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Sample records for spontaneous spinal fusion

  1. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Herniated disk - fusion; Spinal stenosis - fusion; Laminectomy - fusion Patient Instructions Bathroom safety - adults Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Spine surgery - discharge Surgical wound care - open Images Scoliosis Spinal ...

  2. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  3. Stem Cells in Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael A; Haudenschild, Dominik R; Wegner, Adam M; Klineberg, Eric O

    2017-12-01

    Review of literature. This review of literature investigates the application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in spinal fusion, highlights potential uses in the development of bone grafts, and discusses limitations based on both preclinical and clinical models. A review of literature was conducted looking at current studies using stem cells for augmentation of spinal fusion in both animal and human models. Eleven preclinical studies were found that used various animal models. Average fusion rates across studies were 59.8% for autograft and 73.7% for stem cell-based grafts. Outcomes included manual palpation and stressing of the fusion, radiography, micro-computed tomography (μCT), and histological analysis. Fifteen clinical studies, 7 prospective and 8 retrospective, were found. Fusion rates ranged from 60% to 100%, averaging 87.1% in experimental groups and 87.2% in autograft control groups. It appears that there is minimal clinical difference between commercially available stem cells and bone marrow aspirates indicating that MSCs may be a good choice in a patient with poor marrow quality. Overcoming morbidity and limitations of autograft for spinal fusion, remains a significant problem for spinal surgeons and further studies are needed to determine the efficacy of stem cells in augmenting spinal fusion.

  4. Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    inflammation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord , spontaneous recovery, functional recovery, inflammation, biomarkers, trauma 16...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0614 TITLE: Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ona Bloom...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0614 W81XWH-15-1-0614 Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  5. Spontaneous herniation of the thoracic spinal cord : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sung Chan; Lee, Seong Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous herniation of the spinal cord is a rare disease entity in which spinal cord substance is herniated through a previously uninjured and/or untouched dural. It is a cause of myelopathy that is treatable but difficult to diagnose. We report the CT and MR findings of a case of spontaneous thoracic spinal cord through a dural defect

  6. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel

    2007-01-01

    consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2......) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means...... of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted...

  7. Cell Therapy To Obtain Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    and allografts have been commonly used in spinal fusion, revision total hip arthroplasty , maxillofacial reconstruction, and repair of segmental...Goldberg VM. Selection of bone grafts for revision total hip arthroplasty . Clin Orthop Relat Res 2000 Dec(381):68-76. 3. Nishida J, Shimamura T. Methods...require bone grafting(4), as do millions of total joint arthroplasties , spinal arthrodeses, maxillofacial surgeries and implant fixations(5). In

  8. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant contro...

  9. The spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma : a study of the etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; Ponssen, H

    From the literature 199 cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) are analyzed. With these data and the vascular anatomical characteristics of the spinal epidural space, the theories on the etiology of the SSEH are discussed. There seems to be no relationship between the SSEH and arterial

  10. Biomaterials and Bioactive Agents in Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rui M; Varanda, Pedro; Reis, Rui L; Duarte, Ana Rita C; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2017-12-01

    Management of degenerative spine pathologies frequently leads to the need for spinal fusion (SF), where bone growth is induced toward stabilization of the interventioned spine. Autologous bone graft (ABG) remains the gold-standard inducer, whereas new bone graft substitutes attempt to achieve effective de novo bone formation and solid fusion. Limited fusion outcomes have driven motivation for more sophisticated and multidisciplinary solutions, involving new biomaterials and/or biologics, through innovative delivery platforms. The present review will analyze the most recent body of literature that is focused on new approaches for consistent bone fusion of spinal vertebrae, including the development of new biomaterials that pursue physical and chemical aptitudes; the delivery of growth factors (GF) to accelerate new bone formation; and the use of cells to improve functional bone development. Bone graft substitutes currently in clinical practice, such as demineralized bone matrix and ceramics, are still used as a starting point for the study of new bioactive agents. Polyesters such as polycaprolactone and polylactic acid arise as platforms for the development of composites, where a mineral element and cell/GF constitute the delivery system. Exciting fusion outcomes were obtained in several small and large animal models with these. On what regards bioactive agents, mesenchymal stem cells, preferentially derived from the bone marrow or adipose tissue, were studied in this context. Autologous and allogeneic approaches, as well as osteogenically differentiated cells, have been tested. These cell sources have further been genetically engineered for specific GF expression. Nevertheless, results on fusion efficacy with cells have been inconsistent. On the other hand, the delivery of GF (most commonly bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2]) has provided favorable outcomes. Complications related to burst release and dosing are still the target of research through the development

  11. Outcome of a posterior spinal fusion technique using spinous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objective: Spinal fusion is a rapidly developing area of spine surgery. Many of the implants often used are not within the reach of the patients in the developing world. In this study, we describe the outcome of a novel technique of posterior spinal fusion using the rush nail and spinous process wire. Materials and ...

  12. Outcome of a posterior spinal fusion technique using spinous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adeolu and Komolafe: Posterior spinal fusion with spinous process wire and vertical strut. Introduction ... risk of injuring the canal contents on both short and ... Patient population. Patients were informed about the technique and availability of other spinal fusion options and potential advantages and disadvantages were.

  13. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    cells, while other fibers were unmyelinated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that some of the regenerated fibers were tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-immunoreactive, indicating a central origin. These findings suggest that there is a considerable amount of spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord...... lesions in rodents and that the fibers remain several months after injury. The findings of tyrosine hydroxylase- and serotonin-immunoreactivity in the axons suggest that descending central fibers contribute to this endogenous repair of ischemic spinal cord injury....

  14. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma as a Potentially Important Stroke Mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsu Akimoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemiparesis develops in response to a wide range of neurological disorders, such as stroke, neoplasms and several inflammatory processes. Occasionally, it may also occur due to a lesion located in the high cervical spinal cord. In this concise review, we describe the features of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma, which should be included in the large list of stroke mimics. Various concerns regarding the diagnostic and therapeutic conundrums relating to the condition are also discussed.

  15. Platelet-rich plasma for the spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Yoon, Won Yong; Chang, Ho Guen

    2018-01-01

    There has been a wide interest in using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a therapeutic agent to enhance spinal fusion. There are two review articles based only on clinical studies regarding the effect of PRP on spinal fusion. However, with regard to both animal model studies and clinical studies, there is no review studies regarding its effect on spinal fusion and no review studies focusing on the platelet count and the concentration of the growth factor in the PRP. The purpose is to review the literatures about the effect of PRP on spinal fusion according to the animal model studies and clinical studies, focusing on the effect of the platelet count and the concentration of the growth factor in the PRP. A PubMed search was performed for English-language articles. We identified 20 articles regarding the effect of PRP on fusion in animal model studies and clinical studies, of which 16 articles met the study criteria of case-control studies or prospective randomized studies for the spinal fusion. The articles were categorized into small-sized animal model, middle-sized animal model, and clinical studies. Studies have shown both beneficial and inhibitory effects. The conclusion that PRP has the stimulating effect on spinal fusion was not reached. However, PRP might promote the human spinal fusion if the platelet count or the concentration of growth factors in the PRP increases.

  16. Operative treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas : a study of the factors determining postoperative outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; van Alphen, H A

    OBJECTIVE: We clarify the factors affecting postoperative outcomes in patients who have suffered spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas. METHODS: We review 330 cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas from the international literature and three unpublished cases of our own. Attention was

  17. MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Beom [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. The MR and clinical findings in six patients (M:F=3D4:2;adult:child=3D3:3) with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma were reviewed. Five patients without any predisposing factor which might cause the condition and one with acute myelogenous leukemia were included. Emergency surgery was performed in two patients, and the other four were managed conservatively. The epidural lesion involved between three and seven vertebrae (mean:4.5), and relative to the spinal cord was located in the posterior-lateral (n=3D4), anterior (n=3D1), or right lateral (n=3D1) area. The hematoma was isointense (n=3D1) or hyperintense (n=3D5) with spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and hypointense (n=3D2) or hyperintense (n=3D4) on T2-weighted images. It was completely absorbed in four of five patients who underwent follow-up MR imaging, but not changed in one. The clinical outcome of these patients was complete recovery (n=3D4), spastic cerebral palsy (n=3D1), or unknown (n=3D1). Because of the lesion's characteristic signal intensity; MR imaging is very useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. (author)

  18. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  19. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    cells, while other fibers were unmyelinated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that some of the regenerated fibers were tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-immunoreactive, indicating a central origin. These findings suggest that there is a considerable amount of spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord......Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total...... length of all NF-immunolabeled axons within the lesion cavities was increased 6- to 10-fold at 5, 10, and 15 wk post-lesion compared with 1 wk post-surgery. In ultrastructural studies we found the putatively regenerating axons within the lesion to be associated either with oligodendrocytes or Schwann...

  20. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman Aycan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural abscess (SEA is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation.

  1. The temporal expression of adipokines during spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Sohrab; Bertone, Alicia L; Hussein, Hayam Hamaz; Toth, Jeffrey M; Kaido, Mari; Khan, Safdar

    2017-12-01

    Adipokines are secreted by white adipose tissue and have been associated with fracture healing. Our goal was to report the temporal expression of adipokines during spinal fusion in an established rabbit model. Our goal was to report the temporal expression of adipokines during spinal fusion in an established rabbit model. The study design included a laboratory animal model. New Zealand white rabbits were assigned to either sham surgery (n=2), unilateral posterior spinal fusion (n=14), or bilateral posterior spinal fusion (n=14). Rabbits were euthanized 1-6 and 10 weeks out from surgery. Fusion was evaluated by radiographs, manual palpation, and histology. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction on the bone fusion mass catalogued the gene expression of leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at each time point. Results were normalized to the internal control gene, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) (2^ΔCt), and control bone sites (2^ΔΔCt). Quantitative data were analyzed by two-factor analysis of variance (pfusion over time (pfusion by palpation after 4 weeks was 68.75%. Leptin expression in decortication and bone graft sites peaked at 5 weeks after the fusion procedure (p=.0143), adiponectin expression was greatest 1 week after surgery (pfusion procedure (pfusion. Adiponectin and resistin may play a role early on during the fusion process. Our results suggest that leptin expression may be upstream of VEGF expression during spinal fusion, and both appear to play an important role in bone spinal fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation.

  3. Cerebral Vasospasm with Ischemia following a Spontaneous Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia F. Shakur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known consequence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH triggered by blood breakdown products. Here, we present the first case of cerebral vasospasm with ischemia following a spontaneous spinal SAH. A 67-year-old woman, who was on Coumadin for atrial fibrillation, presented with chest pain radiating to the back accompanied by headache and leg paresthesias. The international normalized ratio (INR was 4.5. Ten hours after presentation, she developed loss of movement in both legs and lack of sensation below the umbilicus. Spine MRI showed intradural hemorrhage. Her coagulopathy was reversed, and she underwent T2 to T12 laminectomies. A large subarachnoid hematoma was evacuated. Given her complaint of headache preoperatively and the intraoperative finding of spinal SAH, a head CT was done postoperatively that displayed SAH in peripheral sulci. On postoperative day 5, she became obtunded. Brain MRI demonstrated focal restricted diffusion in the left frontoparietal area. Formal angiography revealed vasospasm in anterior cerebral arteries bilaterally and right middle cerebral artery. Vasospasm was treated, and she returned to baseline within 48 hours. Spontaneous spinal SAH can result in the same sequelae typically associated with aneurysmal SAH, and the clinician must have a degree of suspicion in such patients. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cerebral vasospasm may explain this unique case.

  4. Family satisfaction following spinal fusion in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jenny; Torode, Ian; Ellaway, Carolyn; Jacoby, Peter; Bunting, Catherine; Wong, Kingsley; Christodoulou, John; Leonard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated family satisfaction following spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome. Families participating in the population-based and longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database whose daughter had undergone spinal fusion provided data on satisfaction overall, care processes and expected changes in health and function. Content analysis of responses to open-ended questions was conducted. Families reported high levels of overall satisfaction and consistently high ratings in relation to surgical and ICU care. Outstanding clinical care and the development of strong partnerships with clinical staff were much appreciated by families, whereas poor information exchange and inconsistent care caused concerns. Family satisfaction is an important outcome within a patient-centred quality of care framework. Our findings suggest strategies to inform the delivery of care in relation to spinal fusion for Rett syndrome and could also inform the hospital care of other children with disability and a high risk of hospitalization.

  5. Sub-threshold spinal cord stimulation facilitates spontaneous motor activity in spinal rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidural stimulation of the spinal cord can be used to enable stepping on a treadmill (electrical enabling motor control, eEmc) after a complete mid-thoracic spinal cord transection in adult rats. Herein we have studied the effects of eEmc using a sub-threshold intensity of stimulation combined with spontaneous load-bearing proprioception to facilitate hindlimb stepping and standing during daily cage activity in paralyzed rats. Methods We hypothesized that eEmc combined with spontaneous cage activity would greatly increase the frequency and level of activation of the locomotor circuits in paralyzed rats. Spontaneous cage activity was recorded using a specially designed swivel connector to record EMG signals and an IR based camcorder to record video. Results and conclusion The spinal rats initially were very lethargic in their cages showing little movement. Without eEmc, the rats remained rather inactive with the torso rarely being elevated from the cage floor. When the rats used their forelimbs to move, the hindlimbs were extended and dragged behind with little or no flexion. In contrast, with eEmc the rats were highly active and the hindlimbs showed robust alternating flexion and extension resulting in step-like movements during forelimb-facilitated locomotion and often would stand using the sides of the cages as support. The mean and summed integrated EMG levels in both a hindlimb flexor and extensor muscle were higher with than without eEmc. These data suggest that eEmc, in combination with the associated proprioceptive input, can modulate the spinal networks to significantly amplify the amount and robustness of spontaneous motor activity in paralyzed rats. PMID:24156340

  6. A Case of Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Mimicking Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Rabia Koç

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute non-traumatic myelopathy and may present with various clinical phenotypes. Focal neurological symptoms can result in overlooking this differential diagnosis in patients presenting with neurological deficits and assuming the diagnosis of a stroke. Therefore, a thorough documentation of patient history is of great importance, since this can reveal symptoms suggestive of a different etiology. Here, we present a case of an 80-year-old female who was admitted with a hemiparesis without cortical or cranial neurological abnormalities. She mentioned of preceding shoulder and neck pain. Diagnosis of epidural hematoma was made by cervical magnetic resonance imaging. Symptoms resolved partially after surgical intervention. Our case illustrates the variation in the clinical presentation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma which can be misdiagnosed as stroke. Therefore, in patients with preceding neck, shoulder or interscapular pain and focal neurological deficits, this diagnosis should be included in the differential, particularly when cortical and cranial signs are lacking

  7. Stem cells regenerative properties on new rat spinal fusion model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klíma, K.; Vaněček, Václav; Kohout, A.; Jiroušek, Ondřej; Foltán, R.; Štulík, J.; Machoň, V.; Pavlíková, G.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Šedý, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2015), s. 119-128 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13477; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/0320 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378297 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * bone graft substitute * spinal fusion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  8. Early Versus Late Initiation of Rehabilitation After Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Christensen, Finn B; Nielsen, Claus V

    2013-01-01

    , and costs. METHODS: A cost-effectiveness analysis and a cost-utility analysis were conducted. Eighty-two patients undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion due to degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis (grade I or II) were randomized to an identical protocol of 4 sessions of group...

  9. Adjacent segment degeneration: observations in a goat spinal fusion study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, R.J.W.; Helder, M.N.; Wuisman, P.I.J.M.; Bank, R.A.; Everts, V.; Smit, T.H.

    2008-01-01

    Study Design. The adjacent discs of 13 goats, originally used in a lumbar spinal fusion model study, were analyzed for symptoms of intervertebral disc degeneration by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), macroscopy, and histology. These goats were followed for 6 months and the results were

  10. Adjacent segment degeneration: observations in a goat spinal fusion study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, Roel J. W.; Helder, Macro N.; Wuisman, Paul I. J. M.; Bank, Ruud A.; Everts, Vincent E.; Smit, Theo H.

    2008-01-01

    The adjacent discs of 13 goats, originally used in a lumbar spinal fusion model study, were analyzed for symptoms of intervertebral disc degeneration by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), macroscopy, and histology. These goats were followed for 6 months and the results were compared with 6

  11. Three-dimensional imaging of lumbar spinal fusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafetz, N.; Hunter, J.C.; Cann, C.E.; Morris, J.M.; Ax, L.; Catterling, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    Using a Cemax 1000 three-dimensional (3D) imaging computer/workstation, the author evaluated 15 patients with lumbar spinal fusions (four with pseudarthrosis). Both axial images with sagittal and coronal reformations and 3D images were obtained. The diagnoses (spinal stenosis and psuedarthrosis) were changed in four patients, confirmed in six patients, and unchanged in five patients with the addition of the 3D images. The ''cut-away'' 3D images proved particularly helpful for evaluation of central and lateral spinal stenosis, whereas the ''external'' 3D images were most useful for evaluation of the integrity of the fusion. Additionally, orthopedic surgeons found 3D images superior for both surgical planning and explaining pathology to patients

  12. Adolescents' perceptions of music therapy following spinal fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, Charmaine; Adamek, Mary S

    2013-02-01

    To explore adolescents' memories about music therapy after spinal fusion surgery and their recommendations for future patients. Spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most painful surgeries performed. Music therapy is shown to decrease postoperative pain in children after minor surgery. In preparation for developing a preoperative information program, we interviewed adolescents who had spinal fusion and postoperative music therapy to find out what they remembered and what they recommended for future patients. Eight adolescents who had spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were interviewed about their experiences. For this qualitative study, the investigators independently used thematic analysis techniques to formulate interpretive themes. Together they discussed their ideas and assigned overall meanings to the information. The eight participants were 13-17 years of age and had surgery between 2-24 months previously. The overarching themes identified from the interviews were relaxation and pain perception, choice and control, therapist interaction and preoperative information. Participants stated that music therapy helped with mental relaxation and distraction from pain. It was important to be able to choose the type of music for the therapy and to use self-control to focus on the positive. Their recommendation was that future patients should be provided with information preoperatively about music therapy and pain management. Participants recommended a combination of auditory and visual information, especially the experiences of previous patients who had spinal fusion and music therapy. Music provided live at the bedside by a music therapist was remembered vividly and positively by most of the participants. The presence of a music therapist providing patient-selected music at the bedside is important. Methods to introduce adolescents to music therapy and how to use music for relaxation should be developed and tested. © 2012

  13. Cell Therapy to Obtain Spinal Fusion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A; Davis, Alan R; Heggeness, Michael; Gannon, Francis; Dickinson, Mary; Hipp, John; West, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    .... Current procedures are highly invasive with limited success. The goal of this study is to develop a safe efficacious system for inducing spine fusion which will eliminate the need for invasive surgery...

  14. Cell Therapy to Obtain Spinal Fusion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A; Davis, Alan R; Moran, Kevin M; West, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    .... Current procedures are highly invasive with limited success. The goal of this study is to develop a safe efficacious system for inducing spine fusion which will eliminate the need for invasive surgery...

  15. Postoperative spinal alignment remodeling in Lenke 1C scoliosis treated with selective thoracic fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yu; Bünger, Cody E; Zhang, Yanqun

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Selective thoracic fusion may cause spinal imbalance in certain patients; how the spinal alignment changes over time after surgery is highly correlated with the final spinal balance. PURPOSE: To investigate how spinal alignment changes over time after selective thoracic fusion...... after surgery. Although some patients regained spinal balance through postoperative spinal alignment remodeling, 11 patients remained imbalanced at 2-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Selective thoracic fusion is prone to cause leftward spinal imbalance in Lenke 1C scoliosis patients. Postoperative spinal...... alignment remodeling can facilitate recovery of spinal balance in some patients. Postoperative spinal imbalance in Lenke 1C scoliosis patients could be prevented by selecting stable vertebra or the vertebrae above as LIV, checking the balance condition during surgery, or considering ratio criteria when...

  16. Pain prevalence and trajectories following pediatric spinal fusion surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sieberg, Christine B.; Simons, Laura E.; Edelstein, Mark R.; DeAngelis, Maria R.; Pielech, Melissa; Sethna, Navil; Hresko, M. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Factors contributing to pain following surgery are poorly understood with previous research largely focused on adults. With approximately 6 million children undergoing surgery each year8, there is a need to study pediatric persistent postsurgical pain. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multi-centered registry examining post-surgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire- Version...

  17. Hospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Wesley M; Johnson, Joseph R; Li, Neill Y; Yang, JaeWon; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-09-04

    Interhospital competition has been shown to influence the adoption of surgical techniques and approaches, clinical patient outcomes, and health-care resource use for select surgical procedures. However, little is known regarding these dynamics as they relate to spine surgery. This investigation sought to examine the relationship between interhospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion. This study used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample dataset, years 2003, 2006, and 2009. Patients were included based on the presence of the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes corresponding to lumbar spinal fusion, as well as on the presence of data on the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). The outcome measures are perioperative complications, defined using an ICD-9-CM coding algorithm. The HHI, a validated measure of competition within a market, was used to assess hospital market competitiveness. The HHI was calculated based on the hospital cachement area. Multiple regression was performed to adjust for confounding variables including patient age, gender, primary payer, severity of illness score, primary versus revision fusion, anterior versus posterior approach, national region, hospital bed size, location or teaching status, ownership, and year. Perioperative clinical outcomes were assessed based on ICD-9-CM codes with modifications. In total, 417,520 weighted patients (87,999 unweighted records) were analyzed. The mean cachement area HHI was 0.31 (range 0.099-0.724). The average patient age was 55.4 years (standard error=0.194), and the majority of patients were female (55.8%, n=232,727). The majority of procedures were primary spinal fusions (92.7%, n=386,998) and fusions with a posterior-only technique (81.5%, n=340,271). Most procedures occurred in the South (42.5%, n=177,509) or the Midwest (27.0%, n=112,758) regions. In the multiple regression analysis, increased hospital

  18. Association of insurance status and spinal fusion usage in the United States during two decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Jason; Mirahmadizadeh, Alireza; Seifi, Ali

    2018-02-21

    This study examined the distribution of spinal fusion usage among payer groups in the United States. Using the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, total discharges, length of stay, and mean hospital charges of patients who underwent spinal fusion from 1997 to 2014 in the United States were determined and analyzed. 5,715,625 total discharges with spinal fusion were reported. Among them, 2,875,188 (50.3%) were covered by private insurance, 1,710,182 by Medicare (29.9%), 342,638 (6.0%) by Medicaid, and 91,990 (1.6%) were uninsured. A statistically significant increase in spinal fusion usage occurred within each payer group over the study period (P fusion. Furthermore, annual growth in spinal fusion usage was greatest among private insurance patients, and smallest among uninsured patients. Total discharges with spinal fusion increased significantly across all payer groups between 1997 and 2014, but not equally. Further inquiry is indicated to determine the etiology of spinal fusion usage discrepancies between payer groups. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sympathovagal effects of spinal anesthesia assessed by the spontaneous cardiac baroreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratadour, P; Viale, J P; Parlow, J; Sagnard, P; Counioux, H; Bagou, G; Annat, G; Hughson, R; Quintin, L

    1997-12-01

    The changes in sympathovagal balance induced by spinal anesthesia remain controversial. The spontaneous baroreflex method allows the continuous assessment of the spontaneous engagement of the cardiac baroreflex, giving an index of sympathovagal balance. The purpose of this study was to follow the effects of spinal anesthesia on spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. Continuous electrocardiogram and noninvasive blood pressure were recorded in 24 patients scheduled for elective inguinal hernia repair and randomly assigned to three groups: (1) no volume loading, (2) volume loading of 15 ml/kg lactated Ringer's solution, and (3) continuous infusion of etilefrine (an ephedrine-like drug). Each patient was studied before, during, and after bupivacaine-induced spinal anesthesia (mean sensory block: T4). Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity and parameters of time-domain analysis of heart rate variability were calculated from 30 min of recording of each period. No significant change in spontaneous baroreflex slope or parameters of time-domain analysis were observed after regional anesthesia in any group. However, three patients experienced episodes of bradycardia and hypotension in the absence of a high block; these three patients showed an increase in spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity and time-domain parameters. Using a noninvasive, continuous technique to estimate cardiac sympathovagal balance, no significant variation in autonomic balance induced by spinal anesthesia was observed. However, untoward episodes of bradycardia and hypotension occurred in three patients, who could not be prospectively identified by the parameters studied.

  20. Outcome of instrumented spinal fusion for chronic low back pain: review of 100 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M.A; Pasha, I.F.; Malik, A.S.; Asad, A.; Aebi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of instrumented spinal fusion in selected patients with Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP) in our setup. Consecutive first one hundred patients were selected from spine unit database that underwent instrumented spinal fusion for chronic low back pain lasting more than one year, due to degenerative disease of spine. Average age was 42 years. There were 62 males and 38 females. Diagnosis included; spinal stenosis (26%), failed disc surgery (22%), spondylolisthesis (19%), degenerative disc disease (17%), and instability (16%). Operations performed; Pedicle Screw Fixation (PSF) with Postero-lateral Fusion (PLF) in 3% patients. Trans Laminar Facet Screw (TLFS) with PLF in 24% patients. Anterior Lumbar Inter-body Fusion (ALIF) in 9% patients. Posterior Lumbar Inter-body Fusion (PLIF) in 40% patients and Trans-foraminal Lumbar Inter-body Fusion (TLIF) in 24% patients. Average follow up was for 30 months. 86% patients had full spinal fusion. 71% patients were fully satisfied with treatment, 28% were partially satisfied. Post-operatively, on average, visual analogue scale (VAS) showed 48 points significant improvement and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) showed 53 points significant improvement. Instrumented Spinal Fusion is effective in our set up for relieving symptoms and improving functional outcome in selected patients with debilitating Chronic Low Back Pain due to degenerative disease of spine. Single fusion technique is not ideal for all types of patients and surgeon has to be versatile and trained in using different fusion techniques as the situation demands. (author)

  1. 1995 Volvo Award in basic sciences. The use of an osteoinductive growth factor for lumbar spinal fusion. Part I: Biology of spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, S D; Schimandle, J H; Hutton, W C; Chen, M I

    1995-12-15

    The histology of lumbar intertransverse process spinal fusion was studied in an experimental model in rabbits. To qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the sequential histology of spinal fusion using a previously validated animal model. Few previous studies have described the sequential histology during the posterolateral spinal fusion healing process using autogenous bone, and a basic understanding of the biology of this repair process is lacking. Fourteen adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent single-level posterolateral lumbar intertransverse process arthrodesis with autogenous iliac bone graft. Animals were killed 1-10 weeks after surgery, and the fusion masses were analyzed histologically and quantitated using a semiautomated image analysis system. Three distinct phases of healing were identified (inflammatory, reparative, and remodeling) and occurred in sequence but in a delayed fashion in the central zone of the fusion mass compared with the outer transverse process zones. Membraneous bone formation, evident first at the ends of the fusion eminating from the decorticated transverse processes, was the predominant mechanism of healing. The central zone was somewhat different in that there was a period of endochondral bone formation during weeks 3 and 4 in this zone where cartilage formed and was converted to bone. Remodeling in the central zone had equilibrated with the transverse process zones by 10 weeks. Lumbar intertransverse process spinal fusion is a complex process from a spatial and temporal standpoint. When autogenous bone is used as the graft material, this process critically depends on a variety of factors from the decorticated host bone and exposed marrow. The persistence of a central cartilage zone may be related to some types of nonunions and deserves future investigation. This enhanced understanding of the biology of spinal fusion with autogenous bone graft will provide a foundation for optimizing the use of osteoinductive bone growth

  2. Lumbar spinal fusion. Outcome in relation to surgical methods, choice of implant and postoperative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Finn Bjarke

    2004-10-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) has become one of the most common causes of disability in adults under 45 years of age and is consequently one of the most common reasons for early retirement in industrialised societies. Accordingly, CLBP represents an expensive drain on society's resources and is a very challenging area for which a consensus for rational therapy is yet to be established. The spinal fusion procedure was introduced as a treatment option for CLBP more than 70 years ago. However, few areas of spinal surgery have caused so much controversy as spinal fusion. The literature reveals divergent opinions about when fusion is indicated and how it should be performed. Furthermore, the significance of the role of postoperative rehabilitation following spinal fusion may be underestimated. There exists no consensus on the design of a program specific for rehabilitation. Ideally, for any given surgical procedure, it should be possible to identify not only possible complications relative to a surgical procedure, but also what symptoms may be expected, and what pain behaviour may be expected of a particular patient. The overall aims of the current studies were: 1) to introduce patient-based functional outcome evaluation into spinal fusion treatment; 2) to evaluate radiological assessment of different spinal fusion procedures; 3) to investigate the effect of titanium versus stainless steel pedicle screws on mechanical fixation and bone ingrowth in lumbar spinal fusion; 4) to analyse the clinical and radiological outcome of different lumbar spinal fusion techniques; 5) to evaluate complications and re-operation rates following different surgical procedures; and 6) to analyse the effect of different rehabilitation strategies for lumbar spinal fusion patients. The present thesis comprises 9 studies: 2 clinical retrospective studies, 1 clinical prospective case/reference study, 5 clinical randomised prospective studies and 1 animal study (Mini-pigs). In total, 594 patients

  3. Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma of intracranial origin presenting as back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Judy C; Layman, Kerri

    2014-11-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is an uncommon condition mainly associated with bleeding dyscrasias, use of anticoagulants, trauma, iatrogenic procedures, and vascular malformations. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are recommended to prevent progressive neurologic compromise. Spinal SDH concomitant with intracranial SDH is an even rarer entity, with few cases reported in the English literature. Here we present a case of spontaneous spinal SDH with intracranial SDH presenting as sacral back pain in a 70-year-old man. We also describe the potential mechanism, treatment, and prognosis of concomitant spinal and intracranial SDH. We report an unusual case of spontaneous spinal SDH concomitant with intracranial SDH and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, potential etiology, treatment, and prognosis of this disease. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Awareness of the association between spinal SDH and intracranial SDH can expedite appropriate imaging of both brain and spine, which can lead to a more complete diagnosis and require changes in patient management in the emergency setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Therapy Efficacy in Rheumatoid Arthritis to Define Unresponsive Patients (BATTER-UP) The goal of this study is to develop a way to...predict which patients with rheumatoid arthritis will benefit from anti- TNF therapy . Role: Principal Investigator, 0.6 Calendar Months, (5%) NIH...Outcomes: • ASIA Impairment Scale Grade (A-D) • Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM, survey of activities of daily living) • NeuroRecovery Scale (NRS, physical therapy -based exam)

  5. Indication for spinal fusion and the risk of adjacent segment pathology: does reason for fusion affect risk? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael J; Dettori, Joseph R; Standaert, Christopher J; Ely, Claire G; Chapman, Jens R

    2012-10-15

    A systematic review. To determine whether different indications or reasons for spinal fusion are associated with different risks of subsequent adjacent segment pathology (ASP) in the lumbar and cervical spine. Pre-existing degeneration at levels adjacent to an arthrodesis may play a role in the development of symptomatic adjacent segment pathology. Although most spinal arthrodeses occur in patients with degenerative spinal disease, spinal fusion occurs in the pediatric and trauma population, and also congenitally. Evaluating the risk of ASP in these populations may shed light on its etiology. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library for articles published between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2011. We included all articles that described the risk of radiographical adjacent segment pathology (RASP) following surgical fusion for degenerative disease, for trauma, or for conditions requiring fusion in pediatrics in the lumbar or cervical spine. In addition, we included studies recording ASP in patients with congenital fusion. Nineteen studies met our inclusion criteria. In patients who underwent fusion in the lumbar spine for degenerative reasons, the RASP rate averaged 12.4% during an average of 5.6-year follow-up. For patients who underwent fusion in the cervical spine for degenerative reasons, the average RASP rate was 25.3% during a 2.3-year follow-up. For patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome and congenital fusion, the RASP rate averaged 49.7% during an average of 23.5-years of follow-up. In patients who were fused for scoliosis, the average RASP rate was 20.3% of 3.9-year follow-up. However there is significant variation between studies in patient population, follow-up, and definition of RASP. In the cervical spine, the rate of RASP in patients with fusion for degenerative reasons indications is greater than the rate of RASP in patients with congenital fusion suggesting that the pre-existing health and status of the adjacent level at

  6. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images.

  7. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  8. Evidence for Use of Teriparatide in Spinal Fusion Surgery in Osteoporotic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Navjot; Lee, Jennifer S; Wu, Joy Y; Tharin, Suzanne

    2017-04-01

    Osteoporosis is defined as bone mineral density. A PubMed literature review was performed to review preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of teriparatide in osteoporotic patients undergoing spine fusion surgery. Preclinical studies in animal models show that teriparatide increases spinal fusion rates. Early clinical studies show that teriparatide both increases spinal fusion rates and decreases hardware loosening in the setting of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Ongoing additional trials will help formulate preoperative screening recommendations, determine the optimal duration of preoperative and postoperative teriparatide treatment, and investigate its utility in men. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Lumbar spinal fusion patients' demands to the primary health sector: evaluation of three rehabilitation protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B; Lauerberg, Ida

    2006-01-01

    Very few studies have investigated the effects or costs of rehabilitation regimens following lumbar spinal fusion. The effectiveness of in-hospital rehabilitation regimens has substantial impact on patients' demands in the primary health care sector. The aim of this study was to investigate patient......-articulated demands to the primary health care sector following lumbar spinal fusion and three different in-hospital rehabilitation regimens in a prospective, randomized study with a 2-year follow-up. Ninety patients were randomized 3 months post lumbar spinal fusion to either a 'video' group (one-time oral...... instruction by a physiotherapist and patients were then issued a video for home exercise), or a 'café' group (video regimen with the addition of three café meetings with other fusion-operated patients) or a 'training' group (exercise therapy; physiotherapist-guided; two times a week for 8 weeks). Register...

  10. Spinal cord compression by spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma in polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalina, P; Drehobl, K E; Black, K; Woldenberg, R; Sapan, M

    1995-06-01

    A woman with an eight-year history of polycythemia vera presented with numbness and weakness of both legs. A large spinal haematoma was revealed on magnetic resonance imaging which was treated clinically and which subsequently resolved.

  11. Assessing mechanical integrity of spinal fusion by in situ endochondral osteoinduction in the murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Ashvin K; Dewan, Rahul A; Calderon, Nathan; Fuentes, Angie; Lazard, Zawaunyka; Davis, Alan R; Heggeness, Michael; Hipp, John A; Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A

    2010-08-21

    Historically, radiographs, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) exams, palpation and histology have been used to assess fusions in a mouse spine. The objective of this study was to develop a faster, cheaper, reproducible test to directly quantify the mechanical integrity of spinal fusions in mice. Fusions were induced in ten mice spine using a previously described technique of in situ endochondral ossification, harvested with soft tissue, and cast in radiolucent alginate material for handling. Using a validated software package and a customized mechanical apparatus that flexed and extended the spinal column, the amount of intervertebral motion between adjacent vertebral discs was determined with static flexed and extended lateral spine radiographs. Micro-CT images of the same were also blindly reviewed for fusion. Mean intervertebral motion between control, non-fused, spinal vertebral discs was 6.1 +/- 0.2 degrees during spine flexion/extension. In fusion samples, adjacent vertebrae with less than 3.5 degrees intervertebral motion had fusions documented by micro-CT inspection. Measuring the amount of intervertebral rotation between vertebrae during spine flexion/extension is a relatively simple, cheap (<$100), clinically relevant, and fast test for assessing the mechanical success of spinal fusion in mice that compared favorably to the standard, micro-CT.

  12. Biomechanical effects of fusion levels on the risk of proximal junctional failure and kyphosis in lumbar spinal fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won Man; Choi, Dae Kyung; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yongjung J; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2015-12-01

    Spinal fusion surgery is a widely used surgical procedure for sagittal realignment. Clinical studies have reported that spinal fusion may cause proximal junctional kyphosis and failure with disc failure, vertebral fracture, and/or failure at the implant-bone interface. However, the biomechanical injury mechanisms of proximal junctional kyphosis and failure remain unclear. A finite element model of the thoracolumbar spine was used. Nine fusion models with pedicle screw systems implanted at the L2-L3, L3-L4, L4-L5, L5-S1, L2-L4, L3-L5, L4-S1, L2-L5, and L3-S1 levels were developed based on the respective surgical protocols. The developed models simulated flexion-extension using hybrid testing protocol. When spinal fusion was performed at more distal levels, particularly at the L5-S1 level, the following biomechanical properties increased during flexion-extension: range of motion, stress on the annulus fibrosus fibers and vertebra at the adjacent motion segment, and the magnitude of axial forces on the pedicle screw at the uppermost instrumented vertebra. The results of this study demonstrate that more distal fusion levels, particularly in spinal fusion including the L5-S1 level, lead to greater increases in the risk of proximal junctional kyphosis and failure, as evidenced by larger ranges of motion, higher stresses on fibers of the annulus fibrosus and vertebra at the adjacent segment, and higher axial forces on the screw at the uppermost instrumented vertebra in flexion-extension. Therefore, fusion levels should be carefully selected to avoid proximal junctional kyphosis and failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The risk of stroke after spinal fusion surgery: a national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jau-Ching; Chen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Laura; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Thien, Peck-Foong; Cheng, Henrich; Lo, Su-Shun

    2012-06-01

    Postoperative stroke is a rare complication of spinal fusion surgery, but its relevant risk and incidence remain unclear. To investigate the incidence and risk of stroke after spinal fusion surgery. Cohort study. All study subjects were extracted from a nationwide representative cohort of one million people from 2000 to 2005. Stroke, including hemorrhagic and ischemic, during the study period. An exposure group of 2,249 subjects who received spinal fusion surgery during the study period was compared with 2,203 control subjects matched by age, sex, and propensity score. All were followed up for 3 years for all kinds of stroke. Demographics, comorbidities, and nonmeasurable covariates were matched between the two groups. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed, with adjustments by Cox regression model. There were 4,452 subjects, including 2,249 spinal fusion patients and 2,203 controls, who were followed up for 12,967 person-years. The incidence rates of any, hemorrhagic, and ischemic strokes were 9.95, 1.21, and 8.86, respectively, per 1,000 person-years in the spinal fusion group and 11.5, 1.69, and 9.93, respectively, in the comparison group. Patients who received spinal fusion surgery were less likely to have any stroke (crude hazard ratio [HR]=0.87, p=.393), hemorrhagic stroke (HR=0.72, p=.473), and ischemic stroke (HR=0.89, p=.582) than the comparison group but without statistical significance. After adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, and medications, there were still no significant differences for risks of any, hemorrhagic, and ischemic strokes (adjusted HR=0.89, 1.36, and 0.87; p=.522, .553, and .477, respectively) in the spinal fusion group. Patients receiving spinal fusion surgery have similar incidence rates of having a stroke within 3 years postoperation as those without surgery. Risks of any postoperative stroke are similar or insignificantly lower in the spinal fusion group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Anterior spinal fusion by thoracoscopy. A non-traumatic technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulot, E; Trouilloud, P; Ragois, P; Giroux, E A; Grammont, P M

    1997-01-01

    Video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a new modality which allows visualization of, and access to the intrathoracic organs without thoracotomy. Recently, this technique has been used for anterior thoracic spine approach to perform surgery which previously required standard postero-lateral thoracotomy. The authors report their initial experience of anterior spinal fusion using thoracoscopy and give a detailed description of their surgical procedure. This technique, started on June 1993, was performed only in one level 1 in 10 patients who had thoracic spine trauma with fracture or luxation. The procedure was performed in the lateral decubitus position. The patient was prepared in the standard manner for a full thoracotomy. Surgical instruments that are needed for conversion to an open procedure must be in the operative room. Ventilation was stopped to the ipsilateral lung. Lung's collapse of the surgical side was obtained with a double lumen tube. Carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation was used to further collapse. The first thoracoscopic portal was placed through the sixth or seventh intercostal space in the posterior axillary line, which was the safest place. All subsequent portals were placed under thoracoscopic visualization, in a triangular way as recommended by Landreneau (1992). Only open trocars were used to avoid complication of CO2 insufflation. Once the target level has been defined, a needle was placed into the disc space and roentgenographic confirmation obtained. The parietal pleura was then divided using monopolar electrocautery. Segmental vessels of the operation field lied transversely across the midportion of the vertebral body. They were mobilised and systematically ligated with endoscopic clip to simplify the procedure. Then the intervertebral space was opened and bone and disc were removed, restricted to the anterior and middle third. The graft was placed into the thoracic cavity by using a high density calcium hydroxyapatite ceramic block

  15. Effects of Strontium Ranelate on Spinal Interbody Fusion Surgery in an Osteoporotic Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Ting Tsai

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a bone disease that afflicts millions of people around the world, and a variety of spinal integrity issues, such as degenerative spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis, are frequently concomitant with osteoporosis and are sometimes treated with spinal interbody fusion surgery. Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of strontium ranelate (SrR treatment of osteoporosis in improving bone strength, promoting bone remodeling, and reducing the risk of fractures, but its effects on interbody fusion surgery have not been adequately investigated. SrR-treated rats subjected to interbody fusion surgery exhibited significantly higher lumbar vertebral bone mineral density after 12 weeks of treatment than rats subjected to the same surgery but not treated with SrR. Furthermore, histological and radiographic assessments showed that a greater amount of newly formed bone tissue was present and that better fusion union occurred in the SrR-treated rats than in the untreated rats. Taken together, these results show significant differences in bone mineral density, PINP level, histological score, SrR content and mechanical testing, which demonstrate a relatively moderate effect of SrR treatment on bone strength and remodeling in the specific context of recovery after an interbody fusion surgery, and suggest the potential of SrR treatment as an effective adjunct to spinal interbody fusion surgery for human patients.

  16. The Effect of Early Initiation of Rehabilitation after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Bünger, Cody

    2012-01-01

    examined patients' subsequent rehabilitation. Group-based rehabilitation is both efficient and cost-effective in rehabilitation of lumbar spinal fusion patients.Methods: Patients with degenerative disc diseases undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion were randomly assigned to initiate...... work. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare the groups in terms of differences from baseline to 6 months and 1-year follow-up.Results: According to the ODI, at 1-year follow-up, the 6w-group had a median reduction of -6(-19;4) compared with -20(-30;-7) in the 12w-group (p...

  17. The effect of electrical stimulation on lumbar spinal fusion in older patients: a randomized, controlled, multi-center trial: part 2: fusion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Thomas; Christensen, Finn B; Egund, Niels; Ernst, Carsten; Fruensgaard, Søren; Østergaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Jens Langer; Rasmussen, Sten; Niedermann, Bent; Høy, Kristian; Helmig, Peter; Holm, Randi; Lindblad, Bent Erling; Hansen, Ebbe Stender; Bünger, Cody

    2009-10-01

    Randomized, controlled, multi-center trial. To investigate the effect of direct current (DC) electrical stimulation on fusion rates after lumbar spinal fusion in patients older than 60 years. Older patients have increased complication rates after spinal fusion surgery. Treatments which have the possibility of enhancing functional outcome and fusion rates without lengthening the procedure could prove beneficial. DC-stimulation of spinal fusion has proven effective in increasing fusion rates in younger and "high risk" patients, but little information exist on the effect in older patients. A randomized clinical trial comprising 5 orthopedic centers. The study included a total of 107 patients randomized to uninstrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion with or without DC-stimulation. Fusion rate was assessed at 2 year follow-up using thin slice CT. Functional outcome was assessed using Dallas Pain Questionnaire and Low Back Pain Rating Scale pain index. RESULTS.: Available follow-up after 2 years was 89% (84 of 95 patients). Fusion rates were surprisingly low. DC-stimulation had no effect on fusion rate: 35% versus 36% in controls. Other factors associated with low fusion rates were female gender (32% vs. 42% in males, P = 0.050) and smoking (21% vs. 42% in nonsmokers, P = 0.079). Patients who achieved a solid fusion as determined by CT had superior functional outcome and pain scores at their latest follow-up. Thin slice CT revealed very high nonunion rates after uninstrumented spinal fusion in older patients. DC-stimulation was not effective in increasing fusion rates in this patient population. The achievement of a solid fusion was associated with superior functional outcome.

  18. Assessing mechanical integrity of spinal fusion by in situ endochondral osteoinduction in the murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Ashvin K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Historically, radiographs, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT exams, palpation and histology have been used to assess fusions in a mouse spine. The objective of this study was to develop a faster, cheaper, reproducible test to directly quantify the mechanical integrity of spinal fusions in mice. Methods Fusions were induced in ten mice spine using a previously described technique of in situ endochondral ossification, harvested with soft tissue, and cast in radiolucent alginate material for handling. Using a validated software package and a customized mechanical apparatus that flexed and extended the spinal column, the amount of intervertebral motion between adjacent vertebral discs was determined with static flexed and extended lateral spine radiographs. Micro-CT images of the same were also blindly reviewed for fusion. Results Mean intervertebral motion between control, non-fused, spinal vertebral discs was 6.1 ± 0.2° during spine flexion/extension. In fusion samples, adjacent vertebrae with less than 3.5° intervertebral motion had fusions documented by micro-CT inspection. Conclusions Measuring the amount of intervertebral rotation between vertebrae during spine flexion/extension is a relatively simple, cheap (

  19. Risk factors of adjacent segment disease requiring surgery after lumbar spinal fusion: comparison of posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Yongdai; Soh, Jae-Wan; Shin, Byung-Joon

    2014-03-01

    A retrospective study. To determine the incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) requiring surgery among patients previously treated with spinal fusion for degenerative lumbar disease and to compare the survivorship of adjacent segment according to various risk factors including comparison of fusion methods: posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) versus posterolateral fusion (PLF). One of the major issues after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment disease. Biomechanically, PLIF has been reported to be more rigid than PLF, and therefore, patients who undergo PLIF are suspected to experience a higher incidence of ASD than those who underwent PLF. There have been many studies analyzing the risk factors of ASD, but we are not aware of any study comparing PLIF with PLF in incidence of ASD requiring surgery. A consecutive series of 490 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal fusion of 3 or fewer segments to treat degenerative lumbar disease was identified. The mean age at index operation was 53 years, and the mean follow-up period was 51 months (12-236 mo). The number of patients treated by PLF and PLIF were 103 and 387, respectively. The incidence and prevalence of revision surgery for ASD were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. For risk factor analysis, we used log-rank test and Cox regression analysis with fusion methods, sex, age, number of fused segments, and presence of laminectomy adjacent to index fusion. After index spinal fusion, 23 patients (4.7%) had undergone additional surgery for ASD. Kaplan-Meier analysis predicted a disease-free survival rate of adjacent segments in 94.2% of patients at 5 years and 89.6% at 10 years after the index operation. In the analysis of risk factors, PLIF was associated with 3.4 times higher incidence of ASD requiring surgery than PLF (P = 0.037). Patients older than 60 years at the time of index operation were 2.5 times more likely to undergo revision operation than those younger

  20. Developments in bone tissue engineering research for spinal fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Many orthopaedic procedures require fusion of a bony defect. Sometimes a bone graft is needed for this fusion. Autograft bone is considered the golden standard. The harvesting of this bone is time consuming and may have serious side effects, such as chronic donor site pain. Available alternatives

  1. The Outcomes of Anterior Spinal Fusion for Cervical Compressive Myelopathy—A Retrospective Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz-King Suen

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion is a viable surgical option for patients with one level of anterior cervical cord compression, especially for patients with kyphosis or straight canal spine. For patients with two- to three-level involvement, anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion provides good functional result in proper selection of cases. We also identified some prognostic factors (male sex, symptoms less than 1 year, and age less than 70 years in predicting a favourable outcome of anterior spinal fusion for CCM.

  2. Spinal fusion in children with spina bifida : influence on ambulation level and functional abilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, MAGC; Gulmans, VAM; Gooskens, RHJM; Pruijs, JEH; Helders, PJM

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of spinal fusion on ambulation and functional abilities in children with spina bifida for whom early mobilization was stimulated. Ten children (three males and seven females) with myelomeningocele were prospectively followed. Their mean age at

  3. Engineering spinal fusion: evaluating ceramic materials for cell based tissue engineered approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis was to advance the development of tissue engineered posterolateral spinal fusion by investigating the potential of calcium phosphate ceramic materials to support cell based tissue engineered bone formation. This was accomplished by developing several novel model

  4. Treatment of postoperative infection after posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation in a patient with neuromuscular scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghattas, Paul J; Mehlman, Charles T; Eichten, David

    2014-02-01

    According to the literature, patients with neuromuscular scoliosis have a higher rate of infection after spinal fusion. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to assess the optimal treatment and related outcomes for patients with infections after posterior spinal fusion. In this article, we examine the data and report a case in which a vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device was used as definitive treatment for a deep wound infection after posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation in a patient with neuromuscular scoliosis. Our patient, a 17-year-old adolescent girl with progressive neuromuscular scoliosis, underwent posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation and bone graft from T2 to sacrum without complication. One month after surgery, she presented with a draining wound. She underwent repeat surgical irrigation and debridement with subsequent use of a wound VAC. The wound VAC was used for more than 2 months, until skin closure was complete. The deep polymicrobial wound infection was treated successfully and definitively with a wound VAC. This case report suggests that good long-term outcomes can be achieved with use of a wound VAC for definitive closure, with possible avoidance of other secondary surgeries requiring skin grafts or flaps for wound closure.

  5. Coaptive film versus subcuticular suture: comparing skin closure time after posterior spinal instrumented fusion in pediatric patients with spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottkau, Brian E; Rebello, Gleeson; Merlin, Gabriel; Winograd, Jonathan M

    2010-11-01

    A prospective, randomized trial comparing skin closure time between coaptive film and subcuticular Monocryl sutures in children undergoing posterior instrumented spinal fusion. To prospectively compare skin closure time, complication rate and cosmetic result between coaptive film and subcuticular Monocryl wound closures in pediatric spine surgery. Posterior instrumented spinal fusions for spinal deformity in children are time-consuming ventures that are demanding on both the patient and physician. Minimizing the time for skin closure at the end of prolonged surgery diminishes the physical burden on the surgeon, the operating room personnel, and reduces operating room costs. Twenty-five children (mean age, 14.1 year) underwent posterior instrumented spinal fusion. Twenty-five incisions in 25 patients (12 closed with 3-0 subcuticular Monocryl sutures, 13 closed with coaptive film [Steri Strip S; 3 M company]) were evaluated. The method of skin closure was randomized before beginning the procedure and the surgeon informed just before skin closure. Closure time was recorded. A blinded plastic surgeon using a visual analogue scale assessed the cosmetic results at a minimum 3-month follow-up. Incisions closed with coaptive film required less time to complete than incisions closed with subcuticular suture. The mean time for skin closure using coaptive film was 290.62 seconds compared to the mean time of 674.75 seconds using Monocryl sutures (P < 0.000001). The average length of incisions closed with coaptive film was similar to the corresponding incisions that were closed with subcuticular Monocryl sutures (30.8 and 34.0 cm, respectively, P = 0.22). There was no significant difference in the cosmetic results or the number of wound complications using either technique. Coaptive film is a time-saving option for skin closure following pediatric spine surgery with comparable cosmetic results and no difference in complication rates.

  6. Fusion of SPECT/TC images: Usefulness and benefits in degenerative spinal cord pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo, Monica; Ucros, Gonzalo; Bermudez, Sonia; Morillo, Anibal; Rodriguez, Andres

    2005-01-01

    The objectives are to compare CT and SPECT bone scintigraphy evaluated independently with SPECT-CT fusion images in patients with known degenerative spinal pathology. To demonstrate the clinical usefulness of CT and SPECT fusion images. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients with suspected degenerative spinal disease were evaluated with thin-slice, non-angled helical CT and bone scintigrams with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), both with multiplanar reconstructions within a 24-hour period After independent evaluation by a nuclear medicine specialist and a radiologist, multimodality image fusion software was used to merge the CT and SPECT studies and a final consensus interpretation of the combined images was obtained. Results: Thirty-two SPECT bone scintigraphy images, helical CT studies and SPECT-CT fusion images were obtained for 31 patients with degenerative spinal disease. The results of the bone scintigraphy and CT scans were in agreement in 17 pairs of studies (53.12%). In these studies image fusion did not provide additional information on the location or extension of the lesions. In 11 of the study pairs (34.2%), the information obtained was not in agreement between scintigraphy and CT studies: CT images demonstrated several abnormalities, whereas the SPECT images showed only one dominant lesion, or the SPECT images did not provide enough information for anatomical localization. In these cases image fusion helped establish the precise localization of the most clinically significant lesion, which matched the lesion with the greatest uptake. In 4 studies (12.5%) the CT and SPECT images were not in agreement: CT and SPECT images showed different information (normal scintigraphy, abnormal CT), thus leading to inconclusive fusion images. Conclusion: The use of CT-SPECT fusion images in degenerative spinal disease allows for the integration of anatomic detail with physiologic and functional information. CT-SPECT fusion improves the

  7. Thoracic spinal subdural hematoma complicating anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzman, Nicole M; Kapun, Jennifer; Wagener, Christopher

    2015-10-13

    A spinal subdural hematoma is a rare clinical entity with considerable consequences without prompt diagnosis and treatment. Throughout the literature, there are limited accounts of spinal subdural hematoma formation following spinal surgery. This report is the first to describe the formation of a spinal subdural hematoma in the thoracic spine following surgery at the cervical level. A 53-year-old woman developed significant paraparesis several hours after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of C5-6. Expeditious return to operating room for anterior cervical revision decompression was performed, and the epidural hematoma was evacuated without difficulty. Postoperative imaging demonstrated a subdural hematoma confined to the thoracic level, and the patient was returned to the operating room for a third surgical procedure. Decompression of T1-3, with evacuation of the subdural hematoma was performed. Postprocedure, the patient's sensory and motor deficits were restored, and, with rehabilitation, the patient gained functional mobility. Spinal subdural hematomas should be considered as a rare but potential complication of cervical discectomy and fusion. With early diagnosis and treatment, favorable outcomes may be achieved.

  8. Long-term health care utilisation and costs after spinal fusion in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Borbjerg; Bünger, Cody; Søgaard, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Spinal fusion surgery rates in the elderly are increasing. Cost effectiveness analyses with relatively short-length follow-up have been performed. But the long-term effects in terms of health care use are largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe the long......-term consequences of spinal fusion surgery in elderly patients on health care use and costs using a health care system perspective. METHODS: 194 patients undergoing spinal fusion between 2001 and 2005 (70 men, 124 women) with a mean age of 70 years (range 59-88) at surgery were included. Average length of follow......-up was 6.2 years (range 0.3-9.0 years). Data on resource utilisation and costs were obtained from national registers providing complete coverage of all reimbursed contacts with primary- and secondary health care providers. Data were available from 3 years prior fusion surgery until the end of 2009. RESULTS...

  9. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ninomiya, Koshi; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  10. Spontaneous Thoracic Curve Correction After Selective Posterior Fusion of Thoracolumbar/Lumbar Curves in Lenke 5C Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Xi-ming; Wei, Xian-zhao; Zhu, Xiao-dong; Li, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Selective fusion of the thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L) curve is an effective method for the treatment of Lenke type 5C curves. Several studies have demonstrated that spontaneous correction of the thoracic curve does indeed occur. However, how this correction occurs after isolated posterior segmental instrumentation of the structural lumbar curve has not been well described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of the thoracic curve to selective TL/L curve fusion in patients with Lenke type 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and assess the correlative clinical outcomes. Thirty-four consecutive patients with Lenke type 5C AIS were included in this study. All patients underwent selective TL/L curve instrumentation and fusion via the posterior approach. Coronal and sagittal radiographs were analyzed before surgery, at 1 week after surgery and at least 2 years after surgery. The preoperative coronal Cobb angle of the major TL/L curve was 45.4° ± 7.0°, and that of the minor thoracic curve was 25.4° ± 8.8°. The major TL/L and minor thoracic curves were corrected to postoperative angles of 9.5° ± 5.0° and 11.2° ± 5.2°, respectively, and measured 10.5° ± 6.0° and 13.4° ± 7.5° at the follow-up, respectively. The supine side-bending average Cobb angle of the thoracic curve was 9.9°. These results demonstrate satisfactory improvements because of coronal and sagittal restoration. Significant correlations were found between the preoperative and early postoperative conditions and the Cobb angle changes of the minor thoracic curve and the major TL/L curves (r = 0.42, P = 0.01). Significant correlations were also observed between the early and final follow-up postoperative conditions and the Cobb angle changes of the minor thoracic curve and the major TL/L curves (r = 0.57, P 5C AIS patients. Supine side-bending radiographs are an effective method of predicting the spontaneous correction of thoracic curves. The correction of LL is important for

  11. Lower preoperative Hounsfield unit measurements are associated with adjacent segment fracture after spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Dennis S; Schreiber, Joseph J; Taher, Fadi; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2013-03-01

    Retrospective case-control study. To determine the association of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements with adjacent segment fractures after spinal fusion. Adjacent segment fracture is a potentially devastating complication after spinal fusion surgery in osteoporotic patient. Recently, a technique for assessing bone mineral density using HU measurements from computed tomography was described and correlated with both dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-assessed bone mineral density and compressive strength in an osseous model. Patients with adjacent segment fractures after spinal fusion were identified from a prospectively collected patient database and matched 1:1 with nonfracture controls on the basis of age, sex, and fusion construct. Minimum follow-up was 6 months. Patients with metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis or those taking medications known to negatively alter bone strength were excluded. HU assessment was done according to the previously published protocol using the preoperative computed tomography. Twenty patients had complete imaging data and could be matched to nonfracture controls. The groups were well matched with respect to age, sex, body mass index, and number of levels fused. Following the index surgical procedure, the fracture group had more positive sagittal balance than the control group (10.7 cm vs. 9.1 cm). Analysis of HU values at the fracture level showed a significantly lower value in the fracture group than in the controls (145.6 vs. 199.4, P = 0.006). Similarly, global assessment of HU across the thoracic and lumbar spines was significantly lower in the fracture group (139.9 vs. 170.1, P = 0.032). HU was significantly lower both locally and globally in the fracture cohort. Because computed tomographic scans are frequently part of preoperative planning for spinal fusion, this information should be incorporated in preoperative planning. Studies to prospectively validate HU as a predictor of adjacent segment fracture risk and to

  12. Role of spinal glial cells in bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao LU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effects of intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, a glial metabolism inhibitor, on bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and inflammatory response. Methods Forty adult male SD rats with intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into five groups (8 each: (1 bee-toxin alone group; (2 vehicle (solvent group; (3 low dose (1nmol fluorocitrate group; (4 middle dose (10nmol fluorocitrate group; (5 high dose (50nmol fluorocitrate group. After the measurement of rat paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT and paw volume (PV, the drug or vehicle was administered intrathecally. Twenty minutes later, bee-toxin (0.2mg/50μl was intraplantarly injected into the left hind paw of every rat, and spontaneous flinching reflexes (SFR were observed instantly for 1 hour. Two hours later, PWMT and PV were measured again. Results Intraplantar injection of bee-toxin into one hind paw of rat induced persistent SFR lasting for 1 hour, with PWMT decreased and PV increased in the injected paw. Compared with control group, pretreatment with intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate produced a significant inhibition of bee-toxin-induced persistent SFR (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, decreased the PWMT in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05, but it had no effect on bee-toxin-induced paw edema. Conclusion Activation of spinal glial cells may participate in bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain and mechanical hyperalgesia, but not inflammatory response.

  13. Effect of zoledronic acid on lumbar spinal fusion in osteoporotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qirui; Chen, Jian; Fan, Jin; Li, Qingqing; Yin, Guoyong; Yu, Lipeng

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effect of zoledronic acid (ZA) on lumbar spinal fusion in patients with osteoporosis. This retrospective study includes 94 osteoporotic patients suffering from lumbar degenerative diseases or lumbar fracture who underwent lumbar spinal fusion in our institution from January 2013 to August 2014. They were divided into ZA group and control group according to whether the patient received ZA infusion or not. The patients in ZA group were given 5 mg intravenous ZA at the 3rd-5th days after operation. All patients took daily oral supplement of 600 mg calcium carbonate and 800 IU vitamin D during the follow-up after operation. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 36 (SF-36) scores were recorded preoperatively and post-operatively to evaluate the clinic outcomes; the spinal fusion was assessed by X-ray or CT Scan. 64 patients finished the final follow-up, including 30 patients in ZA group and 34 patients in control group. No significant difference was observed in gender, age, and preoperative BMI VAS, ODI, and SF-36 scores between the two groups (P > 0.05). The post-operative VAS and ODI scores decreased rapidly at 3 and 6 months, but rose back slightly at 12 and 24 months in both groups. On the contrary, post-operative SF-36 scores increased rapidly at 3 and 6 months, while fell back slightly at 12 and 24 months, with a statistically significant difference between the two groups at 12 months, but not at 3 and 6 month post-operation. The spinal fusion rate in ZA group was 90% at 6 months, 92% at 12 months, while it was 75% at 6 months, 92.86% at 12 months in control group, significantly different between the two groups at 12 months, but not at 6 months. In the whole follow-up period, adjacent vertebral compressing fracture occurred in five patients in control group, none in ZA group. No pedicle screw loosening was observed in ZA group, with six in control group. Zoledronic acid accelerates

  14. Lumbar spinal fusion patients’ demands to the primary health sector: evaluation of three rehabilitation protocols. A prospective randomized study

    OpenAIRE

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B.; Lauersen, Ida; Bünger, Cody E.

    2005-01-01

    Very few studies have investigated the effects or costs of rehabilitation regimens following lumbar spinal fusion. The effectiveness of in-hospital rehabilitation regimens has substantial impact on patients’ demands in the primary health care sector. The aim of this study was to investigate patient-articulated demands to the primary health care sector following lumbar spinal fusion and three different in-hospital rehabilitation regimens in a prospective, randomized study with a 2-year follow-...

  15. Proximal Junctional Kyphosis in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Following Segmental Posterior Spinal Instrumentation and Fusion; Minimum 2 Years Follow-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Khaki Nahad; Hassan Ghandhari; Hamid Behtash; Ebrahim Ameri; Bahram Mobini; Hossein Vahid Tari

    2009-01-01

    Background:To evaluate proximal junctional segment changes in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis(AIS) the posterior spinal fusion and also instrumentation also and finding of probable risk factors, were all considered in this study.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed radiographs of 121 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion for AIS from T3 or below, with a mean follow-   up of 32.8 months(range,24-83). All coronal and sagittal measurements including the proximal junctional k...

  16. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  17. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted. PMID:25276453

  18. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapp SM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4–S1 intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.Keywords: AxiaLIF, fusion, lumbar, minimally invasive, presacral

  19. Health economic evaluation in lumbar spinal fusion: a systematic literature review anno 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B

    2006-01-01

    in clinical practice are present, economic evaluation is needed in order to facilitate the decision-makers' budget allocations. NHS Economic Evaluation Database, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched. Two independent reviewers (one clinical content expert and one economic content expert) applied...... that the clinical effects are statistically synonymous, it does not support the use of high-cost techniques. There is a great potential for improvement of methodological quality in economic evaluations of lumbar spinal fusion and further research is imperative....

  20. Spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome: post-operative recovery and family experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, C; Leonard, H; Torode, I; Downs, J

    2015-11-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder mainly affecting females and scoliosis is a common co-morbidity. Spinal fusion may be recommended if the scoliosis is progressive. This qualitative study investigated recovery of girls with Rett syndrome during the first 12 post-operative months and explored family perspectives and coping around the time of surgery. Parents registered with the population-based Australian Rett Syndrome Database were recruited to this study if their daughter had a confirmed pathogenic MECP2 mutation and spinal fusion between 2006 and 2012. Twenty-five interviews were conducted to determine their daughter's recovery and parental stresses and coping. Themes in the interview data were identified with content analysis, and the regaining of gross motor skills over the first 12 post-operative months was described with time-to-event (survival) analysis. Pain and energy levels, appetite, mood and coinciding health issues influenced their daughter's post-operative recovery. The majority of girls recovered preoperative sitting (88%), standing (81%) and walking (80%) by 12 months. The decision to proceed with surgery was associated with feelings of fear, obligation, relief and guilt for families. Development of complications, poor support and feelings of isolation increased their emotional burden whereas adequate information and discharge preparation, confidence in self and staff, and balancing personal needs with their daughter's care relieved this burden. Our study identified clinical practice issues in relation to families whose daughter with Rett syndrome undergoes spinal fusion, issues that are also relevant to other severe disabilities. Return of wellness and gross motor skills following spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome occurred within the first 12 post-operative months in most cases. Parents require information and practical support to alleviate their emotional burden. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Differences in 3D vs. 2D analysis in lumbar spinal fusion simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hung-Wei; Bashkuev, Maxim; Pumberger, Matthias; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2018-03-15

    Lumbar interbody fusion is currently the gold standard in treating patients with disc degeneration or segmental instability. Despite it having been used for several decades, the non-union rate remains high. A failed fusion is frequently attributed to an inadequate mechanical environment after instrumentation. Finite element (FE) models can provide insights into the mechanics of the fusion process. Previous fusion simulations using FE models showed that the geometries and material of the cage can greatly influence the fusion outcome. However, these studies used axisymmetric models which lacked realistic spinal geometries. Therefore, different modeling approaches were evaluated to understand the bone-formation process. Three FE models of the lumbar motion segment (L4-L5) were developed: 2D, Sym-3D and Nonsym-3D. The fusion process based on existing mechano-regulation algorithms using the FE simulations to evaluate the mechanical environment was then integrated into these models. In addition, the influence of different lordotic angles (5, 10 and 15°) was investigated. The volume of newly formed bone, the axial stiffness of the whole segment and bone distribution inside and surrounding the cage were evaluated. In contrast to the Nonsym-3D, the 2D and Sym-3D models predicted excessive bone formation prior to bridging (peak values with 36 and 9% higher than in equilibrium, respectively). The 3D models predicted a more uniform bone distribution compared to the 2D model. The current results demonstrate the crucial role of the realistic 3D geometry of the lumbar motion segment in predicting bone formation after lumbar spinal fusion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Preparing Platelet-Rich Plasma with Whole Blood Harvested Intraoperatively During Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Zheng; Zhou, Ning-Feng; Huang, Yu-Feng; Bao, Yu-Jie; Wu, De-Sheng; Zhang, Ya-Dong

    2017-07-22

    BACKGROUND Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has gained growing popularity in use in spinal fusion procedures in the last decade. Substantial intraoperative blood loss is frequently accompanied with spinal fusion, and it is unknown whether blood harvested intraoperatively qualifies for PRP preparation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Whole blood was harvested intraoperatively and venous blood was collected by venipuncture. Then, we investigated the platelet concentrations in whole blood and PRP, the concentration of growth factors in PRP, and the effects of PRP on the proliferation and viability of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs). RESULTS Our results revealed that intraoperatively harvested whole blood and whole blood collected by venipuncture were similar in platelet concentration. In addition, PRP formulations prepared from both kinds of whole blood were similar in concentration of platelet and growth factors. Additional analysis showed that the similar concentrations of growth factors resulted from the similar platelet concentrations of whole blood and PRP between the two groups. Moreover, these two kinds of PRP formulations had similar effects on promoting cell proliferation and enhancing cell viability. CONCLUSIONS Therefore, intraoperatively harvested whole blood may be a potential option for preparing PRP spinal fusion.

  3. Wound healing without drains in posterior spinal fusion in idiopathic scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsiddiky, A.; Nisar, K.A.; Alhuzaimi, F.; Albishi, W.; Alnuaim, B.; Albarrag, M.; Meo, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of wound infection and neurological injuries in patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal fusion without use of drains. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from February 2007 to June 2010. Methodology: Patients who underwent similar technique of posterior spinal fusion instrumentation for the correction of scoliosis without use of drain were included. Wound Demographics, wound healing, complications and duration of hospital stay were considered and described as frequency and mean values. Results: The average age at the time of surgery was 12.80 +- 1.30 years, duration of surgery was 3.80 +- 0.86 hours, hospital stay was 3.84 +- 0.78 days and patients were followed-up over the last 30 months. There was no incidence of any neurological complication and deep infection. However, only 2 (4.16%) cases with superficial skin infection were treated with dressing and antibiotics with full recovery. Conclusion: The wound healing is adequate without using drain for patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation when good wash, watertight closure technique and appropriate antibiotics coverage is provided. (author)

  4. Bone SPECT/CT in the postoperative spine: a focus on spinal fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Riyami, Khulood; Bomanji, Jamshed [University College London Hospitals, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Royal Free Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Wyngaert, Tim van den [Antwerp University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edegem (Belgium); University of Antwerp, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2017-11-15

    Low back pain is a global problem affecting one in 10 people. The management of low back pain varies from conservative to more invasive methods with a spectacular increase in the number of patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery during the last decade. Conventional radiological and radionuclide studies are often used in the assessment of persistent or recurring pain after spinal surgery with several advantages and limitations related to each technique. This article reviews the key contribution of integrated bone SPECT/CT in evaluating patients with persistent or recurring pain after spinal surgery, focusing on spinal fusion. Current literature supports the use of bone SPECT/CT as an adjunct imaging modality and problem-solving tool in evaluating patients with suspicion of pseudarthrosis, adjacent segment degeneration, and hardware failure. The role of bone SPECT/CT in post-operative orthopaedic scenarios is evolving, and this review highlights the need for further research on the role of bone SPECT/CT in these patients. (orig.)

  5. Bone SPECT/CT in the postoperative spine: a focus on spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Riyami, Khulood; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Van den Wyngaert, Tim; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2017-11-01

    Low back pain is a global problem affecting one in 10 people. The management of low back pain varies from conservative to more invasive methods with a spectacular increase in the number of patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery during the last decade. Conventional radiological and radionuclide studies are often used in the assessment of persistent or recurring pain after spinal surgery with several advantages and limitations related to each technique. This article reviews the key contribution of integrated bone SPECT/CT in evaluating patients with persistent or recurring pain after spinal surgery, focusing on spinal fusion. Current literature supports the use of bone SPECT/CT as an adjunct imaging modality and problem-solving tool in evaluating patients with suspicion of pseudarthrosis, adjacent segment degeneration, and hardware failure. The role of bone SPECT/CT in post-operative orthopaedic scenarios is evolving, and this review highlights the need for further research on the role of bone SPECT/CT in these patients.

  6. Increased Total Anesthetic Time Leads to Higher Rates of Surgical Site Infections in Spinal Fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Ross C; Murphy, Meghan; Maloney, Patrick; Kor, Daryl; Nassr, Ahmad; Freedman, Brett; Fogelson, Jeremy; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective review of a consecutive series of spinal fusions comparing patient and procedural characteristics of patients who developed surgical site infections (SSIs) after spinal fusion. It is known that increased surgical time (incision to closure) is associated with a higher rate of postoperative SSIs. We sought to determine whether increased total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) is a factor in the development of SSIs as well. In spine surgery for deformity and degenerative disease, SSI has been associated with operative time, revealing a nearly 10-fold increase in SSI rates in prolonged surgery. Surgical time is associated with infections in other surgical disciplines as well. No studies have reported whether total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) has an association with SSIs. Surgical records were searched in a retrospective fashion to identify all spine fusion procedures performed between January 2010 and July 2012. All SSIs during that timeframe were recorded and compared with the list of cases performed between 2010 and 2012 in a case-control design. There were 20 (1.7%) SSIs in this fusion cohort. On univariate analyses of operative factors, there was a significant association between total anesthetic time (Infection 7.6 ± 0.5 hrs vs. no infection -6.0 ± 0.1 hrs, P operative time (infection 5.5 ± 0.4 hrs vs. no infection - 4.4 ± 0.06 hrs, P infections, whereas level of pathology and emergent surgery were not significant. On multivariate logistic analysis, BMI and total anesthetic time remained independent predictors of SSI whereas ASA status and operative time did not. Increasing BMI and total anesthetic time were independent predictors of SSIs in this cohort of over 1000 consecutive spinal fusions. 3.

  7. Hemiparesis Caused by Cervical Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma: A Report of 3 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinya Nakanishi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH with hemiparesis. The first patient was a 73-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis, neck pain, and left shoulder pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C3–C6 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The second patient was a 62-year-old man who presented with right hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a right posterolateral dominant epidural hematoma at the C6-T1 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The third patient was a 60-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C2–C4 level. The condition of the patient improved with conservative treatment. The classical clinical presentation of SSEH is acute onset of severe irradiating back pain followed by progression to paralysis, whereas SSEH with hemiparesis is less common. Our cases suggest that acute cervical spinal epidural hematoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with clinical symptoms of sudden neck pain and radicular pain with progression to hemiparesis.

  8. Spinal fusion for chronic low back pain: systematic review on the accuracy of tests for patient selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, P.C.P.H.; Staal, J.B.; Walenkamp, G.H.; Bie, R.A. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Spinal fusion is a common but controversial treatment for chronic low back pain (LBP) with outcomes similar to those of programmed conservative care. To improve the results of fusion, tests for patient selection are used in clinical practice. PURPOSE: To determine the prognostic

  9. CORRELATION BETWEEN OBESITY, SAGITTAL BALANCE AND CLINICAL OUTCOME IN SPINAL FUSION

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    Marcel Machado da Motta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To correlate obesity with radiographic parameters of spinal and spinopelvic balance in patients undergoing spinal arthrodesis, and to correlate obesity with clinical outcome of these patients.Methods:Observational retrospective study including patients who underwent spinal arthrodesis, with minimum follow-up period of three months. We measured waist circumference, as well as height and weight to calculate body mass index (BMI and obtained radiographs of the total column. The clinical parameters studied were pain by visual analog scale (VAS and the Oswestry questionnaire (ODI. Obesity correlated with radiographic parameters of the sagittal and spinopelvic balance and postoperative clinical parameters.Results:32 patients were analyzed. The higher the BMI, the greater the value of VAS found, but without statistical significance (p=0.83. There was also no correlation between BMI and the ODI questionnaire. Analyzing the abdominal circumference, there was no correlation between the VAS and ODI. There was no correlation between BMI or waist circumference and the radiographic parameters of global spinopelvic sagittal alignment. Regarding the postoperative results, there was no correlation between the mean BMI and waist circumference and the postoperative results for ODI and VAS (p=0.75 and p=0.7, respectively.Conclusions:The clinical outcomes of patients who undergone spinal fusion were not affected by the BMI and waist circumference. Also, there was no correlation between radiographic parameters of spinal and spinopelvic sagittal balance with obesity in patients previously treated with arthrodesis of the spine.

  10. Selective Retention of Bone Marrow-Derived Cells to Enhance Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Yoichi; Nitto, Hironori; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Valdevit, Antonio D.; Kambic, Helen E.; Davros, William J.; Easley, Kirk A.; Powell, Kimerly A.

    2005-01-01

    Connective tissue progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from fresh bone marrow aspirates using some porous matrices as a surface for cell attachment and selective retention, and for creating a cellular graft that is enriched with respect to the number of progenitor cells. We evaluated the potential value of this method using demineralized cortical bone powder as the matrix. Matrix alone, matrix plus marrow, and matrix enriched with marrow cells were compared in an established canine spinal fusion model. Fusions were compared based on union score, fusion mass, fusion volume, and by mechanical testing. Enriched matrix grafts delivered a mean of 2.3 times more cells and approximately 5.6 times more progenitors than matrix mixed with bone marrow. The union score with enriched matrix was superior to matrix alone and matrix plus marrow. Fusion volume and fusion area also were greater with the enriched matrix. These data suggest that the strategy of selective retention provides a rapid, simple, and effective method for concentration and delivery of marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting procedures in various clinical settings. PMID:15738828

  11. Progressively unstable c2 spondylolysis requiring spinal fusion: case report.

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    Nishimura, Yusuke; Ellis, Michael John; Anderson, Jennifer; Hara, Masahito; Natsume, Atsushi; Ginsberg, Howard Joeseph

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spondylolysis is a rare condition defined as a corticated cleft at the pars interarticularis in the cervical spine. This is the case of C2 spondylolysis demonstrating progressive significant instability, which was successfully treated by anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with cervical anterior plate. We describe a 20-year-old female with C2 spondylolysis presenting with progressive worsening of neck pain associated with progressive instability at the C2/3 segment. The progression of instability was well-documented on flexion-extension cervical spine x-rays. She was successfully treated by C2/3 ACDF with anterior cervical plate. Her preoperative significant neck pain resolved immediately after the surgical intervention. She was completely free from neurological symptoms at 1-year postoperative follow-up. We also review the literature and discuss 24 reported cases with C2 spondylolysis. When planning treatment, we should make sure to differentiate this pathology from acute traumatic fracture, which is a hangman's fracture. Assessment of C2/3 instability associated with neurological deficits is extremely important to consider management properly. C2/3 ACDF with cervical plate is biomechanically viable, less invasive, and provides adequate surgical stabilization for unstable C2 spondylolysis.

  12. Analyzer-based imaging of spinal fusion in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M E; Beavis, R C; Allen, L A; Fiorella, David; Schueltke, E; Juurlink, B H; Chapman, L D; Zhong, Z

    2008-01-01

    Analyzer-based imaging (ABI) utilizes synchrotron radiation sources to create collimated monochromatic x-rays. In addition to x-ray absorption, this technique uses refraction and scatter rejection to create images. ABI provides dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging techniques. Twenty-one adult male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups to undergo the following interventions: (1) non-injured control, (2) decortication alone, (3) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and (4) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and interspinous wiring. Surgical procedures were performed at the L5-6 level. Animals were killed at 2, 4 and 6 weeks after the intervention and the spine muscle blocks were excised. Specimens were assessed for the presence of fusion by (1) manual testing, (2) conventional absorption radiography and (3) ABI. ABI showed no evidence of bone fusion in groups 1 and 2 and showed solid or possibly solid fusion in subjects from groups 3 and 4 at 6 weeks. Metal artifacts were not present in any of the ABI images. Conventional absorption radiographs did not provide diagnostic quality imaging of either the graft material or fusion masses in any of the specimens in any of the groups. Synchrotron-based ABI represents a novel imaging technique which can be used to assess spinal fusion in a small animal model. ABI produces superior image quality when compared to conventional radiographs

  13. Perioperative outcomes, complications, and costs associated with lumbar spinal fusion in older patients with spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kevin L; Auerbach, Joshua D; Lau, Edmund; Schmier, Jordana; Ochoa, Jorge A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the perioperative outcomes, complications, and costs associated with posterolateral spinal fusion (PSF) among Medicare enrollees with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and/or spondylolisthesis by using a national Medicare claims database. A 5% systematic sample of Medicare claims data (2005-2009) was used to identify outcomes in patients who had undergone PSF for a diagnosis of LSS and/or spondylolisthesis. Patients eligible for study inclusion also required a minimum of 2 years of follow-up and a claim history of at least 12 months prior to surgery. A final cohort of 1672 patients was eligible for analysis. Approximately half (50.7%) had LSS only, 10.2% had spondylolisthesis only, and 39.1% had both LSS and spondylolisthesis. The average age was 71.4 years, and the average length of stay was 4.6 days. At 3 months and 1 and 2 years postoperatively, the incidence of spine reoperation was 10.9%, 13.3%, and 16.9%, respectively, whereas readmissions for complications occurred in 11.1%, 17.5%, and 24.9% of cases, respectively. At 2 years postoperatively, 36.2% of patients had either undergone spine reoperation and/or received an epidural injection. The average Medicare payment was $36,230 ± $17,020, $46,840 ± $31,350, and $61,610 ± $46,580 at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after surgery, respectively. The data showed that 1 in 6 elderly patients treated with PSF for LSS or spondylolisthesis underwent reoperation on the spine within 2 years of surgery, and nearly 1 in 4 patients was readmitted for a surgery-related complication. These data highlight several potential areas in which improvements may be made in the effective delivery and cost of surgical care for patients with spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis.

  14. A Multicenter Radiographic Evaluation of the Rates of Preoperative and Postoperative Malalignment in Degenerative Spinal Fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, Jean-Christophe A; Segebarth, Bradley; Schroerlucke, Samuel R; Khanna, Nitin; Pollina, John; Youssef, Jim A; Tohmeh, Antoine G; Uribe, Juan S

    2017-11-20

    that alignment preservation/restoration considerations should be incorporated into the decision-making of even degenerative lumbar spinal fusions. 3.

  15. Remifentanil in combination with ketamine versus remifentanil in spinal fusion surgery--a double blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, B A; Al Ramadani, R; Daas, R; Naylor, I; Zelkó, R

    2010-08-01

    This study is aimed at conducting a program for two different anesthetic methods used during a spinal fusion surgery to ensure better intra-operative hemodynamic stability and post-operative pain control. A prospective, randomized, double blind study in patients scheduled for spinal fusion surgery, who were randomly allocated to two groups, G1 and G2, (n = 15 per group), class I-II ASA, was carried out. Both groups received pre-operatively midazolam, followed intra-operatively by propofol, sevoflurane, atracurium, and either remifentanil infusion 0.2 microg/kg/min (G1), or the same dose of remifentanil infusion and low doses of ketamine infusion 1 microg/kg/min (G2) anesthetics, antidote medication and post-operative morphine doses. HR, MAP, vital signs, surgical bleeding, urine output, duration of surgery and duration of anesthesia were recorded. In a 24-h recovery period in a post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) the recovery time, the first pain score and analgesic requirements were measured. Intra-operative HR and arterial BP were significantly less (p < 0.05) in G1 as compared to G2. In the PACU the first pain scores were significantly less (p < 0.05) in G2 than in G1. The time for the first patient analgesia demand dose was greater in G2, as also morphine consumption which was greater in G1 than G2 (p < 0.05). Other results were the same. None of the patients had any adverse drug reaction. Adding low doses of ketamine hydrochloride could be a routine therapy to improve the hemodynamic stability and reduce the post-operative morphine consumption during spinal fusion surgery.

  16. Spinal fusion for scoliosis in Rett syndrome with an emphasis on early postoperative complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabos, Peter G; Inan, Muharrem; Thacker, Mihir; Borkhu, Buttugs

    2012-01-15

    Retrospective case-control study. To examine the postoperative complications of posterior spinal fusion in a population of patients with Rett syndrome (RS). Scoliosis is a common feature of RS, a progressive neurologic disorder affecting almost exclusively females. Despite this, there is little published information regarding the surgical treatment of scoliosis in this disorder. Sixteen consecutive female patients with RS treated by posterior spinal fusion and unit rod instrumentation for progressive scoliosis between 1995 and 2003 were evaluated. Only patients with a minimum of 2-year follow-up were included. Preoperative medical conditions and postoperative complications were recorded. As a control group, we randomly selected 32 spastic quadriplegic patients who underwent the identical procedure during the same time period, selected from our database and matched according to age, level of neurologic impairment, and medical complexity. There was a high rate of early medical complications in the RS patients, with 28 major and 37 minor complications. Only 1 patient did not have a major medical complication, and every patient had at least 1 minor gastrointestinal and/or respiratory complication. Major respiratory complications occurred in 10 patients (63%) and comprised 61% of all major complications. Major gastrointestinal complications occurred in 6 patients (37%) and comprised 21% of all major complications. Other major complications included disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (1 patient), subacute bacterial endocarditis (1 patient), sacral decubiti requiring surgical debridement (2 patients), and extensive bilateral heterotopic ossification of the hips (1 patient). There were no cases of instrumentation failure, pseudarthrosis, deep infection, or need for rod revision. Postoperative complication scores were similar to those in patients with spastic quadriplegic pattern cerebral palsy. Spinal fusion for scoliosis in RS can give a satisfactory technical result

  17. Stacked macro fiber piezoelectric composite generator for a spinal fusion implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaben, Eric J.; Goetzinger, Nathan C.; Domann, John P.; Barrett-Gonzalez, Ronald; Arnold, Paul M.; Friis, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    A manufacturing method was developed to create a piezoelectric 3-layer stacked, macro fiber composite generator operating in d33 mode to promote bone growth in spinal fusion surgeries. A specimen of 9 × 17 × 9 mm thick was constructed from 800 μm diameter PZT fibers and medical grade epoxy. Electromechanical testing was performed at three stages of manufacturing to determine the influence of these processes on power generation. An average peak power of over 335 μW was generated in the heat-treated specimen during simulated human body loads. The work provides insights into manufacturing methods for lowered source impedance power generation for a variety of applications.

  18. EFFICACY OF PLATELET-RICH PLASMA IN EXPERIMENTAL INSTRUMENTED INTERBODY SPINAL FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfilippo Caggiari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to analyze the influence of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP on bone growth in experimental instrumented interbody spinal fusion (IISF. Methods. 16 adult sheep underwent IISF at L3–L4 level using a cylindrical threaded expanding titanium cage with morselized iliac crest cancellous autograft. In 8 animals (Group I this was augmented with PRP, in the remaining 8 (Group II, it was not. Radiographs of the spine were taken preoperatively and at 1, 3, and 6 months, moreover autoptic vertebral samples were obtained and evaluated histologically and by CT scan at 8 months. Results. Histological analysis revealed more evident new bone formation with bony bridge into the cages in Group I than Group II. There were relevant differences between the groups with regard to interbody fusion calculated using trabecular bone score (p<0.05.

  19. The spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma : A clinical and anatomical study with correlations to the morphology of the internal vertebral venous plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Rob

    1997-01-01

    This thesis concerns a clinical study of the spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) and a study of the vascular anatomy of the spinal epidural space. In particular the morphology of the internal vertebral venous plexus is studied, in an attempt to find an explanation for the etiology of this

  20. Spinal fusion limits upper body range of motion during gait without inducing compensatory mechanisms in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewijn, R M; Kingma, I; de Kleuver, M; Schimmel, J J P; Keijsers, N L W

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies show a limited alteration of gait at normal walking speed after spinal fusion surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), despite the presumed essential role of spinal mobility during gait. This study analyses how spinal fusion affects gait at more challenging walking speeds. More specifically, we investigated whether thoracic-pelvic rotations are reduced to a larger extent at higher gait speeds and whether compensatory mechanisms above and below the stiffened spine are present. 18 AIS patients underwent gait analysis at increasing walking speeds (0.45 to 2.22m/s) before and after spinal fusion. The range of motion (ROM) of the upper (thorax, thoracic-pelvic and pelvis) and lower body (hip, knee and ankle) was determined in all three planes. Spatiotemporal parameters of interest were stride length and cadence. Spinal fusion diminished transverse plane thoracic-pelvic ROM and this difference was more explicit at higher walking speeds. Transversal pelvis ROM was also decreased but this effect was not affected by speed. Lower body ROM, step length and cadence remained unaffected. Despite the reduction of upper body ROM after spine surgery during high speed gait, no altered spatiotemporal parameters or increased compensatory ROM above or below the fusion (i.e. in the shoulder girdle or lower extremities) was identified. Thus, it remains unclear how patients can cope so well with such major surgery. Future studies should focus on analyzing the kinematics of individual spinal levels above and below the fusion during gait to investigate possible compensatory mechanisms within the spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomechanics of lumbosacral spinal fusion in combined compression-torsion loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S W; Langrana, N A; Lee, C K

    1986-11-01

    The current study investigates the stabilizing effects of three different types of spinal fusion to the juxta-free motion segments and to the fused segment of the lumbosacral spine under combined compression-torsion loads. Sixteen fresh human cadaver lumbosacral spines were tested under a simulated physiologic loading condition. The relative movements of the motion segments, as well as the angular rotations and the center of rotation were then computed and analyzed. The average torsional stiffness of the unfused three-motion segment was found to be 2.35 nm/degree. After fusion, the torsional stiffness did not increase significantly. Under the compression-torsional load, the anterior and bilateral-lateral fusions provided adequate stabilizing effect on the fused segment. The posterior fusion provided the least amount of stabilizing effect. These findings are similar to the results of the compression-bending experiment. Whereas the compression-bending loads produced significantly increased stress at the juxta-free segments, the compression-torsional loads did not produce any significant amount of increase in torsional stress at the juxta-free segments.

  2. Adjacent Segment Disease 44 Years Following Posterior Spinal Fusion for Congenital Lumbar Kyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Avionna; Mesfin, Addisu

    2017-11-01

    Case report. To report the clinical and imaging findings of a patient with lumbar stenosis 44 years after posterior spinal fusion for congenital lumbar kyphosis. To our knowledge, there are no long-term follow-up reports after posterior spine fusion (PSF) for congenital kyphosis. Congenital kyphosis is an uncommon deformity with the potential to progress rapidly and result in deformity and neurologic deficits. We report the patient's history, physical examination, imaging findings, and management in addition to providing a literature review. A 54-year-old-male who underwent T8-L3 PSF in 1972 because of congenital kyphosis presented 44 years after surgery with lower back pain, buttock, and bilateral posterior leg pain. On physical examination, no weakness was elicited and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated L4-L5 lumbar stenosis. The patient was enrolled in physical therapy and responded well to medical/interventional management. To our knowledge, this is the longest follow-up of surgical management of congenital lumbar kyphosis. Posterior fusion only halted the progression of the kyphosis with subsequent developed of adjacent segment disease distal to the fusion. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of late (>1 y) deep infection after spinal fusion: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sumeet; LaGreca, Jaren; Hotchkiss, Mark; Erickson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of late infection published in the literature varies from 1% to 12% with varying definition of late infection (range, 3 mo to 1 y). Current evidence suggests implant removal and antibiotic therapy is necessary to clear these infections. A high incidence of late (>1 y) deep infection after instrumented spinal fusion was identified at our institution. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of our management of these patients. A total of 1390 patients underwent instrumented spinal fusion from 2000 to 2009. Forty-two patients developed deep infection >1 year after index procedure (3%) and had surgical debridement. Clinical records and microbiology reports were reviewed for details of operative and postoperative management. Advanced imaging was only obtained in 6 patients (5 computed tomography, 1 magnetic resonance imaging). Offending organisms were identified in 39/42 patients, 27 of these grew Propionibacterium acnes. P. acnes grew in culture at a median of 6 days (range, 3 to 10 d), significantly longer than all other organisms, which grew in a median of 1 day (range, 0 to 8 d) (Pculture. Treatment is generally successful with thorough debridement, removal of implants, and antibiotic treatment. retrospective comparative study.

  4. Role of osteogenic protein-1/bone morphogenetic protein-7 in spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Munns

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Justin Munns, Daniel K Park, Kern SinghDepartment of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: Osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1, also known as bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7, is a protein in the TGF-β family of cellular proteins that has shown potential for application in patients undergoing spinal fusion due to its proven osteoinductive effects, particularly in patients with spondylolisthesis. OP-1 initiates numerous processes at the cellular level, acting on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts to stimulate bone growth. Animal studies of OP-1 have provided strong evidence for the ability of OP-1 to initiate ossification in posterolateral arthrodesis. Promising findings in early clinical trials with OP-1 prompted FDA approval for use in long bone nonunions in 2001 and subsequently for revision posterolateral arthrodesis in 2004 under a conditional Humanitarian Device Exemption. Larger clinical trials have recently shown no notable safety concerns or increases in adverse events associated with OP-1. However, a recent clinical trial has not conclusively demonstrated the noninferiority of OP-1 compared to autograft in revision posterolateral arthrodesis. The future of OP-1 application in patients with spondylolisthesis thus remains uncertain with the recent rejection of Premarket Approval (PMA status by the FDA (April 2009. Further investigation of its treatment success and immunological consequences appears warranted to establish FDA approval for its use in its current form.Keywords: osteogenic protein-1, bone morphogenetic protein-7, spinal fusion

  5. Radiological and clinical outcomes of novel Ti/PEEK combined spinal fusion cages: a systematic review and preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Yusuf; Mobbs, Ralph J; Pelletier, Matthew H; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-03-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to provide a systematic review of the available clinical studies of Ti/PEEK combined cages in spinal interbody fusion surgeries, focusing on their radiological and clinical outcomes. A secondary aim was to provide a review and evaluation of the in vitro and preclinical studies reported on Ti/PEEK-coated implants. A systematic search of the literature was performed in March 2015 via three databases: Medline, Embase and Cochrane library. The following key search terms were combined with synonyms to identify relevant articles: "spinal fusion," "PEEK," "titanium" and "cage." The novelty of this intervention translates into a paucity of clinical trials, albeit the results of the seven clinical studies that met the criteria for inclusion are promising. All studies reported rate of fusion as a primary outcome. Two studies reported slightly improved fusion in the experimental Ti/PEEK combination cohort, one study identical fusion (91.7 %) and three studies excellent fusion (96, 100 and 94 %) in the Ti/PEEK cohort, although no differences reached statistical significance. Clinical studies at this early stage demonstrate that Ti/PEEK implants are safe and efficacious, exhibiting similar fusion rates and clinical outcomes compared to the current standard PEEK. There is clinical evidence substantiating the improved radiographic fusion of Ti/PEEK, albeit the differences were not significant. This field is promising, gaining substantial popularity, and further clinical trials are needed in the future to establish Ti/PEEK cages as a mainstay of clinical practice.

  6. Prognosis of spontaneous thoracic curve correction after the selective anterior fusion of thoracolumbar/lumbar (Lenke 5C) curves in idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkoylu, Alpaslan; Luk, Keith D K; Wong, Yat W; Cheung, Kenneth M C

    2014-07-01

    Prognosis of minor lumbar curve correction after selective thoracic fusion in idiopathic scoliosis is well defined. However, the prognosis of minor thoracic curve after isolated anterior fusion of the major lumbar curve has not been well described. To define the prognosis of spontaneous thoracic curve correction after selective anterior fusion of the lumbar/thoracolumbar curve in idiopathic scoliosis. A retrospective cohort study on the prognosis of the minor curve after selective anterior correction and fusion of the lumbar/thoracolumbar curve in idiopathic scoliosis. Idiopathic lumbar scoliosis patients treated with anterior spinal fusion. The Scoliosis Research Society 22 questionnaire was used as an outcome measure at the final follow-up. Twenty-eight patients were included in this study. Four patients were male, 24 patients were female, and average age at the time of surgery was 16 years. Mean follow-up was 48 months. According to the Lenke Classification, 22 patients were 5CN, 5 were 5C-, and 1 was 5C+. All operations were performed in the same institution. Standing long posterior-anterior and lateral radiographs were taken just before surgery, 1 week after surgery, and at final follow-up. The mean preoperative Cobb angle of the lumbar (major) curve was 53° (standard deviation [SD]=8.6) and that of the thoracic (minor) curve was 38.4° (SD=6.24). The lumbar and thoracic curves were corrected to 10° (SD=7.6) and 25° (SD=8.3) postoperatively and measured 17° (SD=10.6) and 27° (SD=7.7), respectively, at the last follow-up. There was a significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative measurements of the minor curves (p.05). Regarding the overall sagittal balance, there was no significant difference between preoperative, early, and late postoperative measurements (p>.05). Selective anterior fusion of the major thoracolumbar/lumbar curve was an effective method for the treatment of Lenke Type 5C curves. Minor thoracic curves did not progress

  7. Deficient conditioned pain modulation after spinal cord injury correlates with clinical spontaneous pain measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, Sergiu; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Avila-Martin, Gerardo; Taylor, Julian

    2015-02-01

    The contribution of endogenous pain modulation dysfunction to clinical and sensory measures of neuropathic pain (NP) has not been fully explored. Habituation, temporal summation, and heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulus-induced modulation of tonic heat pain intensity were examined in healthy noninjured subjects (n = 10), and above the level of spinal cord injury (SCI) in individuals without (SCI-noNP, n = 10) and with NP (SCI-NP, n = 10). Thermoalgesic thresholds, Cz/AFz contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs), and phasic or tonic (30 seconds) heat pain intensity were assessed within the C6 dermatome. Although habituation to tonic heat pain intensity (0-10) was reported by the noninjured (10 s: 3.5 ± 0.3 vs 30 s: 2.2 ± 0.5 numerical rating scale; P = 0.003), loss of habituation was identified in both the SCI-noNP (3.8 ± 0.3 vs 3.6 ± 0.5) and SCI-NP group (4.2 ± 0.4 vs 4.9 ± 0.8). Significant temporal summation of tonic heat pain intensity was not observed in the 3 groups. Inhibition of tonic heat pain intensity induced by heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulus was identified in the noninjured (-29.7% ± 9.7%) and SCI-noNP groups (-19.6% ± 7.0%), but not in subjects with SCI-NP (+1.1% ± 8.0%; P P = 0.015) and evoked heat pain intensity (ρ = 0.8; P = 0.007) in the SCI-NP group. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the mean conditioned pain modulation (R = 0.72) correlated with pain severity and pressing spontaneous pain in the SCI-NP group. Comprehensive assessment of sensory dysfunction above the level of injury with tonic thermal test and conditioning stimuli revealed less-efficient endogenous pain modulation in subjects with SCI-NP.

  8. Evaluation of Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks Disease by Computerized Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Mustafa S; Kara, Sadık; Albayram, Mehmet S; Okkesim, Şükrü

    2016-05-17

    Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks (SSCFL) is a disease based on tears on the dura mater. Due to widespread symptoms and low frequency of the disease, diagnosis is problematic. Diagnostic lumbar puncture is commonly used for diagnosing SSCFL, though it is invasive and may cause pain, inflammation or new leakages. T2-weighted MR imaging is also used for diagnosis; however, the literature on T2-weighted MRI states that findings for diagnosis of SSCFL could be erroneous when differentiating the diseased and control. One another technique for diagnosis is CT-myelography, but this has been suggested to be less successful than T2-weighted MRI and it needs an initial lumbar puncture. This study aimed to develop an objective, computerized numerical analysis method using noninvasive routine Magnetic Resonance Images that can be used in the evaluation and diagnosis of SSCFL disease. Brain boundaries were automatically detected using methods of mathematical morphology, and a distance transform was employed. According to normalized distances, average densities of certain sites were proportioned and a numerical criterion related to cerebrospinal fluid distribution was calculated. The developed method was able to differentiate between 14 patients and 14 control subjects significantly with p = 0.0088 and d = 0.958. Also, the pre and post-treatment MRI of four patients was obtained and analyzed. The results were differentiated statistically (p = 0.0320, d = 0.853). An original, noninvasive and objective diagnostic test based on computerized image processing has been developed for evaluation of SSCFL. To our knowledge, this is the first computerized image processing method for evaluation of the disease. Discrimination between patients and controls shows the validity of the method. Also, post-treatment changes observed in four patients support this verdict.

  9. Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgeon. The rehabilitation program may include back strengthening exercises and possibly a cardiovascular (aerobic) conditioning program. In some cases, a comprehensive program will be custom-designed to safely get the patient back to ...

  10. Risk factors for progressive neuromuscular scoliosis requiring posterior spinal fusion after selective dorsal rhizotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Christensen, Michael T; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Smith, John T; Halvorson, Kyle; Brockmeyer, Douglas L; Walker, Marion L; Bollo, Robert J

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) via limited laminectomy is an effective treatment of lower-extremity spasticity in the pediatric population. Children with spasticity are also at risk for neuromuscular scoliosis; however, specific risk factors for progressive spinal deformity requiring posterior spinal fusion (PSF) after SDR are unknown. The authors' goal was to identify potential risk factors. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent SDR via limited laminectomy between 2003 and 2014 and who had at least 1 year of follow-up. They analyzed demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables to elucidate risk factors for progressive neuromuscular scoliosis. The primary outcome was need for PSF. RESULTS One hundred thirty-four patients underwent SDR and had at least 12 months of follow-up (mean 65 months); 48 patients (36%) had detailed pre- and postoperative radiographic data available. The mean age at surgery was 10 years (SD 5.1 years). Eighty-four patients (63%) were ambulatory before SDR, 109 (82%) underwent a single-level laminectomy, and a mean of 53% of the dorsal rootlets from L-1 to S-1 were sectioned. Fifteen patients (11.2%) subsequently required PSF for progressive deformity. Nonambulatory status (p 30° (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with PSF on univariate analysis, but no statistically significant correlation was found with any clinical or radiographic variable and PSF after SDR on multivariate regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS Patients with preoperative nonambulatory status and Cobb angle > 30° may be at risk for progressive spinal deformity requiring PSF after SDR. These are well-known risk factors for progressive deformity in children with spasticity in general. Although our analysis suggests SDR via limited laminectomy may not significantly accelerate the development of neuromuscular scoliosis, further case-control studies are critical to elucidate the impact of SDR on spinal deformity.

  11. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of 18F-fluoride PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van; Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn

    2015-01-01

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of 18 F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after 18 F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) 18 F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following 18 F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, 18 F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest Oswestry Disability Index

  12. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Radiology /Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) {sup 18}F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following {sup 18}F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, {sup 18}F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest

  13. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with acute spinal cord injury revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhu

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity.Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores.Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as potential biomarkers for

  14. Long-term outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with spinal stenosis and degenerative scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurra, Swamy; Lavelle, William F; Silverstein, Michael P; Savage, Jason W; Orr, R Douglas

    2017-11-22

    Patients with spinal deformity may present with complaints related to either the deformity itself or the manifestations of the coexisting spinal stenosis. There are reports of successful management of lumbar pathology in the absence of global sagittal or coronal imbalance, with limited decompression and fusion, addressing only the symptomatic segment. Our study examined the long-term outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), a less extensive procedure, based on the experience of the senior author over the past 10 years. This was a retrospective study of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and spinal deformity managed by one surgeon at The Cleveland Clinic since 2003. Forty-one patients were included in the study. The present study measures the long-term clinical functional outcomes of these patients through EQ-5D (EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire), PHQ-9 (Patient Health Questionnaire), and PDQ (Pain Disability Questionnaire) forms, along with documented radiographic parameters and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). There were no funding or potential conflicts of interest associated biases in the present study. Patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis with neutral global alignment in the sagittal and coronal planes and symptomatic stenosis at the deformity level were treated by limited fusion and TLIF, and had a follow-up period of at least 5 years. Excluded were patients under 18 years of age, had more than three levels of fusion, and had an active spinal malignancy or recent spinal trauma. The grouping variables were curve magnitude, revision surgeries, and TLIF levels. Clinical outcomes were compared in all the grouping variables. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests were utilized; pfusion, in the setting of modest spinal deformity, is a reasonable and safe option. Further study on the concept of short segment fusions in the growing patient population is required as more comprehensive fusions do have noted complication

  15. Efficacy of Early Fusion With Local Bone Graft and Platelet-Rich Plasma in Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Followed Over 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Machino, Masaaki; Ota, Kyotaro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Takamatsu, Junki; Matsushita, Tadashi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2017-12-01

    Prospective clinical study. Many oral surgeons use platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for bone defects, but the efficacy of PRP for spinal arthrodesis remains uncertain. The objective was to compare the efficacy of autologous local bone graft and PRP with local bone graft alone for promotion of bony union in posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) surgery, with investigation of the safety of PRP over 10 years. A prospective study was conducted in 29 consecutive patients who underwent one-level PLF at L4/5 for degenerative lumbar disease. Local bone on the left (control) side and local bone with PRP on the right side were grafted. The fusion area and absorption of grafted bone at 58 regions were determined using computed tomography at 2 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Average bone fusion areas on the PRP side were significantly wider at 3 and 6 months after surgery ( P fusion for lumbar arthrodesis with no adverse events over 10 years, and thus is a safe and low cost autologous option in spinal fusion.

  16. Factors predicting postoperative complications following spinal fusions in children with cerebral palsy scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishnianidze, Tristan; Bayhan, Ilhan A; Abousamra, Oussama; Sees, Julieanne; Rogers, Kenneth J; Dabney, Kirk W; Miller, Freeman

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the postoperative complications after posterior spinal fusion (PSF) in cerebral palsy (CP) scoliosis and identify the predictive preoperative risk factors. All PSFs consecutively performed for CP scoliosis between 2004 and 2013 were reviewed. Preoperative risk score (ORS) and postoperative complications score (POCS) were used as measures of all recorded preoperative risk factors and postoperative complications, respectively. The review included 303 children with a mean age of 14.6 ± 3.0 years. Mean hospitalization was 16 days. Dependence on G-tube feeding was associated with higher POCS (P = 0.027). Postoperative fever, seizures, and septicemia were associated with higher ORS (P scoliosis. Children with G-tube need special perioperative care. No other specific preoperative risk factor predicted postoperative complications.

  17. Does low-dose aspirin increase blood loss after spinal fusion surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suk-Bong; Cho, Kyu-Jung; Moon, Kyung-Ho; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Jung, Se-Jin

    2011-04-01

    Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular disease is recommended to be discontinued at least 7 days before spinal surgery. To determine the effect of stopping low-dose aspirin at least 7 days before surgery on the level of the perioperative blood loss or complications related to hemorrhage. Retrospective case study. Patients who underwent spinal fusion surgery for degenerative lumbar disease. Clinical outcome was measured by the Oswestry Disability Index. The aspirin group included 38 patients who had taken 100 mg aspirin for an average of 40.3 months. They stopped aspirin for at least 7 days before surgery (mean, 9.0 days). The control group included 38 patients who had not taken aspirin. Both groups were matched in terms of age, gender, number of fused segments, and surgical procedures. The diagnosis in all patients was degenerative spinal disease. The mean age in the aspirin and control groups was 68.5 and 69.1 years, respectively. The mean number of levels fused was 2.0 segments in both groups. During surgery, the estimated blood loss was 855.3 cc in the aspirin group and 840.8 cc in the control group with no significant difference (p=.84). However, there was a significant difference in blood drainage after surgery. The hemovac blood drainage after surgery was 864.4 cc in the aspirin group but only 458.4 cc in the control group (pdrainage after surgery was significantly higher in the aspirin group despite stopping aspirin 7 days before surgery. Hence, surgeons should pay careful attention to postoperative blood loss and complications related to hemorrhage in patients who have been taking low-dose aspirin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The local cytokine and growth factor response to rhBMP-2 after spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, John D; Markova, Dessislava Z; Schroeder, Greg D; Calio, Brian P; Shah, Anuj; Brooks, Corbin W; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Anderson, D Greg; Kepler, Chris K

    2018-03-14

    The systemic response regarding cytokine expression after application of recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in a rat spinal fusion model has recently been defined 1 , but the local response has not. Defining the local cytokine and growth factor response at the fusion site will help explain the roles of these molecules in the fusion process, as well as that of rhBMP-2. Our hypothesis is that application of rhBMP-2 to the fusion site will alter the local levels of cytokines and growth factors throughout the fusion process, in a manner that is different than the systemic response given the tissue-specific effects of rhBMP-2. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the local cytokine and growth factor response after application of rhBMP-2 in a rat spinal fusion model. Animal study, basic science METHODS: This study was partially funded by a physician sponsored grant from Medtronic. 135 Wistar rats (age 8 weeks, weighing approximately 300-400g) underwent L4-L5 posterolateral intertransverse fusion with demineralized bone graft (approximately 0.4cm 3 rat demineralized bone matrix (DBM) per side). In the first group, 10µg of rhBMP-2 on an allograft collagen sponge (ACS) was added to the fusion site with approximately 0.4cm 3 rat DBM per side. In the second group, 100µg of rhBMP-2 on an ACS was added to the fusion site with approximately 0.4cm 3 rat DBM per side, and the third experiment was the control group, which consisted of only an ACS plus 0.4cm 3 DBM per side. There were nine groups of five animals each per experiment. Each group was sacrificed at time points up to four weeks (1, 6, 24, 48 hours, and 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 days after surgery). At sacrifice, the DBM, transverse processes, and any new bone formed was harvested, immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen, and prepared for protein extraction. ELISA was performed to compare the levels of various cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-10) and growth factors (VEGF, IGF-1, PDGF

  19. Transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion in the treatment of thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Wu

    Full Text Available A retrospective clinical study.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion in the treatment of thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation with spinal cord injury.Twenty-six spinal cord injured patients with thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation were treated by transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and complications were recorded; the Cobb angle and compressive rate (CR of the anterior height of two adjacent vertebrae were measured; and the nerve injury was assessed according to sensory scores and motor scores of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury.The operative time was 250±57 min, and intraoperative blood loss was 440±168 ml. Cerebrospinal leakage was detected and repaired during the operation in two patients. A total of 24 of 26 patients were followed up for more than 2 years. ASIA sensory scores and motor scores were improved significantly at 3 months and 6 months after operation; the Cobb angle and CR of the anterior height of two adjacent vertebrae were corrected and showed a significant difference at post-operation; and the values were maintained at 3 months after operation and the last follow-up.We showed that transforaminal decompression together with interbody fusion is an alternative method to treat thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation.

  20. Minimally Invasive Surgery Versus Open Surgery Spinal Fusion for Spondylolisthesis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Victor M; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Gilder, Hannah E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Phan, Kevin; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-02-01

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. Compare minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and open surgery (OS) spinal fusion outcomes for the treatment of spondylolisthesis. OS spinal fusion is an interventional option for patients with spinal disease who have failed conservative therapy. During the past decade, MIS approaches have increasingly been used, with potential benefits of reduced surgical trauma, postoperative pain, and length of hospital stay. However, current literature consists of single-center, low-quality studies with no review of approaches specific to spondylolisthesis only. This first systematic review of the literature regarding MIS and OS spinal fusion for spondylolisthesis treatment was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for article identification, screening, eligibility, and inclusion. Electronic literature search of Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Scopus databases yielded 2489 articles. These articles were screened against established criteria for inclusion into this study. A total of five retrospective and five prospective articles with a total of 602 patients were found. Reported spondylolisthesis grades were I and II only. Overall, MIS was associated with less intraoperative blood loss (mean difference [MD], -331.04 mL; 95% confidence interval [CI], -490.48 to -171.59; P spondylolisthesis. Moreover, although prospective trials associate MIS with better functional outcomes, longer-term and randomized trials are warranted to validate any association found in this study. 2.

  1. Retrospective Study of Anterior Interbody Fusion Rates and Patient Outcomes of Using Mineralized Collagen and Bone Marrow Aspirate in Multilevel Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostin, Richard; O'Brien, Michael; McCarthy, Ian; Bess, Shay; Gupta, Munish; Klineberg, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Retrospective, single-center analysis of multilevel anterior fusion rates and health-related quality-of-life outcomes of mineralized collagen and bone marrow aspirate (BMA) in anterior interbody fusion cages for spine fusion surgery. To determine the ability and effectiveness of mineralized collagen and BMA to achieve multilevel anterior spinal fusion in adult spinal deformity patients when placed in carbon fiber reinforced polymer cages. High rates of postoperative pain and nonunion can result from spine fusion procedures. Factors that affect the success of fusion include patient comorbidities, position of implant, and mechanical and biological deficiencies, as well as the choice of bone graft replacement. Analysis of radiographic images and health-related quality-of-life outcomes was performed for a consecutive series of 22 prospectively enrolled adult spinal deformity patients with 104 total anterior fusion levels. Fusions were graded by 3 blinded surgeons not involved in the operative procedure; each fusion was graded on a 1-4 scale based on fusion mass appearance. Levels with an average fusion grade of 1-2.4 were classified as fused; levels with an average grade >2.5 were classified as not fused. The mean patient age was 51.5 years (range, 38-61) with 21 females. A total of 95% of anterior operative levels were graded as fused based on flexion/extension and full-length biplane radiographs at 1 year. Computed tomography grading showed a reduced fusion rate at 87% overall. There was a statistically significant improvement in the Oswestry Disability Index and Scoliosis Research Society 22-item questionnaire scores at 1 and 2 years after index surgery. Fusion rates in multilevel anterior spinal fusion using mineralized collagen and BMA are relatively low compared with fusion rates of 95% or more reported in the existing literature on long fusions with bone morphogenetic protein.

  2. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and spinal fusion do not substantially impact on postural balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, Janneke Jp; Groen, Brenda E; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    The spinal curvature in patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) causes an asymmetry of upper body postural alignment, which might affect postural balance. However, the currently available studies on balance in AIS patients are not consistent. Furthermore, it is not known whether potential deficits are similar between patients with single and double curves. Finally, the effects of a corrective posterior spinal fusion on postural balance have not yet been well established. Postural balance was tested on a force plate, in 26 female subjects with AIS (12-18 years old; preoperative Cobb-angle: 42-71°; single curve n = 18, double curve n = 6) preoperatively, at 3 months and 1 year postoperatively. We also conducted a balance assessment in 18 healthy age-matched female subjects. Subjects were tested during quiet double-leg standing in four conditions (eyes open/closed; foam/solid surface), while standing on one leg, while performing a dynamic balance (weight shifting) task and while performing a reaching task in four directions. AIS subjects did not demonstrate greater COP velocities than controls during the double-leg standing tasks. In the reaching task, however, they achieved smaller COP displacements than healthy controls, except in the anterior direction. AIS patients with double curves had significantly greater COP velocities in all test conditions compared to those with a single curve (p COP velocities was observed in the foam eyes closed and right leg standing condition at 3 months post surgery. At 1-year post surgery, however, there were no significant differences in any of the outcome measures compared to the pre-surgery assessment, irrespective of the curve type. Postural balance in AIS patients scheduled for surgery was similar to healthy age matched controls, except for a poorer reaching capacity. The latter finding may be related to their reduced range of motion of the spine. Patients with double curves demonstrated poorer balance

  3. Artificial disc versus spinal fusion in the treatment of cervical spine degenerations in tetraplegics: a comparison of clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhl, K; Röhrich, F

    2009-09-01

    Comparative prospective study. To determine functionality of the cervical spine when using ProDisc C in comparison with the conventional method of treatment (decompression and fusion) in paraplegics. Spinal Cord Injury Centre in Germany. Two homogeneous groups were studied. The patients were treated with ventral decompression and either had a fusion with an iliac bone graft and plate (group 1) or had received a disc replacement (group 2). Pre- and postoperatively, the subjective scores of SF 36 and Neck Disability Score were determined. Also, objective data of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) III and mobility of the cervical spine, using the neutral-0-method, were evaluated. Prosthesis implementation and union or fusion were monitored by X-rays. Complications and alterations of the neurology were recorded according to the American Spinal Injury Association Score. Neurological remissions of the radicular syndrome that caused the operation were observed. In one case, the dislocation of the prosthesis necessitated an alternative treatment. Mobility of the cervical spine after 6 months was higher in group 2. Both groups showed signs of improvement in the Neck Disability Score and in SF 36. None of the two groups had changes in their SCIM score. One case in group 2 showed ventral blocking; all cases of group 1 fused successfully. Usage of prostheses results in improved total mobility of the cervical spine in comparison with the outcomes of a fusion. This study also confirmed these results in tetraplegics.

  4. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrosky, Brian M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Hayes, Kari L.; Fenton, Laura Z. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); Koo, Phillip J. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in

  5. 1995 Volvo Award in basic sciences. The use of an osteoinductive growth factor for lumbar spinal fusion. Part II: Study of dose, carrier, and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, S D; Schimandle, J H; Hutton, W C

    1995-12-15

    Efficacy of a bovine-derived osteoinductive growth factor was studied in a rabbit model and in a nonhuman primate model of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. To determine the minimum effective dose of growth factor and the influence of different carrier material on the outcome of intertransverse process lumbar fusion. Bone morphogenetic proteins and related growth factors are becoming increasingly available in purified extract or genetically engineered forms and are capable of inducing new bone formation in vivo. Osteoinductive growth factors to enhance lumbar spinal infusion have not been well studied in models of posterolateral intertransverse process fusion. Because of the diminished potential of bone regeneration in primates (including humans) compared with phylogenetically lower animals, extrapolations regarding dose and efficacy cannot be made directly from results obtained in experiments performed on phylogenetically lower animals. Experiments on non-human primates are a critical step before attempting to use these growth factors on humans. METHODS. One hundred fifteen adult New Zealand white rabbits and 10 adult rhesus macaques underwent single level posterolateral intertransverse process lumbar spinal arthrodesis to evaluate different doses and carrier materials for a bovine-derived osteoinductive bone protein extract. Rabbit fusion masses were evaluated 5 weeks after arthrodesis by manual palpation, radiography, biomechanical testing, and light microscopy. Monkey fusion masses were evaluated 12 weeks after arthrodesis by radiography and light microscopy. Successful posterolateral intertransverse process spinal fusions were achieved in the rabbit models using an osteoinductive growth factor with three different carriers (autogenous iliac bone, demineralized allogeneic bone matrix, and natural coral). There was a dose-dependent response to the osteoinductive growth factor in the rabbit model, indicating that a threshold must be overcome before bone

  6. EVALUATION OF PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN QUALITY OF LIFE OF PATIENTS WITH ADOLESCENT IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS UNDERGOING SPINAL FUSION BY THE POSTERIOR APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    POMAR, FELIPE DE MORAES; SOUSA, DAPHINE DE CARVALHO; GOTFRYD, ALBERTO OFENHEJM; CARNEIRO, NICOLA JORGE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prognostic factors in the treatment of patients diagnosed with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion by the posterior approach. Methods: The study included 48 patients with idiopathic adolescent scoliosis (43 females and 5 males) who underwent spinal fusion by the posterior approach, with an average age at diagnosis of 12 years, and clinical signs of Risser between 3 and 4 at the time of surgery. Clinical and radiographic measurements...

  7. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated large, low-frequency, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current in neonatal rat spinal dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, L M; Zeng, J; Terman, G W

    2006-09-01

    Examples of spontaneous oscillating neural activity contributing to both pathological and physiological states are abundant throughout the CNS. Here we report a spontaneous oscillating intermittent synaptic current located in lamina I of the neonatal rat spinal cord dorsal horn. The spontaneous oscillating intermittent synaptic current is characterized by its large amplitude, slow decay time, and low-frequency. We demonstrate that post-synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate the spontaneous oscillating intermittent synaptic current, as it is inhibited by magnesium, bath-applied d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV), or intracellular MK-801. The NR2B subunit of the NMDAR appears important to this phenomenon, as the NR2B subunit selective NMDAR antagonist, alpha-(4-hydroxphenyl)-beta-methyl-4-benzyl-1-piperidineethanol tartrate (ifenprodil), also partially inhibited the spontaneous oscillating intermittent synaptic current. Inhibition of spontaneous glutamate release by the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) or the mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5] enkephalin-ol (DAMGO) inhibited the spontaneous oscillating intermittent synaptic current frequency. Marked inhibition of spontaneous oscillating intermittent synaptic current frequency by tetrodotoxin (TTX), but not post-synaptic N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl)triethylammonium bromide (QX-314), suggests that the glutamate release important to the spontaneous oscillating intermittent synaptic current is dependent on active neural processes. Conversely, increasing dorsal horn synaptic glutamate release by GABAA or glycine inhibition increased spontaneous oscillating intermittent synaptic current frequency. Moreover, inhibiting glutamate transporters with threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartic acid (DL-TBOA) increased spontaneous oscillating intermittent synaptic current frequency and decay time. A possible functional role of this spontaneous NMDAR

  8. A prospective, open-label trial of clevidipine for controlled hypotension during posterior spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kako, Hiromi; Gable, Andrew; Martin, David; Beebe, Allan; Thung, Arlyne; Samora, Walter; Klamar, Jan; Bhalla, Tarun; Tobias, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Controlled hypotension is one means to limit or avoid the need for allogeneic blood products. Clevidipine is a short-acting, intravenous calcium channel antagonist with a half-life of 1 to 3 minutes due to rapid metabolism by non-specific blood and tissue esterases. To date, there are no prospective evaluations with clevidipine in the pediatric population. We prospectively evaluated the dosing requirements, efficacy, and safety of clevidipine for ontrolled hypotension during spinal surgery for neuromuscular scoliosis in the pediatric population. Patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion for neuromuscular scoliosis were eligible for inclusion. The study was an open label, observational study. Maintenance anesthesia included desflurane titrated to maintain a bispectral index at 40 to 60 and a remifentanil infusion. Motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were monitored intraoperatively. When the mean arterial pressure (MAP) was ≥ 65 mmHg despite remifentanil at 0.3 mcg/kg/min, clevidipine was added to maintain the MAP at 55 to 65 mmHg. Clevidipine was initiated at 0.25 to 1 mcg/kg/min and titrated up in increments of 0.25 to 1 mcg/kg/min every 3 to 5 minutes to achieve the desired MAP. The study cohort included 45 patients. Fifteen patients (33.3%) did not require a clevidipine infusion to maintain the desired MAP range, leaving 30 patients including 13 males and 17 females for analysis. These patients ranged in age from 7.9 to 17.4 years (mean ± SD: 13.7 ± 2.2 years) and in weight from 18.9 to 78.1 kg (mean ± SD: 43.4 ± 14.2 kg). Intraoperatively, the clevidipine infusion was stopped in 6 patients as the surgeon expressed concerns regarding spinal cord perfusion and requested a higher MAP than the study protocol allowed. The data until that point were included for analysis. The target MAP was initially achieved at a mean time of 8.9 minutes. Sixteen of the 30 patients (53.3%) achieved the target MAP within 5 minutes. Heart rate (HR) increased from a

  9. Ketamine as an Adjunct to Postoperative Pain Management in Opioid Tolerant Patients After Spinal Fusions: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Michael K.; Ya Deau, Jacques T.; Wukovits, Barbara; Lipnitsky, Jane Y.

    2007-01-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is challenging, particularly in patients with preexisting narcotic dependency. Ketamine has been used at subanesthetic doses as a N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist to block the processing of nociceptive input in chronic pain syndromes. This prospective randomized study was designed to assess the use of ketamine as an adjunct to acute pain management in narcotic tolerant patients after spinal fusions. Twenty-six patients for 1–2 level poster...

  10. Preserving ambulatory potential in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy who undergo spinal fusion using unit rod instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Chang, Wei-Ning; Shah, Suken A; Dabney, K W; Miller, Freeman

    2003-03-01

    A retrospective study investigated 24 ambulatory pediatric patients with spastic cerebral palsy and neuromuscular scoliosis. To evaluate the effect of spinal fusion from T1-T2 to the sacrum with pelvic fixation using unit rod instrumentation on the ambulatory potential of these patients. Spinal deformities in patients with cerebral palsy and good ambulatory capacity are infrequently associated with pelvic obliquity, so instrumented spinal fusions traditionally do not extend to the pelvis. The medical charts and radiographs were reviewed, and the patients' ambulatory ability was assessed clinically with videotape or complete gait analysis. A questionnaire assessing patients' functional improvement was given to the caretakers. The study group included 17 female and 7 male patients, among whom were 19 quadriplegics and 5 diplegics. The mean age at surgery was 15.4 years. Of the 24 patients, 20 underwent posterior spinal fusion and 4 had combined anteroposterior procedures. The patients were evaluated clinically before surgery and after surgery. Follow-up evaluations of ambulatory function occurred at a mean of 2.86 years after surgery. No alteration in the ambulatory status of the patients was found, except in one patient who experienced bilateral hip heterotopic ossification and gradually lost her ability to ambulate. Preoperative and postoperative gait analysis was performed for 12 patients, showing no change in their ambulatory function. The surgical outcome survey demonstrated significant improvement in the patients' physical appearance, head and trunk balance, sitting ability, and respiration, with no change in ambulatory capacity. Spine surgery with fusion extending to the pelvis in ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy provided excellent deformity correction and preserved their ambulatory function.

  11. Risk factors for adjacent segment pathology requiring additional surgery after single-level spinal fusion: impact of pre-existing spinal stenosis demonstrated by preoperative myelography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yugué, Itaru; Okada, Seiji; Masuda, Muneaki; Ueta, Takayoshi; Maeda, Takeshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2016-05-01

    We determined the incidence of and risk factors for clinical adjacent segment pathology (C-ASP) requiring additional surgeries among patients previously treated with one-segment lumbar decompression and fusion surgery. We retrospectively analysed 161 consecutive patients who underwent one-segment lumbar decompression and fusion surgery for L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patient age, sex, body mass index (BMI), facet orientation and tropism, laminar inclination angle, spinal canal stenosis ratio [on myelography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)], preoperative adjacent segment instability, arthrodesis type, pseudarthrosis, segmental lordosis at L4-5, and the present L4 slip were evaluated by a log-rank test using the Kaplan-Meier method. A multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model was used to analyse all factors found significant by the log-rank test. Of 161 patients, 22 patients (13.7 %) had additional surgeries at cranial segments located adjacent to the index surgery's location. Pre-existing canal stenosis ≥47 % at the adjacent segment on myelography, greater facet tropism, and high BMI were significant risk factors for C-ASP. The estimated incidences at 10 years postoperatively for each of these factors were 51.3, 39.6, and 32.5 %, and the risks for C-ASP were 4.9, 3.7, and, 3.1 times higher than their counterparts, respectively. Notably, spinal canal stenosis on myelography, but not on MRI, was found to be a significant risk factor for C-ASP (log-rank test P < 0.0001 and 0.299, respectively). Pre-existing spinal stenosis, greater facet tropism, and higher BMI significantly increased C-ASP risk. Myelography is a more accurate method for detecting latent spinal canal stenosis as a risk factor for C-ASP.

  12. Spinal fusion using adipose stem cells seeded on a radiolucent cage filler : a feasibility study of a single surgical procedure in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, Robert J.; Smit, Theo H.; Vergroesen, Pieter P.; Bank, Ruud A.; Stoop, Reinout; van Rietbergen, Bert; van Royen, Barend J.; Helder, Marco N.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a one-step surgical concept, employing adipose stem cells (ASCs) and a novel degradable radiolucent cage filler (poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone; PLCL), within polyetheretherketone cages in a stand-alone caprine spinal fusion model. A double-level fusion study was

  13. Spinal fusion using adipose stem cells seeded on a radiolucent cage filler: a feasibility study of a single surgical procedure in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, R.J.; Smit, T.H.; Vergroesen, P.P.A.; Bank, R.A.; Stoop, R.; van Rietbergen, B.; van Royen, B.J.; Helder, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of a one-step surgical concept, employing adipose stem cells (ASCs) and a novel degradable radiolucent cage filler (poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone; PLCL), within polyetheretherketone cages in a stand-alone caprine spinal fusion model. Methods: A double-level fusion

  14. Spinal fusion using adipose stem cells seeded on a radiolucent cage filler: a feasibility study of a single surgical procedure in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, R.J.; Smit, T.H.; Vergroesen, P.P.; Bank, R.A.; Stoop, R.; Rietbergen, B. van; Royen, B.J. van; Helder, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility of a one-step surgical concept, employing adipose stem cells (ASCs) and a novel degradable radiolucent cage filler (poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone; PLCL), within polyetheretherketone cages in a stand-alone caprine spinal fusion model. METHODS: A double-level fusion

  15. Spinal fusion using adipose stem cells seeded on a radiolucent cage filler: a feasibility study of a single surgical procedure in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, Robert J.; Smit, Theo H.; Vergroesen, Pieter P.; Bank, Ruud A.; Stoop, Reinout; van Rietbergen, Bert; van Royen, Barend J.; Helder, Marco N.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a one-step surgical concept, employing adipose stem cells (ASCs) and a novel degradable radiolucent cage filler (poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone; PLCL), within polyetheretherketone cages in a stand-alone caprine spinal fusion model. A double-level fusion study was

  16. Effect of modulating dietary vitamin D on the general bone health of rats during posterolateral spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamb, Neil; Kanim, Linda; Maldonado, Ruben; Svet, Mark; Metzger, Melodie

    2017-12-20

    Vitamin D plays a significant role in musculoskeletal health by regulating calcium, phosphate, and promoting new bone mineralization. The purpose of this study was to understand the effect of dietary vitamin D on general bone health during peri-operative bone healing via an in vivo dosing study of vitamin D in a rat posterolateral fusion model using autograft. Vitamin D Deficient (DD), vitamin D Insufficient (ID), Control vitamin D (CD), and Hyper-vitamin D (HD) groups were studied. Increasing dietary vitamin D improved quantitative measures of femoral geometry, including femoral strength, stiffness, and density. Femoral biomechanics, cortical thickness, moment of inertia, cross-sectional area, and measures from bone ashing were all greater in the HD group versus the CD. This suggests that additional dietary vitamin D above normal levels during spinal fusion may lead to improvement in bone health. Serum vitamin D levels were also observed to decrease during fusion healing. These results demonstrate that dietary vitamin D improves general bone health in the femur of a rat model during posterolateral spinal fusion. This suggests a role for further clinical evaluation of vitamin D dietary intake during the peri-operative period, with the possibility of avoiding adverse consequences to general bone health. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Promoting spinal fusions by biomineralized silk fibroin films seeded with bone marrow stromal cells: An in vivo animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yong; Chen, Liang; Niu, Hai-Yun; Shen, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Hui-Lin

    2016-03-01

    To prepare a biomineralized nano silk fibroin film seeded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), and to evaluate its performance in spinal fusion. The silk fibroin film was mineralized in a modified, simulated body fluid, seeded with BMSCs, and evaluated in a rat model of posterolateral lumbar fusion, compared with pure silk fibroin, silk fibroin/bone marrow stromal cells, mineralized silk fibroin, mineralized silk fibroin/bone marrow stromal cells, iliac crest bone, and no graft. After 12 weeks, all rats were sacrificed and underwent manual palpation, micro-CT scanning, biomechanical testing, and histology. The infrared spectrum, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated deposition of mineral layers on the silk fibroin film surface. The fusion rate, bone volume, relative strength and stiffness, and histological score of the mineralized silk fibroin/bone marrow stromal cells were slightly lower than the autograft, but without any significant difference (p > 0.05). In addition, the mineralized silk fibroin was significantly greater in most parameters than the silk fibroin/bone marrow stromal cells (p spinal fusion is enhanced when the mineralized silk fibroin is seeded with bone marrow stromal cells. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Relaxation Training and Postoperative Music Therapy for Adolescents Undergoing Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kirsten; Adamek, Mary; Kleiber, Charmaine

    2017-02-01

    Spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most painful surgeries experienced by adolescents. Music therapy, utilizing music-assisted relaxation with controlled breathing and imagery, is a promising intervention for reducing pain and anxiety for these patients. It can be challenging to teach new coping strategies to post-operative patients who are already in pain. This study evaluated the effects of introducing music-assisted relaxation training to adolescents before surgery. Outcome measures were self-reported pain and anxiety, recorded on 0-10 numeric rating scale, and observed behavioral indicators of pain and relaxation. The training intervention was a 12-minute video about music-assisted relaxation with opportunities to practice before surgery. Forty-four participants between the ages of 10 and 19 were enrolled. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental group that watched the video at the preoperative visit or to the control group that did not watch the video. All subjects received a music therapy session with a board certified music therapist on post-operative day 2 while out of bed for the first time. Pain and anxiety were significantly reduced from immediately pre-therapy to post-therapy (paired t-test; p). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain.

  20. Combined nonlinear metrics to evaluate spontaneous EEG recordings from chronic spinal cord injury in a rat model: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jiangbo; Xu, Hanhui; Wang, Yazhou; Cui, Hongyan; Hu, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a high-cost disability and may cause permanent loss of movement and sensation below the injury location. The chance of cure in human after SCI is extremely limited. Instead, neural regeneration could have been seen in animals after SCI, and such regeneration could be retarded by blocking neural plasticity pathways, showing the importance of neural plasticity in functional recovery. As an indicator of nonlinear dynamics in the brain, sample entropy was used here in combination with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and Kolmogorov complexity to quantify functional plasticity changes in spontaneous EEG recordings of rats before and after SCI. The results showed that the sample entropy values were decreased at the first day following injury then gradually increased during recovery. DFA and Kolmogorov complexity results were in consistent with sample entropy, showing the complexity of the EEG time series was lost after injury and partially regained in 1 week. The tendency to regain complexity is in line with the observation of behavioral rehabilitation. A critical time point was found during the recovery process after SCI. Our preliminary results suggested that the combined use of these nonlinear dynamical metrics could provide a quantitative and predictive way to assess the change of neural plasticity in a spinal cord injury rat model.

  1. Central Sensitization Inventory as a Predictor of Worse Quality of Life Measures and Increased Length of Stay Following Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, E Emily; Walsh, Kevin M; Thompson, Nicolas R; Krishnaney, Ajit A

    2017-08-01

    Central sensitization is abnormal and intense enhancement of pain mechanism by the central nervous system. Patients with central sensitization may be at higher risk of poor outcomes after spinal fusion. The Central Sensitivity Inventory (CSI) was developed to identify and quantify key symptoms related to central sensitization. In 664 patients who underwent thoracic and/or lumbar fusion, we evaluated retrospectively pretreatment CSI as a predictor of postoperative quality of life measures, length of stay, and discharge status. Preoperative Pain Disability Questionnaire scores, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores, and EuroQol-5 Dimensions index scores were significantly worse in patients with preoperative CSI ≥40 compared with patients with preoperative CSI <40 (P < 0.0001 for all). After adjusting for demographic variables, operation duration, and preoperative health status, preoperative CSI was significantly associated with higher postoperative Pain Disability Questionnaire total score (unadjusted P < 0.001, adjusted P = 0.009), higher postoperative Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score (unadjusted P < 0.001, adjusted P = 0.001), and lower postoperative EuroQol-5 Dimensions index (unadjusted P < 0.001, adjusted P = 0.001). For each 10-unit increase in CSI, average length of stay increased by 6.4% (95% confidence interval 0.4%-12.6%, P = 0.035). The odds of being discharged home after adjusting for confounders was not statistically related to preoperative CSI (P = 0.0709). Preoperative CSI was associated with worse quality of life outcomes and increased length of stay after spinal fusions. CSI may be an additional measure in evaluating patients preoperatively to better predict successful spinal fusion outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with cages and local bone graft in the treatment of spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillier, Hans; Birkenmaier, Christof; Rauch, Alexander; Weiler, Christoph; Kauschke, Thomas; Refior, Hans Jürgen

    2006-08-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) implants are increasingly being used for 360 degrees fusion after decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis combined with degenerative instability. Both titanium and PEEK (PolyEtherEtherKetone) implants are commonly used. Assessing the clinical and radiological results as well as typical complications, such as migration of the cages, is important. In addition, questions such as which radiological parameters can be used to assess successful fusion, and whether the exclusive use of local bone graft is sufficient, are frequently debated. We prospectively evaluated 30 patients after PLIF instrumentation for degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis, over a course of 42 months. In all cases, titanium cages and local bone graft were used for spondylodesis. The follow-up protocol of these 30 cases included standardised clinical and radiological evaluation at 3, 6, 12 and 42 months after surgery. Overall satisfactory results were achieved. With one exception, a stable result was achieved with restoration of the intervertebral space in the anterior column. After 42 months of follow-up in most cases, a radiologically visible loss of disc space height can be demonstrated. Clinically relevant migration of the cage in the dorsal direction was detected in one case. Based on our experience, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) can be recommended for the treatment of monosegmental and bisegmental spinal stenosis, with or without segmental instability. Postoperative evaluation is mainly based on clinical parameters since the titanium implant affects the diagnostic value of imaging studies and is responsible for artefacts. The results observed in our group of patients suggest that local autologous bone graft procured from the posterior elements after decompression is an adequate material for bone grafting in this procedure.

  3. Nonsurgical management of an extensive spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma causing quadriplegia and respiratory distress in a choledocholithiasis patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasck, Kyle; Khoury, Jason; Aoude, Ahmed; Abduljabbar, Fahad; Jarzem, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) manifests from blood accumulating in the epidural space, compressing the spinal cord, and leading to acute neurological deficits. The disease's cloudy etiology and rarity contribute to dangerously suboptimal therapeutic principles. These neural deficits can be permanent, even fatal, if the SSEH is not treated in a timely and appropriate manner. Standard therapy is decompressive laminectomy, though nonsurgical management is a viable course of action for patients who meet a criterion that is continuously being refined. Patient concerns: A 76-year-old woman on warfarin for a past pulmonary embolism presented to the emergency room with jaundice, myalgia, hematuria, neck pain, and an International Normalized Ratio (INR) of 14. Upon admission, she rapidly developed quadriplegia and respiratory distress that necessitated intubation. Diagnoses: T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an epidural space-occupying hyperintensity from C2 to S5 consistent with a spinal epidural hematoma. An incidental finding of dilated intrahepatic and common bile ducts prompted an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which demonstrated choledocholithiasis. Interventions: The patient's INR was normalized with Vitamin K and Beriplex. Upon transfer to the surgical spine team for assessment of a possible intervention, the patient began to demonstrate recovery of neural functions. The ensuing sustained motor improvement motivated the team's preference for close neurologic monitoring and continued medical therapy over surgery. Thirteen hours after the onset of her symptoms, the patient was extubated. A sphincterotomy was later performed, removing 81 common bile duct stones. Outcomes: MRI demonstrated complete resorption of the SSEH and the patient maintained full neurological function at final follow-up. Lessons: Nonsurgical management of SSEH should be considered in the context of early and sustained recovery

  4. DNA Amplification by Breakage/Fusion/Bridge Cycles Initiated by Spontaneous Telomere Loss in a Human Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W.l. Lo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of genomic instability is an important step in generatingthe multiple genetic changes required for cancer. One consequence of genomic instability is the overexpression of oncogenes due to gene amplification. One mechanism for gene amplification is the breakagelfusionlbridge (B/F/Bcyclethatinvolvesthe repeated fusion and breakage of chromosomes following the loss of a telomere. B/F/B cycles have been associated with low-copy gene amplification in human cancer cells, and have been proposed to be an initiating event in high-copy gene amplification. We have found that spontaneous telomere loss on a marker chromosome 16 in a human tumor cell line results in sister chromatid fusion and prolonged periods of chromosome instability. The high rate of anaphase bridges involving chromosome 16 demonstrates that this instability results from B/F/B cycles. The amplification of subtelomeric DNA on the marker chromosome provides conclusive evidence that B/F/B cycles initiated by spontaneous telomere loss are a mechanism for gene amplification in human cancer cells.

  5. A retrospective review to assess whether spinal fusion and scoliosis correction improved activity and participation for children with Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Mathew David; Wallace, Charles; Gibson, Alex; Noordeen, Hilali; Tucker, Stewart; Molloy, Sean; Lehovsky, Jan

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates outcome of scoliosis treatment for 11 children with Angelman syndrome (AS), with particular focus on activity, participation and the musculoskeletal factors that may affect these outcomes. Retrospective review of medical records, radiographs and questionnaires administered to caregivers of 11 children (8M:3F) with AS and scoliosis. Six underwent observational treatment during childhood and five underwent spinal fusion. The Activities Scale for Kids (ASKp) questionnaire was used to measure activity and participation. Questionnaire and radiographic data were recorded over a 2 year period. In the observational group, scoliosis increased from 31° to 46°. Mean ASKp decreased from 13.8 to 11.9 (p = 0.06). In the operative group, scoliosis decreased from 68° to 29°. Mean ASKp increased from 11.4 to 15.9 (p < 0.01). There was also a reduction in spinal-related pain and mean number of hospital admissions for chest infection. However, there was a 60% major complication rate. There was no difference in mobility, GMFCS level, feeding or communication in either group before or after treatment. In children with significant scoliosis and AS, spinal fusion was associated with a small improvement in activity and participation, reduction in pain and a decrease in frequency of severe chest infections. Non-operative treatment resulted in progression of scoliosis during childhood and decrease in activity.

  6. Role of spinal glial cells in bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Yao LU; Jian-xiu WANG; Zhi-guo YAO; Hui-sheng CHEN

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, a glial metabolism inhibitor, on bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and inflammatory response. Methods Forty adult male SD rats with intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into five groups (8 each): (1) bee-toxin alone group; (2) vehicle (solvent) group; (3) low dose (1nmol) fluorocitrate group; (4) middle dose (10nmol) fluorocitrate group; (5) high dose (50nmol) fluorocitrate group. After the...

  7. Prognosis and adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion surgery for destructive spondyloarthropathy in long-term hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Keishi; Moriyama, Tokuhide; Tachibana, Toshiya; Inoue, Shinichi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Kusuyama, Kazuki; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2017-03-01

    Lumbar destructive spondyloarthropathy (DSA) is a serious complication in long-term hemodialysis patients. There have not been many reports regarding the surgical management for lumbar DSA. In addition, the adjacent segment pathology after lumbar fusion surgery for DSA is unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcome and occurrence of adjacent segmental disease (ASD) after lumbar instrumented fusion surgery for DSA in long-term hemodialysis patients. A consecutive series of 36 long-term hemodialysis patients who underwent lumbar instrumented fusion surgery for DSA were included in this study. The mean age at surgery was 65 years. The mean follow-up period was 4 years. Symptomatic ASD was defined as symptomatic spinal stenosis or back pain with radiographic ASD. The Japanese Orthopedic Association score (JOA score), recovery rate (Hirabayashi method), complications, and reoperation were reviewed. The mean JOA score significantly increased from 13.5 before surgery to 21.3 at the final follow-up. The mean recovery rate was 51.4%. Six of the 36 patients died within 1 year after index surgery. One patient died due to perioperative complication. Symptomatic ASD occurred in 43% (13 of 30) of the cases. Of these 13 cases, 5 had adjacent segment disc degeneration and 8 had adjacent segment spinal stenosis. Three cases (10%) required reoperation due to proximal ASD. Multi-level fusion surgery increased the risk of ASD compared with single-level fusion surgery (59% vs. 23%). The recovery rate was significantly lower in the ASD group than the non-ASD group (38% vs. 61%). This study demonstrated that symptomatic ASD occurred in 43% of patients after surgery for lumbar DSA. A high mortality rate and complication rate were observed in long-term hemodialysis patients. Therefore, care should be taken for preoperative planning for surgical management of DSA. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. Short-term alendronate treatment does not maintain a residual effect on spinal fusion with interbody devices and bone graft after treatment withdrawal: an experimental study on spinal fusion in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Baoding; Zou, Xuenong; Li, Haisheng; Xue, Qingyun; Bünger, Cody

    2013-02-01

    Whether alendronate treatment has a residual effect on bone ingrowth into porous biomaterial in humans or experimental animals after treatment withdrawal is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate bone ingrowth into porous tantalum and carbon fiber interbody implants after discontinuing alendronate treatment in experimental spinal fusion in pigs. Twenty-four pigs were randomly divided into two groups of each 12 pigs. The pigs underwent anterior intervertebral lumbar arthrodeses at L2-3, L4-5 and L6-7. Each level was randomly allocated to one of the three implants: a porous tantalum ring with pedicle screw fixation, a porous tantalum ring or a carbon fiber cage with anterior staple fixation. The central hole of implants was packed with an autograft. Alendronate was given orally for the first 3 months to one of the two groups. The pigs were observed for 6 months postoperatively. Histology and micro-CT scans were done at the endpoint. The spinal fusion rates of each implant showed no differences between two treatment groups. Furthermore, no differences were found between two groups as for bone ingrowth into the central holes of implants and bone-implant interface in each implant, or as for the pores of tantalum implants. Trabecular bone microarchitecture in the central hole of the carbon fiber cage did not differ between two treatment groups. The application of ALN, with a dose equivalent to that given to humans during the first 3 months after surgery, does not maintain a residual effect on spinal fusion with porous tantalum ring and autograft after treatment withdrawal in a porcine ALIF model.

  9. One-step (standard) versus two-step surgical approach in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis posterior spinal fusion: Which is better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Norman; Valentin, Pablo; García-Cartagena, Manuel; Samalot, Solais; Iriarte, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective cohort study with IRB approval. Significant blood loss remains an important concern in terms of the performance of the posterior spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Several strategies have been reported to minimize blood loss during surgery. In order to address the need to minimize blood loss without sacrificing the quality of the fusion, in our hospital, we adopted a two-step surgical approach. This surgical approach consist of the exposure and instrumentation of the lumbar region prior to and followed by an extension of the surgical incision to the thoracic region for its subsequent instrumentation. The main purpose of this study was to compare a two-step surgical approach with the one-step (standard) approach. This study was a review of all the data on consecutive posterior spinal fusion surgeries performed by a specific two-surgeon team during 2004-2013. Demographics, surgical variables, radiographic findings, and outcomes regarding blood loss, morbidity, and the duration of the procedure were evaluated. Eighty-five patients underwent the standard surgical exposure, and 41 patients underwent the two-step surgical technique. With the exception of BMI, neither group showed any statistically preoperative variable significant differences. None of the postoperative outcome variables were statistically significant between both surgical approaches. No differences were detected in terms of using a two-step surgical approach versus the one-step standard surgical approach regarding perioperative blood loss, surgical time, or complications. Level of evidence III.

  10. Adjacent segment pathology following anterior decompression and fusion using cage and plate for the treatment of degenerative cervical spinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective study. To analyze the incidence and prevalence of clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) following anterior decompression and fusion with cage and plate augmentation for degenerative cervical diseases. No long-term data on the use of cage and plate augmentation have been reported. The study population consisted of 231 patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with cage and plate for degenerative cervical spinal disease. The incidence and prevalence of CASP was determined by using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. To analyze the factors that influence CASP, data on preoperative and postoperative sagittal alignment, spinal canal diameter, the distance between the plate and adjacent disc, extent of fusion level, and the presence or absence of adjacent segment degenerative changes by imaging studies were evaluated. CASP occurred in 15 of the cases, of which 9 required additional surgery. At 8-year follow-up, the average yearly incidence was 1.1%. The rate of disease-free survival based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was 93.6% at 5 years and 90.2% at 8 years. No statistically significant differences in CASP incidence based on radiological analysis were observed. Significantly high incidence of CASP was observed in the presence of increased adjacent segment degenerative changes (pdegenerative cervical disease is associated with a lower incidence in CSAP by 1.1% per year, and the extent of preoperative adjacent segment degenerative changes has been shown as a risk factor for CASP.

  11. Clinical results of posterolateral fusion for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. A follow-up study of more than 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Hiroshi; Tajima, Naoya; Kubo, Shinichiro

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes and the effects on unfused motion segments of posterolateral fusion. This study involved 35 cases (37 intervertebral levels) of posterolateral fusion performed to treat degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. There were 20 male and 15 female patients ranging in age from 30 to 67 years, with a mean age of 49 years. The postoperative period ranged from 10 years to 17 years and 8 months, with a mean period of 13 years. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for assessment of treatment for low back pain. The effects on unfused motion segments were investigated with radiographic and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Postoperative satisfactory improvement (mean recovery rate, 66.9%) reached a plateau at 1 year and was maintained at final follow-up. Radiographically, the union rate was 86.5%. There were few cases of induced instability of unfused motion segments. On MR imaging, increased signal intensity in both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images was seen in the paravertebral muscles in 15 of 20 cases (75.0%). Posterolateral fusion is a useful technique for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Clinical outcomes were stable throughout follow-up. Instability of unfused motion segments rarely occurred. (author)

  12. The Association Between Adjuvant Pain Medication Use and Outcomes Following Pediatric Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Rebecca E; Trzcinski, Stacey; Cohen, Mindy; Erickson, Mark; Errico, Thomas; McLeod, Lisa

    2017-05-15

    A comparative effectiveness database study. The aim of this study was to describe variation in use of adjuvant therapies for managing postoperative pain in in patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion (PSF) for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and determine association between use of these therapies and patient outcomes. Variation in postoperative pain management for children undergoing PSF for AIS likely impacts outcomes. Minimal evidence exists to support strategies that most effectively minimize prolonged intravenous (IV) opioids and hospitalizations. We included patients aged 10 to 18 years discharged from one of 38 freestanding children's hospitals participating in a national database from December 1, 2012, to January 5, 2015, with ICD9 codes indicating scoliosis and PSF procedure. Use of ketorolac, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogues (GABAa), and benzodiazepines was compared across hospitals. Hierarchical logistic regression adjusting for confounders and accounting for clustering of patients within hospitals was used to estimate association between these therapies and odds of prolonged duration of IV opioids, prolonged length of stay (LOS), and early readmissions. Across hospitals, use of ketorolac and GABAa was highly variable and increased over time among 7349 subjects. Use of ketorolac was independently associated with significantly lower odds of prolonged LOS [odds ratio (OR) 0.75, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.64-0.89] and prolonged duration of IV opioid (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.73-0.98). GABAa use was significantly associated with decreased odds of prolonged IV opioid use (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.53-0.75). Readmission rate at 30 days was 1.6% and most strongly associated with prolonged LOS. In this national cohort of children with AIS undergoing PSF, patients who received postoperative ketorolac or GABAa were less likely to have prolonged IV opioid exposure. Given the rapid increase in use of adjuvant therapies without strong evidence, resources

  13. Does preoperative orientation and education alleviate anxiety in posterior spinal fusion patients? A prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Leslie; Nash, Cassie; Moisan, Alice; Scott, Donna C; Barkoh, Kaku; Warner, William C; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Kelly, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    A prospective, randomized study examined the effect of interventional preoperative education and orientation for scoliosis surgery (PEOSS) on anxiety levels of patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion (PSF). Secondary outcomes analyzed were caregiver anxiety, length of stay, morphine equivalent usage, and patient/caregiver satisfaction. Patients undergoing PSF were randomly distributed into a control group (N=39) or interventional group (N=26). All subjects and caregivers completed the State (current)-Trait (typical) Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at different intervals: preoperative appointment, preoperative holding area, postoperative orthopaedic unit, and discharge. At discharge, patients and caregivers completed a satisfaction survey. Significantly higher state anxiety scores were found compared with baseline at all time intervals in both the control group and PEOSS group. The PEOSS group had higher state anxiety scores than the control group at the postoperative interval (P=0.024). There were no significant differences in the caregiver state anxiety scores between the groups at any time interval. Trait anxiety scores for both groups remained stable over time, establishing that the measurement tool accurately reflected baseline anxiety. No significant differences were found in length of stay or morphine equivalent use. Patient satisfaction scores were higher in the PEOSS group than in the control group (P=0.0005). PSF was associated with increased anxiety at all time intervals in adolescents in both groups. In the PEOSS group, PSF was associated with increased anxiety in the immediate postoperative period. Despite the increase in anxiety, patient satisfaction was higher in the intervention group. It is likely that patients need age-appropriate information and educational strategies to minimize anxiety during PSF. Further work is underway to study and develop more effective interventional strategies. Level I study.

  14. Spontaneous Vesicle Fusion Is Differentially Regulated at Cholinergic and GABAergic Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haowen Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The locomotion of C. elegans is balanced by excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter release at neuromuscular junctions. However, the molecular mechanisms that maintain the balance of synaptic transmission remain enigmatic. Here, we investigated the function of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in triggering spontaneous release at cholinergic and GABAergic synapses. Recordings of the miniature excitatory/inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs and mIPSCs, respectively showed that UNC-2/CaV2 and EGL-19/CaV1 channels are the two major triggers for spontaneous release. Notably, however, Ca2+-independent spontaneous release was observed at GABAergic but not cholinergic synapses. Functional screening led to the identification of hypomorphic unc-64/Syntaxin-1A and snb-1/VAMP2 mutants in which mEPSCs are severely impaired, whereas mIPSCs remain unaltered, indicating differential regulation of these currents at cholinergic and GABAergic synapses. Moreover, Ca2+-independent spontaneous GABA release was nearly abolished in the hypomorphic unc-64 and snb-1 mutants, suggesting distinct mechanisms for Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent spontaneous release.

  15. The Effects of rhBMP-2 Used for Spinal Fusion on Spinal Cord Pathology After Traumatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-29

    Oudega, 2006). Secondary injury contributes to further cellular loss through hemorrhage, ischemia , excitotoxicity, inflammatory response and...following the accident (Fehlings and Perrin, 2005). Surgical management of spinal column instability requires internal fixation, together with biologic...despite comparable BBB scores observed on the 1st post- operative day between the groups. Thus, treatment with rhBMP-2 led to a transient 73 worsening

  16. Effects of gabapentin on muscle spasticity and both induced as well as spontaneous autonomic dysreflexia after complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Rabchevsky

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that the neuropathic pain medication, gabapentin (GBP; Neurontin, significantly attenuated both noxious colorectal distension (CRD-induced autonomic dysreflexia (AD and tail pinch-induced spasticity compared to saline-treated cohorts 2-3 weeks after complete high thoracic (T4 spinal cord injury (SCI. Here we employed long-term blood pressure telemetry to test, firstly, the efficacy of daily versus acute GBP treatment in modulating AD and tail spasticity in response to noxious stimuli at 2 and 3 weeks post-injury. Secondly, we determined whether daily GBP alters baseline cardiovascular parameters, as well as spontaneous AD events detected using a novel algorithm based on blood pressure telemetry data. At both 14 and 21 days after SCI, irrespective of daily treatment, acute GBP given 1 hr prior to stimulus significantly attenuated CRD-induced AD and pinch-evoked tail spasticity; conversely, acute saline had no such effects. Moreover, daily GBP did not alter 24 hr mean arterial pressure (MAP or heart rate values compared to saline treatment, nor did it reduce the incidence of spontaneous AD events compared to saline over the three week assessment period. Power spectral density analysis of the MAP signals demonstrated relative power losses in mid frequency ranges (0.2-0.8 Hz for all injured animals relative to low frequency MAP power (0.02-0.08 Hz. However, there was no significant difference between groups over time post-injury; hence, GBP had no effect on the persistent loss of MAP fluctuations in the mid frequency range after injury. In summary, the mechanism(s by which acute GBP treatment mitigate aberrant somatosensory and cardiophysiological responses to noxious stimuli after SCI remain unclear. Nevertheless, with further refinements in defining the dynamics associated with AD events, such as eliminating requisite concomitant bradycardia, the objective repeatability of automatic detection of hypertensive crises provides a

  17. Audio-visual Classification and Fusion of Spontaneous Affect Data in Likelihood Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaou, Mihalis A.; Gunes, Hatice; Pantic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on audio-visual (using facial expression, shoulder and audio cues) classification of spontaneous affect, utilising generative models for classification (i) in terms of Maximum Likelihood Classification with the assumption that the generative model structure in the classifier is

  18. Cyst-Like Osteolytic Formations in Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2) Augmented Sheep Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsin Chuan; Lee, Soonchul; Ting, Kang; Shen, Jia; Wang, Chenchao; Nguyen, Alan; Berthiaume, Emily A; Zara, Janette N; Turner, A Simon; Seim, Howard B; Kwak, Jin Hee; Zhang, Xinli; Soo, Chia

    2017-07-01

    Multiple case reports using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) have reported complications. However, the local adverse effects of rhBMP-2 application are not well documented. In this report we show that, in addition to promoting lumbar spinal fusion through potent osteogenic effects, rhBMP-2 augmentation promotes local cyst-like osteolytic formations in sheep trabecular bones that have undergone anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Three months after operation, conventional computed tomography showed that the trabecular bones of the rhBMP-2 application groups could fuse, whereas no fusion was observed in the control group. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the core implant area's bone volume fraction and bone mineral density increased proportionately with rhBMP-2 dose. Multiple cyst-like bone voids were observed in peri-implant areas when using rhBMP-2 applications, and these sites showed significant bone mineral density decreases in relation to the unaffected regions. Biomechanically, these areas decreased in strength by 32% in comparison with noncystic areas. Histologically, rhBMP-2-affected void sites had an increased amount of fatty marrow, thinner trabecular bones, and significantly more adiponectin- and cathepsin K-positive cells. Despite promoting successful fusion, rhBMP-2 use in clinical applications may result in local adverse structural alterations and compromised biomechanical changes to the bone. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced heterotopic ossification of the retroperitoneum, psoas muscle, pelvis and abdominal wall following lumbar spinal fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Raj K.; Moncayo, Valeria M.; Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Terk, Michael R.; Smitson, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with vertebral collapse at L5 as an initial manifestation of multiple myeloma and underwent spinal fusion surgery using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Subsequent computed tomography (CT) scans and X-rays revealed heterotopic ossification of the left psoas muscle, pelvis, and anterior abdominal wall. While the occurrence of heterotopic ossification has previously been reported when rhBMP-2 has been used for spinal fusion surgery, this case demonstrates that it can occur to a much greater degree than previously seen. (orig.)

  20. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation.Methods: Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reco...

  1. Lumbar spinal fusion patients' demands to the primary health sector: evaluation of three rehabilitation protocols. A prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B; Lauerberg, Ida; Lauersen, Ida; Bünger, Cody E

    2006-05-01

    Very few studies have investigated the effects or costs of rehabilitation regimens following lumbar spinal fusion. The effectiveness of in-hospital rehabilitation regimens has substantial impact on patients' demands in the primary health care sector. The aim of this study was to investigate patient-articulated demands to the primary health care sector following lumbar spinal fusion and three different in-hospital rehabilitation regimens in a prospective, randomized study with a 2-year follow-up. Ninety patients were randomized 3 months post lumbar spinal fusion to either a 'video' group (one-time oral instruction by a physiotherapist and patients were then issued a video for home exercise), or a 'café' group (video regimen with the addition of three café meetings with other fusion-operated patients) or a 'training' group (exercise therapy; physiotherapist-guided; two times a week for 8 weeks). Register data of service utilization in the primary health care sector were collected from the time of randomization through 24 months postsurgery. Costs of in-hospital protocols were estimated and the service utilization in the primary health care sector and its cost were analyzed. A significant difference (P=0.023) in number of contacts was found among groups at 2-year follow-up. Within the periods of 3-6 months and 7-12 months postoperatively, the experimental groups required less than half the amount of care within the primary health care sector as compared to the video group (P=0.001 and P=0.008). The incremental costs of the café regimen respectively, the training regimen were compensated by cost savings in the primary health care sector, at ratios of 4.70 (95% CI 4.64; 4.77) and 1.70 (95% CI 1.68; 1.72). This study concludes that a low-cost biopsychosocial rehabilitation regimen significantly reduces service utilization in the primary health care sector as compared to the usual regimen and a training exercise regimen. The results stress the importance of a cognitive

  2. Low-melt bioactive glass-reinforced 3D printing akermanite porous cages with highly improved mechanical properties for lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xiurong; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Xianyan; Wang, Juncheng; Zhuang, Chen; Jin, Zhouwen; Liu, An; Zhao, Tengfei; Xu, Sanzhong; Gao, Changyou; Gou, Zhongru; Yang, Guojing

    2017-12-09

    Although great strides have been made in medical technology, low back/neck pain and intervertebral disc degeneration initiated from disc degenerative disease remains a clinical challenge. Within the field of regenerative medicine therapy, we have sought to improve the biomechanical transformation of spinal fusion procedures conducted using biodegradable porous implants. Specifically, we have focused on developing mechanically strong bioceramic cages for spinal fusion and functional recovery. Herein, we fabricated the akermanite (AKE) ceramic-based porous cages using low-melting bioactive glass (BG) and 3D printing technology. The osteogenic cell adhesion on the cages was evaluated in vitro, and the spinal fusion was tested in the intervertebral disc trauma model. The results indicated that incorporation of 15% or 30% BG into AKE (i.e., AKE/BG15 and AKE/BG30) could enhance the compressive strength of bioceramic cages by 2- or 5-fold higher than the pure AKE cages (AKE/BG0). In comparison with porous β-tricalcium phosphate cages, the surface of AKE/BG15 and AKE/BG30 cages greatly promoted the growth and alkaline phosphatase expression of osteogenic cells. Histological and biomechanical analysis showed that the AKE/BG15 and AKE/BG30 readily stimulated the new bone tissue growth and improved the spinal biomechanics recovery. In the AKE/BG15 and AKE/BG30 cage groups, 4-6 of the rabbits demonstrated a successful fusion. In contrast, only 0-1 of the initial seeded AKE/BG0 and tricalcium phosphate cages resulted in fusion at 12 weeks post-operatively. In summary, the akermanite-based cages showed an increased bone regenerative effect within an intervertebral disc trauma model, and thus, provided a promising candidate for improving spinal fusion surgery. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Non-operative treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas: a review of the literature and a comparison with operative cases : a review of the literature and a comparison with operative cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J M

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors that favour spontaneous recovery in patients who suffered a spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). METHODS: The literature was reviewed regarding non-operative cases of SSEH (SSEH(cons)). Sixty-two cases from the literature and 2 of our own cases were collected,

  4. Long-term Radiological and Clinical Outcomes After Using Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Concentrate Obtained With Selective Retention Cell Technology in Posterolateral Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Mohamed Abdelhamid Ali; La Maida, Giovanni Andrea; Misaggi, Bernardo

    2017-12-15

    Retrospective study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes of the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell concentrate obtained with selective cell retention technology using Cellect with a particular collagen scaffold, Healos for posterolateral spinal fusion. With the increasing rate of spinal fusion, the problem of pseudarthrosis, which contributes to recurrent pain with patient disability, is considered to be the most common cause of revision lumbar spine surgery. Intensive research is being carried out to develop an alternative source of bone grafting and improve the spinal fusion rate. A retrospective review of hospital records was performed. Identified patients were contacted to have a clinical and radiological evaluation follow-up. Clinical outcome was evaluated using visual analog scales for the back pain (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, and quality of life (EQ-5D) questionnaire. Radiological outcome was evaluated by performing dynamic flexion/extension lateral views and calculation of segmental Cobb angle. Any implant-associated complication was reported. Computed tomography (CT) scans were also performed. Twenty-one patients were included and all patients achieved successful fusion. The mean difference of the segmental Cobb angle was 0.48° (range 0.3°-0.7°). Computed tomography scans showed solid bilateral fusion with bridging bone (Grade I) in all patients, but solid unilateral fusion with bridging bone (Grade II) was detected for one patient at one level. Patients started to resume working activities within a mean period of 3.5 months. The VAS score for the residual back pain was 4.1 ± 2.1, whereas the ODI was 10.5 ± 5.6 points, and the mean disability index was 21.1%. The use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell concentrate obtained with selective cell retention technology could be considered as an effective means for augmenting spinal fusion. 3.

  5. Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraghi, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is proposed that Iran as a world's potential supplier of fossile fuel should participate in fusion research and gain experience in this new field. Fusion, as an ultimate source of energy in future, and the problems concerned with the fusion reactors are reviewed. Furthermore; plasma heating, magnetic and inertial confinement in a fusion reactor are discussed. A brief description of tokamak, theta pinch and magnetic mirror reactors is also included

  6. The positive effect of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion is preserved at long-term follow-up: a RCT with 11-13 year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Videbaek, Tina S; Hansen, Ebbe S

    2008-01-01

    patients originally randomised to posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion with or without pedicle screw instrumentation. Follow-up included Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), SF-36 and a question regarding willingness to undergo the procedure again knowing the result as global...

  7. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. The mean follow-up was 36.9 months (range: 24-62 months). The kyphotic angle ranged from 15.2-35.1° preoperatively, with an average measurement of 27.8°. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system was used to evaluate the neurological deficits and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) used to judge the activity of TB. Spinal TB was completely cured in all 17 patients. There was no recurrent TB infection. The postoperative kyphotic angle was 6.6-10.2°, 8.1° in average, and there was no significant loss of the correction at final follow-up. Solid fusion was achieved in all cases. Neurological condition in all patients was improved after surgery. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation can be a feasible and effective method the in treatment of single-segment lumbar spinal TB.

  8. Allograft versus autograft in cervical and lumbar spinal fusions: an examination of operative time, length of stay, surgical site infection, and blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Grauberger, Jennifer; Shepherd, Daniel; Maloney, Patrick R; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Nassr, Ahmad; Bydon, Mohamad

    2016-11-23

    Autograft harvesting for spine arthrodesis has been associated with longer operative times and increased blood loss. Allograft compared to autograft in spinal fusions has not been studied in a multicenter cohort. Patients enrolled in the ACS-NSQIP registry between 2012 and 2013 who underwent cervical or lumbar spinal fusion with either allograft or autograft through a separate incision were included for analysis. The primary outcomes of interest were operative time, length of stay, blood transfusion, and surgical site infection (SSI). A total of 6,790 and 6,718 patients received a cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, respectively. On unadjusted analysis in both cervical and lumbar cohorts, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion (cervical: 2.9% vs 1.0%, poperative time (cervical: 167 vs 128 minutes, poperative times (cervical: 27.8 minutes, 95% CI 20.7-35.0; and lumbar: 25.4 minutes, 95% CI 17.7-33.1) relative to allograft. Autograft was not associated with either length of stay or SSI. In a multicenter cohort of patients undergoing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion and increased operative time relative to allograft.

  9. Posterior spinal fusion to sacrum in non-ambulatory hypotonic neuromuscular patients: sacral rod/bone graft onlay method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Theresa; Shapiro, Frederic

    2014-05-01

    A retrospective study involving 65 non-ambulatory patients with hypotonic neuromuscular scoliosis has assessed the effectiveness of a sacral rod/bone onlay technique for extending spinal fusion to the sacrum. To extend posterior spinal fusion to the sacrum, we used either 1 Harrington rod and 1 Luque L rod with sublaminar wires in 14 patients (Group 1) or two rods with sublaminar wires in 51 patients (Group 2) along with abundant autograft and allograft bone covering the ends of the rods. Diagnoses were Duchenne muscular dystrophy 53, spinal muscular atrophy 4, myopathy 3, limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2, infantile FSH muscular dystrophy 1, cerebral palsy 1, and Friedreich ataxia 1. Mean age at surgery was 14.3 years (±2.2, range 10.9-25.2). Radiographic follow-up (2 years post-surgery or greater) was 6.4 years (±4.4, range 2-25.3). Using the onlay technique, all patients fused with no rod breakage or pseudarthrosis. For the entire series, the mean pre-operative scoliosis was 54.7° (±31.1, range 0°-120°) with post-operative correction to 21.8° (±21.7, range 0°-91°) and long-term follow-up 24° (±22.9, range 0°-94°). For pelvic obliquity, pre-operative deformity was 17.3° (±11.3, range 0°-51°) with post-operative correction to 8.9° (±7.8, range 0°-35°) and long-term follow-up 10.1° (±8.1, range 0°-27°). Five required revision at a mean of 3.3 years post-original surgery involving rod shortening at the distal end. One of these had associated infection. Lumbosacral stability and long-term sitting comfort have been achieved in all patients. Problems can be minimized by positioning the rods firmly against the sacrum at the time of surgery with a relatively short extension beyond the L5-S1 junction. The procedure is valuable in hypotonic non-ambulatory neuromuscular patients whose immobility enhances the success rate for fusion due to diminished stress at the lumbosacral junction. It is particularly warranted for those with osteoporosis and

  10. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  11. Comparative Study Between Cobalt Chrome and Titanium Alloy Rods for Multilevel Spinal Fusion: Proximal Junctional Kyphosis More Frequently Occurred in Patients Having Cobalt Chrome Rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sanghyun; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2017-07-01

    The use of titanium alloy (Ti) rods is frequently associated with rod fracture after spinal fixation. To address this issue, cobalt chrome (CoCr) rods, which are advantageous because of their greater strength and resistance to fatigue relative to Ti rods, have been introduced. The purpose of the present study was to compare radiographic outcomes after the use of Ti versus CoCr rods in a matched cohort of patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion for treatment of spinal instability. We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who had undergone spinal fusion involving more than 3 levels at a single institution between 2004 and 2015. Patients were matched for age, diagnosis, 3-column osteotomy, levels fused, and T score. Fifty patients with Ti rods were identified and appropriately matched to 50 consecutive patients with CoCr rods. The distributions of age at surgery, sex, diagnosis, 3-column osteotomy, levels fused, number of patients with previous surgical procedures, and T score did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. However, there were significant differences in length of follow-up (CoCr, 25.0 vs. Ti, 28.5 months; P < 0.001), fusion rate (CoCr, 45 [90%] vs. Ti, 33 [66%]; P = 0.004), occurrence of rod breakage (CoCr, 0 vs. T, 8 [16%]; P = 0.006), and junctional kyphosis (CoCr, 24 [46%] vs. Ti, 9 [18%]; P = 0.003). Our findings indicate that the use of CoCr rods is effective in ensuring stability of the posterior spinal construct and accomplishment of spinal fusion. Furthermore, our results indicate that junctional kyphosis may occur more frequently in CoCr systems than in Ti systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials for spinal cord injury as developed by the ICCP panel: spontaneous recovery after spinal cord injury and statistical power needed for therapeutic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, J W; Curt, A; Steeves, J D; Coleman, W P; Tuszynski, M H; Lammertse, D; Bartlett, P F; Blight, A R; Dietz, V; Ditunno, J; Dobkin, B H; Havton, L A; Ellaway, P H; Fehlings, M G; Privat, A; Grossman, R; Guest, J D; Kleitman, N; Nakamura, M; Gaviria, M; Short, D

    2007-03-01

    The International Campaign for Cures of Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis (ICCP) supported an international panel tasked with reviewing the methodology for clinical trials in spinal cord injury (SCI), and making recommendations on the conduct of future trials. This is the first of four papers. Here, we examine the spontaneous rate of recovery after SCI and resulting consequences for achieving statistically significant results in clinical trials. We have reanalysed data from the Sygen trial to provide some of this information. Almost all people living with SCI show some recovery of motor function below the initial spinal injury level. While the spontaneous recovery of motor function in patients with motor-complete SCI is fairly limited and predictable, recovery in incomplete SCI patients (American spinal injury Association impairment scale (AIS) C and AIS D) is both more substantial and highly variable. With motor complete lesions (AIS A/AIS B) the majority of functional return is within the zone of partial preservation, and may be sufficient to reclassify the injury level to a lower spinal level. The vast majority of recovery occurs in the first 3 months, but a small amount can persist for up to 18 months or longer. Some sensory recovery occurs after SCI, on roughly the same time course as motor recovery. Based on previous data of the magnitude of spontaneous recovery after SCI, as measured by changes in ASIA motor scores, power calculations suggest that the number of subjects required to achieve a significant result from a trial declines considerably as the start of the study is delayed after SCI. Trials of treatments that are most efficacious when given soon after injury will therefore, require larger patient numbers than trials of treatments that are effective at later time points. As AIS B patients show greater spontaneous recovery than AIS A patients, the number of AIS A patients requiring to be enrolled into a trial is lower. This factor will have to be balanced

  13. Spinal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis ... by bacteria or fungal organisms. Spinal infections may occur following surgery or spontaneously in patients with certain risk factors. ...

  14. Multiple-hook fixation in revision spinal deformity surgery for patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass: technical note and preliminary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A previous multilevel fusion mass encountered during revision spinal deformity surgery may obscure anatomical landmarks, making instrumentation unworkable or incurring substantial blood loss and operative time. This study introduced a surgical technique of multiple-hook fixation for fixating previous multilevel fusion masses in revision spinal deformity surgeries and then evaluated its outcomes. METHODS Patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass who underwent revision corrective surgery down to the lumbosacral junction were retrospectively studied. Multiple hooks were used to fixate the fusion mass and linked to distal pedicle screws in the lumbosacral-pelvic complex. Radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS The charts of 8 consecutive patients with spinal deformity were retrospectively reviewed (7 women, 1 man; mean age 56 years). The primary diagnoses included flat-back deformity (6 cases), thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis (1 case), and lumbar spondylosis secondary to a previous scoliosis fusion (1 case). The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. Operations were performed at T3/4-ilium (4 cases), T7-ilium (1 case), T6-S1 (1 case), T12-S1 (1 case), and T9-L5 (1 case). Of 8 patients, 7 had sagittal imbalance preoperatively, and their mean C-7 plumb line improved from 10.8 ± 2.9 cm preoperatively to 5.3 ± 3.6 cm at final follow-up (p = 0.003). The mean lumbar lordosis of these patients at final follow-up was significantly greater than that preoperatively (35.2° ± 12.6° vs 16.8° ± 11.8°, respectively; p = 0.005). Two perioperative complications included osteotomy-related leg weakness in 1 patient and a stitch abscess in another. CONCLUSIONS The multiple-hook technique provides a viable alternative option for fixating a previous multilevel fusion mass in revision spinal deformity surgery.

  15. Local effect of zoledronic acid on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion with demineralized bone matrix in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Pawel; Farei-Campagna, Jan; Jentzsch, Thorsten; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Werner, Clément M

    2018-01-01

    Posterolateral spinal fusion is a common orthopaedic surgery performed to treat degenerative and traumatic deformities of the spinal column. In posteriolateral spinal fusion, different osteoinductive demineralized bone matrix products have been previously investigated. We evaluated the effect of locally applied zoledronic acid in combination with commercially available demineralized bone matrix putty on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion in a murine in vivo model. A posterolateral sacral spine fusion in murine model was used to evaluate the new bone formation. We used the sacral spine fusion model to model the clinical situation in which a bone graft or demineralized bone matrix is applied after dorsal instrumentation of the spine. In our study, group 1 received decortications only (n = 10), group 2 received decortication, and absorbable collagen sponge carrier, group 3 received decortication and absorbable collagen sponge carrier with zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg, group 4 received demineralized bone matrix putty (DBM putty) plus decortication (n = 10), and group 5 received DBM putty, decortication and locally applied zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg. Imaging was performed using MicroCT for new bone formation assessment. Also, murine spines were harvested for histopathological analysis 10 weeks after surgery. The surgery performed through midline posterior approach was reproducible. In group with decortication alone there was no new bone formation. Application of demineralized bone matrix putty alone produced new bone formation which bridged the S1-S4 laminae. Local application of zoledronic acid to demineralized bone matrix putty resulted in significant increase of new bone formation as compared to demineralized bone matrix putty group alone. A single local application of zoledronic acid with DBM putty during posterolateral fusion in sacral murine spine model increased significantly new bone formation in situ in our model. Therefore, our

  16. The effect of electrical stimulation on lumbar spinal fusion in older patients: a randomized, controlled, multi-center trial: part 1: functional outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Thomas; Christensen, Finn B; Ernst, Carsten; Fruensgaard, Søren; Østergaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Jens Langer; Rasmussen, Sten; Niedermann, Bent; Høy, Kristian; Helmig, Peter; Holm, Randi; Lindblad, Bent Erling; Hansen, Ebbe Stender; Egund, Niels; Bünger, Cody

    2009-10-01

    Randomized, controlled, multi-center trial. To investigate the effect of direct current (DC) electrical stimulation on functional and clinical outcome after lumbar spinal fusion in patients older than 60 years. Older patients have increased complication rates after spinal fusion surgery. Treatments which have the possibility of enhancing functional outcome and fusion rates without lengthening the procedure could prove beneficial. DC-stimulation of spinal fusion has proven effective in increasing fusion rates in younger and "high risk" patients, but functional outcome measures have not been reported. A randomized, clinical trial comprising 5 orthopedic centers. The study included a total of 107 patients randomized to uninstrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion with or without DC-stimulation. Functional outcome was assessed using Dallas Pain Questionnaire, SF-36, Low Back Pain Rating Scale pain index, and walking distance. Follow-up after 1 year was 95/107 (89%). DC-stimulated patients had significant better outcome in 3 of 4 categories in the Dallas Pain Questionnaire, better SF-36 scores (not significantly), but no difference in pain scores were observed. Median walking distance at latest follow-up was better in the stimulated group (not significant). Walking distance was significantly associated with functional outcome. There was no difference in any of the functional outcome scores between patients who experienced a perioperative complication and those without complications. The achievement of a good functional outcome was heavily dependent on the obtained walking distance. DC-stimulated patients tended to have better functional outcome as compared to controls. No negative effects of perioperative complications could be observed on the short-term functional outcome.

  17. Proximal Junctional Kyphosis in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Following Segmental Posterior Spinal Instrumentation and Fusion; Minimum 2 Years Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khaki Nahad

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:To evaluate proximal junctional segment changes in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis(AIS the posterior spinal fusion and also instrumentation also and finding of probable risk factors, were all considered in this study.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed radiographs of 121 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion for AIS from T3 or below, with a mean follow-   up of 32.8 months(range,24-83. All coronal and sagittal measurements including the proximal junctional kyphosis (PJKangle recorded on standing anteroposterior and lateral radiographs preoperative, early postoperative and on follow-up radiographs.The data were analyzed using the Spss 10.0 software.Dependent(paired samples student t-test was used for analysis between the groups Results: There was PJK angle above normal for the same junctional segment preoperatively in 13 patients (10.7% and the incidence of the PJK postoperatively was   7.4% (9 patients, 7 female and 2 male, all detected until 2 years postoperation.The mean increase in the PJK angle from pre-operation until 6 weeks postoperation was 5.9° (range,0-13°(P=0.02 and until 2 years post operation was 14.3° (range, 2- 16°(p=0.000.The mean proximal junctional angle increased 1.6° until 2 years postoperation in non-PJK group(n=112.Conclusion: The prevalence of Proximal Junctional Kyphosis was low and a silent radiographic problem. In some cases is preventable with perfect pre-operative planning. There is no specific demographic or radiographic variables or instrumentation types associated with developing PJK .

  18. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and spinal fusion do not substantially impact on postural balance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, J.J.; Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Kleuver, M. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spinal curvature in patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) causes an asymmetry of upper body postural alignment, which might affect postural balance. However, the currently available studies on balance in AIS patients are not consistent. Furthermore, it is not known

  19. Early endogenous activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors after spinal cord injury is a protective response involved in spontaneous recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Arevalo-Martin

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI induces a cascade of processes that may further expand the damage (secondary injury or, alternatively, may be part of a safeguard response. Here we show that after a moderate-severe contusive SCI in rats there is a significant and very early increase in the spinal cord content of the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG and arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide, AEA. Since 2-AG and AEA act through CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, we administered at 20 minutes after lesion a single injection of their respective antagonists AM281 and AM630 alone or in combination to block the effects of this early endocannabinoid accumulation. We observed that AM281, AM630 or AM281 plus AM630 administration impairs the spontaneous motor recovery of rats according to the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB locomotor scale. However, blockade of CB1, CB2 or both receptors produced different effects at the histopathological level. Thus, AM630 administration results at 90 days after lesion in increased MHC-II expression by spinal cord microglia/monocytes and reduced number of serotoninergic fibres in lumbar spinal cord (below the lesion. AM281 exerted the same effects but also increased oedema volume estimated by MRI. Co-administration of AM281 and AM630 produced the effects observed with the administration of either AM281 or AM630 and also reduced white matter and myelin preservation and enhanced microgliosis in the epicentre. Overall, our results suggest that the endocannabinoids acting through CB1 and CB2 receptors are part of an early neuroprotective response triggered after SCI that is involved in the spontaneous recovery after an incomplete lesion.

  20. A case of acute spinal subdural hematoma with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Rapid spontaneous remission, relapse, and complete resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michito Namekawa

    2017-06-01

    In addition to rostrocaudal spreading of bloody components in the subdural space, rupture of the hematoma into the subarachnoid space must have released pressure, compressing the spinal cord. In this case report, we also describe the serial MRI studies and note the limitations of the resolution of spinal MRI in the acute phase.

  1. Sagittal spinal balance after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support results from a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Bünger, Cody E; Henriksen, Mads; Neils, Egund; Christensen, Finn B

    2011-02-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To analyze the long-term clinical impact of anterior column support on sagittal balance after lumbar spinal fusion. Several investigators have stressed the importance of maintaining sagittal balance in relation to spinal fusion to avoid lumbar 'flat back,' accelerated adjacent segment degeneration, pain, and inferior functional outcome. Only limited evidence exists on how sagittal alignment affects clinical outcome. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. No randomized controlled trial has been published analyzing the effect of anterior support on radiographic measurements of sagittal balance. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for posterolateral lumbar fusion plus anterior support (PLF + ALIF) or posterolateral lumbar fusion. A total of 92 patients participated. Sagittal balance parameters were examined on full lateral radiographs of the spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and positioning of C7 plumb line. The type of lumbar lordosis was evaluated and outcome assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Follow-up rate was 74%. Sagittal balance parameters were similar between randomization groups. None of the parameters differed significantly between patients with an ODI from 0 to 40 and patients with ODI over 40. Balanced patients had a significantly superior outcome as measured by ODI (P Lumbar lordosis and type of lordosis correlated with outcome but could not explain the superior outcome in the group with anterior support. Whether sagittal balance and anterior support during fusion provide a protective effect on adjacent motion segments remains unclear.

  2. [Application of small freeze-drying allogeneic bone plots mixed with autologous bone graft in spinal fusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Changqing; Li, Zhenyu; Zhou, Wenyu; Zeng, Tenghui; Sun, Shiquan; Li, Baoxing

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the osteoblasts effect, complications and influencing factors in the application of small freeze-drying allogeneic bone plots mixed autologous bone fragments in spinal surgery, and to compare with autogenous bone graft. From January 2003 to January 2007, 515 cases of spinal injuries were treated. A total of 324 cases were treated with small freeze-drying allogeneic bone plots mixed with autologous bone grafts (group A), including 211 males and 113 females with an average age of 36 years (18-83 years). There were 182 cases of thoracolumbar vertebra fracture, 68 cases of lumbar spondylolisthesis, 47 cases of lumbar vertebral canal stenosis, 17 cases of cervical disc herniation, 5 cases of cervical spine fracture-dislocation and 5 cases of thoracolumbar vertebra tumor. The weight of bone graft was 10-60 g (mean 30 g). A total of 191 cases were treated with autogenous bone grafting (group B), including 135 males and 56 females with an average age of 32 years (23-78 years). There were 109 cases of thoracolumbar vertebra fracture, 23 cases of lumbar spondylolisthesis, 17 cases of lumbar vertebral canal stenosis, 19 cases of cervical disc herniation, and 23 cases of cervical spine fracture-dislocation. The weight of bone graft was 10-50 g (mean 25 g). In group A, effusion of wound increased in 4 cases and the result of bacterial culture was negative; effusion was absorbed after 2 weeks of local irrigation, drainage and cortin management. In group B, no obvious effusion was observed. The follow-up time was 10-36 months (mean 17.4 months) in group A and 8-36 months (mean 16.8 months) in group B. The bone healing was achieved in 308 cases within 4-10 months (mean 8.1 months) and in 184 cases within 4-10 months (mean 5.8 months), and the bone fusion rates were 95.06% and 96.34% in groups A and B, respectively. There was no significant difference in bone fusion rate between groups (P > 0.05). According to Mankin and Komender evaluation standard, the response

  3. Ketamine as an adjunct to postoperative pain management in opioid tolerant patients after spinal fusions: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael K; Ya Deau, Jacques T; Wukovits, Barbara; Lipnitsky, Jane Y

    2008-02-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is challenging, particularly in patients with preexisting narcotic dependency. Ketamine has been used at subanesthetic doses as a N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist to block the processing of nociceptive input in chronic pain syndromes. This prospective randomized study was designed to assess the use of ketamine as an adjunct to acute pain management in narcotic tolerant patients after spinal fusions. Twenty-six patients for 1-2 level posterior lumbar fusions with segmental instrumentation were randomly assigned to receive ketamine or act as a control. Patients in the ketamine group received 0.2 mg/kg on induction of general anesthesia and then 2 mcg kg(-1) hour(-1) for the next 24 hours. Patients were extubated in the operating room and within 15 minutes of arriving in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) were started on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) hydromorphone without a basal infusion. Patients were assessed for pain (numerical rating scale [NRS]), narcotic use, level of sedation, delirium, and physical therapy milestones until discharge. The ketamine group had significantly less pain during their first postoperative hour in the PACU (NRS 4.8 vs 8.7) and continued to have less pain during the first postoperative day at rest (3.6 vs 5.5) and with physical therapy (5.6 vs 8.0). Three patients in the control group failed PCA pain management and were converted to intravenous ketamine infusions when their pain scores improved. Patients in the ketamine group required less hydromorphone than the control group, but the differences were not significant. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine reduced postoperative pain in narcotic tolerant patients undergoing posterior spine fusions.

  4. Considerations in Spinal Fusion Surgery for Chronic Lumbar Pain: Psychosocial Factors, Rating Scales, and Perioperative Patient Education-A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Daniel; Krafcik, Brianna M; Mansour, Tarek R; Alnemari, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Despite widespread use of lumbar spinal fusion as a treatment for back pain, outcomes remain variable. Optimizing patient selection can help to reduce adverse outcomes. This literature review was conducted to better understand factors associated with optimal postoperative results after lumbar spinal fusion for chronic back pain and current tools used for evaluation. The PubMed database was searched for clinical trials related to psychosocial determinants of outcome after lumbar spinal fusion surgery; evaluation of commonly used patient subjective outcome measures; and perioperative cognitive, behavioral, and educational therapies. Reference lists of included studies were also searched by hand for additional studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients' perception of good health before surgery and low cardiovascular comorbidity predict improved postoperative physical functional capacity and greater patient satisfaction. Depression, tobacco use, and litigation predict poorer outcomes after lumbar fusion. Incorporation of cognitive-behavioral therapy perioperatively can address these psychosocial risk factors and improve outcomes. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, European Quality of Life five dimensions questionnaire, visual analog pain scale, brief pain inventory, and Oswestry Disability Index can provide specific feedback to track patient progress and are important to understand when evaluating the current literature. This review summarizes current information and explains commonly used assessment tools to guide clinicians in decision making when caring for patients with lower back pain. When determining a treatment algorithm, physicians must consider predictive psychosocial factors. Use of perioperative cognitive-behavioral therapy and patient education can improve outcomes after lumbar spinal fusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of Age on Change in Self-Image 5 Years After Complex Spinal Fusion (≥5 Levels).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Adogwa, Owoicho; Sergesketter, Amanda; Behrens, Shay; Hobbs, Cassie; Bridwell, Keith H; Karikari, Isaac O

    2017-01-01

    Spinal deformities that require ≥5 fusion levels are difficult and challenging for both the surgeon and patient. Corrections of moderate to severe deformities have been shown to improve patient-reported outcomes (PROs), and provide patients with a better quality of life. Self-image is an important PRO because it sheds insight into the patient's perception of health, as well as serving as a proxy of satisfaction for patients with spine deformity undergoing corrective surgery. However, with an aging population, the impact of age on long-term change in self-image is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of age on self-image 5 years after undergoing an elective complex spinal fusion (≥5 levels). This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of 55 adult patients (≥18 years old) undergoing ≥5 levels of spinal fusion to the sacrum with iliac fixation from January 2002 to December 2008. Patients were grouped by age: young (self-image, mental health, and pain) was completed before surgery then at follow-up (at least 5 years after surgery). The primary outcome investigated in this study was the change in self-image after surgery. Baseline characteristics and preoperative variables were similar in both cohorts. There were no significant differences in intraoperative variables, including the mean ± standard deviation number of fusion levels between the cohorts (young, 11.2 ±4.3 vs. older, 12.1 ± 4.0; P = 0.42). Complication rates were similar between the cohorts, with no significant differences in the types of complications (young, 29.63% vs. older, 25.0%; P = 0.77). There were no significant differences in preoperative and follow-up PROs between the cohorts. The mean ± standard deviation preoperative and follow-up self-image scores were (young, 2.35±0.58 vs. older, 2.68 ± 0.64; P = 0.51) and (young, 3.82 ± 0.63 vs. older, 3.51 ± 0.94), respectively. There were no significant differences in the change of function

  6. Accelerated L5-S1 Segment Degeneration after Spinal Fusion on and above L4-5 : Minimum 4-Year Follow-Up Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Yoon; Chin, Dong Kyu; Cho, Yong Eun

    2009-02-01

    Many biomechanical and clinical studies on adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) have addressed cranial segment. No study has been conducted on caudal segment degeneration after upper segment multiple lumbar fusions. This is a retrospective investigation of the L5-S1 segment after spinal fusion at and above L4-5, which was undertaken to analyze the rate of caudal ASD at L5-S1 after spinal fusion on and above L4-5 and to determine that factors that might have influenced it. The authors included 67 patients with L4-5, L3-5, or L2-5 posterior fusions. Among these patients, 28 underwent L4-5 fusion, 23 L3-5, and 16 L2-5 fusions. Pre- and postoperative radiographs were analyzed to assess degenerative changes at L5-S1. Also, clinical results after fusion surgery were analyzed. Among the 67 patients, 3 had pseudoarthrosis, and 35 had no evidence of ASD, cranially and caudally. Thirteen patients (19.4%) showed caudal ASD, 23 (34.3%) cranial ASD, and 4 (6.0%) both cranial and caudal ASD. Correlation analysis for caudal ASD at L5-S1 showed that pre-existing L5-S1 degeneration was most strongly correlated. In addition, numbers of fusion segments and age were also found to be correlated. Clinical outcome was not correlated with caudal ASD at L5-S1. If caudal and cranial ASD are considered, the overall occurrence rate of ASD increases to 50%. The incidence rate of caudal ASD at L5-S1 was significantly lower than that of cranial ASD. Furthermore, the occurrence of caudal ASD was found to be significantly correlated with pre-existing disc degeneration.

  7. Three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography-magnetic resonance fusion image-based preoperative planning for surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele repair. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yohei; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nakajima, Shin; Yamasaki, Mami

    2011-01-01

    Surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele (MMC) repair are often difficult and complicated, because the anatomical structures can be deformed in complex and unpredictable ways. Imaging helps the surgeon understand the patient's spinal anatomy. Whereas two-dimensional images provide only limited information for surgical planning, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed computed tomography (CT)-magnetic resonance (MR) fusion images produce clearer representations of the spinal regions. Here we describe simple and quick methods for obtaining 3D reconstructed CT-MR fusion images for preoperative planning of surgical procedures using the iPlan cranial (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) neuronavigation software. 3D CT images of the vertebral bone were combined with heavily T 2 -weighted MR images of the spinal cord, lipoma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space, and nerve root through a process of fusion, segmentation, and reconstruction of the 3D images. We also used our procedure called 'Image Overlay' to directly project the 3D reconstructed image onto the body surface using an light emitting diode (LED) projector. The final reconstructed 3D images took 10-30 minutes to obtain, and provided the surgeon with a representation of the individual pathological structures, so enabled the design of effective surgical plans, even in patients with bony deformity such as scoliosis. None of the 19 patients treated based on our 3D reconstruction method has had neurological complications, except for CSF leakage. This 3D reconstructed imaging method, combined with Image Overlay, improves the visual understanding of complicated surgical situations, and should improve surgical efficiency and outcome. (author)

  8. Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  9. Effectiveness of Reoperations for Adjacent Segment Disease Following Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysch, Austin; Ajiboye, Remi M; Sharma, Akshay; Li, Jesse; Reza, Tara; Harley, Dushawn; Park, Don Y; Pourtaheri, Sina

    2018-03-01

    Although several options are available to address adjacent segment disease (ASD), the most effective surgical treatment has not been determined. In addition, it is important to subdivide ASD into stenosis with or without instability to determine if a decompression alone vs an extension of fusion is necessary. A systematic search of multiple medical reference databases was conducted for studies on surgical treatment of ASD. The primary outcome measures used were radiographic and clinical success rates. Meta-analysis was completed to determine effect summary values, 95% confidence intervals, and Q statistic and I 2 values, using the random effects model for heterogeneity. The search yielded 662 studies, of which 657 were excluded. A total of 5 (level IV) studies with a total of 118 patients were included in this review. In 2 studies (46 patients), stenosis without instability was the indication for reoperation for ASD. However, extension of fusion was the modality of choice for the treatment of ASD in all studies. Overall clinical improvement (in back and/or leg pain scores) was noted in 71.3% of patients (95% confidence interval, 37.4-100), while radiographic fusion was noted in 89.3% of patients (95% confidence interval, 51.2-100). Following reoperation for ASD, revision surgery rates ranged from 4.5% to 23.1% at last clinical follow-up. There is variability in the clinical improvement following lumbar fusion for ASD. In addition, little literature exists regarding the optimal treatment options for patients with ASD for stenosis with or without instability. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(2):e161-e167.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. The Correlation Between Restoration of Lumbar Lordosis and Surgical Outcome in the Treatment of Low-grade Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis With Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Ta; Yang, Stephen S; Chen, Tzu Yung

    2016-02-01

    Retrospective clinical study. To investigate the relationship between the restoration of the lumbar lordosis (LL) and the surgical outcome of patients undergoing spinal fusion for low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Correlation between low back pain and the loss of LL in the treatment of low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis has seldom been reported. Between May 2005 and July 2011, 59 patients with low back pain and neurogenic claudication due to low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent spinal decompression and fusion by a senior surgeon. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. The mean age of the remaining 49 patients (10 men and 39 women) was 64.0 years (range, 47-88 y). Patients were categorized on the basis of the spino-pelvic posture: type 1 [pelvic incidence (PI)60 degrees) (n=13). The LL restoration ratio was calculated by the actual LL divided by the predicted LL. The clinical results were evaluated using a visual analogue scale and the Oswestry Disability Index. Postoperative 36-inch spinal films were used to assess the sagittal balance. The mean follow-up period was 43.2 months (range, 28-62 mo). Forty-eight patients showed significant improvement with respect to visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index regardless of whether the LL was restored higher or lower. Postoperative 36-inch spinal films showed the C7 plumb line to be within an average of 4.4 cm (range, 0.6-5.6 cm) from the posterior-superior corner of the S1 vertebrae. Patients with smaller PI tended to be restored higher, and those patients with a larger PI were more likely to be restored lower. For patients with normal sagittal balance, the surgical outcomes in the treatment of low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal fusion are not correlated with restoration of the LL.

  11. Seasonal Variations in the Risk of Reoperation for Surgical Site Infection Following Elective Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Retrospective Study Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Oichi, Takeshi; Kato, So; Matsui, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective study of data abstracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) database, a national representative database in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variations in the risk of reoperation for surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal fusion surgery. Although higher rates of infection in the summer than in other seasons were thought to be caused by increasing inexperience of new staff, high temperature, and high humidity, no studies have examined seasonal variations in the risk of SSI following spinal fusion surgery in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in summer season. In Japan, medical staff rotation starts in April. We retrospectively extracted the data of patients who were admitted between July 2010 and March 2013 from the DPC database. Patients were included if they were aged 20 years or older and underwent elective spinal fusion surgery. The primary outcome was reoperation for SSI during hospitalization. We performed multivariate analysis to clarify the risk factors of primary outcome with adjustment for patient background characteristics. We identified 47,252 eligible patients (23,659 male, 23,593 female). The mean age of the patients was 65.4 years (range, 20-101 yrs). Overall, reoperation for SSI occurred in 0.93% of the patients during hospitalization. The risk of reoperation for SSI was significantly higher in April (vs. February; odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.43, P = 0.03) as well as other known risk factors. In subgroup analysis with stratification for type of hospital, month of surgery was identified as an independent risk factor of reoperation for SSI among cases in an academic hospital, although there was no seasonal variation among those in a nonacademic hospital. This study showed that month of surgery is a risk factor of reoperation for SSI following elective spinal fusion surgery, nevertheless, in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in

  12. Postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis and posterior spinal fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Florian; Mutlak, Haitham; Tizi, Karima; Senft, Christian; Setzer, Matthias; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The value of postoperative epidural analgesia after major spinal surgery is well established. Thus far, the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been denied to patients undergoing debridement and instrumentation in spondylodiscitis, with the risk of increased postoperative pain resulting in prolonged recovery. The value of PCEA with special regard to infectious complications remains to be clarified. The present study examined the value of postoperative PCEA in comparison with intravenous analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis undergoing posterior spinal surgery. METHODS Thirty-two patients treated surgically for spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine were prospectively included in a database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Postoperative antibiotic treatment, functional capacity, pain levels, side effects, and complications were documented. Sixteen patients were given patient-demanded intravenous analgesia (PIA) followed by 16 patients assigned to PCEA. If PCEA was applied, the insertion of an epidural catheter was performed under the direct visual guidance of the surgeon at the end of the surgery. RESULTS Three patients intended for PCEA treatment were excluded due to predefined exclusion criteria. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in the PCEA group during the first 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.03). As determined by the trunk control test conducted at 8 (p spondylodiscitis.

  13. Infection related never events in pediatric patients undergoing spinal fusion procedures in United States: prevalence and predictors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerajalandhar Allareddy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence and predictors of infection related never events (NE associated with spinal fusion procedures (SFP in children (age < = 18 years in the United States. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2004 to 2008. All pediatric hospitalizations that underwent SFP were selected for analysis. The main outcomes measures include occurrence of certain NE's. The association between the occurrence of a NE and factors (patient & hospital related were examined using multivariable logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of 56,465 hospitalizations, 61.7% occurred among females. The average age was 13.7 y and two-thirds were whites. The major insurance payer was private insurance (67.4%. About 82% of all hospitalizations occurred on an elective basis. Teaching hospitals accounted for a majority of hospitalizations (87.9%. Two-thirds were posterior fusion techniques, 52.3% had underlying musculoskeletal deformities, and the most frequently present co-morbid conditions (CMC included paralysis (10.9%, chronic pulmonary disease (9.7%, and fluid/electrolyte disorders (7.6%. Overall rate of occurrence of a NE was 4.8%. Post-operative pneumonia was the most frequently occurring NE (2.9%. Female gender (OR = 0.78 and elective admissions (OR = 0.66 were associated with lower risk of NE occurrence. Medicaid coverage (OR = 1.46, primary diagnosis of other acquired deformities (OR = 1.82, spinal cord injury (OR = 6.94, other nervous system disorders (OR = 2.84 were associated with higher risk of NE occurrence. Among CMC, those with chronic blood loss anemia (OR = 2.57, coagulopathy (OR = 1.97, depression (OR = 2, drug abuse (OR = 3.71, fluid/electrolyte disorders (OR = 2.62, neurological disorders (OR = 1.72, paralysis (OR = 1.75, renal failure (OR = 5.45, and weight loss (OR = 4.61 were risk factors for higher odds of a NE occurrence. Hospital teaching status, region, hospital size, and

  14. Delayed Adjacent Level Spondylodiscitis after Initial Surgery with Instrumented Spinal Fusion: A Report of Three Cases and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narihito Nagoshi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, 2 cases of adjacent level spondylodiscitis occurring a few months after initial spinal fusion were reported. However, the development of delayed adjacent level spondylodiscitis is very rare. The authors report 3 cases of spondylodiscitis that occurred at the proximal adjacent level of the fused spine more than 1 year after the initial surgery. Antibiotic treatment was initially chosen in all three cases. In two of the cases, progressive neurological deficit occurred at the level of the infection due to compression of neural elements and spinal instability. For these patients, additional spinal fusion was performed. In each of the three cases, the selected treatment resulted in successful bony fusion at the level of the spondylodiscitis. According to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System, deep wound infection is defined as occurring within 1 year after surgery with instrumentation. The spondylodiscitis in the present cases occurred more than 1 year after the initial surgery, suggesting that these cases may be considered as adjacent segment disease rather than surgical site infection.

  15. Radiologic comparison of posterior release, internal distraction, final PSO and spinal fusion with one-stage posterior vertebral column resection for multi-level severe congenital scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shichang; Zhang, Nannan; Song, Yueming; Song, Zongrang; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Jijun; Xie, En; Wu, Qining; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-06-20

    To compare radiologic results of posterior release, internal distraction, and final pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) and spinal fusionwith one-stage posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) in treating multi-level severe congenital scoliosis. Forty-onesevere congenital scoliosis patients were used in the study. Group A comprised 24 patients who underwent one-stage PVCR. Group B comprised 17 patients who underwent posterior release with internal distraction, followed by final posterior fusion and instrumentation. The average preoperative main curve was 110.4° (95-130°) in group A and 109.4° (range 90°-126°) in group B. Postoperative follow-up time was ≥2 years (2.0-4.5 years) to analyze the radiographic and clinical outcomes. A comparison of posterior release, internal distraction, and final spinal fusion with PVCR showed no significant differences in postoperative main curve and compensatory caudal curve correction, coronal and sagittal imbalance. However, significant differences were found between the 2 groups in compensatory cranial curve correction. Posterior release, internal distraction, and final spinal fusion produce better corrective results in compensatory cranial curve correction than PVCR in treating severe multi-level congenital scoliosis.

  16. Effects of dexmedetomidine on CD42a+/CD14+, HLADR+/CD14+and inflammatory cytokine levels in patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongmei; Lu, Jian; Shen, Yingyan; Kang, Shuai; Zong, Youming

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effects of dexmedetomidine (Dex) on CD42a + /CD14 + ,HLADR + /CD14 + and inflammatory cytokine levels in patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion. Patients and methods Forty ASA I-II patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion were randomly divided into Dex and control groups (n=20). A continuous intravenous infusion of Dex (0.5μg/kg/h) or normal saline was started 10min prior to induction and was stopped 15min before operation completion. Serum levels of CD42a + /CD14 + , HLADR + /CD14 + , WBC, PLT, CRP, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α were measured before induction (T 1 ), 30min (T 2 ) after operation initiation, and 60min (T 3 ), 1d (T 4 ), 3d (T 5 ), and 5d (T 6 ) post-operation. VAS values were obtained at T 3 , T 4 , T 5 and T 6 , as well as hospital days. Treatment with Dex significantly decreased CD42a + /CD14 + at T 2 , T 3 , and T 4 , and markedly increased HLADR + /CD14 + at T 4 and T 5 when compared with controls. CRP and WBC were markedly decreased at T 2 , T 3 , T 4 and T 5 (P0.05). Dex can inhibit the inflammatory response and reduce immunosuppression in patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lumbar Spinous Process Fixation and Fusion: A Systematic Review and Critical Analysis of an Emerging Spinal Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alejandro J; Scheer, Justin K; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Patel, Alpesh A; Smith, Zachary A

    2017-11-01

    A systematic review. The available literature on interspinous rigid fixation/fusion devices (IFD) was systematically reviewed to explore the devices' efficacy and complication profile. The clinical application of new spinal technologies may proceed without well-established evidence, as is the case with IFDs. IFDs are plate-like devices that are attached to the lateral aspects of 2 adjacent spinous processes to promote rigidity at that segment. Despite almost a decade since the devices' introduction, the literature regarding efficacy and safety is sparse. Complications have been reported but no definitive study is known to the authors. A systematic review of the past 10 years of English literature was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. The timeframe was chosen based on publication of the first study containing a modern IFD, the SPIRE, in 2006. All PubMed publications containing MeSH headings or with title or abstract containing any combination of the words "interspinous," "spinous process," "fusion," "fixation," "plate," or "plating" were included. Exclusion criteria consisted of dynamic stabilization devices (X-Stop, DIAM, etc.), cervical spine, pediatrics, and animal models. The articles were blinded to author and journal, assigned a level of evidence by Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) criteria, and summarized in an evidentiary table. A total of 293 articles were found in the initial search, of which 15 remained after examination for exclusion criteria. No class I or class II evidence regarding IFDs was found. IFDs have been shown by methodologically flawed and highly biased class III evidence to reduce instability at 1 year, without statistical comparison of complication rates against other treatment modalities. Although IFDs are heavily marketed and commonly applied in modern practice, data on safety and efficacy are inadequate. The paucity of evidence warrants reexamination of these devices' value and indications by the spine surgery

  18. What are the possibilities of spontaneous resorption of a thoracic disc herniation occupying more than 20% of the spinal canal in the asymptomatic subject? Comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauge, David; Madkouri, Rachid; Clément, Robert; Reina, Vincent; Brauge, Thomas; Gaillard, Stephan

    2017-10-01

    Thoracic disc herniation is a rare pathology for which surgical treatment is difficult. The discovery of asymptomatic or only slightly symptomatic lesions can be problematic, especially in cases of marked canal stenosis. The possibility of spontaneous resorption has been documented by a few case reports but there is no study on this subject. Our objective was to compare the clinical and radiological data for two groups of patients with significant thoracic herniation (occupying more than 20% of the spinal canal): one showing spontaneous resorption (group 1) and the other persistence of the lesion during follow up (group 2). The physiological processes of thoracic herniation are also discussed. We present a retrospective study of our database of patients with thoracic hernia. Only subjects who initially showed signs of slight or absent myelopathy (Frankel D or E) were included. Group 1 and 2 are composed of 12 and 17 patients respectively. The clinical and radiological data are compared. The two groups were not different for the following parameters: age, sex ratio, disc calcification, size, trajectory, side, hernia level. Other parameters were evaluated and were not associated with a higher rate of resorption: disc calcification, intramedullary hypersignal in T2 sequence, calcification of the posterior common vertebral ligament, calcification of another disc and Scheuerman's disease. Asymptomatic thoracic disc herniation is a condition that can disappear spontaneously, even in the case of a large lesion. To date, there are no clinical or radiological data that can predict such an evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The beneficial effect of Batroxobin on blood loss reduction in spinal fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hui-Min; Chen, Li; Frary, Charles Edward

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Batroxobin on blood loss during spinal operations. Methods After obtaining approval from the ethics committee at the hospital along with informed written consent, we performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study....... The primary outcomes were intraoperative, 24 h postoperative, and total perioperative blood loss. Secondary outcomes were hemoglobin (Hb), red blood cell count (RBC), the volume of blood/fluid transfusion intraoperatively, and 24 h postoperatively. Safety evaluation parameters were the incidence of venous.......58), but there was no difference in the amount of blood/fluid transfused, postoperatively Hb, or RBC between the two groups. After the operation, coagulation parameters were not significantly different between the 2 groups at the days 1 or 3 postoperatively. No adverse events related to the use of Batroxobin were recorded...

  20. Automated double-cone-beam CT fusion technique. Enhanced evaluation of glue distribution in cases of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) embolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farago, Giuseppe [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Caldiera, V. [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Antozzi, C.; Bellino, A. [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Neuroimmunology and Neuromuscular Diseases, Milan (Italy); Innocenti, A. [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Neuro-Oncology, Milan (Italy); Ciceri, E. [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata Borgo Trento, Department of Neuroradiology, Verona (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are acquired diseases that represent the majority of all arteriovenous spinal shunts, leading to progressive and disabling myelopathy. Treatment is focused on accurately disconnecting the fistula point. We present our experience with the double-cone-beam CT fusion technique successfully applied to evaluate treatment results in a series of SDAVFs. Between November 2011 and December 2015 we performed double-DynaCT acquisition (pre- and post-embolisation) in 12 cases of SDAVF. A successful DynaCT fusion technique was only achieved in the group of patients with pre- and post-treatment images acquired at the same time as the treatment session, under general anaesthesia (4/12). DynaCT performed on different days proved to be inadequate for the automated fusion technique because of changes in the body position (8/12). A pre-treatment flat-panel cone-beam CT with contrast, at the time of diagnostic angiography, can be very helpful to detect the correct level of the fistula and the relationship between the fistula and the surrounding structures. In case of the endovascular approach, additional post-treatment native acquisition merged with the pre-treatment acquisition (double-cone-beam CT fusion technique) permits to immediately evaluate the distribution of the glue cast and to confirm the success of the procedure. (orig.)

  1. ATPase N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive Fusion Protein: A Novel Key Player for Causing Spontaneous Network Excitation in Human Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Christina; Bidmon, Hans-Jürgen; Pannek, Heinz W; Hans, Volkmar; Gorji, Ali; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Zilles, Karl

    2018-02-10

    The molecular basis for onset, maintenance and propagation of excitation along neuronal networks in epilepsy is still poorly understood. Besides different neurotransmitter receptors that control signal transfer at the synapse, one key regulator involved in all of these processes is the ATPase N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF). Therefore, we analyzed receptor subunits and NSF levels in tissues from the medial temporal gyrus (MTG) of patients with pharmaco-resistant focal temporal lobe epilepsy resected during epilepsy surgery and autopsy controls. The resected tissues were further characterized by field potential recordings into tissues with and without spontaneous sharp wave activity. We detected increased levels of NSF, NMDA 1.1, 2A and GABA A γ 2 receptor subunits associated with spontaneous sharp wave spiking activity. We further identified correlations between NSF, AMPA receptor subunit, metabotropic glutamate receptor and adenosine 1 receptor levels in the spontaneous sharp wave spiking tissues. Our findings suggest that NSF plays a key role in controlling spontaneous network excitation in epilepsy by two mechanisms of action: (1) directly via controlling transmitter release at the presynaptic side, and (2) indirectly via altering the function of possible receptor crosstalk and directing/integrating specific receptor compounds through/into the postsynaptic membrane. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spontaneous development of full weight-supported stepping after complete spinal cord transection in the neonatal opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Wheaton

    Full Text Available Spinal cord trauma in the adult nervous system usually results in permanent loss of function below the injury level. The immature spinal cord has greater capacity for repair and can develop considerable functionality by adulthood. This study used the marsupial laboratory opossum Monodelphis domestica, which is born at a very early stage of neural development. Complete spinal cord transection was made in the lower-thoracic region of pups at postnatal-day 7 (P7 or P28, and the animals grew to adulthood. Injury at P7 resulted in a dense neuronal tissue bridge that connected the two ends of the cord; retrograde neuronal labelling indicated that supraspinal and propriospinal innervation spanned the injury site. This repair was associated with pronounced behavioural recovery, coordinated gait and an ability to use hindlimbs when swimming. Injury at P28 resulted in a cyst-like cavity encased in scar tissue forming at the injury site. Using retrograde labelling, no labelled brainstem or propriospinal neurons were found above the lesion, indicating that detectable neuronal connectivity had not spanned the injury site. However, these animals could use their hindlimbs to take weight-supporting steps but could not use their hindlimbs when swimming. White matter, demonstrated by Luxol Fast Blue staining, was present in the injury site of P7- but not P28-injured animals. Overall, these studies demonstrated that provided spinal injury occurs early in development, regrowth of supraspinal innervation is possible. This repair appears to lead to improved functional outcomes. At older ages, even without detectable axonal growth spanning the injury site, substantial development of locomotion was still possible. This outcome is discussed in conjunction with preliminary findings of differences in the local propriospinal circuits following spinal cord injury (demonstrated with fluororuby labelling, which may underlie the weight bearing locomotion observed in the

  3. Cervical lordotic alignment following posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: reciprocal changes and risk factors for malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Terai, Hidetomi; Suzuki, Akinobu; Hoshino, Masatoshi; Tamai, Koji; Ohyama, Shoichiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Numerous reports have been published on the effectiveness and safety of correction of the coronal Cobb angle and thoracolumbar sagittal alignment in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Suboptimal sagittal alignment, such as decreased thoracic kyphosis (TK), after corrective surgery, is a possible cause of lumbar or cervical spinal degeneration and junctional malalignment; however, few reports are available on reciprocal changes outside of the fused segments, such as the cervical lordotic angle (CLA). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the perioperative CLA and other radiographic factors or clinical results in AIS, and to identify independent risk factors of postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis. METHODS A total of 51 AIS patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with the placement of pedicle screw (PS) constructs at thoracic levels were included in the study. Clinical and radiographic follow-up of patients was conducted for a minimum of 2 years, and the postoperative course was evaluated. The authors measured and identified the changes in the CLA and other radiographic parameters using whole-spine radiography, with the patient in the standing position, performed immediately before surgery, 2 weeks after surgery, and 2 years after surgery. The postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis group included patients whose CLA at 2-year follow-up was smaller than -10°. The reciprocal changes of the CLA and other parameters were also investigated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to determine the associated risk factors for postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis. RESULTS This study comprised 48 females and 3 males (mean age 16.0 years). The mean follow-up period was 47 months (range 24-90 months). The main coronal thoracic curve was corrected from 54.6° to 16.4°, and the mean correction rate was 69.8% at 2 years. The CLA significantly increased from the mean preoperative measurement (-5.4° ± 14°) to the 2

  4. Initial investigation of 18F-NaF PET/CT for identification of vertebral sites amenable to surgical revision after spinal fusion surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quon, Andrew; Iagaru, Andrei; Dodd, Robert; Abreu, Marcelo Rodrigues de; Sprinz, Clarice; Hennemann, Sergio; Alves Neto, Jose Maria

    2012-01-01

    A pilot study was performed in patients with recurrent back pain after spinal fusion surgery to evaluate the ability of 18 F-NaF PET/CT imaging to correctly identify those requiring surgical intervention and to locate a site amenable to surgical intervention. In this prospective study 22 patients with recurrent back pain after spinal surgery and with equivocal findings on physical examination and CT were enrolled for evaluation with 18 F-NaF PET/CT. All PET/CT images were prospectively reviewed with the primary objective of identifying or ruling out the presence of lesions amenable to surgical intervention. The PET/CT results were then validated during surgical exploration or clinical follow-up of at least 15 months. Abnormal 18 F-NaF foci were found in 16 of the 22 patients, and surgical intervention was recommended. These foci were located at various sites: screws, cages, rods, fixation hardware, and bone grafts. In 6 of the 22 patients no foci requiring surgical intervention were found. Validation of the results by surgery (15 patients) or on clinical follow-up (7 patients) showed that 18 F-NaF PET/CT correctly predicted the presence of an abnormality requiring surgical intervention in 15 of 16 patients and was falsely positive in 1 of 16. In this initial investigation, 18 F-NaF PET/CT imaging showed potential utility for evaluation of recurrent symptoms after spinal fusion surgery by identifying those patients requiring surgical management. (orig.)

  5. Pain management in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion: combined intrathecal morphine and continuous epidural versus PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravish, Matthew; Muldowney, Bridget; Becker, Aimee; Hetzel, Scott; McCarthy, James J; Nemeth, Blaise A; Noonan, Kenneth J

    2012-12-01

    A retrospective case-comparison study. Compare efficacy and safety of combined intrathecal morphine (ITM) and epidural analgesia (EPI) to that of conventional intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after posterior spinal fusion (PSF) for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Pain control after PSF in AIS has been managed traditionally with IV-PCA. More recently studies have shown improvement in pain control with the use of continuous EPI or intraoperative ITM. No studies to our knowledge have compared the use of both ITM and EPI analgesia to that of IV-PCA. An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective case-comparison study was performed from 1989 to 2009 of all patients undergoing PSF for AIS. Patients received either IV-PCA or ITM/EPI. Daily pain scores were recorded along with total opioid and benzodiazepine use. Adverse events were recorded for all the patients. A total of 146 patients were initially included in the study; 95 patients received ITM/EPI and 51 received IV-PCA as a historical control. Eight patients from the ITM/EPI group were excluded from the pain comparison portion of the study. There were no statistical differences in age, sex, weight, or hospital stay between the 2 groups. The ITM/EPI group had, on average, 1 additional level of fusion (P = 0.001). Daily average pain scores were lower in the ITM/EPI group on all hospital days, and statistically lower in days 1 and 3 to 5. Total opioid requirement was significantly lower in the ITM/EPI patients, although oral opioid use was higher among this group. Total benzodiazepine use was lower among the IV-PCA group. A total of 15.7% of the IV-PCA patients had bladder hypotonia, compared with 1.1% of the ITM/EPI group (P = 0.002). The rate of illeus was 15.7% in the IV-PCA patients and 5.7% in the ITM/EPI (P = 0.071). Respiratory depression was reported in 4 ITM/EPI patients, 0 in our PCA group. Technical catheter malfunction was reported in 8.5% of the EPI group. The use of ITM

  6. Automated double-cone-beam CT fusion technique. Enhanced evaluation of glue distribution in cases of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) embolisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faragò, Giuseppe; Caldiera, V; Antozzi, C; Bellino, A; Innocenti, A; Ciceri, E

    2017-05-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are acquired diseases that represent the majority of all arteriovenous spinal shunts, leading to progressive and disabling myelopathy. Treatment is focused on accurately disconnecting the fistula point. We present our experience with the double-cone-beam CT fusion technique successfully applied to evaluate treatment results in a series of SDAVFs. Between November 2011 and December 2015 we performed double-DynaCT acquisition (pre- and post-embolisation) in 12 cases of SDAVF. A successful DynaCT fusion technique was only achieved in the group of patients with pre- and post-treatment images acquired at the same time as the treatment session, under general anaesthesia (4/12). DynaCT performed on different days proved to be inadequate for the automated fusion technique because of changes in the body position (8/12). A pre-treatment flat-panel cone-beam CT with contrast, at the time of diagnostic angiography, can be very helpful to detect the correct level of the fistula and the relationship between the fistula and the surrounding structures. In case of the endovascular approach, additional post-treatment native acquisition merged with the pre-treatment acquisition (double-cone-beam CT fusion technique) permits to immediately evaluate the distribution of the glue cast and to confirm the success of the procedure. • SDAVF treatment must be aimed to occlude the fistula point shunt. • Native post-operative cone-beam CT permits high-spatial-resolution imaging of the embolic cast. • The automated double-cone-beam CT fusion technique (pre/post) accurately demonstrates intravascular glue distribution after embolisation. • Patient movements should be avoided to obtain good technical results.

  7. Nonsurgical management of an extensive spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma causing quadriplegia and respiratory distress in a choledocholithiasis patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasck, Kyle; Khoury, Jason; Aoude, Ahmed; Abduljabbar, Fahad; Jarzem, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) manifests from blood accumulating in the epidural space, compressing the spinal cord, and leading to acute neurological deficits. The disease's cloudy etiology and rarity contribute to dangerously suboptimal therapeutic principles. These neural deficits can be permanent, even fatal, if the SSEH is not treated in a timely and appropriate manner. Standard therapy is decompressive laminectomy, though nonsurgical management is a viable course of action for patients who meet a criterion that is continuously being refined. A 76-year-old woman on warfarin for a past pulmonary embolism presented to the emergency room with jaundice, myalgia, hematuria, neck pain, and an International Normalized Ratio (INR) of 14. Upon admission, she rapidly developed quadriplegia and respiratory distress that necessitated intubation. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an epidural space-occupying hyperintensity from C2 to S5 consistent with a spinal epidural hematoma. An incidental finding of dilated intrahepatic and common bile ducts prompted an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which demonstrated choledocholithiasis. The patient's INR was normalized with Vitamin K and Beriplex. Upon transfer to the surgical spine team for assessment of a possible intervention, the patient began to demonstrate recovery of neural functions. The ensuing sustained motor improvement motivated the team's preference for close neurologic monitoring and continued medical therapy over surgery. Thirteen hours after the onset of her symptoms, the patient was extubated. A sphincterotomy was later performed, removing 81 common bile duct stones. MRI demonstrated complete resorption of the SSEH and the patient maintained full neurological function at final follow-up. Nonsurgical management of SSEH should be considered in the context of early and sustained recovery. Severe initial neural deficit does not necessitate surgical decompression

  8. Spontaneous regression of curve in immature idiopathic scoliosis - does spinal column play a role to balance? An observation with literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Hitesh N; Suh, Seung-Woo; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Hong, Jae-Young; Venkatesh, Kp; Muzaffar, Nasir

    2010-11-04

    Child with mild scoliosis is always a subject of interest for most orthopaedic surgeons regarding progression. Literature described Hueter-Volkmann theory regarding disc and vertebral wedging, and muscular imbalance for the progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. However, many authors reported spontaneous resolution of curves also without any reason for that and the rate of resolution reported is almost 25%. Purpose of this study was to question the role of paraspinal muscle tuning/balancing mechanism, especially in patients with idiopathic scoliosis with early mild curve, for spontaneous regression or progression as well as changing pattern of curves. An observational study of serial radiograms in 169 idiopathic scoliosis children (with minimum follow-up one year) was carried. All children with Cobb angle change and progression of their curves, respectively. Additionally changes in the pattern of curve were also noted. Average age was 9.2 years at first visit and 10.11 years at final follow-up with an average follow-up of 21 months. 32.5% (55/169), 41.4% (70/169) and 26% (44/169) children exhibited regression, no change and progression in their curves, respectively. 46.1% of children (78/169) showed changing pattern of their curves during the follow-up visits before it settled down to final curve. Comparing final fate of curve with side of curve and number of curves it did not show any relationship (p > 0.05) in our study population. Possible reason for changing patterns could be better explained by the tuning/balancing mechanism of spinal column that makes an effort to balance the spine and result into spontaneous regression or prevent further progression of curve. If this which we called as "tuning/balancing mechanism" fails, curve will ultimately progress.

  9. Spontaneous regression of curve in immature idiopathic scoliosis - does spinal column play a role to balance? An observation with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modi Hitesh N

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Child with mild scoliosis is always a subject of interest for most orthopaedic surgeons regarding progression. Literature described Hueter-Volkmann theory regarding disc and vertebral wedging, and muscular imbalance for the progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. However, many authors reported spontaneous resolution of curves also without any reason for that and the rate of resolution reported is almost 25%. Purpose of this study was to question the role of paraspinal muscle tuning/balancing mechanism, especially in patients with idiopathic scoliosis with early mild curve, for spontaneous regression or progression as well as changing pattern of curves. Methods An observational study of serial radiograms in 169 idiopathic scoliosis children (with minimum follow-up one year was carried. All children with Cobb angle Results Average age was 9.2 years at first visit and 10.11 years at final follow-up with an average follow-up of 21 months. 32.5% (55/169, 41.4% (70/169 and 26% (44/169 children exhibited regression, no change and progression in their curves, respectively. 46.1% of children (78/169 showed changing pattern of their curves during the follow-up visits before it settled down to final curve. Comparing final fate of curve with side of curve and number of curves it did not show any relationship (p > 0.05 in our study population. Conclusion Possible reason for changing patterns could be better explained by the tuning/balancing mechanism of spinal column that makes an effort to balance the spine and result into spontaneous regression or prevent further progression of curve. If this which we called as "tuning/balancing mechanism" fails, curve will ultimately progress.

  10. Spontaneous rupture of an infected renal cyst and external drainage through a lumbar surgical scar in a male patient with cervical spinal cord injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidyanathan Subramanian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The spontaneous rupture of an infected renal cyst is a rare event. Spontaneous rupture with drainage to the exterior through a surgical scar has not been reported previously. Case presentation A 49-year-old male with tetraplegia had undergone extended right pyelolithotomy in 1999. Deroofing and marsupialisation of a cyst in the upper pole of the right kidney was performed in 2003. Subsequently there was recurrence of a thick-walled cystic space-occupying lesion in the upper pole of the right kidney. Thick pus was aspirated from the renal cyst on six occasions between September 2003 and November 2004. In March 2006, ultrasound examination revealed a cyst measuring 6.2 cm in diameter in the upper pole of the right kidney. Aspiration was planned when the renal cyst reached 7.5 cm in diameter. However, 11 months later, the cyst ruptured spontaneously and drained through the previous surgical scar in the flank, while the patient was recovering from a severe chest infection in the spinal unit. Ultrasound examination showed a fistulous tract running between the renal cyst and the abdominal wall. Repeated minor trauma sustained during turning, hoisting and chest physiotherapy all may have contributed to the rupture of the infected renal cyst and drainage through a weak spot in the abdominal wall. Conclusion In hindsight, we might have prevented rupture of the renal cyst had we considered aspiration of the renal cyst before it reached 7.5 cm in diameter, although this 7.5 cm diameter, as the threshold for percutaneous aspiration, is an arbitrary setting. This patient could have been advised to wear an abdominal corset to protect the right flank from pressure applied unintentionally during turning, hoisting or assisted coughing.

  11. Pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch predisposes to adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Mueller, Daniel A; Rothenfluh, Esin; Min, Kan

    2015-06-01

    sagittal malalignment is maintained after lumbar fusion surgery.

  12. Acute vertebral fracture after spinal fusion: a case report illustrating the added value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography to magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with spinal Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, M.; Putzier, M.; Pumberger, M.; Hermann, K.G.; Diekhoff, T.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is degraded by metal-implant-induced artifacts when used for the diagnostic assessment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with instrumented spinal fusion. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) offers a promising supplementary imaging tool in these patients. This case report describes an 85-year-old woman who presented with a suspected acute vertebral fracture after long posterior lumbar interbody fusion. This is the first report of a vertebral fracture that showed bone marrow edema on DECT; however, edema was missed by an MRI STIR sequence owing to metal artifacts. Bone marrow assessment using DECT is less susceptible to metal artifacts than MRI, resulting in improved visualization of vertebral edema in the vicinity of fused vertebral bodies. (orig.)

  13. Metallic artefact reduction with monoenergetic dual-energy CT: systematic ex vivo evaluation of posterior spinal fusion implants from various vendors and different spine levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, R.; Winklhofer, S.; Andreisek, G.; Alkadhi, H.; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Osterhoff, G.; Wanner, G.A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Fortunati, M. [The Spine Center, Thun (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate optimal monoenergetic dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) settings for artefact reduction of posterior spinal fusion implants of various vendors and spine levels. Posterior spinal fusion implants of five vendors for cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine were examined ex vivo with single-energy (SE) CT (120 kVp) and DECT (140/100 kVp). Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimised image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Two independent radiologists assessed quantitative and qualitative image parameters for each device and spine level. Inter-reader agreements of quantitative and qualitative parameters were high (ICC = 0.81-1.00, {kappa} = 0.54-0.77). HU values of spinal fusion implants were significantly different among vendors (P < 0.001), spine levels (P < 0.01) and among SECT, monoenergetic DECT of 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and OPTkeV (P < 0.01). Image quality was significantly (P < 0.001) different between datasets and improved with higher monoenergies of DECT compared with SECT (V = 0.58, P < 0.001). Artefacts decreased significantly (V = 0.51, P < 0.001) at higher monoenergies. OPTkeV values ranged from 123-141 keV. OPTkeV according to vendor and spine level are presented herein. Monoenergetic DECT provides significantly better image quality and less metallic artefacts from implants than SECT. Use of individual keV values for vendor and spine level is recommended. (orig.)

  14. Interdisciplinary Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Part of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Rehabilitation: Experience of Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgreen, Pil; Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving lumbar spinal fusion surgery often have persisting postoperative pain negatively affecting their daily life. These patients may be helped by interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral therapy which is recognized as an effective intervention for improving beneficial pain coping behavior, thereby facilitating the rehabilitation process of patients with chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experience of patients recovering from lumbar spinal fusion surgery and to explore potential similarities and disparities in pain coping behavior between receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. We conducted semistructured interviews with 10 patients; 5 receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy in connection with their lumbar spinal fusion surgery and 5 receiving usual care. We conducted a phenomenological analysis to reach our first aim and then conducted a comparative content analysis to reach our second aim. Patients' postoperative experience was characterized by the need to adapt to the limitations imposed by back discomfort (coexisting with the back), need for recognition and support from others regarding their pain, a relatively long rehabilitation period during which they "awaited the result of surgery", and ambivalence toward analgesics. The patients in both groups had similar negative perception of analgesics and tended to abstain from them to avoid addiction. Coping behavior apparently differed among receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Receivers prevented or minimized pain by resting before pain onset, whereas nonreceivers awaited pain onset before resting. The postoperative experience entailed ambivalence, causing uncertainty, worry and insecurity. This ambivalence was relieved when others recognized the patient's pain and offered support. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as part of rehabilitation may have encouraged beneficial pain coping

  15. The significance of removing ruptured intervertebral discs for interbody fusion in treating thoracic or lumbar type B and C spinal injuries through a one-stage posterior approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Shi Zhang

    Full Text Available To identify the negative effect on treatment results of reserving damaged intervertebral discs when treating type B and type C spinal fracture-dislocations through a one-stage posterior approach.This is a retrospective review of 53 consecutive patients who were treated in our spine surgery center from January 2005 to May 2012 due to severe thoracolumbar spinal fracture-dislocation. The patients in Group A (24 patients underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression. In Group B (29 patients, the patients underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression evacuating of the ruptured disc and inserting of a bone graft into the evacuated disc space for interbody fusion. The mean time between injury and operation was 4.1 days (range 2-15 days. The clinical, radiologic and complication outcomes were analyzed retrospectively.Periodic follow-ups were carried out until an affirmative union or treatment failure took place. A progressive kyphosis angle larger than 10°, loss of disc height, pseudoarthrosis, recurrence of dislocation or subluxation, or instrument failure before fusion were considered treatment failures. Treatment failures were detected in 13 cases in Group A (failure rate was 54.2%. In Group B, there were 28 cases in which definitive bone fusion was demonstrated on CT scans, and CT scans of the other cases demonstrated undefined pseudoarthrosis without hardware failure. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups (p0.05 Fisher's exact test.Intervertebral disc damage is a common characteristic in type B and C spinal fracture-dislocation injuries. The damaged intervertebral disc should be removed and substituted with a bone graft because reserving the damaged disc in situ increases the risk of treatment failure.

  16. Anthropometric characteristics, high prevalence of undernutrition and weight loss: impact on outcomes in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after spinal fusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tarrant, Roslyn C

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal anthropometry including comparably lower weight and body mass index (BMI) in the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) population is increasingly recognised, however, no study has examined postoperative weight loss or its clinical relevance in these relatively thin patients. This study aimed to assess perioperative nutritional status as well as clinically severe involuntary weight loss and its impact on outcomes in patients with AIS undergoing posterior spinal fusion (PSF). A further objective was to compare preoperative anthropometric measurements of the current AIS cohort with healthy controls.

  17. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells assembled with low-dose BMP-2 in a three-dimensional hybrid construct enhances posterolateral spinal fusion in syngeneic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tao; Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; Toh, Soo Yein; Wang, Ming; Lam, Raymond Wing Moon; Naidu, Mathanapriya; Bhakta, Gajadhar; Cool, Simon M; Bhakoo, Kishore; Li, Jun; Goh, James Cho-Hong; Wong, Hee-Kit

    2015-12-01

    The combination of potent osteoinductive growth factor, functional osteoblastic cells, and osteoconductive materials to induce bone formation is a well-established concept in bone tissue engineering. However, supraphysiological dose of growth factor, such as recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2), which is necessary in contemporary clinical application, have been reported to result in severe side effects. We hypothesize that the synergistic osteoinductive capacity of low-dose bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) combined with undifferentiated bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) is comparable to that of osteogenically differentiated BMSCs when used in a rodent model of posterolateral spinal fusion. A prospective study using a rodent model of posterolateral spinal fusion was carried out. Thirty-six syngeneic Fischer rats comprised the patient sample. Six groups of implants were evaluated as follows (n=6): (1) 10 µg BMP-2 with undifferentiated BMSCs; (2) 10 µg BMP-2 with osteogenic-differentiated BMSCs; (3) 2.5 µg BMP-2 with undifferentiated BMSCs; (4) 2.5 µg BMP-2 with osteogenic-differentiated BMSCs; (5) 0.5 µg BMP-2 with undifferentiated BMSCs; and (6) 0.5 µg BMP-2 with osteogenic-differentiated BMSCs. Optimal in vitro osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) gene analysis whereas in vivo bone formation capacity was evaluated by manual palpation, micro-computed tomography, and histology. Rat BMSCs cultured in fibrin matrix that was loaded into the pores of medical-grade poly epsilon caprolactone tricalcium phosphate scaffolds differentiated toward osteogenic lineage by expressing osterix, runt-related transcription factor 2, and osteocalcium mRNA when supplemented with dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and β-glycerophosphate. Whereas qRT-PCR revealed optimal increase in osteogenic genes expression after 7 days of in vitro culture, in vivo transplantation study showed

  18. EVALUATION OF PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN QUALITY OF LIFE OF PATIENTS WITH ADOLESCENT IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS UNDERGOING SPINAL FUSION BY THE POSTERIOR APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIPE DE MORAES POMAR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prognostic factors in the treatment of patients diagnosed with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion by the posterior approach. Methods: The study included 48 patients with idiopathic adolescent scoliosis (43 females and 5 males who underwent spinal fusion by the posterior approach, with an average age at diagnosis of 12 years, and clinical signs of Risser between 3 and 4 at the time of surgery. Clinical and radiographic measurements were performed, the participants answered the SRS-30 questionnaire, and the analysis of the medical record data was performed in two occasions during the preoperative period and at the end of two years of follow-up. Results: All satisfaction measures showed statistically significant change after the procedure (p<0.05 with respect to the radiographic characteristics, except for the lumbar apical vertebral translation (p=0.540 and Cobb L1-L5 (p=0.225. Conclusion: In general, it was found that patients who received surgical treatment were more satisfied with their appearance than those who underwent conservative treatment.

  19. The development of whole blood titanium levels after instrumented spinal fusion – Is there a correlation between the number of fused segments and titanium levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Most modern spinal implants contain titanium and remain in the patient’s body permanently. Local and systemic effects such as tissue necrosis, osteolysis and malignant cell transformation caused by implants have been described. Increasing tissue concentration and whole blood levels of ions are necessary before a disease caused by a contaminant develops. The aim of the present study was the measurement of whole blood titanium levels and the evaluation of a possible correlation between these changes and the number of fused segments. Methods A prospective study was designed to determine changes in whole blood titanium levels after spinal fusion and to analyze the correlation to the number of pedicle screws, cross connectors and interbody devices implanted. Blood samples were taken preoperatively in group I (n = 15), on the first, second and 10th day postoperatively, as well as 3 and 12 months after surgery. Group II (n = 16) served as a control group of volunteers who did not have any metal implants in the body. Blood samples were taken once in this group. The number of screw-rod-connections and the length of the spinal fusion were determined using radiographic pictures. This study was checked and approved by the ethical committee of the University of Tuebingen. Results The mean age in group I was 47 ± 22 years (range 16 - 85 years). There were three male (20%) and twelve female (80%) patients. The median number of fused segments was 5 (range 1 to 11 segments). No statistically significant increase in the titanium level was seen 12 months after surgery (mean difference: -7.2 μg/l, 95% CI: -26.9 to 12.5 μg/l, p = 0.446). By observing the individual titanium levels, 4 out of 15 patients demonstrated an increase in titanium levels 12 months after surgery. No statistically significant correlation between fused segments (r = -0.188, p = 0.503) length of instrumentation (r = -0.329, p = 0.231), number of

  20. Cervical spinal locking plate in combination with cortical ring allograft for a one level fusion in dogs with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Robert L; Levine, Jonathan M; Coates, Joan R; Bahr, Anne; Hettlich, Bianca F; Kerwin, Sharon C

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate use of a surgical technique commonly used in humans for treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in dogs. Prospective case series. Dogs with CSM (n=10). Dogs weighing >30 kg that had CSM at 1 vertebral articulation were eligible for inclusion. Dogs had vertebral column distraction/fusion performed using a cortical ring allograft, cancellous autograft, and a spinal locking plate. Dogs were evaluated temporally by repeat neurological examinations and by client perception of postsurgical outcome, determined by telephone interview. Nine dogs survived the immediate postoperative period. Seven of 8 dogs had moderate to complete improvement without recurrence (mean follow-up, 2.48 years). The most common postsurgical complications were screw loosening (n=4) and plate shifting (2), neither of which required surgical revision. One dog had pseudoarthrosis that may have negatively impacted outcome. Treatment of single level CSM in dogs with ring allograft and a spinal locking plate system may lead to successful outcomes. The major problems encountered with included cost of the implants and adjusting the system designed for humans to fit the vertebral column of a dog. For dogs with CSM at a single level, the use of a spinal locking plate in combination with a cortical ring allograft can be an effective surgical treatment. Costs of the implants as well as anatomic differences in dogs make this type of surgery less appealing.

  1. 1997 Volvo Award winner in clinical studies. The effect of pedicle screw instrumentation on functional outcome and fusion rates in posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion: a prospective, randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, K; Christensen, F B; Eiskjaer, S P; Hansen, E S; Fruensgaard, S; Bünger, C E

    1997-12-15

    A prospective randomized clinical study. To evaluate supplementary pedicle screw fixation (Cotrel-Dubousset) in posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. The rationale behind lumbar fusion is to eliminate pathologic motion to relieve pain. To improve fusion rates and to allow reduction, a rigid transpedicular screw fixation may be beneficial, but the positive effect of this may be counter-balanced by an increase in complications. The inclusion criteria were severe, chronic low back pain from spondylolisthesis Grades 1 and 2 or from primary or secondary degenerative segmental instability. One hundred thirty patients were randomly allocated to receive no instrumentation (n = 66) or Cotrel-Dubousset instrumentation (n = 64) in posterolateral lumbar fusion. Variables were registered at the time of surgery and at 1 and 2 years after surgery. Follow-up was achieved in 97.7% of the patients. Fusion rates deduced from plain radiographs were not significantly different between instrumented and noninstrumented groups. The functional outcome assessed by the Dallas Pain Questionnaire improved significantly in both groups, and there were no significant differences in results between the two groups, except for significantly better (P < 0.06) functional outcome in relation to daily activities in the instrumented group when neural decompression had been performed. The global patients' satisfaction was 82% in the instrumented group versus 74% in the noninstrumented group (not significant). Fixation of instrumentation increased operation time, blood loss, and early reoperation rate significantly. Patients experienced only a few minor postoperative complications; none were major. Two infections appeared in the Cotrel-Dubousset group. Significant symptoms from misplacement of pedicle screws were seen in 4.8% of the instrumented patients. Lumbar posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw fixation increases the operation time, blood loss, and reoperation rate, and leads to a significant risk

  2. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Associated With Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Secondary Fusion Rates Following Open vs Minimally Invasive Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöller, Karsten; Alimi, Marjan; Cong, Guang-Ting; Christos, Paul; Härtl, Roger

    2017-03-01

    Decompression without fusion is a treatment option in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) associated with stable low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). A minimally invasive unilateral laminotomy (MIL) for "over the top" decompression might be a less destabilizing alternative to traditional open laminectomy (OL). To review secondary fusion rates after open vs minimally invasive decompression surgery. We performed a literature search in Pubmed/MEDLINE using the keywords "lumbar spondylolisthesis" and "decompression surgery." All studies that separately reported the outcome of patients with LSS+DS that were treated by OL or MIL (transmuscular or subperiosteal route) were included in our systematic review and meta-analysis. The primary end point was secondary fusion rate. Secondary end points were total reoperation rate, postoperative progression of listhetic slip, and patient satisfaction. We identified 37 studies (19 with OL, 18 with MIL), with a total of 1156 patients, that were published between 1983 and 2015. The studies' evidence was mostly level 3 or 4. Secondary fusion rates were 12.8% after OL and 3.3% after MIL; the total reoperation rates were 16.3% after OL and 5.8% after MIL. In the OL cohort, 72% of the studies reported a slip progression compared to 0% in the MIL cohort, respectively. After OL, satisfactory outcome was 62.7% compared to 76% after MIL. In patients with LSS and DS, minimally invasive decompression is associated with lower reoperation and fusion rates, less slip progression, and greater patient satisfaction than open surgery. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  3. Effective treatment of post-spinal fusion methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus vertebral osteomyelitis with linezolid in a renal-transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunde, Atsushi; Inage, Kazuhide; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2015-11-24

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-caused pyogenic spondylitis is a serious complication associated with lumbar fusion surgery. Often, anti-MRSA drugs are not used properly or patients discontinue drug use because of side effects including renal failure. We report a case at our hospital of a 54-year-old male renal-transplant patient who developed MRSA vertebral osteomyelitis after spinal fusion and was treated effectively with linezolid. After diagnosis of post-fusion surgery osteomyelitis, we conducted emergency flushing and debridement and began linezolid treatment (1200 mg/day, divided) immediately after the surgery. The level of C-reactive protein gradually decreased and became negative 4 weeks after the initiation of linezolid treatment. Serum creatinine level was approximately 1.3 mg/dL throughout the treatment period, indicating no deterioration in renal function. These results suggest that early flushing and debridement together with linezolid administration is an effective treatment for MRSA vertebral osteomyelitis in renal-transplant patients.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of the Position of the Cerebellar Tonsil before and after Posterior Spinal Fusion in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Tomas Bosio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  To evaluate variations in cerebellar tonsil position after posterior spinal fusion (PSF in neurologically intact patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS.  Methods: We retrospective evaluated 40 patients with AIS and no neurological symptoms that underwent PSF. Anteroposterior and sagittal standing radiographs, and sagittal hindbrain MRI were performed in all patients before and after spinal surgery.  The level of the cerebellar tonsil relative to the magnum foramen was measured according to the method described by Aboulezz (J Comput Assist Tomogr 1985. We evaluate variations in cerebellar tonsil position in relation to spinal correction and spinal elongation after PSF. Results: Mean preoperative magnitude of the curve was 53,15° (SD 10,46° and thoracic kyphosis was 35,42º (SD 12,38°. Mean postoperative values were 7,45º (SD 7,33°  and 27,87º (SD 9,03°, respectively. This represents 86% correction in the coronal plane (p<0.00001 and 25% of kyphosis variation (p<0.00001. The average length of the spine in the coronal plane was 44,5 cm (SD 5,25 cm in preoperative x-rays and 48,27 cm (SD 4,40 cm in postoperative x-rays (p<0.00001.  The average length in the sagittal plane was 50,87 cm (SD 4,47 cm in preoperative x-rays and 55,13cm (SD 3,27 cm in postoperative x-rays (p<0.00001. There was no significant difference in the position of the Cerebellar Tonsil before and after spinal correction (p=0,6042. In 10 (25% of the 40 patients, we observed caudal displacement in cerebellar tonsil position after PSF. Average displacement in these patients was 1,22 mm (range 0.1-2.3 mm. In 21 patients we did not observe any variation and in 2 a cephalic displacement was measured. Conclusions:  In most AIS patients, position of the cerebellar tonsil does not change with PSF. We were not able to find any correlation between curve correction or spine elongation and variations in cerebellar tonsillar position.

  5. N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) is involved in central sensitization in the spinal cord through GluR2 subunit composition switch after inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Tayo; Furue, Hidemasa; Okuda-Ashitaka, Emiko; Tagaya, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yoshimura, Megumu; Ito, Seiji

    2008-06-01

    Central sensitization, similar to long-term potentiation in the hippocampus, refers to the increased synaptic efficacy established in somatosensory neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord following tissue injury or nerve damage. In the course of inflammation, many proteins including glutamate receptors are assumed to be dynamically reorganized in the postsynaptic density (PSD) and involved in persistent pain. Mechanical hyperalgesia induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was inhibited at 4 h, but not at 24 h, by indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostanoid synthesis. To elucidate the nature of the molecule(s) involved in the late phase of inflammatory pain, we analysed the PSD fraction prepared from the lumbar spinal cord of rats before and 24 h after CFA injection by conducting two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis. N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) was identified as a downregulated protein in the PSD by MALDI-TOF MS and immunoblotting. Concomitant with the decrease in NSF, GluR2 and GluR3 were decreased and GluR1 was conversely increased in the PSD fraction 24 h after CFA injection. In vivo patch-clamp recordings of rats 24 h after CFA injection showed that excitatory postsynaptic currents of dorsal horn neurons evoked by pinch stimuli to inflamed skin were inwardly rectified and inhibited by 60% by philanthotoxin-433, a selective inhibitor of the Ca2+-permeable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor. These results suggest that peripheral inflammation gives rise to central sensitization in the spinal cord through subunit composition switch of AMPA receptors in the late phase.

  6. Adjacent segment degeneration after lumbar spinal fusion compared with motion-preservation procedures: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Aixing; Hai, Yong; Yang, Jincai; Zhou, Lijin; Chen, Xiaolong; Guo, Hui

    2016-05-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficacy of motion-preservation procedures to prevent the adjacent segment degeneration (ASDeg) or adjacent segment disease (ASDis) compared with fusion in lumbar spine. PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were comprehensively searched and a meta-analysis was performed of all randomized controlled trials and well designed prospective or retrospective comparative cohort studies assessing the lumbar fusion and motion-preservation procedures. We compared the ASDeg and ASDis rate, reoperation rate, operation time, blood loss, length of hospital stay, visual analogue scale (VAS) and oswestry disability index (ODI) improvement of the two procedures. A total of 15 studies consisting of 1474 patients were included in this study. The meta-analysis indicated that the prevalence of ASDeg, ASDis and reoperation rate on the adjacent level were lower in motion-preservation procedures group than in the fusion group (P = 0.001; P = 0.0004; P adjacent segment degeneration compared with the lumbar fusion. And the clinical outcomes of the two procedures are similar.

  7. Influence of Distal Fusion Level on Sagittal Spinopelvic and Spinal Parameters in the Surgical Management of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgül, Turgut; Sarıyılmaz, Kerim; Korkmaz, Murat; Özkunt, Okan; Kaya, Özcan; Dikici, Fatih

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective analysis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This study aimed to investigate the influence of distinct distal fusion levels on spinopelvic parameters in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) who underwent posterior instrumentation and fusion surgery. The distal fusion level selection in treatment of AIS is the one of milestone to effect on surgical outcome. Most of the paper focused on the coronal deformity correction and balance. The literature have lack of knowledge about spinopelvic changing after surgical treatment and the relation with distal fusion level. We evaluate the spinopelvic and pelvic parameter alteration after fusion surgery in treatment of AIS. A total of 100 patients with AIS (88 females and 12 males) were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were assigned into the following three groups according to the distal fusion level: lumbar 2 (L2), lumbar 3 (L3), and lumbar 4 (L4). Using a lateral plane radiograph of the whole spine, spinopelvic angular parameters such as thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were radiologically assessed. The mean age was 15±2.4 years, and the mean follow-up period was 24.27±11.69 months. Regarding the lowest instrumented vertebra, patients were categorized as follows: 30 patients in L2 (group 1), 40 patients in L3 (group 2), and 30 patients in L4 (group 3). TK decreased from 36.60±13.30 degrees preoperatively to 26.00±7.3 degrees postoperatively in each group ( p =0.001). LL decreased from 52.8±9.4 degrees preoperatively to 44.30±7.50 degrees postoperatively ( p =0.001). Although PI showed no difference preoperatively among the groups, it was statistically higher postoperatively in group 3 than in the other groups ( p 0.05). However, mean SS was significantly higher in group 3 ( p =0.042, p <0.05). PT decreased from 15.50±7.90 degrees preoperatively to 15.2±7.10 degrees postoperatively. The positive relationship (28

  8. Comparison of short-term and long-term outcomes of spinal fusion with and without posterior instrumentation in congenital scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behtash H.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital scoliosis is a developmental disorder defined as a lateral curvature of the spine. Its progressive trend and complications, such as cosmetic problems, pain and pulmonary symptoms, have put scoliosis as an important skeletal deformity that should be corrected. One of the currently accepted methods of treatment is posterior spinal fusion (PSF that may be performed with or without instrumentation. However, the use of implants in conjunction with PSF in congenital spine deformity has been debated over the past three decades primarily because of increased risk of neurological deficit and implant displacement. The aim of this study was to compare short-term and long-term outcomes of spinal fusion with and without posterior instrumentation in congenital scoliosis.Methods: In this historical cohort study, 41 patients with congenital scoliosis were recruited. All patients underwent PSF surgery between 1977 and 1996. They were divided into two groups according to the use of instrumentation: 22 congenital scoliotic patients who were treated by PSF without any instrumentation (group A, and 19 instrumented PSF patients (group B. Instrumentation was mostly performed using the Harrington rod. The major curve angle was measured before surgery, two weeks and one year after PSF surgery and at the end of the follow-up period. Results: The mean baseline curve angles were 66.3° and 69.1° in groups A and B, respectively. The mean Cobb angles one year after PSF were 43.1° and 38.4° in groups A and B, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 8 years (SD=3 and, at the end of this period, the final Cobb angles were 47.3° and 39.4° in groups A and B, respectively. Therefore, the final angle correction was 28.7% in patients without instrumentation and 43% in patients with instrumentation. The mean loss of correction was 5.5% and 4.3% in groups A and B, respectively. The final curve angles was significantly more corrected for those patients

  9. Does the lower instrumented vertebra have an effect on lumbar mobility, subjective perception of trunk flexibility, and quality of life in patients with idiopathic scoliosis treated by spinal fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Raya, Judith; Bago, Juan; Pellise, Ferran; Cuxart, Ampar; Villanueva, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    Cross-sectional study in patients with idiopathic scoliosis treated with spinal fusion. To measure lumbar spine mobility in the study population; determine low back pain intensity (LBPi), subjective perception of trunk flexibility (TF), and quality of life using validated outcome instruments; and investigate correlations of the lower instrumented vertebra (LIV) with TF, LBPi, and quality of life. The loss of range of motion resulting from spinal fusion might lead to low back pain, trunk rigidity, and a negative impact on quality of life. Nonetheless, these outcomes have not been conclusively demonstrated because lumbar mobility and LIV have not been correlated with validated outcome instruments. Forty-one patients (mean age, 27 y) with idiopathic scoliosis treated by spinal fusion (mean time since surgery, 135 mo) were included. Patients were assigned to 3 groups according to LIV level: group 1 (fusion to T12, L1, or L2) 14 patients; group 2 (fusion to L3) 13 patients, and group 3 (fusion to L4, L5, or S1) 14 patients. At midterm follow-up, patients completed the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 Questionnaire and Quality of Life Profile for Spine Deformities to evaluate perceived TF, and rated LBPi with a numerical scale. Lumbar mobility was assessed using a dual digital inclinometer. Group 3 (fusion to L4, L5, or S1) showed statistically significant differences relative to the other groups, with less lumbar mobility and poorer scores for the SRS subtotal (P = 0.003) and SRS pain scale (P = 0.01). Nevertheless, LBPi and TF were similar in the 3 groups. TF correlated with SRS-22 subtotal (r = -0.38, P = 0.01) and pain scale (r = -0.42, P = 0.007) scores, and with LBPi (r = 0.43, P = 0.005). LIV correlated moderately with lumbar mobility, health-related quality of life (SRS-22), and spinal pain (SRS-22 pain subscale), but not with intensity of pain in the lumbar area or perceived TF.

  10. Outcomes of Revision Surgery Following Instrumented Posterolateral Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Comparative Analysis between Pseudarthrosis and Adjacent Segment Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Seung-Pyo; Jo, Young-Hoon; Jeong, Hae Won; Choi, Won Rak; Kang, Chang-Nam

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective study. We examined the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who received revision surgery for pseudarthrosis or adjacent segment disease (ASD) following decompression and instrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF). At present, information regarding the outcomes of revision surgery for complications such as pseudarthrosis and ASD following instrumented PLF is limited. This study examined 60 patients who received PLF for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and subsequently developed pseudarthrosis or ASD leading to revision surgery. Subjects were divided into a group of 21 patients who received revision surgery for pseudarthrosis (Group P) and a group of 39 patients who received revision surgery for ASD (Group A). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the visual analogue scales for back pain (VAS-BP) and leg pain (VAS-LP), the Korean Oswestry disability index (K-ODI), and each patient's subjective satisfaction. Radiological outcomes were evaluated from the extent of bone union, and complications in the two groups were compared. VAS-LP at final follow-up was not statistically different between the two groups ( p =0.353), although VAS-BP and K-ODI at final follow-up were significantly worse in Group P than in Group A (all p <0.05), and only 52% of the patients in Group P felt that their overall well-being had improved following revision surgery. Fusion rates after the first revision surgery were 71% (15/21) in Group P and 95% (37/39) in Group A ( p =0.018). The rate of reoperation was significantly higher in Group P (29%) than in Group A (5%) ( p =0.021) due to complications. Clinical and radiological outcomes were worse in patients who had received revision surgery for pseudarthrosis than in those who had revision surgery for ASD. Elderly patients should be carefully advised of the risks and benefits before planning revision surgery for pseudarthrosis.

  11. Early results of two methods of posterior spinal stabilization in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... Discussion. PSR has become the gold standard in posterior spinal fusion techniques. Its success has revolutionized spinal surgery. The Advantages include three column fusion as against one column fusion as is seen in other posterior fusion techniques like Rogers and Bohlman's techniques.[9‑13] Other.

  12. Evaluation of cell binding peptide (p15) with silk fibre enhanced hydroxyappatite bone substitute for posterolateral spinal fusion in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.; Jespersen, Stig; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    's gold standard are highly desired. Uninstrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) is one of the most challenging bone graft procedures because of large graft size and lack of external stability. P15 is a synthetic 15 amino acid peptide sequence, identical to the biding site for alpha2-beta1 integrin...... on the surface of bone forming cells. The binding initiates natural intra- and extracellular signalling pathways, inducing production of growth factors, bone morphogenic proteins and cytokines. P15 peptide has previously shown to improve osteoinductive properties when coated on graft materials. Purpose...

  13. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Jinyu; Zhou, Haohan; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhao, Jianwu

    2017-03-14

    Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily), experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily), and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily). The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG ( p antibiotics ( p antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  14. Clinical Effectiveness and Safety of Intraoperative Methadone in Patients Undergoing Posterior Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Randomized, Double-blinded, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph W; Avram, Michael J; Greenberg, Steven B; Shear, Torin D; Deshur, Mark A; Vender, Jeffery S; Benson, Jessica; Newmark, Rebecca L

    2017-05-01

    Patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery often experience severe pain during the first three postoperative days. The aim of this parallel-group randomized trial was to assess the effect of the long-duration opioid methadone on postoperative analgesic requirements, pain scores, and patient satisfaction after complex spine surgery. One hundred twenty patients were randomized to receive either methadone 0.2 mg/kg at the start of surgery or hydromorphone 2 mg at surgical closure. Anesthetic care was standardized, and clinicians were blinded to group assignment. The primary outcome was intravenous hydromorphone consumption on postoperative day 1. Pain scores and satisfaction with pain management were measured at postanesthesia care unit admission, 1 and 2 h postadmission, and on the mornings and afternoons of postoperative days 1 to 3. One hundred fifteen patients were included in the analysis. Median hydromorphone use was reduced in the methadone group not only on postoperative day 1 (4.56 vs. 9.90 mg) but also on postoperative days 2 (0.60 vs. 3.15 mg) and 3 (0 vs. 0.4 mg; all Pmethadone group at 21 of 27 assessments (all P = 0.001 to methadone group than in the hydromorphone group until the morning of postoperative day 3 (all P = 0.001 to methadone administration reduced postoperative opioid requirements, decreased pain scores, and improved patient satisfaction with pain management.

  15. Application of Lean Principles to Neurosurgical Procedures: The Case of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery, a Literature Review and Pilot Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jesse J; Raskin, Jeffrey S; Hardaway, Fran; Holste, Katherine; Brown, Sarah; Raslan, Ahmed M

    2018-03-14

    Delivery of higher value healthcare is an ultimate government and public goal. Improving efficiency by standardization of surgical steps can improve patient outcomes, reduce costs, and lead to higher value healthcare. Lean principles and methodology have improved timeliness in perioperative medicine; however, process mapping of surgery itself has not been performed. To apply Plan/Do/Study/Act (PDSA) cycles methodology to lumbar posterior instrumented fusion (PIF) using lean principles to create a standard work flow, identify waste, remove intraoperative variability, and examine feasibility among pilot cases. Process maps for 5 PIF procedures were created by a PDSA cycle from 1 faculty neurosurgeon at 1 institution. Plan, modularize PIF into basic components; Do, map and time components; Study, analyze results; and Act, identify waste. Waste inventories, spaghetti diagrams, and chartings of time spent per step were created. Procedural steps were broadly defined in order to compare steps despite the variability in PIF and were analyzed with box and whisker plots to evaluate variability. Temporal variabilities in duration of decompression vs closure and hardware vs closure were significantly different (P = .003). Variability in procedural step duration was smallest for closure and largest for exposure. Wastes including waiting and instrument defects accounted for 15% and 66% of all waste, respectively. This pilot series demonstrates that lean principles can standardize surgical workflows and identify waste. Though time and labor intensive, lean principles and PDSA methodology can be applied to operative steps, not just the perioperative period.

  16. Does a preoperative cognitive-behavioral intervention affect disability, pain behavior, pain, and return to work the first year after lumbar spinal fusion surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Holm, Randi; Bünger, Cody Eric; Oestergaard, Lisa Gregersen

    2015-05-01

    A randomized clinical trial including 90 patients. To examine the effect of a preoperative cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBT) for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion (LSF) surgery. Few published studies have looked at the potential of rehabilitation to improve outcomes after LSF. Rehabilitation programs using CBT are recommended. Furthermore, initiating interventions preoperatively seems beneficial, but only limited data exist in the field of spine surgery. Patients with degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis undergoing LSF were randomized to usual care (control group) or preoperative CBT and usual care (CBT group). Primary outcome was change in Oswestry Disability Index from baseline to 1-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes were catastrophizing, fear avoidance belief, work status, and back and leg pain. At 1-year follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference between the CBT group and the control group in Oswestry Disability Index score (P = 0.082). However, the CBT group had achieved a significant reduction of -15 points (-26; -4) already at 3 months (between group difference P = 0.003), and this reduction was maintained throughout the year. There were no differences between groups at 1-year follow-up with regard to any of the secondary outcomes. Participating in a preoperative CBT intervention in addition to usual care did not produce better outcomes at 1-year follow-up for patients undergoing LSF. Although the reduction in disability was achieved much faster in the CBT group, resulting in a significant difference between groups already 3 months after surgery, it did not translate into a faster return to work. Our findings support the need for further research into the use of targeted rehabilitation interventions among patients with elevated levels of catastrophizing and fear avoidance beliefs. 2.

  17. Administrative database concerns: accuracy of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision coding is poor for preoperative anemia in patients undergoing spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Bohl, Daniel D; Basques, Bryce A; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-11-15

    Cross-sectional study. To objectively evaluate the ability of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes, which are used as the foundation for administratively coded national databases, to identify preoperative anemia in patients undergoing spinal fusion. National database research in spine surgery continues to rise. However, the validity of studies based on administratively coded data, such as the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, are dependent on the accuracy of ICD-9 coding. Such coding has previously been found to have poor sensitivity to conditions such as obesity and infection. A cross-sectional study was performed at an academic medical center. Hospital-reported anemia ICD-9 codes (those used for administratively coded databases) were directly compared with the chart-documented preoperative hematocrits (true laboratory values). A patient was deemed to have preoperative anemia if the preoperative hematocrit was less than the lower end of the normal range (36.0% for females and 41.0% for males). The study included 260 patients. Of these, 37 patients (14.2%) were anemic; however, only 10 patients (3.8%) received an "anemia" ICD-9 code. Of the 10 patients coded as anemic, 7 were anemic by definition, whereas 3 were not, and thus were miscoded. This equates to an ICD-9 code sensitivity of 0.19, with a specificity of 0.99, and positive and negative predictive values of 0.70 and 0.88, respectively. This study uses preoperative anemia to demonstrate the potential inaccuracies of ICD-9 coding. These results have implications for publications using databases that are compiled from ICD-9 coding data. Furthermore, the findings of the current investigation raise concerns regarding the accuracy of additional comorbidities. Although administrative databases are powerful resources that provide large sample sizes, it is crucial that we further consider the quality of the data source relative to its intended purpose.

  18. Spontaneous canine hydrocephalus: cerebrospinal fluid dynamics1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar, A.; Hochwald, G. M.; Kay, W. J.; Ransohoff, J.

    1971-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics were studied in 14 dogs with spontaneous hydrocephalus. In nine of the dogs aqueductal obstruction was observed and the remainder had a `communicating type' hydrocephalus. The major histological findings consisted of severe ependymal destruction, spongy changes in the periventricular white matter, increased density of capillaries in this area, and varying degrees of thickening, fibrosis, and fusion of the choroid villi. The formation and absorption of CSF were studied by perfusion of the cerebral ventricles. The rate of formation of CSF was found to decrease with perfusion pressure by Vf = 0·02595−0·00022 P ml./min (P = pressure in cm H2O). The absorption of spinal fluid was found to increase linearly with pressure by Va = 0·0165 + 0·00050 P. The various factors influencing the formation and absorption of the spinal fluid are discussed. The meaning and attainment of `arrest' of the hydrocephalic process in terms of the measured rates of CSF formation and absorption in these animals are considered. Images PMID:5571319

  19. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures...... around 20 C, but at temperatures above 26 C we observe an increase in the scattered intensity due to fusion. The system is unusually well suited for the study of basic mechanisms of vesicle fusion. The vesicles are flexible with a bending rigidity of only a few k(H)T. The monolayer spontaneous curvature......, Ho, depends strongly on temperature in a known way and is thus tunable. For temperatures where H-0 > 0 vesicles tyre long-term stable, while in the range H-0 fusion rate increases the more negative the Spontaneous curvature Through a quantitative;analysis of the fusion rate we arrive tit...

  20. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  1. Unpredicted spontaneous extrusion of a renal calculus in an adult male with spina bifida and paraplegia: report of a misdiagnosis. Measures to be taken to reduce urological errors in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurpreet

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A delay in diagnosis or a misdiagnosis may occur in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI or spinal bifida as typical symptoms of a clinical condition may be absent because of their neurological impairment. Case presentation A 29-year old male, who was born with spina bifida and hydrocephalus, became unwell and developed a swelling and large red mark in his left loin eighteen months ago. Pyonephrosis or perinephric abscess was suspected. X-ray of the abdomen showed left-sided staghorn calculus. Since ultrasound scan showed no features of pyonephrosis or perinephric abscess, he was prescribed a prolonged course of antibiotics for infection presumed to arise from the site of metal implant in spine. He developed a discharging sinus, following which the loin swelling and red mark subsided. About three months ago, he again developed a red mark and minimal swelling in the left loin. Ultrasound scan detected no abnormality in the renal or perinephric region. Therefore, the red mark and swelling were attributed to pressure from the backrest of his chair. Five weeks later, the swelling in the left loin burst open and a large stone was extruded spontaneously. An X-ray of the abdomen showed that he had extruded the central portion of the staghorn calculus from left kidney. With hindsight, the extruded renal calculus could be seen lying in the subcutaneous tissue of left loin lateral to the 10th rib in the X-ray of abdomen, which was taken when he presented with red mark and minimal swelling. Conclusion This case illustrates how mistakes in diagnosis could occur in spinal cord injury patients, and highlights the need for corrective measures to reduce urological errors in these patients. Voluntary reporting of urological errors is recommended to facilitate learning from our mistakes. In the patients who have marked spinal curvature, ultrasonography of kidneys and perinephric region may not be entirely reliable. As clinical symptoms and

  2. Intraoperative antepulsion of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal fusion surgery techniques develop together with technologic advancements. New complications are seen as the result of new techniques and these may be very severe due to spinal cord and vascular structures in the lumbar region. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion cage (PLIFC) was shown to enhance spinal ...

  3. Biomechanics of coupled motion in the cervical spine during simulated whiplash in patients with pre-existing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, H.; Nightingale, R. W.; Dang, A. B. C.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Loss of motion following spine segment fusion results in increased strain in the adjacent motion segments. However, to date, studies on the biomechanics of the cervical spine have not assessed the role of coupled motions in the lumbar spine. Accordingly, we investigated the biomechanics of the cervical spine following cervical fusion and lumbar fusion during simulated whiplash using a whole-human finite element (FE) model to simulate coupled motions of the spine. Methods A previous...

  4. Perturbed and spontaneous regional cerebral blood flow responses to changes in blood pressure after high-level spinal cord injury: the effect of midodrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Aaron A; Krassioukov, Andrei V; Ainslie, Philip N; Warburton, Darren E R

    2014-03-15

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) above the T6 spinal segment suffer from orthostatic intolerance. How cerebral blood flow (CBF) responds to orthostatic challenges in SCI is poorly understood. Furthermore, it is unclear how interventions meant to improve orthostatic tolerance in SCI influence CBF. This study aimed to examine 1) the acute regional CBF responses to rapid changes in blood pressure (BP) during orthostatic stress in individuals with SCI and able-bodied (AB) individuals; and 2) the effect of midodrine (alpha1-agonist) on orthostatic tolerance and CBF regulation in SCI. Ten individuals with SCI >T6, and 10 age- and sex-matched AB controls had beat-by-beat BP and middle and posterior cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv, PCAv, respectively) recorded during a progressive tilt-test to quantify the acute CBF response and orthostatic tolerance. Dynamic MCAv and PCAv to BP relationships were evaluated continuously in the time domain and frequency domain (via transfer function analysis). The SCI group was tested again after administration of 10 mg midodrine to elevate BP. Coherence (i.e., linearity) was elevated in SCI between BP-MCAv and BP-PCAv by 35% and 22%, respectively, compared with AB, whereas SCI BP-PCAv gain (i.e., magnitudinal relationship) was reduced 30% compared with AB (all P midodrine led to improved PCAv responses 30-60 s following tilt (10 ± 3% vs. 4 ± 2% decline; P < 0.05), and a 59% improvement in orthostatic tolerance (P < 0.01). The vertebrobasilar region may be particularly susceptible to hypoperfusion in SCI, leading to increased orthostatic intolerance.

  5. Unilateral fusion of the odontoid process with the atlas in Klippel-Feil syndrome: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Young; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon; Suk, Kyung Soo; Han, Mi Young [Kyunghee Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) displays congenital fusion of the cervical vertebrae; it is a relatively common condition and has many associated malformations such as Sprengel's deformity, scoliosis, rib anomalies, congenital defects of the brain or spinal cord, renal anomalies, congenital heart disease, deafness, cleft palate, cranial and facial asymmetry, and enteric cysts. There are various types of cervical fusion observed in KFS. However, fusion of the odontoid process with the atlas is a very rare finding. We report here on a 4-year-old boy with unilateral fusion of a separated odontoid process with the lateral mass of the atlas, and this was associated with a spontaneously closed ventricular septal defect, a small patent ductus arteriosus and a horseshoe kidney.

  6. The Outcomes of Minimally Invasive versus Open Posterior Approach Spinal Fusion in Treatment of Lumbar Spondylolisthesis: The Current Evidence from Prospective Comparative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ai-Min; Chen, Chun-Hui; Shen, Zhi-Hao; Feng, Zhen-Hua; Weng, Wan-Qing; Li, Shu-Min; Chi, Yong-Long; Yin, Li-Hui; Ni, Wen-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Purpose . To investigate the evidence of minimally invasive (MI) versus open (OP) posterior lumbar fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis from current prospective literatures. Methods . The electronic literature database of Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library was searched at April 2016. The data of operative time, estimated blood loss and length of hospital stay, visual analog scale (VAS) of both lower back pain and leg pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI), SF-36 PCS (physical component scores) and SF-36 MCS (mental component scores), complications, fusion rate, and secondary surgery were extracted and analyzed by STATA 12.0 software. Results . Five nonrandom prospective comparative studies were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that the MI group had a significantly longer operative time than OP group, less blood loss, and shorter hospital stay. No significant difference was found in back pain, leg pain, ODI, SF-36 PCS, SF-36 MCS, complications, fusion rate, and secondary surgery between MI and OP groups. Conclusion . The prospective evidence suggested that MI posterior fusion for spondylolisthesis had less EBL and hospital stay than OP fusion; however it took more operative time. Both MI and OP fusion had similar results in pain and functional outcomes, complication, fusion rate, and secondary surgery.

  7. The Outcomes of Minimally Invasive versus Open Posterior Approach Spinal Fusion in Treatment of Lumbar Spondylolisthesis: The Current Evidence from Prospective Comparative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the evidence of minimally invasive (MI versus open (OP posterior lumbar fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis from current prospective literatures. Methods. The electronic literature database of Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library was searched at April 2016. The data of operative time, estimated blood loss and length of hospital stay, visual analog scale (VAS of both lower back pain and leg pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI, SF-36 PCS (physical component scores and SF-36 MCS (mental component scores, complications, fusion rate, and secondary surgery were extracted and analyzed by STATA 12.0 software. Results. Five nonrandom prospective comparative studies were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that the MI group had a significantly longer operative time than OP group, less blood loss, and shorter hospital stay. No significant difference was found in back pain, leg pain, ODI, SF-36 PCS, SF-36 MCS, complications, fusion rate, and secondary surgery between MI and OP groups. Conclusion. The prospective evidence suggested that MI posterior fusion for spondylolisthesis had less EBL and hospital stay than OP fusion; however it took more operative time. Both MI and OP fusion had similar results in pain and functional outcomes, complication, fusion rate, and secondary surgery.

  8. The effectiveness of decompression alone compared with additional fusion for lumbar spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis: a pragmatic comparative non-inferiority observational study from the Norwegian Registry for Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austevoll, Ivar M; Gjestad, Rolf; Brox, Jens Ivar; Solberg, Tore K; Storheim, Kjersti; Rekeland, Frode; Hermansen, Erland; Indrekvam, Kari; Hellum, Christian

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of adding fusion to decompression in patients operated for lumbar spinal stenosis with a concomitant lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. After propensity score matching, 260 patients operated with decompression and fusion and 260 patients operated with decompression alone were compared. Primary outcome measures were leg and back pain [Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), 0-10] and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, 0-100) at 12 months. At 12-month follow-up, the fusion group rated their pain significantly lower than the decompression alone group [leg pain 3.0 and 3.6, respectively, mean difference -0.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI) -1.2 to -0.05, p = 0.03 and back pain 3.3 and 3.9, respectively, mean difference -0.6, 95 % CI -1.1 to -0.1, p = 0.02]. ODI was not significantly different between the groups (21.0 versus 23.3, mean difference -2.3, 95 % CI -5.8 to 1.1, p = 0.18). Seventy-four percent of the fusion group and 63 % of the decompression alone group achieved a clinically important improvement in back pain (difference in proportion of responders = 11 %, 95 % CI 2-20 %, p = 0.01), corresponding to a number needed to treat of 9 patients (95 % CI 5-50). There was no significant difference in responder rate for leg pain (74 and 67 %, respectively, difference 7 %, 95 % CI -1 to 16 %, p = 0.09) or for ODI (67 and 59 %, respectively, difference 8 %, 95 % CI 0-18 %, p = 0.06). The duration of surgery and hospital stay was longer for the fusion group (mean difference 68 min, 95 % CI 58-78, p treatment option for each patient.

  9. ISSLS Prize winner: Long-term follow-up suggests spinal fusion is associated with increased adjacent segment disc degeneration but without influence on clinical outcome: results of a combined follow-up from 4 randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Anne F; Leivseth, Gunnar; Brox, Jens-Ivar; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle; Fairbank, Jeremy C T

    2014-08-01

    Cross-sectional analysis of long-term follow-up (LTFU) data from 4 randomized controlled trials of operative versus nonoperative treatment for chronic low back pain. To examine the influence of spinal fusion on adjacent segment disc space height as an indicator of disc degeneration at LTFU. There is ongoing debate as to whether adjacent segment disc degeneration results from the increased mechanical stress of fusion. Plain standing lateral radiographs were obtained at LTFU (mean, 13 ± 4 yr postrandomization) in 229 of 464 (49%) patients randomized to surgery and 140 of 303 (46%), to nonoperative care. Disc space height and posteroanterior displacement were measured for each lumbar segment using a validated computer-assisted distortion compensated roentgen analysis technique. Values were reported in units of standard deviations above or below age and sex-adjusted normal values. Patient-rated outcomes included the Oswestry Disability Index and pain scales. Radiographs were usable in 355 of 369 (96%) patients (259 fusion and 96 nonoperative treatment). Both treatment groups showed significantly lower values for disc space height of the adjacent segment than norm values. There was a significant difference between treatment groups for the disc space height of the cranial adjacent segment (in both as-treated and intention-to-treat analyses). The mean treatment effect of fusion on adjacent segment disc space height was -0.44 SDs (95% CI, -0.77 to -0.11; P = 0.01; as-treated analysis); there was no group difference for posteroanterior displacement (0.18 SDs, 95% confidence interval, -0.28 to 0.64, P = 0.45). Adjacent level disc space height and posteroanterior displacement were not correlated with Oswestry Disability Index or pain scores at LTFU (r = 0.010-0.05; P > 0.33). Fusion was associated with lower disc space height at the adjacent segment after an average of 13 years of FU. The reduced disc space height had no influence on patient self-rated outcomes (pain or

  10. [Spinal column: implants and revisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, S M; Meyer, H S; Meyer, B

    2016-03-01

    Non-fusion spinal implants are designed to reduce the commonly occurring risks and complications of spinal fusion surgery, e.g. long duration of surgery, high blood loss, screw loosening and adjacent segment disease, by dynamic or movement preserving approaches. This principle could be shown for interspinous spacers, cervical and lumbar total disc replacement and dynamic stabilization; however, due to the continuing high rate of revision surgery, the indications for surgery require as much attention and evidence as comparative data on the surgical technique itself.

  11. Spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davari R

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A case with bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax was presented. Etiology, mechanism, and treatment were discussed on the review of literature. Spontaneous Pneumothorax is a clinical entity resulting from a sudden non traumatic rupture of the lung. Biach reported in 1880 that 78% of 916 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax had tuberculosis. Kjergaard emphasized 1932 the primary importance of subpleural bleb disease. Currently the clinical spectrum of spontaneous pneumothorax seems to have entered a third era with the recognition of the interstitial lung disease and AIDS as a significant etiology. Standard treatment is including: observation, thoracocentesis, tube thoracostomy. Chemical pleurodesis, bullectomy or wedge resection of lung with pleural abrasion and occasionally pleurectomy. Little information has been reported regarding the efficacy of such treatment in spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to non bleb disease

  12. The 'Lumbar Fusion Outcome Score' (LUFOS): a new practical and surgically oriented grading system for preoperative prediction of surgical outcomes after lumbar spinal fusion in patients with degenerative disc disease and refractory chronic axial low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Tobias A; Rehman, Azeem A; Teles, Alisson R; Aldag, Jean C; Dinh, Dzung H; McCall, Todd D

    2017-01-01

    In order to evaluate the predictive effect of non-invasive preoperative imaging methods on surgical outcomes of lumbar fusion for patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) and refractory chronic axial low back pain (LBP), the authors conducted a retrospective review of 45 patients with DDD and refractory LBP submitted to anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) at a single center from 2007 to 2010. Surgical outcomes - as measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS/back pain) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) - were evaluated pre-operatively and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year post-operatively. Linear mixed-effects models were generated in order to identify possible preoperative imaging characteristics (including bone scan/99mTc scintigraphy increased endplate uptake, Modic endplate changes, and disc degeneration graded according to Pfirrmann classification) which may be predictive of long-term surgical outcomes . After controlling for confounders, a combined score, the Lumbar Fusion Outcome Score (LUFOS), was developed. The LUFOS grading system was able to stratify patients in two general groups (Non-surgical: LUFOS 0 and 1; Surgical: LUFOS 2 and 3) that presented significantly different surgical outcomes in terms of estimated marginal means of VAS/back pain (p = 0.001) and ODI (p = 0.006) beginning at 3 months and continuing up to 1 year of follow-up. In conclusion,  LUFOS has been devised as a new practical and surgically oriented grading system based on simple key parameters from non-invasive preoperative imaging exams (magnetic resonance imaging/MRI and bone scan/99mTc scintigraphy) which has been shown to be highly predictive of surgical outcomes of patients undergoing lumbar fusion for treatment for refractory chronic axial LBP.

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  14. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman Aycan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla.

  15. Spinal epidural hematomas examined on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejnowski, G.; Poniatowska, R.; Kozlowski, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematomas are rare pathology, caused by trauma or spontaneous. In clinical examination acute spinal cord compression is observed. MRI designations appear entirely particular. In sagittal projection, biconvex mass in the dorsal, or sometimes ventral part of the spinal canal is clearly visible. This is well delineated by the thecal sac from the cord and cauda equina. MRI investigations in 3 patients revealed corresponding with spinal bone injuries and cord edema epidural hematomas. Differential diagnosis must contain subdural hematoma and epidural neoplasms or abscess. (author)

  16. [Therapeutic progress in lumbar spinal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shao-Yan; Huang, Yan-Sheng; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2017-05-25

    Along with the population aging in China, patients with lumbar spinal stenosis(LSS) caused by recessive change incessantly increase. At present, there is no adequate evidence to recommend any specific nonoperative treatment for LSS, and surgery is still an effective method. The cilincal symptoms of the patients without conservative treatment got improvement after surgery, which is the strongest evidence base. Spinal instability after simple decompression promotes the development of fusion technique, and the accelerated adjacent segment degeneration and no relief in symptoms after fusion lead to dynamic fixation technology emerge as the times require. Patients with spinal canal decompression whether need bone fusion or not is still controversial. For the past few years, the operation of simple decompression for LSS obviously decreased, whereas the decompression plus fusion surgery showed sustainable growth. Decompression complicated with fusion was more and more adopted in LSS, in order to reduce the hidden risk of spinal instability and deformity. Although decompressive operation has determinate effect, now it is still unclear if the therapeutic effect of decompression complicated with fusion is better than simple decompression. This article reviews the current studies to explore whether decompression plus bone fusion is applicable for LSS. To further explore the best choice of surgical treatment for LSS, we focused on evidence-based therapeutic options. Copyright© 2017 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  17. Spontaneous deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, Benjamin; Geradin, Damien

    Platform businesses such as Airbnb and Uber have risen to success partly by sidestepping laws and regulations that encumber their traditional competitors. Such rule flouting is what the authors call “spontaneous private deregulation,” and it’s happening in a growing number of industries. The authors

  18. “White Cord Syndrome” of Acute Tetraplegia after Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion for Chronic Spinal Cord Compression: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley R. Chin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paralysis is the most feared postoperative complication of ACDF and occurs most often due to an epidural hematoma. In the absence of a clear etiology, inadequate decompression or vascular insult such as ischemia/reperfusion injury are the usual suspects. Herewith we report a case of complete loss of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs during elective ACDF at C4-5 and C5-6 followed by postoperative C6 incomplete tetraplegia without any discernible technical cause. A postoperative MRI demonstrated a large area of high signal changes on T2-weighted MRI intrinsic to the cord “white cord syndrome” but no residual compression. This was considered consistent with spinal cord gliosis with possible acute edema. The acute decompression of the herniated disc resulted in cord expansion and rush-in reperfusion. We postulate that this may have led to disruption in the blood brain barrier (BBB and triggered a cascade of reperfusion injuries resulting in acute neurologic dysfunction. At 16 months postoperatively our patient is recovering slowly and is now a Nurick Grade 4.

  19. A prospective randomized trial comparing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus plate-only open-door laminoplasty for the treatment of spinal stenosis in degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun-Qi; Li, Xi-Lei; Zhou, Xiao-Gang; Bian, Chong; Wang, Han-Ming; Huang, Jian-Ming; Dong, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For three or more involved cervical levels, there is a debate over which approach yields the best outcomes for the treatment of multilevel cervical degenerative disease. Our objective is to compare the radiological and clinical outcomes of two treatments for multilevel cervical degenerative disease: anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) versus plate-only open-door laminoplasty (laminoplasty). Patients were randomized on a 1:1 randomization schedule with 17 patients in the ACDF group and 17 patients in the laminoplasty group. Clinical outcomes were assessed by a visual analog scale (VAS), Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, operative time, blood loss, rates of complications, drainage volume, discharge days after surgery, and complications. The cervical spine curvature index (CI) and range of motion (ROM) were assessed with radiographs. The mean VAS score, the mean JOA score, and the rate of complications did not differ significantly between groups. The laminoplasty group had greater blood loss, a longer operative time, more drainage volume, and a longer hospital stay than the ACDF group. There were no significant differences in the CI and ROM between the two groups at baseline and at each follow-up time point. ROM in both groups decreased significantly after surgery. Both ACDF and laminoplasty are effective and safe treatments for multilevel cervical degenerative disease. ACDF causes fewer traumas than laminoplasty.

  20. Minimum 20 Years Long-term Clinical Outcome After Spinal Fusion and Instrumentation for Scoliosis: Comparison of the SRS-22 Patient Questionnaire With That in Nonscoliosis Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takahiro; Suzuki, Nobumasa; Kono, Katsuki; Ohyama, Yasumasa; Imura, Jyunya; Ato, Akihisa; Ozeki, Satoru; Nohara, Yutaka

    2015-08-15

    A retrospective minimum 20-year follow-up study using 4 standard self-administered questionnaires, one of which, the SRS-22 was also administered to control groups. To evaluate long-term postoperative pain and other clinical outcomes of scoliosis correction and fusion surgery with Harrington instrumentation using Moe square-ended rods for better preservation of sagittal alignment. Only a few long-term outcome studies have used standardized and validated self-administered tools, and no studies have established SRS-22 control data within their own population. There is no previous minimum 20-year follow-up evaluation after correction surgery preserving thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis. Of 86 consecutive patients who underwent instrumentation surgery for scoliosis by a single surgeon, 61 patients participated using Japanese Orthopaedic Association, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index, and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS-22) questionnaires and 51 patients were included in this study. Results were analyzed for pain and other clinical outcomes. A total of 771 hospital employees were sent SRS-22 questionnaires. A total of 763 responded, resulting in 2 control groups composed of nonscoliosis and untreated mild scoliosis controls of the same culture and language as the long-term follow-up group. The prevalence of continuous low back pain was about 15%. Average Japanese Orthopaedic Association, Oswestry Disability Index, and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire scores at follow-up were 25 points, 7.3%, and 1.6, respectively. The average SRS-22 scores were 4.2 (function), 4.3 (pain), 3.7 (self-image), and 3.9 (mental health) for the postoperative follow-up group compared with 4.5 (function), 4.3 (pain), 3.5 (self-image), and 3.5 (mental health) for the nonscoliosis controls. Improved preservation of normal sagittal alignment resulted in a prevalence of low back pain comparable with the age-matched general population. Moreover, SRS-22

  1. Role of allografts in spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz Nather

    1999-01-01

    With development of more tissue banks in the region and internationally, allografts are increasingly being used in orthopaedic surgery including spinal surgery. Two groups of patients will particularly benefit from the use of allografts. The first group is young children in whom iliac crest is cartilaginous and cannot provide sufficient quantity of autografts. The second is the elderly where bones from iliac crest are porotic and fatty. Allografts are used to fulfill two distinct functions in Spinal Surgery. One is to act as a buttress for anterior spinal surgery using cortical allografts. The other is to enhance fusion for posterior spinal surgery. Up to December 1997, 71 transplantations have been performed using allografts from NUH Tissue Bank. Anterior Spinal Surgery has been performed in 15 cases. The indications are mainly Trauma-Burst Fractures and Spinal Secondaries to the Spine. All cases are in thoracic and thoracolumbar region. Allografts used are deep frozen and freeze-dried cortical allografts. Femur is used for thoraco-lumbar region and humerus for upper thoracic region. Instrumentation used ranged from anterior devices (Canada, DCP, Synergy etc) to posterior devices (ISOLA). Deep frozen allografts and more recently freeze-dried allografts are preferred especially for osteoporotic spines. Cortical allografts are packed with autografts from ribs in the medullary canal. Allograft-autograft composites are always used to ensure better incorporation. Postero-lateral fusion has been performed for 56 cases. The indications include congenital and idiopathic scoliosis, degenerative stenosis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, fracture-dislocation, osteoporotic burst fracture, spinal secondaries with cord compression and traumatic spondylolisthesis. Deep frozen bone allografts are used in combination with patient's own autografts from spinous processes to provide a 50% mix. Instrumentation used include Hartshill, Steffee, Isola

  2. Spontaneous idiopathic spinal epidural hematoma: two different presentations of the same disease Hematoma epidural espinal espontáneo: dos diferentes presentaciones clínicas de la misma enfermedad Hematoma epidural espinhal espontâneo: duas diferentes apresentações da mesma doença

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrúbal Falavigna

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma with different clinical presentations without precipitating factors and a brief review of the literature. Our case first developed acute and had progressive cervical spinal cord signs that determined emergency decompressive laminectomy. On the other hand, the second patient, who was chronic, was operated almost five months after the initial symptoms and the radiological diagnosis was a large facet cyst. Early surgical intervention is the chosen treatment for spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas. Spinal surgeons should bear in mind that spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas may have different clinical presentations according to their location in order to perform a differential diagnosis.Fueron relatados dos casos de hematoma epidural espinal espontáneo con diferentes presentaciones clínicas sin factores precipitantes, y fue hecha una breve revisión de la literatura. Nuestro caso 1 tuvo un desarrollo agudo y mostró señales progresivas en la columna cervical que determinaron una laminectomía descompresiva de emergencia. Por otro lado, el segundo paciente, crónico, fue operado casi cinco meses después de los síntomas iniciales y el diagnóstico radiológico fue de un gran quiste sinovial. La intervención quirúrgica temprana es el tratamiento de elección para hematomas espontáneos epidurales espinales. El tratamiento quirúrgico representa la forma más común de terapia para todos los tipos de presentaciones clínicas. Debemos considerar que el tratamiento conservador (o no sea más común en casos de presentación leve, principalmente en pacientes con hematoma espinal crónico. Para realizar un diagnóstico diferencial, los cirujanos deben recordar que los hematomas epidurales espinales espontáneos pueden tener distintas presentaciones clínicas según su ubicación.Os autores relatam dois casos de hematoma epidural espinhal espontâneo com diferentes apresentações cl

  3. EMP Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    KUNTAY, Isık

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel fusion scheme, called EMP Fusion, which has the promise of achieving breakeven and realizing commercial fusion power. The method is based on harnessing the power of an electromagnetic pulse generated by the now well-developed flux compression technology. The electromagnetic pulse acts as a means of both heating up the plasma and confining the plasma, eliminating intermediate steps. The EMP Fusion device is simpler compared to other fusion devices and this reduces...

  4. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  5. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... images of the back and spinal canal A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the spine to ... trigger or worsen pain and disability such as lifting heavy objects or walking long distances. Talk to ...

  6. Spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  7. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  8. Spinal vascular malformations; Spinale Gefaessmalformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal vascular malformations are a group of rare diseases with different clinical presentations ranging from incidental asymptomatic findings to progressive tetraplegia. This article provides an overview about imaging features as well as clinical and therapeutic aspects of spinal arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas and capillary telangiectasia. (orig.) [German] Spinale Gefaessmalformationen sind eine Gruppe seltener Erkrankungen mit unterschiedlichen klinischen Praesentationen, die vom asymptomatischen Zufallsbefund bis zur progredienten Tetraparese reichen. Dieser Artikel gibt einen Ueberblick ueber radiologische Befunde sowie klinische und therapeutische Aspekte von spinalen arteriovenoesen Malformationen, Kavernomen und kapillaeren Teleangiektasien. (orig.)

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... device. (a) Identification. An intervertebral body fusion device is an implanted single or multiple component spinal device made from a variety of materials, including titanium and polymers. The device is...

  13. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  14. Fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of fusion power, and its advantages and disadvantages, are outlined. Present research programmes and future plans directed towards the development of a fusion power reactor, are summarized. (U.K.)

  15. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    This dissertation investigates fusion rings, which are Grothendieck groups of rigid, monoidal, semisimple, abelian categories. Special interest is in rational fusion rings, i.e., fusion rings which admit a finite basis, for as commutative rings they may be presented as quotients of polynomial rings...... by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum...

  16. Fusion: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2006-01-01

    The article gives an overview and introduction to the activities of SCK-CEN's research programme on fusion. The decision to construct the ITER international nuclear fusion experiment in Cadarache is highlighted. A summary of the Belgian contributions to fusion research is given with particular emphasis on studies of radiation effects on diagnostics systems, radiation effects on remote handling sensing systems, fusion waste management and socio-economic studies

  17. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  18. An injectable method for noninvasive spine fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabisi, Ronke M; Lazard, ZaWaunyka; Heggeness, Michael H; Moran, Kevin M; Hipp, John A; Dewan, Ashvin K; Davis, Alan R; West, Jennifer L; Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A

    2011-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce bone formation but are difficult to localize, and subsequent diffusion from the site of interest and short half-life reduce the efficacy of the protein. Currently, spine fusion requires stripping, decortications of the transverse processes, and an autograft harvest procedure. Even in combination with BMPs, clinical spinal fusion has a high failure rate, presumably because of difficulties in localizing sufficient levels of BMP. The goal was to achieve reliable spine fusion through a single injection of a cell-based gene therapy system without the need for any surgical intervention. Eighty-seven immunodeficient (n=44) and immune-competent (n=43) mice were injected along the paraspinous musculature to achieve rapid induction of heterotopic ossification (HO) and ultimately spinal arthrodesis. Immunodeficient and immune-competent mice were injected with fibroblasts, transduced with an adenoviral vector to express BMP2, along the paraspinous musculature. Bone formation was evaluated via radiographs, microcomputed tomography, and biomechanical analysis. ew bridging bone between the vertebrae and the fusion to adjacent skeletal bone was obtained as early as 2 weeks. Reduction in spine flexion-extension also occurred as early as 2 weeks after injection of the gene therapy system, with greater than 90% fusion by 4 weeks in all animals regardless of their genetic background. Injection of our cell-based system into the paraspinous musculature induces spinal fusion that is dependent neither on the cell type nor on the immune status. These studies are the first to harness HO in an immune-competent model as a noninvasive injectable system for clinically relevant spinal fusion and may one day impact human spinal arthrodesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lumbar spine fusion surgery and stroke: a national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jau-Ching; Chen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Laura; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Thien, Peck-Foong; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Cheng, Henrich; Lo, Su-Shun

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the incidence and risk of stroke after lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Study subjects were identified from a nationwide cohort of 1 million people from 2000 to 2005 and were divided into the lumbar spinal fusion group (n = 2,015), who received posterior lumbar spinal fusion surgery, and the comparison group (n = 16,120) composed of age-, sex-, and propensity score-matched control subjects. The matching process was intended to adjust for demographics, comorbidities, and other immeasurable covariates to minimize selection bias. All subjects were followed up for 3 years for stroke, including hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed. The overall incidence rate of stroke in the cohort was 9.99 per 1,000 person-year. The lumbar spinal fusion group was less likely to have any stroke (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.83, p = 0.293), hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR = 0.74, p = 0.739) and ischemic stroke (adjusted HR = 0.81, p = 0.250) than the comparison group, but without significance. Three years post-operatively, patients who received lumbar spinal fusion had stroke incidence rates similar to those without surgery. Posterior lumbar spinal fusion surgery is not associated with increased risks for any kind of stroke.

  20. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  1. Fusion Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This first issue of a quarterly newsletter announces the startup of the Tokamak de Varennes, describes Canada's national fusion program, and outlines the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. A map gives the location of the eleven principal fusion centres in Canada. (L.L.)

  2. DELTAMETHRIN AND PERMETHRIN DECREASE SPONTANEOUS ACTIVITY IN NEURONAL NETWORKS IN VITRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of pyrethroid insecticides on spontaneous electrical activity were investigated in primary cultures of cortical or spinal cord neurons grown on microelectrode arrays. Bicuculline (40 ¿M) was utilized to block fast GABAergic transmission, and concentration-dependent effect...

  3. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  4. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  5. Spontaneous Regression after Extensive Recurrence of a Pediatric Cervical Spine Aneurysmal Bone Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Brembilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal bone cyst is a pseudotumoral lesion. Complete resection prior to selective arterial embolization seems to be the treatment of choice for the more extensive and destructive lesions. In these cases maintaining stability of the cervical spine is critical. This can be very challenging in children and adolescents in whom the axial skeleton is still growing. In this case a young girl presented with a voluminous cervical aneurysmal bone cyst encaging both vertebral arteries and spinal cord. The lesion was treated with aggressive surgical resection, followed by cervical vertebral fusion with instrumentation. After nine months the patient referred no pain and no neurological deficit. MRI scans showed an extensive local recurrence. The family of the young girl refused any other therapy and any other followup. The patients returned to our attention after five years with no pain and neurological deficit. Cervical spine radiographs and MRI scans showed a complete regression of the extensive local recurrence. In the literature, the possibility of spontaneous regression of residual part or local recurrence is reported. The case of this young girl provided the chance to attend a spontaneous regression in an extensive recurrence of aneurismal bone cyst.

  6. Spinal trauma. Pathophysiology and management of traumatic spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shores, A

    1992-07-01

    . The preferred approach for atlantoaxial subluxation is ventral, and the cross pinning, vertebral fusion technique is used for stabilization. Fracture luxations of C-2 are repaired with small plates on the ventral vertebral body. The thoracic and upper lumbar spine is stabilized with dorsal fixation techniques or combined dorsal spinal plate/vertebral body plate fixation. Several methods of fixation can be used with lower lumbar or lumbosacral fractures, including the modified segmental technique and the combined dorsal spinal plate/Kirschner-Ehmer technique.

  7. Fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs

  8. 1989 Volvo Award in basic science. Device-related osteoporosis with spinal instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, P C; Farey, I D; Sutterlin, C E; Gurr, K R; Warden, K E; Cunningham, B W

    1989-09-01

    An animal model of anterior and posterior column instability was developed to allow in vivo observation of bone remodeling and arthrodesis after spinal instrumentation. After an initial anterior and posterior destabilizing lesion was created at the L5-L6 vertebral levels in 42 adult beagles, various spinal reconstructive surgical procedures were performed--with or without bilateral posterolateral bone grafting, and with or without spinal instrumentation (Harrington distraction; Luque rectangular, or Cotrel-Dubousset transpedicular methods). After 6 months' postoperative observation, there was a significantly improved probability of achieving a spinal fusion if spinal instrumentation had been used (P = 0.058). Nondestructive mechanical testing after removal of all metal instrumentation in torsion, axial compression, and flexion revealed that the fusions performed in conjunction with spinal instrumentation were more rigid (P less than 0.05). Quantitative histomorphometry showed that the volumetric density of bone was significantly lower (ie, device-related osteoporosis occurred) for fused versus unfused spines; and Harrington- and Cotrel-Dubousset-instrumented dogs became more osteoporotic than the other three groups. The rigidity of spinal instrumentation led to device-related osteoporosis (stress shielding) of the vertebra. However, as the rigidity of spinal instrumentation increased, there was an increased probability of achieving a successful spinal fusion. The improved mechanical properties of spinal instrumentation on spinal arthrodesis more than compensate for the occurrence of device-related osteoporosis in the spine.

  9. Spinal pseudarthrosis in ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, F.L.; Ho, E.K.W.; Fang, D.; Hsu, L.C.S.; Leong, J.C.Y.; Ngan, H.

    Spinal pseudarthrosis is an important mechanical complication in longstanding ankylosing spondylitis. Thirty-five patients with 40 lesions were studied. Three lesions through vertebral bodies resulted from complete fractures. The rest occured at interspaces, more common at the lower thoracic and upper lumbar segments. Double pseudarthrotic lesions were observed in 5 patients. Progressive osteolysis of the anterior elements was prominent, with variable sclerosis, osteophytes, vacuum phenomenon, subluxation and fragmentation. A posterior element weak link, as a bony break or facet joint non-fusion, was an essential component in every lesion, playing an initiating or perpetuating role in its pathogenesis. Mechanical derangement from trauma, severe round kyphosis, spondylodiscitis, hip disease, spinal operation and unusual activities may be contributing factors. Initial treatment is conservative, but 16 patients required operative stabilisation.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  11. Spinal Muscular Atrophy FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SMA: Frequently Asked Questions What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy? Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neuromuscular ... future trials in SMA. What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Respiratory Distress (SMARD)? SMARD and SMA are ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  16. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  2. Controlled fusion; La fusion controlee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobin, J.L

    2005-07-01

    During the last fifty years the researches on controlled thermonuclear fusion reached great performance in the magnetic confinement (tokamaks) as in the inertial confinement (lasers). But the state of the art is not in favor of the apparition of the fusion in the energy market before the second half of the 21 century. To explain this opinion the author presents the fusion reactions of light nuclei and the problems bound to the magnetic confinement. (A.L.B.)

  3. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  4. Comparison of treatment methods in lumbar spinal stenosis for geriatric patient: nerve block versus radiofrequency neurotomy versus spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Kyu; Kim, Sung Bum; Kim, Min Ki; Park, Bong Jin; Choi, Seok Geun; Lim, Young Jin; Kim, Tae Sung

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of spinal treatment, including nerve block, radiofrequency neurotomy, instrumented fusions, is increasing, and progressively involves patients of age 65 and older. Treatment of the geriatric patients is often a difficult challenge for the spine surgeon. General health, sociofamilial and mental condition of the patients as well as the treatment techniques and postoperative management are to be accurately evaluated and planned. We tried to compare three treatment methods of spinal stenosis for geriatric patient in single institution. The cases of treatment methods in spinal stenosis over than 65 years old were analyzed. The numbers of patients were 371 underwent nerve block, radiofrequency neurotomy, instrumented fusions from January 2009 to December 2012 (nerve block: 253, radiofrequency neurotomy: 56, instrumented fusions: 62). The authors reviewed medical records, operative findings and postoperative clinical results, retrospectively. Simple X-ray were evaluated and clinical outcome was measured by Odom's criteria at 1 month after procedures. We were observed excellent and good results in 162 (64%) patients with nerve block, 40 (71%) patient with radIofrequency neurotomy, 46 (74%) patient with spinal surgery. Poor results were 20 (8%) patients in nerve block, 2 (3%) patients in radiofrequency neurotomy, 3 (5%) patient in spinal surgery. We reviewed literatures and analyzed three treatment methods of spinal stenosis for geriatric patients. Although the long term outcome of surgical treatment was most favorable, radiofrequency neurotomy and nerve block can be considered for the secondary management of elderly lumbar spinals stenosis patients.

  5. Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  6. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Investigations addressing the molecular keys of osteoclast fusion are primarily based on end-point analyses. No matter if investigations are performed in vivo or in vitro the impact of a given factor is predominantly analyzed by counting the number of multi-nucleated cells, the number of nuclei per...... multinucleated cell or TRAcP activity. But end-point analyses do not show how the fusion came about. This would not be a problem if fusion of osteoclasts was a random process and occurred by the same molecular mechanism from beginning to end. However, we and others have in the recent period published data...... suggesting that fusion partners may specifically select each other and that heterogeneity between the partners seems to play a role. Therefore, we set out to directly test the hypothesis that fusion factors have a heterogenic involvement at different stages of nuclearity. Therefore, we have analyzed...

  7. Fusion physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Karl; Tran, Minh Quang

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a comprehensive reference for graduate students and an invaluable guide for more experienced researchers. It provides an introduction to nuclear fusion and its status and prospects, and features specialized chapters written by leaders in the field, presenting the main research and development concepts in fusion physics. It starts with an introduction to the case for the development of fusion as an energy source. Magnetic and inertial confinement are addressed. Dedicated chapters focus on the physics of confinement, the equilibrium and stability of tokamaks, diagnostics, heating and current drive by neutral beam and radiofrequency waves, and plasma–wall interactions. While the tokamak is a leading concept for the realization of fusion, other concepts (helical confinement and, in a broader sense, other magnetic and inertial configurations) are also addressed in the book. At over 1100 pages, this publication provides an unparalleled resource for fusion physicists and engineers.

  8. Analysis of Risk Factors for Adjacent Segment Degeneration Occurring More than 5 Years after Fusion with Pedicle Screw Fixation for Degenerative Lumbar Spine

    OpenAIRE

    Soh, Jaewan; Lee, Jae Chul; Shin, Byung Joon

    2013-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose We investigated the risk factors in adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after more than 5 years of follow-up of lumbar spinal fusion. Overview of Literature There are many concerns regarding ASD followed by lumbar spinal fusion. However, there is a great deal of dispute about the risk factors. Methods A total of 55 patients who were followed up for more than 5 years after lumbar fusion were observed. Gender, age, residence, fusion method, number of ...

  9. Spinal cord infarction; Spinaler Infarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, N.; Shariat, K.; Ulmer, S.; Stippich, C.; Ahlhelm, F.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone. Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord. (orig.) [German] Die durch einen Rueckenmarkinfarkt verursachte Symptomatik kann aufgrund der komplexen Blutversorgung des Myelons zu unterschiedlichen neurologischen Ausfaellen fuehren. Dabei steht haeufig die durch eine arterielle Minderperfusion des Myelons bedingte Querschnittssymptomatik im Vordergrund. Venoes induzierte Mikrozirkulationsstoerungen sind anhand des neurologischen Befundes klinisch nicht immer von arteriellen Infarkten zu unterscheiden. Die moderne Bildgebung unter Einsatz der CT- (CTA) und MR-Angiographie (MRA) dient dem Ausschluss nichtvaskulaerer Ursachen fuer die Symptomatik wie Entzuendungen und Tumoren sowie der praeoperativen Planung vor der Aortenchirurgie zum Nachweis der fuer die Myelondurchblutung entscheidenden A. Adamkiewicz. Im Gegensatz zur CT kann mittels MRT ein Infarkt im Myelon mit hoher Verlaesslichkeit nachgewiesen werden. (orig.)

  10. Adjacent segment degeneration after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support: a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year magnetic resonance imaging follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Egund, Niels; Christensen, Finn B; Grethe Jurik, Anne; Bünger, Cody E

    2010-10-15

    Randomized controlled trial. To analyze long-term adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after lumbar fusion on magnetic resonance imaging and compare randomization groups with and without anterior column support. ASD can be a long-term complication after fusion. The prevalence and the cause of ASD are not well documented, but ASD are one of the main arguments for introducing the use of motion-preserving techniques as an alternative to fusion. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral lumbar fusion (ALIF+PLF) has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for ALIF+PLF or for PLF alone. Ninety-five patients participated. ASD was examined on magnetic resonance imaging with regard to disc degeneration, disc herniation, stenosis, and endplate changes. Disc heights on radiographs taken at index surgery and at long-term follow-up were compared. Outcome was assessed by validated questionnaires. The follow-up rate was 76%. ASD was similar between randomization groups. In the total cohort, endplate changes were seen in 26% of the participants and correlated significantly with the presence of disc degeneration and disc herniation. Disc degeneration and dorsal disc herniation were the parameters registered most frequently and were significantly more pronounced at the first adjacent level than at the second and the third adjacent levels. Patients without disc height reduction over time were significantly younger than patients with disc height reduction. Disc degeneration and stenosis correlated significantly with outcome at the first adjacent level. The cause of the superior outcome in the group with anterior support is still unclear. Compared with the findings reported in the literature, the prevalence of ASD is likely to be in concordance with the expected changes in a nonoperated symptomatic population and therefore

  11. Pain and disability following first-time lumbar fusion surgery for degenerative disorders: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Koenders, N.H.J.; Rushton, A.; Heneghan, N.; Verra, M.L.; Willems, P.; Hoogeboom, T.J.; Staal, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal fusion for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine is frequently used, despite current research presenting inconclusive evidence. This study aims to systematically review and meta-analyse the natural course of pain and disability in patients with degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine such as spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, disc herniation, or discogenic low back pain to improve lumbar spinal fusion management. Methods/design An electronic database search w...

  12. Spontaneous pneumothorax in weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnejon, T; Sarac, S; Cropp, A J

    1995-06-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is infrequently caused by strenuous exertion. To our knowledge there has only been one case of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting reported in the medical literature. We describe three consecutive cases of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting. We postulate that spontaneous pneumothorax in these patients may be secondary to improper breathing techniques. It is important that physicians and weight trainers be aware of the association between weight lifting and spontaneous pneumothorax and assure that proper instruction is given to athletes who work with weights.

  13. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Franz

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  14. Impact of Movement Disorders on Management of Spinal Deformity in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yoon; Oh, Jae Keun; Smith, Justin S; Ailon, Tamir; Fehlings, Michael G; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-10-01

    Spinal deformities are frequent and disabling complications of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease and multiple system atrophy. The most distinct spinal deformities include camptocormia, antecollis, Pisa syndrome, and scoliosis. Spinal surgery has become lower risk and more efficacious for complex spinal deformities, and thus more appealing to patients, particularly those for whom conservative treatment is inappropriate or ineffective. Recent innovations and advances in spinal surgery have revolutionized the management of spinal deformities in elderly patients. However, spinal deformity surgeries in patients with Parkinson disease remain challenging. High rates of mechanical complications can necessitate revision surgery. The success of spinal surgery in patients with Parkinson disease depends on an interdisciplinary approach, including both surgeons and movement disorder specialists, to select appropriate surgical patients and manage postoperative movement in order to decrease mechanical failures. Achieving appropriate correction of sagittal alignment with strong biomechanical instrumentation and bone fusion is the key determinant of satisfactory results.

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord ... by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  17. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    SNARE proteins constitute the minimal machinery needed for membrane fusion. SNAREs operate by forming a complex, which pulls the lipid bilayers into close contact and provides the mechanical force needed for lipid bilayer fusion. At the chemical synapse, SNARE-complex formation between...... the vesicular SNARE VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2 and the target (plasma membrane) SNAREs SNAP25 and syntaxin-1 results in fusion and release of neurotransmitter, synchronized to the electrical activity of the cell by calcium influx and binding to synaptotagmin. Formation of the SNARE complex is tightly regulated...... and appears to start with syntaxin-1 bound to an SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) protein. Proteins of the Munc13-family are responsible for opening up syntaxin and allowing sequential binding of SNAP-25 and VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2. N- to C-terminal “zippering” of the SNARE domains leads to membrane fusion...

  18. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik

    1995-02-01

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4 He, 3 He, 3 H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4 He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  19. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  20. Late Results of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Interbody Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Da?l?, Murat; Er, Uygur; ?im?ek, Serkan; Bavbek, Murad

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for degenerative cervical disc disease. Overview of Literature Anterior spinal surgery originated in the mid-1950s and graft for fusion was also employed. Currently anterior cervical microdiscectomy and fusion with an intervertebral cage is a widely accepted procedure for treatment of cervical disc hernia. Artificial grafts and cages for fusion are preferred because of their ...

  1. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The efforts of the Chemical Technology Division in fusion energy include the areas of fuel handling, processing, and containment. Current studies are concerned largely with the development of vacuum pumps for fusion reactors and experiments and with development and evaluation of techniques for recovering tritium from solid or liquid breeding blankets. In addition, a small effort is devoted to support of the ORNL design of a major Tokamak experiment, The Next Step (TNS)

  2. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  3. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  4. Extramedullary spinal teratoma presenting with recurrent aseptic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpayo, Lucy L; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Man; Wang, Kai; Wang, Jiao; Yang, Li

    2014-06-01

    Spinal teratomas are extremely rare; they constitute meningitis. A 7-year-old boy presented with paroxysmal abdominal pain and a history of recurrent aseptic meningitis. Kernig and Brudzinski signs were present. Lumber puncture revealed pleocytosis with no evidence of bacteria growth. Imaging of the spine revealed a cystic lesion in spinal cord at thoracic level 9-11. Endoscopic excision of the cyst was successfully performed. Surgical and histopathological findings confirmed extramedullary matured teratoma. As the symptomatic attacks of spontaneous rupture of spinal teratoma resemble presentations of Mollaret meningitis, spinal teratoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Mollaret meningitis. We describe a rare example of spinal teratoma causing recurrent meningitis. Spine imaging should be considered in individuals with recurrent aseptic meningitis as this promotes earlier diagnosis, more appropriate treatment, and improved neurological outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had spinal stenosis by means of MR imaging. All patients had undergone myelography and CT. Thirty patients underwent surgery. MR imaging included T1-weighted spin echo sequences with repetition time = 600 msec, echo time = 20 (600/20) sagittal and axial sections 4 mm thick with 2 mm gap. T2-weighted 2,000/60 axial images were obtained on 14 patients. Examinations were retrospectively evaluated for central stenosis, lateral recess narrowing, and foraminal encroachment. Measurements of sagittal, interpedicular, interfacet, and recess dimensions were made at L3-5. On MR images, 20 patients had single-level and 30 had multiple-level stenosis. There was excellent agreement between modalities with central canal stenosis, but a discrepancy in six patients with bony foraminal stenosis. MR imaging was an accurate method for assessment of lumbar stenosis, but CT appears marginally better for detection of bony foraminal stenosis in certain cases

  6. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  7. Spinal instability in ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badve Siddharth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unstable spinal lesions in patients with ankylosing spondylitis are common and have a high incidence of associated neurological deficit. The evolution and presentation of these lesions is unclear and the management strategies can be confusing. We present retrospective analysis of the cases of ankylosing spondylitis developing spinal instability either due to spondylodiscitis or fractures for mechanisms of injury, presentations, management strategies and outcome. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective analysis of 16 cases of ankylosing spondylitis, treated surgically for unstable spinal lesions over a period of 12 years (1995-2007; 87.5% (n=14 patients had low energy (no obvious/trivial trauma while 12.5% (n=2 patients sustained high energy trauma. The most common presentation was pain associated with neurological deficit. The surgical indications included neurological deficit, chronic pain due to instability and progressive deformity. All patients were treated surgically with anterior surgery in 18.8% (n=3 patients, posterior in 56.2% (n=9 patients and combined approach in 25% (n=4 patients. Instrumented fusion was carried out in 87.5% (n=14 patients. Average surgical duration was 3.84 (Range 2-7.5 hours, blood loss 765.6 (± 472.5 ml and follow-up 54.5 (Range 18-54 months. The patients were evaluated for pain score, Frankel neurological grading, deformity progression and radiological fusion. One patient died of medical complications a week following surgery. Results: Intra-operative adverse events like dural tears and inadequate deformity correction occurred in 18.7% (n=3 patients (Cases 6, 7 and 8 which could be managed conservatively. There was a significant improvement in the Visual analogue score for pain from a pre-surgical median of 8 to post-surgical median of 2 (P=0.001, while the neurological status improved in 90% (n=9 patients among those with preoperative neurological deficit who could be followed-up (n =10. Frankel

  8. Destination fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivakumar, B.; Shapira, D.; Stelson, P.H.; Beckerman, M.; Harmon, B.A.; Teh, K.; Ayik, S.

    1986-01-01

    The orbiting yields of reaction products from the 28 Si + 14 N interaction have been measured. The relative magnitudes of the orbiting yields indicate that the dinuclear complex (DNCs) formed in such interactions live sufficiently long to permit the equilibration of charge and mass. Since both the 16 O and the 12 C orbiting yields exceed the 14 N, it appears that there is no preferred directions for mass flow between the interacting nuclei. Since the orbiting yields are typically 10% of the fusion yield, and we believe the orbiting process reflects how the DNCs formed in such collisions evolve towards fusion, it seems apt to conclude that fusion occurs not through a process of continual particle exchange whereby one nucleus is gradually consumed by the other, but by a dinuclear system that retains it mass asymmetry. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Biomechanical effects of hybrid stabilization on the risk of proximal adjacent-segment degeneration following lumbar spinal fusion using an interspinous device or a pedicle screw-based dynamic fixator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Young Eun; Lee, Hak Joong; Kim, Dong Gyu; Kim, Chi Heon

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw-rod-based hybrid stabilization (PH) and interspinous device-based hybrid stabilization (IH) have been proposed to prevent adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) and their effectiveness has been reported. However, a comparative study based on sound biomechanical proof has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical effects of IH and PH on the transition and adjacent segments. METHODS A validated finite element model of the normal lumbosacral spine was used. Based on the normal model, a rigid fusion model was immobilized at the L4-5 level by a rigid fixator. The DIAM or NFlex model was added on the L3-4 segment of the fusion model to construct the IH and PH models, respectively. The developed models simulated 4 different loading directions using the hybrid loading protocol. RESULTS Compared with the intact case, fusion on L4-5 produced 18.8%, 9.3%, 11.7%, and 13.7% increments in motion at L3-4 under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, respectively. Additional instrumentation at L3-4 (transition segment) in hybrid models reduced motion changes at this level. The IH model showed 8.4%, -33.9%, 6.9%, and 2.0% change in motion at the segment, whereas the PH model showed -30.4%, -26.7%, -23.0%, and 12.9%. At L2-3 (adjacent segment), the PH model showed 14.3%, 3.4%, 15.0%, and 0.8% of motion increment compared with the motion in the IH model. Both hybrid models showed decreased intradiscal pressure (IDP) at the transition segment compared with the fusion model, but the pressure at L2-3 (adjacent segment) increased in all loading directions except under extension. CONCLUSIONS Both IH and PH models limited excessive motion and IDP at the transition segment compared with the fusion model. At the segment adjacent to the transition level, PH induced higher stress than IH model. Such differences may eventually influence the likelihood of ASD.

  10. Spontaneous uterine rupture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Rupture of a gravid uterus is a surgical emergency. Predisposing factors include a scarred uterus. Spontaneous rupture of an unscarred uterus during pregnancy is a rare occurrence. We hereby present the case of a spontaneous complete uterine rupture at a gestational age of 34 weeks in a 35 year old patient ...

  11. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  12. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Micci, Francesca; Andersen, Kristin; Kilen Andersen, Hege; Meling, Torstein R; Due-Tønnessen, Bernt; Scheie, David; Heim, Sverre; Brandal, Petter

    2016-12-01

    We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After algorithmic and manual filtering, the final list consisted of 24 potential fusion events. Raw RNA-seq read sequences and PCR validation supports two novel fusion genes: a reciprocal fusion gene involving UQCR10 and C1orf194 in an adult spinal ependymoma and a TSPAN4-CD151 fusion gene in a pediatric infratentorial anaplastic ependymoma. Our previously reported ALK rearrangements and the RELA and YAP1 fusions found in supratentorial ependymomas were until now the only known fusion genes present in ependymal tumors. The chimeric transcripts presented here are the first to be reported in infratentorial or spinal ependymomas. Further studies are required to characterize the genomic rearrangements causing these fusion genes, as well as the frequency and functional importance of the fusions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Fusion cuisine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    define the culinary tradition of journalism studies in the first place. In so doing, we offer a recipe for journalism studies fusion cooking that: 1) considers technological change (audiences’ diets); 2) analyses institutional change (audiences’ supermarket of information); and 3) evaluates journalism...

  14. Magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project

  15. Fusion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aschbacher, Michael; Oliver, Bob

    2016-01-01

    This is a survey article on the theory of fusion systems, a relatively new area of mathematics with connections to local finite group theory, algebraic topology, and modular representation theory. We first describe the general theory and then look separately at these connections.

  16. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord ... SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  5. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_ ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the... injury to the patient.” (2) Class III (premarket approval), when intended to provide immobilization and...-4V, and unalloyed titanium, that allow the surgeon to build an implant system to fit the patient's...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  16. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report

    OpenAIRE

    Bielecki, Mateusz; Kunert, Przemys?aw; Prokopienko, Marek; Nowak, Arkadiusz; Czernicki, Tomasz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points’ location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. Aim: To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis was...

  17. Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma: Report of a case managed conservatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Tariq

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a rare cause of acute spinal cord compression. A 25-year-old male presented with a history of sudden onset of complete quadriplegia with sensory loss below the neck along with loss of bowel and bladder control. He had no history of any constitutional symptoms. He reported 10 days later. He was managed conservatively and after two weeks of intensive rehabilitation he had complete neural recovery. The spontaneous recovery of neurological impairment is attributed to the spreading of the hematoma throughout the epidural space, thus decreasing the pressure with partial neural recovery. Conservative treatment is a fair option in young patients who present late and show neurological improvement. The neurological status on presentation will guide the further approach to management.

  18. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D 2 molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D 2 fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into 4 He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; 3 He to 4 He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of 3 He/ 4 He

  19. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  20. Magnetic fusion; La fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project.

  1. Quantitative study of neurofilament-positive fiber length in rat spinal cord lesions using isotropic virtual planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Janson, A M

    1998-01-01

    Spontaneous reocurrence of neurofilament (NF)-positive fibers has been described after spinal cord lesions in rats. However, previously introduced methods to evaluate the lesion and the regenerative fiber outgrowth suffer from several biases, why a new concept of quantitative, morphological...... analysis after spinal cord injury is needed. Length quantification of the putatively spontaneously regenerating fibers has been difficult until recently, when two length estimators based on sampling with isotropic virtual planes within thick physical sections were introduced. The applicability...

  2. Mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the surgical technique and advantages of the mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation. Clinical and radiographic results were assessed to determine the clinical outcomes in twelve consecutive patients selected for minimally invasive access (mini-open technique) for TLIF in Prasat Neurological Institute. A retrospective analysis was performed on 12 patients (age range, 38-74 yr; mean, 54. 8 yr) who underwent mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation between September 2006 and June 2008. The titanium pedicle screws were introduced bilaterally through the 3.5 cm length, skin incisions with Spine Classics MLD- system retractor, autologous bone graft were inserted to perform TLIF in all patients. Eight patients were augmented anterior column support with titanium interbody cage, unilateral cage insertion in four patients and the others were inserted bilaterally interbody cages. Six patients presented with low back pain and associated radiculopathy, and six presented with low back pain only. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was performed at L3-L4 in two patients, L4-L5 in four patients, L5-S1 in five patients, and two levels fusion in one patient. All patients were able to ambulate after spinal fusion. The patients were able to walk within 1.4 days (range 1-2 days). The hospital stay averaged 4.4 days (range 3-7 days). Periodic follow-up took place 1 to 21 months after surgery (mean, 7.4 months). The radiological fusion was archived in all nine patients who were operated on more than two months age. The other three patients who had been follow-up less than two months were probably fusion on the 1-month followed-up radiological examination. The use of mini-open technique for pedicle screw instrumentation with spinal fusion procedure provides excellent clinical results and may be an operation of choice for

  3. Complication with Removal of a Lumbar Spinal Locking Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Crawford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The use of locking plate technology for anterior lumbar spinal fusion has increased stability of the vertebral fusion mass over traditional nonconstrained screw and plate systems. This case report outlines a complication due to the use of this construct. Case. A patient with a history of L2 corpectomy and anterior spinal fusion presented with discitis at the L4/5 level and underwent an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF supplemented with a locking plate placed anterolaterally for stability. Fifteen months after the ALIF procedure, he returned with a hardware infection. He underwent debridement of the infection site and removal of hardware. Results. Once hardware was exposed, removal of the locking plate screws was only successful in one out of four screws using a reverse thread screw removal device. Three of the reverse thread screw removal devices broke in attempt to remove the subsequent screws. A metal cutting drill was then used to break hoop stresses associated with the locking device and the plate was removed. Conclusion. Anterior locking plates add significant stability to an anterior spinal fusion mass. However, removal of this hardware can be complicated by the inherent properties of the design with significant risk of major vascular injury.

  4. Nursing review of cervical laminectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2017-01-01

    Cervical radiiculopathy/nerve root compression, myelopathy/cord compression are variously attributed to stenosis/narrowing of the spinal canal [anterior/posterior (AP) to less than 10 mm is defined as absolute stenosis, and 13 mm as relative stenosis]. Additional pathology includes disc herniations, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), and ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL). Patients, typically over 60 years of age, may present with severe myeloradicular syndromes requiring multilevel laminectomies and posterior instrumented fusions. Patients typically first undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the cervical spine that best demonstrate soft tissue pathology; spinal cord and/or nerve root compression in three dimensions (AP/coronal (front/back), lateral (side), and axial (cross section)). Computed tomography (CT) studies better define ossification/calcific changes contributing to stenosis, including OPLL and/or OYL. If there is multilevel cervical pathology and an adequately preserved cervical lordosis (curvature with the neck), a cervical laminectomy may provide adequate cord/root decompression. Performed under intraoperative monitoring, the laminae (bones cover the back of the cervical spine), spinous processes (midline bony protuberant structures), and OYL may be directly removed. Posterior fusions, utilizing varying instrumentation/constructs may prevent reversal of the lordosis (kyphosis: curve angled forward) and re-tethering of the spinal cord. Patients with myeloradiculopathy (cord/root compression) and multilevel cervical stenosis attributed to disc herniations, OPLL, and/or OYL with an adequate lordosis may require multilevel laminectomy and an instrumented fusion.

  5. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Postoperative spinal infection mimicking systemic vasculitis with titanium-spinal implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stathopoulos Konstantinos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary systemic vasculitis after posterior spinal fusion surgery is rare. It is usually related to over-reaction of immune-system, to genetic factors, toxicity, infection or metal allergies. Case Description A 14 year-old girl with a history of extended posterior spinal fusion due to idiopathic scoliosis presented to our department with diffuse erythema and nephritis (macroscopic hemuresis and proteinuria 5 months post surgery. The surgical trauma had no signs of inflammation or infection. The blood markers ESR and CRP were increased. Skin tests were positive for nickel allergy, which is a content of titanium alloy. The patient received corticosteroids systematically (hydrocortisone 10 mg for 6 months, leading to total recess of skin and systemic reaction. However, a palpable mass close to the surgical wound raised the suspicion of a late infection. The patient had a second surgery consisting of surgical debridement and one stage revision of posterior spinal instrumentation. Intraoperative cultures were positive to Staphylococcus aureus. Intravenous antibiotics were administered. The patient is now free of symptoms 24 months post revision surgery without any signs of recurrence of either vasculitis or infection. Literature Review Systemic vasculitis after spinal surgery is exceptionally rare. Causative factors are broad and sometimes controversial. In general, it is associated with allergy to metal ions. This is usually addressed with metal on metal total hip bearings. In spinal surgery, titanium implants are considered to be inert and only few reports have presented cases with systemic vasculitides. Therefore, other etiologies of immune over-reaction should always be considered, such as drug toxicity, infection, or genetic predisposition. Purposes and Clinical Relevance Our purpose was to highlight the difficulties during the diagnostic work-up for systemic vasculitis and management in cases of posterior spinal surgery.

  7. Spontaneous Spondylodiscitis - Epidemiology, Clinical Features, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkova Aneta S.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous spondylodiscitis is a rare but serious infectious disease which is a combination of an inflammatory process, involving one or more adjacent vertebral bodies (spondylitis, the intervertebral discs (discitis and finally - the neighboring neural structures. In most cases the condition is due to a hematogenous infection and can affect all regions of the spinal cord, but it is usually localized in the lumbar area. The most common clinical symptom is a pronounced, constant and increasing nocturnal paravertebral pain, while consequently different degrees of residual neurological symptoms from nerve roots and/or spinal cord may appear. The disease course is chronic and the lack of specific symptoms often prolongs the time between its debut and the diagnosis. This delay in diagnosis determines its potentially high morbidity and mortality. Treatment is conservative in cases with no residual neurological symptoms and consists of antibiotic therapy and immobilization. Surgical treatment is necessary in patients with neurological deficit, spinal instability or drug resistance.

  8. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.

    1982-02-01

    In this paper, the physics of laser fusion is described on an elementary level. The irradiated matter consists of a dense inner core surrounded by a less dense plasma corona. The laser radiation is mainly absorbed in the outer periphery of the plasma. The absorbed energy is transported inward to the ablation surface where plasma flow is created. Due to this plasma flow, a sequence of inward going shock waves and heat waves are created, resulting in the compression and heating of the core to high density and temperature. The interaction physics between laser and matter leading to thermonuclear burn is summarized by the following sequence of events: Laser absorption → Energy transport → Compression → Nuclear Fusion. This scenario is shown in particular for a Nd:laser with a wavelength of 1 μm. The wavelength scaling of the physical processes is also discussed. In addition to the laser-plasma physics, the Nd high power pulsed laser is described. We give a very brief description of the oscillator, the amplifiers, the spatial filters, the isolators and the diagnostics involved. Last, but not least, the concept of reactors for laser fusion and the necessary laser system are discussed. (author)

  9. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  10. Osteoporosis and the Management of Spinal Degenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Tome-Bermejo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis has become a major medical problem as the aged population of the world rapidly grows. Osteoporosispredisposes patients to fracture, progressive spinal deformities, and stenosis, and is subject to be a major concernbefore performing spine surgery, especially with bone fusions and instrumentation. Osteoporosis has often beenconsidered a contraindication for spinal surgery, while in some instances patients have undergone limited and inadequateprocedures in order to avoid concomitant instrumentation. As the population ages and the expectations of older patientsincrease, the demand for surgical treatment in older patients with osteoporosis and spinal degenerative diseasesbecomes progressively more important. Nowadays, advances in surgical and anesthetic technology make it possible tooperate successfully on elderly patients who no longer accept disabling physical conditions. This article discusses thebiomechanics of the osteoporotic spine, the diagnosis and management of osteoporotic patients with spinal conditions,as well as the novel treatments, recommendations, surgical indications, strategies and instrumentation in patients withosteoporosis who need spine operations.

  11. Radioactivity and fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, H.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is expected to give an ultimate solution to energy problems over the long term. From recent progress in developing technology for fusion reactors, we can anticipate a prototype fusion reactor by 2030. This review article describes the present status of nuclear fusion research, including muon catalyzed fusion (μCF) which attracts quite new physical interest. Tritium is an essential component of fusion reactors, because the first-stage fusion reactors will utilize a mixture of deuterium and tritium as their fuel. The knowledge about tritium as well as the fusion-neutron induced radioactivity is summarized in terms of nuclear fusion research. (orig.)

  12. Investigation of different cage designs and mechano-regulation algorithms in the lumbar interbody fusion process - a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo, Sergio; Schmidt, Hendrik; Rohlmann, Antonius; Putzier, Michael; Simón, Antonio; Duda, Georg; Checa, Sara

    2014-04-11

    Lumbar interbody fusion cages are commonly used to treat painful spinal degeneration and instability by achieving bony fusion. Many different cage designs exist, however the effect of cage morphology and material properties on the fusion process remains largely unknown. This finite element model study aims to investigate the influence of different cage designs on bone fusion using two mechano-regulation algorithms of tissue formation. It could be observed that different cages play a distinct key role in the mechanical conditions within the fusion region and therefore regulate the time course of the fusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The increased prevalence of cervical spondylosis in patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, William W; Carrer, Alexandra; Lu, Michael; Hu, Serena S

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the concomitance of cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Patients with degenerative cervical spine disease have higher rates of degeneration in the lumbar spine. In addition, degenerative cervical spine changes have been observed in adult patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformities. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies quantifying the association between cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity in adult patients. Patients seen by a spine surgeon or spine specialist at a single institution were assessed for cervical spondylosis and/or thoracolumbar spinal deformity using an administrative claims database. Spinal radiographic utilization and surgical intervention were used to infer severity of spinal disease. The relative prevalence of each spinal diagnosis was assessed in patients with and without the other diagnosis. A total of 47,560 patients were included in this study. Cervical spondylosis occurred in 13.1% overall, but was found in 31.0% of patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformity (OR=3.27, Pspondylosis (OR=3.26, Pspondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity had significantly higher rates of the other spinal diagnosis. This correlation was increased with increased severity of disease. Patients with both diagnoses were significantly more likely to have received a spine fusion. Further research is warranted to establish the cause of this correlation. Clinicians should use this information to both screen and counsel patients who present for cervical spondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

  14. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury in a Trauma Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarouf, Ahmad; McQuown, Colleen M; Frey, Jennifer A; Ahmed, Rami A; Derrick, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The recommended practice for over 30 years has been to routinely immobilize patients with unstable cervical spinal injuries using cervical spinal collars. It is shown that patients with Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are four times more likely to suffer a spinal fracture compared to the general population and have an eleven-fold greater risk of spinal cord injury. Current protocols of spinal immobilization were responsible for secondary neurologic deterioration in some of these patients. To describe an iatrogenic injury resulting from the use of a rigid spinal board and advocate for the use of alternative immobilization methods or no immobilization at all. We present our case here of a 68-year-old male with a history of AS. The patient was ambulatory on scene after a low speed car accident, but immobilized with a rigid backboard by paramedics. He developed back pain and paraplegia suddenly when the backboard was lifted for transport to the hospital. A CT scan revealed an extension fraction of T10 to T11 with involvement of the posterior column. Emergency spinal fusion was performed. Patient died of complications in the hospital. This case shows that spinal immobilization should be avoided in cases of ambulatory patients without a clear indication. Alternative transport methods such as vacuum mattresses should be considered when spinal immobilization is indicated, especially for patients with predispositions to spinal injury, particularly AS, to maintain the natural alignment of the spinal curvature.

  15. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cervical spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hsien Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH is an unpredictable and rare complication of spinal surgery. We report five cases of RCH following cervical spinal surgery, and summarize another seven similar cases from the literature. Dural opening with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF hypovolemia seems to be an important factor contributing to RCH following cervical spinal surgery. As other authors have proposed, surgical positioning may be another factor contributing to RCH. RCH is thought to be hemorrhagic venous infarction, resulting from the stretching occlusion of the superior cerebellar vein by the cerebellar sag effect. Either intraoperative CSF loss or a postoperative CSF leak from drainage may cause cerebellar sag, further resulting in RCH. RCH is usually self-limiting, and most patients with RCH have an optimal outcome after conservative treatment. Severe cases that involved surgical intervention because of evidence of brainstem compression or hydrocephalus also had acceptable outcomes, compared to spontaneous CH. It has been suggested that one way to prevent RCH is to avoid extensive perioperative loss of CSF, by paying attention to surgical positioning during spinal surgery. We also underline the importance of early diagnosis and CSF expansion in the early treatment of RCH.

  16. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cervical spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Hsien; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Huang, Wen-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is an unpredictable and rare complication of spinal surgery. We report five cases of RCH following cervical spinal surgery, and summarize another seven similar cases from the literature. Dural opening with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypovolemia seems to be an important factor contributing to RCH following cervical spinal surgery. As other authors have proposed, surgical positioning may be another factor contributing to RCH. RCH is thought to be hemorrhagic venous infarction, resulting from the stretching occlusion of the superior cerebellar vein by the cerebellar sag effect. Either intraoperative CSF loss or a postoperative CSF leak from drainage may cause cerebellar sag, further resulting in RCH. RCH is usually self-limiting, and most patients with RCH have an optimal outcome after conservative treatment. Severe cases that involved surgical intervention because of evidence of brainstem compression or hydrocephalus also had acceptable outcomes, compared to spontaneous CH. It has been suggested that one way to prevent RCH is to avoid extensive perioperative loss of CSF, by paying attention to surgical positioning during spinal surgery. We also underline the importance of early diagnosis and CSF expansion in the early treatment of RCH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Taiwan LLC. All rights reserved.

  17. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  18. Functional reorganization of the forepaw cortical representation immediately after thoracic spinal cord hemisection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, J G; Humanes-Valera, D; Aguilar, J; Foffani, G

    2014-07-01

    Spinal cord injury may produce long-term reorganization of cortical circuits. Little is known, however, about the early neurophysiological changes occurring immediately after injury. On the one hand, complete thoracic spinal cord transection of the spinal cord immediately decreases the level of cortical spontaneous activity and increases the cortical responses to stimuli delivered to the forepaw, above the level of the lesion. On the other hand, a thoracic spinal cord hemisection produces an immediate cortical hyperexcitability in response to preserved spinothalamic inputs from stimuli delivered to the hindpaw, below the level of the lesion. Here we show that a thoracic spinal cord hemisection also produces a bilateral increase of the responses evoked in the forepaw cortex by forepaw stimuli, associated with a bilateral decrease of cortical spontaneous activity. Importantly, the increased cortical forepaw responses are immediate in the cortex contralateral to the hemisection (significant within 30min after injury), but they are progressive in the cortex ipsilateral to the hemisection (reaching significance only 2.5h after injury). Conversely, the decreased cortical spontaneous activity is progressive both ipsilaterally and contralaterally to the hemisection (again reaching significance only 2.5h after injury). In synthesis, the present work reports a functional reorganization of the forepaw cortical representation immediately after thoracic spinal cord hemisection, which is likely important to fully understand the mechanisms underlying long-term cortical reorganization after incomplete spinal cord injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metastatic thymoma presenting as spontaneous epidural lumbar haematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivapathasundram, Ganeshwaran; Sammons, Vanessa; Bazina, Renata

    2016-05-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old man who was found to have metastatic thymoma to his lumbar spine presenting as a spontaneous epidural haematoma. The man presented with back pain and cauda equina like symptoms in the absence of trauma, antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents. Following a laminectomy and excision of the epidural collection he made a full neurological recovery. Histopathology of the haematoma demonstrated metastatic thymoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case of metastatic thymoma to the lumbar spine presenting as a spontaneous epidural collection. We believe, in all patients with spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma and a background of malignancy, histopathological analysis should be sought.

  20. Tethered spinal cord syndrome with lumbar segmental stenosis treated with XLIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Carpineta, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Literature review of adults TCS associated with lumbar spinal degenerative disease as lumbar canal stenosis or disc herniation, is reported. Moderate entity of traction of spinal cord may remain asymptomatic in childhood and may result in delayed neurological deficits in adult life. The stretching of conus medullaris and spinal nerves of cauda equina, reduces regional blood flow and causes neural death and fibrous tissue replacement. Sudden or progressive onset of paraparesis with spastic gait, bladder dysfunction and acute low back pain in patient with history of spinal dysraphism must be considered as possible lumbar spinal cord compression caused by low lying cord related to TCS. Surgical decompression should be performed as early as possible to ensure neurological recovery. XLIF approach seems to be safe and fast and represent an excellent surgical option to obtain spinal cord indirect decompression and lumbar interbody fusion.

  1. 1997 Volvo Award winner in clinical studies. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis: a prospective, randomized study comparing decompressive laminectomy and arthrodesis with and without spinal instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischgrund, J S; Mackay, M; Herkowitz, H N; Brower, R; Montgomery, D M; Kurz, L T

    1997-12-15

    This prospective study analyzed the influence of transpedicular instrumented on the operative treatment of patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. To determine whether the addition of transpedicular instrumented improves the clinical outcome and fusion rate of patients undergoing posterolateral fusion after decompression for spinal stenosis with concomitant degenerative spondylolisthesis. Decompression is often necessary in the treatment of symptomatic patients who have degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. Results of recent studies demonstrated that outcomes are significantly improved if posterolateral arthrodesis is performed at the listhesed level. A meta-analysis of the literature concluded that adjunctive spinal instrumentation for this procedure can enhance the fusion rate, although the effect on clinical outcome remains uncertain. Seventy-six patients who had symptomatic spinal stenosis associated with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis were prospectively studied. All patients underwent posterior decompression with concomitant posterolateral intertransverse process arthrodesis. The patients were randomized to a segmental transpedicular instrumented or noninstrumented group. Sixty-seven patients were available for a 2-year follow-up. Clinical outcome was excellent or good in 76% of the patients in whom instrumentation was placed and in 85% of those in whom no instrumentation was placed (P = 0.45). Successful arthrodesis occurred in 82% of the instrumented cases versus 45% of the noninstrumented cases (P = 0.0015). Overall, successful fusion did not influence patient outcome (P = 0.435). In patients undergoing single-level posterolateral fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis, the use of pedicle screws may lead to a higher fusion rate, but clinical outcome shows no improvement in pain in the back and lower limbs.

  2. Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Is Associated with Low Spinal Bone Density: A Comparative Study between Spinal Stenosis and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Finn B.; Langdahl, Bente L.; Ernst, Carsten; Fruensgaard, Søren; Østergaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Jens Langer; Niedermann, Bent; Høy, Kristian; Helmig, Peter; Holm, Randi; Egund, Niels; Bünger, Cody

    2013-01-01

    Spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis share many symptoms and the same treatment, but their causes remain unclear. Bone mineral density has been suggested to play a role. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in spinal bone density between spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis patients. 81 patients older than 60 years, who underwent DXA-scanning of their lumbar spine one year after a lumbar spinal fusion procedure, were included. Radiographs were assessed for disc height, vertebral wedging, and osteophytosis. Pain was assessed using the Low Back Pain Rating Scale pain index. T-score of the lumbar spine was significantly lower among degenerative spondylolisthesis patients compared with spinal stenosis patients (−1.52 versus −0.52, P = 0.04). Thirty-nine percent of degenerative spondylolisthesis patients were classified as osteoporotic and further 30% osteopenic compared to only 9% of spinal stenosis patients being osteoporotic and 30% osteopenic (P = 0.01). Pain levels tended to increase with poorer bone status (P = 0.06). Patients treated surgically for symptomatic degenerative spondylolisthesis have much lower bone mass than patients of similar age treated surgically for spinal stenosis. Low BMD might play a role in the development of the degenerative spondylolisthesis, further studies are needed to clarify this. PMID:24024179

  3. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is the Spinal Cord Damaged? The spine (spinal column) contains the spinal cord, which is divided into four sections: Cervical (neck) Thoracic (chest) Lumbar (lower back) Sacral (pelvis). Each section is referred ...

  4. Spontaneous Atraumatic Mediastinal Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morkos Iskander BSc, BMBS, MRCS, PGCertMedEd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous atraumatic mediastinal hematomas are rare. We present a case of a previously fit and well middle-aged lady who presented with acute breathlessness and an increasing neck swelling and spontaneous neck bruising. On plain chest radiograph, widening of the mediastinum was noted. The bruising was later confirmed to be secondary to mediastinal hematoma. This life-threatening diagnostic conundrum was managed conservatively with a multidisciplinary team approach involving upper gastrointestinal and thoracic surgeons, gastroenterologists, radiologists, intensivists, and hematologists along with a variety of diagnostic modalities. A review of literature is also presented to help surgeons manage such challenging and complicated cases.

  5. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  6. Spinal injury in sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  7. Spinal injury in sport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barile, Antonio; Limbucci, Nicola; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  8. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  9. The safe spinal anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anticoagulation. Refusal. Severe hypovolaemia or shock. Localised sepsis .... Side-effects and complications of spinal anaesthesia. Side-effect/complication. Mechanism. Treatment. Hypotension. Sympathetic block causes vasodilatation.

  10. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  11. Spontaneous Appendicocutaneous Fistula I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M T0k0de* MB, BS and. Dr 0. A. AWOj0bi+ FMCS (Nig). ABSTRACT. Ruptured appendicitis is not a common cause of spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula. A case of ruptured retrocaecal appendicitis presenting as an enterocutaneous fistula in a Nigerian woman is presented. The literature on this disorder is also reviewed.

  12. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Edna; Caly, Wanda Regina

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs in 30% of patients with ascites due to cirrhosis leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. The pathogenesis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is related to altered host defenses observed in end-stage liver disease, overgrowth of microorganisms, and bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to mesenteric lymph nodes. Clinical manifestations vary from severe to slight or absent, demanding analysis of the ascitic fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by a number of neutrophils over 250/mm3 associated or not to bacterial growth in culture of an ascites sample. Enterobacteriae prevail and Escherichia coli has been the most frequent bacterium reported. Mortality rates decreased markedly in the last two decades due to early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment. Third generation intravenous cephalosporins are effective in 70% to 95% of the cases. Recurrence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is common and can be prevented by the continuous use of oral norfloxacin. The development of bacterial resistance demands the search for new options in the prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; probiotics are a promising new approach, but deserve further evaluation. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients with cirrhosis and ascites shortly after an acute episode of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  13. Spontaneous Grammar Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoo, Hong Sing; Lewis, Marilyn

    1998-01-01

    Describes one New Zealand university language teacher's reflection on her own grammar explanations to university-level students of Bahasa Indonesian. Examines form-focused instruction through the teacher's spontaneous answers to students' questions about the form of the language they are studying. The teacher's experiences show that it takes time…

  14. EDITORIAL SPONTANEOUS BACTERIAL PERITONITIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequent]y occurs in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites. It is defined as an infection of previously sterile ascitic fluid without any demonstrable intrabdominal source of infection. It is now internationally agreed that a polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell count in the ascitic fluid of over 250 ...

  15. Spontaneous dimensional reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlip, Steven

    2012-10-01

    Over the past few years, evidence has begun to accumulate suggesting that spacetime may undergo a "spontaneous dimensional reduction" to two dimensions near the Planck scale. I review some of this evidence, and discuss the (still very speculative) proposal that the underlying mechanism may be related to short-distance focusing of light rays by quantum fluctuations.

  16. Catalysed fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Francis

    2012-01-01

    A sizzling romance and a romp with subatomic particles at CERN. Love, discovery and adventure in the city where nations meet and beams collide. Life in a large laboratory. As always, the challenges are the same. Who leads? Who follows? Who succeeds? Who gets the credit? Who gets the women or the men? Young Jeremy arrives in CERN and joins the quest for green energy. Coping with baffling jargon and manifold dangers, he is distracted by radioactive rats, lovely ladies and an unscrupulous rival. Full of doubts and hesitations, he falls for a dazzling Danish girl, who leads him astray. His brilliant idea leads to a discovery and a new route to cold fusion. But his personal life is scrambled. Does it bring fame or failure? Tragedy or triumph?

  17. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Jesse Goff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient’s rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery.

  18. OPERATIVE TREATMENT FOR DEGENERATIVE LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo K. Fokter

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS is a common cause of low back and leg pain in the elderly. Conservative treatment seldom results in sustained improvement.Methods. Fifty-six patients (33 women, 23 men older than 50 years (mean 67 years, range 51 to 82 years and with no prior low back surgery were treated from 1993 to 1999 for clinical and radiologic evidence of DLSS. The goal of this study was to describe the results of decompressive laminectomy with or without fusion in terms of reoperation, severity of back pain, leg pain and patient satisfaction. Answers to Swiss spinal stenosis questionnaires completed before surgery and one to five years afterwards were evaluated. Seven patients (12.5% with degenerative spondylolisthesis, scoliosis and/or more radical facetectomies received fusion.Results. Of the 56 patients in the original cohort, two were deceased and two had undergone reoperation by follow-up. Forty-eight patients answered questionnaires. Average duration of follow-up was 2.5 years. More than 70 percent of the respondents had no or only mild back or buttock pain at follow-up and more than 60 percent were able to walk more than 500 m. Added fusion reduced the incidence of low back pain and pain frequency, and increased walking distance (ANOVA.Conclusions. Eighty-one percent of patients were satisfied with the results of surgery and 87.5% would choose to have the operation again if they had the choice. Decompressive laminectomy for DLSS yields best results if instrumented fusion is included in the procedure.

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago play_arrow What is ... What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new ...

  20. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heather Taylor, PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, ... Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT Mary Jane Mulcahey, PhD, OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ... PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ...

  6. Humero-spinal dysostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, H; Vidal, J; Vallcanera, A; Alberto, C; Muro, D; Dominguez, F

    1979-07-24

    A 2 year old boy with humero-spinal dysostosis is described. This is the third case of this disease reported in the literature. Humero-spinal dysostosis is characterised radiologically by distal humeral bifurcation, elbow subluxation and coronal cleft vertebrae. Congenital, progressive heart disease, possibly with fatal outcome, is probably part of the syndrome.

  7. Clinical Experiences of Non-fusion Dynamic Stabilization Surgery for Adjacent Segmental Pathology after Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative to spinal fusion, non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery has been developed, showing good clinical outcomes. In the present study, we introduce our surgical series, which involves non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery for adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after lumbar fusion surgery. Fifteen patients (13 female and 2 male, mean age of 62.1 years) who underwent dynamic stabilization surgery for symptomatic ASP were included and medical records, magnetic resonance images (MRI), and plain radiographs were retrospectively evaluated. Twelve of the 15 patients had the fusion segment at L4-5, and the most common segment affected by ASP was L3-4. The time interval between prior fusion and later non-fusion surgery was mean 67.0 months. The Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index showed values of 7.4 and 58.5% before the non-fusion surgery and these values respectively declined to 4.2 and 41.3% postoperatively at 36 months (p=0.027 and p=0.018, respectively). During the mean 44.8 months of follow-up, medication of analgesics was also significantly reduced. The MRI grade for disc and central stenosis identified significant degeneration at L3-4, and similar disc degeneration from lateral radiographs was determined at L3-4 between before the prior fusion surgery and the later non-fusion surgery. After the non-fusion surgery, the L3-4 segment and the proximal segment of L2-3 were preserved in the disc, stenosis and facet joint whereas L1-2 showed disc degeneration on the last MRI (p=0.032). Five instances of radiologic ASP were identified, showing characteristic disc-space narrowing at the proximal segments of L1-2 and L2-3. However, no patient underwent additional surgery for ASP after non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery. The proposed non-fusion dynamic stabilization system could be an effective surgical treatment for elderly patients with symptomatic ASP after lumbar fusion.

  8. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Summaries of research are included for each of the following topics: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) the MACK/MACKLIB system for nuclear response functions, and (5) energy storage and power supply systems for fusion reactors

  9. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  10. Relationship between motor recovery and independence after sensorimotor-complete cervical spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, John L K; Lammertse, Daniel P; Schubert, Martin; Curt, Armin; Steeves, John D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For therapeutics directed to the injured spinal cord, a change in neurological impairment has been proposed as a relevant acute clinical study end point. However, changes in neurological function, even if statistically significant, may not be associated with a functional impact, such as a meaningful improvement in items within the self-care subscore of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the functional significance associated with spontane...

  11. Spontaneous healing of spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almafragi, Amar; Convens, Carl; Heuvel, Paul Van Den

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome and sudden cardiac death. It should be suspected in every healthy young woman without cardiac risk factors, especially during the peripartum or postpartum periods. It is important to check for a history of drug abuse, collagen vascular disease or blunt trauma of the chest. Coronary angiography is essential for diagnosis and early management. We wonder whether thrombolysis might aggravate coronary dissection. All types of treatment (medical therapy, percutaneous intervention or surgery) improve the prognosis without affecting survival times if used appropriately according to the clinical stability and the angiographic features of the involved coronary arteries. Prompt recognition and targeted treatment improve outcomes. We report a case of SCAD in a young female free of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, who presented six hours after thrombolysis for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed a dissection of the left anterior descending and immediate branch. She had successful coronary artery bypass grafting, with complete healing of left anterior descending dissection.

  12. Brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Kyu; Byun, Woo Mok; Cho, Jae Ho; Cho Kil Ho; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Yang Gu [Keimyoung Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jin [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. A retrospective review of MRI findings was conducted on six patients with clinically proven spontaneous intracranial hypotension; no patient had a history of previous spinal puncture. Follow-up MRI was available in two patients, and to detect CSF leakage, radio-nuclide cisternography(n=3D5), myelography(n=3D1), and MR myelography(n=3D1) were performed. On contrast-enhanced T1WI, diffuse dural enhancement was seen in all cases, subdural hematoma or hygroma was seen in four cases, pituitary gland prominence in four, dural sinus dilatation in four, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil in two, downward displacement of the iter in one, and suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement in two. In no patient was abnormal CSF leakage found. Although dural enhancement, as seen on MRI, is not specific, diffuse enhancement of the dura mater accompanied by subdural hematoma, hygroma, pituitary gland prominence, dural sinus dilatation, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil, or suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement can strongly suggest intracranial hypotension.=20.

  13. Fusion fuel and renewables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entler, Slavomir

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that fusion fuel meets all aspects applied when defining renewables. A table of definitions of renewables is presented. The sections of the paper are as follows: An industrial renewable source; Nuclear fusion; Current situation in research; Definitions of renewable sources; Energy concept of nuclear fusion; Fusion fuel; Natural energy flow; Environmental impacts; Fusion fuel assessment; Sustainable power; and Energy mix from renewables. (P.A.)

  14. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Research during this report period has covered the following areas: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) MACKLIB-IV, a new library of nuclear response functions, (5) energy storage and power supply requirements for commercial fusion reactors, (6) blanket/shield design evaluation for commercial fusion reactors, and (7) cross section measurements, evaluations, and techniques

  15. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  16. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R ampersand D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R ampersand D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase

  17. Spinal sensory projection neuron responses to spinal cord stimulation are mediated by circuits beyond gate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhe C; Janik, John J; Peters, Ryan V; Chen, Gang; Ji, Ru-Rong; Grill, Warren M

    2015-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a therapy used to treat intractable pain with a putative mechanism of action based on the Gate Control Theory. We hypothesized that sensory projection neuron responses to SCS would follow a single stereotyped response curve as a function of SCS frequency, as predicted by the Gate Control circuit. We recorded the responses of antidromically identified sensory projection neurons in the lumbar spinal cord during 1- to 150-Hz SCS in both healthy rats and neuropathic rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). The relationship between SCS frequency and projection neuron activity predicted by the Gate Control circuit accounted for a subset of neuronal responses to SCS but could not account for the full range of observed responses. Heterogeneous responses were classifiable into three additional groups and were reproduced using computational models of spinal microcircuits representing other interactions between nociceptive and nonnociceptive sensory inputs. Intrathecal administration of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, increased spontaneous and evoked activity in projection neurons, enhanced excitatory responses to SCS, and reduced inhibitory responses to SCS, suggesting that GABAA neurotransmission plays a broad role in regulating projection neuron activity. These in vivo and computational results challenge the Gate Control Theory as the only mechanism underlying SCS and refine our understanding of the effects of SCS on spinal sensory neurons within the framework of contemporary understanding of dorsal horn circuitry. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Spontaneous pneumorrhachis and transverse myelitis complicating purulent meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchra Amara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumorrhachis is the presence of air in the spinal canal; mostly, it has an iatrogenic origin. The association of this entity with spontaneous pneumomediastinum without any pneumothorax is rarely reported in the literature. The spontaneous resorption is the usual evolution. The association to acute transverse myelitis is discussed by the authors. The patient is a 21-year-old male with pneumorrhachis associated to a spontaneous pneumomediastinum was admitted at the emergency department for bacterial meningitis. The antibiotherapy has marked the clinical profile by disappearance of the meningeal signs in the 48 h after admission. In contrast, the neurological symptoms were of marked aggravation by appearance of a tetraparesis with a respiratory distress syndrome having required artificial ventilation. The computed tomography (CT scan showed a typical hypodensity corresponding to paramedullary air extending to several thoracic segments. The spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a high cervical medullary edema without signs of compression. The patient died within 15 days with a profile of vasoparalysis resistant to vasoactive drugs. Pneumomediastinum associated to pneumorrhachis and transverse myelitis complicating purulent meningitis is a rare entity. Although the usual evolution is favorable, the occurrence of serious complications is possible.

  19. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Holck, S.; Christensen, I.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer...... specimens express syncytin, an endogenous retroviral envelope protein, previously implicated in fusions between placental trophoblast cells. Additionally, endothelial and cancer cells are shown to express ASCT-2, a receptor for syncytin. Syncytin antisense treatment decreases syncytin expression...... and inhibits fusions between breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, a syncytin inhibitory peptide also inhibits fusions between cancer and endothelial cells. These results are the first to show that syncytin is expressed by human cancer cells and is involved in cancer-endothelial cell fusions....

  20. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kai [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Shandong Province (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Song, Yong [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Department of Stomatology, Liu Zhou People' s Hospital, Guangxi (China); Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Liu, Ke, E-mail: liuke.1999@aliyun.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Shang, Zheng-jun, E-mail: shangzhengjun@hotmail.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  1. Ion cyclotron emission by spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Costa, O. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Gresillon, D. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1994-07-01

    The goal of the study is to examine whether the spontaneous emission can account for ICE (ion cyclotron emission) experimental results, or part of them. A straightforward approach to plasma emission is chosen, investigating the near equilibrium wave radiation by gyrating ions, and thus building from the majority and fast fusion ions the plasma fluctuations and emission on the fast magnetoacoustic or compressional Alfven wave mode in the IC frequency range. Similarities with the ICE experiments are shown: the emission temperature in the presence of fast ions (even in a very small amount), the strong fast ion emission increase with the harmonic, the fine double-line splitting of each peak, the linear but not proportional increase of the peak width with the harmonic. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Review of fusion synfuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high-temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 65% are projected for fusion reactors using high-temperatures blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion

  3. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustai...

  4. Induction of cell-cell fusion by ectromelia virus is not inhibited by its fusion inhibitory complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs Pinhas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ectromelia virus, a member of the Orthopox genus, is the causative agent of the highly infectious mousepox disease. Previous studies have shown that different poxviruses induce cell-cell fusion which is manifested by the formation of multinucleated-giant cells (polykaryocytes. This phenomenon has been widely studied with vaccinia virus in conditions which require artificial acidification of the medium. Results We show that Ectromelia virus induces cell-cell fusion under neutral pH conditions and requires the presence of a sufficient amount of viral particles on the plasma membrane of infected cells. This could be achieved by infection with a replicating virus and its propagation in infected cells (fusion "from within" or by infection with a high amount of virus particles per cell (fusion "from without". Inhibition of virus maturation or inhibition of virus transport on microtubules towards the plasma membrane resulted in a complete inhibition of syncytia formation. We show that in contrast to vaccinia virus, Ectromelia virus induces cell-cell fusion irrespectively of its hemagglutination properties and cell-surface expression of the orthologs of the fusion inhibitory complex, A56 and K2. Additionally, cell-cell fusion was also detected in mice lungs following lethal respiratory infection. Conclusion Ectromelia virus induces spontaneous cell-cell fusion in-vitro and in-vivo although expressing an A56/K2 fusion inhibitory complex. This syncytia formation property cannot be attributed to the 37 amino acid deletion in ECTV A56.

  5. Recapping hemilaminoplasty for spinal surgical disorders using ultrasonic bone curette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Hidenori; Itoh, Yasunobu; Numazawa, Shinichi; Tomii, Masato; Watanabe, Kazuo; Hirano, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a novel method of the recapping hemilaminoplasty in a retrospective study of patients with spinal surgical disorders. This report describes the surgical technique and the results of hemilaminoplasty using an ultrasonic bone curette. The aim of this study was to examine the safety and effectiveness of the hemilaminoplasty technique with ultrasonic bone curette. Between April 2003 and July 2011, 33 patients with various spinal diseases (17 spinal tumors, 5 dural arteriovenous fistulas, 3 syringomyelia, 2 sacral perineural cysts, and 2 arachnoid cysts) were treated microsurgically by using an ultrasonic bone curette with scalpel blade and lightweight handpiece. The ultrasonic bone curette was used for division of lamina. After resection of the lesion, the excised lamina was replaced exactly in situ to its original anatomic position with a titanium plate and screw. Additional fusion technique was not required and the device was easy to handle. All patients were observed both neurologically and radiologically by dynamic plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scan. The operation was performed successfully and there were no instrument-related complications such as dural laceration, nerve root injury, and vessels injury. The mean number of resected and restored lamina was 1.7. CT confirmed primary bone fusion in all patients by 12 months after surgery. The ultrasonic bone curette is a useful instrument for recapping hemilaminoplasty in various spinal surgeries. This method allows anatomical reconstruction of the excised bone to preserve the posterior surrounding tissues.

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow ... recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_ ... Counseling About Media Donate Contact Us Terms of Use Site Map Privacy Statement 312-284-2525 info@ ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources ...

  11. Spinal Injury: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EmergencyManual/WhatToDoInMedicalEmergency/Default.aspx?id=258&terms=spinal+injuries. Accessed Jan. 8, 2015. Marx JA, et al. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_ ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ... advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... What are the chances of regaining feeling and mobility after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How ... advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  8. Spontaneous Thigh Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan, Sameer K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A young man presented with a painful and swollen thigh, without any history of trauma, illness, coagulopathic medication or recent exertional exercise. Preliminary imaging delineated a haematoma in the anterior thigh, without any fractures or muscle trauma. Emergent fasciotomies were performed. No pathology could be identified intra-operatively, or on follow-up imaging. A review of thigh compartment syndromes described in literature is presented in a table. Emergency physicians and traumatologists should be cognisant of spontaneous atraumatic presentations of thigh compartment syndrome, to ensure prompt referral and definitive management of this limb-threatening condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:134-138].

  9. Fusion Canada issue 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    Fusion Canada's publication of the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is the CFFTP Industrial Impact Study, CCFM/TdeV Update:helium pumping, research funds, and deuterium in beryllium - high temperature behaviour. 3 figs

  10. Laser fusion: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.

    1975-01-01

    The laser fusion concept is described along with developments in neodymium and carbon dioxide lasers. Fuel design and fabrication are reviewed. Some spin-offs of the laser fusion program are discussed. (U.S.)

  11. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  12. Canada's Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada's fusion strategy is based on developing specialized technologies in well-defined areas and supplying these technologies to international fusion projects. Two areas are specially emphasized in Canada: engineered fusion system technologies, and specific magnetic confinement and materials studies. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project focuses on the first of these areas. It tritium and fusion reactor fuel systems, remote maintenance and related safety studies. In the second area, the Centre Canadian de fusion magnetique operates the Tokamak de Varennes, the main magnetic fusion device in Canada. Both projects are partnerships linking the Government of Canada, represented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and provincial governments, electrical utilities, universities and industry. Canada's program has extensive international links, through which it collaborates with the major world fusion programs, including participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

  13. Fusion Canada issue 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue ITER reactor siting, a major upgrade for TdeV tokamak, Ceramic Breeders: new tritium mapping technique and Joint Fusion Symposium. 2 figs

  14. Spontaneous Tumor Lysis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia C. Weeks MD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS is a known complication of malignancy and its treatment. The incidence varies on malignancy type, but is most common with hematologic neoplasms during cytotoxic treatment. Spontaneous TLS is thought to be rare. This case study is of a 62-year-old female admitted with multisystem organ failure, with subsequent diagnosis of aggressive B cell lymphoma. On admission, laboratory abnormalities included renal failure, elevated uric acid (20.7 mg/dL, and 3+ amorphous urates on urinalysis. Oliguric renal failure persisted despite aggressive hydration and diuretic use, requiring initiation of hemodialysis prior to chemotherapy. Antihyperuricemic therapy and hemodialysis were used to resolve hyperuricemia. However, due to multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome with extremely poor prognosis, the patient ultimately expired in the setting of a terminal ventilator wean. Although our patient did not meet current TLS criteria, she required hemodialysis due to uric acid nephropathy, a complication of TLS. This poses the clinical question of whether adequate diagnostic criteria exist for spontaneous TLS and if the lack of currently accepted guidelines has resulted in the underestimation of its incidence. Allopurinol and rasburicase are commonly used for prevention and treatment of TLS. Although both drugs decrease uric acid levels, allopurinol mechanistically prevents formation of the substrate rasburicase acts to solubilize. These drugs were administered together in our patient, although no established guidelines recommend combined use. This raises the clinical question of whether combined therapy is truly beneficial or, conversely, detrimental to patient outcomes.

  15. Surgical fusion of early onset severe scoliosis increases survival in Rett syndrome: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jenny; Torode, Ian; Wong, Kingsley; Ellaway, Carolyn; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Izatt, Maree T; Askin, Geoffrey N; Mcphee, Bruce I; Cundy, Peter; Leonard, Helen

    2016-06-01

    Scoliosis is a common comorbidity in Rett syndrome and spinal fusion may be recommended if severe. We investigated the impact of spinal fusion on survival and risk of severe lower respiratory tract infection in Rett syndrome. Data were ascertained from hospital medical records, the Australian Rett Syndrome Database, a longitudinal and population-based registry, and from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Death Index database. Cox regression and generalized estimating equation models were used to estimate the effects of spinal surgery on survival and severe respiratory infection respectively in 140 females who developed severe scoliosis (Cobb angle ≥45°) before adulthood. After adjusting for mutation type and age of scoliosis onset, the rate of death was lower in the surgery group (hazard ratio [HR] 0.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12-0.74; p=0.009) compared to those without surgery. Rate of death was particularly reduced for those with early onset scoliosis (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.52; p=0.002). There was some evidence to suggest that spinal fusion was associated with a reduction in risk of severe respiratory infection among those with early onset scoliosis (risk ratio 0.41, 95% CI 0.16-1.03; p=0.06). With appropriate cautions, spinal fusion confers an advantage to life expectancy in Rett syndrome. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Should smoking habit dictate the fusion technique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, A; Mannion, A F; Grob, D

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of smoking on the outcome of patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spinal diseases, and to examine whether smoking had a differential impact on outcome, depending on the fusion technique used. The cohort included 120 patients treated with two different fusion techniques (translaminar screw fixation and TLIF). They were categorised with regard to their smoking habits at the time of surgery and completed the Core Outcome Measures Index at baseline and follow-up (FU) (3, 12 and 24 months FU); at FU they also rated the global outcome of surgery. The distribution of smokers was comparable in the two groups. For the TS group, the greater the number of cigarettes smoked, the less the reduction in pain intensity from pre-op to 24 months FU; the relationship was not significant for the TLIF group. The percentage of good global outcomes declined with time in the TS smokers such that by 24 months FU, there was a significant difference between TS smokers and TS-non-smokers. No such difference between smokers and non-smokers was evident in the TLIF group at any FU time. In conclusion, the TS technique was more vulnerable to the effects of smoking than was TLIF: possibly the more extensive stabilisation of the 360° fusion renders the environment less susceptible to the detrimental effects on bony fusion of cigarette smoking.

  17. Evaluation of spinal ultrasound in spinal dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, J.A.; Bruyn, R. de; Patel, K.; Thompson, D

    2003-03-01

    AIMS: The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of spinal ultrasound in detecting occult spinal dysraphism (OSD) in neonates and infants, and to determine the degree of agreement between ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-five consecutive infants had spinal ultrasound over 31 months. Of these, 15 patients (age 1 day-7 months, mean 40 days; nine male) had follow-up MRI. Ultrasound and MRI findings were correlated retrospectively. RESULTS: Six out of 15 (40%) ultrasound examinations showed full agreement with MRI, seven of 15 (47%) had partial agreement, and two of 15 (13%) had no agreement. In the present series ultrasound failed to visualize: four of four dorsal dermal sinuses, three of four fatty filum terminales, one of one terminal lipoma, two of four partial sacral agenesis, three of four hydromyelia and one of 10 low-lying cords. CONCLUSION: Agreement between ultrasound and MRI was good, particularly for the detection of low-lying cord (90%). Therefore we recommend ultrasound as a first-line screening test for OSD. If ultrasound is abnormal, equivocal or technically limited, MRI is advised for full assessment.

  18. Congenital spinal malformations; Kongenitale spinale Malformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale spinale Malformationen stellen eine komplexe Gruppe an Stoerungen dar, deren Genese sich am einfachsten aus der Embryologie heraus erklaeren laesst. Bei der klinisch-radiologischen Begutachtung ist zunaechst ihre korrekte Klassifikation im Rahmen der Erstdiagnose wichtig. Im weiteren Verlauf ist es jedoch zudem entscheidend, moegliche Komplikationen wie beispielsweise eine Hydromyelie oder ein Wiederanheften des Myelons nach Operation einer Spina bifida aperta zu erkennen. Zudem sollte bei der Diagnosestellung einer kongenitalen spinalen Malformation immer auch auf assoziierte Fehlbildungen, wie z.B. die Diastematomyelie oder das intraspinale Lipom bei der Spina bifida aperta, sowie auf eine moegliche syndromale Einordnung wie beispielsweise beim OEIS-oder VACTERL-Syndrom geachtet werden. (orig.)

  19. Cold fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy

  20. User's perspective on fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    The need in fusion, from the electric utilities viewpoint, is for fusion to be a real option, not huge, complicated nuclear plants costing $10 billion each and requiring restructuring the energy industry to provide and use them. A course for future fusion reactor work in order to be a real option is discussed. The advantages of alternate concepts to the tokamak are presented

  1. Fusion Canada issue 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on availability of Canadian Tritium, an ITER update, a CCFM update on Tokamak and the new team organization, an international report on Fusion in Canada and a Laser Fusion Project at the University of Toronto. 3 figs

  2. Fusion Canada issue 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on increased funding for the Canadian Fusion Program, news of the compact Toroid fuelling gun, an update on Tokamak de Varennes, the Canada - U.S. fusion meeting, measurements of plasma flow velocity, and replaceable Tokamak divertors. 4 figs

  3. Zipping into fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Fusion of lipid bilayers in cells facilitates the active transport of chemicals. Non-viral membrane fusion is regulated by a cascade of proteins as the process is highly regulated both in space and time. In eukaryotic cells, the so-called SNARE protein complex is at the heart of fusion. However,

  4. The UKAEA's fusion programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweetman, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    D.R. Sweetman, director of the UKAEA fusion programme, reviews the current state of the work being performed on the UK-Euratom fusion programme. The JET programme, Tokamak programme, reversed field pinch programme, fusion technology and funding are all discussed. (author)

  5. Laminectomy plus Fusion versus Laminectomy Alone for Lumbar Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghogawala, Zoher; Dziura, James; Butler, William E; Dai, Feng; Terrin, Norma; Magge, Subu N; Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Harrington, J Fred; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Schwartz, J Sanford; Sonntag, Volker K H; Barker, Fred G; Benzel, Edward C

    2016-04-14

    The comparative effectiveness of performing instrumented (rigid pedicle screws affixed to titanium alloy rods) lumbar spinal fusion in addition to decompressive laminectomy in patients with symptomatic lumbar grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis is unknown. In this randomized, controlled trial, we assigned patients, 50 to 80 years of age, who had stable degenerative spondylolisthesis (degree of spondylolisthesis, 3 to 14 mm) and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis to undergo either decompressive laminectomy alone (decompression-alone group) or laminectomy with posterolateral instrumented fusion (fusion group). The primary outcome measure was the change in the physical-component summary score of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36; range, 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating better quality of life) 2 years after surgery. The secondary outcome measure was the score on the Oswestry Disability Index (range, 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more disability related to back pain). Patients were followed for 4 years. A total of 66 patients (mean age, 67 years; 80% women) underwent randomization. The rate of follow-up was 89% at 1 year, 86% at 2 years, and 68% at 4 years. The fusion group had a greater increase in SF-36 physical-component summary scores at 2 years after surgery than did the decompression-alone group (15.2 vs. 9.5, for a difference of 5.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.1 to 11.3; P=0.046). The increases in the SF-36 physical-component summary scores in the fusion group remained greater than those in the decompression-alone group at 3 years and at 4 years (P=0.02 for both years). With respect to reductions in disability related to back pain, the changes in the Oswestry Disability Index scores at 2 years after surgery did not differ significantly between the study groups (-17.9 in the decompression-alone group and -26.3 in the fusion group, P=0.06). More blood loss and longer hospital stays occurred

  6. Single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulizi, Yakefu; Liang, Wei-Dong; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Maimaiti, Maierdan; Sheng, Wei-Bin

    2017-07-14

    Spinal brucellosis is a less commonly reported infectious spinal pathology. There are few reports regarding the surgical treatment of spinal brucellosis in existing literature. This retrospective study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral spinal brucellosis. From February 2012 to April 2015, 32 consecutive patients (19 males and 13 females, mean age 53.7 ± 8.7) with lumbosacral brucellosis treated by transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation were enrolled. Medical records, imaging studies, laboratory data were collected and summarized. Surgical outcomes were evaluated based on visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale. The changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), clinical symptoms and complications were investigated. Graft fusion was evaluated using Bridwell grading criteria. The mean follow-up period was 24.9 ± 8.2 months. Back pain and radiating leg pain was relieved significantly in all patients after operation. No implant failures were observed in any patients. Wound infection was observed in two patients and sinus formation was observed in one patient. Solid bony fusion was achieved in 30 patients and the fusion rate was 93.8%. The levels of ESR and CRP were returned to normal by the end of three months' follow-up. VAS and ODI scores were significantly improved (P brucellosis.

  7. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  8. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  9. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  10. Activated microglia in the spinal cord underlies diabetic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Couture, Réjean; Hong, Yanguo

    2014-04-05

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common chronic medical condition. Approximately 30% of diabetic patients develop neuropathic pain, manifested as spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. Hyperglycemia induces metabolic changes in peripheral tissues and enhances oxidative stress in nerve fibers. The damages and subsequent reactive inflammation affect structural properties of Schwann cells and axons leading to the release of neuropoietic mediators, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-nociceptive mediators. Therefore, diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP) shares some histological features and underlying mechanisms with traumatic neuropathy. DNP displays, however, other distinct features; for instance, sensory input to the spinal cord decreases rather than increasing in diabetic patients. Consequently, development of central sensitization in DNP involves mechanisms that are distinct from traumatic neuropathic pain. In DNP, the contribution of spinal cord microglia activation to central sensitization and pain processes is emerging as a new concept. Besides inflammation in the periphery, hyperglycemia and the resulting production of reactive oxygen species affect the local microenvironment in the spinal cord. All these alterations could trigger resting and sessile microglia to the activated phenotype. In turn, microglia synthesize and release pro-inflammatory cytokines and neuroactive molecules capable of inducing hyperactivity of spinal nociceptive neurons. Hence, it is imperative to elucidate glial mechanisms underlying DNP for the development of effective therapeutic agents. The present review highlights the recent developments regarding the contribution of spinal microglia as compelling target for the treatment of DNP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spontaneous wave packet reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    There are taken into account the main conceptual difficulties met by standard quantum mechanics in dealing with physical processes involving macroscopic system. It is stressed how J.A.Wheeler's remarks and lucid analysis have been relevant to pinpoint and to bring to its extreme consequences the puzzling aspects of quantum phenomena. It is shown how the recently proposed models of spontaneous dynamical reduction represent a consistent way to overcome the conceptual difficulties of the standard theory. Obviously, many nontrivial problems remain open, the first and more relevant one being that of generalizing the model theories considered to the relativistic case. This is the challenge of the dynamical reduction program. 43 refs, 2 figs

  12. Spontaneous subdural hematoma of the thoracolumbar region with massive recurrent bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cincu Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disorder and can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasias, lumbar puncture, trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. We discuss an unusual case of an elderly woman who presented with spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma and developed massive rebleeding on the third day following initial evacuation of hematoma. This case illustrates that a patient with routine normal coagulation profile and adequate hemostasis can still harbor platelet dysfunction (in present case due to polycythemia and later on can manifest as rebleeding and neurological deterioration.

  13. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Depression and Spinal Cord Injury [ Download this pamphlet: “Depression and Spinal Cord Injury” (PDF - 477KB)] Depression is a common illness that ...

  14. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Condition Information Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): Condition Information What is SCI? SCI is ... 3 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Spinal cord injury: Hope through research. Retrieved June 19 , 2013 , from ...

  15. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ... compressed by bone (which may result from cervical spondylosis or a fracture), an accumulation of blood (hematoma), ...

  16. Spinal vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, Timo [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany); Mull, Michael; Thron, Armin [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Gilsbach, Joachim M. [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare diseases that consist of true inborn cavernomas and arteriovenous malformations (including perimedullary fistulae, glomerular and juvenile AVMs) and presumably acquired dural arteriovenous fistulae. This review article gives an overview of the imaging features both on MRI and angiography, the differential diagnoses, the clinical symptomatology and the potential therapeutic approaches to these diseases. It is concluded that MRI is the diagnostic modality of first choice in suspected spinal vascular malformation and should be complemented by selective spinal angiography. Treatment in symptomatic patients offers an improvement in the prognosis, but should be performed in specialized centers. Patients with spinal cord cavernomas and perimedullary fistulae type I are surgical candidates. Dural arteriovenous fistulae can either be operated upon or can be treated by an endovascular approach, the former being a simple, quick and secure approach to obliterate the fistula, while the latter is technically demanding. In spinal arteriovenous malformations, the endovascular approach is the method of first choice; in selected cases, a combined therapy might be sensible. (orig.)

  17. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  18. Radiographic evaluation of indirect decompression of mini-open anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion: oblique lateral interbody fusion for degenerated lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Jun; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-03-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion provides minimally invasive treatment of spinal deformity, but complications including nerve and psoas muscle injury have been noted. To avoid nerve injury, mini-open anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion methods using an approach between the aorta and psoas, such as oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) have been applied. OLIF with percutaneous pedicle screws without posterior decompression can indirectly decompress the spinal canal in lumbar degenerated spondylolisthesis. In the current study, we examined the radiographic and clinical efficacy of OLIF for lumbar degenerated spondylolisthesis. We assessed 20 patients with lumbar degenerated spondylolisthesis who underwent OLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation without posterior laminectomy. MR and CT images and clinical symptoms were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. Cross sections of the spinal canal were evaluated with MRI, and disk height, cross-sectional areas of intervertebral foramina, and degree of upper vertebral slip were evaluated with CT. Clinical symptoms including low back pain, leg pain, and lower extremity numbness were evaluated using a visual analog scale and the Oswestry Disability Index before and 6 months after surgery. After surgery, significant increases in axial and sagittal spinal canal diameter (12 and 32 %), spinal canal area (19 %), disk height (61 %), and intervertebral foramen areas (21 % on the right side, 39 % on the left), and significant decrease of upper vertebral slip (-9 %) were found (P spondylolisthesis with back and leg symptoms.

  19. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  20. Adjacent level disk disease--is it really a fusion disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Teija; Oxland, Thomas R

    2011-10-01

    Adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) is a relatively common phenomenon after spinal fusion surgery. Whether ASD is a consequence of the previous fusion or an individual's predisposition to continued degeneration remains unsolved to date. This article summarizes the existing biomechanical and clinical literature on the causes and clinical impact of ASD, as well as possible risk factors. Further, the theoretical advantage of motion-preserving technologies that aim to preserve the adjacent segment is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lumbar interbody fusion: techniques, indications and comparison of interbody fusion options including PLIF, TLIF, MI-TLIF, OLIF/ATP, LLIF and ALIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Malham, Greg; Seex, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine is common in the ageing population, and is one of the most frequent causes of disability. Lumbar spondylosis may result in mechanical back pain, radicular and claudicant symptoms, reduced mobility and poor quality of life. Surgical interbody fusion of degenerative levels is an effective treatment option to stabilize the painful motion segment, and may provide indirect decompression of the neural elements, restore lordosis and correct deformity. The surgical options for interbody fusion of the lumbar spine include: posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF), oblique lumbar interbody fusion/anterior to psoas (OLIF/ATP), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). The indications may include: discogenic/facetogenic low back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy due to foraminal stenosis, lumbar degenerative spinal deformity including symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. In general, traditional posterior approaches are frequently used with acceptable fusion rates and low complication rates, however they are limited by thecal sac and nerve root retraction, along with iatrogenic injury to the paraspinal musculature and disruption of the posterior tension band. Minimally invasive (MIS) posterior approaches have evolved in an attempt to reduce approach related complications. Anterior approaches avoid the spinal canal, cauda equina and nerve roots, however have issues with approach related abdominal and vascular complications. In addition, lateral and OLIF techniques have potential risks to the lumbar plexus and psoas muscle. The present study aims firstly to comprehensively review the available literature and evidence for different lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) techniques. Secondly, we propose a set of recommendations and guidelines

  2. Fusion technology 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, C.; Gasparatto, M.; Knoepfel, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the biennial series of symposia on the title subject, organized by the European Fusion Laboratories, is the exchange of information on the design, construction and operation of fusion experiments and on the technology being developed for the next step devices and fusion reactors. The coverage of the volume includes the technological aspects of fusion reactors in relation to new developments, this forming a guideline for the definition of future work. These proceedings comprise three volumes and contain both the invited lectures and contributed papers presented at the symposium which was attended by 569 participants from around the globe. The 343 papers, including 12 invited papers, characterize the increasing interest of industry in the fusion programme, giving a broad and current overview on the progress and trends fusion technology is experiencing now, as well as indicating the future for fusion devices

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Spinal Arthrodesis: From Preclinical Research to Clinical Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Salamanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of spinal fusion procedures has rapidly augmented over the last decades and although autogenous bone graft is the “gold standard” for these procedures, alternatives to its use have been investigated over many years. A number of emerging strategies as well as tissue engineering with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been planned to enhance spinal fusion rate. This descriptive systematic literature review summarizes the in vivo studies, dealing with the use of MSCs in spinal arthrodesis surgery and the state of the art in clinical applications. The review has yielded promising evidence supporting the use of MSCs as a cell-based therapy in spinal fusion procedures, thus representing a suitable biological approach able to reduce the high cost of osteoinductive factors as well as the high dose needed to induce bone formation. Nevertheless, despite the fact that MSCs therapy is an interesting and important opportunity of research, in this review it was detected that there are still doubts about the optimal cell concentration and delivery method as well as the ideal implantation techniques and the type of scaffolds for cell delivery. Thus, further inquiry is necessary to carefully evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of MSCs use in spine fusion.

  4. Potentialities of spinal liquor scanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlakhov, N.; Vylkanov, P.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that spinal liquor scanography is a harmless and informative method for the examination of patients, permitting to detect injury foci for spinal cord tumours in 90% cases, for acute injuries of the vertebral column and spinal cord in 89.5% cases, for herniation of nucleus pulposus in 81% cases. The method of spinal liquor scanography can be used in neurology and neurosurgery to select the method of treatment and to evaluate its efficiency

  5. Diagnostic strategies in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Uwe [Institut fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Aschaffenburg, Am Hasenkopf 1, 63739 Aschaffenburg (Germany); Freund, Michael [Institut fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Aschaffenburg, Am Hasenkopf 1, 63739 Aschaffenburg (Germany)]. E-mail: michael.freund@klinikum-aschaffenburg.de

    2006-04-15

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if nerve roots or even the spinal cord are affected. Besides presenting the important anatomical and technical basis underlying the imaging findings of spinal injuries, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are discussed. Based on the current literature and recommendations of scientific organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic work up of spinal trauma. The different imaging modalities are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of the methods are discussed.

  6. Diagnostic strategies in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, Uwe; Freund, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if nerve roots or even the spinal cord are affected. Besides presenting the important anatomical and technical basis underlying the imaging findings of spinal injuries, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are discussed. Based on the current literature and recommendations of scientific organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic work up of spinal trauma. The different imaging modalities are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of the methods are discussed

  7. Spontaneous compactification to homogeneous spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous compactification of extra dimensions to compact homogeneous spaces is studied. The methods developed within the framework of coset space dimensional reduction scheme and the most general form of invariant metrics are used to find solutions of spontaneous compactification equations

  8. Screening for spontaneous preterm birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, M.A.; van Dam, A.J.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is the most important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this thesis studies on spontaneous preterm birth are presented. The main objective was to investigate the predictive capacity of mid-trimester cervical length measurement for spontaneous preterm birth in a

  9. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  10. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  11. Spinal segmental dysgenesis CASE SERIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a rare congenital spinal abnormality seen in neonates and infants, in which a segment of the spine and spinal cord fails to develop normally. The condition is segmental in nature, with vertebrae above and below the malformation. It is commonly associated with various abnormalities that ...

  12. Imaging fusion (SPECT/CT) in degenerative disease of spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, P.; Ucros, G.; Bermudez, S.; Ocampo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To determine the utility of Fusion Imaging SPECT/CT in degenerative pathology of the spine and to establish the impact of the use of fusion imaging in spinal pain due to degenerative changes of the spine. Materials and methods: 44 Patients (M=21, F=23) average age of 63 years and with degenerative pathology of spine were sent to Diagnosis Imaging department in FSFB. Bone scintigraphy (SPECT), CT of spine (cervical: 30%, Lumbar 70%) and fusion imaging were performed in all of them. Bone scintigraphy was carried out in a gamma camera Siemens Diacam double head attached to ESOFT computer. The images were acquired in matrix 128 x 128, 20 seg/imag, 64 images. CT of spine was performed same day or two days after in Helycoidal Siemens somatom emotion CT. The fusion was done in a Dicom workstation in sagital, axial and coronal reconstruction. The findings were evaluated by 2 Nuclear Medicine physicians and 2 radiologists of the staff of FSFB in an independent way. Results: Bone scan (SPECT) and CT of 44 patients were evaluated. CT showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 27 (61.3%) patients, uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 7 (15.9%), bulging disc in 9(20.4%), spinal nucleus lesion in 7(15.9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%), spinal foraminal stenosis in 7 (15.9%), spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis in 4 (9%). Bone scan showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 29 (65.9%), uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 4 (9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%) and normal 3 (6.8%). The imaging fusion showed coincidence findings (main lesion in CT with high uptake in scintigraphy) in 34 patients (77.2%) and no coincidence in 10 (22.8%). In 15 (34.09%) patients the fusion provided additional information. The analysis of the findings of CT and SPECT showed similar results in most of the cases and the fusion didn't provide additional information but it allowed to confirm the findings but when the findings didn't match where the CT showed several findings and SPECT only one area with high uptake

  13. Spinal CT scan, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival. (Chiba, N.)

  14. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: Hamman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushank Chadha, BS

    2018-04-01

    significant fat stranding. The image also showed an intraluminal stent traversing the gastric antrum and gastric pylorus with no indication of obstruction. Circumferential mural thickening of the gastric antrum and body were consistent with the patient’s history of gastric adenocarcinoma. The shotty perigastric lymph nodes with associated fat stranding, along the greater curvature of the distal gastric body suggested local regional nodal metastases and possible peritoneal carcinomatosis. The thoracic CT scans showed extensive pneumomediastinum that tracked into the soft tissues of the neck, which given the history of vomiting also raised concern for esophageal perforation. There was still no evidence of mediastinal abscess or fat stranding. Additionally, a left subclavian vein port catheter, which terminates with tip at the cavoatrial junction of the superior vena cava can also be seen on the image. Discussion: Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum, also known as Hamman syndrome, is defined by the uncommon incidence of free air in the mediastinum due to the bursting of alveoli, as a result of extended spells of shouting, coughing, or vomiting.1,2 The condition is diagnosed when a clear cause (aerodigestive rupture, barotrauma, infection secondary to gas-forming organisms3 for pneumomediastinum cannot be clearly identified on diagnostic studies. Macklin and Macklin were the first to note the pathogenesis of the syndrome and explained that the common denominator to spontaneous pneumomediastinum was that increased alveolar pressure leads to alveolar rupture.3 Common clinical findings for spontaneous pneumomediastinum include: chest pain, dyspnea, cough, and emesis.4 The condition is not always readily recognized on initial presentation in part for its rare incidence, estimated to be approximately 1 in every 44,500 ED patients3and also because of the non-specific presenting symptoms. For this patient, there was no clear singular cause, and therefore she received care for spontaneous

  15. Acute Reciprocal Changes Distant from the Site of Spinal Osteotomies Affect Global Postoperative Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Klineberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Three-column vertebral resections are frequently applied to correct sagittal malalignment; their effects on distant unfused levels need to be understood. Methods. 134 consecutive adult PSO patients were included (29 thoracic, 105 lumbar. Radiographic analysis included pre- and postoperative regional curvatures and pelvic parameters, with paired independent t-tests to evaluate changes. Results. A thoracic osteotomy with limited fusion leads to a correction of the kyphosis and to a spontaneous decrease of the unfused lumbar lordosis (−8°. When the fusion was extended, the lumbar lordosis increased (+8°. A lumbar osteotomy with limited fusion leads to a correction of the lumbar lordosis and to a spontaneous increase of the unfused thoracic kyphosis (+13°. When the fusion was extended, the thoracic kyphosis increased by 6°. Conclusion. Data from this study suggest that lumbar and thoracic resection leads to reciprocal changes in unfused segments and requires consideration beyond focal corrections.

  16. Spinal Neurocysticercosis: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaya P, Melina; Roa, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic illness of the central nervous system caused by the larval form of Taenia solium and its considered to be endemic in Latin America. Its diagnosis is based on imaging findings and epidemiological data; although its diagnosis can be made through the detection of specific IgG antibodies, these tests have limited availability in our environment. Central nervous system involvement is generally observed in the brain parenchyma, and less commonly in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space; only infrequently is reported to involve the structures within the spinal canal, in this article we review a case of a patient with spinal cysticercal involvement.

  17. [Congenital spinal malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl-Wagner, B B; Reiser, M F

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered.

  18. Congenital spinal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [de

  19. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  20. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.