WorldWideScience

Sample records for spontaneous vibrational raman

  1. The Use of Spontaneous Raman Scattering for Hydrogen Leak Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degroot, Wim A.

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic probe has been built and demonstrated that utilizes back scattered spontaneous Raman spectroscopy to detect and identify gaseous species. The small probe, coupled to the laser and data acquisition equipment with optical fibers, has applications in gaseous leak detection and process monitoring. The probe design and data acquisition system are described. Raman scattering theory has been reviewed and the results of intensity calculations of hydrogen and nitrogen Raman scattering are given. Because the device is in its developmental stage, only preliminary experimental results are presented here. Intensity scans across the rotational-vibrational Raman lines of nitrogen and hydrogen are presented. Nitrogen at a partial pressure of 0.077 MPa was detected. Hydrogen at a partial pressure of 2 kPa approached the lower limit of detectability with the present apparatus. Potential instrument improvements that would allow more sensitive and rapid hydrogen detection are identified.

  2. Cell Imaging by Spontaneous and Amplified Raman Spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy (RS is a powerful, noninvasive optical technique able to detect vibrational modes of chemical bonds. The high chemical specificity due to its fingerprinting character and the minimal requests for sample preparation have rendered it nowadays very popular in the analysis of biosystems for diagnostic purposes. In this paper, we first discuss the main advantages of spontaneous RS by describing the study of a single protozoan (Acanthamoeba, which plays an important role in a severe ophthalmological disease (Acanthamoeba keratitis. Later on, we point out that the weak signals that originated from Raman scattering do not allow probing optically thin samples, such as cellular membrane. Experimental approaches able to overcome this drawback are based on the use of metallic nanostructures, which lead to a huge amplification of the Raman yields thanks to the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS and tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS are examples of such innovative techniques, in which metallic nanostructures are assembled on a flat surface or on the tip of a scanning probe microscope, respectively. Herein, we provide a couple of examples (red blood cells and bacterial spores aimed at studying cell membranes with these techniques.

  3. Vibrational Raman optical activity of ketose monosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Alasdair F.; Hecht, Lutz; Barron, Laurence D.

    1995-07-01

    The vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the four ketose sugars D-fructose, L-sorbose, D-tagatose and D-psicose in aqueous solution, which have been measured in backscattering in the range ≈250-1500 cm -1, are reported. These results are combined with those from a previous ROA study of aldose and pentose sugars in an attempt to establish new vibrational assignments and to verify old ones. The high information content of these spectra provides a new perspective on all the central features of monosaccharide stereochemistry including dominant anomeric configuration, ring conformation, exocyclic CH 2OH group conformation and relative disposition of the hydroxyl groups around the ring.

  4. High-precision measurement of the temperature of methanol and ethanol droplets using spontaneous Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, T.; Grünefeld, G.; Beushausen, V.

    The temperature of liquid methanol and ethanol is demonstrated to be determined by a non-intrusive laser technique in sprays. The method is based on spontaneous Raman scattering, namely the shape and spectral position of the OH stretching band, which is temperature dependent. The accuracy achieved in this way is about +/-2 °C. Thus, it could be applied to precise evaporation studies in sprays. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that this technique can be performed with moderate spectral resolution, although the spectral shape of a Raman line used for temperature determination. Hence, several other vibrational Raman lines can be recorded simultaneously along a line by using a spatially resolving optical multichannel analyzer. This yields the possibility to obtain additional spatially resolved information, e.g., air/fuel ratio, vapour/liquid mass fraction, or gas temperature, simultaneously.

  5. Vibrational characterization of pheomelanin and trichochrome F by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto; Solano, Francisco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-06-01

    We characterize for the first time the vibrational state of natural pheomelanin using Raman spectroscopy and model pigment synthesized from 5-S-cysteinyldopa. The shape of the Raman spectrum was very different from that of eumelanin. Four Raman bands were visible in the 500-2000 cm-1 wavenumber region about 500, 1150, 1490 and 2000 cm-1, which we assigned to the out-of-plane deformation and the stretching vibration of the phenyl rings, to the stretching vibration of C-N bonds or the stretching and wagging vibration of CH2, and to overtone or combination bands. Interestingly, we also show that the Raman spectrum of synthetic trichochrome F, a pigment that may be produced along with pheomelanin during pheomelanogenesis, is different from that of pheomelanin and similar to the spectrum of eumelanin. We could detect Raman signal of both eumelanin and pheomelanin in feathers and hairs where both pigments simultaneously occur without the need of isolating the pigment. This indicates that Raman spectroscopy represents a non-invasive method to detect pheomelanin and distinguish it from other pigments. This may be especially relevant to detect pheomelanin in animal skin including humans, where it has been associated with animal appearance and classification, human phototypes, prevention of skin diseases and cancer risk.

  6. Molecular vibrations the theory of infrared and Raman vibrational spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, E Bright; Cross, Paul C

    1980-01-01

    Pedagogical classic and essential reference focuses on mathematics of detailed vibrational analyses of polyatomic molecules, advancing from application of wave mechanics to potential functions and methods of solving secular determinant.

  7. Terahertz mechanical vibrations in lysozyme: Raman spectroscopy vs modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Piana, Gianfranco; Bassani, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical behaviour of proteins is receiving an increasing attention from the scientific community. Recently it has been suggested that mechanical vibrations play a crucial role in controlling structural configuration changes (folding) which govern proteins biological function. The mechanism behind protein folding is still not completely understood, and many efforts are being made to investigate this phenomenon. Complex molecular dynamics simulations and sophisticated experimental measurements are conducted to investigate protein dynamics and to perform protein structure predictions; however, these are two related, although quite distinct, approaches. Here we investigate mechanical vibrations of lysozyme by Raman spectroscopy and linear normal mode calculations (modal analysis). The input mechanical parameters to the numerical computations are taken from the literature. We first give an estimate of the order of magnitude of protein vibration frequencies by considering both classical wave mechanics and structural dynamics formulas. Afterwards, we perform modal analyses of some relevant chemical groups and of the full lysozyme protein. The numerical results are compared to experimental data, obtained from both in-house and literature Raman measurements. In particular, the attention is focused on a large peak at 0.84 THz (29.3 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum obtained analyzing a lyophilized powder sample.

  8. Spontaneous orbiting of two spheres levitated in a vibrated liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Martinez, H A; Liao, L; Hill, R J A; Swift, Michael R; Bowley, R M

    2013-04-12

    In the absence of gravity, particles can form a suspension in a liquid irrespective of the difference in density between the solid and the liquid. If such a suspension is subjected to vibration, there is relative motion between the particles and the fluid which can lead to self-organization and pattern formation. Here, we describe experiments carried out to investigate the behavior of two identical spheres suspended magnetically in a fluid, mimicking weightless conditions. Under vibration, the spheres mutually attract and, for sufficiently large vibration amplitudes, the spheres are observed to spontaneously orbit each other. The collapse of the experimental data onto a single curve indicates that the instability occurs at a critical value of the streaming Reynolds number. Simulations reproduce the observed behavior qualitatively and quantitatively, and are used to identify the features of the flow that are responsible for this instability.

  9. Identification of LDPE Grades Focusing on Specific CH2 Raman Vibration Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Jumeau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of applications of vibrational spectroscopy techniques (Raman spectroscopy in the analysis and characterization of polymers are more and more used and accurate. In this paper, our purpose is to characterize Low Density Poly(Ethylene (LDPE grades by Raman spectroscopy and in particular with CH2 Raman vibration modes. With temperature measurements, we determine different amorphous and crystalline Raman assignments. From these results and on the basis of the evolution of CH2 bending Raman vibration modes, we develop a phenomenological model in correlation with Differential Scanning Calorimetry and in particular with crystalline lamella thickness determination.

  10. Vibrational microspectroscopy of food. Raman vs. FT-IR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Løkke, Mette Marie; Micklander, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy are complementary techniques for the study of molecular vibrations and structure. The combination with a microscope results in an analytical method that allows spatially resolved investigation of the chemical composition of heterogeneous foods and food ingredients...... to different heterogeneous food systems. FT-IR and Raman microspectroscopy were applied to a number of different problems related to food analysis: (1) in situ determination of starch and pectin in the potato cell, (2) in situ determination of the distribution of amygdalin in bitter almonds, (3......) the composition of blisters found on the surface of bread, (4) the microstructure of high-lysine barley and (5) the composition of white spots in the shell of frozen shrimps. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids and nucleotide bases for target bacterial vibrational mode identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Argue, Leanne; Hyre, Aaron; Jacobson, Michele; Christesen, Steven D.

    2006-05-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies of bacteria have reported a wide range of vibrational mode assignments associated with biological material. We present Raman and SER spectra of the amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamine, cysteine, alanine, proline, methionine, asparagine, threonine, valine, glycine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid and the nucleic acid bases adenosine, guanosine, thymidine, and uridine to better characterize biological vibrational mode assignments for bacterial target identification. We also report spectra of the bacteria Bacillus globigii, Pantoea agglomerans, and Yersinia rhodei along with band assignments determined from the reference spectra obtained.

  12. Microsecond Scale Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging by Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Wang, Ping; Li, Junjie; Lee, Seung-Young; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Real-time vibrational spectroscopic imaging is desired for monitoring cellular states and cellular processes in a label-free manner. Raman spectroscopic imaging of highly dynamic systems is inhibited by relatively slow spectral acquisition on millisecond to second scale. Here, we report microsecond scale vibrational spectroscopic imaging by lock-in free parallel detection of spectrally dispersed stimulated Raman scattering signal. Using a homebuilt tuned amplifier array, our method enables Ra...

  13. Single pulse vibrational Raman scattering by a broadband KrF excimer laser in a hydrogen-air flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitz, Robert W.; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Bowling, J. M.; Cheng, Tsarng-Sheng

    1990-01-01

    Spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) is produced by a broadband excimer laser at 248 nm (KrF) in a H2-air flame, and VRS spectra are recorded for lean, stoichiometric, and rich flames. Except at very lean flame conditions, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) processes interfere with VRS Stokes lines from H2, H2O, and O2. No interference is found for the N2 Stokes and N2 anti-Stokes lines. In a stoichiometric H2/air flame, single-pulse measurements of N2 concentration and temperature (by the VRS Stokes to anti-Stokes ratio) have a relative standard deviation of 7.7 and 10 percent, respectively. These single pulse measurement errors compare well with photon statistics calculations using measured Raman cross sections.

  14. FT-IR and Raman vibrational microspectroscopies used for spectral biodiagnosis of human tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Li, Mei-Jane; Cheng, Wen-Ting

    2007-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman vibrational microspectroscopies used for biomedical diagnosis of human tissues are reviewed from basic principle to biological applications. The advantages and disadvantages of both vibrational microspectroscopies are compared to highlight their efficiency and adaptability for noninvasively investigating the chemical compositions of ultrastructual human tissues at different disease states. Biochemical fingerprints applied to the biological samples ...

  15. Femtosecond time-resolved studies of coherent vibrational Raman scattering in large gas-phase molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, C.C.; Chandler, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from femtosecond time-resolved coherent Raman experiments in which we excite and monitor vibrational coherence in gas-phase samples of benzene and 1,3,5-hexatriene. Different physical mechanisms for coherence decay are seen in these two molecules. In benzene, where the Raman polarizability is largely isotropic, the Q branch of the vibrational Raman spectrum is the primary feature excited. Molecules in different rotational states have different Q-branch transition frequencies due to vibration--rotation interaction. Thus, the macroscopic polarization that is observed in these experiments decays because it has many frequency components from molecules in different rotational states, and these frequency components go out of phase with each other. In 1,3,5-hexatriene, the Raman excitation produces molecules in a coherent superposition of rotational states, through (O, P, R, and S branch) transitions that are strong due to the large anisotropy of the Raman polarizability. The coherent superposition of rotational states corresponds to initially spatially oriented, vibrationally excited, molecules that are freely rotating. The rotation of molecules away from the initial orientation is primarily responsible for the coherence decay in this case. These experiments produce large (∼10% efficiency) Raman shifted signals with modest excitation pulse energies (10 μJ) demonstrating the feasibility of this approach for a variety of gas phase studies. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. The Raman and vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-containing complexes and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxton, P.M.; Schaeffer, M.W.; Ohline, S.M.; Kim, W.; Venturo, V.A.; Felker, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results pertaining to the excitation of intermolecular vibrations in the Raman and vibronic spectra of aromatic-containing, weakly bound complexes and clusters are reported. The theoretical analysis of intermolecular Raman activity is based on the assumption that the polarizability tensor of a weakly bound species is given by the sum of the polarizability tensors of its constituent monomers. The analysis shows that the van der Waals bending fundamentals in aromatic--rare gas complexes may be expected to be strongly Raman active. More generally, it predicts strong Raman activity for intermolecular vibrations that involve the libration or internal rotation of monomer moieties having appreciable permanent polarizability anisotropies. The vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-rare gas complexes is analyzed under the assumption that every vibronic band gains its strength from an aromatic-localized transition. It is found that intermolecular vibrational excitations can accompany aromatic-localized vibronic excitations by the usual Franck--Condon mechanism or by a mechanism dependent on the librational amplitude of the aromatic moiety during the course of the pertinent intermolecular vibration. The latter mechanism can impart appreciable intensity to bands that are forbidden by rigid-molecule symmetry selection rules. The applicability of such rules is therefore called into question. Finally, experimental spectra of intermolecular transitions, obtained by mass-selective, ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies, are reported for benzene--X (X=Ar, --Ar 2 , N 2 , HCl, CO 2 , and --fluorene), fluorobenzene--Ar and --Kr, aniline--Ar, and fluorene--Ar and --Ar 2 . The results support the conclusions of the theoretical analyses and provide further evidence for the value of Raman methods in characterizing intermolecular vibrational level structures

  17. PULSED MULTICHANNEL RAMAN SPECTROMETRY OF TRANSIENT STATES

    OpenAIRE

    Buntinx, G.; Bridoux, M.; Deffontaine, A.; Poizat, O.

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a nonperturbing diagnostic tool that provides detailed structural information about molecules through the vibrational-line positions and intensities. Because of many specific properties, pulsed Raman spectroscopy can provide valuable information in situations in which ultrarapid recording of the vibrational spectra is of crucial importance.

  18. FT-IR, RAMAN AND DFT STUDIES ON THE VIBRATIONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bis(aminoethoxy)propane, IR spectra, Raman spectra, Molecular structure, DFT. INTRODUCTION. Ketal based linkages have recently been investigated for the development of novel acid- cleavable polymers those are formulated into the ...

  19. Epi-detection of vibrational phase contrast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbacik, E.T.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a system for the phase-resolved epi-detection of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in highly scattering and/or thick samples. With this setup, we measure the complex vibrational responses of multiple components in a thick, highly-scattering pharmaceutical tablet in

  20. Vibrational interference of Raman and high harmonic generation pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, Zachary B.; Tonzani, Stefano; Greene, Chris H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model of high harmonic generation which incorporates the internal vibrational degrees of freedom present in molecules. It is shown that vibrational dynamics during the HHG process cause the molecular wavefunction to interfere with itself, in a manner analogous to an optical beamsplitter. In addition, a semiclassical model of the continuum electron is developed which connects with rigorous treatments of electron-ion scattering.

  1. Lanthanum trilactate: Vibrational spectroscopic study - infrared/Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, M.; Novák, Vít; Bartůněk, V.; Člupek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 87, Nov (2016), s. 123-128 ISSN 0924-2031 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : lanthanum trilactate * tris(2-hydroxypropanoato-O1,O2) * lanthanum tris[2-(hydroxy-kappa O)propanoato-kappa O] * Raman spectra * infrared spectra * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.740, year: 2016

  2. VIBRATIONAL RAMAN OPTICAL-ACTIVITY CALCULATIONS USING LONDON ATOMIC ORBITALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgaker, T.; Ruud, K.; Bak, Keld L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of Raman differential intensities are presented at the self-consistent field (SCF) level of theory. The electric dipole-electric dipole, electric dipole-magnetic dipole and electric dipole-electric quadrupole polarizability tensors are calculated at the frequency of the inc...... of the incident light, using SCF linear response theory. London atomic orbitals are employed, imposing gauge origin invariance on the calculations. Calculations have been carried out in the harmonic approximation for CFHDT and methyloxirane.......Ab initio calculations of Raman differential intensities are presented at the self-consistent field (SCF) level of theory. The electric dipole-electric dipole, electric dipole-magnetic dipole and electric dipole-electric quadrupole polarizability tensors are calculated at the frequency...

  3. Micro-Raman Vibrational Identification of 10-MDP Bond to Zirconia and Shear Bond Strength Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Paula, Diego Martins; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra; Frota, Natasha Marques; Melo, Radamés; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro

    2017-01-01

    So far, there is no report regarding the micro-Raman vibrational fingerprint of the bonds between 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) and zirconia ceramics. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the Raman vibrational peaks related to the bonds of 10-MDP with zirconia, as well as the influence on microshear bond strength. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to assess the vibrational peak of 10-MDP binding to zirconia. Microshear bond strength of the dual-cure resin cement to zirconia with the presence of 10-MDP in composition of experimental ceramic primer and self-adhesive resin cement was also surveyed. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test ( p MDP. The presence of 10-MDP in both experimental ceramic primer and self-adhesive resin cement improved microshear bond strength to zirconia ceramic. It can be concluded that the nondestructive method of micro-Raman spectroscopy was able to characterize chemical bonds of 10-MDP with zirconia, which improves the bond strengths of resin cement.

  4. Structure and behaviour of proteins, nucleic acids and viruses from vibrational Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barron, L.D.; Blanch, E.W.; McColl, I.H.

    2003-01-01

    On account of its sensitivity to chirality Raman optical activity (ROA), which may be measured as a small difference in vibrational Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized incident light, is a powerful probe of structure and behaviour of biomolecules...... is especially favourable for fold determination using pattern recognition techniques. This article gives a brief account of the ROA technique and presents the ROA spectra of a selection of proteins, nucleic acids and viruses that illustrate the applications of ROA spectroscopy in biomolecular research....

  5. Wide-Field Vibrational Phase Contrast Imaging Based on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Yong-Gang; Ji Zi-Heng; Dong Da-Shan; Gong Qi-Huang; Shi Ke-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We propose and implement a wide-field vibrational phase contrast detection to obtain imaging of imaginary components of third-order nonlinear susceptibility in a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope with full suppression of the non-resonant background. This technique is based on the unique ability of recovering the phase of the generated CARS signal based on holographic recording. By capturing the phase distributions of the generated CARS field from the sample and from the environment under resonant illumination, we demonstrate the retrieval of imaginary components in the CARS microscope and achieve background free coherent Raman imaging. (paper)

  6. Temperature measurement of single evaporating water droplets in a nitrogen flow using spontaneous Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinisch, Christian; Wills, Jon B; Reid, Jonathan P; Tschudi, Theo; Tropea, Cameron

    2009-11-14

    The evaporation dynamics of stationary water droplets held within an electrodynamic trap are investigated in a nitrogen flow of variable velocity. In particular, the influence of the nitrogen gas flow on the temperature of the evaporating water droplets is studied. By applying a contact free measurement technique, based on spontaneous Raman scattering, time averaged and time resolved measurements of temperature in the droplet volume are compared. This technique determines the temperature from an intensity ratio in the OH stretching band of the Stokes-Raman scattering after calibration. The measured trends in temperature over the first 5 s of evaporation are found to be in agreement with theoretical calculations of the heat and mass transfer rates.

  7. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-21

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into "coffee" rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.

  8. Chains of benzenes with lithium-atom adsorption: Vibrations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Yenni P.; Stegmann, Thomas; Klein, Douglas J.; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-09-01

    We study effects of different configurations of adsorbates on the vibrational modes as well as symmetries of polyacenes and poly-p-phenylenes focusing on lithium atom adsorption. We found that the spectra of the vibrational modes distinguish the different configurations. For more regular adsorption schemes the lowest states are bending and torsion modes of the skeleton, which are essentially followed by the adsorbate. On poly-p-phenylenes we found that lithium adsorption reduces and often eliminates the torsion between rings thus increasing symmetry. There is spontaneous symmetry breaking in poly-p-phenylenes due to double adsorption of lithium atoms on alternating rings.

  9. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy as a tool to detect molecular vibrations in ground and excited electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Rao, B. Jayachander [Departamento de Química and Centro de Química, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2016-05-14

    We give a detailed theoretical analysis of the simplest variant of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond Raman probe pulse are applied resonantly to a chromophore in thermal equilibrium in the ground electronic state. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of the detection of dephasing-free Raman-like lines revealing vibrational modes not only in the electronic ground state but also in the excited electronic state of the chromophore. The analytical results obtained with simplifying assumptions for the shape of the laser pulses are substantiated by numerical simulations with realistic laser pulses, employing the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach.

  10. Nature of the hyper-Raman active vibrations of lithium borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, G; Hehlen, B; Vacher, R; Courtens, E [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux (LCVN), UMR 5587 CNRS, University of Montpellier II, F-34095 Montpellier (France)], E-mail: bernard.hehlen@lcvn.univ-montp2.fr

    2008-04-16

    Hyper-Raman spectra of two lithium borate glasses, 4B{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Li{sub 2}O and 2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Li{sub 2}O, are compared to those of pure boron oxide glass, v-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A mode analysis is performed using a structural model based on the symmetry of the elementary structural units (ESUs) constituting the glasses. Most spectral components arise from internal vibrations of BO{sub 3} triangles, B{sub 3}O{sub 3} boroxol rings, and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra. In particular, a mode associated with stretching motions of BO{sub 4} units can be assigned to a vibration of F{sub 2} symmetry in the T{sub d} tetrahedral point group. The hyper-Raman scattering intensity of its transverse optic component appears to be proportional to the number of BO{sub 4} units in the glass. The boson peak observed in hyper-Raman scattering arises from external modes of rigid ESUs which correspond to librational motions coupled to their translations. The scattering strength of these modes strongly decreases with increasing Li concentration. In pure v-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, external modes of boroxols presumably dominate this scattering. The decrease in the boroxol concentration in lithium borate glasses correlates with the apparent hardening of the boson peak.

  11. Microsecond Scale Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging by Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Wang, Ping; Li, Junjie; Lee, Seung-Young; Oglesbee, Robert A; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    Real-time vibrational spectroscopic imaging is desired for monitoring cellular states and cellular processes in a label-free manner. Raman spectroscopic imaging of highly dynamic systems is inhibited by relatively slow spectral acquisition on millisecond to second scale. Here, we report microsecond scale vibrational spectroscopic imaging by lock-in free parallel detection of spectrally dispersed stimulated Raman scattering signal. Using a homebuilt tuned amplifier array, our method enables Raman spectral acquisition, within the window defined by the broadband pulse, at the speed of 32 microseconds and with close to shot-noise limited detection sensitivity. Incorporated with multivariate curve resolution analysis, our platform allows compositional mapping of lipid droplets in single live cells, observation of intracellular retinoid metabolism, discrimination of fat droplets from protein-rich organelles in Caenorhabditis elegans, spectral detection of fast flowing tumor cells, and monitoring drug diffusion through skin tissue in vivo . The reported technique opens new opportunities for compositional analysis of cellular compartment in a microscope setting and high-throughput spectral profiling of single cells in a flow cytometer setting.

  12. Vibrational imaging and microspectroscopies based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkmer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    For noninvasive characterization of chemical species or biological components within a complex heterogeneous system, their intrinsic molecular vibrational properties can be used in contrast mechanisms in optical microscopy. A series of recent advances have made coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy a powerful technique that allows vibrational imaging with high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability. In this review, we discuss theoretical and experimental aspects of CARS microscopy in a collinear excitation beam geometry. Particular attention is given to the underlying physical principles behind the new features of CARS signal generation under tight focusing conditions. We provide a brief overview of the instrumentation of CARS microscopy and its experimental characterization by means of imaging of model systems and live unstained cells. CARS microscopy offers the possibility of spatially resolved vibrational spectroscopy, providing chemical and physical structure information of molecular specimens on the sub-micrometre length scale. We review multiplex CARS microspectroscopy allowing fast acquisition of frequency-resolved CARS spectra, time-resolved CARS microspectroscopy recording ultrafast Raman free induction decays and CARS correlation spectroscopy probing dynamical processes with chemical selectivity. (topical review)

  13. Vibrational and structural investigation of SOUL protein single crystals by using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Barbara; Giarola, Marco; Mariotto, Gino; Ambrosi, Emmanuele; Monaco, Hugo L.

    2010-05-01

    Protein SOUL is a new member of the recently discovered putative heme-binding protein family called SOUL/HEBP and, to date, no structural information exists for this protein. Here, micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to study the vibrational properties of single crystals obtained from recombinant protein SOUL by means of two different optimization routes. This spectroscopic approach offers the valuable advantage of the in-situ collection of experimental data from protein crystals, placed onto a hanging-drop plate, under the same conditions used to grow the crystals. By focusing on the regions of amides I and III bands, some secondary structure characteristic features have been recognized. Moreover, some side-chain marker bands were observed in the Raman spectra of SOUL crystals and the unambiguous assignment of these peaks inferred by comparing the experimental Raman spectra of pure amino acids and their Raman intensities computed using quantum chemical calculations. Our comparative analysis allows to get a deeper understanding of the side-chain environments and of the interactions involving these specific amino acids in the two different SOUL crystals.

  14. Isotropic collision-induced scattering by CF4 in a Raman vibrational band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, J.-L.; Elliasmine, A.; Le Duff, Y.; Bancewicz, T.

    1999-06-01

    Light-scattering intensities and depolarization ratio data have been recorded at room temperature for gaseous tetrafluoromethane in the collision-induced band of the Raman vibrational line ν1=908 cm-1. For the first time, binary isotropic intensities of the ν1-Raman band are reported in absolute units for Stokes frequency shifts up to 110 cm-1. From comparison with theoretical semiclassical computations of the dipole-multipole spectrum contributions, evaluations of the first derivatives of the successive dipole-multipole polarizability tensors are provided. These results are coherent with those obtained from corresponding depolarized intensities. Moreover, the agreement with ab initio quantum-chemistry calculations of the CF4 multipolar polarizabilities is satisfactory.

  15. Vibrational dynamics in dendridic oligoarylamines by Raman spectroscopy and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulszewicz-Bajer, Irena; Louarn, Guy; Djurado, David; Skorka, Lukasz; Szymanski, Marek; Mevellec, Jean Yves; Rols, Stephane; Pron, Adam

    2014-05-15

    Vibrational dynamics in triarylamine dendrimers was studied in a complementary way by Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopies and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (IINS). Three molecules were investigated, namely, unsubstituted triarylamine dendrimer of the first generation and two dendrimers of the first and second generation, substituted in the crown with butyl groups. To facilitate the assignment of the observed IR and Raman modes as well as the IINS peaks, vibrational models, based on the general valence force field method (GVFF), were calculated for all three compounds studied. A perfect consistency between the calculated and experimental results was found. Moreover, an important complementarity of the vibrational spectroscopies and IINS was established for the investigated dendrimers. The IINS peaks originating mainly from the C-H motions were not restricted by particular selection rules and only dependent on the IINS cross section. To the contrary, Raman and IR bands were imposed by the selection rules and the local geometry of the dendrimers yielding mainly C-C and C-N deformation modes with those of C-H nature of much lower intensity. Raman spectroscopy was also applied to the studies of the oxidation of dendrimers to their cationic forms. A strong Raman resonance effect was observed, since the spectra of the studied compounds, registered at different levels of their oxidation, strongly depended on the position of the excitation line with respect to their electronic spectrum. In particular, the blue (458 nm) excitation line turned out to be insensitive toward the cationic forms yielding very limited spectral information. To the contrary, the use of the red (647 nm) and infrared (1064 nm) excitation lines allowed for an unambiguous monitoring of the spectral changes in dendrimers oxidized to nominally monocationic and tricationic states. The analysis of oxidation-induced spectral changes in the tricationic state indicated that the charge storage

  16. Raman study of vibrational dephasing in liquid CH3CN and CD3CN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, J.; Schiemann, V.H.; Sharko, P.T.; Jonas, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Raman line shapes of the ν 1 (a 1 ) C--H and C--D fundamentals in liquid acetonitrile and acetonitrile-d 3 have been measured as a function of pressure up to 4 kbar within the temperature interval 30--120 degreeC. Densities have also been determined. From the isotropic component of the vibrational Raman band shape the vibrational relaxation times have been obtained as a function of temperature and pressure (density). The experimental results can be summarized as follows: (i) as T increases at constant density rho, the vibrational relaxation rate (tau/sub vib/) -1 increases; (ii) at constant T as density is raised tau/sub vib/ -1 increases; (iii) at constant pressure the T increase produces higher tau/sub vib/ -1 , however, the change is more pronounced for the CD 3 CN liquid. Isotopic dilution studies of the CH 3 CN/CD 3 CN mixtures shows no significant effect on (tau/sub vib/ -1 ). The experimental data are interpreted in terms of the Kubo stochastic line shape theory and the dephasing model of Fischer and Laubereau. The results based on Kubo formalism indicate that dephasing is the dominant relaxation mechanism and that the modulation is fast. The isolated binary collision model proposed by Fischer and Laubereau for vibrational dephasing reproduces the essential features of the density and temperature dependence of the (tau/sub vib/) -1 and suggests that pure dephasing is the dominant broadening mechanism for the isotropic line shapes studied. In the calculation the elastic collision times were approximated by the Enskog relaxation times

  17. Spontaneous confocal Raman microscopy--a tool to study the uptake of nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes into cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Gabriela; Rojas, Elena; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Donath, Edwin; Moya, Sergio Enrique

    2011-06-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy as a label-free technique was applied to study the uptake and internalization of poly(lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into hepatocarcinoma human HepG2 cells. Spontaneous confocal Raman spectra was recorded from the cells exposed to oxidized CNTs and to PLGA NPs. The Raman spectra showed bands arising from the cellular environment: lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, as well as bands characteristic for either PLGA NPs or CNTs. The simultaneous generation of Raman bands from the cell and nanomaterials from the same spot proves internalization, and also indicates the cellular region, where the nanomaterial is located. For PLGA NPs, it was found that they preferentially co-localized with lipid bodies, while the oxidized CNTs are located in the cytoplasm.

  18. Electronic and vibrational Raman spectroscopy of Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electronic and vibrational Raman spectroscopy of Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 through the phase transitions. Md MOTIN SEIKH1,2, A K SOOD1,3 and CHANDRABHAS NARAYANA1. 1Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced. Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560 064, India.

  19. Vibrational dynamics (IR, Raman, NRVS) and DFT study of new antitumor tetranuclearstannoxanecluster, Sn(IV)$-$oxo$-${di$-$o$-$vanillin} dimethyl dichloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjmand, F. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Sharma, S. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Usman, M. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Leu, B. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Hu, M. Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Toupet, L. [Univ. de Rennes, Rennes (France). Inst. de Physique de Rennes; Gosztola, David J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Tabassum, S. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-06-21

    The vibrational dynamics of a newly synthesized tetrastannoxane was characterized with a combination of experimental (Raman, IR and tin-based nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) and computational (DFT/B3LYP) methods, with an emphasis on the vibrations of the tin sites. The cytotoxic activity revealed a significant regression selectively against the human pancreatic cell lines.

  20. Vibrational infrared and Raman spectra of polypeptides: Fragments-in-fragments within molecular tailoring approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Nityananda; Gadre, Shridhar R., E-mail: gadre@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2016-03-21

    The present work reports the calculation of vibrational infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of large molecular systems employing molecular tailoring approach (MTA). Further, it extends the grafting procedure for the accurate evaluation of IR and Raman spectra of large molecular systems, employing a new methodology termed as Fragments-in-Fragments (FIF), within MTA. Unlike the previous MTA-based studies, the accurate estimation of the requisite molecular properties is achieved without performing any full calculations (FC). The basic idea of the grafting procedure is implemented by invoking the nearly basis-set-independent nature of the MTA-based error vis-à-vis the respective FCs. FIF has been tested out for the estimation of the above molecular properties for three isomers, viz., β-strand, 3{sub 10}- and α-helix of acetyl(alanine){sub n}NH{sub 2} (n = 10, 15) polypeptides, three conformers of doubly protonated gramicidin S decapeptide and trpzip2 protein (PDB id: 1LE1), respectively, employing BP86/TZVP, M06/6-311G**, and M05-2X/6-31G** levels of theory. For most of the cases, a maximum difference of 3 cm{sup −1} is achieved between the grafted-MTA frequencies and the corresponding FC values. Further, a comparison of the BP86/TZVP level IR and Raman spectra of α-helical (alanine){sub 20} and its N-deuterated derivative shows an excellent agreement with the existing experimental spectra. In view of the requirement of only MTA-based calculations and the ability of FIF to work at any level of theory, the current methodology provides a cost-effective solution for obtaining accurate spectra of large molecular systems.

  1. Vibrational infrared and Raman spectra of polypeptides: Fragments-in-fragments within molecular tailoring approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Nityananda; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2016-03-01

    The present work reports the calculation of vibrational infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of large molecular systems employing molecular tailoring approach (MTA). Further, it extends the grafting procedure for the accurate evaluation of IR and Raman spectra of large molecular systems, employing a new methodology termed as Fragments-in-Fragments (FIF), within MTA. Unlike the previous MTA-based studies, the accurate estimation of the requisite molecular properties is achieved without performing any full calculations (FC). The basic idea of the grafting procedure is implemented by invoking the nearly basis-set-independent nature of the MTA-based error vis-à-vis the respective FCs. FIF has been tested out for the estimation of the above molecular properties for three isomers, viz., β-strand, 310- and α-helix of acetyl(alanine)nNH2 (n = 10, 15) polypeptides, three conformers of doubly protonated gramicidin S decapeptide and trpzip2 protein (PDB id: 1LE1), respectively, employing BP86/TZVP, M06/6-311G**, and M05-2X/6-31G** levels of theory. For most of the cases, a maximum difference of 3 cm-1 is achieved between the grafted-MTA frequencies and the corresponding FC values. Further, a comparison of the BP86/TZVP level IR and Raman spectra of α-helical (alanine)20 and its N-deuterated derivative shows an excellent agreement with the existing experimental spectra. In view of the requirement of only MTA-based calculations and the ability of FIF to work at any level of theory, the current methodology provides a cost-effective solution for obtaining accurate spectra of large molecular systems.

  2. Raman scattering investigations on Co and Mn doped ZnO epitaxial films: local vibration modes and defect associated ferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qiang; Liu, Guolei; Yan, Shishen; Mei, Liangmo

    2014-03-01

    The studies of local vibration modes (LVMs) of Co or Mn substitution in wurtzite ZnO lattice have been rather limited, and evolution of LVM bound defects as well as associated ferromagnetism are still poorly understood.In this paper, Raman scattering spectroscopy has been performed on high quality Co and Mn doped ZnO epitaxial films, which were grown on Al2O3 (0001) by oxygen-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Raman measurements revealed two local vibration modes (LVMs) at 723 and 699 cm?1 due to the substitution of Co2+ in wurtzite ZnO lattice. The LVM at 723 cm?1 is found to be an elemental sensitive vibration mode for Co substitution. The LVM at 699cm-1 can be attributed to enrichment of Co2+ bound with oxygen vacancy, the cobalt?oxygen vacancy?cobalt complexes, which associated with ferromagnetism. It reveals two competitive local vibration modes (LVMs) at 712 and 523 cm-1 due to the substitution of Mn ions in wurtzite ZnO lattice. The LVM at 712cm-1 is found to be an elemental vibration mode of Mn substitution in wurtzite ZnO lattice, while the LVM at 523cm-1 can be attributed to the local vibration mode of acceptor bound Mn substitution in wurtzite ZnO lattice. the NSF Grant NO. 11374189 and 51231007.

  3. Applications of spontaneous laser Raman spectroscopy in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantner, E.; Steinert, D.; Freudenberger, M.; Ache, H.J.

    1984-12-01

    With a commercially available laser Raman spectrometer combined with a microscope (Raman microprobe) the applicability of this method to the analysis of liquid and solid samples from nuclear fuel reprocessing has been studied. Till now, the determination of U, TBP, and its degradation products in simulated organic and aqueous process solutions has been investigated and precipitation products containing zirconium and molybdenum have been analyzed with the Raman microprobe. The results obtained are described. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Experimental Raman and IR spectral and theoretical studies of vibrational spectrum and molecular structure of Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mayuri; Singh, N. P.; Yadav, R. A.

    2014-08-01

    Vibrational spectrum of Pantothenic acid has been investigated using experimental IR and Raman spectroscopies and density functional theory methods available with the Gaussian 09 software. Vibrational assignments of the observed IR and Raman bands have been proposed in light of the results obtained from computations. In order to assign the observed IR and Raman frequencies the potential energy distributions (PEDs) have also been computed using GAR2PED software. Optimized geometrical parameters suggest that the overall symmetry of the molecule is C1. The molecule is found to possess eight conformations. Conformational analysis was carried out to obtain the most stable configuration of the molecule. In the present paper the vibrational features of the lowest energy conformer C-I have been studied. The two methyl groups have slightly distorted symmetries from C3V. The acidic Osbnd H bond is found to be the smallest one. To investigate molecular stability and bond strength we have used natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). Charge transfer occurs in the molecule have been shown by the calculated highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) energies. The mapping of electron density iso-surface with electrostatic potential (ESP), has been carried out to get the information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecule.

  5. Statistical strategies to reveal potential vibrational markers for in vivo analysis by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Mendes, Thiago de; Pinto, Liliane Pereira; Santos, Laurita dos; Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; Téllez Soto, Claudio Alberto; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of biological systems by spectroscopic techniques involves the evaluation of hundreds to thousands of variables. Hence, different statistical approaches are used to elucidate regions that discriminate classes of samples and to propose new vibrational markers for explaining various phenomena like disease monitoring, mechanisms of action of drugs, food, and so on. However, the technical statistics are not always widely discussed in applied sciences. In this context, this work presents a detailed discussion including the various steps necessary for proper statistical analysis. It includes univariate parametric and nonparametric tests, as well as multivariate unsupervised and supervised approaches. The main objective of this study is to promote proper understanding of the application of various statistical tools in these spectroscopic methods used for the analysis of biological samples. The discussion of these methods is performed on a set of in vivo confocal Raman spectra of human skin analysis that aims to identify skin aging markers. In the Appendix, a complete routine of data analysis is executed in a free software that can be used by the scientific community involved in these studies.

  6. Identification of Multiple Water-Iodide Species in Concentrated NaI Solutions Based on the Raman Bending Vibration of Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besemer, M.; Bloemenkamp, R.; Ariese, F.; van Manen, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of aqueous electrolytes on the water bending vibration was studied with Raman spectroscopy. For all salts investigated (NaI, NaBr, NaCl, and NaSCN), we observed a nonlinear intensity increase of the water bending vibration with increasing concentration. Different lasers and a tunable

  7. Vibrational Relaxation of the Backbone and Base Modes in LacDNA Complexes by UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Cristina M; Bratu, Ioan; Hernanz, Antonio

    2017-07-20

    Vibrational band shape analysis through time correlation function concept is widely used to obtain experimental information on the molecular dynamics of medium-size molecules in different environments. Interesting details are revealed by extending this technique to biomolecules such as functional groups of the nucleic acids in media approaching the physiological conditions. In this work a study into the UV resonance Raman (UVRR) vibrational half bandwidths of functional groups in LacDNA, upon lowering the pH (pH 6.4, pH 3.45) and in the presence of Mn 2+ and Ca 2+ ions, respectively, was of interest. The corresponding global relaxation times have been derived. Also, the 793 cm -1 UVRR band, corresponding to ν (backbone O-P-O, dT) oscillator of LacDNA in aqueous solutions, was selected for band shape-analysis. Vibrational relaxation appears as the dominant relaxation process for this mode, with vibrational dephasing being the most efficient for this oscillator. Current theories developed for vibrational dephasing have been applied to this profile, and relevant relaxation parameters have been obtained and discussed. To our knowledge this is the first study on DNA oligomers vibrational band shape analysis through time correlation function concept.

  8. Effects of phase and coupling between the vibrational modes on selective excitation in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Vishesha; Malinovsky, Vladimir S.; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has been a major tool of investigation of biological structures as it contains the vibrational signature of molecules. A quantum control method based on chirped pulse adiabatic passage was recently proposed for selective excitation of a predetermined vibrational mode in CARS microscopy [Malinovskaya and Malinovsky, Opt. Lett. 32, 707 (2007)]. The method utilizes the chirp sign variation at the peak pulse amplitude and gives a robust adiabatic excitation of the desired vibrational mode. Using this method, we investigate the impact of coupling between vibrational modes in molecules on controllability of excitation of the CARS signal. We analyze two models of two coupled two-level systems (TLSs) having slightly different transitional frequencies. The first model, featuring degenerate ground states of the TLSs, gives robust adiabatic excitation and maximum coherence in the resonant TLS for positive value of the chirp. In the second model, implying nondegenerate ground states in the TLSs, a population distribution is observed in both TLSs, resulting in a lack of selectivity of excitation and low coherence. It is shown that the relative phase and coupling between the TLSs play an important role in optimizing coherence in the desired vibrational mode and suppressing unwanted transitions in CARS microscopy.

  9. raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    also had the devoted and loyal assistance of Asutosh Dey, known to everyone in the Association as Ashu Babu. Raman soon ...... Even after reaching the hotel, the stream of photographers and news- paper reporters continued to show us their ...... My affection, loyalty and respect for him were something extraordinary and I ...

  10. Infrared and Raman Vibrational Spectroscopies Reveal the Palette of Frescos Found in the Medieval Monastery of Karaach Teke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorba, T.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Pavlidou, E.; Andrikopoulos, K.S.; Daniilia, S.; Popkonstantinov, K.; Kostova, R.; Platnyov, V.

    2007-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is applied on samples obtained from the excavation area of the medieval Monastery (10 th century) of Karaach-Teke in Bulgaria. The results of the corresponding study, reveal the type of materials used for the creation of the wall-paintings and give evidence of Byzantine influence, a fact that further supports the well known impact of Byzantium on the technology and thematic-aesthetic features of iconography in Bulgaria during this era. In addition, the complementarity of FTIR and -Raman spectroscopies in the identification of pigments is indicated

  11. Raman scattering from ZnO incorporating Fe nanoparticles: Vibrational modes and low-frequency acoustic modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romcevic, N., E-mail: romcevi@ipb.ac.r [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Kostic, R.; Hadzic, B.; Romcevic, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Kuryliszyn-Kudelska, I.; Dobrowolski, W.D. [Institute of Physics PAS, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02/668 Warsaw (Poland); Narkiewicz, U.; Sibera, D. [Szcecin University of Tehnology, Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Puleskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin, Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: Nanocrystaline samples of ZnO(Fe) were synthesized by wet chemical method. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine composition of the samples (ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and the mean crystalline size (8-52 nm). Small amount (5 wt.%) of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the beginning of the synthesis results in forming of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. Large amount (90 wt.%) of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the beginning of the synthesis results in forming Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Both samples contain ZnO phase which is not registered by XRD, but is clearly seen in the Raman spectra. Main characteristics of experimental Raman spectrum in 200-1600 cm{sup -1} spectral region are: sharp peak at 436 cm{sup -1} and broad two-phonon structure at {approx}1150 cm{sup -1}, typical for ZnO; broad structure below 700 cm{sup -1} that has different position and shape in case of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} or Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. In low-frequency Raman spectra of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles registered peaks agree well with the calculated frequencies of acoustic phonons. As a result we identified (0,2), (0,0), (2,2) and (1,0) modes. - Abstract: Nanocrystaline samples of ZnO(Fe) were synthesized by wet chemical method. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine composition of the samples (ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and the mean crystalline size (8-52 nm). In this paper we report the experimental spectra of Raman scattering. Main characteristics of experimental Raman spectrum in 200-1600 cm{sup -1} spectral region are: sharp peak at 436 cm{sup -1} and broad two-phonon structure at {approx}1150 cm{sup -1}, typical for ZnO; broad structure below 700 cm{sup -1} that has different position and shape in case of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} or Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Low-frequency Raman modes were measured and assigned according to confined acoustic vibrations of spherical nanoparticles

  12. Molecular structure, vibrational spectra (FTIR and FT Raman) and natural bond orbital analysis of 4-Aminomethylpiperidine: DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalakshmi, G; Balachandran, V

    2014-10-15

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-Aminomethylpiperidine have been recorded using Perkin Elmer Spectrophotometer and Nexus 670 spectrophotometer. The equilibrium geometrical parameters, various bonding features, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and the Raman scattering activities were calculated using Hartree-Fock and density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. Detailed interpretations of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the aid of the normal coordinate analysis. The spectroscopic and natural bonds orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the occurrence of intra molecular hydrogen bonds, electron delocalization and steric effects. The changes in electron density in the global minimum and in the energy of hyperconjugative interactions of 4-Aminomethylpiperidine (4AMP) were calculated. The theoretical UV-Visible spectrum of the compound was computed in the region 200-400nm by time-dependent TD-DFT approach. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occur within the molecule. The dipole moment (μ) and polarizability (α), anisotropy polarizability (Δα) and hyperpolarizability (β) of the molecule have been reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [A study of phonon vibration like modes for aggregation structure in silicate melts by high temperature Raman spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei-Cang; Li, Ru-Bi; Shang, Tong-Ming; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Jian-Hua; You, Jing-Lin

    2010-05-01

    Silicate melts are special fractal dimension system that is metastable state of near-way order and far-way disorder. In this paper, the size of nanometer aggregation structure and the frequences of phonon vibration like mode in the low dimension silicate series (CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 and Na2-Al2O3-SiO2 series) synthesized via high temperature melting and sol gel methods were measured by means of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), low wavenumber Raman spectrum (LWRS) and high temperature Raman spectrum (HTRS in situ measuring). The nanometer self-similarity aggregation structure(it's size is about a few nm to a few tens nm) and phonic phonon vibration like modes of low temperature silicate gel, high temperature silicate melts and it's quenching glasses phases were obtained. So a quantitative method by HTRS for measuring the aggregation size in the high temperature melts was established. The results showed that the aggregation size of the silicate melts is smaller at high temperature than at room temperature and the number of bridge oxygen in one Si-O tetrahedron in network structure units is decreasing at high temperature. This study work provides important theory and information for deliberating geochemistry characteristic, crystallization & evolution of natural magma and enhancing performance of low dimension silicate matelials.

  14. Evaluation of NaCl Effect on Vibration-Delaminated Metal-Polymer Composites by Improved Micro-Raman Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zumelzu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene terephthalate (PET is a polymer coating that protects the electrolytic chromium coated steel (ECCS against aggressive electrolytes like NaCl. It is widely accepted by manufacturers that NaCl has no effect on the PET coating, which is inert. However, we showed that there are some effects at the structural level, caused by vibrations, and facilitated by defects on the layers. The vibrations occurring during the transportation of food containers produce delaminations at given points of the metal-polymer interface, known as antinodes, which in turn may produce PET degradation affecting food quality. The former can be determined by electrochemical measurements, and the changes in composition or structural order can be characterized by Raman. The present work applied this latter technique in experimental samples of PET-coated ECCS sheets by performing perpendicular and parallel analyses to the surface, and determined that it constitutes a new potential methodology to determine the behavior of the composite under the above conditions. The results demonstrated that the delamination areas on the PET facilitated polymer degradation by the electrolyte. Moreover, the Raman characterization evidenced the presence of multilayers and crystalline orderings, which limited its functionality as a protective coating.

  15. FT-IR, Raman and DFT studies on the vibrational spectra of 2,2-bis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    propane (baep) were examined both experimentally and theoretically including FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic methods. Among the possible structural configurations, 30 of them were handled in the framework of this study. The structural ...

  16. Analysis of environmental microplastics by vibrational microspectroscopy: FTIR, Raman or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käppler, Andrea; Fischer, Dieter; Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Schernewski, Gerald; Labrenz, Matthias; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Voit, Brigitte

    2016-11-01

    The contamination of aquatic ecosystems with microplastics has recently been reported through many studies, and negative impacts on the aquatic biota have been described. For the chemical identification of microplastics, mainly Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy are used. But up to now, a critical comparison and validation of both spectroscopic methods with respect to microplastics analysis is missing. To close this knowledge gap, we investigated environmental samples by both Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. Firstly, particles and fibres >500 μm extracted from beach sediment samples were analysed by Raman and FTIR microspectroscopic single measurements. Our results illustrate that both methods are in principle suitable to identify microplastics from the environment. However, in some cases, especially for coloured particles, a combination of both spectroscopic methods is necessary for a complete and reliable characterisation of the chemical composition. Secondly, a marine sample containing particles microplastics as well as spectra quality, measurement time and handling. We show that FTIR imaging leads to significant underestimation (about 35 %) of microplastics compared to Raman imaging, especially in the size range microplastics fraction into 500-50 μm (rapid and reliable analysis by FTIR imaging) and into 50-1 μm (detailed and more time-consuming analysis by Raman imaging). Graphical Abstract Marine microplastic sample (fraction <400 μm) on a silicon filter (middle) with the corresponding Raman and IR images.

  17. Vibrational Raman and optical studies of Cm in zirconia-based pyrochlores and related oxide matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assefa, Z.; Haire, R.G.; Raison, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to follow the phase behavior of Cm-Zr oxide materials as a function of Cm:Zr ratio. Three different structural phases, monoclinic, cubic and pyrochlore, are formed when the Cm:Zr ratio is varied from > 0 to 1. Each phase produces a distinct Raman profile in the 100-700 cm -1 spectral region. Up to 10 atom % Cm, the Raman spectra indicate that the monoclinic structure is dominant. Raman bands corresponding to the monoclinic phase are absent in samples containing 20-40 atom % Cm. Concomitantly, a band at ∼600 cm -1 broadens and increases in intensity with increasing curium content, indicating that the cubic phase is dominant in this concentration range. The pyrochlore oxide structure, which forms at 50 atom % Cm, generates three Raman bands (the center of mass are at 283, 387, 495 cm -1 ) out of six bands predicted by nuclear site group analyses. The strongest of these is at 283 cm -1 , and corresponds to the O-Cm-O bending mode. Details of these studies will be compared and discussed with data obtained for comparable systems containing selected analogous 4f-elements. (author)

  18. Chains of benzenes with lithium-atom adsorption: Vibrations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Yenni P.; Stegmann, Thomas; Klein, Douglas J.; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    We study effects of different configurations of adsorbates on the vibrational modes as well as symmetries of polyacenes and poly-p-phenylenes focusing on lithium atom adsorption. We found that the spectra of the vibrational modes distinguish the different configurations. For more regular adsorption schemes the lowest states are bending and torsion modes of the skeleton, which are essentially followed by the adsorbate. On poly-p-phenylenes we found that lithium adsorption reduces and often eli...

  19. Anomalous lattice vibrations of monolayer MoS 2 probed by ultraviolet Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive Raman scattering study of monolayer MoS2 with increasing laser excitation energies ranging from the near-infrared to the deep-ultraviolet. The Raman scattering intensities from the second-order phonon modes are revealed to be enhanced anomalously by only the ultraviolet excitation wavelength 354 nm. We demonstrate theoretically that such resonant behavior arises from a strong optical absorption that forms near the Γ point and of the band structure and an inter-valley resonant electronic scattering by the M-point phonons. These results advance our understanding of the double resonance Raman scattering process in low-dimensional semiconducting nanomaterials and provide a foundation for the technological development of monolayer MoS2 in the ultraviolet frequency range. © the Owner Societies 2015.

  20. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy of Eugenol, Isoeugenol, and Methyl Eugenol: Conformational Analysis and Vibrational Assignments from Density Functional Theory Calculations of the Anharmonic Fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhry, Babur Z; Ryall, John P; Dines, Trevor J; Mendham, Andrew P

    2015-11-19

    IR and Raman spectra of eugenol, isoeugenol and methyl eugenol have been obtained in the liquid phase. Vibrational spectroscopic results are discussed in relation to computed structures and spectra of the low energy conformations of these molecules obtained from DFT calculations at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. Although computed differences in vibrational spectra for the different conformers were generally small, close examination, in conjunction with the experimental spectra, enabled conformational analysis of all three molecules. Anharmonic contributions to computed vibrational spectra were obtained from calculations of cubic and quartic force constants at the B3LYP/DZ level. This permitted the determination of the anharmonic fundamentals for comparison with the experimental IR and Raman band positions, leading to an excellent fit between calculated and experimental spectra. Band assignments were obtained in terms of potential energy distributions (ped's).

  1. Raman spectroscopic and low-temperature calorimetric investigation of the low-energy vibrational dynamics of hen egg-white lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, C.; D'Angelo, G.; Wanderlingh, U.; Vasi, C.

    2011-05-01

    The low-frequency vibrational dynamics of chicken hen egg-white lysozyme were investigated using Raman spectroscopy and low-temperature calorimetry. An amorphous-like behaviour of low-frequency dynamics was observed in this protein. By using inelastic light scattering data and resorting to a fitting procedure, the low-temperature specific heat trend was theoretically reproduced, confirming that, as in disordered systems, the same low-energy excitations give rise to the observed anomalies in low-frequency vibrational and low-temperature thermal properties. A further study of polarised and depolarised Raman spectra has allowed us to infer information about the symmetry of these modes. The frequency dependence of the light-vibrational coupling constant has also been analysed.

  2. On the Raman and infrared vibrational spectra of the ɛ and ζ phases of oxygen. Systematic DFT studies with localized basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Calle, A. J.; Zicovich-Wilson, C. M.; Ramírez-Solís, A.

    2015-10-01

    We address the pressure evolution of the Raman and infrared vibrational modes of the ɛ and ζ phases of oxygen. We use DFT with various GGA and hybrid functionals with localized atomic basis sets. The frequency evolution of the OV, MIR, FIR, L1 and L2 modes is in good agreement with experimental data. The better performance of all methods at pressures >30 GPa is related to the decreasing multireference character of the (O2)4 unit cell wavefunction. Hybrid functionals predict the ɛ-ζ phase transition by the appearance of red-shifted L1 and L2 Raman modes in the transition pressure region.

  3. Analysis of structure and vibrational dynamics of the BeTe(001) surface using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Müller, A.; Weigand, W.

    2003-01-01

    The atomic structure and lattice dynamics of epitaxial BeTe(001) thin films are derived from surface x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. On the Te-rich BeTe(001) surface [1 (1) over bar0]-oriented Te dimers are identified. They cause a (2 X 1) superstructure and induce a pronounced buckling...... geometry and the vibration modes are in very good agreement with the results of density functional theory calculations....

  4. Vibrational assignments for the Raman and the phosphorescence spectra of 9,10-anthraquinone and 9,10-anthraquinone-d81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, K.K.; Smolarek, J.; Khalil, O.S.; Goodman, L.

    1979-01-01

    The Raman spectra of 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) and 9,10-anthraquinone-d/sub 8/ are examined. Raman band assignments are made from this data and from a published normal coordinate analysis. The Raman spectra of AQ at 5K is reported and vibrational assignments for the phosphorescence spectra of AQ in n-hexane at 4.2 K are reexamined in light of new 3 B 1 /sub g/ → 1 A/sub g/ phosphorescence data. Contrary to previous work from this laboratory, it is concluded that although higher order vibronic interactions may be operative between the two closely spaced 3 A/sub u/- 3 B 1 /sub g/ electronic states, these interactions are not manifested in the phosphorescence spectra of AQ in n-hexane at 4.2 K

  5. Vibrational spectroscopic (FTIR and FT-Raman), first-order hyperpolarizablity, HOMO, LUMO, NBO, Mulliken charge analyses of 2-ethylimidazole based on Hartree-Fock and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivazhagan, M; Manivel, S; Jeyavijayan, S; Meenakshi, R

    2015-01-05

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-ethylimidazole (2EIDZ) have been recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1), respectively. Utilizing the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out. The optimized molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities, were calculated by ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of 2EIDZ is also reported based on total energy distribution (TED). The values of the total dipole moment (μ) and the first-order hyperpolarizability (β) of the compound were computed. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Besides, HOMO and LUMO analysis, Mulliken's charge analysis and several thermodynamic properties have been calculated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural and Raman Vibrational Studies of CeO2-Bi2O3 Oxide System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bourja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of ceramics samples belonging to the CeO2-Bi2O3 phase system have been prepared via a coprecipitation route. The crystallized phases were obtained by heating the solid precursors at 600∘C for 6 hours, then quenching the samples. X-ray diffraction analyses show that for x<0.20 a solid solution Ce1−xBixO2−x/2 with fluorine structure is formed. For x ranging between 0.25 and 0.7, a tetragonal β′ phase coexisting with the FCC solid solution is observed. For x ranging between 0.8 and 0.9, a new tetragonal β phase appears. The β′ phase is postulated to be a superstructure of the β phase. Finally, close to x=1, the classical monoclinic α Bi2O3 structure is observed. Raman spectroscopy confirms the existence of the phase changes as x varies between 0 and 1.

  7. Molecular structure, vibrational analysis (FT-IR, FT-Raman), NMR, UV, NBO and HOMO-LUMO analysis of N,N-Diphenyl Formamide based on DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathammal, R; Monisha, N R; Yasaswini, S; Krishnakumar, V

    2015-03-15

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis is carried out by using Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the range 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1) respectively for N,N-Diphenyl Formamide (DPF) molecule. The optimized molecular structures, vibrational frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectra of the title molecule are evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) with standard B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies are calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions and the charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond (NBO) analysis. The possible electronic transitions are determined by HOMO-LUMO orbital shapes and their energies. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) and the first hyperpolarizability of the title compound are calculated. The Mulliken charges and electric dipole moment of the molecule are computed using DFT calculations. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift of the molecules are calculated by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vibrational Characterizations of Zn0.72Li0.28O/Si Thin Films Studied by Fourier Transform Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myo Myat Thet; Win Kyaw; Yin Maung Maung; Ko Ko Kyaw Soe

    2008-03-01

    The Zn0.72Li0.28O/Si (x = 0.28mol%) thin layers were fabricated on p-Si(100) substrate with five different process temperature. Vibrational characterizations of those thin films were investigated by FT- Raman spectroscopy. The resulted spectral line characters have been compared with that of Zn0.72Li0.28O/Glass thin films. Some vibrational motions of starting materials and final(candidate) thin films molecules were found in two substrates of glass and Si and vibrational frequencies were assigned by using molecular spectroscopy. Most of the frequencies of starting and final materials were found to be shifted in each of the films of two different substrates.

  9. Molecular structure and vibrational analysis of Trifluoperazine by FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopies combined with DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P; Gunasekaran, S; Gnanasambandan, T; Seshadri, S

    2015-02-25

    The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental vibrational modes of Trifluoperazine (TFZ) was carried out using the experimental FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis data and quantum chemical studies. The observed vibrational data were compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically for the optimized geometry of the compound from the DFT-B3LYP gradient calculations employing 6-31G (d,p) basis set. Thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and enthalpy have been calculated for the molecule. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The intramolecular contacts have been interpreted using natural bond orbital (NBO) and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) analysis. Important non-linear properties such as first hyperpolarizability of TFZ have been computed using B3LYP quantum chemical calculation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of gases with a Fourier transform spectrometer - The spectrum of D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D. E.; Weber, A.; Brault, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Fourier transform spectrometry (FTS) is presently used to record the spontaneous incoherent laser Raman spectra of gases. The high resolution, sensitivity, calibration accuracy and spectral coverage achieved demonstrate the viability of FTS for Raman spectroscopy. Attention is given to the coefficients obtained by fitting measurements obtained from the spectrum of D2, containing both v = 0-0 and 1-0 transitions, to the Dunham (1932) expansion of the vibration-rotation energy levels.

  11. Vibrational microspectroscopic identification of powdered traditional medicines: chemical micromorphology of Poria observed by infrared and Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Sun, Su-qin; Ma, Fang; Zhou, Qun

    2014-07-15

    Microscopic identification using optical microscopes is a simple and effective method to identify powdered traditional medicines made from plants, animals and fungi. Sometimes, the criteria based on physical properties of the microscopic characteristics of drug powder may be ambiguous, which makes the microscopic identification method subjective and empirical to some extent. In this research, the vibrational microspectroscopic identification method is proposed for more explicit discrimination of powdered traditional medicines. The chemical micromorphology, i.e., chemical compositions and related physical morphologies, of the drug powder can be profiled objectively and quantitatively by infrared and Raman microspectroscopy, leading to better understanding about the formation mechanisms of microscopic characteristics and more accurate identification criteria. As an example, the powder of Poria, which is one of the most used traditional Chinese medicines, is studied in this research. Three types of hyphae are classified according to their infrared spectral features in the region from 1200 to 900 cm(-1). Different kinds of polysaccharides indicate that these hyphae may be in different stages of the growth. The granular and branched clumps observed by the optical microscope may be formed from the aggregation of the mature hyphae with β-D-glucan reserves. The newfound spherical particles may originate from the exuded droplets in the fresh Poria because they are both composed of α-D-glucan. The results are helpful to understand the development of the hyphae and the formation of active polysaccharides in Poria and to establish accurate microspectroscopic identification criteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultra violet resonance Raman spectroscopy in lignin analysis: determination of characteristic vibrations of p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, and syringyl lignin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saariaho, Anna-Maija; Jääskeläinen, Anna-Stiina; Nuopponen, Mari; Vuorinen, Tapani

    2003-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy of wood and lignin samples is preferably carried out in the near-infrared region because lignin produces an intense laser-induced fluorescence background at visible excitation wavelengths. However, excitation of aromatic and conjugated lignin structures with deep ultra violet (UV) light gives resonance-enhanced Raman signals while the overlapping fluorescence is eliminated. In this study, ultra violet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy was used to define characteristic vibration bands of model compounds of p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, and syringyl lignin structures at three excitation wavelengths (229, 244, and 257 nm). The intensities of each band, relative to the intensity of the aromatic vibration band at 1600 cm-1, were defined and the most suitable excitation wavelength was suggested for each structure. p-Hydroxyphenyl structures showed intensive characteristic bands at 1217-1214 and 1179-1167 cm-1 with excitation at 244 nm, whereas the bands of guaiacyl structures were more intensive with 257 nm excitation. Most intensive characteristic bands of guaiacyl structures were found at 1289-1279, 1187-1185, 1158-1155, and 791-704 cm-1. Syringyl structures had almost identical spectra with 244 and 257 nm excitations with characteristic bands at 1514-1506, 1333-1330, and 981-962 cm-1. The characteristic bands of the three structural units were also found from the compression wood, softwood, and hardwood samples, indicating that UVRR spectroscopy can be applied for the determination of chemical structures of lignin.

  13. Vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs and a preliminary investigation of their transformation using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Hassan Refat H. [Chemical and Forensic Sciences/University Analytical Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom); Edwards, Howell G.M. [Chemical and Forensic Sciences/University Analytical Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: H.G.M.Edwards@bradford.ac.uk; Hargreaves, Michael D.; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J.; Telford, Richard J. [Chemical and Forensic Sciences/University Analytical Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-14

    Knowledge and control of the polymorphic phases of chemical compounds are important aspects of drug development in the pharmaceutical industry. Salmeterol xinafoate, a long acting {beta}-adrenergic receptor agonist, exists in two polymorphic Forms, I and II. Raman and near infrared spectra were obtained of these polymorphs at selected wavelengths in the range of 488-1064 nm; significant differences in the Raman and near-infrared spectra were apparent and key spectral marker bands have been identified for the vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of the individual polymorphs which were also characterised with X ray diffractometry. The solid-state transition of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs was studied using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry isothermally between transitions. This method assisted in the unambiguous characterisation of the two polymorphic forms by providing a simultaneous probe of both the thermal and vibrational data. The study demonstrates the value of a rapid in situ analysis of a drug polymorph which can be of potential value for at-line in-process control.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs and a preliminary investigation of their transformation using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Hassan Refat H.; Edwards, Howell G.M.; Hargreaves, Michael D.; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J.; Telford, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge and control of the polymorphic phases of chemical compounds are important aspects of drug development in the pharmaceutical industry. Salmeterol xinafoate, a long acting β-adrenergic receptor agonist, exists in two polymorphic Forms, I and II. Raman and near infrared spectra were obtained of these polymorphs at selected wavelengths in the range of 488-1064 nm; significant differences in the Raman and near-infrared spectra were apparent and key spectral marker bands have been identified for the vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of the individual polymorphs which were also characterised with X ray diffractometry. The solid-state transition of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs was studied using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry isothermally between transitions. This method assisted in the unambiguous characterisation of the two polymorphic forms by providing a simultaneous probe of both the thermal and vibrational data. The study demonstrates the value of a rapid in situ analysis of a drug polymorph which can be of potential value for at-line in-process control

  15. Vibrational spectra (FT-IR, FT-Raman), frontier molecular orbital, first hyperpolarizability, NBO analysis and thermodynamics properties of Piroxicam by HF and DFT methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S.; Gunasekaran, S.; Srinivasan, S.

    2015-03-01

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-Hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(2-pyridinyl)-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (Piroxicam) have been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1 respectively. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies and bonding features of piroxicam in the ground state have been calculated by Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) methods using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled and they are compared with experimental obtained by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the title compound has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution (PED). The electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) are also performed. The linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyper polarizability (β) values of the title compound have been computed. The molecular stability arising from hyper conjugative interaction, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis.

  16. Multiwavelength excitation Raman scattering analysis of bulk and two-dimensional MoS2: vibrational properties of atomically thin MoS2 layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placidi, Marcel; Dimitrievska, Mirjana; Izquierdo-Roca, Victor; Fontané, Xavier; Espindola-Rodriguez, Moises; López-Marino, Simon; Neuschitzer, Markus; Pérez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Pérez-Tomás, Amador; Mestres, Narcis; Bermudez, Veronica; Yaremko, Anatoliy

    2015-01-01

    In order to deepen the knowledge of the vibrational properties of two-dimensional (2D) MoS 2 atomic layers, a complete and systematic Raman scattering analysis has been performed using both bulk single-crystal MoS 2 samples and atomically thin MoS 2 layers. Raman spectra have been measured under non-resonant and resonant conditions using seven different excitation wavelengths from near-infrared (NIR) to ultraviolet (UV). These measurements have allowed us to observe and identify 41 peaks, among which 22 have not been previously experimentally observed for this compound, and characterize the existence of different resonant excitation conditions for the different excitation wavelengths. This has also included the first analysis of resonant Raman spectra that are achieved using UV excitation conditions. In addition, the analysis of atomically thin MoS 2 layers has corroborated the higher potential of UV resonant Raman scattering measurements for the non-destructive assessment of 2D MoS 2 samples. Analysis of the relative integral intensity of the additional first- and second-order peaks measured under UV resonant excitation conditions is proposed for the non-destructive characterization of the thickness of the layers, complementing previous studies based on the changes of the peak frequencies. (paper)

  17. Spontaneous nano-gap formation in Ag film using NaCl sacrificial layer for Raman enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyungchan; Jeon, Wook Jin; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Jae-Young; Yu, Hak Ki

    2018-03-01

    We report the method of fabrication of nano-gaps (known as hot spots) in Ag thin film using a sodium chloride (NaCl) sacrificial layer for Raman enhancement. The Ag thin film (20–50 nm) on the NaCl sacrificial layer undergoes an interfacial reaction due to the AgCl formed at the interface during water molecule intercalation. The intercalated water molecules can dissolve the NaCl molecules at interfaces and form the ionic state of Na+ and Cl‑, promoting the AgCl formation. The Ag atoms can migrate by the driving force of this interfacial reaction, resulting in the formation of nano-size gaps in the film. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of Ag films with nano-size gaps has been investigated using Raman reporter molecules, Rhodamine 6G (R6G).

  18. An experimental study of the structural and vibrational properties of sesquiterpene lactone cnicin using FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-visible and NMR spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Fernando; Romano, Elida; Leyton, Patricio; Paipa, Carolina; Catalán, César Atilio Nazareno; Fortuna, Mario Antonio; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2014-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of cnicin is presented, combining the use of infrared, Raman, NMR and UV-visible spectroscopies with density functional theory (DFT) that employs hybrid B3LYP exchange correlation functional and a 6-31G∗ basis set. The molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders, stabilization energies, topological properties and energy gap are presented by performing NBO, AIM and HOMO-LUMO calculations at the same level of theory as cnicin. A complete vibrational compound assignment was performed by employing internal coordinate analysis and a scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology. Comparisons between the theoretical and experimental vibrational and ultraviolet-visible spectra show a strong concordance. The geometrical parameters and NBO studies suggest a probable negative Cotton effect for cnicin, which can be attributed to the π → π∗ transition for an α,β-unsaturated γ-lactone, as reported in the literature.

  19. Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy of catalysts: Adsorption and coke formation in zeolites and vibrational spectra of supported metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Yek Tann

    2001-10-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to study the physicochemical and catalytic properties of zeolites and supported metal oxide catalysts using UV Raman spectroscopy. In order to reduce the thermal degradation and possible photodecomposition of adsorbates by UV radiation, we have developed a novel fluidized bed method for measuring the UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The UV Raman spectra of various organic compounds adsorbed in zeolites H-USY and H-ZSM-5 are recorded. When measurements are performed on stationary and spinning samples, the Raman spectra show the presence of coke, a typical end product of heat and photochemistry. In contrast, the Raman peaks of the unreacted adsorbates dominate the spectra measured using the fluidized bed method. These results indicate that the fluidized bed technique is a good method for measuring UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The formation of coke in the methanol-to-gasoline conversion over zeolite H-ZSM-5 causes deactivation of the catalyst. To gain insight into the formation of coke, we have studied this reaction using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectral changes suggest coke is produced from conjugated olefins via cyclopentadiene intermediates. Aromatic compounds in gasoline may also be produced from cyclopentadienes. The adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolites may alter the molecular sieving characteristics of these materials which ultimately affect their performance as catalysts and adsorbents. We have quantified the adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolite H-RHO using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of the zeolite after the adsorption of water, methanol or acetonitrile are consistent with an increase in the average T-O-T angle of the zeolite of 5-8°. The adsorption of ammonia, on the other hand, decreases the average T-O-T angle by 5°. Because of certain advantages of UV Raman spectroscopy over visible Raman spectroscopy, recently there is a strong interest in

  20. Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman of Biological Material

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guicheteau, Jason A; Gonser, Kristina; Christesen, Steven Dale

    2004-01-01

    .... Vibrational spectroscopic methods such as Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) provide rapid detailed fingerprint information about the molecular composition of biomaterial in a non-destructive manner...

  1. Raman-IR vibrational and XRD characterization of ancient and modern mineralogy from volcanic eruption in Tenerife Island: Implication for Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Lalla

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A detailed vibrational Raman-IR spectroscopic and diffractional analyses have been performed on basalts from two locations from Tenerife Island: (1 the Arenas Negras volcano which belongs to the historical eruption not showing visible alteration and (2 Pillow Lavas zone from Anaga Massif which shows a clearly fluid-rock interaction caused by submarine alteration. These places have been extensively studied due to its similarity with the surface of Mars. The analysis is based on the mineral detection of selected samples by a Micro-Raman study of the materials. The complementary techniques have confirmed the mineralogy detected by the Raman measurement. The results show a volcanic environment behavior with primary phases like olivine, pyroxene, and feldspar/plagioclase. Moreover, the presence of accessory minerals or secondary mineralization like phosphate, iron oxides, zeolite or carbonates shows the alteration processes on each outcrop. The variation in the crystallinity and amorphous phases is related to fluid-rock interaction caused by hydrothermal episodes and external weathering processes, which shows several analogies with the ancient volcanic activity from Mars.

  2. Molecular structure, vibrational spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman), UV and NBO analysis of 2-chlorobenzonitrile by density functional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Akhil R; Saleem, H; Subashchandrabose, S; Sundaraganesan, N; Sebastain, S

    2011-02-01

    In this work, we will report a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra, NBO and UV spectral analysis of 2-chlorobenzonitrile (2-ClBN). The FT-IR solid phase (4000-400 cm(-1)), and FT-Raman spectra (3500-50 cm(-1)) of 2-ClBN was recorded. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies and bonding features of 2-ClBN in the ground state have been calculated by using the density functional methods (BLYP, B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of normal co-ordinate analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The results show that charge in electron density (ED) in the σ* and π* anti bonding orbitals and E2 energies confirms the occurrence of ICT (Intra molecular Charge Transfer) within the molecule. The UV spectrum was measured in ethanol solution. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies also confirm that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Finally calculated results were applied to simulated Infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which show good agreement with observed spectra. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Interference-free optical detection for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Fischer, David G (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) that utilizes a frame-transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor operating in a subframe burst gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics is disclosed. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds (<5 .mu.s), without compromising optical throughput or image fidelity. When used in conjunction with a pair of orthogonally-polarized excitation lasers, the technique measures time-resolved vibrational Raman scattering that is minimally contaminated by problematic optical background noise.

  4. Efficient 1.9 μm emission in H2-filled hollow core fiber by pure stimulated vibrational Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zefeng; Yu, Fei; Wadsworth, William J; Knight, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    We report here efficient 1.9 μm emission by pure stimulated vibrational Raman scattering in a hydrogen-filled anti-resonant hollow-core fiber pumped with a 1064 nm microchip laser. A maximum quantum conversion efficiency ∼48% was achieved by using a 6.5 m length of fiber filled with 23 bar hydrogen, with a maximum peak output power >2 kW. By properly designing the transmission bands of the fiber, selecting alternative pump sources and active gases, the emission wavelength could be extended into the mid-infrared. This provides a potential route for generating efficient, compact, broadly tunable, high power, and narrow linewidth mid-infrared fiber gas lasers with broad application in defense, environmental, and medical monitoring. (letter)

  5. Visualizing Resonances in the Complex Plane with Vibrational Phase Contrast Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Garbacik, E.T.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Otto, Cornelis; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2010-01-01

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the emitted signal carries both amplitude and phase information of the molecules in the focal volume. Most CARS experiments ignore the phase component, but its detection allows for two advantages over intensity-only CARS. First, the pure resonant

  6. Electronic [UV-Visible] and vibrational [FT-IR, FT-Raman] investigation and NMR-mass spectroscopic analysis of terephthalic acid using quantum Gaussian calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, N; Prince, J Joseph; Ramalingam, S; Periandy, S

    2015-03-15

    In this research work, the vibrational IR, polarization Raman, NMR and mass spectra of terephthalic acid (TA) were recorded. The observed fundamental peaks (IR, Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The hybrid computational calculations were carried out for calculating geometrical and vibrational parameters by DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The molecular mass spectral data related to base molecule and substitutional group of the compound was analyzed. The modification of the chemical property by the reaction mechanism of the injection of dicarboxylic group in the base molecule was investigated. The (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra were simulated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and the absolute chemical shifts related to TMS were compared with experimental spectra. The study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by hybrid Gaussian calculation methods. The orbital energies of different levels of HOMO and LUMO were calculated and the molecular orbital lobe overlapping showed the inter charge transformation between the base molecule and ligand group. From the frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), the possibility of electrophilic and nucleophilic hit also analyzed. The NLO activity of the title compound related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability were also discussed. The present molecule was fragmented with respect to atomic mass and the mass variation depends on the substitutions have also been studied. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electronic [UV-Visible] and vibrational [FT-IR, FT-Raman] investigation and NMR-mass spectroscopic analysis of terephthalic acid using quantum Gaussian calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, N.; Joseph Prince, J.; Ramalingam, S.; Periandy, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this research work, the vibrational IR, polarization Raman, NMR and mass spectra of terephthalic acid (TA) were recorded. The observed fundamental peaks (IR, Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The hybrid computational calculations were carried out for calculating geometrical and vibrational parameters by DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The molecular mass spectral data related to base molecule and substitutional group of the compound was analyzed. The modification of the chemical property by the reaction mechanism of the injection of dicarboxylic group in the base molecule was investigated. The 13C and 1H NMR spectra were simulated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and the absolute chemical shifts related to TMS were compared with experimental spectra. The study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by hybrid Gaussian calculation methods. The orbital energies of different levels of HOMO and LUMO were calculated and the molecular orbital lobe overlapping showed the inter charge transformation between the base molecule and ligand group. From the frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), the possibility of electrophilic and nucleophilic hit also analyzed. The NLO activity of the title compound related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability were also discussed. The present molecule was fragmented with respect to atomic mass and the mass variation depends on the substitutions have also been studied.

  8. Resonance Raman detection of iron-ligand vibrations in cyano(pyridine)(octaethylporphinato)iron(III): Effects of pyridine basicity on the Fe-CN bond strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Tadayuki; Hatano, Keiichiro; Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Arata, Yoji

    1988-01-01

    The influence of axial ligand basicity on the bonding of iron(III) in cyano adducts of octaethylporphyrin has been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. In a six-coordinate ferric low-spin complex, cyano(pyridine)(octaethylporphinato)iron(III), Fe(OEP)(CN)(py), Raman lines at 449 and 191 cm -1 were assigned to the ν(Fe-CN) and ν(Fe-py) stretching modes, respectively. When pyridine was displaced with its derivatives, py-X, where X = 4-cyano, 3-acetyl, 3-methyl, 4-methyl, 3,4-dimethyl, and 4-dimethylamino, the ν(Fe-CN) stretching frequency was found to decrease in the complex with a high pyridine basicity. It was concluded that the stronger the trans pyridine basicity, the weaker the iron-carbon (cyanide) bond. A clear frequency shift was observed in the ν 4 model, though most of the porphyrin vibrations were insensitive to the ligand substitution. The frequency of the ν 4 mode, which is the C a -N(pyrrole) breathing vibration of the porphyrin skeleton, was found to increase with an increase in pyridine basicity. This is contrary to what was found in ferrous low-spin hemes as CO complexes. The ν 4 shift in the CN complexes was explained in terms of forward π donation; donation of electrons from the porphyrin π orbital to the d π vacancy of the low-spin iron(III) weakened the C a -N(pyrrole) bonds and hence decreased the ν 4 frequency. 32 references, 8 figures

  9. Raman spectroscopy for cancer detection and characterization in metastasis models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Shigehiro; Oshima, Yusuke; Sato, Mitsunori; Ishimaru, Kei; Yoshida, Motohira; Yamamoto, Yuji; Matsuno, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yuji

    2017-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a wealth of diagnostic information to the surgeon with in situ cancer detection and label-free histopathology in clinical practice. Raman spectroscopy is a developing optical technique which can analyze biological tissues with light scattering. The difference in frequencies between the incident light and the scattering light are called Raman shifts, which correspond to the vibrational energy of the molecular bonds. Raman spectrum gives information about the molecular structure and composition in biological specimens. We had been previously reported that Raman spectroscopy could distinguish various histological types of human lung cancer cells from normal cells in vitro. However, to identify and detect cancer diagnostic biomarkers in vivo on Raman spectroscopy is still challenging, because malignancy can be characterized not only by the cancer cells but also by the environmental factors including immune cells, stroma cells, secretion vesicles and extracellular matrix. Here we investigate morphological and molecular dynamics in both cancer cells and their environment in xenograft models and spontaneous metastasis models using Raman spectroscopy combined with fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We are also constructing a custom-designed Raman spectral imaging system for both in vitro and in vivo assay of tumor tissues to reveal the metastasis process and to evaluate therapeutic effects of anti-cancer drugs and their drug delivery toward the clinical application of the technique.

  10. Effects of the voids filling on the lattice vibrations for the CoSb3-based thermoelectric materials-Raman scattering spectra and theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Pengxian; Shen Zigang; Hu Xing

    2010-01-01

    The unfilled CoSb 3 and the voids filled skutterudites (La, Ce and La 0.5 Ce 0.5 ) Fe 3 CoSb 12 powders were synthesized via a hydrothermal route and the effects of the La and Ce filling in the voids on the Raman scattering spectra were investigated. The results suggest that the phonon vibration frequencies of the filled skutterudites in the lower frequency range shift down significantly, while the others in the higher frequency range shift up slightly as compared with the unfilled CoSb 3 . The calculated phonon frequencies for the (La, Ce and La 0.5 Ce 0.5 ) Fe 3 CoSb 12 indicate that all the frequencies shift down, but the frequency shifting down in the lower frequency range is more remarkable than that in the higher frequency range. By comparing the electron density differences of the unfilled CoSb 3 and the voids filled (La, Ce and La 0.5 Ce 0.5 ) Fe 3 CoSb 12 , the frequency shifting phenomena observed in the Raman scattering spectra may be attributed to the complex bonding behaviors between the La or Ce atoms with the parent Co and Sb atoms.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallinger, R.F.; Farquharson, S.; Woodruff, W.H.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S 0 and T 1 states of the carotenoids β-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C 50 )-β-carotene, β-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl β-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S 0 and T 1 , regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S 0 and T 1 reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited state which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T 1 states of carotenoids and in the S 1 states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S 1 lifetime (of the 1 B/sub u/ and/or the 1 A/sub g/* states) of β-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps

  12. Vibrational study by inelastic neutron scattering, infrared absorption and Raman scattering of potassium, rubidium and cesium dihydrogenarsenate crystals: Comparison with thallium dihydrogenarsenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Calvé, Nicole; Pasquier, Bernadette; Ouafik, Zahra

    1997-10-01

    The vibrational study of polycrystalline potassium, rubidium and cesium dihydrogenarsenates, KH 2AsO 4 RbH 2AsO 4 and CsH 2AsO 4, has been undertaken in the 20-4000 cm -1 range. The inelastic neutron scattering spectra obtained at 20 K allow a precise assignment of the OH vibrations. The infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectra of the paraelectric and ferroelectric phases have been analyzed. The three compounds are isomorphous with KH 2PO 4. The results are compared to those obtained for the thallium dihydrogenarsenate TlH 2AsO 4. In all compounds the proton dynamics appear weakly coupled to heavy atoms motions. The order-disorder transition at Tc is associated to relational motions of anions and protons in the tetragonal potassium, rubidium and cesium dihydrogenarsenates and to collective reorientational motions of anions in monoclinic thallium derivative. The spectroscopic features show the participation of cations K t, Rb + and Cs + to the dynamics of the three-dimensional lattice in both phases. In contrast, heavy-cation Tl + motions are decoupled from the dynamics of hydrogen bond layers. No correlation between ordering of lattice and OH stretching wavenumber is observed.

  13. 1.7  μm band narrow-linewidth tunable Raman fiber lasers pumped by spectrum-sliced amplified spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Di; Du, Quanli; Li, Xiaoyan; Han, Kexuan; Zhang, Lizhong; Wang, Tianshu; Jiang, Huilin

    2017-12-10

    A 1.7 μm band tunable narrow-linewidth Raman fiber laser based on spectrally sliced amplified spontaneous emission (SS-ASE) and multiple filter structures is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In this scheme, an SS-ASE source is employed as a pump source in order to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering. The ring configuration includes a 500 m long high nonlinear optical fiber and a 10 km long dispersion shifted fiber as the gain medium. A segment of un-pumped polarization-maintaining erbium-doped fiber is used to modify the shape of the spectrum. Furthermore, a nonlinear polarization rotation scheme is applied as the wavelength selector to generate lasers. A high-finesse ring filter and a ring filter are used to narrow the linewidth of the laser, respectively. We demonstrate tuning capabilities of a single laser over 28 nm between 1652 nm and 1680 nm by adjusting the polarization controller (PC) and tunable filter. The tunable laser has a 0.023 nm effective linewidth with the high-finesse ring filter. The stable multi-wavelength laser operation of up to four wavelengths can be obtained by adjusting the PC carefully when the pump power increases.

  14. Propagation of a strong x-ray pulse: Pulse compression, stimulated Raman scattering, amplified spontaneous emission, lasing without inversion, and four-wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Liu Jicai; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-01-01

    We study the compression of strong x-ray pulses from x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) propagating through the resonant medium of atomic argon. The simulations are based on the three-level model with the frequency of the incident x-ray pulse tuned in the 2p 3/2 -4s resonance. The pulse propagation is accompanied by the self-seeded stimulated resonant Raman scattering (SRRS). The SRRS starts from two channels of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), 4s-2p 3/2 and 3s-2p 3/2 , which form the extensive ringing pattern and widen the power spectrum. The produced seed field triggers the Stokes ASE channel 3s-2p 3/2 . The population inversion is quenched for longer propagation distances where the ASE is followed by the lasing without inversion (LWI), which amplifies the Stokes component. Both ASE and LWI reshape the input pulse: The compressed front part of the pulse (up to 100 as) is followed by the long tail of the ringing and beating between the pump and Stokes frequencies. The pump pulse also generates weaker Stokes and anti-Stokes fields caused by four-wave mixing. These four spectral bands have fine structures caused by the dynamical Stark effect. A slowdown of the XFEL pulse up to 78% of the speed of light in vacuum is found because of a large nonlinear refractive index.

  15. Conformational preference of a chiral terpene: vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), infrared and Raman study of S-(-)-limonene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Juan Ramón Avilés; Ureña, Francisco Partal; González, Juan Jesús López

    2009-04-14

    S-(-)-Limonene oxide (4-isopropenyl-1-methyl-7-oxabicyclo[4.1.0]heptane) is a secondary metabolite and an atmospheric pollutant product of oxidation of other terpenes, such as limonene and alpha-pinene, among others. For the first time, a theoretical study of the molecular structure and a theoretical and experimental analysis of the infrared and Raman spectra of this chemical species are presented. Theoretical calculations reveal the existence of two conformers depending on the position of the isopropenyl group (axial and equatorial) and twelve rotamers (six equatorials and six axials), with the six equatorial ones as the most stable (around 97%) on the basis of Boltzmann's distribution law. In the current work, from a reliable assignment of the IR and Raman spectra and with the help from the study of the VCD spectrum of the title compound, five rotamers have been detected experimentally in the liquid phase. The present work reveals that IR, Raman and VCD are helpful complementary techniques to characterize flexible systems, as terpenes, which present several conformers.

  16. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, and NMR spectroscopy and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Fernando E; Leyton, Patricio; Paipa, Carolina; Fortuna, Mario; Brandán, Silvia A

    2015-03-05

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR spectroscopies and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to study the structural and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol using the hybrid B3LYP method together with the 6-31G(∗) basis set. Three stable structures with minimum energy found on the potential energy curves (PES) were optimized, and the corresponding molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders, stabilization energies and topological properties were computed at the same approximation level. The complete assignment of the bands observed in the vibrational spectrum of 13-epi-sclareol was performed taking into account the internal symmetry coordinates for the three structures using the scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology at the same level of theory. In addition, the force constants were calculated and compared with those reported in the literature for similar compounds. The predicted vibrational spectrum and the calculated (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR chemical shifts are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results. The theoretical UV-Vis spectra for the most stable structure of 13-epi-sclareol demonstrate a better correlation with the corresponding experimental spectrum. The study of the three conformers by means of the theory of atoms in molecules (AIM) revealed different H bond interactions and a strong dependence of the interactions on the distance between the involved atoms. Furthermore, the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations showed the characteristics of the electronic delocalization for the two six-membered rings with chair conformations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  18. Molecular structure, vibrational spectroscopic analysis (IR & Raman), HOMO-LUMO and NBO analysis of anti-cancer drug sunitinib using DFT method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mıhçıokur, Özlem; Özpozan, Talat

    2017-12-01

    Oxindole and its derivatives have wide applications in different industries such as in synthetic & natural fibers, dyes for hair and plastic materials in addition to their biological importance. In the present study, one of the oxindole derivatives, N-(2-diethylaminoethyl)-5-[(Z)-(5-fluoro-2-oxo-1H-indol-3-ylidene)methyl]-2,4-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide (Sunitinib), which is used as an anti-cancer drug, was investigated in terms of structural, vibrational spectroscopic and theoretical analysis. The calculations have been performed for gaseous, aqueous and DMSO phases, respectively. Potential Energy Surface (PES) scan has been carrried out to obtain the most stable structures of all the phases of the title molecule using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level and the geometrical variations among them are discussed. The solvent effect for Sunitinib in aqueous and DMSO phases have been performed by means of the self-consistent recognition reaction field (SCRF) method as implemented in the integral equation formalism polarized continuum model (IEFPCM). On the other hand, NBO analysis has been carried out to understand probable hydrogen bonding sites and charge transfers. Additionally, the HOMO and the LUMO energies are calculated using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) to determine the intra molecular charge transfers (ICT) within the molecule and the kinetic stabilities for each phases. The molecular electrostatic potential surface (MESP) has been plotted over the optimized structure to estimate the reactive sites of electrophilic and nucleophilic attacks regarding Sunitinib molecule. The potential energy distribution (PED) has been calculated using VEDA4 program and vibrational assignments of the experimental spectra (IR & Raman) have been elucidated by means of the calculated vibrational spectra. The observed vibrational spectra of Sunitinib is compared with the calculated spectra obtained by using B3LYP functional both with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Theoretical results

  19. Adsorption and Vibrational Study of Folic Acid on Gold Nanopillar Structures Using Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Rozo, Ciro E.

    2015-01-01

    on the nanopillars within the high electromagnetic field areas. The adsorption behaviour of folic acid and the band assignment of the main vibrations together with the optimized geometry of folic acid and folic acid in the presence of a cluster of 10 gold atoms were assessed using the density functional theory (B3...... that the interaction of folic acid with the Au NP occurred primarily through the nitrogen atoms, from their pteridine ring. Finally, the obtained adsorption isotherm for folic acid was deduced from the analysis of the SERS spectra and it followed a negative cooperative binding model....

  20. Molecules-in-molecules fragment-based method for the calculation of chiroptical spectra of large molecules: Vibrational circular dichroism and Raman optical activity spectra of alanine polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K V Jovan; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-12-01

    The molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method has recently been adapted to evaluate the chiroptical (vibrational circular dichroism [VCD] and Raman optical activity [ROA]) spectra of large molecules such as peptides. In the MIM-VCD and MIM-ROA methods, the relevant higher energy derivatives of the parent molecule are assembled from the corresponding derivatives of smaller fragment subsystems. In addition, the missing long-range interfragment interactions are accounted at a computationally less expensive level of theory (MIM2). In this work we employed the MIM-VCD and MIM-ROA fragment-based methods to explore the evolution of the chiroptical spectroscopic characteristics of 3 10 -helix, α-helix, β-hairpin, γ-turn, and β-extended conformers of gas phase polyalanine (chain length n = 6-14). The different conformers of polyalanine show distinctive features in the MIM chiroptical spectra and the associated spectral intensities increase with evolution of system size. For a better understanding the site-specific effects on the vibrational spectra, isotopic substitutions were also performed employing the MIM method. An increasing redshift with the number of isotopically labeled 13 C=O functional groups in the peptide molecule was seen. For larger polypeptides, we implemented the two-step-MIM model to circumvent the high computational expense associated with the evaluation of chiroptical spectra at a high level of theory using large basis sets. The chiroptical spectra of α-(alanine) 20 polypeptide obtained using the two-step-MIM model, including continuum solvation effects, show good agreement with the full calculations and experiment. This benchmark study suggests that the MIM-fragment approach can assist in predicting and interpreting chiroptical spectra of large polypeptides. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Next generation hazard detection via ultrafast coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John J.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2013-05-01

    Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (MCARS) is used to detect an explosive precursor material and two chemical warfare simulants. The spectral bandwidth of the femtosecond laser pulse used in these studies is sufficient to coherently and simultaneously drive all the vibrational modes in the molecule of interest. The research performed here demonstrates that MCARS has the capability to detect an explosive precursor (e.g., acetone) and hazardous materials, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (a sarin and a mustard gas chemical warfare simulant, respectively), with high specificity. Evidence shows that MCARS is capable of overcoming common the sensitivity limitations of spontaneous Raman scattering, thus allowing for the detection of the target material in milliseconds with standard USB spectrometers as opposed to seconds with intensified spectrometers. The exponential increase in the number of scattered photons suggests that the MCARS technique may be capable of overcoming range detection challenges common to spontaneous Raman scattering.

  2. Molecular vibrational investigation [FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR] on Bis(thiourea) Nickel chloride using HF and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S; Sundararajan, R S; Ramachandraraja, C; Ramalingam, S; Durga, R

    2015-03-05

    In the present research work, the FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra of the Bis(thiourea) Nickel chloride (BTNC) were recorded and analyzed. The observed fundamental frequencies in finger print and functional group regions were assigned according to their uniqueness region. The computational calculations were carried out by HF and DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The present organo-metallic compound was made up of covalent and coordination covalent bonds. The modified vibrational pattern of the complex molecule associated with ligand group was analyzed. Furthermore, the (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR spectral data were calculated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their spectra were simulated and the chemical shifts linked to TMS were compared. A investigation on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies were carried out. The kubo gap of the present compound was calculated related to HOMO and LUMO energies which confirm the occurring of charge transformation between the base and ligand. Besides frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. The NLO properties related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability based on the finite-field approach were also discussed. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular vibrational investigation [FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR] on Bis(thiourea) Nickel chloride using HF and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S.; Sundararajan, R. S.; Ramachandraraja, C.; Ramalingam, S.; Durga, R.

    2015-03-01

    In the present research work, the FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra of the Bis(thiourea) Nickel chloride (BTNC) were recorded and analyzed. The observed fundamental frequencies in finger print and functional group regions were assigned according to their uniqueness region. The computational calculations were carried out by HF and DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The present organo-metallic compound was made up of covalent and coordination covalent bonds. The modified vibrational pattern of the complex molecule associated with ligand group was analyzed. Furthermore, the 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectral data were calculated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their spectra were simulated and the chemical shifts linked to TMS were compared. A investigation on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies were carried out. The kubo gap of the present compound was calculated related to HOMO and LUMO energies which confirm the occurring of charge transformation between the base and ligand. Besides frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. The NLO properties related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability based on the finite-field approach were also discussed.

  4. Resonance Raman studies of Escherichia coli sulfite reductase hemoprotein. 2. Fe4S4 cluster vibrational modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, J.F.; Siegel, L.M.; Han, Sanghwa; Spiro, T.G.

    1989-01-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra from the hemoprotein subunit of Escherichia coli sulfite reductase (SiR-HP) are examined in the low-frequency (200-500 cm -1 ) region where Fe-S stretching modes are expected. In spectra obtained with excitation in the siroheme Soret or Q bands, this region is dominated by siroheme modes. Modes assignable to the Fe 4 S 4 cluster are selectively enhanced, however, with excitation at 488.0 or 457.9 nm. The assignments are confirmed by observation of the expected frequency shifts in SiR-HP extracted from E. coli grown on 34 S-labeled sulfate. The mode frequencies and isotopic shifts resemble those seen in RR spectra of other Fe 4 S 4 proteins and analogues, but the breathing mode of the cluster at 342 cm -1 is higher than that observed in the other species. Spectra of various ligand complexes of SiR-HP reveal only slight sensitivity of the cluster terminal ligand modes to the presence of exogenous heme ligands, at variance with a model of ligand binding in a bridged mode between heme and cluster. Close examination of RR spectra obtained with siroheme Soret-band excitation reveals additional 34 S-sensitive features at 352 and 393 cm -1 . These may be attributed to a bridging thiolate ligand

  5. Theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational analysis included FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV techniques of 2,4,5-trimethylbenzoic acid (monomer and dimer structures).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Atac, Ahmet

    2015-01-05

    Theoretical study on the structural and vibrational analysis of monomer and dimer structures of 2,4,5-trimethylbenzoic acid (2,4,5-TMBA, C₁₀H₁₂O₂) were presented. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and the Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of the title molecule in solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1), respectively. The geometrical parameters and energies were investigated with the help of Density Functional Theory (DFT) employing B3LYP method and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes. The geometric parameters were compared with experimental data of the title molecule. The UV absorption spectrum of the studied compound was computed and recorded in the range of 190-400 nm dissolved in water and ethanol. Besides, charge transfer occurring in the molecule between HOMO and LUMO energies, frontier energy gap, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were calculated and presented. In addition these, thermodynamic properties and Mulliken atomic charges were performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Super-multiplex vibrational imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lu; Chen, Zhixing; Shi, Lixue; Long, Rong; Anzalone, Andrew V.; Zhang, Luyuan; Hu, Fanghao; Yuste, Rafael; Cornish, Virginia W.; Min, Wei

    2017-04-01

    The ability to visualize directly a large number of distinct molecular species inside cells is increasingly essential for understanding complex systems and processes. Even though existing methods have successfully been used to explore structure-function relationships in nervous systems, to profile RNA in situ, to reveal the heterogeneity of tumour microenvironments and to study dynamic macromolecular assembly, it remains challenging to image many species with high selectivity and sensitivity under biological conditions. For instance, fluorescence microscopy faces a ‘colour barrier’, owing to the intrinsically broad (about 1,500 inverse centimetres) and featureless nature of fluorescence spectra that limits the number of resolvable colours to two to five (or seven to nine if using complicated instrumentation and analysis). Spontaneous Raman microscopy probes vibrational transitions with much narrower resonances (peak width of about 10 inverse centimetres) and so does not suffer from this problem, but weak signals make many bio-imaging applications impossible. Although surface-enhanced Raman scattering offers high sensitivity and multiplicity, it cannot be readily used to image specific molecular targets quantitatively inside live cells. Here we use stimulated Raman scattering under electronic pre-resonance conditions to image target molecules inside living cells with very high vibrational selectivity and sensitivity (down to 250 nanomolar with a time constant of 1 millisecond). We create a palette of triple-bond-conjugated near-infrared dyes that each displays a single peak in the cell-silent Raman spectral window; when combined with available fluorescent probes, this palette provides 24 resolvable colours, with the potential for further expansion. Proof-of-principle experiments on neuronal co-cultures and brain tissues reveal cell-type-dependent heterogeneities in DNA and protein metabolism under physiological and pathological conditions, underscoring the

  7. Probing the evaporation of ternary ethanol-methanol-water droplets by cavity enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howle, Chris R; Homer, Chris J; Hopkins, Rebecca J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2007-10-21

    Cavity enhanced Raman scattering is used to characterise the evolving composition of ternary aerosol droplets containing methanol, ethanol and water during evaporation into a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Measurements made using non-linear stimulated Raman scattering from these ternary alcohol-water droplets allow the in situ determination of the concentration of the two alcohol components with high accuracy. The overlapping spontaneous Raman bands of the two alcohol components, arising from C-H stretching vibrational modes, are spectrally-resolved in stimulated Raman scattering measurements. We also demonstrate that the evaporation measurements are consistent with a quasi-steady state evaporation model, which can be used to interpret the evaporation dynamics occurring at a range of pressures at a particular evaporation time.

  8. Raman Scattering Study of Lattice Vibrations in the Type-II Superlattice InAs /InAs1 -xSbx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Henan; Zhang, Yong; Steenbergen, Elizabeth H.; Liu, Shi; Lin, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yong-Hang; Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Kim, Jin K.; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Klem, John F.

    2017-09-01

    The InAs /InAs1 -xSbx superlattice system distinctly differs from two well-studied superlattice systems GaAs /AlAs and InAs /GaSb in terms of electronic band alignment, common elements at the interface, and phonon spectrum overlapping of the constituents. This fact leads to the unique electronic and vibrational properties of the InAs /InAs1 -xSbx system when compared to the other two systems. In this work, we report a polarized Raman study of the vibrational properties of the InAs /InAs1 -xSbx superlattices (SLs) as well as selected InAs1 -xSbx alloys, all grown on GaSb substrates by either MBE or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) from both the growth surface and cleaved edge. In the SL, from the (001) backscattering geometry, an InAs-like longitudinal optical (LO) mode is observed as the primary feature, and its intensity is found to increase with increasing Sb composition. From the (110) cleaved-edge backscattering geometry, an InAs-like transverse optical (TO) mode is observed as the main feature in two cross-polarization configurations, but an additional InAs-like "forbidden" LO mode is observed in two parallel-polarization configurations. The InAs1 -xSbx alloys lattice matched to the substrate (xSb˜0.09 ) grown by MBE are also found to exhibit the forbidden LO mode, implying the existence of some unexpected [001] modulation. However, the strained samples (xSb˜0.35 ) grown by MOCVD are found to behave like a disordered alloy. The primary conclusions are (1) the InAs-like LO or TO mode can be either a confined or quasiconfined mode in the InAs layers of the SL or extended mode of the whole structure depending on the Sb composition. (2) InAs /InAs1 -xSbx and InAs /GaSb SLs exhibit significantly different behaviors in the cleaved-edge geometry but qualitatively similar in the (001) geometry. (3) The appearance of the forbidden LO-like mode is a universal signature for SLs and bulk systems resulting from the mixing of phonon modes due to structural

  9. Theoretical, ab initio and DFT, study of the structure and vibrational analysis of Raman, IR and INS spectra of (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}SiNCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Liencres, M.P. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, University of Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain)], E-mail: liencres@ujaen.es; Navarro, A. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, University of Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Ben Altabef, A. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Bioquimica, Quimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, San Lorenzo 456, 4000 S.M. de Tucuman (Argentina); Lopez-Gonzalez, J.J. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, University of Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Fernandez-Gomez, M. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, University of Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Kearley, G.J. [Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-11-08

    The molecular geometry for trimethylsilylisocyanate ((CH{sub 3}){sub 3}SiNCO) has been calculated at MP2 and DFT/B3LYP and DFT/B3PW91 methods, and using the 6-31G*, 6-311G**, 6-311++G**, cc-pVDZ and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The equilibrium structure of the molecule, linear or bent as concerns the -SiNCO moiety, was found to rely on the method employed. The potential energy surface of -SiNC bending has been investigated by quantum mechanical ab initio calculations at MPn (n = 2-4) and QCISD(T) levels of theory with the cc-pVTZ basis set. This large amplitude bending motion (the {upsilon} {sub 24} mode) was determined to be very anharmonic, with a low barrier to linearity of the SiNCO skeleton of {approx}4-25 cm{sup -1}. New vapour and liquid IR, liquid Raman spectra and, for first time, INS spectrum have been recorded, and a complete vibrational assignment has been performed. INS data have allowed to assign two modes at 674 cm{sup -1} and 141 cm{sup -1} which, so far, have been considered as silent, i.e. A{sub 2}, since previous authors have used a frame of C {sub 3v} symmetry for this system. The intermolecular interactions show to have little effect on the torsional region (below 250 cm{sup -1} in INS spectrum) and the isolated-molecule approximation works well in that region. A normal coordinate analysis has been carried out by scaling the force fields calculated at MP2/6-311++G** and B3LYP/cc-pVDZ levels of theory using the scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology. In order to get the best possible agreement between calculated and observed vibrational wavenumbers, the scale factors were refined by least squares yielding a final r.m.s. of {approx}7 cm{sup -1}.

  10. Resonance Raman studies of Co-O2 and O-O stretching vibrations in oxy-cobalt hemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, H C; Tsubaki, M; Yu, N T

    1983-03-01

    Strong evidence suggests that the stretching vibration of the bound oxygen can be perturbed by an accidentally degenerate porphyrin ring mode, resulting in two split frequencies. In the Co(II)(TpivPP) (pyridine) (18)O(2) complex, we demonstrate that the nu((18)O-(18)O) mode, after being shifted from its nu((16)O-(16)O) value at 1,156 cm(-1), undergoes a resonance interaction with the 1,080 cm(-1) porphyrin mode, giving rise to two lines at 1,067 and 1,089 cm(-1). In the O(2) complex of Co(II) mesoporphyrin IX-substituted sperm whale myoglobin, we observed a dramatic intensity increase at 1,132 cm(-1) upon (16)O(2) --> (18)O(2) substitution, which is due to the reappearance of the 1,132-cm(-1) porphyrin mode after the removal of resonance conditions. A decrease in O(2) binding affinity, caused by the proximal base tension, corresponds to an increase in the Co-O(2) stretching frequency. The nu(Co-O(2)) at 527 cm(-1) for the low affinity Co(II)(TpivPP)(1,2-Me(2)Im) O(2) complex is 11 cm(-1) higher than the 516-cm(-1) value for the high affinity complex (with N-MeIm replacing 1,2-Me(2)Im). However, in the corresponding iron complexes the reverse behavior is observed, i.e., the nu(Fe-O(2)) decreases for the (1,2-Me(2)Im) complex. There is a 24-cm(-1) difference in the Co-O(2) stretching frequencies between Co(II)(TpivPP)(N-MeIm)O(2) (at 516 cm(-1)) and oxy meso CoMb (at 540 cm(-1)), suggesting a protein induced distortion of the Co-O-O linkage. However, the values for nu(Fe-O(2)) are nearly identical between Fe(II)(TpivPP)(N-MeIm)O(2) (at 571 cm(-1)) and oxy Mb (at 573 cm(-1)), indicating that O(2) binds to myoglobin in the same manner as in the sterically unhindered "picket fence" complex. Evidence is presented that suggests the presence of two dioxygen stretching frequencies due to two different conformers in each of the N-MeIm and 1,2-Me(2)Im complex of oxy Co(II)(TpivPP).

  11. Resonance Raman Studies of Co—O2 and O—O Stretching Vibrations in Oxy-Cobalt Hemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Helen C.; Tsubaki, Motonari; Yu, Nai-Teng

    1983-01-01

    Strong evidence suggests that the stretching vibration of the bound oxygen can be perturbed by an accidentally degenerate porphyrin ring mode, resulting in two split frequencies. In the Co(II)(TpivPP) (pyridine) 18O2 complex, we demonstrate that the ν(18O—18O) mode, after being shifted from its ν(16O—16O) value at 1,156 cm-1, undergoes a resonance interaction with the 1,080 cm-1 porphyrin mode, giving rise to two lines at 1,067 and 1,089 cm-1. In the O2 complex of Co(II) mesoporphyrin IX-substituted sperm whale myoglobin, we observed a dramatic intensity increase at 1,132 cm-1 upon 16O2 → 18O2 substitution, which is due to the reappearance of the 1,132-cm-1 porphyrin mode after the removal of resonance conditions. A decrease in O2 binding affinity, caused by the proximal base tension, corresponds to an increase in the Co—O2 stretching frequency. The ν(Co—O2) at 527 cm-1 for the low affinity Co(II)(TpivPP)(1,2-Me2Im) O2 complex is 11 cm-1 higher than the 516-cm-1 value for the high affinity complex (with N-MeIm replacing 1,2-Me2Im). However, in the corresponding iron complexes the reverse behavior is observed, i.e., the ν(Fe—O2) decreases for the (1,2-Me2Im) complex. There is a 24-cm-1 difference in the Co—O2 stretching frequencies between Co(II)(TpivPP)(N-MeIm)O2 (at 516 cm-1) and oxy meso CoMb (at 540 cm-1), suggesting a protein induced distortion of the Co—O—O linkage. However, the values for ν(Fe—O2) are nearly identical between Fe(II)(TpivPP)(N-MeIm)O2 (at 571 cm-1) and oxy Mb (at 573 cm-1), indicating that O2 binds to myoglobin in the same manner as in the sterically unhindered “picket fence” complex. Evidence is presented that suggests the presence of two dioxygen stretching frequencies due to two different conformers in each of the N-MeIm and 1,2-Me2Im complex of oxy Co(II)(TpivPP). PMID:6838973

  12. Normal coordinate analysis and vibrational spectroscopy (FT-IR and FT-Raman) studies of (2S)-2-amino-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-methylpropanoic acid using ab initio HF and DFT method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakaran, A.; Muthu, S.

    2012-12-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of (2S)-2-amino-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-methylpropanoic acid (2ADMA) were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The geometrical structure, harmonic vibrational frequency, infrared intensity, Raman activities and bonding features of this compound was carried out by ab initio HF and DFT methods with 6-31G (d,p) basis set. The complete vibrational frequency assignments were made by normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology (SQMF). The electric dipole moment (μ) and the first-order hyperpolarizability (β0) values have been the computed quantum mechanically. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that, the charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The charge delocalizations of these molecules have been analyzed using NBO analysis. The solvent effects have been calculated using TD-DFT in combination with the polarized continuum model (PCM), and the results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The other molecular properties like Mulliken population analysis, electrostatic potential (ESP) and thermodynamic properties of the title compound at the different temperatures have been calculated. Finally, the calculation results were applied to simulate infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which shows good agreement with observed spectra.

  13. NBO, HOMO-LUMO, UV, NLO, NMR and vibrational analysis of veratrole using FT-IR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR spectra and HF-DFT computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvitha, A; Periandy, S; Gayathri, P

    2015-03-05

    This work deals with FT-IR, FT-Raman and FT-NMR spectral analysis and NBO, NLO, HOMO-LUMO and electronic transitions studies on veratrole. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands were interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and geometrical parameter calculations based on Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by time independent DFT approach. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), Natural Bond-Orbital (NBO) analysis and thermodynamic properties were performed. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental chemical shift. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectroscopic investigation (FT-IR and FT-Raman), vibrational assignments, HOMO-LUMO analysis and molecular docking study of 1-hydroxy-4,5,8-tris(4-methoxyphenyl) anthraquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renjith, R.; Sheena Mary, Y.; Tresa Varghese, Hema; Yohannan Panicker, C.; Thiemann, Thies; Shereef, Anas; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2015-12-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 1-hydroxy-4,5,8-tris(4-methoxyphenyl)anthraquinone were recorded and analyzed. The vibrational wavenumbers were computed using DFT quantum chemical calculations. The data obtained from wavenumber calculations were used to assign the vibrational bands obtained experimentally. A detailed molecular picture of the title compound and its interactions were obtained from NBO analysis. From the MEP plot it is clear that the negative electrostatic potential regions are mainly localized over carbonyl group. There is some evidence of a region of negative electrostatic potential due to π-electron density of the benzo groups. Molecular docking study shows that methoxy groups attached to the phenyl rings and hydroxyl group are crucial for binding and the title compound might exhibit inhibitory activity against PI3K and may act as an anti-neoplastic agent.

  15. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    near-ultraviolet range of electromagnetic spectra. The shift in energy in Raman effect gives information about the ... Raman spectroscopy is commonly used in chemistry, since vibrational information is very specific for the ... in polarizability is compatible with preservation of the center of symmetry. Thus, in a centrosymmetric ...

  16. Vibrational analysis using FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra and HF-DFT methods and NBO, NLO, NMR, HOMO-LUMO, UV and electronic transitions studies on 2,2,4-trimethyl pentane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvitha, A; Periandy, S; Govindarajan, M; Gayathri, P

    2015-03-05

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the range 100-4000cm(-1)and 50-4000cm(-1), respectively, for 2,2,4-Trimethyl Pentane, TMP (C8H18) molecule. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands are interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and geometrical parameter calculations based on Hartree Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results shows the best agreement with the experimental values over the other method. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies shows that charge transfer within the molecule. The physical reactions of single bond hydrocarbon TMP were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which shows the excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, Mulliken atomic charges, UV, frontier molecular orbital (FMO), MEP, NLO activity, Natural Bond-Orbital (NBO) analysis, NMR and thermodynamic properties of title molecule were also performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Vibrational Relaxation in Neat Crystals of Naphthalene by Picosecond CARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesp, Ben H.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1980-01-01

    Picosecond delayed CARS experiments on totally symmetric modes in naphthalene at 1.5 K are reported. The Raman lineshape of the vibrational excitons is lorentzian and vibrational relaxation can be surprisingly slow. The Raman lineshape of the Ag exciton level of the 766 cm-1 vibrational mode reveals

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy at very high pressures. Part 28. Raman and far-infrared spectra of some complex chlorides A2MCl6 under hydrostatic pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, David M.; Berg, Rolf W.; Williams, Alan D.

    1981-01-01

    Raman and far-IR mode frequency shifts with pressure have been observed under hydrostatic conditions in a gasketed diamond anvil cell (d.a.c.). Using compressibilities calculated from unit cell constants and lattice energies, Grüneisen parameters gammai have been obtained for all observed modes. ...

  19. Near ground state Raman sideband cooling of an ion in a hybrid radiofrequency-optical lattice trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylinskii, Alexei; Karpa, Leon; Gangloff, Dorian; Cetina, Marko; Vuletic, Vladan

    2013-05-01

    We achieve near ground state cooling of an ion in a hybrid trap formed by a two-dimensional radio-frequency Paul trap and an optical lattice produced by a cavity in the axial dimension. We drive far-detuned lattice-assisted Raman transitions on the red vibrational sideband between the Zeeman sublevels of the 2S1/2 ground level of 174Yb+. The cooling cycle is completed by a close-detuned spontaneous Raman transition. Efficient Cooling in all three dimensions is achieved this way. Furthermore, spatially dependent AC Stark shifts induced by the lattice allow us to measure axial temperature via ion fluorescence, and we estimate the population of the lattice vibrational ground state to be above 50%. This work is an important step towards quantum information and quantum simulations with ions in hybrid traps and optical lattices. Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  20. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  1. Alignment characterization of single-wall carbon nanotubes by Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pijun; Liu Liyue; Zhang Yafei

    2003-01-01

    A novel method for identifying the Raman modes of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) based on the symmetry of the vibration modes has been studied. The Raman intensity of each vibration mode varies with polarization direction, and the relationship can be expressed as analytical functions. This method avoids troublesome numerical calculation and easily gives clear relations between Raman intensity and polarization direction. In this way, one can distinguish each Raman-active mode of SWNT through the polarized Raman spectrum

  2. Raman spectra of lithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Bi, Dongxue; Voinov, Y. P.; Vodchits, A. I.; Gorshunov, B. P.; Yurasov, N. I.; Yurasova, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the results of investigating the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra in the lithium compounds crystals in a wide spectral range by the fibre-optic spectroscopy method. We also present the stimulated Raman scattering spectra in the lithium hydroxide and lithium deuteride crystals obtained with the use of powerful laser source. The symmetry properties of the lithium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide monohydrate and lithium deuteride crystals optical modes were analyzed by means of the irreducible representations of the point symmetry groups. We have established the selection rules in the Raman and infrared absorption spectra of LiOH, LiOH·H2O and LiD crystals.

  3. Squeezing, photon bunching, photon antibunching and nonclassical photon statistics in degenerate hyper Raman processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Biswajit; Mandal, Swapan

    2007-01-01

    An initially prepared coherent state coupled to a second-order nonlinear medium is responsible for stimulated and spontaneous hyper Raman processes. By using an intuitive approach based on perturbation theory, the Hamiltonian corresponding to the hyper Raman processes is analytically solved to obtain the temporal development of the field operators. It is true that these analytical solutions are valid for small coupling constants. However, the interesting part is that these solutions are valid for reasonably large time. Hence, the present analytical solutions are quite general and are fresh compared to those solutions under short-time approximations. By exploiting the analytical solutions of field operators for various modes, we investigate the squeezing, photon antibunching and nonclassical photon statistics for pure modes of the input coherent light responsible for hyper Raman processes. At least in one instance (stimulated hyper Raman processes for vibration phonon mode), we report the simultaneous appearance of classical (photon bunching) and nonclassical (squeezing) effects of the radiation field responsible for hyper Raman processes

  4. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  5. The theory of the Raman effect in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindus, L.

    1976-01-01

    The most important Raman scattering mechanism in crystals is one in which the radiation interacts indirectly with the lattice via the electrons. The study of Raman scattering from crystals is an important method for obtaining information about their lattice vibration frequencies. In this synthesis paper the theory of the first order Raman effect in crystals is considered based on the essential papers. (author)

  6. RAMAN amplifier gain dynamics with ASE : Numerical analysis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... understanding the basic properties of the gain medium. So in this work, we demonstrate an analytical formalism and a numerical horizon of the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise power for distributed Raman amplifier (DRA). Keywords: Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), optical noise, Raman amplification ...

  7. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  8. Time-resolved broadband Raman spectroscopies: A unified six-wave-mixing representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-09-01

    Excited-state vibrational dynamics in molecules can be studied by an electronically off-resonant Raman process induced by a probe pulse with variable delay with respect to an actinic pulse. We establish the connection between several variants of the technique that involve either spontaneous or stimulated Raman detection and different pulse configurations. By using loop diagrams in the frequency domain, we show that all signals can be described as six wave mixing which depend on the same four point molecular correlation functions involving two transition dipoles and two polarizabilities and accompanied by a different gating. Simulations for the stochastic two-state-jump model illustrate the origin of the absorptive and dispersive features observed experimentally.

  9. Industrial applications of Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, J. G.; Walder, F.; Petty, C.; Kemeny, G.

    1993-03-01

    In the last two decades, Raman spectroscopy has matured as an important method for the study of molecules and complex molecular systems. This is evident from the number of fine texts and the many review articles which have been published describing theory and applications of Raman spectroscopy over a very broad range of subjects (1-10). Raman spectroscopy is the essential partner to infrared spectroscopy for a complete vibrational analysis of a molecule in structure determinations. From the understanding developed on small molecules, theory was extended to interpret the spectra of larger systems such as polymers, biological molecules, and ordered condensed phases. The contribution of Raman spectroscopy to these areas has been significant. It was the development of commercial lasers in the 1960s which spurred the renewed interest in the Raman technique. But applications were still limited for highly fluorescing or intensely colored systems. In 1986, a breakthrough paper by Hirschfeld and Chase (11) described the use of near-infrared laser excitation and a commercial interferometer-based FT-IR spectrometer to record FT-Raman spectra. Significant advantages included the inherent multiplex, throughput and data processing features of the FT interferometers and the use of a ND:YAG laser (1.064 μm) which dramatically decreased problems with sample fluorescence and decomposition. A deluge of papers describing applications of FT-Raman spectroscopy can be found in the Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, Spectrochimica Acta (special issues 40A ad 47A), and Applied Spectroscopy since then.

  10. Improved assignments of the vibrational fundamental modes of ortho-, meta-, and para-xylene using gas- and liquid-phase infrared and Raman spectra combined with ab initio calculations: Quantitative gas-phase infrared spectra for detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmaier, Rodica; Scharko, Nicole K.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Nguyen, Kiet T.; Williams, Stephen D.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2017-12-01

    Xylenes contain a blend of the ortho-, meta-, and para- isomers, and all are abundant contaminants in the ground, surface waters, and air. To better characterize xylene and to better enable its detection, high quality quantitative vapor-phase infrared spectra of all three isomers over the 6500 - 540 cm-1 range are reported. All fundamental vibrational modes are assigned based on these vapor-phase infrared spectra, liquid-phase infrared and Raman spectra, along with density functional theory (DFT), ab initio MP2 and high energy-accuracy compound theoretical model (W1BD) calculations. Both MP2 and DFT predict a single conformer with C2v symmetry for ortho-xylene, and two conformers each for meta- and para-xylene, depending on the preferred orientations of the methyl groups. For meta-xylene the two conformers have Cs and C2 symmetry, and for para-xylene these conformers have C2v or C2h symmetry. Since the relative population of the two conformers is approximately 50% for both isomers and predicted frequencies and intensities are very similar for each conformer, an arbitrary choice to discuss the Cs conformer for meta-xylene and the C2v conformer for para-xylene is made. Integrated band intensities for all isomers are reported. Using the quantitative infrared data, the global warming potential values of each isomer are determined. Potential bands for atmospheric monitoring are also discussed.

  11. Raman scattering of rare earth hexaborides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogita, Norio; Hasegawa, Takumi; Udagawa, Masayuki; Iga, Fumitoshi; Kunii, Satoru

    2009-01-01

    Raman scattering spectra were measured for the rare-earth hexaborides RB 6 (R = Ce, Gd, or Dy). All Raman-active phonons due to B 6 vibrations were observed in the range 600 - 1400 cm -1 . Anomalous peaks were detected below 200 cm -1 , which correspond to vibrations of rare-earth ion excited by second-order Raman scattering process. The intensity and energy of the rare-earth mode decrease with decreasing temperature. This suggests that the rare-earth ion vibrates in a shallow and anharmonic potential due to the boron cage. Using the reported values of mean square displacement of rare-earth ion, we estimated the anharmonic contribution for the rare-earth vibrations.

  12. High-speed stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for studying the metabolic diversity of motile Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y.; Wakisaka, Y.; Iwata, O.; Nakashima, A.; Ito, T.; Hirose, M.; Domon, R.; Sugawara, M.; Tsumura, N.; Watarai, H.; Shimobaba, T.; Suzuki, K.; Goda, K.; Ozeki, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Microalgae have been receiving great attention for their ability to produce biomaterials that are applicable for food supplements, drugs, biodegradable plastics, and biofuels. Among such microalgae, Euglena gracilis has become a popular species by virtue of its capability of accumulating useful metabolites including paramylon and lipids. In order to maximize the production of desired metabolites, it is essential to find ideal culturing conditions and to develop efficient methods for genetic transformation. To achieve this, understanding and controlling cell-to-cell variations in response to external stress is essential, with chemically specific analysis of microalgal cells including E. gracilis. However, conventional analytical tools such as fluorescence microscopy and spontaneous Raman scattering are not suitable for evaluation of diverse populations of motile microalgae, being restricted either by the requirement for fluorescent labels or a limited imaging speed, respectively. Here we demonstrate video-rate label-free metabolite imaging of live E. gracilis using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) - an optical spectroscopic method for probing the vibrational signatures of molecules with orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman scattering. Our SRS's highspeed image acquisition (27 metabolite images per second) allows for population analysis of live E. gracilis cells cultured under nitrogen-deficiency - a technique for promoting the accumulation of paramylon and lipids within the cell body. Thus, our SRS system's fast imaging capability enables quantification and analysis of previously unresolvable cell-to-cell variations in the metabolite accumulation of large motile E. gracilis cell populations.

  13. Raman spectra of selected transuranium trihalides in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, W.R.; Begun, G.M.; Haire, R.G.; Peterson, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Raman spectral data have been obtained from a number of transuranium trihalides in the solid state. The Raman spectra of these actinide compounds are reported and compared to the published Raman spectra of isostructural compounds. Tentative symmetry assignments have been made for the observed Raman-active lattice vibrations based on nuclear site symmetry analysis of their respective crystal structures and comparisons to the symmetry assignments made for isostructural lanthanide compounds. The Raman spectral data obtained in this study represent a partial data base for the use of Raman spectroscopy for identifying the crystal structures exhibited by these and isostructural compounds

  14. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  15. Spectra and structure of gallium compounds. Part X. Infrared and Raman spectra, vibrational assignment, and normal coordinate calculations for trimethylaminegallium trichloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durig, J. R.; Chatterjee, K. K.

    The far IR (450-480 cm-1) and Raman (3200-3230 cm-1) spectra of (CH3)3 NGaCl3 have been recorded in the solid state and interpreted in detail on the basis of C3 molecular symmetry. A modified valence force field model is used to calculate the frequencies and potential energy distribution of the adduct. The calculated force constants of the adduct are compared with those previously reported for the free Lewis acid and the free Lewis base moieties, and the observed differences ascribed to geometrical changes of the uncomplexed species on adduct formation and explained on the basis of the VSEPR model and non-bond interactions. Extensive coupling is observed between the GaN stretching mode and the NC3 symmetric stretching and the NC3 symmetric deformational modes. Strong coupling interaction is also found between the GaCl3 antisymmetric stretch and the NC3 antisymmetric deformation. The calculated value of 2.50 mdyn Å-1 for the GaN stretching force constant in (CH3)3NGaCl3 is larger than any of those previously determined in complexes such as (CH3)3NGaH3 (2.43 mdyn Å-1), (CH3)3NGa(CH3)3 (1.61 mdyn Å-1), and H3NGa(CH3)3 (1.08 mdyn Å-1). The observed variations in the magnitudes of the stretching force constants of the donor-acceptor dative bond is found to be consistent with the estimated relative stabilities of this series of adducts.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  17. Vibrations and reorientations of H2O molecules in [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 studied by Raman light scattering, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering and proton magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Hetmańczyk, Lukasz; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna; Mikuli, Edward; Florek-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Harańczyk, Hubert

    2014-04-24

    Vibrational-reorientational dynamics of H2O ligands in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 was investigated by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), proton magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), quasielastic and inelastic incoherent Neutron Scattering (QENS and IINS) methods. Neutron powder diffraction (NPD) measurements, performed simultaneously with QENS, did not indicated a change of the crystal structure at the phase transition (detected earlier by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at TC(h)=252.9 K (on heating) and at TC(c)=226.5K (on cooling)). Temperature dependence of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of νs(OH) band at ca. 3248 cm(-1) in the RS spectra indicated small discontinuity in the vicinity of phase transition temperature, what suggests that the observed phase transition may be associated with a change of the H2O reorientational dynamics. However, an activation energy value (Ea) for the reorientational motions of H2O ligands in both phases is nearly the same and equals to ca. 8 kJ mol(-1). The QENS peaks, registered for low temperature phase do not show any broadening. However, in the high temperature phase a small QENS broadening is clearly visible, what implies that the reorientational dynamics of H2O ligands undergoes a change at the phase transition. (1)H NMR line is a superposition of two powder Pake doublets, differentiated by a dipolar broadening, suggesting that there are two types of the water molecules in the crystal lattice of [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 which are structurally not equivalent average distances between the interacting protons are: 1.39 and 1.18 Å. However, their reorientational dynamics is very similar (τc=3.3⋅10(-10) s). Activation energies for the reorientational motion of these both kinds of H2O ligands have nearly the same values in an experimental error limit: and equal to ca. 40 kJ mole(-1). The phase transition is not seen in the (1)H NMR spectra temperature dependencies. Infrared (IR), Raman (RS) and inelastic

  18. Application of micro Raman spectroscopy to industrial FC membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikvaidze, G; Gabrusenoks, J; Kleperis, J; Vaivars, G

    2007-01-01

    Raman spectra of as-received and protonated membranes (Nafion NRE-212, Fumapem F-14100 and Fumasep FAA) were measured with He-Cd and Ar laser. For the first time the Raman and IR spectra are reported of Fumasep membranes. Most of peaks in vibration spectra active in Raman and IR of membranes are interpreted with C-F, C-S, C-O-C, SO 3 , C-C bonds. The vibration region connected with protons and H-O bond in both types of membranes is found in Raman and IR spectra

  19. Improved assignments of the vibrational fundamental modes of ortho -, meta -, and para -xylene using gas- and liquid-phase infrared and Raman spectra combined with ab initio calculations: Quantitative gas-phase infrared spectra for detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenmaier, Rodica; Scharko, Nicole K.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Nguyen, Kiet T.; Williams, Stephen D.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2017-07-25

    Xylenes contain a blend of the ortho-, meta-, and para- isomers, and all are abundant contaminants in the ground, surface waters, and air. To better characterize xylene and to better enable its detection, we report high quality quantitative vapor-phase infrared spectra of all three isomers over the 540-6500 cm-1 range. All fundamental vibrational modes are assigned based on these vapor-phase infrared spectra, liquid-phase infrared and Raman spectra, along with density functional theory (DFT), ab initio MP2 and high energy-accuracy compound theoretical model (W1BD) calculations. Both MP2 and DFT predict a single conformer with C2v symmetry for ortho-xylene, and two conformers each for meta- and para-xylene, depending on the preferred orientations of the methyl groups. For meta-xylene the two conformers have Cs and C2 symmetry, and for para-xylene these conformers have C2v or C2h symmetry. Since the relative population of the two conformers is approximately 50% for both isomers and predicted frequencies and intensities are very similar for each conformer, we made an arbitrary choice to discuss the Cs conformer for meta-xylene and the C2v conformer for para-xylene. We report integrated band intensities for all isomers. Using the quantitative infrared data, we determine the global warming potential values of each isomer and discuss potential bands for atmospheric monitoring.

  20. HOMO-LUMO, UV, NLO, NMR and vibrational analysis of 3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazole using FT-IR, FT-RAMAN FT-NMR spectra and HF-DFT computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carthigayan, K; Xavier, S; Periandy, S

    2015-05-05

    In this paper, the spectral analysis of 3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazole is carried out using the FT-IR, FT Raman, FT NMR and UV-Vis spectra with the help of quantum mechanical computations using HF and density functional theories. The different conformers of the compound and their minimum energies are studied using B3LYP functional with 6-311+G (d,p) basis set and the most stable conformer with minimum energy was identified and the same conformer was used for further computations. The computed wave numbers from different methods are scaled so as to agree with the experimental values and the scaling factors are reported. All the modes of vibrations are assigned and the structure the molecule is analyzed in terms of parameters like bond length, bond angle and dihedral angle predicted by both HF and B3LYP methods with 6-311+G (d,p) and 6-311++G (d,p) basis sets. The values of dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and hyperpolarizability (β) of the molecule are reported, using which the non-linear property of the molecule is discussed. The HOMO-LUMO mappings are reported which reveals the different charge transfer possibilities within the molecule. The isotropic chemical shifts predicted for (1)H and (13)C atoms using gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) theory show good agreement with experimental shifts. NBO analysis is carried out to picture the charge transfer between the localized bonds and lone pairs. The thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) at different temperatures are also calculated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davari R

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A case with bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax was presented. Etiology, mechanism, and treatment were discussed on the review of literature. Spontaneous Pneumothorax is a clinical entity resulting from a sudden non traumatic rupture of the lung. Biach reported in 1880 that 78% of 916 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax had tuberculosis. Kjergaard emphasized 1932 the primary importance of subpleural bleb disease. Currently the clinical spectrum of spontaneous pneumothorax seems to have entered a third era with the recognition of the interstitial lung disease and AIDS as a significant etiology. Standard treatment is including: observation, thoracocentesis, tube thoracostomy. Chemical pleurodesis, bullectomy or wedge resection of lung with pleural abrasion and occasionally pleurectomy. Little information has been reported regarding the efficacy of such treatment in spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to non bleb disease

  2. Raman spectroscopic study of some chalcopyrite-xanthate flotation products

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Andreev, GN

    2003-12-16

    Full Text Available of normal vibrations of the corresponding individual compounds. The latter facilitated the Raman spectroscopic elucidation of the reaction products formed on the chalcopyrite surface in real industrial flotation conditions with a sodium isopropyl xanthate...

  3. A relationship between Raman and infrared spectra: the case of push pull molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Zoppo, M.; Tommasini, M.; Castiglioni, C.; Zerbi, G.

    1998-04-01

    Vibrational spectra of push-pull polyenes show a peculiar feature namely, in infrared and Raman spectra strong, coincident bands appear, arising from vibrations localised on the polyene bridge. A simple model, based on the introduction of an effective internal field due to the charge transfer between end groups allows the infrared and Raman intensities of these bands to be related.

  4. Coherent Raman scattering: Applications in imaging and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Meng

    In this thesis, I discuss the theory, implementation and applications of coherent Raman scattering to imaging and sensing. A time domain interferometric method has been developed to collect high resolution shot-noise-limited Raman spectra over the Raman fingerprint regime and completely remove the electronic background signal in coherent Raman scattering. Compared with other existing coherent Raman microscopy methods, this time domain approach is proved to be simpler and more robust in rejecting background signal. We apply this method to image polymers and biological samples and demonstrate that the same setup can be used to collect two photon fluorescence and self phase modulation signals. A signal to noise ratio analysis is performed to show that this time domain method has a comparable signal to noise ratio to spectral domain methods, which we confirm experimentally. The coherent Raman method is also compared with spontaneous Raman scattering. The conditions under which coherent methods provide signal enhancement are discussed and experiments are performed to compare coherent Raman scattering with spontaneous Raman scattering under typical biological imaging conditions. A critical power, above which coherent Raman scattering is more sensitive than spontaneous Raman scattering, is experimentally determined to be ˜1mW in samples of high molecule concentration with a 75MHz laser system. This finding is contrary to claims that coherent methods provide many orders of magnitude enhancement under comparable conditions. In addition to the far field applications, I also discuss the combination of our time domain coherent Raman method with near field enhancement to explore the possibility of sensing and near field imaging. We report the first direct time-resolved coherent Raman measurement performed on a nanostructured substrate for molecule sensing. The preliminary results demonstrate that sub 20 fs pulses can be used to obtain coherent Raman spectra from a small number

  5. [Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis of thiabendazole pesticide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei; Wu, Rui-mei; Liu, Mu-hua; Wang, Xiao-bin; Yan, Lin-yuan

    2015-02-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique was used to analyze the Raman peaks of thiabendazole pesticides in the present paper. Surface enhanced substrates of silver nanoparticle were made based on microwave technology. Raman signals of thiabendazole were collected by laser Micro-Raman spectrometer with 514. 5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, respectively. The Raman peaks at different excitation wavelengths were analyzed and compared. The Raman peaks 782 and 1 012 at 785 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were C--H out-of-plane vibrations. While 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were vng and C==N stretching. The study results showed that the intensity of Raman peak and Raman shift at different excitation wavelengths were different And strong Raman signals were observed at 782, 1012, 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths. These characteristic vibrational modes are characteristic Raman peaks of carbendazim pesticide. The results can provide basis for the rapid screening of pesticide residue in agricultural products and food based on Raman spectrum.

  6. Pure rotational Raman lidar for the measurement of vertical profiles of temperature in the lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, M.; Radhakrishnan, S. R.; Presennakumar, B.; Murty, V. S.; Bindhu, R.

    2006-12-01

    The design and development of the new Raman lidar of the Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre is presented here. This station is located at 8 degrees 33 minutes N, 77 degrees E in India. This lidar can monitor atmospheric temperature (using Pure Rotational Raman Spectrum), aerosol extinction coefficient, water vapor profile and clouds. Advantages of Pure Rotational Raman method over Vibrational Raman method are presented with the result obtained using Vibrational Raman lidar. Optical layout of the lidar system, PRRS method and aerosol extinction measurements are described briefly.

  7. Raman Chandrasekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Raman Chandrasekar. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 430-439 General Article. How Children Learn to Use Language - An Overview of R. Narasimhan's Ideas on Child Language Acquisition.

  8. CV Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    style, philosophy and motivations. We thus have here an authoritative biography of the most .... What motivated Raman to do the extraordinary things he did against all odds? What was the secret of his success? ... to Professor S. Chandrasekhar for permission to quote some of his statements. I am very indebted to Prof.

  9. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  10. Spontaneous deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, Benjamin; Geradin, Damien

    Platform businesses such as Airbnb and Uber have risen to success partly by sidestepping laws and regulations that encumber their traditional competitors. Such rule flouting is what the authors call “spontaneous private deregulation,” and it’s happening in a growing number of industries. The authors

  11. Vibrational spectra of opal-based photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovbeshko, G; Fesenko, O; Boyko, V; Romanyuk, V; Moiseyenko, V; Gorelik, V; Dolgov, L; Kiisk, V; Sildos, I

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic silica opals were investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopies. Vibrational modes associated with molecular groups of opal globules and admixtures were detected. Similarities in Raman and infrared spectra of synthetic opal with reference fused and α-quartz indicate the presence of amorphous phase in opal globules. Also some spectral bands designate on modified optical stretching vibrations at 1000-1200 cm −1 and bigger amount of Si-H defects in photonic crystal.

  12. Vibration mixer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, S.A.; Chernov, V.S.; Denisenko, V.V.; Gorodnyanskiy, I.F.; Prokopov, L.I.; Tikhonov, Yu.P.

    1983-01-01

    The vibration mixer is proposed which contains a housing, vibration drive with rod installed in the upper part of the mixing mechanism made in the form of a hollow shaft with blades. In order to improve intensity of mixing and dispersion of the mud, the shaft with the blades is arranged on the rod of the vibrator and is equipped with a cam coupling whose drive disc is attached to the vibration rod. The rod is made helical, while the drive disc of the cam coupling is attached to the helical surface of the rod. In addition, the vibration mixer is equipped with perforated discs installed on the ends of the rods.

  13. Raman Spectra and Dynamics of Thiocyanate Ion in Poly(Vinyl Alcohol)-KSCN Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, M. M.; Rabadanov, K. Sh.; Shabanov, N. S.; Tretinnikov, O. N.; Amirov, A. M.; Gadjimagomedov, S. Kh.

    2017-11-01

    Raman spectra of poly(vinyl alcohol)-potassium-thiocyanate films are studied. Parameters of vibrational and orientational relaxation of thiocyanate ion in the polymer matrix are determined. The character and rate of vibrational dephasing become identical to SCN- vibrations in aqueous solution at salt concentrations ≥0.3 M.

  14. Quantitative aspects of near-infrared Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, F. T.; Smith, M. J.

    Three fundamental behaviors of vibrational spectroscopy data manipulation routinely associated with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy are evaluated for near-infrared (NIR) Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. Spectral reproducibility, spectral subtraction and sensitivity are examined relative to the NIR FT-Raman experiment. Quantitative predictive ability is compared for identical sets of samples containing mixtures of the three xylene isomers. Partial least-squares analysis is used to compare predictive ability. IR performance is found to be better than Raman, though the potential for method development using NIR FT-Raman is shown to be quite promising.

  15. Anharmonic Theoretical Vibrational Spectroscopy of Polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Paweł T; Jacob, Christoph R

    2016-08-18

    Because of the size of polypeptides and proteins, the quantum-chemical prediction of their vibrational spectra presents an exceptionally challenging task. Here, we address one of these challenges, namely, the inclusion of anharmonicities. By performing the expansion of the potential energy surface in localized-mode coordinates instead of the normal-mode coordinates, it becomes possible to calculate anharmonic vibrational spectra of polypeptides efficiently and reliably. We apply this approach to calculate the infrared, Raman, and Raman optical activity spectra of helical alanine polypeptides consisting of up to 20 amino acids. We find that while anharmonicities do not alter the band shapes, simple scaling procedures cannot account for the different shifts found for the individual bands. This closes an important gap in theoretical vibrational spectroscopy by making it possible to quantify the anharmonic contributions and opens the door to a first-principles calculation of multidimensional vibrational spectra.

  16. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matries; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  17. Synthesis, structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis, vibrational and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hirshfeld surface analysis for visually analysing intermolecular interactions in crystal structures employing molecular surfacecontours and 2D fingerprint plots has been used to scrutinize molecular shapes. The vibration properties of this structure were studied by IR spectroscopy and Raman scattering. Vibration spectra ...

  18. Vibrational spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and quantum mechanical study of 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-ethyl-9-methyl-6H-thieno[3,2-f] [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a][1,4] diazepine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Tintu K.; Prasana, Johanan Christian; Muthu, S.; George, Jacob

    2018-04-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-ethyl-9-methyl-6H-thieno [3,2-f] [1,2,4] triazolo [4,3-a] [1,4] diazepine were investigated in the present study using FT-IR and FT-Raman techniques. The results obtained were compared with quantum mechanical methods, as it serves as an important tool in interpreting and predicting vibrational spectra. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and Raman scattering were calculated using density functional theory B3LYP method with 6-311++g (d,p) basis set. All the experimental results were in line with the theoretical data. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and HOMO LUMO energies of the title compound were accounted. The results indicated that the title compound has a lower softness value (0.27) and high electrophilicity index (4.98) hence describing its biological activity. Further, natural bond orbital was also analyzed as part of the work. Fukui functions were calculated in order to explain the chemical selectivity or the reactivity site in 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-ethyl-9-methyl-6H-thieno [3,2-f] [1,2,4] triazolo [4,3-a] [1,4] diazepine. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound were closely examined at different temperatures. It revealed the correlations between heat capacity (C), entropy (S) and enthalpy changes (H) with temperatures. The paper further explains that the title compound can act as good antidepressant through molecular docking studies.

  19. Raman bands in Ag nanoparticles obtained in extract of Opuntia ficus-indica plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocarando-Chacon, J.-G.; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Vargas-Vazquez, D.; Rodríguez Melgarejo, F.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Mani-Gonzalez, P. G.; Leon-Sarabia, E.; Navarro-Badilla, A.; Ramírez-Bon, R.

    2014-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been obtained in an extract of Opuntia ficus-indica plant. The size and distribution of nanoparticles were quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The diameter was estimated to be about 15 nm. In addition, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) peaks of silver were observed in these samples. Three Raman bands have been experimentally detected at 83, 110 and 160 cm-1. The bands at 83 and 110 cm-1 are assigned to the silver-silver Raman modes (skeletal modes) and the Raman mode located at 160 cm-1 has been assigned to breathing modes. Vibrational assignments of Raman modes have been carried out based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum mechanical calculation. Structural and vibrational properties for small Agn clusters with 2≤n≤9 were determined. Calculated Raman modes for small metal clusters have an approximation trend of Raman bands. These Raman bands were obtained experimentally for silver nanoparticles (AgNP).

  20. Raman Optical Activity of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Barron, Laurence D.

    Now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure, Raman optical activity (ROA) measures a small difference in Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized light. As ROA spectra measure vibrational optical activity, they contain highly informative band structures sensitive to the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, nucleic acids, viruses and carbohydrates as well as the absolute configurations of small molecules. In this review we present a survey of recent studies on biomolecular structure and dynamics using ROA and also a discussion of future applications of this powerful new technique in biomedical research.

  1. Vibrational and Thermal Properties of Oxyanionic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korabel'nikov, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    The vibrational and thermal properties of dolomite and alkali chlorates and perchlorates were studied in the gradient approximation of density functional theory using the method of a linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). Long-wave vibration frequencies, IR and Raman spectra, and mode Gruneisen parameters were calculated. Equation-of-state parameters, thermodynamic potentials, entropy, heat capacity, and thermal expansion coefficient were also determined. The thermal expansion coefficient of dolomite was established to be much lower than for chlorates and perchlorates. The temperature dependence of the heat capacity at T > 200 K was shown to be generally governed by intramolecular vibrations.

  2. Experimental vibrational contributions to molecular hyperpolarisabilities: methods and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglioni, C.; Tommasini, M.; Del Zoppo, M.

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a simple but a complete guide to the experimental determination of vibrational molecular first and second hyperpolarisabilities from measurements of band frequencies and intensities in vibrational (IR and Raman) spectra. The approximations involved in the method are discussed and a comparison with the theoretical results is presented. A brief summary of the many applications of the "vibrational method" and a critical discussion of the problems involved are also reported.

  3. Vibrational Micro-Spectroscopy of Human Tissues Analysis: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Hoang, Vu Dang; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2017-05-04

    Vibrational spectroscopy (Infrared (IR) and Raman) and, in particular, micro-spectroscopy and micro-spectroscopic imaging have been used to characterize developmental changes in tissues, to monitor these changes in cell cultures and to detect disease and drug-induced modifications. The conventional methods for biochemical and histophatological tissue characterization necessitate complex and "time-consuming" sample manipulations and the results are rarely quantifiable. The spectroscopy of molecular vibrations using mid-IR or Raman techniques has been applied to samples of human tissue. This article reviews the application of these vibrational spectroscopic techniques for analysis of biological tissue published between 2005 and 2015.

  4. Structural, intramolecular hydrogen bonding and vibrational studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA) index elucidated the impact of hydrogen bond- ing in the ring. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding energy has been calculated from topological study. The low wavenumber vibrational modes obtained from experimental FT-Raman spectrum also supported the presence.

  5. Raman Spectroscopic Study of Tungsten(VI) Oxosulfato Complexes in WO3–K2S2O7–K2SO4 Molten Mixtures: Stoichiometry, Vibrational Properties and Molecular Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, Andreas L.; Kalampounias, Angelos G.; Berg, Rolf W.

    2011-01-01

    The dissolution reaction of WO3 in pure molten K2S2O7 and in molten K2S2O7-K2SO4 mixtures is studied under static equilibrium conditions in the XWO3 0 = 0-0.33 mol fraction range at temperatures up to 860 C. High temperature Raman spectroscopy shows that the dissolution leads to formation of WVI...

  6. Applications of the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picquart, M.; Haro P, E.; Bernard, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Vibration spectroscopy techniques are used for many times to identify substances, determine molecular structure and quantify them, independently of their physical state. Raman spectroscopy as infrared absorption permit to access the vibration energy levels of molecules. In the second case, the permanent dipolar moment is involved while in the first one it is the polarizability (and the induced dipolar moment). Unfortunately, the classical Raman spectroscopy is low sensitive in particular in the case of biological molecules. On the opposite, the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) offers great potentialities. In this case, the molecules are adsorbed on a rough surface or on nanoparticles of gold or silver and the: signal can be increased by a factor of 10 7 to 10 8 . Moreover, the spectral enhancement is greater for the vibrations of the functional group of the molecule adsorbed on the substrate. In this work, we present the main theoretical bases of SERS, and some results obtain on different systems. (Author)

  7. Using Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to Identify Colorants in Art: An Experiment for an Upper-Division Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Hannah E.; Frano, Kristen A.; Svoboda, Shelley A.; Wustholz, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of art represent an attractive way to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in nanoscience, vibrational spectroscopy, and instrumental analysis. Here, we present an undergraduate analytical or physical chemistry laboratory wherein a combination of normal Raman and SERS spectroscopy is used to…

  8. The resonance Raman excitation profile of lutein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles for the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lutein in acetone, toluene and carbon disulfide solvents have been measured. The results are interpreted in terms of a three-mode vibrational theory which includes both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening effects. Excellent agreement between calculated and observed excitation profiles and visible spectra was found in acetone and toluene, but the results in carbon disulfide indicate a possible breakdown in the three-mode model. The major broadening mechanism is homogeneous, with about a 25% contribution from inhomogeneous broadening.

  9. Quantitative Infrared Absorption Spectra and Vibrational Assignments of Crotonaldehyde and Methyl Vinyl Ketone Using Gas-Phase Mid-Infrared, Far-Infrared, and Liquid Raman Spectra: s-cis vs s-trans Composition Confirmed via Temperature Studies and ab Initio Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenmaier, Rodica; Williams, Stephen D.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2016-12-16

    Methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and crotonaldehyde are chemical isomers; both are also important species in tropospheric chemistry. We report quantitative vapor-phase infrared spectra of crotonaldehyde and MVK vapors over the 540-6500 cm-1 range. Vibrational assignments of all fundamental modes are made for both molecules based on far- and mid-infrared vapor-phase spectra, liquid Raman spectra, along with density functional theory and ab initio MP2 and high energy-accuracy compound theoretical models (W1BD). Theoretical results indicate that at room temperature the crotonaldehyde equilibrium mixture is approximately 97% s-trans and only 3% s-cis conformer. Nearly all observed bands are thus associated with the s-trans conformer, but a few appear to be uniquely associated the s-cis conformer, notably ν16c at 730.90 cm-1, which displays a substantial intensity increase with temperature (62% upon going from 5 to 50 oC). The intensity of the corresponding mode of the s-trans conformer decreases with temperature. Under the same conditions, the MVK equilibrium mixture is approximately 69% s-trans conformer and 31% s-cis. W1BD calculations indicate that for MVK this is one of those (rare) cases where there are comparable populations of both conformers, ~doubling the number of observed bands and exacerbating the vibrational assignments. We uniquely assign the bands associated with both the MVK s-cis conformer as well as those of the s-trans, thus completing the vibrational analyses of both conformers from the same set of experimental spectra. Integrated band intensities are reported for both molecules along with global warming potential values. Using the quantitative IR data, potential bands for atmospheric monitoring are also discussed.

  10. Infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopic studies of condensed ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, N.Q.; Knidiri, M.

    1975-01-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra of the complex K 5 (UO 2 ) 2 F 9 were recorded in the region 4000 to 80 cm -1 . Factor group analysis was used to classify the internal vibrations of the binuclear ion (UO 2 ) 2 F 9 5- . Infrared and Raman spectra were assigned and splitting of the internal modes of the (UO 2 ) 2 F 9 5- anion interpreted. (author)

  11. Raman spectra of the transplutonium orthophosphates and trimetaphosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Begun, G.M.; Haire, R.G.; Hellwege, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    Raman spectra have been obtained from multimicrogram samples of crystalline transplutonium (americium through einsteinium) orthophosphates. Spectra were also obtained for americium, curium, and californium trimetaphosphates. Assignments of the major Raman bands and confirmation of the compounds' stoichiometry were made by comparison with spectra obtained in previous studies on the lanthanide phosphates. The variation of transplutonium orthophosphate vibrational frequencies as a function of atomic number was found to be smaller in magnitude than that established for the lanthanide orthophosphates. (author)

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a new optical probe in molecular biophysics and biomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, J.; Wittig, B.; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and detailed molecular structural information plays an increasing role in molecular biophysics and molecular medicine. Therefore, vibrational spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman scattering, which provide high structural information content are of growing interest in biophysical...

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of urine by an ingenious near-infrared Raman spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Yongzeng; Chen, Guannan; Huang, Zufang; Liao, Xiaohua; Xie, Zhiming; Chen, Rong

    2007-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of an elaborately devised near-infrared Raman system in analysis of urine. The broad band in the long-wavelength region of the electronic absorption spectra of the sol with added adsorbent at certain concentrations has been explained in terms of the aggregation of the colloidal silver particles. We have reported the surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectra of urine, and studied the silver solution enhanced effects on the urine Raman scattering. The Raman bands of human's urine was assigned to certain molecule vibrations. We have found that different donators have dissimilar SERS of urine in different physiological condition. Comparatively few studies have explored the ability of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of urine acid. In the present report, we investigated the ability of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy to measure uric acid in the human urine. The results suggested that the present Raman system holds considerable promise for practical use. Practical applications such as the quantitative medical examination of urine metabolites may also be feasible in the near future.

  14. Raman Spectra of Crystalline Double Calcium Orthovanadates Ca10M(VO4)7 (M = Li, K, Na) and Their Interpretation Based on Deconvolution Into Voigt Profilesparagraph>Please check captured article title, if appropriate.paragraph>-->

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodasevich, I. A.; Voitikov, S. V.; Orlovich, V. A.; Kosmyna, M. B.; Shekhovtsov, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    Unpolarized spontaneous Raman spectra of crystalline double calcium orthovanadates Ca10M(VO4)7 (M = Li, K, Na) in the range 150-1600 cm-1 were measured. Two vibrational bands with full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 37-50 cm-1 were found in the regions 150-500 and 700-1000 cm-1. The band shapes were approximated well by deconvolution into Voigt profiles. The band at 700-1000 cm-1 was stronger and deconvoluted into eight Voigt profiles. The frequencies of two strong lines were ~848 and ~862 cm-1 for Ca10Li(VO4)7; ~850 and ~866 cm-1 for Ca10Na(VO4)7; and ~844 and ~866 cm-1 for Ca10K(VO4)7. The Lorentzian width parameters of these lines in the Voigt profiles were ~5 times greater than those of the Gaussian width parameters. The FWHM of the Voigt profiles were ~18-42 cm-1. The two strongest lines had widths of 21-25 cm-1. The vibrational band at 300-500 cm-1 was ~5-6 times weaker than that at 700-1000 cm-1 and was deconvoluted into four lines with widths of 25-40 cm-1. The large FWHM of the Raman lines indicated that the crystal structures were disordered. These crystals could be of interest for Raman conversion of pico- and femtosecond laser pulses because of the intense vibrations with large FWHM in the Raman spectra.

  15. Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopic study of human hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, W.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Farwell, D. W.; Nutbrown, M.

    1997-07-01

    Fourier-transform Raman microscopic spectra of normal, untreated and bleached hair fibres are presented. Vibrational assignments are made and differences are ascribed to the production of cysteic acid from cysteine. Changes in conformation associated with the disulphide bond in the keratotic component are noted from the ν(CSSC) vibrational modes at wave numbers near 500 cm -1. Raman spectra of hair root ends have also been investigated with a diminution in cysteine content being observed. Application of the technique to the biomedical investigation of healthy and diseased hair is proposed.

  16. Quantum and Raman Noise in a Depleted Fiber Optical Parametric Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Rottwitt, Karsten; McKinstrie, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    The noise properties of both phase-sensitive and phase-insensitive saturated parametric amplifiers are studied using a semi-classical approach. Vacuum fluctuations as well as spontaneous Raman scattering are included in the analysis....

  17. Determining the Authenticity of Gemstones Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponick, Aaron; Marchozzi, Emedio; Johnston, Cynthia R.; Wigal, Carl T.

    1998-04-01

    The benefits of laser spectroscopy in the undergraduate curriculum have been the focus of several recent articles in this journal. Raman spectroscopy has been of particular interest since the similarities of Raman to conventional infrared spectroscopy make the interpretation of spectral data well within undergraduate comprehension. In addition, the accessibility to this technology is now within the reach of most undergraduate institutions. This paper reports the development of an experiment using Raman spectroscopy which determines the authenticity of both diamonds and pearls. The resulting spectra provide an introduction to vibrational spectroscopy and can be used in a variety of laboratory courses ranging from introductory chemistry to instrumental analysis.

  18. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on celestite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yenhua; Yu Shucheng; Huang, Eugene; Lee, P.-L.

    2010-01-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of celestite (SrSO 4 ) were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. Variation in the Raman vibrational frequency and change of lattice parameters with pressure indicate that a transformation occurs in celestite. This transformation caused an adjustment in the Sr-O polyhedra that affected the stretching-force constant of SO 4 . Moreover, compressibilities along the crystallographic axes decreased in the order a to c to b. From the compression data, the bulk modulus of the celestite was 87 GPa. Both X-ray and Raman data show that the transition in celestite is reversible.

  19. Raman scattering technique in characterization of glasses containing nanoparticles for integrated optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanda, M.; Furic, K.; Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Gotic, M.; Montagna, M.; Ferrari, M.; Righini, G. C.

    2006-04-01

    Low frequency Raman scattering on the acoustic vibrational modes of nanoparticles has been used for determining the size of dielectric, semiconductor and metal nanoparticles embedded in glass. This contribution reports on application of low-frequency Raman scattering on acoustical vibrational modes of nanoparticles. The theoretical background as well as the experimental results of free non-interacting nanoparticles as well as glass containing different nanoparticles for optoelectronics will be presented. The approach is based on a 1/ν dependence of the Raman light of the vibration coupling coefficient and on the fact that each nanocrystallite of diameter D vibrates with its eigenfrequency ν~1/D. The Raman scattering spectra are analyzed using confined acoustical vibrations model. The model-calculation considered homogeneous broadening of the confined acoustical modes due to interaction of the particles with matrix and inhomogeneous broadening due to the contribution of the Raman scattering from the particles of different sizes. The low frequency Raman spectra of different nanoparticles (nc-TiO II, nc-SnO II, nc-CdS xSe 1-x, and nc-Si) prepared by Physical Vapour Deposition, thermal quenching and thereafter annealing of glass and sol-gel techniques was used for determination of particles size distribution and results were compared to TEM. The Raman spectroscopy technique has proved to be a simple and fast method that has favorable statistical characteristics due to the macroscopic probe volume and makes in situ measurements possible.

  20. Raman spectroscopic analysis of real samples: Brazilian bauxite mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulstich, Fabiano Richard Leite; Castro, Harlem V.; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa; Neumann, Reiner

    2011-10-01

    In this investigation, Raman spectroscopy with 1064 and 632.8 nm excitation was used to investigate real mineral samples of bauxite ore from mines of Northern Brazil, together with Raman mapping and X-rays diffraction. The obtained results show clearly that the use of microRaman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the identification of all the minerals usually found in bauxites: gibbsite, kaolinite, goethite, hematite, anatase and quartz. Bulk samples can also be analysed, and FT-Raman is more adequate due to better signal-to-noise ratio and representativity, although not efficient for kaolinite. The identification of fingerprinting vibrations for all the minerals allows the acquisition of Raman-based chemical maps, potentially powerful tools for process mineralogy applied to bauxite ores.

  1. Part II: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy investigation of methionine containing heterodipeptides adsorbed on colloidal silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podstawka, Edyta; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Proniewicz, Leonard M

    2004-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of methionine (Met) containing dipeptides: Met-X and X-Met, where X is: L-glycine (Gly), L-leucine (Leu), L-proline (Pro), and L-phenylalanine (Phe) are reported. Using pre-aggregated Ag colloid we obtained high-quality SERS spectra of these compounds spontaneously adsorbed on colloidal silver. Additionally, we measured Raman spectra (RS) of these heterodipeptides in a solid state as well as in acidic and basic solutions. The RS and SERS spectra of Met-X and X-Met presented in this work appear to be different. One of the most prominent and common features in the SERS spectra of all these dipeptides is a band in the 660-690 cm(-1) range that is due to the C-S stretching, v(CS), vibration of Met. This suggests that all the abovementioned compounds adsorb on the silver surface through a thioether atom. On the other hand, the SERS spectra of X-Met show clearly that not only the S atom but also the carboxylate group interact with the colloid surface as manifested by the enhancement of bands in the 920-930 and 1380-1396 cm(-1) regions. These bands are ascribed to the v(C-COO(-)) and v(sym)(COO(-)) vibrations, respectively. Additionally, a SERS spectrum of Phe-Met indicates that the interaction of the thioether atom, amine group, and aromatic side chain with the silver surface is favorable and may dictate the orientation and conformation of adsorbed peptide.

  2. Thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4: Temperature dependence of Raman spectra and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Christian B.; Kalampounias, Angelos G.; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4 at temperatures of 240-450 degrees C under static equilibrium conditions. Raman spectra obtained at 10 different temperatures for the molten phase and for the vapors thereof exhibit vibrational wavenumbers and relative...

  3. Vibrational modes and Structure of Niobium(V) Oxosulfato Complexes in the Molten Nb2O5-K2S2O7-K2SO4 System Studied by Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Andreas L.; Borup, Flemming; Berg, Rolf W.

    2010-01-01

    for the binary Nb2O5-K2S2O7 molten system indicate that the dissolution of Nb2O5 proceeds with consumption of S2O7 leading to the formation of a NbV oxosulfato complex according to Nb2O5 + nS2O7 --> C2n-; a simple formalism exploiting the relative Raman band intensities is used for determining the stoichiometric...... for the NbV oxosulfato complexes pertain to NbdO modes: (i) at 937 cm-1 for the mono-oxo NbdO mode of NbO(SO4)3; (ii) at 958 cm-1 for the mono-oxo NbdO mode of NbO(SO4)4S2O7; and (iii) at 926 cm-1 for the symmetric dioxo Nb(=O)2 mode of NbO2(SO4)2....

  4. Remote Raman Efficiencies and Cross-Sections of Organic and Inorganic Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Maeda, Tayro E; Misra, Anupam K; Porter, John N; Bates, David E; Sharma, Shiv K

    2017-05-01

    We determined Raman cross-sections of various organic liquids and inorganic polyatomic ions in aqueous solutions with a 532 nm pulsed laser using remote Raman systems developed at the University of Hawaii. Using a calibrated integrating sphere as a light source, we converted the intensity counts in the spectrum of the light from the integrating sphere measured with UH remote Raman instrument to spectral radiance. From these data, a response function of the remote Raman instrument was obtained. With the intensity-calibrated instrument, we collected remote Raman data from a standard 1 mm path length fused silica spectrophotometer cell filled with cyclohexane. The measured value of the differential Raman cross-section for the 801 cm -1 vibrational mode of cyclohexane is 4.55 × 10 -30 cm 2 sr -1 molecule -1 when excited by a 532 nm laser, in good agreement with the values reported in the literature. Using the measured cyclohexane Raman cross-section as a reference and relative Raman mode intensities of the various ions and organic liquids, we calculated the Raman cross-sections of the strongest Raman lines of nitrate, sulfate, carbonate, phosphate ions, and organic liquids by maintaining same experimental conditions for remote Raman detection. These relative Raman cross-section values will be useful for estimating detection capabilities of remote Raman systems for planetary exploration.

  5. Theoretical study, and infrared and Raman spectra of copper(II) chelated complex with dibenzoylmethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nekoei, A.-R.; Vakili, M.; Hakimi-Tabar, M.

    2014-01-01

    There are some discrepancies in both the vibrational assignments and in the metal-ligand (M-L) bond strengths predicted in the previous studies on the copper (II) chelated complex of dibenzoylmethane, Cu(dbm)2. Also, there is a lack of theoretical structure, Raman spectrum and full vibrational as...

  6. Relationship between infrared and Raman intensities in molecules with polarized π electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasini, M.; Castiglioni, C.; Del Zoppo, M.; Zerbi, G.

    1999-05-01

    A model is presented which allows to obtain a linear relationship between infrared and Raman intensity parameters of the strongest vibrational bands of push-pull conjugated molecules. The results obtained clarify the origin of the exceptionally large values of the vibrational first hyperpolarizability shown by these molecules.

  7. Prof. C. V. Raman | History | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sc. Work in Vibrations and Musical Instruments, Geometrical and Wave Optics, Light and X-ray Scattering, Physics of Crystals, Colour. Best known for the Phenomenon of inelastic light scattering named the 'Raman effect' after him. Large body of experimental work was concerned with waves - wave motions of vibrating ...

  8. Coherent Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eesley, G L

    1981-01-01

    Coherent Raman Spectroscopy provides a unified and general account of the fundamental aspects of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy, also known as coherent Raman spectroscopy. The theoretical basis from which coherent Raman spectroscopy developed is described, along with its applications, utility, and implementation as well as advantages and disadvantages. Experimental data which typifies each technique is presented. This book is comprised of four chapters and opens with an overview of nonlinear optics and coherent Raman spectroscopy, followed by a discussion on nonlinear transfer function of matter

  9. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopic studies of melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Abbas, J. M.; Dogra, Sukh Dev; Sachdeva, Ritika; Rai, Bimal; Tripathi, S. K.; Prakash, Satya; Sathe, Vasant; Saini, G. S. S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the infrared absorption and Raman spectra of melatonin recorded with 488 and 632.8 nm excitations in 3600-2700 and 1700-70 cm-1 regions. Further, we optimized molecular structure of the three conformers of melatonin within density functional theory calculations. Vibrational frequencies of all three conformers have also been calculated. Observed vibrational bands have been assigned to different vibrational motions of the molecules on the basis of potential energy distribution calculations and calculated vibrational frequencies. Observed band positions match well with the calculated values after scaling except Nsbnd H stretching mode frequencies. It is found that the observed and calculated frequencies mismatch of Nsbnd H stretching is due to intermolecular interactions between melatonin molecules.

  10. Resonance Raman and optical dephasing study of tricarbocyanine dyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashworth, SH; Kummrow, A; Lenz, K

    Fluorescence lineshape analysis based on resonance Raman spectra of the dye HITCI was used to determine the details and magnitude of the vibrational part of the line broadening function, Forced light scattering (FLS) was applied to measure optical dephasing of HITCI in ethylene glycol, pumping at

  11. Molecular structures of viruses from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Hecht, Lutz; Syme, Christopher D.

    2002-01-01

    A vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) study of a range of different structural types of virus exemplified by filamentous bacteriophage fd, tobacco mosaic virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus, bacteriophage MS2 and cowpea mosaic virus has revealed that, on account of its sensitivity to chira...

  12. Vibrating minds

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Ed Witten is one of the leading scientists in the field of string theory, the theory that describes elementary particles as vibrating strings. This week he leaves CERN after having spent a few months here on sabbatical. His wish is that the LHC will unveil supersymmetry.

  13. The use of lasers as sources for Raman spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, and light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitini, R.; Ceccaldi, M.; Leicknam, J.P.; Plus, R.

    1975-01-01

    The activity of the laboratory is principally centred on the determination of molecular structures and the study of molecular interactions in solution by infrared and Raman spectrometry. With the development of work on relatively large molecules, particularly biological molecules, it became necessary to complete information on the molecular weight and on the intra and intermolecular geometry and interactions of these bodies. In order to obtain these informations Rayleigh scattering and resonance Raman spectrometry were used. The advantages of using vibrational spectrometry, particularly Raman, in conjunction with the diffusion of light for these structural and molecular interaction studies is emphasized. It is shown that these two techniques could not have developed as they have done in the last few years without the use of lasers as light source [fr

  14. Raman tweezers spectroscopy of live, single red and white blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseefhali Bankapur

    Full Text Available An optical trap has been combined with a Raman spectrometer to make high-resolution measurements of Raman spectra of optically-immobilized, single, live red (RBC and white blood cells (WBC under physiological conditions. Tightly-focused, near infrared wavelength light (1064 nm is utilized for trapping of single cells and 785 nm light is used for Raman excitation at low levels of incident power (few mW. Raman spectra of RBC recorded using this high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength apparatus has enabled identification of several additional lines; the hitherto-unreported lines originate purely from hemoglobin molecules. Raman spectra of single granulocytes and lymphocytes are interpreted on the basis of standard protein and nucleic acid vibrational spectroscopy data. The richness of the measured spectrum illustrates that Raman studies of live cells in suspension are more informative than conventional micro-Raman studies where the cells are chemically bound to a glass cover slip.

  15. Raman scattering studies on PEG functionalized hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamini, D; Devanand Venkatasubbu, G; Kumar, J; Ramakrishnan, V

    2014-01-03

    The pure hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by wet chemical precipitation method. Raman spectral measurements have been made for pure HAP, pure Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 and PEG coated HAP in different mass ratios (sample 1, sample 2 and sample 3). The peaks observed in Raman spectrum of pure HAP and the XRD pattern have confirmed the formation of HAP NPs. Vibrational modes have been assigned for pure HAP and pure PEG 6000. The observed variation in peak position of Raman active vibrational modes of PEG in PEG coated HAP has been elucidated in this work, in terms of intermolecular interactions between PEG and HAP. Further these results suggest that the functionalization of nanoparticles may be independent of PEG mass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Two-Photon Infrared Resonance Can Enhance Coherent Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Andrew J.; Hokr, Brett; Yi, Zhenhuan; Yuan, Luqi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2018-02-01

    In this Letter we present a new technique for attaining efficient low-background coherent Raman scattering where the Raman coherence is mediated by a tunable infrared laser in two-photon resonance with a chosen vibrational transition. In addition to the traditional benefits of conventional coherent Raman schemes, this approach offers a number of advantages including potentially higher emission intensity, reduction of nonresonant four-wave mixing background, preferential excitation of the anti-Stokes field, and simplified phase matching conditions. In particular, this is demonstrated in gaseous methane along the ν1 (A1) and ν3 (T2) vibrational levels using an infrared field tuned between 1400 and 1600 cm-1 and a 532-nm pump field. This approach has broad applications, from coherent light generation to spectroscopic remote sensing and chemically specific imaging in microscopy.

  17. Dark excited states of carotenoid in light harvesting complex probing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational dynamics of dark excited states in carotenoids have been investigated using tunable Raman pump pulses. The S1 state has same vibrational dynamics in light-harvesting complex (LH1 and solution. The S* state in LH1 has similar vibrational modes with the triplet state of carotenoid. However, the so-called S* state in solution does not have the modes and is concluded to be different from the S* state in LH1.

  18. Subframe burst gating for Raman spectroscopy in combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun; Fischer, David; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2010-05-01

    We describe an architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering utilizing a frame-transfer CCD sensor operating in a subframe burst-gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds (noise.

  19. Structures of Ge15Sb x Se85- x chalcogenide glasses affect their Raman gain performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Dai, Shixun; Xu, Dong; Xu, Hang; Li, Xing; Lin, Changgui; Zhang, Peiqing; Xu, Tiefeng

    2017-10-01

    A series of Ge15Sb x Se85- x ( x = 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 mol%) chalcogenide glasses were prepared by traditional melt-quenching method. The refractive indexes, infrared transmissions, and spontaneous Raman spectra of the glass samples were measured. Based on the spontaneous Raman scattering theory and considering the measured Raman spectral data, we calculated the Raman gain coefficients of the chalcogenide glasses. The effect of Sb on the structures and Raman gain coefficients of the glass samples was then systematically investigated to understand the role of chemical composition in glass structure and Raman gain coefficient. In the Ge15Sb x Se85- x glasses, the number of heteropolar Ge-Se, Sb-Se bonds increased, whereas that of homopolar Se-Se bonds decreased at increased Sb concentration. The Raman gain coefficients increased until it reached a maximum value (290 × 10-13 m/W at Ge15Sb20Se65) and then decreased when the Sb concentration further increased. These results showed that the Raman gain coefficients of Ge-Sb-Se chalcogenide glasses without poisonous elements were over 300 times of that of commonly fused silica and closely correlated with the structures of the glasses, suggesting that the Raman gain coefficient can be adjusted by modifying the structures of the glasses. This work provides a new possibility for environment-friendly Raman fiber laser and amplifier materials.

  20. Application of NIR Raman spectroscopy for detecting and characterizing early dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, A. C.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Zhu, R.; Hewko, M.; Dong, C.; Cleghorn, B.; Sowa, M. G.

    2006-02-01

    Early dental caries detection facilitates implementation of non-surgical methods for arresting caries progression and promoting tooth remineralization. We present a method based on Raman spectroscopy with near-IR laser excitation to provide biochemical contrast for detecting and characterizing incipient carious lesions found in extracted human teeth. Changes in Raman spectra are observed in PO 4 3- vibrations arising from hydroxyapatite of mineralized tooth tissue. Examination of various intensities of the PO 4 3- ν2, ν3, ν4 vibrations showed consistent increased intensities in spectra of carious lesions compared to sound enamel. The spectral changes are attributed to demineralization-induced alterations of enamel crystallite morphology and/or orientation. This hypothesis is supported by reduced Raman polarization anisotropy derived from polarized Raman spectra of carious lesions. Polarized Raman spectral imaging of carious lesions found on whole (i.e. un-sectioned) tooth samples will also be presented.

  1. Role of energy exchange in vibrational dephasing processes in liquids and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.

    1981-08-01

    Three theories which claim relevance to the dephasing of molecular vibrations in condensed phase matter are presented. All of these theories predict (in certain limiting cases) that the widths and shifts of molecular vibrations will obey an Arrhenius temperature dependence. The basic tenets of the theories are detailed so that the differences between them may be used in an experiment to distinguish between them. One model, based on intermolecular energy exchange of low-frequency modes, results in dephasing the high-frequency modes when anharmonic coupling is present. A computer analysis of temperature dependent experimental lineshapes can result in the extraction of various parameters such as the anharmonic shifts and the exchange rates. It is shown that, in order to properly assess the relative validity of the three models, other evidence must be obtained such as the spectral parameters of the low-frequency modes, the combination bands, and the isotopic dilution behavior. This evidence is presented for d 14 -durene (perdeutero-1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene) and compared to previous data obtained on pure h 14 -durene. An extension of the (HSC) intermolecular energy exchange model which allows for the possibility of partial delocalization of the low-frequency modes gives an adequate description of the experimental evidence. Isotopic dilution experiments, in particular, have resulted in a detailed picture of the energy transfer dynamics of the low-frequency modes. A section in which some spontaneous Raman spectra support a model of inhomogeneous broadening in liquids based on results of picosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy is presented. The model is that a distribution of environmental sites is created by a distribution in the local density and thus creates inhomogeneous broadening

  2. Vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadini, A.

    1980-01-01

    We present 13 programs for the calculation of vibrational spectroscopic problems applied to small molecules with high symmetry. The programs are compiled for the well known programmable pocket calculator Texas Instruments SR-52. To the special problems, the mathematical formulas, input and output instructions, several numerical examples, literature and the programs with comments are given. Order n = 1: The force constants, isotopic vibrational frequencies and the vibrational amplitudes are calculated for the two mass system XY(Csub(infinitely v)). For the three mass system XY 2 (Dsub(infinitely h)) only the force constants and isotopic frequencies are calculated. Order n = 2: For the three mass systems XYZ(Csub(infinitely v)) and XY 2 (Csub(infinitely 2v)) the inverse matrices G of the kinetic energy are presented. For complete sets of data (with isotopic frequencies, Coriolis coupling constants etc.) the complete force constant matrices are calculated. For non complete sets of data one starts in most cases with diagonal force constant matrices. The complete force constant matrix F is calculated with a minimalisation approximation. The eigenvector matrices L result from the G - F - and N-matrices. The N-matrices are calculated from the G- and F-matrices or from the F- and L-matrices respectively. Order n = 3: The matrix G of the system XYZ(Csub(S)) is calculated. For higher orders n, the 'isotopic reduction method' for the calculation of single force constants of proper systems is described. (orig.) [de

  3. Application of fluorescent and vibration spectroscopy for septic serum human albumin structure deformation during pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyubin, A.; Konstantinova, E.; Slezhkin, V.; Matveeva, K.; Samusev, I.; Bryukhanov, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we perform results of conformational analysis of septic human serum albumin (HSA) carried out by Raman spectroscopy (RS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and fluorescent spectroscopy. The main vibrational groups were identified and analyzed for septic HSA and its health control. Comparison between Raman and IR results were done. Fluorescent spectral changes of Trp-214 group were analyzed. Application of Raman, IR spectroscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy for conformational changes study of HSA during pathology were shown.

  4. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  5. Evidence of low intermolecular coupling in rubrene single crystals by Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg-Wolf, J R; McNeil, L E; Liu Shubin; Kloc, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The observed Raman spectra for single crystals of rubrene and tetracene are compared with the calculated spectra for the isolated molecules. The Raman measurements presented are of the bulk properties of the material, and they confirmed that the vapour growth process yields very pure, unstrained rubrene crystals. Finally, Raman measurements indicate that rubrene, unlike many other oligoacenes, has very weak intermolecular coupling and no observable intermolecular Raman vibrational modes. We discuss the apparent conflict between the high mobility and the weak π-electron overlap in this material

  6. DFT study on the Raman spectra of Fe(II-porphin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovorun D. M.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available DFT quantum-chemical calculations of the Raman spectra of Fe(II-porphin in quintet (ground state were performed. Spin-unrestricted UB3LYP functional in 6-311G basis was used for geometry optimization and Raman calculation. All active modes of Raman spectrum were analyzed in detail. It was noted that the insertion of Fe(II ion into porphin leads to the considerable changes in frequencies and intensities for those vibrational modes which involve nitrogen atoms displacement. The Raman depolarization ratio for plane polarized incident light is discussed

  7. Neural-network analysis of the vibrational spectra of N-acetyl L-alanyl N '-methyl amide conformational states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Frimand, Kenneth; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2001-01-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations utilizing the Becke 3LYP hybrid functional have been carried out for N-acetyl L-alanine N'-methylamide and examined with respect to the effect of water on the structure, the vibrational frequencies, vibrational absorption (VA), vibrational circular...... dichroism (VCD), Raman spectra, and Raman optical activity (ROA) intensities. The large changes due to hydration in the structures, and the relative stability of the conformer, reflected in the VA, VCD, Raman spectra, and ROA spectra observed experimentally, are reproduced by the DFT calculations. A neural...

  8. Raman Spectroscopic Investigation of Dyes in Spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Ute; Ramoji, Anuradha; Rösch, Petra; Da Costa Filho, Paulo Augusto; Robert, Fabien; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a number of synthetic colorants for spices have been investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and surface enhanced (resonance) Raman spectroscopy (SER(S)). The aim of the study was the determination of limits of detection for each dye separately and in binary mixtures of dyes in spiked samples of the spices. Most of the investigated dyes have been azo dyes, some being water-soluble, the other being fat-soluble. Investigating the composition of food preparations is an ongoing and important branch of analytical sciences. On one hand, new ingredients have to be analyzed with regard to their contents, on the other hand, raw materials that have been tampered have to be eliminated from food production processes. In the last decades, the various Raman spectroscopic methods have proven to be successful in many areas of life and materials sciences. The ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish even structural very similar analytes by means of their vibrational fingerprint will also be important in this study. Nevertheless, Raman scattering is a very weak process that is oftentimes overlaid by matrix interferences or fluorescence. In order to achieve limits of detection in the nanomolar range, the signal intensity has to be increased. According to the well-known equations, there are several ways of achieving this increase: •increasing sample concentration •increasing laser power •decreasing the laser wavelength •using electronic resonance •increasing the local electromagnetic field In this study, nearly all of the above-mentioned principles were applied. In a first step, all dyes were investigated in solution at different concentrations to determine a limit of detection. In the second step, spiked spice samples have been extracted with a variety of solvents and process parameters tested. To lower the limit of detection even further, SERS spectroscopy has been used as well in as out of electronic resonance.

  9. Relationship between molecular structure and Raman spectra of quinolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen

    2009-04-01

    DFT calculations were applied to investigate the relationship between the molecular structure and the Raman spectra of quinolines. A variety of different quinolines with increasing complexity was investigated and an aminoquinoline nucleus was found that describes the Raman spectrum of protonated chloroquine. It was discovered that the biological important, rigid C7-chloro group and C4-side chain of chloroquine significantly disturb certain molecular vibrations. The protonation at the N1 position causes dramatic changes of the Raman bands in the wavenumber region between 1500 cm -1 and 1650 cm -1. These bands are putative marker bands of the aminoquinoline drugs for π-π interactions to the hematin targets in malaria infected cells. The calculation of the normal modes and the illustration of the associated atomic displacements are very valuable for a deeper understanding of the associated bands in the Raman spectra.

  10. Assignment of the Raman lines in single crystal barium metaborate (beta-BaB sub 2 O sub 4)

    CERN Document Server

    Ney, P; Maillard, A; Polgar, K

    1998-01-01

    A Raman-scattering study performed on beta-BaB sub 2 O sub 4 (beta-BBO) at room temperature allows us to assign all the vibrational modes detected in the Raman spectra. The internal and external vibration modes are properly obtained by taking account of the light polarization, mode contamination and isotope effects. A correspondence between the lattice and the free-ring modes is also presented. (author)

  11. Pursuing shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) for concomitant detection of breast lesions and microcalcifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Shao, Wanting; Paidi, Santosh Kumar; Han, Bing; Fu, Tong; Wu, Di; Bi, Lirong; Xu, Weiqing; Fan, Zhimin; Barman, Ishan

    2015-10-01

    Although tissue staining followed by morphologic identification remains the gold standard for diagnosis of most cancers, such determinations relying solely on morphology are often hampered by inter- and intra-observer variability. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques, in contrast, offer objective markers for diagnoses and can afford disease detection prior to alterations in cellular and extracellular architecture by furnishing a rapid ``omics''-like view of the biochemical status of the probed specimen. Here, we report a classification approach to concomitantly detect microcalcification status and local pathological state in breast tissue, featuring a combination of vibrational spectroscopy that focuses on the tumor and its microenvironment, and multivariate data analysis of spectral markers reflecting molecular expression. We employ the unprecedented sensitivity and exquisite molecular specificity offered by Au@SiO2 shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) to probe the presence of calcified deposits and distinguish between normal breast tissues, fibroadenoma, atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). By correlating the spectra with the corresponding histologic assessment, we developed partial least squares-discriminant analysis derived decision algorithm that provides excellent diagnostic power in the fresh frozen sections (overall accuracy of 99.4% and 93.6% using SHINs for breast lesions with and without microcalcifications, respectively). The performance of this decision algorithm is competitive with or supersedes that of analogous algorithms employing spontaneous Raman spectroscopy while enabling facile detection due to the considerably higher intensity of SHINERS. Our results pave the way for rapid tissue spectral pathology measurements using SHINERS that can offer a novel stain-free route to accurate and economical diagnoses without human interpretation.Although tissue staining

  12. Measured stimulated Raman gain in methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopert, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    This report is about the stimulated Raman effect in methane due to the nu 1 vibration. For various gas pressures between 150 torr and 30 atm, the Raman lineshape function was both experimentally measured and synthesized using a computer model. The stimulated Raman gain was measured by sending a pump laser beam provided by an argon-ion laser and a weak probe beam provided by a tunable dye laser through a cell of methane gas. The stimulated Raman effect caused some of the energy from the pump beam to be transferred to the probe beam. The intensity of the pump beam was low so the gain of the probe beam was on the order of parts per million. A two detector arrangement and a differential amplifier system that had a feedback loop to balance the detectors was constructed to measure the small gains. A detailed description of this detection system that was able to measure gains as small as 0.2 parts per million is provided

  13. Raman spectroscopic measurements on fluoromethane clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, T. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering, Div. of Applied Physics; Ohmura, R. [Keio Univ., Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hori, A. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan). Course of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The occupation of guest molecules in clathrate-structure cages is of interest to researchers, since this property is involved in the estimation of guest molecule density, the stability of clathrate hydrates, and other features. However, such occupation is known to be non-stoichiometric. It remains difficult to accurately estimate the total amount of natural gases in the hydrates located in the deep ocean or in permafrost. This paper discussed the systematic observations of fluoromethane clathrate hydrates using Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with previously obtained Raman spectra for methane (CH{sub 4}) hydrate. Four types of fluoromethane were utilized as standard guest molecules to investigate cage occupation in the hydrates, as all of them were included in the same crystal structure and shared similar functional groups. The types of fluoromethane that were used included fluoromethane (CH{sub 3}F), difluoromethane (CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}), trifluoromethane (CHF{sub 3}), and tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}). The paper discussed the experimental methods including the temperature and pressure conditions of fluorocarbon hydrate formation. It was concluded that the summary of the Raman peak positions of fluoromethane molecules indicate that the influence of deuterized host molecules on the intramolecular vibration frequencies is less than that suggested by experimental error. The obtained data were confirmed to agree with the empirical model for the Raman peak positions on guest molecules, when the relative position of the guest molecule in a host cage structure is considered. 28 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  14. Application of Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, N.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading causes of death next to heart diseases, Half of all cancer cases occur in developing countries. The conventional histopathology is usually the most trustable gold standard for pre-cancer and cancer diagnosis. However, the applicability of this method is more or less restricted because of the requirement of removing human tissues and the difficulty of real time diagnosis. Recently, there has been increased interest in 'optical biopsy' system using tissue spectroscopy to establish the pathological changes. Among optical based methods, Raman spectroscopy is a unique vibrational spectroscopic technique capable of probing biomolecular structures and conformation of tissues, and has excelled in the early detection of pre-cancer and cancer in the number of organs with high diagnostic specificity. Raman spectroscopy offers certain distinct advantages over than other optical diagnostic techniques such as high spatial resolution, use of less harmful NIR radiation, less or no sample preparation, no influence of water bands which facilitates in vivo/in situ measurements. This makes Raman spectroscopy also very useful for biomedical applications. Several research groups have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique in biomedical applications. The background and principle of these techniques will be discussed with some examples and discussions on how Raman spectroscopy can act as a promising technique for rapid in vivo diagnosis and detection of various cancers at the molecular level. (author)

  15. Construction of coherent antistokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Jazmati, A.

    2007-01-01

    Coherent Antistokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) has been built. It consists of a Raman cell, which is filled with CO 2 gas at 5 atm pressure and a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser pumped dye laser. The two beams are focused by means of a bi-convex lens into Raman cell. The Antistokes signals (CARS signals) are generated due to Four-wave mixing process. The antistokes signals were directed to monochrometer entrance slit by prism . The signals are detected by photomultiplier detector which is fixed on the exit slit and connected to data acquisition card located inside the computed case. The dye laser frequency has to be tuned to satisfy the energy difference between the ν 1 beam (Nd- YAG laser beam) and the ν 2 beam (the stokes beam or the dye laser beam) exactly corresponds to a vibrational - rotational Raman resonance (ν 2 - ν 1 = ν M ) in the 12 CO 2 or 13 CO 2 molecule, then the antistokes signals (ν 3 ) will be generated. The spectra of the CARS signals have been recorded to determine the isotope shift of 12 CO 2 , 13 CO 2 , which is 18.3 cm -1 . (author)

  16. Structure and vibrations of glutathione studied by vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Dogra, Sukh Dev; Kaur, Sarvpreet; Tripathi, S K; Prakash, Satya; Rai, Bimal; Saini, G S S

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational properties of glutathione have been investigated by infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques, and density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Assignments of all the experimentally observed vibrational bands have been done with the help of simulated vibrational spectra and potential energy distribution calculations of glutathione water cluster, which includes the effect of hydrogen bonding. Optimized molecular parameters of energy minimized structure have been compared with the available experimental values. Calculated molecular parameters of glutathione-water cluster match well with the experimental values. Some of the calculated molecular parameters and vibrational frequencies of vapor phase glutathione-water cluster suggest participation of some atoms of glutathione in hydrogen bonding. Experimentally observed UV-Visible absorption spectrum of glutathione has also been reported. Observed band at 203 nm has been assigned to electronic transitions calculated with time dependent density functional theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Urban vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Knudsen, L.; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

      lab   studies   in   that   we   found   a   decreased   detection   rate   in   busy   environments.   Here   we   test   with   a   much   larger   sample   and   age   range,   and   contribute   with   the   first   vibration  sensitivity  testing  outside  the  lab  in  an  urban   public...

  18. Spontaneous pneumothorax in weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnejon, T; Sarac, S; Cropp, A J

    1995-06-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is infrequently caused by strenuous exertion. To our knowledge there has only been one case of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting reported in the medical literature. We describe three consecutive cases of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting. We postulate that spontaneous pneumothorax in these patients may be secondary to improper breathing techniques. It is important that physicians and weight trainers be aware of the association between weight lifting and spontaneous pneumothorax and assure that proper instruction is given to athletes who work with weights.

  19. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubuc, John

    Methods built on Raman spectroscopy have shown major potential in describing and discriminating between malignant and benign specimens. Accurate, real-time medical diagnosis benefits in substantial improvements through this vibrational optical method. Not only is acquisition of data possible in milliseconds and analysis in minutes, Raman allows concurrent detection and monitoring of all biological components. Besides validating a significant Raman signature distinction between non-tumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, this study reveals a label-free method to assess overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in tumor cells. EGFR overexpression sires Raman features associated with phosphorylated threonine and serine, and modifications of DNA/RNA characteristics. Investigations by gel electrophoresis reveal EGF induction of phosphorylated Akt, agreeing with the Raman results. The analysis presented is a vital step toward Raman-based evaluation of EGF receptors in breast cancer cells. With the goal of clinically applying Raman-guided methods for diagnosis of breast tumors, the current results lay the basis for proving label-free optical alternatives in making prognosis of the disease.

  20. Raman Scattering Study of Lattice Vibrations in the Type-II Superlattice InAs/InAs1-xSbx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Henan [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States). Optical Science and Engineering Graduate Program and Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Zhang, Yong [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States). Optical Science and Engineering Graduate Program and Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Steenbergen, Elizabeth H. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Center for Photonics Innovation and School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering; Liu, Shi [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Center for Photonics Innovation and School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering; Lin, Zhiyuan [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Center for Photonics Innovation and School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering; Zhang, Yong-Hang [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Center for Photonics Innovation and School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering; Kim, Jeomoh [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Ji, Mi-Hee [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Detchprohm, Theeradetch [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Dupuis, Russell D. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Kim, Jin K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hawkins, Samuel D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klem, John F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-26

    The InAs/InAs1-xSbx superlattice system distinctly differs from two well-studied superlattice systems GaAs / AlAs and InAs/GaSb in terms of electronic band alignment, common elements at the interface, and phonon spectrum overlapping of the constituents. This fact leads to the unique electronic and vibrational properties of the InAs/InAs1-xSbx system when compared to the other two systems. Here, we report a polarized Raman study of the vibrational properties of the InAs/InAs1-xSbx superlattices (SLs) as well as selected InAs1-xSbx alloys, all grown on GaSb substrates by either MBE or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) from both the growth surface and cleaved edge. In the SL, from the (001) backscattering geometry, an InAs-like longitudinal optical (LO) mode is observed as the primary feature, and its intensity is found to increase with increasing Sb composition. From the (110) cleaved-edge backscattering geometry, an InAs-like transverse optical (TO) mode is observed as the main feature in two cross-polarization configurations, but an additional InAs-like “forbidden” LO mode is observed in two parallel-polarization configurations. The InAs1-xSbx alloys lattice matched to the substrate (xSb ~ 0.09) grown by MBE are also found to exhibit the forbidden LO mode, implying the existence of some unexpected [001] modulation. However, the strained samples (xSb ~ 0.35) grown by MOCVD are found to behave like a disordered alloy. The primary conclusions are (1) the InAs-like LO or TO mode can be either a confined or quasiconfined mode in the InAs layers of the SL or extended mode of the whole structure depending on the Sb composition. (2) InAs/InAs1-xSbx and InAs/GaSb SLs exhibit significantly different behaviors in the cleaved-edge geometry but qualitatively similar in the (001) geometry. (3) The appearance of

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy of shock-compressed fluid N2 and O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Shaw, M.S.; Johnson, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Single-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) was used to observe the vibrational spectra of liquid N 2 shock-compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 41 GPa and 5200 K and liquid O 2 shock-compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 10 GPa and 1000 K. For N 2 , the experimental spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities and estimated vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and Raman line widths. The question of excited state populations in the shock-compressed state is addressed

  2. V V Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. V V Raman. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 13 Issue 6 June 2008 pp 596-605 Reflections. The Scientific Enterprise - Science: Some Definitions and Views · V V Raman · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 13 Issue 8 August ...

  3. Raman crystallography of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bo; Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chase, Elaine; Chadalavada, Durga M; Golden, Barbara L; Carey, Paul R; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2009-10-01

    Raman crystallography is the application of Raman spectroscopy to single crystals. This technique has been applied to a variety of protein molecules where it has provided unique information about biopolymer folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here, we describe the application of Raman crystallography to functional RNA molecules. RNA represents unique opportunities and challenges for Raman crystallography. One issue that confounds studies of RNA is its tendency to adopt multiple non-functional folds. Raman crystallography has the advantage that it isolates a single state of the RNA within the crystal and can evaluate its fold, metal ion binding properties (ligand identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), proton binding properties (identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), and catalytic potential. In particular, base-specific stretches can be identified and then associated with the binding of metal ions and protons. Because measurements are carried out in the hanging drop at ambient, rather than cryo, conditions and because RNA crystals tend to be approximately 70% solvent, RNA dynamics and conformational changes become experimentally accessible. This review focuses on experimental setup and procedures, acquisition and interpretation of Raman data, and determination of physicochemical properties of the RNA. Raman crystallographic and solution biochemical experiments on the HDV RNA enzyme are summarized and found to be in excellent agreement. Remarkably, characterization of the crystalline state has proven to help rather than hinder functional characterization of functional RNA, most likely because the tendency of RNA to fold heterogeneously is limited in a crystalline environment. Future applications of Raman crystallography to RNA are briefly discussed.

  4. Karthik Raman Nagasuma Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karthik Raman1 Nagasuma Chandra2. Department of Biochemistry, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057, Switzerland; Bioinformatics Centre, Raman building, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 23, Issue 2. Current Issue

  5. Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric investigations of the hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, U.

    1992-12-01

    Suitable analytical methods need to be developed and tested for process control and reliable tritium accountability within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor. The analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methanes were taken as an example to examine the laser Raman spectroscopy combined with mass spectrometry using an Omegatron. The Omegatron is suitable for the analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and the stable helium isotopes. The limits of the applicability of this mass spectrometer were shown by the analysis of mixtures of deuterated methanes. The Omegatron was also used for experiments of the radiochemical 'Wilzbach' exchange reaction between tritium and methanes. A laser Raman spectrometer for the analysis of gaseous mixtures containing tritium was designed and build using the single components. A tritium compatible, metal sealed Raman cell with windows of high optical quality and additional measures to minimize stray light was successfully employed for the first time. The Raman spectra of the hydrogen isotopes were measured in the pure rotation and in the rotation vibration branches and used for calibration. The deuterated methanes (CH x D 4-x ) were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, the measured wavenumbers assigned to the corresponding normal vibrations and the wavenumbers of the rotational fine structure summarized in tables. The normal vibrations of the tritiated methanes (CH x T 4-x , CD x T 4-x ) produced via the 'Wilzbach' reaction were determined and assigned. The normal vibrations of the CD x T 4-x molecules were measured by Raman spectroscopy for the first time. (orig.)

  6. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  7. Suppression of resonance Raman scattering via ground state depletion towards sub-diffraction-limited label-free microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieger, S.; Fischedick, M.; Boller, Klaus J.; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of the suppression of spontaneous Raman scattering via ground state depletion. The concept of Raman suppression can be used to achieve sub-diffraction-limited resolution in label-free microscopy by exploiting spatially selective signal suppression

  8. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of radiation-chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, G.N.R.

    1983-01-01

    A tunable pulsed laser Raman spectrometer for time resolved Raman studies of radiation-chemical processes is described. This apparatus utilizes the state of art optical multichannel detection and analysis techniques for data acquisition and electron pulse radiolysis for initiating the reactions. By using this technique the resonance Raman spectra of intermediates with absorption spectra in the 248-900 nm region, and mean lifetimes > 30 ns can be examined. This apparatus can be used to time resolve the vibrational spectral overlap between transients absorbing in the same region, and to follow their decay kinetics by monitoring the well resolved Raman peaks. For kinetic measurements at millisecond time scale, the Raman technique is preferable over optical absorption method where low frequency noise is quite bothersome. A time resolved Raman study of the pulse radiolytic oxidation of aqueous tetrafluorohydroquinone and p-methoxyphenol is briefly discussed. 15 references, 5 figures

  9. Vibrational spectra and normal co-ordinate analysis of 2-aminopyridine and 2-amino picoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Sujin P; Mohan, S

    2006-05-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman (FT-R) spectra of 2-aminopyridine and 2-amino picoline were recorded and the observed frequencies were assigned to various modes of vibration in terms of fundamentals by assuming Cs point group symmetry. A normal co-ordinate analysis was also carried out for the proper assignment of the vibrational frequencies using simple valence force field. A complete vibrational analysis is presented here for the molecules and the results are briefly discussed.

  10. Quantum chemical calculations of vibrational spectra of para-ethylbenzenesulfonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenkovskij, V.M.; Bez''yazychnaya, T.V.; Soldatov, V.S.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations of vibrational spectra of para-ethylbenzenesulfonic acid have been conducted by means of a non-empirical SCF MO LCAO method with the use of the 6-31G(d) basis set. Calculated IR and Raman frequencies are assigned to vibrations of specific atomic groups. It is shown that para-ethylbenzenesulfonic acid can serve as a reasonable quantum chemical model in calculations of vibrational spectra for polystyrene sulfonic resins of various degrees of hydration. (authors) Key words IR absorption and Raman scattering spectra - quantum chemical calculations - para-ethylbenzenesulfonic acid

  11. Hot Ground Vibration Tests

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ground vibration tests or modal surveys are routinely conducted to support flutter analysis for subsonic and supersonic vehicles. However, vibration testing...

  12. Density functional theory study of vibrational spectra, and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    16502. 15. Satyanarayana D N 2004 Vibrational spectroscopy –. Theory and applications (New Delhi: New Age. International (P) Limited Publishers) 2nd ed. 16. Dollish F R, Fateley W G and Bentley F F. 2001 Characteristics Raman frequencies of organic chemsitry (Orlando FL: Hartcourt College Publi- shers) 3rd edn. 17.

  13. Density functional theory study of vibrational spectra, and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of dacarbazine were recorded in the regions 4000-400 and 3500-100 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometry, wavenumber, polarizability and several thermodynamic properties of dacarbazine were studied using ab initio Hartree-Fock, MP2 and DFT methods. A complete vibrational ...

  14. FT Raman microscopy of untreated natural plant fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Farwell, D. W.; Webster, D.

    1997-11-01

    The application of FT-Raman microscopy to the non-destructive analysis of natural plant fibres is demonstrated with samples of flax, jute, ramie, cotton, kapok, sisal and coconut fibre. Vibrational assignments are proposed and characteristic features of each material are presented. Samples were not pre-treated chemically before analysis and were used directly from their respective storage collection; the adaptation of the Raman microscopic technique to the identification of specimens of natural fibres in archaeological burial sites is explored for its forensic potential.

  15. [Micro-Raman and fluorescence spectra of several agrochemicals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yi-lin; Zhang, Peng-xiang; Qian, Xiao-fan

    2004-05-01

    Raman and fluorescence spectra from several agrochemicals were measured, which are sold for the use in vegetables, fruits and grains. Characteristic vibration Raman peaks from some of the agrochemicals were recorded, hence the spectra can be used for their identification. Other marketed agrochemicals demonstrated strong fluorescence under 514.5 nm excitation. It was found that the fluorescence spectra of the agrochemicals are very different. According to these results one can detect the trace amount of agrochemicals left on the surface of fruits, vegetables and grains in situ and conveniently.

  16. FT-Raman and FTIR spectra of photoactive aminobenzazole derivatives in the solid state: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Rodrigo Martins [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus Bagé, Grupo de Pesquisa em Espectroscopia de Materiais Fotônicos, 96400-970 Bagé, RS (Brazil); Rodembusch, Fabiano Severo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Grupo de Pesquisa em Fotoquímica Orgânica Aplicada, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, CEP 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Habis, Charles [Northern Virginia Community College, Manassas, VA (United States); Moreira, Eduardo Ceretta, E-mail: eduardomoreira@unipampa.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus Bagé, Grupo de Pesquisa em Espectroscopia de Materiais Fotônicos, 96400-970 Bagé, RS (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    This study reports the experimental investigation of two photoactive aminobenzazole derivatives in the solid state by FT-Raman and Infrared Spectroscopies (FTIR) and its comparison with theoretical models. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational frequencies, and corresponding vibrational assignments of these compounds have been investigated experimentally and theoretically using Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms (SIESTA) and Gaussian03 Software Package. The FT-Raman and FTIR spectra were acquired with high resolution and emission frequencies identified by simulating the vibrational modes. The most intense peak observed in the FT-Raman spectra is the in-plane deformation vibrational of O–H bond that could be related to the vibrational region responsible for the stabilization of the enol conformer in the ground state which undergoes ESIPT to form a keto tautomer in the excited state. Additionally, the position of the amino group played an important role on the vibrational characteristics of the studied compounds. Also, the simulations proved to be a good approach in undertaking the FTIR and FT-Raman experiments. The use of graphic correlations helps us to determine the method and basis that best fit the experimental results. - Highlights: • Structural and vibrational properties of two aminobenzazoles were reported. • Comparison between experimental techniques and theoretical models. • The position of the amino group played an important role on the vibrational characteristics of the studied compounds.

  17. Physiological effects of railway vibration and noise on sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael G; Croy, Ilona; Ögren, Mikael; Hammar, Oscar; Lindberg, Eva; Persson Waye, Kerstin

    2017-05-01

    This paper evaluates the relative contribution of vibration and noise from railway on physiological sleep outcomes. Vibration from railway freight often accompanies airborne noise, yet is almost totally absent in the existing literature. In an experimental investigation, 23 participants, each sleeping for six nights in the laboratory, were exposed to 36 simulated railway freight pass-bys per night with vibration alone (a Wd,max  = 0.0204 ms -2 ), noise alone (L AF,max  = 49.8 dB), or both vibration and noise simultaneously. A fourth exposure night involved 52 pass-bys with concurrent vibration and noise. Sleep was measured with polysomnography. Cardiac activity was measured with electrocardiography. The probability of cortical arousals or awakenings was greater following all exposures, including vibration alone, than spontaneous reaction probability (p railway freight on sleep.

  18. Early prediction of water-holding capacity in meat by multivariate vibrational spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dorthe Kjær; Morel, Sophie; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    This study had the dual purpose of (a) investigating the feasibility of measuring fundamental vibrational information in fresh porcine meat using infrared (IR) absorption and Raman scattering, and (b) investigating if the vibrational spectra obtained within 1 h after slaughter contained informati...... predictive information according to WHC of the porcine meat. This region covers functional group frequencies of water, protein, fat and glycogen, including the carbonyl and amide groups.......This study had the dual purpose of (a) investigating the feasibility of measuring fundamental vibrational information in fresh porcine meat using infrared (IR) absorption and Raman scattering, and (b) investigating if the vibrational spectra obtained within 1 h after slaughter contained information...... about the water-holding capacity (WHC) of the meat. Preliminary studies performed at a research slaughterhouse revealed a high correlation between WHC and both IR (r=0.89) and Raman spectra using Partial Least Squares Regressions (PLSR). The good results were confirmed under industrial conditions using...

  19. Vibrational dynamics of the host framework in Sn clathrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Bogdan M.; Sturza, Mihai; Hu, Michael Y.; Gosztola, David; Baran, Volodymyr; Fässler, Thomas F.; Alp, E. Ercan

    2014-09-01

    We use nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS), a relatively new, synchrotron-based, isotope-specific technique in combination with a more traditional one, Raman spectroscopy, to probe the vibrational dynamics of the host frameworks in two Zintl clathrates: K8Zn4Sn42 (KZS) and Ba8Ga16Sn30 (BGS). From the normalized Sn vibrational density of states obtained from NRIXS, we calculate the stiffness, a mean force constant of the Sn environment, the resilience, a compact way of expressing the temperature dependence of the Sn mean square displacement, and several thermodynamic properties. The stiffness and the resilience are approximately 7% lower in KZS, reflecting its larger unit cell compared to BGS. We emphasize the complementariness between NRIXS and Raman spectroscopy and establish a series of benchmarks for a more quantitative evaluation of the Raman spectra for the numerous clathrates that are still not suitable for NRIXS studies.

  20. Vibrational Investigations of Silver-Doped Hydroxyapatite with Antibacterial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Steluta Ciobanu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver-doped hydroxyapatite (Ag:HAp was obtained by coprecipitation method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, infrared, and Raman analysis confirmed the development of Ag:HAp with good crystal structure. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed an uniform ellipsoidal morphology with particles from 5 nm to 15 nm. The main vibrational bands characteristic to HAp were identified. The bands assigned to phosphate vibrational group were highlighted in infrared and Raman spectra. The most intense peak Raman spectrum is the narrow band observed at 960 cm−1. In this article Ag:HAp-NPs were also evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against gram-positive, gram-negative, and fungal strains. The specific antimicrobial activity revealed by the qualitative assay demonstrates that our compounds are interacting differently with the microbial targets.

  1. Theory of vibration protection

    CERN Document Server

    Karnovsky, Igor A

    2016-01-01

    This text is an advancement of the theory of vibration protection of mechanical systems with lumped and distributed parameters. The book offers various concepts and methods of solving vibration protection problems, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and the fields of their effective applications. Fundamental approaches of vibration protection, which are considered in this book, are the passive, parametric and optimal active vibration protection. The passive vibration protection is based on vibration isolation, vibration damping and dynamic absorbers. Parametric vibration protection theory is based on the Shchipanov-Luzin invariance principle. Optimal active vibration protection theory is based on the Pontryagin principle and the Krein moment method. The book also contains special topics such as suppression of vibrations at the source of their occurrence and the harmful influence of vibrations on humans. Numerous examples, which illustrate the theoretical ideas of each chapter, ar...

  2. Determination of iprodione in agrochemicals by infrared and Raman spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2007-04-01

    Two methodologies based on vibrational spectrometry--making use of Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) and Raman spectrometry--were developed for iprodione determination in solid pesticide formulations. The FTIR procedure involved the extraction of iprodione by CHCl(3), and the latter determination involved measuring the peak area between 1450 and 1440 cm(-1), corrected using a horizontal baseline defined at 1481 cm(-1). FT-Raman determination was performed directly on the powdered solid products, using standard chromatography glass vials as sample cells and measuring the Raman intensity between 1003 and 993 cm(-1), with a two-point baseline correction established between 1012 and 981 cm(-1). The sensitivities obtained were 0.319 area values g mg(-1) for FTIR determination and 5.58 area values g g(-1) for FT-Raman. The repeatabilities, taken to be the relative standard deviation of five independent measurements at 1.51 mg g(-1) and 10.98% w/w concentration levels, were equal to 0.16% and 0.9% for FTIR and FT-Raman, respectively, and the limits of detection were 0.3 and 0.2% w/w (higher than those obtained for HPLC, 0.016% w/w). FTIR determination provided a sample frequency of 60 h(-1), higher than those obtained for the Raman and reference chromatography methods (25 and 8.6 h(-1), respectively). On the other hand, the new FT-Raman method eliminates reagent consumption and waste generation, and reduces the need for sample handling and the contact of operator with the pesticide. In spite of their lack of sensitivity, vibrational procedures can therefore provide viable environmentally friendly alternatives to laborious, time- and solvent-consuming reference chromatography methods for quality control in commercially available pesticide formulations.

  3. Confocal Raman microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Hollricher, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    This second edition provides a cutting-edge overview of physical, technical and scientific aspects related to the widely used analytical method of confocal Raman microscopy. The book includes expanded background information and adds insights into how confocal Raman microscopy, especially 3D Raman imaging, can be integrated with other methods to produce a variety of correlative microscopy combinations. The benefits are then demonstrated and supported by numerous examples from the fields of materials science, 2D materials, the life sciences, pharmaceutical research and development, as well as the geosciences.

  4. Lattice Vibration of Layered GaTe Single Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of interlayer interaction on in-layer structure of laminar GaTe crystals was studied according to the lattice vibration using micro-Raman analysis. The results were also confirmed by the first principle calculations. Accordingly, the relationship between lattice vibration and crystal structure was established. Ten peaks were observed in the micro-Raman spectra from 100 cm−1 to 300 cm−1. Eight of them fit Raman-active vibration modes and the corresponding displacement vectors were calculated, which proved that the two modes situated at 128.7 cm−1 and 145.7 cm−1 were related to the lattice vibration of GaTe, instead of impurities or defects. Davydov splitting in GaTe was identified and confirmed by the existence of the other two modes, conjugate modes, at 110.7 cm−1 (∆ω = 33.1 cm−1 and 172.5 cm−1 (∆ω = 49.5 cm−1, indicates that the weak interlayer coupling has a significant effect on lattice vibrations in the two-layer monoclinic unit cell. Our results further proved the existence of two layers in each GaTe unit cell.

  5. Femtosecond time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy using sub-7-fs pulses: Apparatus and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-04-01

    We describe details of the setup for time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (TR-ISRS). In this method, snapshot molecular vibrational spectra of the photoreaction transients are captured via time-domain Raman probing using ultrashort pulses. Our instrument features transform-limited sub-7-fs pulses to impulsively excite and probe coherent nuclear wavepacket motions, allowing us to observe vibrational fingerprints of transient species from the terahertz to 3000-cm-1 region with high sensitivity. Key optical components for the best spectroscopic performance are discussed. The TR-ISRS measurements for the excited states of diphenylacetylene in cyclohexane are demonstrated, highlighting the capability of our setup to track femtosecond dynamics of all the Raman-active fundamental molecular vibrations.

  6. Femtosecond time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy using sub-7-fs pulses: Apparatus and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei, E-mail: tahei@riken.jp [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Ultrafast Spectroscopy Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (RAP), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    We describe details of the setup for time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (TR-ISRS). In this method, snapshot molecular vibrational spectra of the photoreaction transients are captured via time-domain Raman probing using ultrashort pulses. Our instrument features transform-limited sub-7-fs pulses to impulsively excite and probe coherent nuclear wavepacket motions, allowing us to observe vibrational fingerprints of transient species from the terahertz to 3000-cm{sup −1} region with high sensitivity. Key optical components for the best spectroscopic performance are discussed. The TR-ISRS measurements for the excited states of diphenylacetylene in cyclohexane are demonstrated, highlighting the capability of our setup to track femtosecond dynamics of all the Raman-active fundamental molecular vibrations.

  7. Natural amber, copal resin and colophony investigated by UV-VIS, infrared and Raman spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, ZhiFan; Dong, Kun; Yang, XiaoYun; Lin, JinChang; Cui, XiaoYing; Zhou, RongFeng; Deng, Qing

    2013-08-01

    Natural amber, copal resin and colophony are have investigated by UV-VIS, infrared and Raman spectrum. In order to distinguish the natural amber, copal resin and colophony, we have successfully used the nondestructive examination (NDE) technology. The results show that UV-VIS could not distinguish these compositions. The infrared spectra can distinguish them, but the technology may destroy the specimen. The Raman spectra show three characteristic peaks of vibration near position 932 cm-1 and position 1179 cm-1 of copal resin, which confirm the existence of terpenes compounds in it. In the Raman spectra of colophony, the vibration characteristic peak at position 1589 cm-1, caused by the conjugate double bond of internal unsaturated resin acid, is the basis of the characteristic difference between colophony and natural amber. The advantages of the distinguished technology by Raman spectroscopy are convenient and nondestructive examination for natural amber, copal resin and colophony.

  8. Raman study of InAs/InP quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, T.; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.; Fuster, D.; González, Y.; González, L.

    2007-04-01

    We present a Raman study of the vibrational modes in InAs/InP (001) quantum wires. The energy of the observed phonon modes evidences the confinement properties of the wires, their strain anisotropy and the effect of atomic intermixing. Resonance effects in confined and interface phonons are discussed for excitation in the vicinity of the E1 critical point. The observed vibrations and their variation with sample characteristics are in agreement with the conclusions of previous structural and optical characterization performed in the same samples.

  9. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for nanoscale strain characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Alvarado; Hayazawa, Norihiko; Kawata, Satoshi

    2009-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), which utilizes the strong localized optical field generated at the apex of a metallic tip when illuminated, has been shown to successfully probe the vibrational spectrum of today's and tomorrow's state-of-the-art silicon and next-generation semiconductor devices, such as quantum dots. Collecting and analyzing the vibrational spectrum not only aids in material identification but also provides insight into strain distributions in semiconductors. Here, the potential of TERS for nanoscale characterization of strain in silicon devices is reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on the key challenges of obtaining spectroscopic images of strain in actual strained silicon devices.

  10. Theoretical calculation (DFT), Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of ponceau 4R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunfei; Li, Yan; Sun, Yingying; Wang, Heya; Qian, He; Yao, Weirong

    2012-10-01

    Ponceau 4R is used as a coloring agent in many different products, such as food, drinks, medicines, cosmetics and tobacco. However, ponceau 4R also shows carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic behavior in high doses. In this work, standard Raman, theoretical Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra have been used to investigate ponceau 4R. More specifically, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to calculate the optimized Raman spectrum of ponceau 4R at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. This has provided a better understanding of the optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies of this dye. In addition, the experimental spectrum of ponceau 4R has been compared with the theoretical spectrum; good agreement was obtained. Finally, it has shown that using SERS the detection limit of the ponceau 4R solution can be as low as 5 μg/mL. This has been achieved by SERS measurements of ponceau 4R on a substrate of gold nanoparticles. The SERS peaks at 1030, 1236, 1356 and 1502 cm-1 were chosen as index for semi-quantitative analysis, showing that the SERS technique provided a useful ultrasensitive method for the detection of ponceau 4R.

  11. IR, Raman, SERS and DFT study of amoxicillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebu, Andreea; Szabó, László; Leopold, Nicolae; Berindean, Cătălin; David, Leontin

    2011-05-01

    In this work a joint experimental and theoretical study on amoxicillin is reported. The molecular vibrations of amoxicillin were investigated by FTIR, FT-Raman and SERS spectroscopies. In parallel, quantum chemical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were used to determine the geometrical, energetic and vibrational characteristics of the molecule with particular emphasis put on the interaction and adsorption geometry of the molecule to the silver colloidal surface. The SERS spectrum of amoxicillin was recorded using a 532 nm laser line and hydroxylamine reduced silver colloid as SERS substrate. FTIR, FT-Raman and SERS spectra of amoxicillin were assigned based on DFT calculations with the hybrid B3LYP exchange-correlation functional, coupled with the standard 6-31G(d) basis set. The calculated molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was used in conjunction with SERS data to predict the adsorption geometry of the molecule on the silver surface.

  12. Applications of Fourier transform Raman and infrared spectroscopy in forensic sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuptsov, Albert N.

    2000-02-01

    First in the world literature comprehensive digital complementary vibrational spectra collection of polymer materials and search system was developed. Non-destructive combined analysis using complementary FT-Raman and FTIR spectra followed by cross-parallel searching on digital spectral libraries, was applied in different fields of forensic sciences. Some unique possibilities of Raman spectroscopy has been shown in the fields of examination of questioned documents, paper, paints, polymer materials, gemstones and other physical evidences.

  13. Spontaneous uterine rupture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Rupture of a gravid uterus is a surgical emergency. Predisposing factors include a scarred uterus. Spontaneous rupture of an unscarred uterus during pregnancy is a rare occurrence. We hereby present the case of a spontaneous complete uterine rupture at a gestational age of 34 weeks in a 35 year old patient ...

  14. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  15. Polarized Raman microspectroscopy on intact human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Katrin R; Koster, Joachim; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2008-10-01

    Polarization-resolved Raman microspectroscopy with near-infrared laser excitation was applied to intact human hair in order to non-invasively investigate the conformation and orientation of the polypeptide chains. By varying the orientation of the hair shaft relative to the polarization directions of the laser/analyzer, a set of four polarized Raman spectra is obtained; this allows to simultaneously determine both the secondary structure of hair proteins and the orientation of the polypeptide strands relative to the axis of the hair shaft. For the amide I band, results from a quantitative analysis of the polarized Raman spectra are compared with theoretically expected values for fibers with uniaxial symmetry. Based on the polarization behavior of the amide I band and further vibrational bands, a partial ordering of alpha-helical polypeptide strands parallel to the hair shaft can be concluded. We suggest that this microspectroscopic approach may be used for human hair diagnostics by detecting structural or orientational alterations of keratins.

  16. Vibrational spectroscopic study of sulphated silk proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, P.; Freddi, G.; Arosio, C.; Tsukada, M.; Arai, T.; Taddei, P.

    2007-05-01

    Degummed Bombyx mori ( B. m.) silk fibroin fabric and mutant naked pupa cocoons (Nd-s) consisting of almost pure silk sericin were treated with chlorosulphonic acid in pyridine and investigated by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies. Untreated silk fibroin and sericin displayed typical spectral features due to characteristic amino acid composition and molecular conformation (prevailing β-sheet with a less ordered structure in sericin). Upon sulphation, the degree of molecular disorder increased in both proteins and new bands appeared. The IR bands at 1049 and 1014 cm -1 were attributed to vibrations of sulphate salts and that at 1385 cm -1 to the νasSO 2 mode of organic covalent sulphates. In the 1300-1180 cm -1 range various contributions of alkyl and aryl sulphate salts, sulphonamides, sulphoamines and organic covalent sulphates, fell. Fibroin covalently bound sulphate groups through the hydroxyl groups of tyrosine and serine, while sericin through the hydroxyl groups of serine, since the δOH vibrations at 1399 cm -1 in IR and at 1408 cm -1 in Raman disappeared almost completely. Finally, the increase of the I850/ I830 intensity ratio of Raman tyrosine doublet in fibroin suggested a change towards a more exposed state of tyrosine residues, in good agreement with the more disordered conformation taken upon sulphation.

  17. Simultaneous Conoscopic Holography and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    of laser light scattered inelastically from a laser-illuminated spot on the surface. The wavelengths of the inelastically scattered light differ from that of the incident laser beam by amounts that correspond to the energies of molecular vibrations. The resulting vibrational spectrum can be used to identify the molecules. Raman spectroscopy is a standard laboratory technique for identifying mineralogical, biological, and other specific chemical compositions.

  18. Comparison of UV and visible Raman spectroscopy of bulk metal molybdate and metal vanadate catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hanjing; Wachs, Israel E; Briand, Laura E

    2005-12-15

    The visible (532 and 442 nm) and UV (325 nm) Raman spectra of bulk mixed metal oxides (metal molybdates and metal vanadates) were compared on the same spectrometer, for the first time, to allow examination of how varying the excitation energy from visible to UV affects the resulting Raman spectra. The quality of the Raman spectra was found to be a strong function of the absorption properties of the bulk mixed oxide. For bulk mixed metal oxides that absorb weakly in the visible and UV regions, both the visible and UV Raman spectra were of high quality and exhibit identical vibrational bands, but with slightly different relative intensities. For bulk mixed metal oxides that absorb strongly in the UV and visible regions and/or strongly in the UV and weakly in the visible regions, the visible Raman spectra are much richer in structural information and of higher resolution than the corresponding UV Raman spectra. This is a consequence of the strong UV absorption that significantly reduces the sampling volume and number of scatterers giving rise to the Raman signal. The shallower escape depth of UV Raman, however, was not sufficient to detect vibrations from the surface metal oxide species that are present on the outermost surface layer of these crystalline mixed metal oxide phases as previously suggested. It was also demonstrated that there is no sample damage by the more energetic UV excitation when very low laser powers and fast detectors are employed, thus avoiding the need of complicated fluidized bed sample arrangements sometimes used for UV Raman investigations. The current comparative Raman investigation carefully documents, for the first time, the advantages and disadvantages of applying different excitation energies in collecting Raman spectra of bulk mixed metal oxide materials.

  19. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  20. Raman spectroscopic study of plasma-treated salmon DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha [Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Wan [Department of Chemistry, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-14

    In this research, we studied the effect of plasma treatment on the optical/structural properties of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from salmon sperm. DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) films were obtained by complexation of DNA with CTMA. Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectra indicated that DNA retained its double helical structure in the solid film. The Raman spectra exhibited several vibration modes corresponding to the nuclear bases and the deoxyribose-phosphate backbones of the DNA, as well as the alkylchains of CTMA. Dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) plasma treatment induced structural modification and damage to the DNA, as observed by changes in the ultraviolet-visible absorption, CD, and Raman spectra. The optical emission spectra of the DBD plasma confirmed that DNA modification was induced by plasma ions such as reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species.

  1. Raman spectroscopic study of a genetically altered kidney cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Joel; Garcia, Francisco; Centeno, Silvia P.; Joshi, N. V.

    2008-02-01

    A Raman spectroscopic investigation of a genetically altered Human Embryonic Kidney Cell (HEK293) along with a pathologically normal cell has been carried out by a conventional method. The genetic alteration was carried out with a standard protocol by using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP). Raman spectra show that there are dramatic differences between the spectrum obtained from a genetically altered cell and that obtained from a pathologically normal cell. The former shows three broad bands; meanwhile the latter shows several sharp peaks corresponding to the ring vibrational modes of Phen, GFP and DNA. The present analysis provides an indication that the force field near Phen located at 64, 65 and 66 was altered during the genetic transformation. The Raman spectrum could be a direct experimental evidence for substantial modifications triggered due to the expression of specific genes.

  2. Condition Assessment of Kevlar Composite Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation includes the following main concepts. Goal: To evaluate Raman spectroscopy as a potential NDE tool for the detection of stress rupture in Kevlar. Objective: Test a series of strand samples that have been aged under various conditions and evaluate differences and trends in the Raman response. Hypothesis: Reduction in strength associated with stress rupture may manifest from changes in the polymer at a molecular level. If so, than these changes may effect the vibrational characteristics of the material, and consequently the Raman spectra produced from the material. Problem Statement: Kevlar composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) on the space shuttles are greater than 25 years old. Stress rupture phenomena is not well understood for COPVs. Other COPVs are planned for hydrogen-fueled vehicles using Carbon composite material. Raman spectroscopy is being explored as an non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique to predict the onset of stress rupture in Kevlar composite materials. Test aged Kevlar strands to discover trends in the Raman response. Strength reduction in Kevlar polymer will manifest itself on the Raman spectra. Conclusions: Raman spectroscopy has shown relative changes in the intensity and FWHM of the 1613 cm(exp -1) peak. Reduction in relative intensity for creep, fleet leader, and SIM specimens compared to the virgin strands. Increase in FWHM has been observed for the creep and fleet leader specimens compared to the virgin strands. Changes in the Raman spectra may result from redistributing loads within the material due to the disruption of hydrogen bonding between crystallites or defects in the crystallites from aging the Kevlar strands. Peak shifting has not been observed to date. Analysis is ongoing. Stress measurements may provide a tool in the short term.

  3. Infrared and Raman Study of the Recluse Spider Silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. L.; Wang, Qijue; Xing, Zhen; Schniepp, H. C.; Qazilbash, M. M.

    Spider silk exhibits remarkable mechanical properties, such as high tensile strength and toughness. We want to gain insight into the composition and structure of spider silk to discover the origin of these properties. We are especially interested in the organization of the crystalline beta sheets that are expected to contribute to the high strength of the silk from the recluse spider, Loxosceles laeta. The recluse spider produces a silk that has a unique geometry amongst arachnids. We measure the silk's optical properties, particularly the infrared-active and Raman-active vibrations. Broadband infrared transmission spectra were collected in the spectral range between 600 cm-1 and 4000 cm-1, with light polarized parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the silk. Raman micro-spectroscopy was performed in the spectral range 500 cm-1 and 4000 cm- 1 with a 514 nm laser. The infrared and Raman vibrational modes are fit with Lorentzian and pseudo-Voigt functions. The vibrational modes are assigned to specific structures and electronic bonds in the silk. This work was supported by NASA/ Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

  4. Boosting the Amount of Molecular Information Through Polarized Resolved Resonance Raman Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Vibrational Raman spectroscopy, one of the experimental techniques available, is applied for characterization and analysis of molecular samples in different areas such as medical, food and environmental analysis. Application of the Raman technique is mostly similar to the application of infrared...... and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy, i.e. only the spectral distribution is analysed. The goal of the present chapter is to demonstrate that the amount of molecular information (also for solutions and powders) can be increased considerably by analysing also the polarization of the Raman and resonance...

  5. Retrieval of phase memory in two independent atomic ensembles by Raman process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Cheng-Ling; Chen, Li-Qing; Zhang, Guo-Wan; Ou, Z. Y.; Zhang, Weiping

    2012-02-01

    In spontaneous Raman process in atomic cell at high gain, both the Stokes field and the accompanying collective atomic excitation (atomic spin wave) are coherent. We find that, due to the spontaneous nature of the process, the phases of the Stokes field and the atomic spin wave change randomly from one realization to another but are anti-correlated. The phases of the atomic ensembles are read out via another Raman process at a later time, thus realizing phase memory in atoms. The observation of phase correlation between the Stokes field and the collective atomic excitations is an important step towards macroscopic EPR-type entanglement of continuous variables between light and atoms.

  6. Vibrational Spectroscopy of the CCl[subscript 4] v[subscript 1] Mode: Theoretical Prediction of Isotopic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, James D.; Wetterer, Anna M.; Cochran, Rea M.; Valente, Edward J.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique, yet it is often missing from the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum. Tetrachloromethane (CCl[subscript 4]) is the ideal molecule for an introductory vibrational spectroscopy experiment and the symmetric stretch vibration contains fine structure due to isotopic variations…

  7. In situ Raman Spectroscopy Study of the Formation of Graphene from Urea and Graphite Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    part and a vibrational part. Raman spectroscopy is then concerned with the vibrational part of the polarizability tensor which reduces to [28...pp. 1558–1565, Mar., 2007. [15] F. Li, J. Song, H. Yang , S. Gan, Q. Zhang, D. Han, A. Ivaska, and L. Niu. “One- step synthesis of graphene/SnO2...and phase transformation in graphite produced by ball milling .” Nanostructured Materials, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 393–399, May, 1996. [23] A. Ferrari, J

  8. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  9. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic investigation on Lamiaceae plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, P.; Popp, J.; Kiefer, W.

    1999-05-01

    The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgaris are studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The containing monoterpenes can be identified by their Raman spectra. Further the essential oils are investigated in their natural environment, the so-called oil cells of these Lamiaceae plants, with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This method has the advantage to enhance Raman signals and furthermore the SERS effect leads to fluorescence quenching.

  10. Multi-wavelength Raman scattering of nanostructured Al-doped zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, V.; Ghidelli, M.; Gondoni, P. [Dipartimento di Energia and NEMAS, Center for Nanoengineered Materials and Surfaces, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Casari, C. S.; Li Bassi, A. [Dipartimento di Energia and NEMAS, Center for Nanoengineered Materials and Surfaces, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology PoliMI, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    In this work we present a detailed Raman scattering investigation of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films characterized by a variety of nanoscale structures and morphologies and synthesized by pulsed laser deposition under different oxygen pressure conditions. The comparison of Raman spectra for pure ZnO and AZO films with similar morphology at the nano/mesoscale allows to investigate the relation between Raman features (peak or band positions, width, relative intensity) and material properties such as local structural order, stoichiometry, and doping. Moreover Raman measurements with three different excitation lines (532, 457, and 325 nm) point out a strong correlation between vibrational and electronic properties. This observation confirms the relevance of a multi-wavelength Raman investigation to obtain a complete structural characterization of advanced doped oxide materials.

  11. Nanodiamonds and silicate minerals in ordinary chondrites as determined by micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Bhaskar J.; Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnarao; Borah, Rashmi R.

    2017-06-01

    We present here the Raman spectroscopic study of silicate and carbonaceous minerals in three ordinary chondrites with the aim to improve our understanding the impact process including the peak metamorphic pressures present in carbon-bearing ordinary chondites. The characteristic Raman vibrational peaks of olivines, pyroxenes, and plagioclase have been determined on three ordinary chondrites from India, Dergaon (H5), Mahadevpur (H4/5), and Kamargaon (L6). The Raman spectra of these meteorite samples show the presence of nanodiamonds at 1334-1345 cm-1 and 1591-1619 cm-1. The full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of Raman peaks for Mahadevpur and Dergaon reflect the nature of shock metamorphism in these meteorites. The frequency shift in Raman spectra might be because of shock effects during the formation of the diamond/graphite grains.

  12. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnally, Michael O; McMahon, Jeffrey M; Van Duyne, Richard P; Schatz, George C

    2016-09-07

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gpu|(2)ImχR(ω)gst (2)/ImχR(ω), where |gpu|(2) is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering.

  13. Insights into Protein Structure and Dynamics by Ultraviolet and Visible Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Peña, Ignacio; Leigh, Brian S; Schlamadinger, Diana E; Kim, Judy E

    2015-08-11

    Raman spectroscopy is a form of vibrational spectroscopy based on inelastic scattering of light. In resonance Raman spectroscopy, the wavelength of the incident light falls within an absorption band of a chromophore, and this overlap of excitation and absorption energy greatly enhances the Raman scattering efficiency of the absorbing species. The ability to probe vibrational spectra of select chromophores within a complex mixture of molecules makes resonance Raman spectroscopy an excellent tool for studies of biomolecules. In this Current Topic, we discuss the type of molecular insights obtained from steady-state and time-resolved resonance Raman studies of a prototypical photoactive protein, rhodopsin. We also review recent efforts in ultraviolet resonance Raman investigations of soluble and membrane-associated biomolecules, including integral membrane proteins and antimicrobial peptides. These examples illustrate that resonance Raman is a sensitive, selective, and practical method for studying the structures of biological molecules, and the molecular bonding, geometry, and environments of protein cofactors, the backbone, and side chains.

  14. Monosodium glutamate in its anhydrous and monohydrate form: Differentiation by Raman spectroscopies and density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peica, N.; Lehene, C.; Leopold, N.; Schlücker, S.; Kiefer, W.

    2007-03-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG), a common flavor enhancer, is detected in aqueous solutions by Raman and surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectroscopies at the micromolar level. The presence of different species, such as protonated and unprotonated MSG, is demonstrated by concentration and pH dependent Raman and SERS experiments. In particular, the symmetric bending modes of the amino group and the stretching modes of the carboxy moiety are employed as marker bands. The protonation of the NH 2 group at acidic pH values, for example, is detected in the Raman spectra. From the measured SERS spectra, a strong chemical interaction of MSG with the colloidal particles is deduced and a geometry of MSG adsorbed on the silver surface is proposed. In order to assign the observed Raman bands, calculations employing density functional theory (DFT) were performed. The calculated geometries, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and Raman scattering activities for both MSG forms are in good agreement with experimental data. The set of theoretical data enables a complete vibrational assignment of the experimentally detected Raman spectra and the differentiation between the anhydrous and monohydrate forms of MSG.

  15. DFT studies on the vibrational and electronic spectra of acetylsalicylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yunfeng; Tang, Guodong; Han, Yonghong; Culnane, Lance F.; Zhao, Jianyin; Zhang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    The following is a theoretical and experimental study on the vibrational and electronic properties of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Vibrational information was obtained by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy which agree well with harmonic vibrational frequency calculations. The calculations were carried out using density functional theory B3LYP methods with 6-311G** and LANL2DZ basis sets. The vibrational assignments were calculated by Gaussview. Absorption UV-Vis experiments of ASA reveal three maximum peaks at 203, 224 and 277 nm, which are in agreement with calculated electronic transitions using TD-B3LYP/6-311G**.

  16. Raman spectrum of asphaltene

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael A.

    2012-11-05

    Asphaltenes extracted from seven different crude oils representing different geological formations from around the globe were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopic technique. Each spectrum is fitted with four main peaks using the Gaussian function. On the basis of D1 and G bands of the Raman spectrum, asphaltene indicated an ordered structure with the presence of boundary defected edges. The average aromatic sheet size of the asphaltene molecules is estimated within the range of 1.52-1.88 nm, which represents approximately seven to eight aromatic fused rings. This estimation is based on the integrated intensity of D1 and G bands, as proposed by Tunistra and Koenig. The results here are in perfect agreement with so many other used techniques and indicate the potential applicability of Raman measurements to determine the average aromatic ring size and its boundary. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  17. State-by-State Investigation of Destructive Interference in Resonance Raman Spectra of Neutral Tyrosine and the Tyrosinate Anion with the Simplified Sum-over-States Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Cabalo, Jerry B.; Saikin, Semion K.; Emmons, Erik D.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    UV resonance Raman scattering is uniquely sensitive to the molecular electronic structure as well as intermolecular interactions. To better understand the relationship between electronic structure and resonance Raman cross section, we carried out combined experimental and theoretical studies of neutral tyrosine and the tyrosinate anion. We studied the Raman cross sections of four vibrational modes as a function of excitation wavelength, and we analyzed them in terms of the contributions of th...

  18. Molecular cavity optomechanics as a theory of plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelli, Philippe; Galland, Christophe; Piro, Nicolas; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2016-02-01

    The exceptional enhancement of Raman scattering by localized plasmonic resonances in the near field of metallic nanoparticles, surfaces or tips (SERS, TERS) has enabled spectroscopic fingerprinting down to the single molecule level. The conventional explanation attributes the enhancement to the subwavelength confinement of the electromagnetic field near nanoantennas. Here, we introduce a new model that also accounts for the dynamical nature of the plasmon-molecule interaction. We thereby reveal an enhancement mechanism not considered before: dynamical backaction amplification of molecular vibrations. We first map the system onto the canonical Hamiltonian of cavity optomechanics, in which the molecular vibration and the plasmon are parametrically coupled. We express the vacuum optomechanical coupling rate for individual molecules in plasmonic 'hot-spots' in terms of the vibrational mode's Raman activity and find it to be orders of magnitude larger than for microfabricated optomechanical systems. Remarkably, the frequency of commonly studied molecular vibrations can be comparable to or larger than the plasmon's decay rate. Together, these considerations predict that an excitation laser blue-detuned from the plasmon resonance can parametrically amplify the molecular vibration, leading to a nonlinear enhancement of Raman emission that is not predicted by the conventional theory. Our optomechanical approach recovers known results, provides a quantitative framework for the calculation of cross-sections, and enables the design of novel systems that leverage dynamical backaction to achieve additional, mode-selective enhancements. It also provides a quantum mechanical framework to analyse plasmon-vibrational interactions in terms of molecular quantum optomechanics.

  19. DFT and experimental studies of the structure and vibrational spectra of 2-(tert-buroxycarbonyl (Boc) - amino)-5-bromopyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, S.; Jawahar, A.; Umadevi, M.; Sathe, V. G.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Franklin Benial, A. Milton

    2014-04-01

    The vibrational frequencies and frontier molecular orbitals of 2-(tert-buroxycarbonyl (Boc) -amino)-5-bromopyridine (BABP) were theoretically calculated by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The vibrational spectra were experimentally recorded by Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectrometer. The computed vibrational frequencies were scaled by scale factors to yield a good agreement with observed vibrational frequencies. Theoretically calculated and experimentally observed vibrational frequencies were compared and assigned. The molecular interaction, stability and intermolecular charge transfer of BABP were studied using frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) analysis.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy - Recent Advancement of Raman Spectroscopy. Ujjal Kumar Sur. General Article Volume 15 Issue 2 February 2010 pp 154-164 ...

  1. Optically active vibrational modes of PPV derivatives on textile substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.A.T. da; Dias, I.F.L.; Santos, E.P. dos; Martins, A.A.; Duarte, J.L.; Laureto, E.; Reis, G.A. dos; Guimarães, P.S.S.; Cury, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV films were deposited by spin-coating on “dirty” textile substrates of canvas, nylon, canvas with resin, jeans and on glass and the temperature dependence of the optical properties of them was studied by photoluminescence and Raman (300 K) techniques. The temperature dependence of the energy, of the half line width at half height of the purely electronic peak, of the integrated PL intensity and of the Huang-Rhys factor, S=I (01) /I (00) , were obtained directly from the PL spectrum. For an analysis of the vibrational modes involved, Raman measurements were performed on substrates with and without polymers deposited and the results compared with those found in the literature. The films of MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV showed optical properties similar to those films deposited on other substrates such as glass, metals, etc. It was observed an inversion of the first vibrational band in relation to the purely electronic peak with increasing temperature in the films deposited on nylon and canvas. The vibrational modes obtained by Raman were used to compose the simulation of the PL line shape of BDMO-PPV films on canvas and nylon, using a model proposed by Lin [29]. - Highlights: ► MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV films were deposited by spin-coating on dirty textile. ► Their properties were studied by photoluminescence and Raman techniques. ► We observed inversion of first vibrational band in relation to purely electronic peak. ► Optically active vibrational modes of PPV derivatives were studied.

  2. Development of Raman spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A.I.

    2008-05-01

    In this work, the Raman spectrophotometer HG.2S Jobin Yvon rebuilt and developed, the Raman setup provided as a gift for Neelian University from Amsterdam University. The main parts, which were replaced, include monochromator, an air-cooled photomultiplier tube RCA IP 28, log amplifier, hand scanning lab VIEW card for computer interfacing. The components assembled and the whole device was tested successfully. The developed setup was checked using some standard solutions, which showed perfect consistency with literature in the references and published papers. Solutions included hexane, cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, benzene and sodium sulfate.(Author)

  3. Vibrational microspectroscopy analysis of human lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, C.; Piergies, N.; Sozańska, A.; Chaniecki, P.; Rękas, M.; Miszczyk, J.; Gajda, M.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2018-01-01

    In this study we present vibrational analysis of healthy (non-affected by cataract) and cataractous human lenses by means of Raman and FTIR spectroscopy methods. The performed analysis provides complex information about the secondary structure of the proteins and conformational changes of the amino acid residues due to the formation of opacification of human lens. Briefly, the changes in the conformation of the Tyr and Trp residues and the protein secondary structure between the healthy and cataractous samples, were recognized. Moreover, the observed spectral pattern suggests that the process of cataract development does not occur uniformly over the entire volume of the lens.

  4. Vibrations and Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    About this textbook An ideal text for students that ties together classical and modern topics of advanced vibration analysis in an interesting and lucid manner. It provides students with a background in elementary vibrations with the tools necessary for understanding and analyzing more complex...... dynamical phenomena that can be encountered in engineering and scientific practice. It progresses steadily from linear vibration theory over various levels of nonlinearity to bifurcation analysis, global dynamics and chaotic vibrations. It trains the student to analyze simple models, recognize nonlinear...... and physics. This edition includes a new chapter on the useful effects of fast vibrations and many new exercise problems. Written for: Students in mechanical or structural engineering. Keywords: Nonlinear Vibrations, Bifurcations, Chaotic Vibrations, Vibrations and Stability....

  5. Human response to vibration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mansfield, Neil J

    2005-01-01

    .... Vibration measurements and standards are also addressed. This book meets the needs of those requiring knowledge of human response to vibration in order to make practical improvements to physical working environments...

  6. Vibrations and Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    dynamical phenomena that can be encountered in engineering and scientific practice. It progresses steadily from linear vibration theory over various levels of nonlinearity to bifurcation analysis, global dynamics and chaotic vibrations. It trains the student to analyze simple models, recognize nonlinear...... and physics. This edition includes a new chapter on the useful effects of fast vibrations and many new exercise problems. Written for: Students in mechanical or structural engineering. Keywords: Nonlinear Vibrations, Bifurcations, Chaotic Vibrations, Vibrations and Stability.......About this textbook An ideal text for students that ties together classical and modern topics of advanced vibration analysis in an interesting and lucid manner. It provides students with a background in elementary vibrations with the tools necessary for understanding and analyzing more complex...

  7. Polymorph characterization of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) using low-frequency Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Peter J; Dabros, Marta; Sarsfield, Beth; Chan, Eric; Carriere, James T; Smith, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Polymorph detection, identification, and quantitation in crystalline materials are of great importance to the pharmaceutical industry. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques used for this purpose include Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and terahertz (THz) and far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. Typically, the fundamental molecular vibrations accessed using high-frequency Raman and MIR spectroscopy or the overtone and combination of bands in the NIR spectra are used to monitor the solid-state forms of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The local environmental sensitivity of the fundamental molecular vibrations provides an indirect probe of the long-range order in molecular crystals. However, low-frequency vibrational spectroscopy provides access to the lattice vibrations of molecular crystals and, hence, has the potential to more directly probe intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Recent advances in filter technology enable high-quality, low-frequency Raman spectra to be acquired using a single-stage spectrograph. This innovation enables the cost-effective collection of high-quality Raman spectra in the 200-10 cm(-1) region. In this study, we demonstrate the potential of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy for the polymorphic characterization of APIs. This approach provides several benefits over existing techniques, including ease of sampling and more intense, information-rich band structures that can potentially discriminate among crystalline forms. An improved understanding of the relationship between the crystalline structure and the low-frequency vibrational spectrum is needed for the more widespread use of the technique.

  8. Calculation of Vibrational Spectra of p-Ethylbenzenesulfonic Acid Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenkovskii, V. M.; Bezyazychnaya, T. V.; Soldatov, V. S.

    2013-09-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations of vibrational spectra of the sulfonated ion-exchanger model p-ethylbenzenesulfonic acid hydrated by 1-10 water molecules and its dimer were calculated by the non-empirical SCF MO LCAO method with the 6-31G(d) basis set. The calculated results were compared with experimental IR and Raman spectra of sulfonated ion exchangers. The infl uence of hydration on the vibrational frequencies of functional groups in the ion exchangers was analyzed. It was shown that the sulfonic acid was completely dissociated if three and more water molecules per functional group were present. Bands near 1130 cm-1 were due to S-O-H bending vibrations in the absence of water molecules and C-S-O-H3O combination vibrations with 3-6 water molecules per sulfonic acid.

  9. Preliminary identification of unicellular algal genus by using combined confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy with PCA and DPLS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shixuan; Xie, Wanyi; Zhang, Ping; Fang, Shaoxi; Li, Zhe; Tang, Peng; Gao, Xia; Guo, Jinsong; Tlili, Chaker; Wang, Deqiang

    2018-02-01

    The analysis of algae and dominant alga plays important roles in ecological and environmental fields since it can be used to forecast water bloom and control its potential deleterious effects. Herein, we combine in vivo confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy with multivariate analysis methods to preliminary identify the three algal genera in water blooms at unicellular scale. Statistical analysis of characteristic Raman peaks demonstrates that certain shifts and different normalized intensities, resulting from composition of different carotenoids, exist in Raman spectra of three algal cells. Principal component analysis (PCA) scores and corresponding loading weights show some differences from Raman spectral characteristics which are caused by vibrations of carotenoids in unicellular algae. Then, discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) classification method is used to verify the effectiveness of algal identification with confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy combined with PCA and DPLS could handle the preliminary identification of dominant alga for forecasting and controlling of water blooms.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology and inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J. B.; Almeida, J.; Cole, K. D.; Reipa, V.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to detect spore contamination and inactivation is relevant to developing and determining decontamination strategy success for food and water safety. This study was conducted to develop a systematic comparison of nondestructive vibrational spectroscopy techniques (Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, SERS, and normal Raman) to determine indicators of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology (spore, vegetative, outgrown, germinated and inactivated spore forms). SERS was found to provide better resolution of commonly utilized signatures of spore physiology (dipicolinic acid at 1006 cm-1 and 1387 cm-1) compared to normal Raman and native fluorescence indigenous to vegetative and outgrown cell samples was quenched in SERS experiment. New features including carotenoid pigments (Raman features at 1142 cm-1, 1512 cm-1) were identified for spore cell forms. Pronounced changes in the low frequency region (300 cm-1 to 500 cm-1) in spore spectra occurred upon germination and inactivation (with both free chlorine and by autoclaving) which is relevant to guiding decontamination and detection strategies using Raman techniques.

  11. Tunable Passive Vibration Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boechler, Nicholas (Inventor); Dillon, Robert Peter (Inventor); Daraio, Chiara (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor); Borgonia, John Paul C. (Inventor); Kahn, Daniel Louis (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An apparatus and method for vibration suppression using a granular particle chain. The granular particle chain is statically compressed and the end particles of the chain are attached to a payload and vibration source. The properties of the granular particles along with the amount of static compression are chosen to provide desired filtering of vibrations.

  12. Vibration of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraverty, Snehashish

    2008-01-01

    Plates are integral parts of most engineering structures and their vibration analysis is required for safe design. This work provides a comprehensive introduction to vibration theory and analysis of two-dimensional plates. It offers information on vibration problems along with a discussion of various plate geometries and boundary conditions.

  13. Vibrations and Eigenvalues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We make music by causing strings, membranes, or air columns to vibrate. Engineers design safe structures by control- ling vibrations. I will describe to you a very simple vibrating system and the mathematics needed to analyse it. The ideas were born in the work of Joseph-Louis Lagrange (1736–1813), and I begin by quot-.

  14. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puppels, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides detailed structural information about molecules studied. In the field of molecular biophysics it has been extensively used for characterization of nucleic acids and proteins and for investigation of interactions between these molecules. It was felt that this technique would have great potential if it could be applied for in situ study of these molecules and their interactions, at the level of single living cell or a chromosome. To make this possible a highly sensitive confocal Raman microspectrometer (CRM) was developed. The instrument is described in detail in this thesis. It incorporates a number of recent technological developments. First, it employs a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD-camera. This type of detector, first used in astronomy, is the ultimate detector for Raman spectroscopy because it combines high quantum efficiency light detection with photon-noise limited operation. Second, an important factor in obtaining a high signal throughput of the spectrometer was the development of a new type of Raman notch filter. In the third place, the confocal detection principle was applied in the CRM. This limits the effective measuring volume to 3 . (author). 279 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs

  15. Parimala, Prof. Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parimala, Prof. Raman Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 21 November 1948. Specialization: Algebra Address: Professor, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Emory University, 400 Dowman Drive W 401, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA Contact: Office: 001-404 727 7577. Residence: 001-404 444 8870

  16. Raman, Prof. Rajiva

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman, Prof. Rajiva Ph.D. (Banaras), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 9 December 1948. Specialization: Human Molecular Genetics & Cytogenetics, Gene Expression & Chromatin Organization in Development and Sex Determination Address: Professor Emeritus, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 ...

  17. Orientation of Pterin-6-Carboxylic Acid on Gold Capped Silicon Nanopillars Platforms: Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Bertel, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The orientation of pterin-6-carboxylic acid on gold nanopillars was investigated by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory methods. The experimentally vibrations from pterin-6-COOH free and attached to the Au surface display vibration features indicating chemical...

  18. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  19. The ''Adatom Model'' of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering): The present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, A.; Billmann, J.; Eickmans, J.; Ertuerk, U.; Pettenkofer, C.

    1984-01-01

    The model predicts resonant Raman scattering by adsorbate vibrations through photon excited charge transfer transition from localized electronic states at sites of atomic scale roughness (e.g. 'adatoms') on silver surfaces to the affinity levels of the adsorbates. Experimental tests are discussed: search for the localized states, shifts of the affinity levels, comparison of SERS at sites of ASR and at atomically smooth parts of the surface, changes in SER vibrational bands by shifts of the affinity levels, 'SERS' vibrational selection rules. Infrared enhancement at sites of ASR is conjectured. Different hypotheses on the role of the 'porosity' of coldly deposited silver films are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Normal mode analysis of isotopic shifts in Raman spectrum of TNT-d5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuemin; Tzeng, Nianfeng; Liu, Yucheng; Junk, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    A combined experimental-computational study was conducted on the Raman spectrum of TNT-d5 in the present study. It was found that among the 24 hybrid density functional theory (DFT) methods, O3LYP, tHCTHhyb, and B3LYP simulations yielded the strongest Raman bands which were closest to those measured from experiments. Simulations of hybrid DFT methods did not show that deuterium replacements alter orientations of 2- and 6-nitro with respect to phenyl ring, considering a larger size of the methyl group. However, the deuterium replacements apparently changed the reduced masses for all deuterium related vibrations. Although no difference of structural parameters was shown between TNT and its deuterated analogue, discrepancy was indicated in vibrational zero energy from our simulations. O3LYP simulation exhibited 24 deuterium involved vibrations, which were coupled into seven Raman bands of TNT-d5. This phenomenon can account for the experimental Raman band shifts or split of TNT-d5 when compared with the corresponding bands of TNT. The present study and its outcomes provide in-depth microchemical insights of Raman characteristics of TNT and may facilitate the design of nano-structures of SERS substrates for detection of TNT and its degradation products. All intensities displayed in this study were calculated from numerical simulations.

  1. Raman spectroscopy an intensity approach

    CERN Document Server

    Guozhen, Wu

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the highlights of our work on the bond polarizability approach to the intensity analysis. The topics covered include surface enhanced Raman scattering, Raman excited virtual states and Raman optical activity (ROA). The first chapter briefly introduces the Raman effect in a succinct but clear way. Chapter 2 deals with the normal mode analysis. This is a basic tool for our work. Chapter 3 introduces our proposed algorithm for the Raman intensity analysis. Chapter 4 heavily introduces the physical picture of Raman virtual states. Chapter 5 offers details so that the readers can have a comprehensive idea of Raman virtual states. Chapter 6 demonstrates how this bond polarizability algorithm is extended to ROA intensity analysis. Chapters 7 and 8 offer details on ROA, showing many findings on ROA mechanism that were not known or neglected before. Chapter 9 introduces our proposed classical treatment on ROA which, as combined with the results from the bond polarizability analysis, leads to a com...

  2. Direct measurement of phase coexistence in DPPC/Cholesterol vesicles using Raman spectroscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, M.J.L.; Bonn, M.; Müller, M.

    2007-01-01

    The phase behavior of bilayers of binary mixtures of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and cholesterol has been studied using Raman spectroscopy. It is observed that the shape of the cholesterol vibrational spectrum in lipid-cholesterol binary mixtures does not vary significantly

  3. Calculation of the Raman line broadening on carbonation in synthetic hydroxyapatite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, F.F.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan; Arends, J.; ten Bosch, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    The position and broadening of the Raman band associated with the phosphate symmetric stretching vibration in hydroxyapatite are simulated using a simple inter- and intra-ionic potential. The results are compared with experimental values. This comparison was made as a function of the incorporation

  4. An FT-raman study of softwood, hardwood, and chemically modified black spruce MWLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; James D. McSweeny; Sally A. Ralph

    1999-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being increasingly used to carry out in situ analysis of wood and other lignocellulosics. To obtain useful information from the spectra, the vibrational bands need to be assigned in terms of contributions from various chemical components and component sub-structures. In additional, so that the technique can be better applied as an analytical...

  5. What Can we learn from Raman spectroscopy and model calculations on room temperature ionic liquids?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    2006-01-01

    calculation software. This software allows everyone - on an ordinary PC after some trial and error - to calculate the most stable equilibrium geometries of guessed chemical structures and to depict their normal vibrations and the fundamental Raman and IR spectra. These new calculations form the basis...

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy at high external pressures the diamond anvil cell

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1984-01-01

    Vibrational Spectroscopy at High External Pressures: The Diamond Anvil Cell presents the effects of high pressure on the vibrational properties of materials as accomplished in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The DAC serves the dual purpose of generating the pressures and being transparent to infrared radiation, allowing the observation of changes caused by pressure. The optical probes highlighted will deal principally with infrared and Raman scattering, although some observations in the visible region will also be presented. The book begins with a discussion of the effects of pressure and pres

  7. Anti-vibration gloves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered. © Crown copyright 2014.

  8. Vibration of hydraulic machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yulin; Liu, Shuhong; Dou, Hua-Shu; Qian, Zhongdong

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of Hydraulic Machinery deals with the vibration problem which has significant influence on the safety and reliable operation of hydraulic machinery. It provides new achievements and the latest developments in these areas, even in the basic areas of this subject. The present book covers the fundamentals of mechanical vibration and rotordynamics as well as their main numerical models and analysis methods for the vibration prediction. The mechanical and hydraulic excitations to the vibration are analyzed, and the pressure fluctuations induced by the unsteady turbulent flow is predicted in order to obtain the unsteady loads. This book also discusses the loads, constraint conditions and the elastic and damping characters of the mechanical system, the structure dynamic analysis, the rotor dynamic analysis and the system instability of hydraulic machines, including the illustration of monitoring system for the instability and the vibration in hydraulic units. All the problems are necessary for vibration pr...

  9. Raman imaging and spectroscopy of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are unique one-dimensional materials that are promising for many potential applications in various important areas. Their vibrational properties reflect the electron and phonon confinement as well as the structures of the tubes. Resonant Raman spectroscopy has been proven to be an exceedingly powerful tool for the characterization of the vibrational and electronic properties of SWNTs. This thesis focuses on the study of Raman spectroscopy of individual single carbon nanotubes. Single tube spectroscopy allows probing the structure dependent properties of SWNTs. A beam-scanning confocal Raman microscope system capable of large-area Raman imaging is first developed for characterizing SWNTs at the single tube level. Raman images and first-order Raman spectra of nanotubes, consisting of both semicoducting and metallic nanotubes, are systemically studied at room temperature in ambient air. The diameter of the nanotubes is determined from their radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency. A broad diameter distribution is observed for nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The tangential G mode Raman spectra of individual metallic nanotubes are found to exhibit a broad distribution of line shapes, which is attributed to shift of the Fermi level due to O2 adsorption. The doping dependence of Raman spectra of metallic tubes is further studied by both electrostatic gating and electrochemical gating. Significant changes in the G band Raman spectra of nanotubes are observed, suggesting the effect of doping on electron-phonon interaction. The observation of a gradual evolution of G band spectrum from a semiconducting type to the broad BWF type reveals evidence of phonon interaction between two G band modes. Raman imaging and Raman spectra of isolated SWNTs and single-layer graphenen are investigated at both room temperature and low temperature. The temperature-induced Raman spectral change of individual nanotubes is observed to be tube

  10. Raman spectroscopic study of solid solution spinel oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosterman, Brian D.

    Solid solution spinel oxides of composition MgxNi1-x Cr2O4, NiFexCr2-xO 4, and FexCr3-xO4 were synthesized and characterized using x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Frequencies of the Raman-active modes are tracked as the metal cations within the spinel lattice are exchanged. This gives information about the dependence of the lattice vibrations on the tetrahedral and octahedral cations. The highest frequency Raman-active mode, A1g, is unaffected by substitution of the divalent tetrahedral cation, whereas the lower frequency vibrations are more strongly affected by substitution of the tetrahedral cation. The change in frequency of many phonons is nonlinear upon cation exchange. All detected modes of MgxNi1-xCr2O4 and FexCr3-xO4 exhibit one-mode behavior. Additional modes are detected in NiFexCr2-xO4 due to cation inversion of the spinel lattice. Results from the FexCr3-xO4 spinels are applied to identifying the corrosion layers of several stainless steel samples exposed to lead-bismuth eutectic in a high-temperature, oxygen controlled environment. The Raman spectrum of the outer corrosion layer in all steels is identified as Fe3O4. The position of the A 1g mode for the inner corrosion layer indicates an iron chromium spinel oxide. Micro-Raman spectroscopy proves capable of determining structural and compositional differences between complex corrosion layers of stainless steels.

  11. Disease recognition by infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Christoph; Steiner, Gerald; Beleites, Claudia; Salzer, Reiner

    2009-02-01

    Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy are emerging biophotonic tools to recognize various diseases. The current review gives an overview of the experimental techniques, data-classification algorithms and applications to assess soft tissues, hard tissues and body fluids. The methodology section presents the principles to combine vibrational spectroscopy with microscopy, lateral information and fiber-optic probes. A crucial step is the classification of spectral data by a variety of algorithms. We discuss unsupervised algorithms such as cluster analysis or principal component analysis and supervised algorithms such as linear discriminant analysis, soft independent modeling of class analogies, artificial neural networks support vector machines, Bayesian classification, partial least-squares regression and ensemble methods. The selected topics include tumors of epithelial tissue, brain tumors, prion diseases, bone diseases, atherosclerosis, kidney stones and gallstones, skin tumors, diabetes and osteoarthritis. ((c) 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  12. Raman study of oxygen deficient YVO{sub 4} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, B.M.; Erdei, S.; Bhalla, A.S.; Ainger, F.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Materials Research Lab.

    1995-10-01

    Oxygen deficiency which is an inherent problem in melt grown YVO{sub 4} single crystals was investigated by Micro-Probe Raman Spectroscopy (MPRS). External vibrational modes at 157 cm{sup {minus}1}, 162 cm{sup {minus}1} and selected internal vibrational modes at 379 cm{sup {minus}1}, 840 cm{sup {minus}1} of full Raman spectra were compared with different YVO{sub 4} crystals grown by the Czochralski (CZ) technique both with and without annealing in an O{sub 2} atmosphere as well as by top seeded solution growth technique (TSSG) in directly produced oxygen deficiency-free form. Special differences of above mentioned frequencies and over 1,000 cm{sup {minus}1} were observed in the Raman spectra, which could prove that the growth technologies generated different rates of oxygen deficiency in addition to critical intrinsic segregation effects in YVO{sub 4} which significantly determine the crystal quality.

  13. Diffusion Raman et luminescence dans des aerogels de silice purs ou dopes Dy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, F.; Fabre, F.; Zwick, A.; Bournett, D.

    1994-02-01

    Light scattering studies of pure and Dy doped aerogels are presented. Careful examination of Stokes and anti-Stokes spectra allow the discrimination between Raman and luminescence processes. It is shown that in pure aerogels, scattered intensity is due to Raman processes only, and the density of vibrational states does not exhibit any singularity. The fractal properties of the structure imply modifications not only in the spectral distribution of the low frequency modes (usually labelled phonons and fractons) but alsoin the high frequency one, at least up to 600 cm-1. In Dy-doped dense silica, coupling between electronic and vibronic excitations is evidenced by the presence of anti-Stokes luminescence. In Dy-doped aerogels, the enlarged Dy3+ electronic levels, strongly coupled with vibrational states give rise to emission processes traducing the response of the sample as a whole, rather than resonant Raman scattering or luminescence processes.

  14. Changes in the vibrational properties of graphene and other related nanostructures under strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codorniu Pujals, D.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of strain in solids modifies their vibrational properties due to the variation of the atomic position and the changes of the interatomic distances. Monolayer graphene is especially sensible to the effects of strain, for example, to that produced by the curvature of some region of the graphene plane. These changes in the vibrational properties of graphene modifies in different way its Raman spectrum. In the case of other graphene-related materials as fullerenes, nano-onions and nano tubes, the curvature is always present, consequently, there is a modification of the vibrational properties in relation with those in graphene, due to the strain provoked by curvature. In this paper, the overall picture of the effect of strain on the vibrational properties of graphene and other carbon nanostructures is presented from a theoretical point of view and the main considerations are correlated with experimental results from Raman spectroscopy (Author)

  15. Spontaneous Atraumatic Mediastinal Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morkos Iskander BSc, BMBS, MRCS, PGCertMedEd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous atraumatic mediastinal hematomas are rare. We present a case of a previously fit and well middle-aged lady who presented with acute breathlessness and an increasing neck swelling and spontaneous neck bruising. On plain chest radiograph, widening of the mediastinum was noted. The bruising was later confirmed to be secondary to mediastinal hematoma. This life-threatening diagnostic conundrum was managed conservatively with a multidisciplinary team approach involving upper gastrointestinal and thoracic surgeons, gastroenterologists, radiologists, intensivists, and hematologists along with a variety of diagnostic modalities. A review of literature is also presented to help surgeons manage such challenging and complicated cases.

  16. Vibrational spectroscopic methods for cytology and cellular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Graeme; Hands, James R; Dorling, Konrad M; Baker, Matthew J

    2014-09-21

    The use of vibrational spectroscopy, FTIR and Raman, for cytology and cellular research has the potential to revolutionise the approach to cellular analysis. Vibrational spectroscopy is non-destructive, simple to operate and provides direct information. Importantly it does not require expensive exogenous labels that may affect the chemistry of the cell under analysis. In addition, the advent of spectroscopic microscopes provides the ability to image cells and acquire spectra with a subcellular resolution. This introductory review focuses on recent developments within this fast paced field and highlights potential for the future use of FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. We particularly focus on the development of live cell research and the new technologies and methodologies that have enabled this.

  17. Significant Contributions of the Albrecht's A Term to Nonresonant Raman Scattering Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zu-Yong; Tian, Guangjun; Duan, Sai; Luo, Yi

    2015-11-10

    The Raman intensity can be well described by the famous Albrecht's Raman theory that consists of A and B terms. It is well-known that the contribution from Albrecht's A term can be neglected without any loss of accuracy for far-off resonant Raman scattering processes. However, as demonstrated in this study, we have found that this widely accepted long-standing assumption fails drastically for totally symmetric vibration modes of molecules in general off-resonant Raman scattering. Perturbed first-principles calculations for water molecule show that strong constructive interference between the A and B terms occurs for the Raman intensity of the symmetric O-H stretching mode, which can account for ∼40% of the total intensity. Meanwhile, a minor destructive interference is found for the angle bending mode. The state-to-state mapping between Albrecht's theory and perturbation theory allows us to verify the accuracy of the widely employed perturbation method for the dynamic/resonant Raman intensities. The model calculations rationalized from water molecule with the bending mode show that the perturbation method is a good approximation only when the absolute energy difference between the first excited state and the incident light is more than five times greater than the vibrational energy in the ground state.

  18. Raman and loss induced quantum noise in depleted fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Rottwitt, Karsten; McKinstrie, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a semi-classical approach for predicting the quantum noise properties of fiber optical parametric amplifiers. The unavoidable contributors of noise, vacuum fluctuations, loss-induced noise, and spontaneous Raman scattering, are included in the analysis of both phase-insensitive and phase...

  19. Attractive and repulsive interactions among methanol molecules in supercritical state investigated by Raman spectroscopy and perturbed hard-sphere theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitow, Ken-ichi; Sasaki, Jungo

    2005-03-08

    The short-range structure of supercritical methanol (CH(3)OH) is investigated by measuring the spontaneous Raman spectra of the C-O stretching mode. The spectra are obtained at a reduced temperature, T(r)=T/T(c)=1.02 (522.9 K), which permits the neat fluid to be studied isothermally as a function of density. As the density increases, the spectral peaks shift toward the lower energy side and the spectra broaden. In the supercritical region, the amount of shifting shows nonlinear density dependence and the width becomes anomalously large. We use the perturbed hard-sphere model to analyze these density dependencies along the vibrational coordinate. The amount of shifting is decomposed into attractive and repulsive components, and the changes in attractive and repulsive energies are evaluated as functions of density and packing fraction, both of which are continuously varied by a factor of 120. Here we show that the shift amount consists principally of the attractive component at all densities, since the attractive energy is about eight times the repulsive energy. The density dependence of the widths is analyzed by calculating homogeneous and inhomogeneous widths as a function of density. The results show that, although vibrational dephasing and density inhomogeneity contribute similarly to the width at low and middle densities, at high density the main contributor turns out to be the vibrational dephasing. We estimate the local density enhancements of supercritical CH(3)OH as function of bulk density by two methods. The results of these analyses show common features, and both the estimated local density enhancements of CH(3)OH are considerably larger than the local density enhancements of simple fluids, i.e., those having nonhydrogen bonding. It is revealed that the local density of supercritical CH(3)OH is 40%-60% greater than the local densities of the simple fluids. We also estimate the local density fluctuation using the obtained values of attractive shift

  20. Near-infrared-excited confocal Raman spectroscopy advances in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J H; Ilancheran, Arunachalam; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a unique optical technique that can probe the changes of vibrational modes of biomolecules associated with tissue premalignant transformation. This study evaluates the clinical utility of confocal Raman spectroscopy over near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) spectroscopy and composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy for improving early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo at colposcopy. A rapid NIR Raman system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic confocal Raman probe was utilized for in vivo NIR AF/Raman spectral measurements of the cervix. A total of 1240 in vivo Raman spectra [normal (n=993), dysplasia (n=247)] were acquired from 84 cervical patients. Principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) together with a leave-one-patient-out, cross-validation method were used to extract the diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic modalities. The diagnostic ability of confocal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated using the PCA-LDA model developed from the significant principal components (PCs) [i.e., PC4, 0.0023%; PC5, 0.00095%; PC8, 0.00022%, (pspectroscopy coupled with PCA-LDA modeling yielded the diagnostic accuracy of 84.1% (a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 87.1%) for in vivo discrimination of dysplastic cervix. The receiver operating characteristic curves further confirmed that the best classification was achieved using confocal Raman spectroscopy compared to the composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This study illustrates that confocal Raman spectroscopy has great potential to improve early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo during clinical colposcopy.

  1. Determination of low-frequency vibrational states in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Hasan, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that density of low frequency (v < 1 THz) vibrational states g(v) in glasses can be determined from heat capacities measured at low temperature. These g(v) are identical to those determined from inelastic neutron scattering studies. The form of g(v) is non quadratic and therefore the Debye density of states may not be used to interpret the Raman, and infrared absorption in glasses. (author)

  2. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandan K. Das

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field.

  3. Gold micro- and nano-particles for surface enhanced vibrational spectroscopy of pyridostigmine bromide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Fesenko, Olena; Kavelin, Vladyslav

    2017-01-01

    Triangular gold microprisms and spherical silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands were examined as an active nanostructures for the surface enhanced Raman and infrared spectroscopy. These particles were probed for the detection of pyridostigmine bromide as a safe analog of military...... compound sarin. Raman and infrared spectral bands of the pyridostigmine bromide were measured. Detailed correlation of obtained spectral bands with specific vibrations in pyridostigmine bromide was done. Silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands showed more essential enhancement of the Raman...

  4. Synthesis and vibrational spectrum of antimony phosphate, SbPO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockner, Wolfgang; Hoyer, Lars P

    2002-07-01

    SbPO4 was synthesized via a new route by reacting antimony metal with meta-phosphoric acid, (HPO3)n at high temperatures. The Raman and IR spectra of the title compound were recorded and the vibrational modes assigned on the basis of a factor group analysis. The internal vibrations are derived from tetrahedral PO4 units (approaching Sb[PO4]) by the correlation method, although the structure is polymeric and not ionic.

  5. Photochromism of Composite Organometallic Nanostructures Based on Diarylethenes. II. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyuk, G. T.; Askirka, V. F.; Lavysh, A. V.; Kurguzenkov, S. A.; Yasinskii, V. M.; Kobeleva, O. I.; Valova, T. M.; Ayt, A. O.; Barachevsky, V. A.; Yarovenko, V. N.; Krayushkin, M. M.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    The structure and photochromic transformations of nanostructured organometallic composites consisting of Ag nanoparticles with shells of photochromic diarylethenes (DAEs) deposited from various solutions onto the nanoparticles were studied using infrared absorption and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) vibrational spectroscopy and quantum chemistry. The studied nanostructures exhibited photochromic properties manifested as reversible photoinduced changes of the relative intensities of SERS bands related to vibrations of bonds participating in the reversible photoisomerization. Spectral manifestations of chemical interaction between metal nanoparticles and DAE molecules were detected.

  6. Influences of composition on Raman scattering from GeSi alloy core-shell nanowire heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Delong; Ye, Han; Yu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Yunzhen; Liu, Yumin; Li, Yinfeng

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the influences of composition on Raman scattering from Ge/Si-GeSi core-shell nanowire heterostructures standing along [011] and [111] crystal directions are numerically investigated. Uniform, linear and spontaneous nonlinear composition profiles (CPs) in GeSi alloy shell are taken into consideration. In uniform CP case, clear double peaks in Raman spectra contributed by core and shell are observed. The strain-induced shift follows linear relation with Ge concentration and nonlinear relation with shell thickness. Larger strain-induced shifts are obtained in nanowires along [111] direction. In linear CP case, the peaks contributed by shell cannot be distinguished in the total spectra and plateaus are formed on the low frequency side. Moreover, the nonlinear CP accounts for the spontaneous composition transition near heterointerface during lateral epitaxy of GeSi shell. Due to the rapid Ge concentration transition, Raman spectra are shown nearly identical to uniform CP cases.

  7. Spontaneous Appendicocutaneous Fistula I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M T0k0de* MB, BS and. Dr 0. A. AWOj0bi+ FMCS (Nig). ABSTRACT. Ruptured appendicitis is not a common cause of spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula. A case of ruptured retrocaecal appendicitis presenting as an enterocutaneous fistula in a Nigerian woman is presented. The literature on this disorder is also reviewed.

  8. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Edna; Caly, Wanda Regina

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs in 30% of patients with ascites due to cirrhosis leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. The pathogenesis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is related to altered host defenses observed in end-stage liver disease, overgrowth of microorganisms, and bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to mesenteric lymph nodes. Clinical manifestations vary from severe to slight or absent, demanding analysis of the ascitic fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by a number of neutrophils over 250/mm3 associated or not to bacterial growth in culture of an ascites sample. Enterobacteriae prevail and Escherichia coli has been the most frequent bacterium reported. Mortality rates decreased markedly in the last two decades due to early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment. Third generation intravenous cephalosporins are effective in 70% to 95% of the cases. Recurrence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is common and can be prevented by the continuous use of oral norfloxacin. The development of bacterial resistance demands the search for new options in the prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; probiotics are a promising new approach, but deserve further evaluation. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients with cirrhosis and ascites shortly after an acute episode of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  9. Spontaneous Grammar Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoo, Hong Sing; Lewis, Marilyn

    1998-01-01

    Describes one New Zealand university language teacher's reflection on her own grammar explanations to university-level students of Bahasa Indonesian. Examines form-focused instruction through the teacher's spontaneous answers to students' questions about the form of the language they are studying. The teacher's experiences show that it takes time…

  10. EDITORIAL SPONTANEOUS BACTERIAL PERITONITIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequent]y occurs in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites. It is defined as an infection of previously sterile ascitic fluid without any demonstrable intrabdominal source of infection. It is now internationally agreed that a polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell count in the ascitic fluid of over 250 ...

  11. Spontaneous dimensional reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlip, Steven

    2012-10-01

    Over the past few years, evidence has begun to accumulate suggesting that spacetime may undergo a "spontaneous dimensional reduction" to two dimensions near the Planck scale. I review some of this evidence, and discuss the (still very speculative) proposal that the underlying mechanism may be related to short-distance focusing of light rays by quantum fluctuations.

  12. State preparation and excited electronic and vibrational behavior in hemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, J Reddy; Gunaratne, Tissa C; Simpson, M Cather

    2006-10-12

    The temporally overlapping, ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics of a model five-coordinate, high-spin heme in a nominally isotropic solvent environment has been studied for the first time with three complementary ultrafast techniques: transient absorption, time-resolved resonance Raman Stokes, and time-resolved resonance Raman anti-Stokes spectroscopies. Vibrational dynamics associated with an evolving ground-state species dominate the observations. Excitation into the blue side of the Soret band led to very rapid S2 --> S1 decay (sub-100 fs), followed by somewhat slower (800 fs) S1 --> S0 nonradiative decay. The initial vibrationally excited, non-Boltzmann S0 state was modeled as shifted to lower energy by 300 cm(-1) and broadened by 20%. On a approximately 10 ps time scale, the S0 state evolved into its room-temperature, thermal distribution S0 profile largely through VER. Anti-Stokes signals disappear very rapidly, indicating that the vibrational energy redistributes internally in about 1-3 ps from the initial accepting modes associated with S1 --> S0 internal conversion to the rest of the macrocycle. Comparisons of anti-Stokes mode intensities and lifetimes from TRARRS studies in which the initial excited state was prepared by ligand photolysis [Mizutani, T.; Kitagawa, T. Science 1997, 278, 443, and Chem. Rec. 2001, 1, 258] suggest that, while transient absorption studies appear to be relatively insensitive to initial preparation of the electronic excited state, the subsequent vibrational dynamics are not. Direct, time-resolved evaluation of vibrational lifetimes provides insight into fast internal conversion in hemes and the pathways of subsequent vibrational energy flow in the ground state. The overall similarity of the model heme electronic dynamics to those of biological systems may be a sign that the protein's influence upon the dynamics of the heme active site is rather subtle.

  13. Raman Spectra of Methane, Ethylene, Ethane, Dimethyl ether, Formaldehyde and Propane for Combustion Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Magnotti, G.

    2015-05-09

    Spontaneous Raman scattering measurements of temperature and major species concentration in hydrocarbon-air flames require detailed knowledge of the Raman spectra of the hydrocarbons present when fuels more complex than methane are used. Although hydrocarbon spectra have been extensively studied at room temperature, there are no data available at higher temperatures. Quantum mechanical calculations, when available are not sufficiently accurate for combustion applications. This work presents experimental measurements of spontaneous Stokes-Raman scattering spectra of methane, ethylene, ethane, dimethyl ether, formaldehyde and propane in the temperature range 300-860 K. Raman spectra from heated hydrocarbons jets have been collected with a higher resolution than is generally employed for Raman measurements in combustion applications. A set of synthetic spectra have been generated for each hydrocarbon, providing the basis for extrapolation to higher temperatures. The spectra provided here will enable simultaneous measurements of multiple hydrocarbons in flames. This capability will greatly extend the range of applicability of Raman measurements in combustion applications. In addition, the experimental spectra provide a validation dataset for quantum mechanical models.

  14. Raman microscopic studies of PVD deposited hard ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constable, C.P.

    2000-01-01

    PVD hard ceramic coatings grown via the combined cathodic arc/unbalance magnetron deposition process were studied using Raman microscopy. Characteristic spectra from binary, multicomponent, multilayered and superlattice coatings were acquired to gain knowledge of the solid-state physics associated with Raman scattering from polycrystalline PVD coatings and to compile a comprehensive spectral database. Defect-induced first order scattering mechanisms were observed which gave rise to two pronounced groups of bands related to the acoustical (150- 300cm -1 ) and optical (400-7 50cm -1 ) parts of the phonon spectrum. Evidence was gathered to support the theory that the optic modes were mainly due to the vibrations of the lighter elements and the acoustic modes due to the vibrations of the heavier elements within the lattice. A study into the deformation and disordering on the Raman spectral bands of PVD coatings was performed. TiAIN and TiZrN coatings were intentionally damaged via scratching methods. These scratches were then analysed by Raman mapping, both across and along, and a detailed spectral interpretation performed. Band broadening occurred which was related to 'phonon relaxation mechanisms' as a direct result of the breaking up of coating grains resulting in a larger proportion of grain boundaries per-unit-volume. A direct correlation of the amount of damage with band width was observed. Band shifts were also found to occur which were due to the stresses caused by the scratching process. These shifts were found to be the largest at the edges of scratches. The Raman mapping of 'droplets', a defect inherent to PVD deposition processes, found that higher compressive stresses and large amounts of disorder occurred for coating growth onto droplets. Strategies designed to evaluate the ability of Raman microscopy to monitor the extent of real wear on cutting tools were evaluated. The removal of a coating layer and subsequent detection of a base layer proved

  15. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  16. Raman peak frequencies of fluoromethane molecules measured in clathrate hydrate crystals: experimental investigations and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tsutomu; Ohmura, Ryo; Hori, Akira

    2010-01-14

    Systematic observations of fluoromethane clathrate hydrates were carried out by Raman spectroscopy. The series of fluoromethanes, i.e., methane (CH(4)), fluoromethane (CH(3)F), difluoromethane (CH(2)F(2)), trifluoromethane (CHF(3)), and tetrafluoromethane (CF(4)), were used as standard guest molecules to investigate the vibration modes of the guest molecules in the hydrate phase, since all of these fluoromethanes are included in the same crystal structure and share similar functional groups. In this study, both the C-H and C-F vibration modes of the guest molecules were systematically collected and assigned each peak based on the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Raman peak table obtained by the DFT calculations was useful for assigning the Raman peaks measured by the experiments. The assignment of the Raman peaks of the C-H stretching mode of each fluoromethane hydrate coincided well with those estimated both experimentally and theoretically in previous studies. The empirical "loose cage-tight cage" model of the Raman peak shifts allowed us to estimate the unperturbed frequencies of the C-H symmetric stretching mode on CH(3)F molecules in the clathrate structure. Clathrate hydrates formed with deuterated water molecules indicated that the deuterium had little effect on the Raman spectra of the intramolecular vibration modes of the guest molecules within the experimental uncertainties.

  17. Raman Spectroscopy and instrumentation for monitoring soil carbon systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, D.L.

    2003-12-08

    This work describes developments in the application of Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) towards the assessment/characterization of carbon in soil. In the past, the nonspecific total carbon mass content of soil samples has generally been determined through mass loss techniques and elemental analysis. However, because of the concern over CO{sub 2} buildup in the atmosphere and its possible role in the ''Greenhouse Effect,'' there is a need for better-defined models of global cycling of carbon. As a means towards this end, there is a need to know more about the structure and functionality of organic materials in soil. Raman spectroscopy may therefore prove to be an exceptional tool in soil carbon analysis. Based on vibrational transitions of irradiated molecules, it provides structural information that is often suitable for sample identification. Furthermore, Raman scattering yields very fine spectral features which offer the potential for multicomponent sample analysis with minimal or no sample pretreatment. Although the intensity of Raman scattering is generally extremely low, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect can greatly enhance Raman signals (10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} range) through the adsorption of compounds on specially roughened metal surfaces. In our laboratory, we have investigated copper, gold and silver as possible substrate metals in the fabrication of SERS substrates. These substrates have included metal-coated microparticles, metal island films, and redox-roughened metal foils. We have evaluated several laser excitation sources spanning the 515-785 nm range for both Raman and SERS analysis. For this particular study, we have selected fulvic and humic acids as models for establishing the feasibility of using Raman and SERS in soil carbon analysis. Our studies thus far have demonstrated that copper substrates perform best in the SERS detection of humic and fulvic acids, particularly when coupled

  18. Identification of anisodamine tablets by Raman and near-infrared spectroscopy with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian; Zang, Hengchang; Li, Jun; Chen, Dejun; Li, Tao; Wang, Fengshan

    2014-06-05

    Vibrational spectroscopy including Raman and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has become an attractive tool for pharmaceutical analysis. In this study, effective calibration models for the identification of anisodamine tablet and its counterfeit and the distinguishment of manufacturing plants, based on Raman and NIR spectroscopy, were built, respectively. Anisodamine counterfeit tablets were identified by Raman spectroscopy with correlation coefficient method, and the results showed that the predictive accuracy was 100%. The genuine anisodamine tablets from 5 different manufacturing plants were distinguished by NIR spectroscopy using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models based on interval principal component analysis (iPCA) method. And the results showed the recognition rate and rejection rate were 100% respectively. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy and NIR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics are feasible and potential tools for rapid pharmaceutical tablet discrimination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analytic calculations of hyper-Raman spectra from density functional theory hyperpolarizability gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringholm, Magnus; Ruud, Kenneth [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø (Norway); Bast, Radovan [Theoretical Chemistry and Biology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); PDC Center for High Performance Computing, Royal Institute of Technology, S-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Oggioni, Luca [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø (Norway); Department of Physics G. Occhialini, University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della scienza 3, 20126 Milan (Italy); Ekström, Ulf [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, 0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-10-07

    We present the first analytic calculations of the geometrical gradients of the first hyperpolarizability tensors at the density-functional theory (DFT) level. We use the analytically calculated hyperpolarizability gradients to explore the importance of electron correlation effects, as described by DFT, on hyper-Raman spectra. In particular, we calculate the hyper-Raman spectra of the all-trans and 11-cis isomers of retinal at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density-functional levels of theory, also allowing us to explore the sensitivity of the hyper-Raman spectra on the geometrical characteristics of these structurally related molecules. We show that the HF results, using B3LYP-calculated vibrational frequencies and force fields, reproduce the experimental data for all-trans-retinal well, and that electron correlation effects are of minor importance for the hyper-Raman intensities.

  20. Spontaneous healing of spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almafragi, Amar; Convens, Carl; Heuvel, Paul Van Den

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome and sudden cardiac death. It should be suspected in every healthy young woman without cardiac risk factors, especially during the peripartum or postpartum periods. It is important to check for a history of drug abuse, collagen vascular disease or blunt trauma of the chest. Coronary angiography is essential for diagnosis and early management. We wonder whether thrombolysis might aggravate coronary dissection. All types of treatment (medical therapy, percutaneous intervention or surgery) improve the prognosis without affecting survival times if used appropriately according to the clinical stability and the angiographic features of the involved coronary arteries. Prompt recognition and targeted treatment improve outcomes. We report a case of SCAD in a young female free of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, who presented six hours after thrombolysis for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed a dissection of the left anterior descending and immediate branch. She had successful coronary artery bypass grafting, with complete healing of left anterior descending dissection.

  1. Rapid identification of single microbes by various Raman spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans; Motzkus, Hans-Walter; Lankers, Markus; Hofer, Stefan; Thiele, Hans; Popp, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    A fast and unambiguous identification of microorganisms is necessary not only for medical purposes but also in technical processes such as the production of pharmaceuticals. Conventional microbiological identification methods are based on the morphology and the ability of microbes to grow under different conditions on various cultivation media depending on their biochemical properties. These methods require pure cultures which need cultivation of at least 6 h but normally much longer. Recently also additional methods to identify bacteria are established e.g. mass spectroscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry or fluorescence spectroscopy. Alternative approaches for the identification of microorganisms are vibrational spectroscopic techniques. With Raman spectroscopy a spectroscopic fingerprint of the microorganisms can be achieved. Using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) macromolecules like DNA/RNA and proteins are resonantly enhanced. With an excitation wavelength of e.g. 244 nm it is possible to determine the ratio of guanine/cytosine to all DNA bases which allows a genotypic identification of microorganisms. The application of UVRR requires a large amount of microorganisms (> 10 6 cells) e.g. at least a micro colony. For the analysis of single cells micro-Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm can be used. Here, the obtained information is from all type of molecules inside the cells which lead to a chemotaxonomic identification. In this contribution we show how wavelength dependent Raman spectroscopy yields significant molecular information applicable for the identification of microorganisms on a single cell level.

  2. Raman scattering in hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon zigzag structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Vladimir S.; Zlobina, Ludmila I.; Sharts, Olga N.

    2000-12-01

    Raman spectra of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbin zigzag structure molecules are studied. The investigations have been fulfilled for following substances: CnH2n+2 (n equals 6, 7, 10), CnH2nO2 (n equals 4, 5, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 18), CnF2n+1Br(n equals 6, 7, 8, 10, 14), for similar structures: H(CF2)10H, H(CF2)10CONH2, F(CF2)5CO2K and commercial products. The frequency shifts of some modes, corresponding to acoustical and optical vibrations, have been observed. The theory, explaining Raman modes frequency dependence on the length of zigzag molecule, is developed. The presence of characteristic isooctane line in Raman spectra of benzines is established. Molecular structure modification of sun- flower-seed oil as a result of technological preparation process has been observed. The obtained results allow detecting zigzag fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon molecules in media and estimating its length with the help of Raman scattering spectroscopy.

  3. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of polyacrylamide gels for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, C.; Murry, P.; Pope, J.; Rintoul, L.; George, G.

    1998-01-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAG) gels are used in magnetic resonance imaging radiation dosimetry. The PAG dosimeter is based on the radiation-induced co-polymerisation and cross-linking of acrylic monomers infused in a gel matrix. PAG was manufactured with a composition of 5% gelatine, 3% acrylamide and 3% N,N'methylene-bis-acrylamide by mass, with distilled water as the remaining constituent [Baldock, 1998]. FT-Raman spectroscopy studies were undertaken to investigate cross-linking changes during the co-polymerisation of PAG in the spectral range of 200 - 3500 cm -1 . Vibrational bands of 1285 cm -1 and 1256 cm -1 were assigned to the acrylamide and bis-acrylamide single CH 2 δ CH2 binding modes. These bands were found to decrease in amplitude with increasing absorbed radiation dose, as a result of co-polymerisation. Principal Component Regression was performed on FT-Raman spectra of PAG samples irradiated to 50 Gy and two components were found to be sufficient to account for 98.7% of variance in the data. Cross validation was used to establish the absorbed radiation dose of an unknown PAG sample from the FT-Raman spectra. The calculated correlation coefficient between measured and predictive samples was 0.997 with a standard error of estimate of 0.976 and a standard error of prediction of 1.140. These results demonstrate the potential of FT-Raman spectroscopy for ionising radiation dosimetry using polyacrylamide gels

  4. Raman scattering with strongly coupled vibron-polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strashko, Artem; Keeling, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Strong coupling between cavity photons and molecular vibrations can lead to the formation of vibron-polaritons. In a recent experiment with PVAc molecules in a metal-metal microcavity [Shalabney et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 54, 7971 (2015), 10.1002/anie.201502979], such a coupling was observed to enhance the Raman scattering probability by several orders of magnitude. Inspired by this, we theoretically analyze the effect of strong photon-vibron coupling on the Raman scattering amplitude of organic molecules. This problem has recently been addressed by del Pino, Feist, and Garcia-Vidal [J. Phys. Chem. C 119, 29132 (2015), 10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b11654] using exact numerics for a small number of molecules. In this paper we derive compact analytic results for any number of molecules, also including the ultrastrong-coupling regime. Our calculations predict a division of the Raman signal into upper and lower polariton modes, with some enhancement to the lower polariton Raman amplitude due to the mode softening under strong coupling.

  5. Observation of stimulated Raman scattering in polar tetragonal crystals of barium antimony tartrate trihydrate, Ba[Sb{sub 2}((+)C{sub 4}H{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminskii, Alexander A. [Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rhee, Hanjo; Eichler, Hans J.; Lux, Oliver [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, Technical University of Berlin (Germany); Nemec, Ivan [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Yoneda, Hitoki; Shirakawa, Akira [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan); Becker, Petra; Bohaty, Ladislav [Section Crystallography, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The non-centrosymmetric polar tetragonal (P4{sub 1}) barium antimony tartrate trihydrate, Ba[Sb{sub 2}((+)C{sub 4}H{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O, was found to be an attractive novel semi-organic crystal manifesting numerous χ{sup (2)}- and χ{sup (3)}-nonlinear optical interactions. In particular, with picosecond single- and dual-wavelength pumping SHG and THG via cascaded parametric four-wave processes were observed. High-order Stokes and anti-Stokes lasing related to two SRS-promoting vibration modes of the crystal, with ω{sub SRS1} ∼ 575 cm{sup -1} and ω{sub SRS2} ∼ 2940 cm{sup -1}, takes place. Basing on a spontaneous Raman investigation an assignment of the two SRS-active vibration modes is discussed. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Laser-excited luminescence of trace Nd3+ impurity in LaBr3 revealed by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinqiu; Cui, Lei; He, Huaqiang; Hu, Yunsheng; Wu, Hao; Zeng, Jia; Liu, Yuzhu

    2012-10-01

    Unexpected additional bands with obvious non-vibrational features were observed in Raman spectra of LaBr3. Extensive study was carried out to reveal the origin of these bands. Results indicate that the additional bands correspond to laser-excited luminescence of trace Nd3+ impurity unintentionally introduced from the La2O3 raw material, which was further confirmed by Raman spectra of specially prepared Nd3+-doped LaBr3 and LaOBr samples. The luminescence properties of Nd3+ in different matrix were compared and discussed. The ultrasensitivity of Raman spectroscopy in detecting trace luminescent lanthanide ions shows good potential for analytical applications.

  7. The Raman fingerprint of plutonium dioxide: Some example applications for the detection of PuO2 in host matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, D.; Naji, M.; Mastromarino, S.; Elorrieta, J. M.; Magnani, N.; Martel, L.; Colle, J.-Y.

    2018-02-01

    Some example applications are presented, in which the peculiar Raman fingerprint of PuO2 can be used for the detection of crystalline Pu4+ with cubic symmetry in an oxide environment in various host materials, like mixed oxide fuels, inert matrices and corium sub-systems. The PuO2 Raman fingerprint was previously observed to consist of one main T2g vibrational mode at 478 cm-1 and two crystal electric field transition lines at 2130 cm-1 and 2610 cm-1. This particular use of Raman spectroscopy is promising for applications in nuclear waste management, safety and safeguard.

  8. Stimulated Raman signals at conical intersections: Ab initio surface hopping simulation protocol with direct propagation of the nuclear wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalewski, Markus, E-mail: mkowalew@uci.edu; Mukamel, Shaul, E-mail: smukamel@uci.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) signals that monitor the excited state conical intersections dynamics of acrolein are simulated. An effective time dependent Hamiltonian for two C—H vibrational marker bands is constructed on the fly using a local mode expansion combined with a semi-classical surface hopping simulation protocol. The signals are obtained by a direct forward and backward propagation of the vibrational wave function on a numerical grid. Earlier work is extended to fully incorporate the anharmonicities and intermode couplings.

  9. Stimulated Raman signals at conical intersections: Ab initio surface hopping simulation protocol with direct propagation of the nuclear wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) signals that monitor the excited state conical intersections dynamics of acrolein are simulated. An effective time dependent Hamiltonian for two C—H vibrational marker bands is constructed on the fly using a local mode expansion combined with a semi-classical surface hopping simulation protocol. The signals are obtained by a direct forward and backward propagation of the vibrational wave function on a numerical grid. Earlier work is extended to fully incorporate the anharmonicities and intermode couplings

  10. Detection and characterization of chemical aerosol using laser-trapping single-particle Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalume, Aimable; Beresnev, Leonid A; Santarpia, Joshua; Pan, Yong-Le

    2017-08-10

    Detection and characterization of the presence of chemical agent aerosols in various complex atmospheric environments is an essential defense mission. Raman spectroscopy has the ability to identify chemical molecules, but there are limited numbers of photons detectable from single airborne aerosol particles as they are flowing through a detection system. In this paper, we report on a single-particle Raman spectrometer system that can measure strong spontaneous, stimulated, and resonance Raman spectral peaks from a single laser-trapped chemical aerosol particle, such as a droplet of the VX nerve agent chemical simulant diethyl phthalate. Using this system, time-resolved Raman spectra and elastic scattered intensities were recorded to monitor the chemical properties and size variation of the trapped particle. Such a system supplies a new approach for the detection and characterization of single airborne chemical aerosol particles.

  11. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    Enkephalin, an endogeneous substance in the human brain showing morphine-like biological functions, has been detected at the single molecule level based on the surface-enhanced Raman signal of the ring breathing mode of phenylalanine, which is one building block of the molecule. For enhancing...... the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy bioanalytical, biomolecular and medical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Procházka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This book gives an overview of recent developments in RS and SERS for sensing and biosensing considering also limitations, possibilities and prospects of this technique. Raman scattering (RS) is a widely used vibrational technique providing highly specific molecular spectral patterns. A severe limitation for the application of this spectroscopic technique lies in the low cross section of RS. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy overcomes this problem by 6-11 orders of magnitude enhancement compared with the standard RS for molecules in the close vicinity of certain rough metal surfaces. Thus, SERS combines molecular fingerprint specificity with potential single-molecule sensitivity. Due to the recent development of new SERS-active substrates, labeling and derivatization chemistry as well as new instrumentations, SERS became a very promising tool for many varied applications, including bioanalytical studies and sensing. Both intrinsic and extrinsic SERS biosensing schemes have been employed to...

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering in Molecular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwane, Madoka; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-08-18

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopy that allows Raman spectroscopy on a single molecular scale. Here, we present a review of SERS from molecular junctions, in which a single molecule or molecules are made to have contact from the top to the bottom of metal surfaces. The molecular junctions are nice platforms for SERS as well as transport measurement. Electronic characterization based on the transport measurements of molecular junctions has been extensively studied for the development of miniaturized electronic devices. Simultaneous SERS and transport measurement of the molecular junctions allow both structural (geometrical) and electronic information on the single molecule scale. The improvement of SERS measurement on molecular junctions open the door toward new nanoscience and nanotechnology in molecular electronics.

  14. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  15. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus

    2017-04-18

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  16. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Hosseinpour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  17. Development and integration of Raman imaging capabilities to Sandia National Laboratories hyperspectral fluorescence imaging instrument.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Nieman, Linda T.

    2005-11-01

    Raman spectroscopic imaging is a powerful technique for visualizing chemical differences within a variety of samples based on the interaction of a substance's molecular vibrations with laser light. While Raman imaging can provide a unique view of samples such as residual stress within silicon devices, chemical degradation, material aging, and sample heterogeneity, the Raman scattering process is often weak and thus requires very sensitive collection optics and detectors. Many commercial instruments (including ones owned here at Sandia National Laboratories) generate Raman images by raster scanning a point focused laser beam across a sample--a process which can expose a sample to extreme levels of laser light and requires lengthy acquisition times. Our previous research efforts have led to the development of a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hyperspectral imager for fluorescence imaging applications such as microarray scanning. This report details the design, integration, and characterization of a line-scan Raman imaging module added to this efficient hyperspectral fluorescence microscope. The original hyperspectral fluorescence instrument serves as the framework for excitation and sample manipulation for the Raman imaging system, while a more appropriate axial transmissive Raman imaging spectrometer and detector are utilized for collection of the Raman scatter. The result is a unique and flexible dual-modality fluorescence and Raman imaging system capable of high-speed imaging at high spatial and spectral resolutions. Care was taken throughout the design and integration process not to hinder any of the fluorescence imaging capabilities. For example, an operator can switch between the fluorescence and Raman modalities without need for extensive optical realignment. The instrument performance has been characterized and sample data is presented.

  18. Mechanical vibration and shock analysis, sinusoidal vibration

    CERN Document Server

    Lalanne, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Everything engineers need to know about mechanical vibration and shock...in one authoritative reference work! This fully updated and revised 3rd edition addresses the entire field of mechanical vibration and shock as one of the most important types of load and stress applied to structures, machines and components in the real world. Examples include everything from the regular and predictable loads applied to turbines, motors or helicopters by the spinning of their constituent parts to the ability of buildings to withstand damage from wind loads or explosions, and the need for cars to m

  19. Structure, vibrations, and hydrogen bond parameters of dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawinkowski, S.; Eilmes, J.; Waluk, J.

    2010-07-01

    Geometry and vibrational structure of dibenzo[ b, i][1,4,8,11]tetraaza[14]annulene (TAA) have been studied using infrared and Raman spectroscopy combined with quantum-chemical calculations. The assignments were proposed for 106 out of the total of 108 TAA vibrations, based on comparison of the theoretical predictions with the experimental data obtained for the parent molecule and its isotopomer in which the NH protons were replaced by deuterons. Reassignments were suggesteded for the NH stretching and out-of-plane vibrations. The values of the parameters of the intramolecular NH⋯N hydrogen bonds were analysed in comparison with the corresponding data for porphyrin and porphycene, molecules with the same structural motif, a cavity composed of four nitrogen atoms and two inner protons. Both experiment and calculations suggest that the molecule of TAA is not planar and is present in a trans tautomeric form, with the protons located on the opposite nitrogen atoms.

  20. Model Indepedent Vibration Control

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Jing

    2010-01-01

    A NMIFC system is proposed for broadband vibration control. It has two important features. Feature F1 is that the NMIFC is stable without introducing any invasive effects, such as probing signals or controller perturbations, into the vibration system; feature F2 is

  1. Vibration Theory, Vol. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present textbook has been written based on previous lecture notes for a course on stochastic vibration theory that is being given on the 9th semester at Aalborg University for M. Sc. students in structural engineering. The present 4th edition of this textbook on linear stochastic vibration...

  2. Handbook Of Noise And Vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This book is about noise and vibration. The first chapter has explanations of noise such as basic of sound, influence of noise, assessment of noise, measurement of prevention of noise and technology, case of noise measurement and soundproof. The second chapter describes vibration with outline, theory of vibration, interpretation of vibration, measurement for reduction of vibration, case of design of protection against vibration. It deals with related regulation and method of measurement.

  3. Sum-Frequency-Generation-Based Laser Sidebands for Tunable Femtosecond Raman Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangdong Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS is an emerging molecular structural dynamics technique for functional materials characterization typically in the visible to near-IR range. To expand its applications we have developed a versatile FSRS setup in the ultraviolet region. We use the combination of a narrowband, ~400 nm Raman pump from a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor and a tunable broadband probe pulse from sum-frequency-generation-based cascaded four-wave mixing (SFG-CFWM laser sidebands in a thin BBO crystal. The ground state Raman spectrum of a laser dye Quinolon 390 in methanol that strongly absorbs at ~355 nm is systematically studied as a standard sample to provide previously unavailable spectroscopic characterization in the vibrational domain. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra can be collected by selecting different orders of SFG-CFWM sidebands as the probe pulse. The stimulated Raman gain with the 402 nm Raman pump is >21 times larger than that with the 550 nm Raman pump when measured at the 1317 cm−1 peak for the aromatic ring deformation and ring-H rocking mode of the dye molecule, demonstrating that pre-resonance enhancement is effectively achieved in the unique UV-FSRS setup. This added tunability in the versatile and compact optical setup enables FSRS to better capture transient conformational snapshots of photosensitive molecules that absorb in the UV range.

  4. Polarized Raman spectroscopic characterization of normal and oral cancer blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    In India oral cancer ranks the top due to the habitual usage of tobacco in its various forms and remains the major burden. Hence priority is given for early diagnosis as it is the better solution for cure or to improve the survival rate. For the past three decades, optical spectroscopic techniques have shown its capacity in the discrimination of normal and malignant samples. Many research works have conventional Raman in the effective detection of cancer using the variations in bond vibrations of the molecules. However in addition polarized Raman provides the orientation and symmetry of biomolecules. If so can polarized Raman be the better choice than the conventional Raman in the detection of cancer? The present study aimed to found the answer for the above query. The conventional and polarized Raman spectra were acquired for the same set of blood plasma samples of normal subjects and oral malignant (OSCC) patients. Thus, obtained Raman spectral data were compared using linear discriminant analysis coupled with artificial neural network (LDA-ANN). The depolarization ratio of biomolecules such as antioxidant, amino acid, protein and nucleic acid bases present in blood plasma was proven to be the best attributes in the categorization of the groups. The polarized Raman results were promising in discriminating oral cancer blood plasma from that of normal blood plasma with improved efficiency. The results will be discussed in detail.

  5. Solvent effects on first-order molecular hyperpolarizability: A study based on vibrational observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliani, P.; Del Zoppo, M.; Castiglioni, C.; Zerbi, G.; Marder, S. R.; Perry, J. W.

    1995-12-01

    Using a recently developed method, we show here that solvent effects on the first molecular hyperpolarizabilities of push-pull polyenes can be predicted by evaluation of the relaxation contribution βr to the hyperpolarizability from vibrational infrared and Raman intensities and vibrational frequencies. The molecules studied in this work are a few organic polymethine dyes with different donor and acceptor groups. The analysis of their vibrational spectra confirms the key role played by the structural parameters of the polyene chain in determining the nonlinear optical response.

  6. L-glutamine: Dynamical properties investigation by means of INS, IR, RAMAN, 1H NMR and DFT techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Bator, G.; Natkaniec, I.

    2014-10-01

    Vibrational spectra of L-glutamine in the solid state were studied using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS), infrared (IR), Raman and 1H NMR spectroscopy techniques. DFT calculation using CASTEP code with the periodic boundary conditions was used to determine and describe the normal modes in the vibrational spectra of pure L-glutamine. An excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental INS, IR and Raman data has been found. Bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the NH3+ group in hydrogen bonds are observed at 2400, 2618 and 2619 cm-1, while the NH3+ torsion vibration mode is observed at 441 cm-1. The band at 2041 cm-1 is assigned to combinations of the NH3+ bending symmetry vibration and the CO2- rocking vibration and can be used as an "indicator band" for the identification of the NH3+ groups in amino acid. For the L-glutamine an activation energy needed for the NH3+ group reorientation was obtained as 7.4 kcal/mol. It was found, that the combination three spectroscopic methods (INS, IR and Raman) with calculations for the crystal state proved to be an effective tool to investigate dynamical properties of amino acid crystals.

  7. Vibrations of rotating machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Osami; Kanki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Keogh, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This book opens with an explanation of the vibrations of a single degree-of-freedom (dof) system for all beginners. Subsequently, vibration analysis of multi-dof systems is explained by modal analysis. Mode synthesis modeling is then introduced for system reduction, which aids understanding in a simplified manner of how complicated rotors behave. Rotor balancing techniques are offered for rigid and flexible rotors through several examples. Consideration of gyroscopic influences on the rotordynamics is then provided and vibration evaluation of a rotor-bearing system is emphasized in terms of forward and backward whirl rotor motions through eigenvalue (natural frequency and damping ratio) analysis. In addition to these rotordynamics concerning rotating shaft vibration measured in a stationary reference frame, blade vibrations are analyzed with Coriolis forces expressed in a rotating reference frame. Other phenomena that may be assessed in stationary and rotating reference frames include stability characteristic...

  8. Vibrations in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprahamian, A.

    1992-01-01

    Quadrupole oscillations around a deformed shape give rise to vibrations in deformed nuclei. Single phonon vibrations of K = 0 (β) and K = 2 (γ) are a systematic feature in deformed nuclei, but the existence of multi-phonon vibrations had remained an open question until the recently reported results in 168 Er. In this nucleus, a two-phonon K = 4(γγ) band was observed at approximately 2.5 times the energy of the single γ vibration. The authors have studied several deformed rare-earth nuclei using the ( 4 He,2n) reaction in order to map out the systematic behavior of these multi-phonon vibrations. Recently, they have identified a similar K = 4 band in 154 Gd

  9. Evaluation and differentiation of the Betulaceae birch bark species and their bioactive triterpene content using analytical FT-vibrational spectroscopy and GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cîntă-Pînzaru, Simona; Dehelean, Cristina A; Soica, Codruta; Culea, Monica; Borcan, Florin

    2012-07-18

    Aiming to obtain the highest triterpene content in the extraction products, nine bark samples from the forest abundant flora of Apuseni Mountains, Romania were Raman spectroscopically evaluated. Three different natural extracts from Betula pendula Roth birch bark have been obtained and characterized using Fourier transform vibrational spectra. This study shows that principal components of the birch tree extract can be rapidly recognized and differentiated based on their vibrational fingerprint band shape and intensity. The vibrational spectroscopy results are supported by the GC-MS data. Based on IR and Raman analysis, one can conclude that all the extracts, independent on the solvent(s) used, revealed dominant betulin species, followed by lupeol. Since Raman measurements could also be performed on fresh plant material, we demonstrated the possibility to apply the present results for the prediction of the highest triterpene content in bark species, for the selection of harvesting time or individual genotypes directly in the field, with appropriate portable Raman equipment.

  10. Principal component analysis of Raman spectra for TiO2 nanoparticle characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Alina Georgiana; Scarisoareanu, Monica; Morjan, Ion; Dutu, Elena; Badiceanu, Maria; Mihailescu, Ion

    2017-09-01

    The Raman spectra of anatase/rutile mixed phases of Sn doped TiO2 nanoparticles and undoped TiO2 nanoparticles, synthesised by laser pyrolysis, with nanocrystallite dimensions varying from 8 to 28 nm, was simultaneously processed with a self-written software that applies Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on the measured spectrum to verify the possibility of objective auto-characterization of nanoparticles from their vibrational modes. The photo-excited process of Raman scattering is very sensible to the material characteristics, especially in the case of nanomaterials, where more properties become relevant for the vibrational behaviour. We used PCA, a statistical procedure that performs eigenvalue decomposition of descriptive data covariance, to automatically analyse the sample's measured Raman spectrum, and to interfere the correlation between nanoparticle dimensions, tin and carbon concentration, and their Principal Component values (PCs). This type of application can allow an approximation of the crystallite size, or tin concentration, only by measuring the Raman spectrum of the sample. The study of loadings of the principal components provides information of the way the vibrational modes are affected by the nanoparticle features and the spectral area relevant for the classification.

  11. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In Raman spectroscopy, inelastic scattering of photons from an atom or molecule in chemical entities is utilized to analyze the composition of solids, liquids and gases. However, the low cross-section limits its applications. The introduction of sur- face-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in 1974 has attracted a lot of attention ...

  12. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  13. Looking at life through molecular vibrations: biomedical applications of CARS spectro-microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rago, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we present a series of studies employing non-linear vibrational microscopy, in the form of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) spectro-microscopy. The underlying motivation of this thesis is to explore the limits and demonstrate the technical feasibility of CARS imaging in a

  14. Nonplanar Tertiary Amides in Rigid Chiral Tricyclic Dilactams. Peptide Group Distortions and Vibrational Optical Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pazderková, Markéta; Profant, V.; Hodačová, J.; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Pazderka, T.; Novotná, P.; Urbanová, M.; Šafařík, Martin; Buděšínský, Miloš; Tichý, Miloš; Bednárová, Lucie; Baumruk, V.; Maloň, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 33 (2013), s. 9626-9642 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/1276 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : spirodilactams * amide bond * vibrational circular dichroism * non-planarity * Raman optical activity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  15. Ultrasensitive detection of phenolic antioxidants by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas-Soto, N.; Aguilar-Hernández, I. A.; Afseth, N.; López-Luke, T.; Contreras-Torres, F. F.; Wold, J. P.

    2017-08-01

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful surface-sensitive technique to study the vibrational properties of analytes at very low concentrations. In this study, ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and sinapic acid were analyzed by SERS using Ag colloids. Analytes were detected up to 2.5x10-9M. For caffeic acid and coumaric acid, this detection limit has been reached for the first time, as well as the SERS analysis of sinapic acid using silver colloids.

  16. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chae-Ryon; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Galindo, Luis; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC) converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA) of 1.0) from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22). A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests. PMID:22125761

  17. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    to perform real-time measurements with little or no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is now considered an invaluable analytical tool, finding application in several fields including medicine, defense and process control. When combined with fiber optics technology, Raman spectroscopy allows......The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...... for the realization of flexible and minimally-invasive devices, able to reach remote or hardly accessible samples, and to perform in-situ analyses in hazardous environments. The work behind this Thesis focuses on the proof-of-principle demonstration of a truly in-fiber Raman probe, where all parts are realized...

  18. Abstract: Stoichiometry, Vibrational Modes and Structures of Molten Nb2O5-K2S2O7 Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, S.; Borup, F.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature Raman spectroscopy is used tostudy the vibrational modes and structures of the Nb205-K2S207(0 < X(Nb2O5)<0.22) molten salt mixtures at 450-700 oC under static equilibria conditions. Band assignments and Raman band intensity correlations with complex stoichiometry are performed in...... in order to characterise the complex(es) formed. The determination of stoichiometry is done following a general procedure which is based on a simple formalism correlating measurements of relative Raman band intensities with the stoichiometry of solutes in molten salt solvents.......High temperature Raman spectroscopy is used tostudy the vibrational modes and structures of the Nb205-K2S207(0 X(Nb2O5)

  19. Multicolored stain-free histopathology with coherent Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudiger, Christian W; Pfannl, Rolf; Orringer, Daniel A; Saar, Brian G; Ji, Minbiao; Zeng, Qing; Ottoboni, Linda; Wei, Ying; Ying, Wei; Waeber, Christian; Sims, John R; De Jager, Philip L; Sagher, Oren; Philbert, Martin A; Xu, Xiaoyin; Kesari, Santosh; Xie, X Sunney; Young, Geoffrey S

    2012-10-01

    Conventional histopathology with hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) has been the gold standard for histopathological diagnosis of a wide range of diseases. However, it is not performed in vivo and requires thin tissue sections obtained after tissue biopsy, which carries risk, particularly in the central nervous system. Here we describe the development of an alternative, multicolored way to visualize tissue in real-time through the use of coherent Raman imaging (CRI), without the use of dyes. CRI relies on intrinsic chemical contrast based on vibrational properties of molecules and intrinsic optical sectioning by nonlinear excitation. We demonstrate that multicolor images originating from CH(2) and CH(3) vibrations of lipids and protein, as well as two-photon absorption of hemoglobin, can be obtained with subcellular resolution from fresh tissue. These stain-free histopathological images show resolutions similar to those obtained by conventional techniques, but do not require tissue fixation, sectioning or staining of the tissue analyzed.

  20. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin, E-mail: wphsieh@stanford.edu; Mao, Wendy L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zalden, Peter [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut (IA), RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); JARA – Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Lindenberg, Aaron M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, PULSE Institute, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    We used high-pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the evolution of vibrational frequencies of the phase change materials (PCMs) Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, GeSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}, and SnSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}. We found that the critical pressure for triggering amorphization in the PCMs decreases with increasing vacancy concentration, demonstrating that the presence of vacancies, rather than differences in the atomic covalent radii, is crucial for pressure-induced amorphization in PCMs. Compared to the as-deposited amorphous phase, the pressure-induced amorphous phase has a similar vibrational spectrum but requires much lower laser power to transform into the crystalline phase, suggesting different kinetics of crystallization, which may have implications for applications of PCMs in non-volatile data storage.

  1. Concentration, temperature, and density in a hydrogen-air flame by excimer-induced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Bowling, John M.; Pitz, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) is an attractive laser diagnostic for the study of supersonic hydrogen-air combustion. The VRS technique gives a complete thermodynamic description of the gas mixture at a point in the reacting flow. Single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering can simultaneously provide independent measurements of density, temperature, and concentration of each major species (H2, H2O, O2 and N2) in a hydrogen/air turbulent combustor. Also the pressure can be calculated using the ideal gas law. However, single-pulse VRS systems in current use for measurement of turbulent combustion have a number of shortcomings when applied to supersonic flows: (1) slow repetition rate (1 to 5 Hz), (2) poor spatial resolution (0.5x0.3x0.3 cu mm), and (3) marginal time resolution. Most of these shortcomings are due to the use of visible wavelength flash-lamp pumped dye lasers. The advent of UV excimer laser allows the possibility of dramatic improvements in the single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering. The excimer based VRS probe will greatly improve repetition rate (100 to 500 Hz), spatial resolution (0.1x0.1x0.1 cu mm) and time resolution (30ns). These improvements result from the lower divergence of the UV excimer, higher repetition rate, and the increased Raman cross-sections (15 to 20 times higher) at ultra-violet (UV) wavelengths. With this increased capability, single-pulse vibrational Raman scattering promises to be an ideal non-intrusive probe for the study of hypersonic propulsion flows.

  2. Raman spectroscopy of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-acrylamide copolymer using gamma irradiation for crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goheen, Steven C.; Saunders, Rachel M.; Davis, Rachel M.; Harvey, Scott D.; Olsen, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    A copolymer hydrogel was made by mixing acrylamide and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate monomers in water and polymerizing with gamma irradiation. The progress of polymerization and the vibrational structure of the hydrogel was examined using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra indicated that the co-polymer has a molecular structure different from polyacrylamide or the individual monomers. The Raman data also indicate the presence of crosslinking at the C=O, NH2 and OH side chains. The spectra further suggest the continuous lengthening of the backbone of the polymers with increasing gamma dose. This is shown as the increase in C-C modes as C=C vibrations decrease. Raman spectra changed most dramatically as the monomer mixture became a gel at a dose of approximately 320 Gy. Spectral differences were subtler with doses exceeding 640 Gy, although chain lengthening continued beyond 1500 Gy. Potential applications of the copolymer hydrogel include reconstructive tissue as well as a standard material for radiation protection dosimetry. Results are discussed in relation to other potential applications of this polymer and dose-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum

  3. [Red Blood Cells Raman Spectroscopy Comparison of Type Two Diabetes Patients and Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Gui-dong; Mu, Xin; Xiao, Hong-bin; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Si-qi; Niu Wen-ying; Jiang, Guang-kun; Feng, Yue-nan; Bian, Jing-qi

    2015-10-01

    By using confocal Raman spectroscopy, Raman spectra were measured in normal rat red blood cells, normal human red blood cells, STZ induced diabetetic rats red blood cells, Alloxan induced diabetetic rats red blood cells and human type 2 diabetes red blood cells. Then principal component analysis (PCA) with support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used for data analysis, and then the distance between classes was used to judge the degree of close to two kinds of rat model with type 2 diabetes. The results found significant differences in the Raman spectra of red blood cell in diabetic and normal red blood cells. To diabetic red blood cells, the peak in the amide VI C=O deformation vibration band is obvious, and amide V N-H deformation vibration band spectral lines appear deviation. Belong to phospholipid fatty acyl C-C skeleton, the 1 130 cm(-1) spectral line is enhanced and the 1 088 cm(-1) spectral line is abated, which show diabetes red cell membrane permeability increased. Raman spectra of PCA combined with SVM can well separate 5 types of red blood cells. Classifier test results show that the classification accuracy is up to 100%. Through the class distance between the two induced method and human type 2 diabetes, it is found that STZ induced model is more close to human type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy can be used for diagnosis of diabetes and rats STZ induced diabetes method is closer to human type 2 diabetes.

  4. The discrimination of 72 nitrate, chlorate and perchlorate salts using IR and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Félix; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Inorganic oxidizing energetic salts including nitrates, chlorates and perchlorates are widely used in the manufacture of not only licit pyrotechnic compositions, but also illicit homemade explosive mixtures. Their identification in forensic laboratories is usually accomplished by either capillary electrophoresis or ion chromatography, with the disadvantage of dissociating the salt into its ions. On the contrary, vibrational spectroscopy, including IR and Raman, enables the non-invasive identification of the salt, i.e. avoiding its dissociation. This study focuses on the discrimination of all nitrate, chlorate and perchlorate salts that are commercially available, using both Raman and IR spectroscopy, with the aim of testing whether every salt can be unequivocally identified. Besides the visual spectra comparison by assigning every band with the corresponding molecular vibrational mode, a statistical analysis based on Pearson correlation was performed to ensure an objective identification, either using Raman, IR or both. Positively, 25 salts (out of 72) were unequivocally identified using Raman, 30 salts when using IR and 44 when combining both techniques. Negatively, some salts were undistinguishable even using both techniques demonstrating there are some salts that provide very similar Raman and IR spectra.

  5. Native alunogen: A Raman spectroscopic study of a well-described specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košek, Filip; Culka, Adam; Žáček, Vladimír; Laufek, František; Škoda, Radek; Jehlička, Jan

    2018-04-01

    Alunogen (Al2(SO4)3 · 17H2O) is a common secondary mineral in the terrestrial environment (acid mine drainage, volcanic or coal-fire fumaroles), and is also formed through the acidic weathering of aluminosilicates. Moreover, alunogen has been suggested as a part of the Al-bearing deposits on Mars. The identification of alunogen in secondary sulfate mixtures by Raman spectroscopy strictly depends on good knowledge of alunogen spectral features and band positions. However, comprehensive Raman data of alunogen of natural origin are lacking. This study reports on Raman spectra obtained from two natural specimens originating from a burning coal dump at the Schoeller mine, Kladno, Czech Republic, along with the additional characterizations by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microprobe. For comparison purposes, a Raman spectrum of a synthetic analogue was also obtained. The studied specimens have (Al1.99Fe3+0.01)2 (SO4)3·17H2O as their calculated empirical formula, and the structural parameters correspond to the previously reported data for alunogen. Both natural specimens and the synthetic analogue showed uniform Raman spectra with no extensive band splitting in the sulfate vibrational regions. The most intensive Raman band associated with the symmetric stretching vibration of the SO4 tetrahedra (ν1) is located at 992 cm-1. A multicomponent band was observable in the characteristic region for OH-related vibrations. A small variation in the spectral intensity of the hydroxyl bands suggests that the studied specimens could possibly be slightly dehydrated.

  6. On the emergence of Raman signals characterizing multicenter nanoscale interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mathew D.; Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-04-01

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within one molecule, with signals in the corresponding spectrum widely used to identify material structures. When the corresponding theory is developed using quantum electrodynamics, the fundamental scattering process is described by a single photon of one radiation mode being annihilated with the concurrent creation of another photon; the two photon energies differ by an amount corresponding to the transfer of vibrational energy within the system. Here, we consider nanoscale interactions between neighboring molecules to mediate the process, by way of a virtual photon exchange to connect the evolution of the two molecular states. We consider both a single and pair of virtual photon exchanges. Our analysis deploys two realistic assumptions: in each pairwise interaction the two components are considered to be (i) chemically different and (ii) held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, displaced by an amount equivalent to the near-field region; resulting in higher order dependences on displacement R becoming increasingly significant, and at the limit the short-range R-6 term can even dominate over R-3 dependence. In our investigation one center undergoes a change in vibrational energy; each neighboring molecule returns to the electronic and vibrational state in which it began. For the purposes of providing results, a Stokes transition has been assumed; analogous principles hold for the anti-Stokes counterpart. Experimentally, there is no change to the dependence on the intensity of laser light. However, the various mechanisms presented herein lead to different selection rules applying in each instance. In some cases specifically identifiable mechanisms will be active for a given transition, leading to new and characteristic lines in the Raman spectrum. A thorough investigation of all physically achievable mechanisms will be detailed in this work.

  7. Spontaneous Thigh Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan, Sameer K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A young man presented with a painful and swollen thigh, without any history of trauma, illness, coagulopathic medication or recent exertional exercise. Preliminary imaging delineated a haematoma in the anterior thigh, without any fractures or muscle trauma. Emergent fasciotomies were performed. No pathology could be identified intra-operatively, or on follow-up imaging. A review of thigh compartment syndromes described in literature is presented in a table. Emergency physicians and traumatologists should be cognisant of spontaneous atraumatic presentations of thigh compartment syndrome, to ensure prompt referral and definitive management of this limb-threatening condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:134-138].

  8. Analysis of polymer surfaces and thin-film coatings with Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAnally, Gerard David

    2001-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the analysis and characterisation of polymer surfaces. The Raman and SERS spectra from a PET film are presented. The SERS spectra from the related polyester PBT and from the monomer DMT are identical to PET, showing that only the aromatic signals are enhanced. Evidence from other compounds is presented to show that loss of the carbonyl stretch (1725 cm -1 ) from the spectra is due to a chemical interaction between the silver and surface carbonyl groups. The interaction of other polymer functional groups with silver is discussed. A comparison of Raman and SERS spectra collected from three faces of a single crystal shows the SERS spectra are depolarised. AFM images of the silver films used to obtain SERS are presented. They consist of regular islands of silver, fused together to form a complete film. The stability and reproducibility and of these surfaces is assessed. Band assignments for the SERS spectrum of PET are presented. A new band in the spectrum (1131 cm -1 ) is assigned to a complex vibration using a density functional calculation. Depth profiling through a polymer film on to the silver layer showed the SERS signals arise from the silver surface only. The profiles show the effects of refraction on the beam, and the adverse affect on the depth resolution. Silver films were used to obtain SERS spectra from a 40 nm thin-film coating on PET, without interference from the PET layer. The use of an azo dye probe as a marker to detect the coating is described. Finally, a novel method for the synthesis of a SERS-active vinyl-benzotriazole monomer is reported. The monomer was incorporated into a thin-film coating and the SERS spectrum obtained from the polymer. (author)

  9. Raman Spectroscopic Study of the Vapour Phase of 1-Methylimidazolium Ethanoate, a Protic Ionic Liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Canongia Lopes, Jose N.; Ferreira, Rui

    2010-01-01

    The gas phase over the ionic liquid 1-methylimidazolium ethanoate, [Hmim][O2CCH3], was studied by means of Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra are presented, the species in the gas phase are identified, and their bands are assigned. The results are interpreted using ab initio quantum mechanical...... calculations that also predict vibrational spectra. The obtained data reinforce a previous interpretation, based on FT-ICR mass spectrometric data, that the vapor phase over [Hmim][O2CCH3] consists predominantly of two neutral molecules, monomeric ethanoic acid and 1-methylimidazole....

  10. Polarized Raman spectra of L-arginine hydrochloride monohydrated single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, J.L.B. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Freire, P.T.C.; Goncalves, R.O.; Melo, F.E.A.; Mendes Filho, J., E-mail: tarso@fisica.ufc.b [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Lima, R.J.C.; Moreno, A.J.D. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Imperatriz, MA (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Sociais, Saude e Tecnologia

    2010-09-15

    Polarized Raman spectra of L-arginine hydrochloride monohydrated single crystal in nine different scattering geometries of the two irreducible representations of factor group C{sub 2} were studied at room temperature. The experimental wavenumber values are compared with those obtained from ab-initio calculation and the assignment of the Raman bands to the respective molecular vibrations is also given. Finally, a discussion related to a previously reported phase transition undergone by L-arginine hydrochloride monohydrated single crystal at low temperature is furnished. (author)

  11. Structural Stability and Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Sine Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author at the Uni......This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author...... and their derivation, thus stimulating them to write interactive and dynamic programs to analyze instability and vibrational modes....

  12. Coherent vibrational dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzani, Guglielmo; De Silvestri, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful investigation tool for a wide class of materials covering diverse areas in physics, chemistry and biology. The continuous development in the laser field regarding ultrashort pulse generation has led to the possibility of producing light pulses that can follow vibrational motion coupled to the electronic transitions in molecules and solids in real time. Aimed at researchers and graduate students using vibrational spectroscopy, this book provides both introductory chapters as well as more advanced contents reporting on recent progress. It also provides a good starting point for scientists seeking a sound introduction to ultrafast optics and spectroscopic techniques.

  13. L-glutamine: Dynamical properties investigation by means of INS, IR, RAMAN, {sup 1}H NMR and DFT techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlukojć, A., E-mail: andrzej@jinr.ru [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16 str., 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Hołderna-Natkaniec, K. [Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Bator, G. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, F. Joliot-Curie 14, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Natkaniec, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2014-10-31

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The L-glutamine was investigated by INS, IR, Raman and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. • DFT calculations for the solids state model were performed. • The NH{sub 3}{sup +} torsional vibration mode is observed in the INS spectra. • Activation energy for the NH{sub 3}{sup +} group reorientation is obtained. - Abstract: Vibrational spectra of L-glutamine in the solid state were studied using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS), infrared (IR), Raman and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy techniques. DFT calculation using CASTEP code with the periodic boundary conditions was used to determine and describe the normal modes in the vibrational spectra of pure L-glutamine. An excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental INS, IR and Raman data has been found. Bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the NH{sub 3}{sup +} group in hydrogen bonds are observed at 2400, 2618 and 2619 cm{sup −1}, while the NH{sub 3}{sup +} torsion vibration mode is observed at 441 cm{sup −1}. The band at 2041 cm{sup −1} is assigned to combinations of the NH{sub 3}{sup +} bending symmetry vibration and the CO{sub 2}{sup -} rocking vibration and can be used as an “indicator band” for the identification of the NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups in amino acid. For the L-glutamine an activation energy needed for the NH{sub 3}{sup +} group reorientation was obtained as 7.4 kcal/mol. It was found, that the combination three spectroscopic methods (INS, IR and Raman) with calculations for the crystal state proved to be an effective tool to investigate dynamical properties of amino acid crystals.

  14. L-glutamine: Dynamical properties investigation by means of INS, IR, RAMAN, 1H NMR and DFT techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Bator, G.; Natkaniec, I.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The L-glutamine was investigated by INS, IR, Raman and 1 H NMR spectroscopy. • DFT calculations for the solids state model were performed. • The NH 3 + torsional vibration mode is observed in the INS spectra. • Activation energy for the NH 3 + group reorientation is obtained. - Abstract: Vibrational spectra of L-glutamine in the solid state were studied using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS), infrared (IR), Raman and 1 H NMR spectroscopy techniques. DFT calculation using CASTEP code with the periodic boundary conditions was used to determine and describe the normal modes in the vibrational spectra of pure L-glutamine. An excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental INS, IR and Raman data has been found. Bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the NH 3 + group in hydrogen bonds are observed at 2400, 2618 and 2619 cm −1 , while the NH 3 + torsion vibration mode is observed at 441 cm −1 . The band at 2041 cm −1 is assigned to combinations of the NH 3 + bending symmetry vibration and the CO 2 - rocking vibration and can be used as an “indicator band” for the identification of the NH 3 + groups in amino acid. For the L-glutamine an activation energy needed for the NH 3 + group reorientation was obtained as 7.4 kcal/mol. It was found, that the combination three spectroscopic methods (INS, IR and Raman) with calculations for the crystal state proved to be an effective tool to investigate dynamical properties of amino acid crystals

  15. Nanophotonics with Surface Enhanced Coherent Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Alexander

    Nonlinear nanophotonics is a rapidly developing field of research that aims at detecting and disentangling weak congested optical signatures on the nanoscale. Sub-wavelength field confinement of the local electromagnetic fields and the resulting field enhancement is achieved by utilizing plasmonic near-field antennas. This allows for probing nanoscopic volumes, a property unattainable by conventional far-field microscopy techniques. Combination of plasmonics and nonlinear optical microscopy provides a path to visualizing a small chemical and spatial subset of target molecules within an ensemble. This is achieved while maintaining rapid signal acquisition, which is necessary for capturing biological processes in living systems. Herein, a novel technique, wide-field surface enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (wfSE-CARS) is presented. This technique allows for isolating weak vibrational signals in nanoscopic proximity to the surface by using chemical sensitivity of coherent Raman microspectroscopy (CRM) and field confinement from surface plasmons supported on a thin gold film. Uniform field enhancement over a large field of view, achieved with surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in wfSE-CARSS, allows for biomolecular imaging demonstrated on extended structures like phospholipid droplets and live cells. Surface selectivity and chemical contrast are achieved at 70 fJ/mum2 incident energy densities, which is over five orders of magnitude lower than used in conventional point scanning CRM. Next, a novel surface sensing imaging technique, local field induced metal emission (LFIME), is introduced. Presence of a sample material at the surface influences the local fields of a thin flat gold film, such that nonlinear fluorescence signal of the metal can be detected in the far-field. Nanoscale nonmetallic, nonfluorescent objects can be imaged with high signal-to-background ratio and diffraction limited lateral resolution using LFIME. Additionally, structure of the

  16. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  17. Spontaneous Tumor Lysis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia C. Weeks MD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS is a known complication of malignancy and its treatment. The incidence varies on malignancy type, but is most common with hematologic neoplasms during cytotoxic treatment. Spontaneous TLS is thought to be rare. This case study is of a 62-year-old female admitted with multisystem organ failure, with subsequent diagnosis of aggressive B cell lymphoma. On admission, laboratory abnormalities included renal failure, elevated uric acid (20.7 mg/dL, and 3+ amorphous urates on urinalysis. Oliguric renal failure persisted despite aggressive hydration and diuretic use, requiring initiation of hemodialysis prior to chemotherapy. Antihyperuricemic therapy and hemodialysis were used to resolve hyperuricemia. However, due to multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome with extremely poor prognosis, the patient ultimately expired in the setting of a terminal ventilator wean. Although our patient did not meet current TLS criteria, she required hemodialysis due to uric acid nephropathy, a complication of TLS. This poses the clinical question of whether adequate diagnostic criteria exist for spontaneous TLS and if the lack of currently accepted guidelines has resulted in the underestimation of its incidence. Allopurinol and rasburicase are commonly used for prevention and treatment of TLS. Although both drugs decrease uric acid levels, allopurinol mechanistically prevents formation of the substrate rasburicase acts to solubilize. These drugs were administered together in our patient, although no established guidelines recommend combined use. This raises the clinical question of whether combined therapy is truly beneficial or, conversely, detrimental to patient outcomes.

  18. Investigation of the Brill transition in nylon 6,6 by Raman, THz-Raman, and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldo Menezes, D.; Reyer, A.; Musso, M.

    2018-02-01

    The Brill transition is a phase transition process in polyamides related with structural changes between the hydrogen bonds of the lateral functional groups (Cdbnd O) and (Nsbnd H). In this study, we have used the potential of Raman spectroscopy for exploring this phase transition in polyamide 6,6 (nylon 6,6), due to the sensitivity of this spectroscopic technique to small intermolecular changes affecting vibrational properties of relevant functional groups. During a step by step heating and cooling process of the sample we collected Raman spectra allowing us from two-dimensional Raman correlation spectroscopy to identify which spectral regions suffered the largest influence during the Brill transition, and from Terahertz Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy to obtain complementary information, e.g. on the temperature of the sample. This allowed us to grasp signatures of the Brill transition from peak parameters of vibrational modes associated with (Csbnd C) skeletal stretches and (CNH) bending, and to verify the Brill transition temperature at around 160 °C, as well as the reversibility of this phase transition.

  19. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  20. Application of silver films with different roughness parameter for septic human serum albumin detection by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyubin, A. Y.; Konstantinova, E. I.; Matveeva, K. I.; Slezhkin, V. A.; Samusev, I. G.; Demin, M. V.; Bryukhanov, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the rough silver films parameters investigation, used as media for surface enhancement Raman spectroscopy for health and septic human serum albumin (HSA) study results have been presented. The detection of small concentrations of HSA isolated from blood serum and it main vibrational groups identification has been done.

  1. UV-vis and Raman spectroelectrochemical investigation of the redox behavior of poly(5-cyanoindole) in acidic aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbi, H; Billaud, D; Louarn, G; Pron, A

    2000-03-01

    Spectroelectrochemical properties of conducting poly(5-cyanoindole) films deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) and platinum electrodes are investigated using UV-vis and resonant Raman spectroscopies. The transitions from undoped to semi-conducting state of P5CN require the partial oxidation of the polymer to create radical-cations by insertion of charge-neutralizing anions into the polymer. In order to obtain detailed structural information from the vibrational spectra, it is necessary to know the vibrational modes of oxidation-sensitive bands. Vibrational assignments were made on the basis of the results obtained on polyindole and P5CN in acetonitrile solution. The drastic changes in optical absorption and Raman spectra observed at various stage of oxidation were explained by the conversions between at least three different structures. On the basis of the Raman spectra, we have identified the vibrational modes associated with neutral and polaronic segments. The perturbation associated with the coexistence of these polaronic segments has been described as a quinoid structure growing on the expense of the benzoid one. The results obtained indicate that the molecular properties of the conducting polymers at various stages of an oxidation are better revealed by in-situ Raman spectra than by ex-situ studies.

  2. Integrated fingerprint and high wavenumber confocal Raman spectroscopy for in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J. H.; Ilancheran, A.; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique capable of optically probing the compositional, conformational, and structural changes in the tissue associated with disease progression. The main goal of this work is to develop an integrated fingerprint (FP) and high wavenumber (HW) in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy for simultaneous FP/HW tissue Raman spectral measurements. This work further explores the potential of integrated FP/HW Raman spectroscopy developed as a diagnostic tool for in vivo detection of cervical precancer. A total of 473 in vivo integrated FP/HW Raman spectra (340 normal and 133 precancer) were acquired from 35 patients within 1 s during clinical colposcopy. The major tissue Raman peaks are noticed around 854, 937, 1001, 1095, 1253, 1313, 1445, 1654, 2946 and 3400 cm-1, related to the molecular changes (e.g., proteins, lipids, glycogen, nucleic acids, water, etc.) that accompany the dysplastic transformation of tissue. The FP (800 - 1800 cm-1), HW (2800 - 3800 cm-1) and the integrated FP/HW Raman spectra were analyzed using partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) together with the leave-one patient-out, cross-validation. The developed PLS-DA classification models and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for the FP, HW and integrated FP/HW spectroscopy further discloses that the performance of integrated FP/HW Raman spectroscopy is superior to that of all others in discriminating the dysplastic cervix. The results of this work indicate that the co-contributions of underlying rich biochemical information revealed by the complementary spectral modalities (FP and HW Raman) can improve the in vivo early diagnosis of cervical precancer at clinical colposcopy

  3. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  4. A vibration sieve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, S.A.; Denisenko, V.V.; Dzhalalov, M.G.; Kirichek, F.P.; Pitatel, Yu.A.; Prokopov, L.I.; Tikhonov, Yu.P.

    1982-01-01

    A vibration sieve is proposed which includes a vibration drive, a body and a screen installed on shock absorbers, a device for washing out the screen, and a subassembly for loading the material. To increase the operational reliability and effectiveness of the vibration sieve by improving the cleaning of the screen, the loading subassembly is equipped with a baffle with a lever which is hinged to it. The device for washing out the screen is made in the form of an electromagnet with a connecting rod, a switch and an eccentric, a friction ratchet mechanism and sprinkling systems. Here, the latter are interconnected, using a connecting rod, while the sprinkling system is installed on rollers under the screen. The electromagnetic switch is installed under the lever. The body is made with grooves for installing the sprinkling system. The vibration sieve is equipped with a switch which interacts with the connecting rod. The friction ratchet mechanism is equipped with a lug.

  5. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  6. Vibrational Spectroscopic Techniques for Probing Bioelectrochemical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Philip A; Vincent, Kylie A

    A more complete understanding of bioelectrochemical interfaces is of increasing importance in both fundamental studies and biotechnological applications of proteins. Bioelectrochemical methods provide detailed information about the activity or rate of a process, but in situ spectroscopic methods are needed to gain direct structural insight into functionally relevant states. A number of methods have been reported that allow electrochemical and spectroscopic data to be collected from the same electrode, providing direct spectroscopic 'snapshots' of protein function, and here we focus on the application of infrared and Raman spectroscopies to the study of electrode-immobilised species. The ability to probe coordination at metal centres, protonation changes in amino acid side chains, reaction-induced changes in organic cofactors or substrates, protein orientation and subtle changes in protein secondary structure simultaneously, rapidly and at room temperature means that vibrational spectroscopic approaches are almost uniquely applicable to answering a wide range of questions in bioelectrochemistry.

  7. Temperature dependence of low-frequency polarized Raman scattering spectra in TlInS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paucar, Raul; Wakita, Kazuki [Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Shim, YongGu; Mimura, Kojiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan); Alekperov, Oktay; Mamedov, Nazim [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-06-15

    In this work, we examined phase transitions in the layered ternary thallium chalcogenide TlInS{sub 2} by studying the temperature dependence of polarized Raman spectra with the aid of the Raman confocal microscope system. The Raman spectra were measured over the temperature range of 77-320 K (which includes the range of successive phase transitions) in the low-frequency region of 35-180 cm{sup -1}. The optical phonons that showed strong temperature dependence were identified as interlayer vibrations related to phase transitions, while the phonons that showed weak temperature dependence were identified as intralayer vibrations. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Vibrational monitor of early demineralization in tooth enamel after in vitro exposure to phosphoridic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Adachi, Tetsuya; Gasparutti, Isabella; Vincini, Giulio; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Rondinella, Alfredo; Marin, Elia; Ichioka, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Kanamura, Narisato

    2017-02-01

    The Raman spectroscopic method has been applied to quantitatively assess the in vitro degree of demineralization in healthy human teeth. Based on previous evaluations of Raman selection rules (empowered by an orientation distribution function (ODF) statistical algorithm) and on a newly proposed analysis of phonon density of states (PDOS) for selected vibrational modes of the hexagonal structure of hydroxyapatite, a molecular-scale evaluation of the demineralization process upon in vitro exposure to a highly acidic beverage (i.e., CocaCola™ Classic, pH = 2.5) could be obtained. The Raman method proved quite sensitive and spectroscopic features could be directly related to an increase in off-stoichiometry of the enamel surface structure since the very early stage of the demineralization process (i.e., when yet invisible to other conventional analytical techniques). The proposed Raman spectroscopic algorithm might possess some generality for caries risk assessment, allowing a prompt non-contact diagnostic practice in dentistry.

  9. Micro-Raman spectroscopy on oral tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenone, F.; Lepore, M.; Perna, G.; Carmone, P.; Riccio, R.; Gaeta, G. M.; Capozzi, V.

    2006-02-01

    Micro-Raman Spectroscopy (μ-RS) provides a unique tool in medicine for a not invasive and real time analysis of biological tissue for biopsy and "in vivo" investigation. Based on the evaluation of molecular vibration frequencies, the μ-RS is able to detect the main molecular bonds of protein constituents, as the C-H and C-C ones. Changes in frequency or in the relative intensity of the vibration modes revealed by μ-RS can be related to changes of chemical bond and of protein structure induced by pathology. The μ-RS has been performed on samples of oral tissue from informed patients, affected by pemphigus vulgaris (an oral pathology) in an advanced regression state. The biopsies were thin slices (about 1mm thick) with 6mm diameter. The sample was measured through a 170 μm thick cover-glass. The experimental set-up was mainly composed by a He-Ne laser and a monochromator equipped with a Peltier cell and with a grating of 1800 grooves/mm. The laser light was focused on the sample surface by means of a long focal length 50X optical objective. The main protein bonds are clearly detectable in the considered samples and this give important information on the integrity and on the state of tissue components (lipids and proteins), and consequently on the occurrence of pathology. The potential application of this method for in vivo analysis is an invaluable alternative to biopsy and pathological examinations for many medical application as screening diagnostic, therapy progress examination, and surgical support.

  10. DFT-Assisted Polymorph Identification from Lattice Raman Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya-Martínez, Natalia; Schrode, Benedikt; Jones, Andrew O F; Salzillo, Tommaso; Ruzié, Christian; Demitri, Nicola; Geerts, Yves H; Venuti, Elisabetta; Della Valle, Raffaele Guido; Zojer, Egbert; Resel, Roland

    2017-08-03

    A combined experimental and theoretical approach, consisting of lattice phonon Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, is proposed as a tool for lattice dynamics characterization and polymorph phase identification. To illustrate the reliability of the method, the lattice phonon Raman spectra of two polymorphs of the molecule 2,7-dioctyloxy[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene are investigated. We show that DFT calculations of the lattice vibrations based on the known crystal structures, including many-body dispersion van der Waals (MBD-vdW) corrections, predict experimental data within an accuracy of ≪5 cm -1 (≪0.6 meV). Due to the high accuracy of the simulations, they can be used to unambiguously identify different polymorphs and to characterize the nature of the lattice vibrations and their relationship to the structural properties. More generally, this work implies that DFT-MBD-vdW is a promising method to describe also other physical properties that depend on lattice dynamics like charge transport.

  11. Structure, IR and Raman spectra of phosphotrihydrazide studied by DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furer, V L; Vandyukov, A E; Majoral, J P; Caminade, A M; Kovalenko, V I

    2016-09-05

    The FTIR and FT Raman measurements of the phosphotrihydrazide (S)P[N(Me)-NH2]3 have been performed. This compound is a zero generation dendrimer G0 with terminal amine groups. Structural optimization and normal mode analysis were obtained for G0 by the density functional theory (DFT). Optimized geometric bond length and angles obtained by DFT show good agreement with experiment. The amine terminal groups are characterized by the well-defined bands at 3321, 3238, 1614cm(-1) in the experimental IR spectrum and by bands at 3327, 3241cm(-1) in the Raman spectrum of G0. The experimental frequencies of asymmetric and symmetric NH2 stretching vibrations of amine group are lower than theoretical values due to intramolecular NH⋯S hydrogen bond. This hydrogen bond is also responsible for higher experimental infrared intensity of these bands as compared with theoretical values. Relying on DFT calculations a complete vibrational assignment is proposed for the studied dendrimer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  14. Spontaneous wave packet reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    There are taken into account the main conceptual difficulties met by standard quantum mechanics in dealing with physical processes involving macroscopic system. It is stressed how J.A.Wheeler's remarks and lucid analysis have been relevant to pinpoint and to bring to its extreme consequences the puzzling aspects of quantum phenomena. It is shown how the recently proposed models of spontaneous dynamical reduction represent a consistent way to overcome the conceptual difficulties of the standard theory. Obviously, many nontrivial problems remain open, the first and more relevant one being that of generalizing the model theories considered to the relativistic case. This is the challenge of the dynamical reduction program. 43 refs, 2 figs

  15. Structural analysis of the antimalarial drug halofantrine by means of Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the antimalarial drug halofantrine is analyzed by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, IR, and Raman spectroscopy. Strong, selective enhancements of the Raman bands of halofantrine at 1621 and 1590 cm(-1) are discovered by means of UV resonance Raman spectroscopy with excitation wavelength lambda(exc)=244 nm. These signal enhancements can be exploited for a localization of small concentrations of halofantrine in a biological environment. The Raman spectrum of halofantrine is calculated by means of DFT calculations [B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p)]. The calculation is very useful for a thorough mode assignment of the Raman bands of halofantrine. The strong bands at 1621 and 1590 cm(-1) in the UV Raman spectrum are assigned to combined C[Double Bond]C stretching vibrations in the phenanthrene ring of halofantrine. These bands are considered as putative marker bands for pipi interactions with the biological target molecules. The calculation of the electron density demonstrates a strong distribution across the phenanthrene ring of halofantrine, besides the electron withdrawing effect of the Cl and CF(3) substituents. This strong and even electron density distribution supports the hypothesis of pipi stacking as a possible mode of action of halofantrine. Complementary IR spectroscopy is performed for an investigation of vibrations of polar functional groups of the halofantrine molecule.

  16. Three-beam double stimulated Raman scatterings: Cascading configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. Jayachander; Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-03-01

    Two-beam stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) has been used in diverse label-free spectroscopy and imaging applications of live cells, biological tissues, and functional materials. Recently, we developed a theoretical framework for the three-beam double SRS processes that involve pump, Stokes, and depletion beams, where the pump-Stokes and pump-depletion SRS processes compete with each other. It was shown that the net Stokes gain signal can be suppressed by increasing the depletion beam intensity. The theoretical prediction has been experimentally confirmed recently. In the previous scheme for a selective suppression of one SRS by making it compete with another SRS, the two SRS processes occur in a parallel manner. However, there is another possibility of three-beam double SRS scheme that can be of use to suppress either Raman gain of the Stokes beam or Raman loss of the pump beam by depleting the Stokes photons with yet another SRS process induced by the pair of Stokes and another (second) Stokes beam. This three-beam double SRS process resembles a cascading energy transfer process from the pump beam to the first Stokes beam (SRS-1) and subsequently from the first Stokes beam to the second Stokes beam (SRS-2). Here, the two stimulated Raman gain-loss processes are associated with two different Raman-active vibrational modes of solute molecule. In the present theory, both the radiation and the molecules are treated quantum mechanically. We then show that the cascading-type three-beam double SRS can be described by coupled differential equations for the photon numbers of the pump and Stokes beams. From the approximate solutions as well as exact numerical calculation results for the coupled differential equations, a possibility of efficiently suppressing the stimulated Raman loss of the pump beam by increasing the second Stokes beam intensity is shown and discussed. To further prove a potential use of this scheme for developing a super-resolution SRS microscopy, we

  17. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  18. Heating by the Raman instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, K.G.; Kruer, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations are presented of the reflection and heating due to stimulated Raman backscatter of intense laser light in large regions of underdense plasma. The heated electron distribution is found to be approximately a Maxwellian of temperature (m/sub e//2)v/sub p/ 2 , where v/sub p/ is the phase velocity of the electron plasma wave. A simple model of the reflection is presented. Raman may cause a pre-heat problem with large laser fusion reactor targets

  19. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  20. Raman spectroscopy of lithographically defined graphene nanoribbons - influence of size and defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampmann, Felix; Scheuschner, Nils; Terres, Bernat; Stampfer, Christoph; Joerger, Danny; Maultzsch, Janina

    2017-01-01

    Graphene nanostructures are an important building block to make use of the properties of graphene for applications in integrated devices. It is important to study edge roughness and defects in such nanostructures for further device improvement as they become important when downscaling structures. Recent Raman studies focused mainly on the D mode to characterize the defects in graphene and graphene nanoribbons (GNR) whereas not much attention has been paid to the D' mode that is smaller in Raman intensity. In this work we show by comparison with AFM measurements of the GNR width that both defect-induced Raman modes have different scattering length scales. Furthermore the size and quality of lithographically defined GNRs can be estimated by a close analysis of the defect-induced Raman modes and the width of the well-studied 2D mode of graphene. The findings are explained by the different vibration pattern for both Raman modes and the differences in the matrix elements determining the Raman intensity, i.e. the electron-phonon coupling and the phonon density of states. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Raman spectroscopy of lithographically defined graphene nanoribbons - influence of size and defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampmann, Felix; Scheuschner, Nils [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Terres, Bernat; Stampfer, Christoph [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Joerger, Danny [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Maultzsch, Janina [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik, Department Physik, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Graphene nanostructures are an important building block to make use of the properties of graphene for applications in integrated devices. It is important to study edge roughness and defects in such nanostructures for further device improvement as they become important when downscaling structures. Recent Raman studies focused mainly on the D mode to characterize the defects in graphene and graphene nanoribbons (GNR) whereas not much attention has been paid to the D' mode that is smaller in Raman intensity. In this work we show by comparison with AFM measurements of the GNR width that both defect-induced Raman modes have different scattering length scales. Furthermore the size and quality of lithographically defined GNRs can be estimated by a close analysis of the defect-induced Raman modes and the width of the well-studied 2D mode of graphene. The findings are explained by the different vibration pattern for both Raman modes and the differences in the matrix elements determining the Raman intensity, i.e. the electron-phonon coupling and the phonon density of states. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-04-14

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution.

  3. Polarized Raman scattering of epitaxial vanadium dioxide films with low-temperature monoclinic phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Keisuke; Sawa, Akihito

    2017-07-01

    A polarized Raman scattering study was carried out on epitaxial VO2 thin films on MgF2(001) and (110) substrates to investigate the Raman symmetry and tensor elements of the phonon modes of the films in a low-temperature monoclinic phase. From the polarization angular dependence of the Raman intensity, we assigned the phonon modes at 137, 194, 310, 340, 499, 612, and 663 cm-1 to Ag symmetry and the phonon modes at 143, 262, 442, 480, 582, and 820 cm-1 to Bg symmetry. The angular-dependence measurements also revealed that two phonon modes with Ag and Bg symmetries are present at about 224 and 393 cm-1, although only a single peak was observed in the Raman spectra at around these wavenumbers. On the basis of the experimental results, we evaluated the Raman tensors of the identified phonon modes. From the Raman tensors, we found that the atomic displacements of the 194 and 340 cm-1 phonon modes are approximately perpendicular and parallel, respectively, to the V-V dimer direction. This is consistent with a previous theoretical prediction, i.e., these modes are attributable to the tilting motion and the stretching vibration of the V-V dimers, respectively.

  4. The vibrational Jahn–Teller effect in E⊗e systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapaliya, Bishnu P.; Dawadi, Mahesh B.; Ziegler, Christopher; Perry, David S., E-mail: dperry@uakron.edu

    2015-10-16

    Highlights: • The vibrational Jahn–Teller effect is documented for three E⊗e molecular systems. • The spontaneous vibrational Jahn–Teller distortion is very small. • Vibrational Jahn–Teller splittings are substantial (1–60 cm{sup −1}). • Vibrational conical intersections in CH{sub 3}OH are accessible at low energies. - Abstract: The Jahn–Teller theorem is applied in the vibrational context where degenerate high-frequency vibrational states (E) are considered as adiabatic functions of low-frequency vibrational coordinates (e). For CH{sub 3}CN and Cr(C{sub 6}H{sub 6})(CO){sub 3}, the global minimum of the non-degenerate electronic potential energy surface occurs at the C{sub 3v} geometry, but in CH{sub 3}OH, the equilibrium geometry is far from the C{sub 3v} reference geometry. In the former cases, the computed spontaneous Jahn–Teller distortion is exceptionally small. In methanol, the vibrational Jahn–Teller interaction results in the splitting of the degenerate E-type CH stretch into what have been traditionally assigned as the distinct ν{sub 2} and ν{sub 9} vibrational bands. The ab initio vibrational frequencies are fit precisely by a two-state high-order Jahn–Teller Hamiltonian (Viel and Eisfeld, 2004). The presence of vibrational conical intersections, including 7 for CH{sub 3}OH, has implications for spectroscopy, for geometric phase, and for ultrafast localized non-adiabatic energy transfer.

  5. In Situ and In Vivo Molecular Analysis by Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-06-01

    Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy is a high-speed vibrational imaging platform with the ability to visualize the chemical content of a living specimen by using molecular vibrational fingerprints. We review technical advances and biological applications of CRS microscopy. The basic theory of CRS and the state-of-the-art instrumentation of a CRS microscope are presented. We further summarize and compare the algorithms that are used to separate the Raman signal from the nonresonant background, to denoise a CRS image, and to decompose a hyperspectral CRS image into concentration maps of principal components. Important applications of single-frequency and hyperspectral CRS microscopy are highlighted. Potential directions of CRS microscopy are discussed.

  6. Solution structures of potato virus X and narcissus mosaic virus from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Robinson, David J.; Hecht, Lutz

    2002-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) and narcissus mosaic virus (NMV) were studied using vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) in order to obtain new information on the structures of their coat protein subunits. The ROA spectra of the two intact virions are very similar to each other and similar to that of to......Potato virus X (PVX) and narcissus mosaic virus (NMV) were studied using vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) in order to obtain new information on the structures of their coat protein subunits. The ROA spectra of the two intact virions are very similar to each other and similar......, suggesting that TMV contains less hydrated alpha-helix. Small differences in other spectral regions reflect differences in some loop, turn and side-chain compositions and conformations among the three viruses. A pattern recognition program based on principal component analysis of ROA spectra indicates...

  7. Studies of ground-state dynamics in isolated species by ionization-detected stimulated Raman techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    First, the author aims to develop methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. Second, the author wishes to apply such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species (molecules, complexes, and clusters) in supersonic molecular beams. In the past year, the author has made progress in several areas. The first pertains to the application of mass-selective ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS) to the size-specific vibrational spectroscopy of solute-solvent{sub n} clusters. The second involves the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The third pertains to the use of IDSRS methods in the study of intermolecular vibrational transitions in van der Waals complexes.

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS): Instrumentation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djaker, Nadia; Lenne, Pierre-Francois; Marguet, Didier; Colonna, Anne; Hadjur, Christophe; Rigneault, Herve

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in laser physics have permitted the development of a new kind of microscopy based on stimulated Raman scattering. This new technique known as Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy allows vibrational imaging with high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities. We review recent advances in CARS microscopy, with applications to chemical and biological systems. We also present an application of CARS microscopy with high optical resolution and spectral selectivity, in resolving structures in surface ex vivo stratum corneum by looking at the CH 2 stretching vibrational band. A strong CARS signal is backscattered from an intense forward generated CARS signal in thick samples. This makes noninvasive imaging of deep structures possible, without labeling or chemical treatments

  9. Raman and terahertz spectroscopical investigation of cocrystal formation process of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Zhang, Huili; Xue, Jiadan; Fang, Hongxia; Zhang, Qi; Xia, Yi; Li, Yafang; Hong, Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Cocrystallization can improve physical and chemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredient, and this feature has great potential in pharmaceutical development. In this study, the cocrystal of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid under grinding condition has been characterized by Raman and terahertz spectroscopical techniques. The major vibrational modes of individual starting components and cocrystal are obtained and assigned. Spectral results show that the vibrational modes of the cocrystal are different from those of the corresponding parent materials. The dynamic process of such pharmaceutical cocrystal formation has also been monitored directly with Raman and THz spectra. The formation rate is pretty fast in first several 20 min grinding time, and then it becomes slow. After ∼35 min, such process has been almost completed. These results offer us the unique means and benchmark for characterizing the cocrystal conformation from molecule-level and also provide us rich information about the reaction dynamic during cocrystal formation process in pharmaceutical fields.

  10. Nonequilibrium Supersonic Freestream Studied Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Cantu, Luca M.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Baurle, Rob; Danehy, Paul M.; Rockwell, Robert; Goyne, Christopher; McDaniel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Measurements were conducted at the University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility of the flow in a constant-area duct downstream of a Mach 2 nozzle. The airflow was heated to approximately 1200 K in the facility heater upstream of the nozzle. Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy was used to measure the rotational and vibrational temperatures of N2 and O2 at two planes in the duct. The expectation was that the vibrational temperature would be in equilibrium, because most scramjet facilities are vitiated air facilities and are in vibrational equilibrium. However, with a flow of clean air, the vibrational temperature of N2 along a streamline remains approximately constant between the measurement plane and the facility heater, the vibrational temperature of O2 in the duct is about 1000 K, and the rotational temperature is consistent with the isentropic flow. The measurements of N2 vibrational temperature enabled cross-stream nonuniformities in the temperature exiting the facility heater to be documented. The measurements are in agreement with computational fluid dynamics models employing separate lumped vibrational and translational/rotational temperatures. Measurements and computations are also reported for a few percent steam addition to the air. The effect of the steam is to bring the flow to thermal equilibrium, also in agreement with the computational fluid dynamics.

  11. Spontaneous compactification to homogeneous spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous compactification of extra dimensions to compact homogeneous spaces is studied. The methods developed within the framework of coset space dimensional reduction scheme and the most general form of invariant metrics are used to find solutions of spontaneous compactification equations

  12. Screening for spontaneous preterm birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, M.A.; van Dam, A.J.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is the most important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this thesis studies on spontaneous preterm birth are presented. The main objective was to investigate the predictive capacity of mid-trimester cervical length measurement for spontaneous preterm birth in a

  13. Raman effect in icosahedral boron-rich solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Werheit, Volodymyr Filipov, Udo Kuhlmann, Ulrich Schwarz, Marc Armbrüster, Andreas Leithe-Jasper, Takaho Tanaka, Iwami Higashi, Torsten Lundström, Vladimir N Gurin and Maria M Korsukova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Raman spectra of numerous icosahedral boron-rich solids having the structure of α-rhombohedral, β-rhombohedral, α-tetragonal, β-tetragonal, YB66, orthorhombic or amorphous boron. The spectra were newly measured and, in some cases, compared with reported data and discussed. We emphasize the importance of a high signal-to-noise ratio in the Raman spectra for detecting weak effects evoked by the modification of compounds, accommodation of interstitial atoms and other structural defects. Vibrations of the icosahedra, occurring in all the spectra, are interpreted using the description of modes in α-rhombohedral boron by Beckel et al. The Raman spectrum of boron carbide is largely clarified. Relative intra- and inter-icosahedral bonding forces are estimated for the different structural groups and for vanadium-doped β-rhombohedral boron. The validity of Badger's rule is demonstrated for the force constants of inter-icosahedral B–B bonds, whereas the agreement is less satisfactory for the intra-icosahedral B–B bonds.

  14. Precise determination of graphene functionalization by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecera, Philipp; Chacón-Torres, Julio C.; Pichler, Thomas; Reich, Stephanie; Soni, Himadri R.; Görling, Andreas; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The verification of a successful covalent functionalization of graphene and related carbon allotropes can easily be carried out by Raman spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the unequivocal assignment and resolution of individual lattice modes associated with the covalent binding of addends was elusive up to now. Here we present an in situ Raman study of a controlled functionalization of potassium intercalated graphite, revealing several new bands appearing in the D-region of the spectrum. The evolution of these bands with increasing degree of functionalization from low to moderate levels provides a basis for the deconvolution of the different components towards quantifying the extent of functionalization. By complementary DFT calculations we were able to identify the vibrational changes in the close proximity of the addend bearing lattice carbon atoms and to assign them to specific Raman modes. The experimental in situ observation of the developing functionalization along with the reoxidation of the intercalated graphite represents an important step towards an improved understanding of the chemistry of graphene. PMID:28480893

  15. Spermatozoa quality assessment: a combined holographic and Raman microscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Annalisa; Ferrara, Maria A.; Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Managò, Stefano; Sirleto, Luigi; Coppola, Giuseppe; De Luca, Anna Chiara

    2015-05-01

    Semen analysis is widely used as diagnostic tool for assessing male fertility, controlling and managing the animal reproduction. The most important parameters measured in a semen analysis are the morphology and biochemical alterations. For obtaining such information, non-invasive, label-free and non-destructive techniques have to be used. Digital Holography (DH) combined with Raman Spectroscopy (RS) could represent the perfect candidate for a rapid, non-destructive and high-sensitive morphological and biochemical sperm cell analysis. In this study, DH-RS combined approach is used for a complete analysis of single bovine spermatozoa. High-resolution images of bovine sperm have been obtained by DH microscopy from the reconstruction of a single acquired hologram, highlighting in some cases morphological alterations. Quantitative 3D reconstructions of sperm head, both normal and anomalous, have been studied and an unexpected structure of the post-acrosomal region of the head has been detected. Such anomalies have been also confirmed by Raman imaging analysis, suggesting the protein vibrations as associated Raman marker of the defect.

  16. Detection of hazardous chemicals using field-portable Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Cherylyn W.; Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2003-07-01

    A major challenge confronting emergency response, border control, and other security-related functions is the accurate, rapid, and safe identification of potentially hazardous chemicals outside a laboratory environment. Raman spectroscopy is a rapid, non-intrusive technique that can be used to confidently identify many classes of hazardous and potentially explosive compounds based on molecular vibration information. Advances in instrumentation now allow reliable field - portable measurements to be made. Before the Raman technique can be effectively applied and be accepted within the scientific community, realistic studies must be performed to develop methods, define limitations, and rigorously evaluate its effectiveness. Examples of a variety of chemicals (including neat and diluted chemical warfare [CW] agents, a CW agent precursor, a biological warfare (BW)-related compound, an illicit drug, and explosives) identified using Raman spectroscopy in various types of containers and on surfaces are given, as well as results from a blind field test of 29 unknown samples which included CW agent precursors and/or degradation products, solvents associated with CW agent production, pesticides, explosives, and BW toxins (mostly mycotoxins). Additionally, results of experimental studies to evaluate the analysis of flammable organic solvents, propellants, military explosives, mixtures containing military explosives, shock-sensitive explosives, and gun powders are described with safety guidelines. Spectral masks for screening unknown samples for explosives and nerve agents are given.

  17. Rapid surface enhanced Raman scattering detection method for chloramphenicol residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Yao, Weirong

    2015-06-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is a widely used amide alcohol antibiotics, which has been banned from using in food producing animals in many countries. In this study, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with gold colloidal nanoparticles was used for the rapid analysis of CAP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted with Gaussian 03 at the B3LYP level using the 3-21G(d) and 6-31G(d) basis sets to analyze the assignment of vibrations. Affirmatively, the theoretical Raman spectrum of CAP was in complete agreement with the experimental spectrum. They both exhibited three strong peaks characteristic of CAP at 1104 cm-1, 1344 cm-1, 1596 cm-1, which were used for rapid qualitative analysis of CAP residues in food samples. The use of SERS as a method for the measurements of CAP was explored by comparing use of different solvents, gold colloidal nanoparticles concentration and absorption time. The method of the detection limit was determined as 0.1 μg/mL using optimum conditions. The Raman peak at 1344 cm-1 was used as the index for quantitative analysis of CAP in food samples, with a linear correlation of R2 = 0.9802. Quantitative analysis of CAP residues in foods revealed that the SERS technique with gold colloidal nanoparticles was sensitive and of a good stability and linear correlation, and suited for rapid analysis of CAP residue in a variety of food samples.

  18. Infrared and NIR Raman spectroscopy in medical microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Dieter

    1998-04-01

    FTIR and FT-NIR Raman spectra of intact microbial cells are highly specific, fingerprint-like signatures which can be used to (i) discriminate between diverse microbial species and strains, (ii) detect in situ intracellular components or structures such as inclusion bodies, storage materials or endospores, (iii) detect and quantify metabolically released CO2 in response to various different substrate, and (iv) characterize growth-dependent phenomena and cell-drug interactions. The characteristic information is extracted from the spectral contours by applying resolution enhancement techniques, difference spectroscopy, and pattern recognition methods such as factor-, cluster-, linear discriminant analysis, and artificial neural networks. Particularly interesting applications arise by means of a light microscope coupled to the spectrometer. FTIR spectra of micro-colonies containing less than 103 cells can be obtained from colony replica by a stamping technique that transfers micro-colonies growing on culture plates to a special IR-sample holder. Using a computer controlled x, y- stage together with mapping and video techniques, the fundamental tasks of microbiological analysis, namely detection, enumeration, and differentiation of micro- organisms can be integrated in one single apparatus. FTIR and NIR-FT-Raman spectroscopy can also be used in tandem to characterize medically important microorganisms. Currently novel methodologies are tested to take advantage of the complementary information of IR and Raman spectra. Representative examples on medically important microorganisms will be given that highlight the new possibilities of vibrational spectroscopies.

  19. Searching for brine on Mars using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    2016-07-01

    In the last few years, water ice and perchlorate salts capable of melting this ice and producing liquid solutions have been discovered at the surface and shallow subsurface of Mars. In addition to via melting of ice, perchlorate salts may also form liquid solutions by absorbing water vapor when the relative humidity is above a certain threshold in a process known as deliquescence. Formed either by melting or deliquescence, liquid solutions (brine) are the most likely way of liquid water activity on the Martian surface and in the shallow subsurface and are therefore important to understand the habitability of Mars. Using Raman spectroscopy, we provide reference spectra of various mixing states of liquid water, water ice and calcium perchlorate, all of which can occur during brine formation. We focus on the perchlorate symmetric stretching band and the O-H stretching vibrational band to distinguish brine from crystalline salt and water ice. We show that perchlorate brines can be identified by analyzing the peaks and their widths in the decomposed Raman spectra of the investigated samples. This serves as an important reference for future in-situ Raman spectrometers on Mars, such as those on the ExoMars and Mars 2020 rovers and can aid in the detection of brine formation on Mars. (Author)

  20. Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy of Individual Cells andCellular Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Fore, S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Huser, T

    2008-05-15

    Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to non-destructively analyze chemical concentrations on the submicron length scale in individual cells without the need for optical labels. This enables the rapid assessment of cellular biochemistry inside living cells, and it allows for their continuous analysis to determine cellular response to external events. Here, we review recent developments in the analysis of single cells, subcellular compartments, and chemical imaging based on Raman spectroscopic techniques. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy provides for the full spectral assessment of cellular biochemistry, while coherent Raman techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is primarily used as an imaging tool comparable to confocal fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are complemented by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which provides higher sensitivity and local specificity, and also extends the techniques to chemical indicators, i.e. pH sensing. We review the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, demonstrate some of their applications and discuss their potential for future research in cell biology and biomedicine.

  1. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: Hamman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushank Chadha, BS

    2018-04-01

    significant fat stranding. The image also showed an intraluminal stent traversing the gastric antrum and gastric pylorus with no indication of obstruction. Circumferential mural thickening of the gastric antrum and body were consistent with the patient’s history of gastric adenocarcinoma. The shotty perigastric lymph nodes with associated fat stranding, along the greater curvature of the distal gastric body suggested local regional nodal metastases and possible peritoneal carcinomatosis. The thoracic CT scans showed extensive pneumomediastinum that tracked into the soft tissues of the neck, which given the history of vomiting also raised concern for esophageal perforation. There was still no evidence of mediastinal abscess or fat stranding. Additionally, a left subclavian vein port catheter, which terminates with tip at the cavoatrial junction of the superior vena cava can also be seen on the image. Discussion: Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum, also known as Hamman syndrome, is defined by the uncommon incidence of free air in the mediastinum due to the bursting of alveoli, as a result of extended spells of shouting, coughing, or vomiting.1,2 The condition is diagnosed when a clear cause (aerodigestive rupture, barotrauma, infection secondary to gas-forming organisms3 for pneumomediastinum cannot be clearly identified on diagnostic studies. Macklin and Macklin were the first to note the pathogenesis of the syndrome and explained that the common denominator to spontaneous pneumomediastinum was that increased alveolar pressure leads to alveolar rupture.3 Common clinical findings for spontaneous pneumomediastinum include: chest pain, dyspnea, cough, and emesis.4 The condition is not always readily recognized on initial presentation in part for its rare incidence, estimated to be approximately 1 in every 44,500 ED patients3and also because of the non-specific presenting symptoms. For this patient, there was no clear singular cause, and therefore she received care for spontaneous

  2. UV Excited Photoacoustic Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J. Chance [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chambers, David H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Steele, Paul T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haugen, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heller, Don [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-11-15

    To summarize, our efforts and findings are as follows: we analyzed the theoretical system performance using known PARS theory coupled with an acoustic detector model to estimate the expected signal-­to-noise ratio (SNR). The system model comprised a mathematical model of the Raman process leading to a prediction of the temperature change in the active region; a thermoacoustic gas prediction of the radiated pressure field (amplitude and pulse shape); and the receiver response for an acoustic microphone, including a simple model of the receiver circuitry (filters, integrators, etc.). Based on the PARS experimental parameters in Appendix B, the model predicted a PARS signal with pressure peak of 7 Pa and duration slightly longer than 2 ms at a distance of 7 mm from the focal spot when acoustic dissipation is not included. An analytical model of a PARS signal with acoustic dissipation was constructed but the numerical calculation is limited to gains of <1% of the experimental value. For these lower gains, the model predicts spreading of the signal.

  3. Enhanced Raman Monitor Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenskow, Dwayne

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous contaminants stems from the need to ensure a healthy and safe environment. NASA/Ames needs sensors that are able to monitor common atmospheric gas concentrations as well as trace amounts of contaminant gases. To provide an accurate assessment of air quality, a monitoring system would need to be continuous and on-line with full spectrum capabilities, allowing simultaneous detection of all gas components in a sample, including both combustible and non-combustible gases. The system demands a high degree of sensitivity to detect low gas concentrations in the low-ppm and sub-ppm regions. For clean and healthy air ('good' category), criteria established by the EPA requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 4 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) in an 8 hour period, 60 ppb of ozone(O3) in a one hour period and 30 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a 24 hour period. One step below this is the National Ambient Air Quality Standard ('moderate' category) which requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 9 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO), 120 ppb of ozone (O3) and 140 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) for their respective time periods. Ideally a monitor should be able to detect the concentrations specified in the 'good' category. To benchmark current abilities of Raman technology in gas phase analysis, laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the RASCAL II anesthetic gas monitor.

  4. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  5. Resonant X-ray Raman scattering on molecules: A benchmark study on HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carniato, Stephane; Taieb, Richard; Journel, Loic; Guillemin, Renaud; Stolte, Wayne C.; Lindle, Dennis W.; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Simon, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Resonant X-ray Raman scattering is a powerful tool to study molecular dynamics and subtle chemical effects like the molecular field beyond vibrational and lifetime limitations. Using this technique in the tender X-ray region, gas phase HCl is studied as a benchmark molecule for other compounds like freons, which play an important role in physical-chemical properties of the ozone layer of atmosphere.

  6. Resonant X-ray Raman scattering on molecules: A benchmark study on HCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carniato, Stephane [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Taieb, Richard, E-mail: richard.taieb@upmc.f [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Journel, Loic; Guillemin, Renaud [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Stolte, Wayne C.; Lindle, Dennis W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4003 (United States); Gel' mukhanov, Faris [Theoretical Chemistry, Roslagstullsbacken 15, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Simon, Marc [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-08-15

    Resonant X-ray Raman scattering is a powerful tool to study molecular dynamics and subtle chemical effects like the molecular field beyond vibrational and lifetime limitations. Using this technique in the tender X-ray region, gas phase HCl is studied as a benchmark molecule for other compounds like freons, which play an important role in physical-chemical properties of the ozone layer of atmosphere.

  7. Regime for a Self-ionizing Raman Laser Amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.S.; Fisch, N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Backward Raman amplification and compression at high power might occur if a long pumping laser pulse is passed through a plasma to interact resonantly with a counter-propagating short seed pulse [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 4448-4451]. One critical issue, however, is that the pump may be unacceptably depleted due to spontaneous Raman backscatter from intrinsic fluctuations in the amplifying plasma medium prior to its useful interaction with the seed. Premature backscatter may be avoided, however, by employing a gaseous medium with pump intensities too low to ionize the medium, and using the intense seed to produce the plasma by rapid photoionization as it is being amplified [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Plasmas (2001)]. In addition to allowing that only rather low power pumps be used, photoionization introduces a damping of the short pulse which must be overcome by the Raman growth rate for net amplification to occur. The parameter space of gas densities, laser wavelengths, and laser intensities is surveyed to identify favorable regimes for this effect. Output laser intensities of 10(superscript ''17'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') for 0.5 mm radiation are found to be feasible for such a scheme using a pump of 10(superscript ''13'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') and an initial seed of 5 x 10(superscript ''14'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') over an amplification length of 5.6 cm in hydrogen gas

  8. Vibration transducer calibration techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, D. J.

    1980-09-01

    Techniques for the calibration of vibration transducers used in the Aeronautical Quality Assurance Directorate of the British Ministry of Defence are presented. Following a review of the types of measurements necessary in the calibration of vibration transducers, the performance requirements of vibration transducers, which can be used to measure acceleration, velocity or vibration amplitude, are discussed, with particular attention given to the piezoelectric accelerometer. Techniques for the accurate measurement of sinusoidal vibration amplitude in reference-grade transducers are then considered, including the use of a position sensitive photocell and the use of a Michelson laser interferometer. Means of comparing the output of working-grade accelerometers with that of previously calibrated reference-grade devices are then outlined, with attention given to a method employing a capacitance bridge technique and a method to be used at temperatures between -50 and 200 C. Automatic calibration procedures developed to speed up the calibration process are outlined, and future possible extensions of system software are indicated.

  9. Proceedings of the national conference on exploring the frontiers of vibrational spectroscopy: abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopy has played and is playing a very important role as it is one of the most efficient methods of molecular structure studies with the help of which direct information about the chemical compounds can be obtained. Spectroscopy has its contribution in a number of branches in areas such as medicine, industry, environment, agriculture, power, construction, forensic analysis (both criminal and civil cases), etc., where it has revolutionized the very face of these sectors. Vibrational spectroscopic (Infrared and Raman) techniques have demonstrated potential to provide non-destructive, rapid clinically relevant diagnostic information. Raman and infrared spectroscopy enable the biochemical signatures from biological tissues to be extracted and analyzed there by advancing the treatment of cancer. Advancement in instrumentation has allowed the development of numerous infrared and Raman spectroscopic methods. Infrared spectroscopy is tremendously used in the fields of pharmaceuticals. medical diagnostics food and agrochemical quality control, and combustion research. Raman spectroscopy is used in condensed matter physics, biomedicinal fields for tissue analysis and chemistry to study vibrational, rotational, and other low-frequency modes in a system. Keeping in mind the fast development: in the Spectroscopy, we have planned to organize a national level conference for 2 days on 'Exploring the Frontiers of Vibrational Spectroscopy' to bring out the tremendous potential of various Spectroscopic techniques available at the global level. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. Continuous temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy of melamine and structural analog detection in milk powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Walter F; Broadhurst, C Leigh; Qin, Jianwei; Lee, Hoyoung; Nguyen, Julie K; Chao, Kuanglin; Hapeman, Cathleen J; Shelton, Daniel R; Kim, Moon S

    2015-03-01

    Hyperspectral Raman imaging has the potential for rapid screening of solid-phase samples for potential adulterants. We can improve mixture analysis algorithms by defining a temperature range in which the contaminant spectrum changes dramatically and uniquely compared with unadulterated material. Raman spectra were acquired for urea, biuret, cyanuric acid, and melamine (pure and at 1% in dried milk powder) from 50 to 310 °C with a gradient of 1 °C min(-1). Adulterants were clearly indentified in the milk powder. Specific frequencies that were mainly associated with ring breathing, stretching, and in-plane deformation shifted with respect to temperature up to 12 cm(-1) in all four molecules. Specific frequencies significantly increased/decreased in intensity within narrow temperature ranges independent of whether the amine was mixed in milk. Correlation of Raman and differential scanning calorimetry data identified structural components and vibrational modes, which concur with or trigger phase transitions.

  11. Raman lidar for hydrogen gas concentration monitoring and future radioactive waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liméry, Anasthase; Cézard, Nicolas; Fleury, Didier; Goular, Didier; Planchat, Christophe; Bertrand, Johan; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2017-11-27

    A multi-channel Raman lidar has been developed, allowing for the first time simultaneous and high-resolution profiling of hydrogen gas and water vapor. The lidar measures vibrational Raman scattering in the UV (355 nm) domain. It works in a high-bandwidth photon counting regime using fast SiPM detectors and takes into account the spectral overlap between hydrogen and water vapor Raman spectra. Measurement of concentration profiles of H 2 and H 2 O are demonstrated along a 5-meter-long open gas cell with 1-meter resolution at 85 meters. The instrument precision is investigated by numerical simulation to anticipate the potential performance at longer range. This lidar could find applications in the French project Cigéo for monitoring radioactive waste disposal cells.

  12. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) differentiation study by confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Collart-Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine brings a huge application for Mesenchymal stem cells such as Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label free , real time and high spatial resolution imaging technique is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800-3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and 960 cm-1 peak (phosphate PO4 3-) were collected. In Dental Pulp Stem Cells 21st day differentiated in buffer solution, phosphate peaks ν1 PO4 3- (first vibrational mode) at 960cm-1 and ν2 PO4 3- at 430cm-1 and ν4 PO4 3- at 585cm-1 are obviously present. Confocal Raman microscopy enables the detection of cell differentiation and it can be used to investigate clinical stem cell research.

  13. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin on the millisecond timescale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terner, J.; Campion, A.; El-Sayed, M.A.

    1977-12-01

    A simple technique is described that uses a continuous wave laser with electromechanical modulation to obtain time-resolved Raman spectra of transient species on the millisecond timescale. The time behavior of the vibrational bands of the intermediates involved in the proton pumping of bacteriorhodopsin is determined. From these results, along with resonance enhancement and power dependence studies, the bands that appear in the continuous wave Raman spectrum of bacteriorhodopsin can be assigned to three intermediates in the photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin, bR/sub 570/, bL/sub 550/, and bM/sub 412/. The Raman spectra of bR/sub 570/ and bM/sub 412/ are compared with published spectra of model Schiff bases of all-trans and 13-cis retinal.

  14. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Yttrium Aluminum Borate Glasses and Glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J.; Brooks, M.; Crenshaw, T.; Morris, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Morgan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Raman spectra of glasses and glass-ceramics in the Y2O3-Al2O3-B2O3 system are reported. Glasses with B2O3 contents ranging from 40 to 60 mole percent were prepared by melting 20 g of the appropriate oxide or carbonate powders in alumina crucibles at 1400 C for 45 minutes. Subsequent heat treatments of the glasses at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C were performed in order to induce nucleation and crystallization. It was found that Na2CO3 added to the melt served as a nucleating agent and resulted in uniform bulk crystallization. The Raman spectra of the glasses are interpreted primarily in terms of vibrations of boron - oxygen structural groups. Comparison of the Raman spectra of the glass-ceramic samples with spectra of aluminate and borate crystalline materials reveal that these glasses crystallize primarily as yttrium aluminum borate, YAl3(BO3)4.

  15. Raman studies of pressure and temperature induced phase transformations in calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exarhos, G.J.; Hess, N.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes phase stability in the calcium carbonate system investigated as a simultaneous function of pressure and temperature up to 40 kbar and several hundred degrees Kelvin. Micro-Raman techniques were used to interrogate samples constrained within a resistively heated diamond anvil cell. Measured spectra allow unequivocal identification of crystalline phases and are used to refine the P,T phase diagram. Calcium carbonate was found to exhibit both reversible and irreversible transformation phenomena among the four known phases which exist under these conditions. Time-dependent Raman intensity variations as the material is perturbed from its equilibrium state allow real-time kinetics measurements to be performed. Evidence suggests that the order of certain observed transformations may be pressure dependent. The utility of Raman spectroscopy to follow transformation phenomena and to estimate fundamental thermophysical properties from the stress dependence of vibrational mode frequencies is demonstrated

  16. Tunable optical setup with high flexibility for spectrally resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, G; Akimov, D; Bartelt, H; Dietzek, B; Popp, J; Schlücker, S

    2011-01-01

    A simplified setup for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is introduced, which allows for recording CARS images with 30 cm -1 excitation bandwidth for probing Raman bands between 500 and 900 cm -1 with minimal requirements for alignment. The experimental arrangement is based on electronic switching between CARS images recorded at different Raman resonances by combining a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as broadband light source and an acousto-optical programmable dispersive filter (AOPDF) as tunable wavelength filter. Such spatial light modulator enables selection of a narrow-band spectrum to yield high vibrational contrast and hence chemical contrast in the resultant CARS images. Furthermore, an experimental approach to reconstruct spectral information from CARS image contrast is introduced

  17. Raman and infrared spectroscopy of carbohydrates: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiercigroch, Ewelina; Szafraniec, Ewelina; Czamara, Krzysztof; Pacia, Marta Z.; Majzner, Katarzyna; Kochan, Kamila; Kaczor, Agnieszka; Baranska, Malgorzata; Malek, Kamilla

    2017-10-01

    Carbohydrates are widespread and naturally occurring compounds, and essential constituents for living organisms. They are quite often reported when biological systems are studied and their role is discussed. However surprisingly, up till now there is no database collecting vibrational spectra of carbohydrates and their assignment, as has been done already for other biomolecules. So, this paper serves as a comprehensive review, where for selected 14 carbohydrates in the solid state both FT-Raman and ATR FT-IR spectra were collected and assigned. Carbohydrates can be divided into four chemical groups and in the same way is organized this review. First, the smallest molecules are discussed, i.e. monosaccharides (D-(-)-ribose, 2-deoxy-D-ribose, L-(-)-arabinose, D-(+)-xylose, D-(+)-glucose, D-(+)-galactose and D-(-)-fructose) and disaccharides (D-(+)-sucrose, D-(+)-maltose and D-(+)-lactose), and then more complex ones, i.e. trisaccharides (D-(+)-raffinose) and polysaccharides (amylopectin, amylose, glycogen). Both Raman and IR spectra were collected in the whole spectral range and discussed looking at the specific regions, i.e. region V (3600-3050 cm- 1), IV (3050-2800 cm- 1) and II (1200-800 cm- 1) assigned to the stretching vibrations of the OH, CH/CH2 and C-O/C-C groups, respectively, and region III (1500-1200 cm- 1) and I (800-100 cm- 1) dominated by deformational modes of the CH/CH2 and CCO groups, respectively. In spite of the fact that vibrational spectra of saccharides are significantly less specific than spectra of other biomolecules (e.g. lipids or proteins), marker bands of the studied molecules can be identified and correlated with their structure.

  18. Ab initio MO calculations on the Structure and Raman and Infrared Spectra of the [Al4O2Cl10]2- oxide species in chloroaluminate melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    2007-01-01

    system of staggered (approximate D3d symmetry), in analogy with the linear Al-O-Al geometry of the analogous [Al2OF6]2- ion, found previously. The calculations included determination of the vibrational harmonic normal modes and the infrared and Raman spectra, (vibrational band wavenumbers and intensities......), without any empiric adjustments of the harmonic force constants, using constants directly predicted from the Gaussian 03W program. Previously obtained IR absorption and Raman scattering spectra of melts are assigned, by comparing to the ab initio quantum mechanical vibrational analysis results....... It is concluded that the small oxide content commonly found in basic and neutral tetrachloroaluminate melts, most probably consist of [Al4O2Cl10]2- ions and the vibrational spectra are given....

  19. Diagnosing basal cell carcinoma in vivo by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy: a Principal Components Analysis discrimination algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Silveira, Fabrício L.; Bodanese, Benito; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T.; Zângaro, Renato A.

    2012-02-01

    This work demonstrated the discrimination among basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and normal human skin in vivo using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained in the suspected lesion prior resectional surgery. After tissue withdrawn, biopsy fragments were submitted to histopathology. Spectra were also obtained in the adjacent, clinically normal skin. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm) with a fiber Raman probe. By comparing the mean spectra of BCC with the normal skin, it has been found important differences in the 800-1000 cm-1 and 1250-1350 cm-1 (vibrations of C-C and amide III, respectively, from lipids and proteins). A discrimination algorithm based on Principal Components Analysis and Mahalanobis distance (PCA/MD) could discriminate the spectra of both tissues with high sensitivity and specificity.

  20. In Vivo Fiber-Optic Raman Mapping Of Metastases In Mouse Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelling, A.; Kirsch, M.; Steiner, G.; Krafft, C.; Schackert, G.; Salzer, R.

    2010-08-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy, in particular Raman spectroscopy, has potential applications in the field of in vivo diagnostics. Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy analyze the complete biochemical information at any given pixel within the visual field. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of performing Raman spectroscopic measurements on living mice brains using a fiber-optic probe with a nominal spatial resolution of 60 μm. The objectives of this study were to 1) evaluate preclinical models, namely murine brain slices containing experimental tumors, 2) optimize the preparation of pristine brain tissue to obtain reference information, to 3) optimize the conditions for introducing a fiber-optic probe to acquire Raman maps in vivo, and 4) to transfer results obtained from human brain tumors to an animal model. Disseminated brain metastases of malignant melanomas were induced by injecting tumor cells into the carotid artery of mice. The procedure mimicked hematogenous tumor spread in one brain hemisphere while the other hemisphere remained tumor free. Three series of sections were prepared consecutively from whole mouse brains: pristine, 2-mm thick sections for Raman mapping and dried, thin sections for FT-IR imaging, hematoxylin and eosin-stained thin sections for histopathological assessment. Raman maps were collected serially using a spectrometer coupled to a fiber-optic probe. FT-IR images were recorded using a spectrometer with a multi-channel detector. The FT-IR images and the Raman maps were evaluated by multivariate data analysis. The results obtained from the thin section studies were employed to guide measurements of murine brains in vivo. Raman maps with an acquisition time of over an hour could be performed on the living animals. No damage to the tissue was observed.

  1. Synthesis, FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, ab initio and DFT studies on benzohydrazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Rani, T; Mythili, C V; Mohan, S

    2011-08-01

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of benzohydrazide (BH) has been carried out by using FTIR and FT-Raman spectral data. The vibrational analysis were aided by electronic structure calculations--ab initio (RHF) and hybrid density functional methods (B3LYP and B3PW91) performed with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, IR intensities, harmonic vibrational frequencies, depolarization ratios and Raman activities have been computed. Potential energy distribution (PED) and normal mode analysis have also been performed. The assignments proposed based on the experimental IR and Raman spectra have been reviewed and complete assignment of the observed spectra have been proposed. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and λ(max) were determined by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method. The geometrical, thermodynamical parameters and absorption wavelengths were compared with the experimental data. The interactions of carbonyl and hydrazide groups on the benzene ring skeletal modes were investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vibrations in orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, L D; Thorne, G C

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of various mechanical properties of skeletal material using vibration techniques have been reported. The purposes of such investigations include the monitoring of pathogenic disorders such as osteoporosis, the rate and extent of fracture healing, and the status of internal fixations. Early investigations pioneered the application of conventional vibration measurement equipment to biological systems. The more recent advent of the microcomputer has made available to research groups more sophisticated techniques for data acquisition and analysis. The economical advantages of such equipment has led to the development of portable research instrumentation which lends itself to use in a clinical environment. This review article reports on the developments and progression of the various vibrational techniques and theories as applied to musculoskeletal systems.

  3. Thermal noise and the incessant vibration of the outer hair cells in the cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fritze

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The continual exposure of outer hair cells (OHCs to thermal noise causes vibrations in resonant frequency. As these vibrations are backprojected, they should be recordable as audiofrequencies in the outer ear canal. But even though they are likely to be amplified in some areas by clustering in terms of the chaos theory, they cannot be picked up in the outer ear canal by currently available recording technologies. Conditions change in the presence of pathology, e.g. loss of OHCs and fibrous replacement: Clusters grow in size and amplitudes become larger so that the vibrations can be picked up as spontaneous oto-acoustic emissions (SOAEs in the outer ear canal. Efforts are needed to demonstrate the presence of physiological OHC vibrations (emission by incessant vibration, EIV by processing auditory recordings with statistical methods.

  4. Initial excited-state structural dynamics of 9-methyladenine from UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladepo, Sulayman A; Loppnow, Glen R

    2011-05-19

    The photophysics and photochemistry of nucleobases are the factors governing the photostability of DNA and RNA, since they are the UV chromophores in nucleic acids. Because the formation of photoproducts involves structural changes in the excited electronic state, we study here the initial excited-state structural dynamics of 9-methyladenine (9-MeA) by using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy. UV resonance Raman intensities are sensitive to the initial excited-state structural dynamics of molecules. Therefore, information about the initial structural changes in the excited-state of a given molecule can be obtained from its UVRR intensities. The resonance Raman spectra of 9-MeA at wavelengths throughout its 262 nm absorption band were measured, and a self-consistent analysis of the resulting resonance Raman excitation profiles and absorption spectrum was performed using a time-dependent wave packet formalism. We found that the initial structural dynamics of this molecule primarily lie along the N3C4, C4C5, C5C6, C5N7, N7C8, and C8N9 stretching vibrations and CH(3) deformation vibrations. These results are discussed in the context of photochemistry and other deactivation processes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. First principles study of vibrational dynamics of ceria-titania hybrid clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid, Abdul, E-mail: abdulmajid40@yahoo.com; Bibi, Maryam [University of Gujrat, Department of Physics (Pakistan)

    2017-04-15

    Density functional theory based calculations were performed to study vibrational properties of ceria, titania, and ceria-titania hybrid clusters. The findings revealed the dominance of vibrations related to oxygen when compared to those of metallic atoms in the clusters. In case of hybrid cluster, the softening of normal modes related to exterior oxygen atoms in ceria and softening/hardening of high/low frequency modes related to titania dimmers are observed. The results calculated for monomers conform to symmetry predictions according to which three IR and three Raman active modes were detected for TiO{sub 2}, whereas two IR active and one Raman active modes were observed for CeO{sub 2}. The comparative analysis indicates that the hybrid cluster CeTiO{sub 4} contains simultaneous vibrational fingerprints of the component dimmers. The symmetry, nature of vibrations, IR and Raman activity, intensities, and atomic involvement in different modes of the clusters are described in detail. The study points to engineering of CeTiO{sub 4} to tailor its properties for technological visible region applications in photocatalytic and electrochemical devices.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopic study of poldervaartite CaCa[SiO3(OH)(OH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the mineral poldervaartite CaCa[SiO3(OH)(OH)] which forms a series with its manganese analogue olmiite CaMn[SiO3(OH)](OH) using a range of techniques including scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows the mineral is reasonably pure and contains only calcium and manganese with low amounts of Al and F. Thermogravimetric analysis proves the mineral decomposes at 485 °C with a mass loss of 7.6% compared with the theoretical mass loss of 7.7%. A strong Raman band at 852 cm-1 is assigned to the SiO stretching vibration of the SiO3(OH) units. Two Raman bands at 914 and 953 cm-1 are attributed to the antisymmetric vibrations. Intense prominent peaks observed at 3487, 3502, 3509, 3521 and 3547 cm-1 are assigned to the OH stretching vibration of the SiO3(OH) units. The observation of multiple OH bands supports the concept of the non-equivalence of the OH units. Vibrational spectroscopy enables a detailed assessment of the molecular structure of poldervaartite.

  7. Spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumino, B.

    1981-12-01

    There has been recently a revival of interest in supersymmetric gauge theories, stimulated by the hope that supersymmetry might help in clarifying some of the questions which remain unanswered in the so called Grand Unified Theories and in particular the gauge hierarchy problem. In a Grand Unified Theory one has two widely different mass scales: the unification mass M approx. = 10/sup 15/GeV at which the unification group (e.g. SU(5)) breaks down to SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) and the mass ..mu.. approx. = 100 GeV at which SU(2) x U(1) is broken down to the U(1) of electromagnetism. There is at present no theoretical understanding of the extreme smallness of the ratio ..mu../M of these two numbers. This is the gauge hierarchy problem. This lecture attempts to review the various mechanisms for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in gauge theories. Most of the discussions are concerned with the tree approximation, but what is presently known about radiative correction is also reviewed.

  8. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  9. Spontaneous lateral temporal encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncbilek, Gokhan; Calis, Mert; Akalan, Nejat

    2013-01-01

    A spontaneous encephalocele is one that develops either because of embryological maldevelopment or from a poorly understood postnatal process that permits brain herniation to occur. We here report a rare case of lateral temporal encephalocele extending to the infratemporal fossa under the zygomatic arch. At birth, the infant was noted to have a large cystic mass in the right side of the face. After being operated on initially in another center in the newborn period, the patient was referred to our clinic with a diagnosis of temporal encephalocele. He was 6 months old at the time of admission. Computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed a 8 × 9 cm fluid-filled, multiloculated cystic mass at the right infratemporal fossa. No intracranial pathology or connection is seen. The patient was operated on to reduce the distortion effect of the growing mass. The histopathological examination of the sac revealed well-differentiated mature glial tissue stained with glial fibrillary acid protein. This rare clinical presentation of encephaloceles should be taken into consideration during the evaluation of the lateral facial masses in the infancy period, and possible intracranial connection should be ruled out before surgery to avoid complications.

  10. Raman spectroscopic study of acute oxidative stress induced changes in mice skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Alimova, Alexandra; Chakraverty, Rahul; Katz, A.; Gayen, S. K.; Larsson, L.; Savage, H. E.; Alfano, R. R.

    2008-02-01

    The oxidative stress due to free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in diseases such as muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer dementia, diabetes mellitus, and mitochrondrial myopathies. In this study, the acute oxidative stress induced changes in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in mouse skeletal muscles are studied in vitro using Raman spectroscopy. Mammalian skeletal muscles are rich in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in both reduced (NADH) and oxidized (NAD) states, as they are sites of aerobic and anaerobic respiration. The relative levels of NAD and NADH are altered in certain physiological and pathological conditions of skeletal muscles. In this study, near infrared Raman spectroscopy is used to identify the molecular fingerprints of NAD and NADH in five-week-old mice biceps femoris muscles. A Raman vibrational mode of NADH is identified in fresh skeletal muscle samples suspended in buffered normal saline. In the same samples, when treated with 1% H IIO II for 5 minutes and 15 minutes, the Raman spectrum shows molecular fingerprints specific to NAD and the disappearance of NADH vibrational bands. The NAD bands after 15 minutes were more intense than after 5 minutes. Since NADH fluoresces and NAD does not, fluorescence spectroscopy is used to confirm the results of the Raman measurements. Fluorescence spectra exhibit an emission peak at 460 nm, corresponding to NADH emission wavelength in fresh muscle samples; while the H IIO II treated muscle samples do not exhibit NADH fluorescence. Raman spectroscopy may be used to develop a minimally invasive, in vivo optical biopsy method to measure the relative NAD and NADH levels in muscle tissues. This may help to detect diseases of muscle, including mitochondrial myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

  11. Vibrations and waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kaliski, S

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive overview of wave phenomena in different media with interacting mechanical, electromagnetic and other fields. Equations describing wave propagation in linear and non-linear elastic media are followed by equations of rheological models, models with internal rotational degrees of freedom and non-local interactions. Equations for coupled fields: thermal, elastic, electromagnetic, piezoelectric, and magneto-spin with adequate boundary conditions are also included. Together with its companion volume Vibrations and Waves. Part A: Vibrations this work provides a wealth

  12. Vibration Theory, Vol. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present textbook has been written based on previous lecture notes for a course on stochastic vibration theory that is being given on the 9th semester at Aalborg University for M. Sc. students in structural engineering. The present 2nd edition of this textbook on linear stochastic vibration th...... theory is basically unchanged in comparison to the 1st edition. Only section 4.2 on single input - single output systems and chapter 6 on offshore structures have been modified in order to enhance the clearness....

  13. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of polyacrylamide gels for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldock, C.; Murry, P.; Pope, J. [Queensland University of Tehchnology, Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Centres for Medical and Health Physics; Rintoul, L.; George, G. [Queensland University of Tehchnology, Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Instrumental and Development Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Polyacrylamide (PAG) gels are used in magnetic resonance imaging radiation dosimetry. The PAG dosimeter is based on the radiation-induced co-polymerisation and cross-linking of acrylic monomers infused in a gel matrix. PAG was manufactured with a composition of 5% gelatine, 3% acrylamide and 3% N,N`methylene-bis-acrylamide by mass, with distilled water as the remaining constituent [Baldock, 1998]. FT-Raman spectroscopy studies were undertaken to investigate cross-linking changes during the co-polymerisation of PAG in the spectral range of 200 - 3500 cm{sup -1}. Vibrational bands of 1285 cm{sup -1} and 1256 cm{sup -1} were assigned to the acrylamide and bis-acrylamide single CH{sub 2} {delta}{sub CH2} binding modes. These bands were found to decrease in amplitude with increasing absorbed radiation dose, as a result of co-polymerisation. Principal Component Regression was performed on FT-Raman spectra of PAG samples irradiated to 50 Gy and two components were found to be sufficient to account for 98.7% of variance in the data. Cross validation was used to establish the absorbed radiation dose of an unknown PAG sample from the FT-Raman spectra. The calculated correlation coefficient between measured and predictive samples was 0.997 with a standard error of estimate of 0.976 and a standard error of prediction of 1.140. These results demonstrate the potential of FT-Raman spectroscopy for ionising radiation dosimetry using polyacrylamide gels

  14. Raman spectroscopic study of left-handed Z-RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trulson, M O; Cruz, P; Puglisi, J D; Tinoco, I; Mathies, R A

    1987-12-29

    The solvent conditions that induce the formation of a left-handed Z form of poly[r(G-C)] have been extended to include 6.5 M NaBr at 35 degrees C and 3.8 M MgCl2 at room temperature. The analysis of the A----Z transition in RNA by circular dichroism (CD), 1H and 31P NMR, and Raman spectroscopy shows that two distinct forms of left-handed RNA exist. The ZR-RNA structure forms in high concentrations of NaBr and NaClO4 and exhibits a unique CD signature. ZD-RNA is found in concentrated MgCl2 and has a CD signature similar to the Z form of poly[d(G-C)]. The loss of Raman intensity of the 813-cm-1 A-form marker band in both the A----ZR-RNA and A----ZD-RNA transitions parallels the loss of intensity at 835 cm-1 in the B----Z transition of DNA. A guanine vibration that is sensitive to the glycosyl torsion angle shifts from 671 cm-1 in A-RNA to 641 cm-1 in both ZD- and ZR-RNA, similar to the B----Z transition in DNA in which this band shifts from 682 to 625 cm-1. Significant differences in the glycosyl angle and sugar pucker between Z-DNA and Z-RNA are suggested by the 16-cm-1 difference in the position of this band. The Raman evidence for structural difference between ZD- and ZR-RNA comes from two groups of bands: First, Raman intensities between 1180 and 1600 cm-1 of ZD-RNA differ from those for ZR-RNA, corroborating the CD evidence for differences in base-stacking geometry. Second, the phosphodiester stretching bands near 815 cm-1 provide evidence of differences in backbone geometry between ZD- and ZR-RNA.

  15. Bilateral spontaneous carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townend, Bradley Scott; Traves, Laura; Crimmins, Denis

    2005-06-01

    Bilateral internal carotid artery dissections have been reported, but spontaneous bilateral dissections are rare. Internal carotid artery dissection can present with a spectrum of symptoms ranging from headache to completed stroke. Two cases of spontaneous bilateral carotid artery dissection are presented, one with headache and minimal symptoms and the other with a stroke syndrome. No cause could be found in either case, making the dissections completely spontaneous. Bilateral internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) should be considered in young patients with unexplained head and neck pain with or without focal neurological symptoms and signs. The increasing availability of imaging would sustain the higher index of suspicion.

  16. Vibrational spectra of solid HNFX (C6H8F8N8O4): Experiments and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Malcolm; Gobin, Cedric; Kim, Eunja

    2007-03-01

    Assignment of the vibrational spectra of molecular solids such as HNFX is very complex. We have made a combined experimental and modeling study of the vibrational spectra of solid HNFX. Crystalline HFNX consists of unit cell with 9 HNFX molecules in Ci symmetry. Vibrational modes were calculated by using the PCFF force field method and were directly compared to measured IR and Raman spectra. A complimentary calculation for molecular HNFX allows us to identify the intramolecular motions measured in experiments. Intermolecular motion by F--H bonds between HNFX molecules will be discussed in this talk.

  17. Imaging lipid metabolism in live Caenorhabditis elegans using fingerprint vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Delong; Belew, Micah Y; Tissenbaum, Heidi A; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-10-27

    Quantitation of lipid storage, unsaturation, and oxidation in live C. elegans has been a long-standing obstacle. The combination of hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering imaging and multivariate analysis in the fingerprint vibration region represents a platform that allows the quantitative mapping of fat distribution, degree of fat unsaturation, lipid oxidation, and cholesterol storage in vivo in the whole worm. Our results reveal for the first time that lysosome-related organelles in intestinal cells are sites for storage of cholesterol in C. elegans. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Molecular structure and vibrational spectra of phenolphthalein and its dianion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimoto, Ko-Ki; Sugiura, Hiromasa; Kato, Toshiyuki; Senda, Hitoshi; Kuwae, Akio; Hanai, Kazuhiko

    2001-02-01

    Infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of phenolphthalein (PP) and its dianion form (sodium and potassium salts) were studied both in the solid state and in aqueous solution. Band assignments were carried out on the basis of the isotope shifts of the ring deuterated and 13C-substituted derivatives. Spectral analyses reveal that the PP dianion exists as mixtures of the benzenoid form (colorless) and the quinonoid form (colored) in the solid state and in aqueous solution, while the neutral PP solely takes the γ-lactone form. This work provides the first vibrational spectroscopic evidence for the coexistence of the two species in the PP dianions.

  19. Heterogeneous Dynamics of Coupled Vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Jansen, Thomas I. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Schoenlein, RW; Corkum, P; DeSilvestri, S; Nelson, KA; Riedle, E

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dynamics of coupled stretch vibrations of a water molecule are revealed by 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. These are caused by non-Gaussian fluctuations of the environment around the individual OH stretch vibrations.

  20. Raman scattering of 2H-MoS2 at simultaneous high temperature and high pressure (up to 600 K and 18.5 GPa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianJun Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Raman spectroscopy of natural molybdenite powder was investigated at simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high pressure in a heatable diamond anvil cell (DAC, to obtain the temperature and pressure dependence of the main Raman vibrational modes (E1g, E 2 g 1 ,A1g, and 2LA(M. Over our experimental temperature and pressure range (300–600 K and 1 atm−18.5 GPa, the Raman modes follow a systematic blue shift with increasing pressure, and red shift with increasing temperature. The results were calculated by three-variable linear fitting. The mutual correlation index of temperature and pressure indicates that the pressure may reduce the temperature dependence of Raman modes. New Raman bands due to structural changes emerged at about 3–4 GPa lower than seen in previous studies; this may be caused by differences in the pressure hydrostaticity and shear stress in the sample cell that promote the interlayer sliding.

  1. Development of single shot 1D-Raman scattering measurements for flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biase, Amelia; Uddi, Mruthunjaya

    2017-11-01

    The majority of energy consumption in the US comes from burning fossil fuels which increases the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has negative impacts on the environment. One solution to this problem is to study the oxy-combustion process. A pure oxygen stream is used instead of air for combustion. Products contain only carbon dioxide and water. It is easy to separate water from carbon dioxide by condensation and the carbon dioxide can be captured easily. Lower gas volume allows for easier removal of pollutants from the flue gas. The design of a system that studies the oxy-combustion process using advanced laser diagnostic techniques and Raman scattering measurements is presented. The experiments focus on spontaneous Raman scattering. This is one of the few techniques that can provide quantitative measurements of the concentration and temperature of different chemical species in a turbulent flow. The experimental design and process of validating the design to ensure the data is accurate is described. The Raman data collected form an experimental data base that is used for the validation of spontaneous Raman scattering in high pressure environments for the oxy-combustion process. NSF EEC 1659710.

  2. Fuel flexibility via real-time Raman fuel-gas analysis for turbine system control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buric, M.; Woodruff, S.; Chorpening, B.; Tucker, D.

    2015-06-01

    The modern energy production base in the U.S. is increasingly incorporating opportunity fuels such as biogas, coalbed methane, coal syngas, solar-derived hydrogen, and others. In many cases, suppliers operate turbine-based generation systems to efficiently utilize these diverse fuels. Unfortunately, turbine engines are difficult to control given the varying energy content of these fuels, combined with the need for a backup natural gas supply to provide continuous operation. Here, we study the use of a specially designed Raman Gas Analyzer based on capillary waveguide technology with sub-second response time for turbine control applications. The NETL Raman Gas Analyzer utilizes a low-power visible pump laser, and a capillary waveguide gas-cell to integrate large spontaneous Raman signals, and fast gas-transfer piping to facilitate quick measurements of fuel-gas components. A U.S. Department of Energy turbine facility known as HYPER (hybrid performance system) serves as a platform for apriori fuel composition measurements for turbine speed or power control. A fuel-dilution system is used to simulate a compositional upset while simultaneously measuring the resultant fuel composition and turbine response functions in real-time. The feasibility and efficacy of system control using the spontaneous Raman-based measurement system is then explored with the goal of illustrating the ability to control a turbine system using available fuel composition as an input process variable.

  3. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  4. Phase Formation and Vibrational Characterization of Pb (Ca) TiO3 Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe Moe Myint; Hnin Thida Lwin; Khin Thida; Aye Aye Phyu; Ko Ko Kyaw Soe

    2008-03-01

    Ca doped PbTiO3 ceramics were prepared by conventional solid solution method and heated at 700 0 C for 3 hours. X-ray diffraction analyses were carried out to determine phase formation. Vibrational frequencies of Pb1-x Cax TiO3 ceramics and constituent polycrystalline phase of CaTiO3 molecules were observed by FTIR spectrum of 400cm-1 to 4000cm-1 region and molecular orientations of Ca doped Pb TiO3 ceramics were also investigated by FT-Raman spectroscopy within the Raman shift ranges of 400 to 4000cm-1 region.

  5. Calibration of the Raman Lidar at the Barbados Cloud Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliani, Johannes; Serikov, Ilya; Brügmann, Björn; Linne, Holger; Stevens, Bjorn

    2017-04-01

    The Max Planck Institute for Meteorology has been conducting atmospheric measurements on the Caribbean island of Barbados with Raman lidars starting in 2010. We present our methods for calibrating temperature and water vapor retrievals from these measurements. Raman lidars measure water vapor by the number density ratio of water vapor to nitrogen molecules, from the amount of vibrational Raman scattered light by both H2O and N2. As there are instrumental uncertainties in the lidar backscatter signal, this data must be calibrated using reference measurements such as radiosondes or ground-based weather stations. We use a combined approach including local balloon soundings, regular soundings at the Barbados airport (11 km distant), and multiple weather stations at the Barbados Cloud Observatory (BCO). The most stable calibration method fits the Lidar profiles to a combination of ground stations, with an adjustment for the typical boundary layer water vapor gradient. Since the weather stations show systematic differences in measured H2O at the same location, their values have to be adjusted to match a trusted source. For this, we consider the small set of BCO balloon soundings as most reliable since they include a pre-launch calibration procedure. This method yields calibrations with low variance and continuous data availability. The Raman lidar can also measure temperatures by Rotational Raman scatter of air molecules. We define the Pure Rotational Raman Scatter (PRRS) ratio as the intensity ratio of PRRS lines with opposite temperature sensitivity. The PRRS ratio links to the air temperature with two dependent calibration constants, which are derived by comparing to balloon soundings. Further, we use the dependence of the two constants to solve for a single independent calibration constant, which we show to be sufficiently stable in time to model the calibration for time periods where no soundings are available. The calibrated temperature can be used to calculate

  6. Applications of Raman Spectroscopy in Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing: A Short Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Kevin; Ryder, Alan G

    2017-06-01

    The production of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) is currently undergoing its biggest transformation in a century. The changes are based on the rapid and dramatic introduction of protein- and macromolecule-based drugs (collectively known as biopharmaceuticals) and can be traced back to the huge investment in biomedical science (in particular in genomics and proteomics) that has been ongoing since the 1970s. Biopharmaceuticals (or biologics) are manufactured using biological-expression systems (such as mammalian, bacterial, insect cells, etc.) and have spawned a large (>€35 billion sales annually in Europe) and growing biopharmaceutical industry (BioPharma). The structural and chemical complexity of biologics, combined with the intricacy of cell-based manufacturing, imposes a huge analytical burden to correctly characterize and quantify both processes (upstream) and products (downstream). In small molecule manufacturing, advances in analytical and computational methods have been extensively exploited to generate process analytical technologies (PAT) that are now used for routine process control, leading to more efficient processes and safer medicines. In the analytical domain, biologic manufacturing is considerably behind and there is both a huge scope and need to produce relevant PAT tools with which to better control processes, and better characterize product macromolecules. Raman spectroscopy, a vibrational spectroscopy with a number of useful properties (nondestructive, non-contact, robustness) has significant potential advantages in BioPharma. Key among them are intrinsically high molecular specificity, the ability to measure in water, the requirement for minimal (or no) sample pre-treatment, the flexibility of sampling configurations, and suitability for automation. Here, we review and discuss a representative selection of the more important Raman applications in BioPharma (with particular emphasis on mammalian cell culture). The review shows that

  7. Full Article: Stoichiometry, Vibrational Modes and Structure of Molten Nb2O5-K2S2O7 Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, S.; Borup, F.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1998-01-01

    The dissolution reaction of Nb205 in pure molten K2S207 has been studied and high temperature Raman spectroscopy has been used for determining the vibrational and structural properties of the Nb(V) complex(es) formed according to the reaction Nb205 + n S207(2-) -> complex. By means of a recently...... of a possible structural model....

  8. Conformational analysis and vibrational spectroscopic studies on dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ildiz, Gulce Ogruc; Akyuz, Sevim

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the theoretical conformation analysis of free dapsone has been performed by single point energy calculations at both semi-empirical PM3 and DFT/B3LYP-3-21G theory levels and three stable conformers were determined. Both the IR and Raman spectra of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The IR intensities and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of each conformer were calculated by DFT method at B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) theory level. For the fundamental characterization, the total energy distribution (TED) calculations of the vibrational modes were done using parallel quantum mechanic solution program (SQM) and the fundamental modes were assigned. The theoretical results are in agreement with the experimental ones.

  9. Nonlinear terahertz coherent excitation of vibrational modes of liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allodi, Marco A; Finneran, Ian A; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2015-12-21

    We report the first coherent excitation of intramolecular vibrational modes via the nonlinear interaction of a TeraHertz (THz) light field with molecular liquids. A terahertz-terahertz-Raman pulse sequence prepares the coherences with a broadband, high-energy, (sub)picosecond terahertz pulse, that are then measured in a terahertz Kerr effect spectrometer via phase-sensitive, heterodyne detection with an optical pulse. The spectrometer reported here has broader terahertz frequency coverage, and an increased sensitivity relative to previously reported terahertz Kerr effect experiments. Vibrational coherences are observed in liquid diiodomethane at 3.66 THz (122 cm(-1)), and in carbon tetrachloride at 6.50 THz (217 cm(-1)), in exact agreement with literature values of those intramolecular modes. This work opens the door to 2D spectroscopies, nonlinear in terahertz field, that can study the dynamics of condensed-phase molecular systems, as well as coherent control at terahertz frequencies.

  10. Raman fiber distributed feedback lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Paul S; Abedin, Kazi S; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Kremp, Tristan; Porque, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate fiber distributed feedback (DFB) lasers using Raman gain in two germanosilicate fibers. Our DFB cavities were 124 mm uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a π phase shift offset from the grating center. Our pump was at 1480 nm and the DFB lasers operated on a single longitudinal mode near 1584 nm. In a commercial Raman gain fiber, the maximum output power, linewidth, and threshold were 150 mW, 7.5 MHz, and 39 W, respectively. In a commercial highly nonlinear fiber, these figures improved to 350 mW, 4 MHz, and 4.3 W, respectively. In both lasers, more than 75% of pump power was transmitted, allowing for the possibility of substantial amplification in subsequent Raman gain fiber. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  11. Theory of Graphene Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Eric J; Yang, Yuan; Kocia, Lucas; Chen, Wei; Fang, Shiang; Borunda, Mario; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-02-23

    Raman scattering plays a key role in unraveling the quantum dynamics of graphene, perhaps the most promising material of recent times. It is crucial to correctly interpret the meaning of the spectra. It is therefore very surprising that the widely accepted understanding of Raman scattering, i.e., Kramers-Heisenberg-Dirac theory, has never been applied to graphene. Doing so here, a remarkable mechanism we term"transition sliding" is uncovered, explaining the uncommon brightness of overtones in graphene. Graphene's dispersive and fixed Raman bands, missing bands, defect density and laser frequency dependence of band intensities, widths of overtone bands, Stokes, anti-Stokes anomalies, and other known properties emerge simply and directly.

  12. Composite Struts Would Damp Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1991-01-01

    New design of composite-material (fiber/matrix laminate) struts increases damping of longitudinal vibrations without decreasing longitudinal stiffness or increasing weight significantly. Plies with opposing chevron patterns of fibers convert longitudinal vibrational stresses into shear stresses in intermediate viscoelastic layer, which dissipate vibrational energy. Composite strut stronger than aluminum strut of same weight and stiffness.

  13. Development of vibrating insoles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, J.M.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Schokker, B.; Postema, K.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the development of vibrating insoles. Insoles, providing a subsensory mechanical noise signal to the plantar side of the feet, may improve balance in healthy young and older people and in patients with stroke or diabetic neuropathy. This study describes

  14. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Role of vibrational spectroscopy in solving problems related to astrobiology will be discussed. Vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for identifying molecules. Theoretical approach used in this work is based on direct computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities from electronic structure codes. One of the applications of this computational technique is possible identification of biological building blocks (amino acids, small peptides, DNA bases) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Identifying small biological molecules in the ISM is very important from the point of view of origin of life. Hybrid (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) theoretical techniques will be discussed that may allow to obtain accurate vibrational spectra of biomolecular building blocks and to create a database of spectroscopic signatures that can assist observations of these molecules in space. Another application of the direct computational spectroscopy technique is to help to design and analyze experimental observations of ice surfaces of one of the Jupiter's moons, Europa, that possibly contains hydrated salts. The presence of hydrated salts on the surface can be an indication of a subsurface ocean and the possible existence of life forms inhabiting such an ocean.

  15. Structural Stability and Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Sine Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author...

  16. Vibrations and Eigenvalues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rical or mechanical reasonings, but solely algebraic [analytic] operations subjected to a uniform and regular procedure. Those. Keywords. Vibrations, eigenvalues .... Suggested Reading. [1] R Bhatia, Fourier Series, Hindustan Book Agency, Second Edition, 2003. [2] G Strang, Essays in Linear Algebra, SIAM, 2012. 872.

  17. Compact Vibration Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  18. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  19. Man-Induced Vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1994-01-01

    work has been done on the measurement of the exact load functions and related reponse analysis. A recent work using a spectral description has been performed by Per-Erik Erikson and includes a good literature survey. Bachmann and Ammann give a good overview of vibrations caused by human activity. Other...

  20. Vibration characteristics of ultrasonic complex vibration for hole machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2012-05-01

    Complex vibration sources that use diagonal slits as a longitudinal-torsional vibration converter have been applied to ultrasonic motors, ultrasonic rock drilling, and ultrasonic welding. However, there are few examples of the application of these sources to ultrasonic machining in combination with an abrasive. Accordingly, a new method has been developed for machining of holes in brittle materials by using the ultrasonic longitudinal and torsional vibration of a hollow-type stepped horn with a diagonal slit vibration converter. In this paper, we compared vibration of a uniform rod and a hollow-type stepped horn, both with diagonal slits, when the conditions of the diagonal slits are constant.