directly contribute to sports and the athletes about values education. The study was…

  19. Differences in Health and Social Support between Homeless Men and Women Entering Permanent Supportive Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winetrobe, Hailey; Wenzel, Suzanne; Rhoades, Harmony; Henwood, Benjamin; Rice, Eric; Harris, Taylor

    Permanent supportive housing (PSH) is the leading intervention to end chronic homelessness. Little is known, however, about gender differences, including potential disparities in physical and mental health and social support, that might inform services available through PSH. This study included 421 homeless adults, at least 39 years old, English- or Spanish-speaking, who were moving into PSH through 26 different agencies in the Los Angeles area. Compared with men entering PSH, homeless women (28% of the sample) were younger (p social networks (Coefficient, 0.79, p social support among homeless adults moving into PSH. PSH cannot be a one-size-fits-all approach. Supportive services within housing should be tailored based on gender and other individual needs. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Social relationships and social support among post-war youth in Northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nutte, Leen; Okello, James; Derluyn, Ilse

    2017-08-01

    Although social relationships and social support are salient factors for post-war adolescents' psychosocial coping and adjustment, there is only limited information regarding war-affected adolescents' views on social support and the relationships within which social support is provided. This study therefore explored both elements among a clinical sample of 20 adolescents living in post-war Northern Uganda. Following Braun and Clarke's thematic analysis, we found a prominent role of the biological mother and other primary biological family members in the upbringing of our participants. Spiritual and material support were perceived to be the most important type of support, respectively, while the adolescents were growing up and in their current lives. These findings provide support for the perception that caregiving systems are adaptable to particular sociocultural contexts. Further, the importance of particular functions of social support could signify a potentially selective buffering effect of these functions in adverse contexts. Because of the importance of the primary biological family and the salient role of parent-child relationships in the face of adversity, future research needs to focus on this particular kind of social relationship in contexts of prolonged collective violence. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  1. The relation of social isolation, loneliness, and social support to disease outcomes among the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaka, Joe; Thompson, Sharon; Palacios, Rebecca

    2006-06-01

    This study examined relations between social isolation, loneliness, and social support to health outcomes in a sample of New Mexico seniors. We used random-digit dialing to obtain a random sample of 755 southern New Mexico seniors. Participants answered questions pertaining to demographics, social isolation and loneliness, social support, and disease diagnosis including diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, liver disease, arthritis, emphysema, tuberculosis, kidney disease, cancer, asthma, and stroke. The sample allowed for comparison of Caucasian and Hispanic participants. Correlational and logistic analyses indicated that belongingness support related most consistently to health outcomes. Ethnic subgroup analysis revealed similarities and differences in the pattern of associations among the predictor and outcome variables. The results demonstrate the importance of social variables for predicting disease outcomes in the elderly and across ethnic groups.

  2. Breastfeeding social marketing: lessons learned from USDA's "Loving Support" campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Social marketing involves the application of commercial marketing principles to advance the public good. Social marketing calls for much more than health communications campaigns. It involves four interrelated tasks: audience benefit, target behavior, essence (brand, relevance, positioning), and developing the "4Ps" (product, price, place, promotion) marketing mix. The ongoing U.S. Department of Agriculture "Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work" campaign was launched in 1997 based on social marketing principles to increase breastfeeding initiation rates and breastfeeding duration among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) participants. Since then there have been improvements in breastfeeding duration in the country, and the majority of WIC women now initiate breastfeeding. Breastfeeding in public places is still not well accepted by society at large, and any and exclusive breastfeeding durations remain exceedingly low. Lessons learned from "Loving Support" and other campaigns indicate that it is important to design social marketing campaigns to target the influential societal forces (e.g., family and friends, healthcare providers, employers, formula industry, legislators) that affect women's decision and ability to breastfeed for the recommended amount of time. This will require formative research that applies the social-ecological model to different population segments, taking and identifying the right incentives to nudge more women to breastfeed for longer. Any new breastfeeding campaign needs to understand and take into account the information acquisition preferences of the target audiences. The vast majority of WIC women have mobile devices and are accessing social media. The Brazilian experience indicates that making breastfeeding the social norm can be done with a solid social marketing strategy. This is consistent with the recently released "Six Steps to Achieve Breastfeeding Goals for WIC Clinics," which identifies

  3. Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Supportive Art and Sport Interventions on Bam Earthquake Related Post Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Children: A Field Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Joshaghani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: "n "nThe main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of psychological therapies and art/sport supportive interventions separately,and in combination on post traumatic stress symptoms in children and compare them with a control group . "nMethods: In a field trial, we evaluated the efficacy of group behavioral therapy, art and sport supportive interventions in Bam earthquake children survivors with PTSD symptoms and compared it with a control group. Before and after interventions we evaluated the PTSD symptoms using K-SADS-PL semi-structural interview for each group and compared them using appropriate statistical methods. "nResults: The participants were 200 individuals who were randomized in four groups according to an intervention program including: Group behavioral therapy; Group behavioral therapy plus art and sport interventions; Art and sport interventions; and control group. During the interventions, 39 individuals were excluded. None of the participants had severed PTSD or other psychiatry disorders that needed pharmacological interventions. In interventional groups, the reduction of total PTSD symptoms and the symptoms of re-experience, avoidance and hyper arousal was not statistically significant. However, in the control group, the PTSD symptoms increased during the study which was statistically significant. "nConclusion: Group behavior therapy and supportive interventions (art and sport may have preventive effects on PTSD symptoms.

  4. Religiosity, Social Support, and Life Satisfaction among Elderly Korean Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisung; Roh, Soonhee; Yeo, Younsook

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The present study tested Smith's (2003. Theorizing religious effects among American adolescents. "Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 42", 17-30. doi:10.1111/1468-5906.t01-1-00158) theory of religious effects to explore the relationship of religiosity, social support, and life satisfaction among elderly Korean…

  5. Studying International Students: Adjustment Issues and Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lijuan

    This study investigated international student adjustment issues and needed social support. Data were obtained from individual interviews with 10 international students at The Ohio State University. Results indicate that international students experience significant problems in their coping with U.S. education, cultural differences, and language…

  6. The Arab Council for the Social Sciences: Support for Institutional ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Funding will enable the organization to deliver on its mandate of building a strong network of social scientists in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. IDRC support to ACSS will be focused on: -ACSS's flagship research program, "Producing the Public in Arab Societies: Participation, Spaces, Media," which aims ...

  7. Life Events, Social Support, and Immune Response in Elderly Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, William Alex; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated effects of recent life events, psychological adjustment, and social support on lymphocyte count among 192 older adults. For males, recent sexual dysfunction lowered lymphocyte count, whereas psychological adjustment and percentage kin in intimate network elevated it. For females, family or legal problems elevated count as did frequent…

  8. Institute of Social Studies Trust (ISST) : Institutional Support | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC supported an institutional assessment of the Institute for Social Studies Trust (ISST) under project 103394. This project will allow ISST to address certain weaknesses in the area of information technology and related staff training, and publication and dissemination of research results. It will also enable ISST to design ...

  9. Perceived Social Support and Students' Life Satisfaction among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their academic performance and total wellbeing. However, Tumkaya (2008) noted that students usually feel unsatisfied with their expectations about the university life or new environment where they find themselves. To understand the influence of perceived social support on students'satisfaction with life, the study adopted ...

  10. Social Support and Self-Esteem in Unemployed University Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackovic-Grgin, Katica; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the relationships between length of unemployment time, self-esteem and general life satisfaction of university graduates (n=98). Also examined the function of social support during the period of unemployment. Results indicated length of unemployment, contrary to previous findings, was not related to self-esteem and general life…

  11. Social Support and Occupational Stress among University Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosio, Saharay E.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational stress creates a negative impact both at the microlevel (i.e., individuals) and at the macrolevel (i.e., organization). This study investigated the role of protective factors of social support and religiosity on occupational stress among university employees. The study used data collected from participants ( N = 72) in a private…

  12. Caregiving and Social Support in Two Illness Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Deborah J.; Hooker, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Examines whether spouse caregivers of people either with noncognitive disorders (Parkinson's disease) or cognitive disorders (Alzheimer's disease) differed in their use and perception of social support resources. Results indicate that caregivers of spouses diagnosed with cognitive disorders were older, had fewer children, and had fewer financial…

  13. Adaptation of the multidimensional scale of perceived social support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) was developed in the USA. The adequacy of its use in Uganda to guarantee its reliability and validity has not been ascertained. Aim: Thus the aim of the present study was to adapt the MSPSS scale by testing the validity and reliability of the ...

  14. Knee osteoarthritis and perceived social support amongst patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease affecting the lives of patients and their families, with the family characteristics moderating the illness course. The perceived social support received by a patient helps in determining the health and functionality of the patient. Methods: A cross-sectional study was ...

  15. Subjective Quality of Life and Perceived Adequacy of Social Support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One such major concern pertains to the very general experiences of life of the elderly and associated factors. The purpose of this study was then to specifically assess the subjective quality of life and perceived adequacy of social support and the possible socio-demographic factors making differences in quality of life.

  16. Supporting Social Interaction in Intelligent Competence Development Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sereno, Bertrand; Boursinou, Eleni; Maxwell, Katrina; Angehrn, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Sereno, B., Boursinou, E., Maxwell, K., & Angehrn, A. A. (2007). Supporting Social Interaction in Intelligent Competence Development Systems. In D. Griffiths, R. Koper & O. Liber (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd TENCompetence Open Workshop (pp. 29-35). January, 11-12, 2007, Manchester, United Kingdom.

  17. Lesbian Friendships: An Exploration of Lesbian Social Support Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degges-White, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Lesbians may face unique challenges when building friendships. The intersection of culturally sanctioned discrimination and familial rejection may intensify the role friendships play for lesbians and the development of social support networks. The author discusses existing research and qualitative findings and provides suggestions for counselors…

  18. Perceived Social Support Predicts Increased Conscientiousness During Older Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Patrick L.; Payne, Brennan R.; Jackson, Joshua J.; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A. L.; Roberts, Brent W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined whether perceived social support predicted adaptive personality change in older adulthood, focusing on the trait of conscientiousness. We tested this hypothesis both at the broad domain level and with respect to the specific lower order facets that comprise conscientiousness: order, self-control, industriousness, responsibility, and traditionalism.

  19. Knee osteoarthritis and perceived social support amongst patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temitope Ilori

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease affecting the lives of patients and their families, with the family characteristics moderating the illness course. The perceived social support received by a patient helps in determining the health and functionality of the patient. Methods: A cross-sectional ...

  20. Adolescent Fathers' Parenting Stress, Social Support, and Involvement with Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jay; Bernd, Elisa; Whiteman, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between concurrent measures of adolescent fathers' parenting stress, social support, and fathers' care-giving involvement with the 3-month-old infant, controlling for fathers' prenatal involvement. The study sample consisted of 50 teenage father-mother dyads. Findings from multivariate regression…

  1. Hardiness, sensation seeking, optimism and social support as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the extent to which hardiness, sensation seeking, optimism and social support predicts stress tolerance among private secondary school teachers in Lagos State, Nigeria. Using an ex post-facto design, 272 teachers (123 males; 149 females) were selected from 8 privates secondary schools in Lagos ...

  2. Social support and coping in adults with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Ramkisson

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Social support is important in helping the patient with diabetes cope with the disease and to improve adherence to treatment. Health care providers should take cognisance of psychosocial factors in the treatment regime of the patient. Family members should be educated about diabetes, the importance of adherence and long-term complications of the disease.

  3. Social Support at a Sufi Lodge in Punjab, Parkistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Uzma; Lund-Thomsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the various types of social support – informational, instrumenmental, and emotional/psychological help – that are provided at a Sufi lodge in southern Punjab, Pakistan. We argue that the lodge has become an important factor in securing the well-being of individuals...

  4. Gender Differences in Self-Esteem and Perceived Social Support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined gender differences in self esteem and perceived social support of street children in Ibadan, Nigeria. A survey research design was employed where the participants were purposively sampled in the study. One hundred and forty eight (N=148) children of the street comprising of 129 males and 19 females ...

  5. Additional Support Needs Reforms and Social Justice in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Sheila; Stead, Joan; Weedon, Elisabet; Wright, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    New additional support-needs legislation in Scotland sought to recognise the way in which poverty, as well as individual impairment, contribute to the creation of children's difficulties in learning. As well as identifying a wider range of needs, the legislation sought to provide parents, irrespective of social background, with more powerful means…

  6. The Socially Supportive Functions of Religion and Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Social support has been shown to be a significant protective factor in the lives of adolescents and has been linked to numerous health and psychological outcomes. Spirituality and religion have also been demonstrated to have similar effects on a host of outcomes. The current study further analyzed the link between these two constructs from a…

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Motivation, Social Support, Alienation from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined tenth grade students' motivation, social support, alienation from school and their ... motivation. Extrinsic motivation is so called because it is external to the learning activity itself. It is usually provided by incentives outside the activity or the task. It is not artificial; ... that ultimately leads students to leave.

  8. Influence of Social Support and Caregivers' Attitude on Depression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of social support and caregiver's attitude on depression among VVF patients. Method: The survey method was used. The instruments used for data collection were the Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) and two other scales developed by the researchers. These were ...

  9. Blogging for Information Management, Learning, and Social Support during Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Samuel K. W.; Kwan, Alvin C. M.; Warning, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The functions and possibilities afforded by blogging have been suggested to be relevant to learning and information management. Its increasing use in the business and education sectors is documented, but currently its use in professional education or internship is limited. The social nature of blogging appears to support the applicability of blogs…

  10. Work Stress Adaptation: Roles of Gender, Social Support and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Workers in Nigeria are faced with many stress factors such as work-related, domestic, after job, age or retirement problem to cope with or managed. In view of this, the present study examined the effects of gender, social support and personality (Type A and Type B) on work stress adaptation. Using random and accidental ...

  11. Coping, family social support, and psychological symptoms among student veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Daniel H; Riggs, Shelley A; Ruggero, Camilo

    2015-04-01

    With rising numbers of student veterans on today's college campuses, multicultural competence in college counseling centers increasingly includes an understanding of military culture and its relation to the psychological health and functioning of student veterans. Research on interpersonal and intrapersonal factors associated with college student veterans' mental health is scarce. The current study examines the contributions of coping style and family social support on symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress in a student veteran sample. We also tested the moderating role of family social support in the relationship between coping style and psychological symptoms. Data from 136 student veterans were analyzed by using path analysis. Results revealed that avoidant coping and family social support significantly predicted depressive and anxiety symptoms. Avoidant coping also significantly predicted posttraumatic stress symptoms. In addition, findings indicated that family social support moderated the relationship between problem-focused coping and depression, as well as between avoidant coping and symptoms of anxiety and depression but not posttraumatic stress. Implications of results for college and university counselors are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Institutional Support: Centre for Economic and Social Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Institutional Support: Centre for Economic and Social Research, Education and Documentation (Burkina Faso). The Centre d'études de documentation et de recherches ... anticipated GrowInclusive Platform now under construction. IDRC partner the World Economic Forum is building a hub for inclusive growth solutions.

  13. Institute of Social Studies Trust (ISST) : Institutional Support | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC supported an institutional assessment of the Institute for Social Studies Trust (ISST) under project 103394. This project will allow ISST to address certain ... innovations to improve lives and livelihoods. Five world-class research teams are working to develop vaccines for neglected livestock diseases in the Global South.

  14. Stress, social support and psychosomatic symptoms in a deprived neighbourhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bancila, Delia; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard; Kronborg Bak, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    From a transactional perspective on stress, the study aimed to examine if the relationships of social support with perceived stress and psychosomatic symptoms are equivalent in deprived and wealthier neighbourhoods. Cross-sectional data were randomly collected from 2906 inhabitants in a deprived...... neighbourhood (851) and wealthier communities (2055), in Esbjerg, Denmark. A model that included psychosomatic symptoms as outcome, and daily worries, economic deprivation, perceived stress and social support as predictors was tested with structural equation modelling in two-group analyses. The findings showed...... significant differences (D2 (6)¼16.66, p.¼0.011) between neighbourhoods, and the fit statistics (CFI¼0.930, RMSEA¼0.034, R2¼0.48) showed good fit. Under an increased perceived stress’ effect, the social support’s impact on psychosomatic symptoms decreased in the deprived neighbourhood compared with the other...

  15. [Social network, social support and feeding habits of infants in their fourth month of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Caroline Maria da Costa; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Hasselmann, Maria Helena

    2013-02-01

    The scope of this study was to investigate the association between the social network, social support and the feeding habits of infants in their fourth month of life. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 294 children selected at 4 Primary Health Care Units in Rio de Janeiro/ Brazil. A 24-hour dietary recall was applied to the mothers to evaluate the feeding habits. Questions related to the number of people upon whom the woman can rely were asked as well as their participation in social activities to measure the social network. The scale in the Medical Outcomes Study was used to measure social support. The analysis was based on multinomial logistic regression models. Most of the infants (84%) received breast milk, but only 16% were exclusively breastfed. Children whose mothers had a small number of relatives to rely on and with low social support were more likely to be bottle-fed rather than exclusively breastfed. The need to integrate members of the social network of the woman during pre-natal care, birth and the after birth period should be encouraged, in such a way that social support can serve the mother's requirements, contributing to exclusive breastfeeding.

  16. Effects of Perceived Social Support and Psychological Resilience on Social Media Addiction among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Okan; Tas, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    This research investigated the effects of perceived social support and psychological resilience on social media addiction among university students. The research group was composed of 503 university students. The ages of participant students varied between 17 and 31 years old. 340 (67.6%) of the participants are female and 163 (32.4%) of them are…

  17. Social Skills and Depressive Symptoms across Adolescence: Social Support as a Mediator in Girls versus Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Wendy; Karevold, Evalill; Roysamb, Espen; Gustavson, Kristin; Mathiesen, Kristin S.

    2013-01-01

    The current population-based study of Norwegian adolescents examined gender-specific patterns in the prospective association between social skills in early adolescence (age 12.5; n = 566) and changes in depressive symptoms from early to late adolescence (age 16.5; n = 375). Further, a potential mediation effect of social support (from peers,…

  18. Young elite athletes and social support: coping with competitive and organizational stress in "Olympic" competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, E; Roberts, G C

    2010-08-01

    Elite adolescent sport is a relatively unexplored research field. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how the Norwegian Olympic Youth Team (N=29) experienced competitive and organizational stress during the European Youth Olympic Festival in July 2007 and how they coped with the stressors. Participants were aged 14-17 and competed in handball, track and field, swimming, and judo. We used a qualitative methodology with interviews and open-ended questionnaires. Qualitative content analyses revealed that the athletes experienced competitive stressors because of the size and importance of the competition, and organizational stressors (e.g., housing, lining up for food, and transportation) exacerbated by the extreme heat during the Festival. The elite competitive experience was novel to all and overwhelming for some of the more "inexperienced" athletes. The athletes used cognitive coping strategies to some extent in addition to relying on different types of social support. The findings revealed the need for social support for adolescent athletes, and underlined the importance of a good coach-athlete relationship in order to perform well and enjoy the competitive experience.

  19. Social support and prolonged cardiovascular reactivity: the moderating influence of relationship quality and type of support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramer, Margit; Supp, Nadja

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the moderating influence of relationship quality on the cardiovascular effects of social support during anticipation of, performance of, and recovery from an evaluative speaking task. Additionally, the generalizability of effects across different types of support was addressed. Sixty normotensive female students were assigned to one of the five support conditions: active verbal support provided by either a supportive or ambivalent friend, mental activation of either a supportive or ambivalent friend, no support. Active support by an ambivalent friend was found to elicit higher magnitude increases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) across all stressor phases. A detrimental influence of mental activation of ambivalent ties on SBP reactivity was observed during speech performance, only. Effects of ambivalence did not extend to experienced emotions and cognitive appraisals. The present findings extend previous research by indicating that interactions with ambivalent ties might be an important determinant of sustained cardiovascular activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. “Community Cup, We Are a Big Family”: Examining Social Inclusion and Acculturation of Newcomers to Canada through a Participatory Sport Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle A. Rich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available While sport is widely understood to produce positive social outcomes for communities, such as the inclusion of diverse and marginalized groups, little researched has focused on the specific processes through which these outcomes may or may not be occurring. In this paper, we discuss the Community Cup program, and specifically a participatory sport event which seeks to connect newcomers to Canada (recent immigrants and refugees in order to build capacity, connect communities, and facilitate further avenues to participation in community life. For this research, we worked collaboratively with the program to conduct an intrinsic case study, utilizing participant observation, document analysis, focus group, and semi-structured interviews. We discuss how the structure and organization of the event influences participants’ experiences and consequently how this impacts the adaptation and acculturation processes. Using Donnelly and Coakley's (2002 cornerstones of social inclusion and Berry’s (1992 framework for understanding acculturation, we critically discuss the ways that the participatory sport event may provide an avenue for inclusion of newcomers, as well as the aspects of inclusion that the event does not address. While exploratory in nature, this paper begins to unpack the complex process of how inclusion may or may not be facilitated through sport, as well discussing the role of the management of these sporting practices. Furthermore, based on our discussion, we offer suggestions for sport event managers to improve the design and implementation of programming offered for diverse/newcomer populations.