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Sample records for spontaneous mutation rates

  1. Spontaneous mutation rates and the rate-doubling dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Borstel, R.C.; Moustaccki, E.; Latarjet, R.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of radiation required to double the frequency of mutations or tumours over the rate of those that occur spontaneously is called the rate-doubling dose. An equivalent concept has been proposed for exposure to other environmental mutagens. The doubling dose concept is predicated on the assumption that all human populations have the same spontaneous mutation rate, and that this spontaneous mutation rate is known. It is now established for prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes that numerous genes control the spontaneous mutation rate, and it is likely that the same is true for human cells as well. Given that the accepted mode of evolution of human populatons is from small, isolated groups of individuals, it seems likely that each population would have a different spontaneous mutation rate. Given that a minimum of twenty genes control or affect the spontaneous mutation rate, and that each of these in turn is susceptible to spontaneously arising or environmentally induced mutations, it seems likely that every individual within a population (except for siblings from identical multiple births) will have a unique spontaneous mutation rate. If each individual in a population does have a different spontaneous mutation rate, the doubling dose concept, in rigorous terms, is fallacious. Therefore, as with other concepts of risk evaluation, the doubling dose concept is subject to criticism. Nevertheless, until we know individual spontaneous mutation rates with precision, and can evaluate risks based on this information, the doubling dose concept has a heuristic value and is needed for practical assessment of risks for defined populations. (author)

  2. Estimating spontaneous mutation rates at enzyme loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Terumi; Yamazaki, Tsuneyuki; Harada, Ko; Kusakabe, Shin-ichi

    1990-04-01

    Spontaneous mutations were accumulated for 1,620,826 allele-generations on chromosomes that originated from six stem second chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster. Only null-electromorph mutations were detected. Band-electromorph mutations were not found. The average rate of null-electromorph mutations was 2.71 x 10 -5 per locus per generation. The 95% confidence interval (μ n ) was 1.97 x 10 -5 n -5 per locus per generation. The upper 95% confidence limit of the band-electromorph mutation rate (μ B ) was 2.28 x 10 -6 per locus per generation. It appeared that null mutations were induced by movable genetic elements and that the mutation rates were different from chromosome to chromosome. (author)

  3. How much do we know about spontaneous human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, J.F. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The much larger number of cell divisions between zygote and sperm than between zygote and egg, the increased age of fathers of children with new dominant mutations, and the greater evolution rate of pseudogenes on the Y chromosome than of those on autosomes all point to a much higher mutation rate in human males than in females, as first pointed out by Haldane in his classical study of X-linked hemophilia. The age of the father is the main factor determining the human spontaneous mutation rate, and probably the total mutation rate. The total mutation rate in Drosophila males of genes causing minor reduction in viability is at least 0.4 per sperm and may be considerably higher. The great mutation load implied by a rate of [approx] 1 per zygote can be greatly ameliorated by quasi-transition selection. Corresponding data are not available for the human population. The evolution rate of pseudogenes in primates suggests some 10[sup 2] new mutations per zygote. Presumably the overwhelming majority of these are neutral, but even the approximate fraction is not known. Statistical evidence in Drosophilia shows that mutations with minor effects cause about the same heterozygous impairment of fitness as those that are lethal when homozygous. The magnitude of heterozygous effect is such that almost all mutant genes are eliminated as heterozygotes before ever becoming homozygous. Although quantitative data in the human species are lacking, anecdotal information supports the conclusion that partial dominance is the rule here as well. This suggests that if the human mutation rate were increased or decreased, the effects would be spread over a period of 50-100 generations. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araten, David J.; Krejci, Ondrej; DiTata, Kimberly; Wunderlich, Mark; Sanders, Katie J.; Zamechek, Leah; Mulloy, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10 −7 per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10 −7 (range ∼3.6–23 × 10 −7 ) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis

  5. Mutation rate and spectrum of spontaneous mutations of deinococcus radiodurans under rifampin stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Xiaoting; Wang Chao; Huang Lifen

    2010-01-01

    An rpoB/Rif r mutation analysis system has been developed from D. radiodurans based on the conservation of rpoB gene. To investigate the concentration effect of rifampin on the spontaneous mutation rate and spectrum of D. radiodurans, the mutation frequencies and rates of D. radiodurans were measured under a wide concentration range of 5∼50 μg /ml of rifampin. It was found that the mutation rate of the bacterium in 5μg /ml of rifampin was significantly higher than those in 25 and 50μg /ml rifampin. Rifampin had concentration-dependent effect not only on the mutation rate but also on the mutation spectrum. The different mutation spectrum under different concentration of rifampin suggested that D. radiodurans might change its anti-mutant strategy under reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress caused by low concentration of rifampin. It is speculated that D. radiodurans focuses on preventing base substitution mutation under low concentration of rifampin as ROS induces mainly oxidative base damage. (authors)

  6. The three faces of riboviral spontaneous mutation: spectrum, mode of genome replication, and mutation rate.

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    Libertad García-Villada

    Full Text Available Riboviruses (RNA viruses without DNA replication intermediates are the most abundant pathogens infecting animals and plants. Only a few riboviral infections can be controlled with antiviral drugs, mainly because of the rapid appearance of resistance mutations. Little reliable information is available concerning i kinds and relative frequencies of mutations (the mutational spectrum, ii mode of genome replication and mutation accumulation, and iii rates of spontaneous mutation. To illuminate these issues, we developed a model in vivo system based on phage Qß infecting its natural host, Escherichia coli. The Qß RT gene encoding the Read-Through protein was used as a mutation reporter. To reduce uncertainties in mutation frequencies due to selection, the experimental Qß populations were established after a single cycle of infection and selection against RT(- mutants during phage growth was ameliorated by plasmid-based RT complementation in trans. The dynamics of Qß genome replication were confirmed to reflect the linear process of iterative copying (the stamping-machine mode. A total of 32 RT mutants were detected among 7,517 Qß isolates. Sequencing analysis of 45 RT mutations revealed a spectrum dominated by 39 transitions, plus 4 transversions and 2 indels. A clear template•primer mismatch bias was observed: A•C>C•A>U•G>G•U> transversion mismatches. The average mutation rate per base replication was ≈9.1×10(-6 for base substitutions and ≈2.3×10(-7 for indels. The estimated mutation rate per genome replication, μ(g, was ≈0.04 (or, per phage generation, ≈0.08, although secondary RT mutations arose during the growth of some RT mutants at a rate about 7-fold higher, signaling the possible impact of transitory bouts of hypermutation. These results are contrasted with those previously reported for other riboviruses to depict the current state of the art in riboviral mutagenesis.

  7. Spontaneous mutation rate in Chinese hamster cell clones differing in UV-sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuilova, E.S.; Bagrova, A.M.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.

    1983-01-01

    The spontaneous rate of appearance of mutations to 6-mercaptopurine (6 MP) resistence in the cells of CHR2 and CHs2 clones dofferent in sensitivity to lethal and matagenous effect of UV-rays, is investigated. Increased UV-sensitivity of CHs2 clone is caused by the violation of postreplicative DNA reparation. It is established that the purity of spontaneously occuring mutations in both clones turns out to be similar, i.e. (1.5-1.8)x10 -5 for the cell pergeneration. It is shown that the effect of postreplicative DNA reparation in the cells of chinese hamster is not connected with the increase of spontaneous mutation ability. The problem on the possible role of reparation in the mechanism of appearance of spontaneous and induced mutations in the cells of Chinese hamster with increased UV-sensitivity is discussed

  8. How variable is a spontaneous mutation rate in cultured mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesen, Jan J.B.; Niericker, Matthieu J.; Dieteren, Nicole; Simons, Jo W.I.M. (MGC-Dept. of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis, State Univ. of Leiden (Netherlands))

    1994-05-01

    The Luria-Delbrueck fluctuation analysis provides a method to estimate mutation rates and is commonly applied in somatic cell genetics and in cancer biology. We developed an assay for a Luria-Delbrueck fluctuation analysis using the mouse lymphoma cell line, GRSL13. As these cells grow in suspension, one can handle hundreds of parallel cultures using multiwell dishes and dispensers. This assay thereby allows not only an accurate determination of the mutation rate per cell generation but also makes it possible to determine at which time after seeding mutations take place. Using approx. 8000 parallel cultures it has been possible to test whether the mutation rate is constant during the assay. It has been found that the spontaneous mutation rate of GRSL13 cells decreases in the course of a fluctuation test from 2x10[sup -6] to about 2x10[sup -7]/cell/generation. It was shown that this increased replication fidelity may partly be caused by cell density: maintenance of cells at high cell density resulted in a spontaneous mutation rate of 0.7[+-]4.0x10[sup -7] compared to 4.0[+-]3.1x10[sup -7] for the standard protocol. In contrast, growing the cells at extremely low cell density resulted in an enhanced mutation rate of 7.7[+-]1.3x10[sup -7]. Thus altogether the mutation rate can vary from 2x10[sup -6] to 0.7x10[sup -7] (approx. 30-fold). These results show that the spontaneous mutation rate is not constant, but highly dependent on experimental conditions. As incomplete expression and metabolic cooperation cannot explain the findings, the data suggest that the fidelity of DNA replication is not fixed but open to variation. Hence, determination of replication infidelity in cultured cells needs rigorous standardization or/and application of controlled variation in culture conditions.

  9. Is there a proportionality between the spontaneous and the X-ray-induction rates of mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.T.; Sankaranarayanan, K.; Sobels, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray induction of recessive visible specific locus mutations at 14 X-chromosome loci was studied in Drosophila melanogaster using the 'Maxy' technique. The X-ray exposure was 3000 R to 5 day-old males and the sampling of germ cells was restricted to mature spermatozoa. Presumptive mutant females recovered in the F 1 generation were tested for transmission, allelism, fertility and viability in males. A total of 128 mutations (115 completes and 13 mosaics including those that were male-viable as well as male-lethal) recovered among 38 898 female progeny were found to be transmitted. On the basis of the above frequency, the average mutation rate can be estimated as 7.8 X 10 -8 /locus/R; for mutations that were viable and fertile in males, the rate is 3.0 X 10 -8 /locus/R(49 mutations among 38 898 progeny). The frequency of mutations at the different loci encompassed a wide range: while no mutations were recovered at the raspberry and carnation loci, at others, the numbers ranged from 1 at echinus to 31 at garnet; in addition, the proportion of mutations that was male-viable was also different, depending on the locus. Schalet's extensive data on spontaneous mutations at 13 (of the 14 loci employed in the present study) loci permit an estimate of the spontaneous rate which is 6.1 X 10 -6 /locus (a total of 39 mutations among 490 000 progeny); for mutations that were viable and fertile in males, the rate is 3.0 X 10 -6 /locus (19 mutations among 490 000 progeny). The mutability of the different loci varied over a 9-fold range. (Auth.)

  10. Spontaneous mutation rate is a plastic trait associated with population density across domains of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krašovec, Rok; Richards, Huw; Gifford, Danna R; Hatcher, Charlie; Faulkner, Katy J; Belavkin, Roman V; Channon, Alastair; Aston, Elizabeth; McBain, Andrew J; Knight, Christopher G

    2017-08-01

    Rates of random, spontaneous mutation can vary plastically, dependent upon the environment. Such plasticity affects evolutionary trajectories and may be adaptive. We recently identified an inverse plastic association between mutation rate and population density at 1 locus in 1 species of bacterium. It is unknown how widespread this association is, whether it varies among organisms, and what molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis or repair are required for this mutation-rate plasticity. Here, we address all 3 questions. We identify a strong negative association between mutation rate and population density across 70 years of published literature, comprising hundreds of mutation rates estimated using phenotypic markers of mutation (fluctuation tests) from all domains of life and viruses. We test this relationship experimentally, determining that there is indeed density-associated mutation-rate plasticity (DAMP) at multiple loci in both eukaryotes and bacteria, with up to 23-fold lower mutation rates at higher population densities. We find that the degree of plasticity varies, even among closely related organisms. Nonetheless, in each domain tested, DAMP requires proteins scavenging the mutagenic oxidised nucleotide 8-oxo-dGTP. This implies that phenotypic markers give a more precise view of mutation rate than previously believed: having accounted for other known factors affecting mutation rate, controlling for population density can reduce variation in mutation-rate estimates by 93%. Widespread DAMP, which we manipulate genetically in disparate organisms, also provides a novel trait to use in the fight against the evolution of antimicrobial resistance. Such a prevalent environmental association and conserved mechanism suggest that mutation has varied plastically with population density since the early origins of life.

  11. Spontaneous mutation rate is a plastic trait associated with population density across domains of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Krašovec

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rates of random, spontaneous mutation can vary plastically, dependent upon the environment. Such plasticity affects evolutionary trajectories and may be adaptive. We recently identified an inverse plastic association between mutation rate and population density at 1 locus in 1 species of bacterium. It is unknown how widespread this association is, whether it varies among organisms, and what molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis or repair are required for this mutation-rate plasticity. Here, we address all 3 questions. We identify a strong negative association between mutation rate and population density across 70 years of published literature, comprising hundreds of mutation rates estimated using phenotypic markers of mutation (fluctuation tests from all domains of life and viruses. We test this relationship experimentally, determining that there is indeed density-associated mutation-rate plasticity (DAMP at multiple loci in both eukaryotes and bacteria, with up to 23-fold lower mutation rates at higher population densities. We find that the degree of plasticity varies, even among closely related organisms. Nonetheless, in each domain tested, DAMP requires proteins scavenging the mutagenic oxidised nucleotide 8-oxo-dGTP. This implies that phenotypic markers give a more precise view of mutation rate than previously believed: having accounted for other known factors affecting mutation rate, controlling for population density can reduce variation in mutation-rate estimates by 93%. Widespread DAMP, which we manipulate genetically in disparate organisms, also provides a novel trait to use in the fight against the evolution of antimicrobial resistance. Such a prevalent environmental association and conserved mechanism suggest that mutation has varied plastically with population density since the early origins of life.

  12. Mitochondrial Mutation Rate, Spectrum and Heteroplasmy in Caenorhabditis elegans Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation Lines of Differing Population Size.

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    Konrad, Anke; Thompson, Owen; Waterston, Robert H; Moerman, Donald G; Keightley, Peter D; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Katju, Vaishali

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of metazoans, given their elevated rates of evolution, have served as pivotal markers for phylogeographic studies and recent phylogenetic events. In order to determine the dynamics of spontaneous mitochondrial mutations in small populations in the absence and presence of selection, we evolved mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Caenorhabditis elegans in parallel over 409 consecutive generations at three varying population sizes of N = 1, 10, and 100 hermaphrodites. The N =1 populations should have a minimal influence of natural selection to provide the spontaneous mutation rate and the expected rate of neutral evolution, whereas larger population sizes should experience increasing intensity of selection. New mutations were identified by Illumina paired-end sequencing of 86 mtDNA genomes across 35 experimental lines and compared with published genomes of natural isolates. The spontaneous mitochondrial mutation rate was estimated at 1.05 × 10-7/site/generation. A strong G/C→A/T mutational bias was observed in both the MA lines and the natural isolates. This suggests that the low G + C content at synonymous sites is the product of mutation bias rather than selection as previously proposed. The mitochondrial effective population size per worm generation was estimated to be 62. Although it was previously concluded that heteroplasmy was rare in C. elegans, the vast majority of mutations in this study were heteroplasmic despite an experimental regime exceeding 400 generations. The frequencies of frameshift and nonsynonymous mutations were negatively correlated with population size, which suggests their deleterious effects on fitness and a potent role for selection in their eradication. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Mutation Rates, Spectra, and Genome-Wide Distribution of Spontaneous Mutations in Mismatch Repair Deficient Yeast

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    Lang, Gregory I.; Parsons, Lance; Gammie, Alison E.

    2013-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a highly conserved DNA repair pathway. In humans, germline mutations in hMSH2 or hMLH1, key components of mismatch repair, have been associated with Lynch syndrome, a leading cause of inherited cancer mortality. Current estimates of the mutation rate and the mutational spectra in mismatch repair defective cells are primarily limited to a small number of individual reporter loci. Here we use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a genome-wide view of the rates, spectra, and distribution of mutation in the absence of mismatch repair. We performed mutation accumulation assays and next generation sequencing on 19 strains, including 16 msh2 missense variants implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. The mutation rate for DNA mismatch repair null strains was approximately 1 mutation per genome per generation, 225-fold greater than the wild-type rate. The mutations were distributed randomly throughout the genome, independent of replication timing. The mutation spectra included insertions/deletions at homopolymeric runs (87.7%) and at larger microsatellites (5.9%), as well as transitions (4.5%) and transversions (1.9%). Additionally, repeat regions with proximal repeats are more likely to be mutated. A bias toward deletions at homopolymers and insertions at (AT)n microsatellites suggests a different mechanism for mismatch generation at these sites. Interestingly, 5% of the single base pair substitutions might represent double-slippage events that occurred at the junction of immediately adjacent repeats, resulting in a shift in the repeat boundary. These data suggest a closer scrutiny of tumor suppressors with homopolymeric runs with proximal repeats as the potential drivers of oncogenesis in mismatch repair defective cells. PMID:23821616

  14. The effects of MSH2 deficiency on spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation rates in the mouse germline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, Karen L-A.; Duyn-Goedhart, Annemarie van; Hickenbotham, Peter; Monger, Karen; Buul, Paul P.W. van; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2007-01-01

    Mutation rates at two expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci were studied in the germline of mismatch repair deficient Msh2 knock-out mice. Spontaneous mutation rates in homozygous Msh2 -/- males were significantly higher than those in isogenic wild-type (Msh2 +/+ ) and heterozygous (Msh2 +/- ) mice. In contrast, the irradiated Msh2 -/- mice did not show any detectable increases in their mutation rate, whereas significant ESTR mutation induction was observed in the irradiated Msh2 +/+ and Msh2 +/- animals. Considering these data and the results of other publications, we propose that the Msh2-deficient mice possess a mutator phenotype in their germline and somatic tissues while the loss of a single Msh2 allele does not affect the stability of heterozygotes

  15. The Rate and Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a Bacterium Naturally Devoid of the Postreplicative Mismatch Repair Pathway

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    Sibel Kucukyildirim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium smegmatis is a bacterium that is naturally devoid of known postreplicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR homologs, mutS and mutL, providing an opportunity to investigate how the mutation rate and spectrum has evolved in the absence of a highly conserved primary repair pathway. Mutation accumulation experiments of M. smegmatis yielded a base-substitution mutation rate of 5.27 × 10−10 per site per generation, or 0.0036 per genome per generation, which is surprisingly similar to the mutation rate in MMR-functional unicellular organisms. Transitions were found more frequently than transversions, with the A:T→G:C transition rate significantly higher than the G:C→A:T transition rate, opposite to what is observed in most studied bacteria. We also found that the transition-mutation rate of M. smegmatis is significantly lower than that of other naturally MMR-devoid or MMR-knockout organisms. Two possible candidates that could be responsible for maintaining high DNA fidelity in this MMR-deficient organism are the ancestral-like DNA polymerase DnaE1, which contains a highly efficient DNA proofreading histidinol phosphatase (PHP domain, and/or the existence of a uracil-DNA glycosylase B (UdgB homolog that might protect the GC-rich M. smegmatis genome against DNA damage arising from oxidation or deamination. Our results suggest that M. smegmatis has a noncanonical Dam (DNA adenine methylase methylation system, with target motifs differing from those previously reported. The mutation features of M. smegmatis provide further evidence that genomes harbor alternative routes for improving replication fidelity, even in the absence of major repair pathways.

  16. The Rate and Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a Bacterium Naturally Devoid of the Postreplicative Mismatch Repair Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukyildirim, Sibel; Long, Hongan; Sung, Way; Miller, Samuel F; Doak, Thomas G; Lynch, Michael

    2016-07-07

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is a bacterium that is naturally devoid of known postreplicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR) homologs, mutS and mutL, providing an opportunity to investigate how the mutation rate and spectrum has evolved in the absence of a highly conserved primary repair pathway. Mutation accumulation experiments of M. smegmatis yielded a base-substitution mutation rate of 5.27 × 10(-10) per site per generation, or 0.0036 per genome per generation, which is surprisingly similar to the mutation rate in MMR-functional unicellular organisms. Transitions were found more frequently than transversions, with the A:T→G:C transition rate significantly higher than the G:C→A:T transition rate, opposite to what is observed in most studied bacteria. We also found that the transition-mutation rate of M. smegmatis is significantly lower than that of other naturally MMR-devoid or MMR-knockout organisms. Two possible candidates that could be responsible for maintaining high DNA fidelity in this MMR-deficient organism are the ancestral-like DNA polymerase DnaE1, which contains a highly efficient DNA proofreading histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain, and/or the existence of a uracil-DNA glycosylase B (UdgB) homolog that might protect the GC-rich M. smegmatis genome against DNA damage arising from oxidation or deamination. Our results suggest that M. smegmatis has a noncanonical Dam (DNA adenine methylase) methylation system, with target motifs differing from those previously reported. The mutation features of M. smegmatis provide further evidence that genomes harbor alternative routes for improving replication fidelity, even in the absence of major repair pathways. Copyright © 2016 Kucukyildirim et al.

  17. The spontaneous chlorophyll mutation frequency in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms; Jensen, Hans Peter

    1986-01-01

    materials and the resulting estimate of the chlorophyll mutant frequency is 1.6 .times. 10-4 in about 1.43 million seedlings. The estimate of the chlorophyll mutation rate per generation is close to 67.3 .times. 10-4 per diploid genome or in the order of 6 .times. 10-7 per locus and haploid genome....

  18. Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells

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    О.А. Ковальова

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

  19. Precise estimates of mutation rate and spectrum in yeast

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    Zhu, Yuan O.; Siegal, Mark L.; Hall, David W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation. The most direct and unbiased method of studying spontaneous mutations is via mutation accumulation (MA) lines. Until recently, MA experiments were limited by the cost of sequencing and thus provided us with small numbers of mutational events and therefore imprecise estimates of rates and patterns of mutation. We used whole-genome sequencing to identify nearly 1,000 spontaneous mutation events accumulated over ∼311,000 generations in 145 diploid MA lines of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MA experiments are usually assumed to have negligible levels of selection, but even mild selection will remove strongly deleterious events. We take advantage of such patterns of selection and show that mutation classes such as indels and aneuploidies (especially monosomies) are proportionately much more likely to contribute mutations of large effect. We also provide conservative estimates of indel, aneuploidy, environment-dependent dominant lethal, and recessive lethal mutation rates. To our knowledge, for the first time in yeast MA data, we identified a sufficiently large number of single-nucleotide mutations to measure context-dependent mutation rates and were able to (i) confirm strong AT bias of mutation in yeast driven by high rate of mutations from C/G to T/A and (ii) detect a higher rate of mutation at C/G nucleotides in two specific contexts consistent with cytosine methylation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24847077

  20. A deletion mutation in GDF9 in sisters with spontaneous DZ twins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montgomery, GW; Zhao, Z.Z.; Marsh, A.J.; Mayne, R.; Treloar, S.A.; James, M.; Martin, N.G.; Boomsma, D.I.; Duffy, DL

    2004-01-01

    A loss of function mutation in growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) in sheep causes increased ovulation rate and infertility in a dosage-sensitive manner. Spontaneous dizygotic (DZ) twinning in the human is under genetic control and women with a history of DZ twinning have an increased incidence

  1. Variation in RNA virus mutation rates across host cells.

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    Marine Combe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10(-6 to 10(-4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10(-5 s/n/r. Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1-21% did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature.

  2. Haldane and the first estimates of the human mutation rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the mouse and dog genomes shows that their selective con- straint is independent of their genic environment. Genome. Res. 14, 852–859. Drake J. W., Charlesworth B., Charlesworth D. and Crow J. F.. 1998 Rates of spontaneous mutation. Genetics 148, 1667–. 1686. Haldane J. B. S. 1927 A mathematical theory of natural ...

  3. EFFECT OF THE ANTIMUTAGENS VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON THE SPONTANEOUS MUTATION SPECTRA OF SALMONELLA TA104

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effect of the Antimutagens Vanillin and Cinnamaldehyde on the / Spontaneous Mutation Spectra of Salmonella TAlO4 Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutagens that, when added to assay plates, reduced the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella typhi...

  4. Studies of human mutation rates: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1988-01-01

    Progress was recorded between January 1 and July 1, 1987 on a project entitled ''Studies of Human Mutation Rates''. Studies underway include methodology for studying mutation at the DNA level, algorithms for automated analyses of two-dimensional polyacrylamide DNA gels, theoretical and applied population genetics, and studies of mutation frequency in A-bomb survivors

  5. A Mutator Phenotype Promoting the Emergence of Spontaneous Oxidative Stress-Resistant Mutants in Campylobacter jejuni.

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    Dai, Lei; Sahin, Orhan; Tang, Yizhi; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-12-15

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of foodborne illnesses worldwide. As a microaerophilic organism, C. jejuni must be able to defend against oxidative stress encountered both in the host and in the environment. How Campylobacter utilizes a mutation-based mechanism for adaptation to oxidative stress is still unknown. Here we present a previously undescribed phenotypic and genetic mechanism that promotes the emergence of oxidative stress-resistant mutants. Specifically, we showed that a naturally occurring mutator phenotype, resulting from a loss of function mutation in the DNA repair enzyme MutY, increased oxidative stress resistance (OX R ) in C. jejuni We further demonstrated that MutY malfunction did not directly contribute to the OX R phenotype but increased the spontaneous mutation rate in the peroxide regulator gene perR , which functions as a repressor for multiple genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Mutations in PerR resulted in loss of its DNA binding function and derepression of PerR-controlled oxidative stress defense genes, thereby conferring an OX R phenotype and facilitating Campylobacter survival under oxidative stress. These findings reveal a new mechanism that promotes the emergence of spontaneous OX R mutants in bacterial organisms. IMPORTANCE Although a mutator phenotype has been shown to promote antibiotic resistance in many bacterial species, little is known about its contribution to the emergence of OX R mutants. This work describes the link between a mutator phenotype and the enhanced emergence of OX R mutants as well as its underlying mechanism involving DNA repair and mutations in PerR. Since DNA repair systems and PerR are well conserved in many bacterial species, especially in Gram positives, the same mechanism may operate in multiple bacterial species. Additionally, we developed a novel method that allows for rapid quantification of spontaneous OX R mutants in a bacterial population. This method represents a technical

  6. Influence of temperature on spontaneous and radiation-induced somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauman, C.H.; Schairer, L.A.; Sparrow, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    Three diploid clones of Tradescantia which are heterozygous or hemizygous for flower color, and which exhibit a 35-fold range in spontaneous mutation frequency, have been compared in their response to increased temperatures. The endpoint studied is the expression of pink and colorless mutations, which arise in stamen hair cells spontaneously and following exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens. Increased temperature (26.5 or 28 0 vs. 16 or 19 0 ) significantly increased the spontaneous pink mutation frequency in stamen hair cells of all three clones. Colorless mutations in clone 0106 were not increased significantly at the higher temperature. The influence of increased temperature on radiation-induced pink mutation frequency was examined in clone 02. Temperatures in the range of 16-28 0 did not influence the magnitude of mutation response after exposure to 100 rad of X-rays; however, the timing of the mutation response was altered both in time of onset and duration. (Auth.)

  7. Teaching the Fluctuation Test "In Silico" by Using Mutate: A Program to Distinguish between the Adaptive and Spontaneous Mutation Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Rodriguez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary…

  8. Mutation Rates of STR Systems in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Christensen, Susanne

    Danish paternity cases in the period 1999 to 2005 were investigated regarding mutation rates in STR loci. STR-typing was performed by the Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Profiler Plus kit in the period 1999 to early 2005, hereafter named the PP9, and by Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Identifier kit...... for the rest of 2005, hereafter named the IDFL. All cases with one to four genetic inconsistencies were manually inspected by two forensic geneticists and statistically analyzed by five statisticians. We found no significant effect of kits and no interaction of kits and STRA loci, but differences in mutation...... rates on different STR loci. In the cases where mutations had occured, we found no interaction between kits, STRA loci or sexes. However, we found differences in the mutation rates between the sexes, meaning that the differences in male and female mutation rates can be assumed constant over STR loci...

  9. Assessing the contribution of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase to spontaneous mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leary Jeffry J

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thymidine kinase (tk mutagenesis assay is often utilized to determine the frequency of herpes simplex virus (HSV replication-mediated mutations. Using this assay, clinical and laboratory HSV-2 isolates were shown to have a 10- to 80-fold higher frequency of spontaneous mutations compared to HSV-1. Methods A panel of HSV-1 and HSV-2, along with polymerase-recombinant viruses expressing type 2 polymerase (Pol within a type 1 genome, were evaluated using the tk and non-HSV DNA mutagenesis assays to measure HSV replication-dependent errors and determine whether the higher mutation frequency of HSV-2 is a distinct property of type 2 polymerases. Results Although HSV-2 have mutation frequencies higher than HSV-1 in the tk assay, these errors are assay-specific. In fact, wild type HSV-1 and the antimutator HSV-1 PAAr5 exhibited a 2–4 fold higher frequency than HSV-2 in the non-HSV DNA mutatagenesis assay. Furthermore, regardless of assay, HSV-1 recombinants expressing HSV-2 Pol had error rates similar to HSV-1, whereas the high mutator virus, HSV-2 6757, consistently showed signficant errors. Additionally, plasmid DNA containing the HSV-2 tk gene, but not type 1 tk or LacZ DNA, was shown to form an anisomorphic DNA stucture. Conclusions This study suggests that the Pol is not solely responsible for the virus-type specific differences in mutation frequency. Accordingly, it is possible that (a mutations may be modulated by other viral polypeptides cooperating with Pol, and (b the localized secondary structure of the viral genome may partially account for the apparently enhanced error frequency of HSV-2.

  10. Recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces and bullous emphysema. A novel mutation causing Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Andrew; Coffey, Niamh; Tomiak, Eva; Voduc, Nha

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHDS) is a rare form of classically cystic lung disease that may present with spontaneous pneumothorax. The associated skin manifestations (fibrofolliculomas) are not always present. This article describes a case of spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to bullous emphysema in an otherwise healthy gentleman caused by a novel mutation in the folliculin (FLCN) gene.

  11. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Saxer

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9, with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9 - 9.5×10(-9, per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11, with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13 to 1.6×10(-10, is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes.

  12. Optimal Mutation Rates on Static Fitness Landscpes

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, M.

    2000-01-01

    We study the evolution of mutation rates for an asexual population living on a static fitness landscape, consisting of multiple peaks forming an evolutionary staircase. The optimal mutation rate is found by maximizing the diffusion towards higher fitness. Surprisingly the optimal genomic copying fidelity is given by Q = e^(-1/ln(n)) (where n is the genome length), independent of all other parameters in the model. Simulations confirm this theoretical result. We also discuss the relation betwee...

  13. Studies of human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    November 1989, marked the beginning of a new three-year cycle of DOE grant support, in connection with which the program underwent a major reorganization. This document presents the progress on the three objectives of the present program which are: to isolate by the technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE), proteins of special interest because of the relative mutability of the corresponding gene, establish the identity of the protein, and, for selected proteins, move to a characterization of the corresponding gene; to develop a more efficient approach, based on 2-D PAGE, for the detection of variants in DNA, with special reference to the identification of mutations in the parents of the individual whose DNA is being examined; and, to continue an effective interface with the genetic studies on the children of atomic bomb survivors in Japan, with reference to both the planning and implementation of new studies at the molecular level.

  14. A Spontaneous Mutation in Contactin 1 in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Davisson, Muriel T.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Tadenev, Abigail L. D.; Motley, William W.; Krishnaswamy, Arjun; Seburn, Kevin L.; Burgess, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the immunoglobulin-superfamily member cell adhesion molecule contactin1 (CNTN1) cause lethal congenital myopathy in human patients and neurodevelopmental phenotypes in knockout mice. Whether the mutant mice provide an accurate model of the human disease is unclear; resolving this will require additional functional tests of the neuromuscular system and examination of Cntn1 mutations on different genetic backgrounds that may influence the phenotype. Toward these e...

  15. Direct estimation of the mitochondrial DNA mutation rate in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Haag-Liautard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA variants are widely used in evolutionary genetics as markers for population history and to estimate divergence times among taxa. Inferences of species history are generally based on phylogenetic comparisons, which assume that molecular evolution is clock-like. Between-species comparisons have also been used to estimate the mutation rate, using sites that are thought to evolve neutrally. We directly estimated the mtDNA mutation rate by scanning the mitochondrial genome of Drosophila melanogaster lines that had undergone approximately 200 generations of spontaneous mutation accumulation (MA. We detected a total of 28 point mutations and eight insertion-deletion (indel mutations, yielding an estimate for the single-nucleotide mutation rate of 6.2 x 10(-8 per site per fly generation. Most mutations were heteroplasmic within a line, and their frequency distribution suggests that the effective number of mitochondrial genomes transmitted per female per generation is about 30. We observed repeated occurrences of some indel mutations, suggesting that indel mutational hotspots are common. Among the point mutations, there is a large excess of G-->A mutations on the major strand (the sense strand for the majority of mitochondrial genes. These mutations tend to occur at nonsynonymous sites of protein-coding genes, and they are expected to be deleterious, so do not become fixed between species. The overall mtDNA mutation rate per base pair per fly generation in Drosophila is estimated to be about 10x higher than the nuclear mutation rate, but the mitochondrial major strand G-->A mutation rate is about 70x higher than the nuclear rate. Silent sites are substantially more strongly biased towards A and T than nonsynonymous sites, consistent with the extreme mutation bias towards A+T. Strand-asymmetric mutation bias, coupled with selection to maintain specific nonsynonymous bases, therefore provides an explanation for the extreme base

  16. Age-related increase in the rate of spontaneou and γ-ray-induced hprt mutations in mouse spleen lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazlev, A.I.; Podlutskii, A.Ya.; Bradbury, R.

    1994-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors continually afflict DNA of cells of organisms. A certain amount of the damage is accumulated causing mutations, increasing the risk of malignacies, impairing cell functions, and upsetting the body's homeostasis. The research reported here studies the rates of spontaneous hprt nmutationsand those induced you ggammairradiation in the splenocytes of mice at various ages. The rate of spontaneous and induced hprt gene mutations increases with aging. In gamma irradiated mice the rate of radiation-induced mutations depended on the absorbed dose and age, with the rate 2.3-3.0 fold higher in 104-110 week old mice than in younger pups. 15 refs., 1 tab

  17. On the Mutation Rate of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Hwang, Charles B. C.

    2005-01-01

    All seven DNA-based microbes for which carefully established mutation rates and mutational spectra were previously available displayed a genomic mutation rate in the neighborhood of 0.003 per chromosome replication. The pathogenic mammalian DNA virus herpes simplex type 1 has an estimated genomic mutation rate compatible with that value.

  18. A spontaneous mutation characterized by chronic proliferative dermatitis in C57BL mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HogenEsch, H.; Gijbels, M. J.; Offerman, E.; van Hooft, J.; van Bekkum, D. W.; Zurcher, C.

    1993-01-01

    Chronic proliferative dermatitis is a new spontaneous mutation in C57BL/Ka mice. Breeding results suggest an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Mutant mice develop skin lesions at the age of 5 to 6 weeks. The lesions occur in the ventral and dorsal skin of the body, whereas ears, footpads, and

  19. Sexual selection on spontaneous mutations strengthens the between-sex genetic correlation for fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Scott L; McGuigan, Katrina; Connallon, Tim; Blows, Mark W; Chenoweth, Stephen F

    2017-10-01

    A proposed benefit to sexual selection is that it promotes purging of deleterious mutations from populations. For this benefit to be realized, sexual selection, which is usually stronger on males, must purge mutations deleterious to both sexes. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that sexual selection on males purges deleterious mutations that affect both male and female fitness. We measured male and female fitness in two panels of spontaneous mutation-accumulation lines of the fly, Drosophila serrata, each established from a common ancestor. One panel of mutation accumulation lines limited both natural and sexual selection (LS lines), whereas the other panel limited natural selection, but allowed sexual selection to operate (SS lines). Although mutation accumulation caused a significant reduction in male and female fitness in both the LS and SS lines, sexual selection had no detectable effect on the extent of the fitness reduction. Similarly, despite evidence of mutational variance for fitness in males and females of both treatments, sexual selection had no significant impact on the amount of mutational genetic variance for fitness. However, sexual selection did reshape the between-sex correlation for fitness: significantly strengthening it in the SS lines. After 25 generations, the between-sex correlation for fitness was positive but considerably less than one in the LS lines, suggesting that, although most mutations had sexually concordant fitness effects, sex-limited, and/or sex-biased mutations contributed substantially to the mutational variance. In the SS lines this correlation was strong and could not be distinguished from unity. Individual-based simulations that mimick the experimental setup reveal two conditions that may drive our results: (1) a modest-to-large fraction of mutations have sex-limited (or highly sex-biased) fitness effects, and (2) the average fitness effect of sex-limited mutations is larger than the average fitness effect of

  20. Verbascoside is not genotoxic in the ST and HB crosses of the Drosophila wing spot test, and its constituent, caffeic acid, decreases the spontaneous mutation rate in the ST cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cruz, Luis Felipe; Ávila-Acevedo, José Guillermo; Ortega-Capitaine, Diego; Ojeda-Duplancher, Jesús Clemente; Perdigón-Moya, Juana Laura; Hernández-Portilla, Luis Barbo; López-Dionicio, Héctor; Durán-Díaz, Angel; Dueñas-García, Irma Elena; Castañeda-Partida, Laura; García-Bores, Ana María; Heres-Pulido, María Eugenia

    2012-03-01

    Verbascoside (VB) is a phenylpropanoid isolated from Buddleja species, some of which originate in Mexico, and was first described in the sixteenth century in the codices of Mexican traditional medicine. VB is present in alcohol extracts and is widely used in the north of Mexico as a sunscreen. VB absorbs UV-A and UV-B radiation and has high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities. VB and its constituent caffeic acid (CA) were screened to determine their genotoxic activity using the Drosophila wing spot test. Third instar larvae (72±4 h) of the standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses, with regulated and high levels of cytochrome P450s (Cyp450s), respectively, were exposed to VB or CA (0, 27, 57, 81, 135, and 173 mM). VB was not genotoxic at any of the concentrations tested in both crosses. The amount of VB residue as determined by HPLC in the adult flies that were fed with VB indicated a low metabolism of this compound, which explains the absence of genotoxicity. CA decreased the spontaneous frequencies of small and total spots and showed putative toxicity in the ST cross. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SPONTANEOUS MUTATIONAL GENOTYPE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION FOR FITNESS-RELATED TRAITS IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Jesús; López-Fanjul, Carlos

    1997-06-01

    Spontaneous mutations were allowed to accumulate for 104-161 generations in 113-176 inbred lines, independently maintained by a single brother-sister mating per generation, all of them derived from a completely homozygous population of Drosophila melanogaster. In each of two to three consecutive generations, all lines were scored for fecundity, egg-to-pupa and pupa-to-adult viabilities, both in the standard laboratory culture medium (ST) and in three harsh media differing from the former by a single factor: higher temperature (HT), higher NaCl concentration (HSC), or a much reduced concentration of nutrients (D). Relative to the standard medium, productivity (fecundity × viability) decreased by 25% (HT), 66% (HSC), and 80% (D). In each medium, mutational variances of those traits and mutational covariances between all possible pairs were calculated from the between-line divergence (codivergence). Mutational correlations between character states in different media were also obtained. Because we used inbred lines, those estimates were mainly due to the accumulation of mildly detrimental mutations, deleterious mutations of large effect being underrepresented. For all traits, mutational heritabilities ranged from 1.41 × 10 -4 to 11.24 × 10 -4 , and did not increase with intensified environmental harshness. Mutational correlations between character states in different media were usually not large (average absolute value 0.31), reflecting a high degree of environmental specificity of the mutations involved. In our results, mutations quasi-neutral in ST conditions and mildly detrimental in more stressful media were not, as a class, important. Mutational correlations between fecundity and egg-to-pupa viability were small and positive in all media. Those involving pupa-to-adult viability were positive in HT, nonsignificant in HSC, and negative in ST and D, showing how the genetic covariance structure of quantitative traits in populations may change in variable

  2. Single genome retrieval of context-dependent variability in mutation rates for human germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2017-01-13

    Accurate knowledge of the core components of substitution rates is of vital importance to understand genome evolution and dynamics. By performing a single-genome and direct analysis of 39,894 retrotransposon remnants, we reveal sequence context-dependent germline nucleotide substitution rates for the human genome. The rates are characterised through rate constants in a time-domain, and are made available through a dedicated program (Trek) and a stand-alone database. Due to the nature of the method design and the imposed stringency criteria, we expect our rate constants to be good estimates for the rates of spontaneous mutations. Benefiting from such data, we study the short-range nucleotide (up to 7-mer) organisation and the germline basal substitution propensity (BSP) profile of the human genome; characterise novel, CpG-independent, substitution prone and resistant motifs; confirm a decreased tendency of moieties with low BSP to undergo somatic mutations in a number of cancer types; and, produce a Trek-based estimate of the overall mutation rate in human. The extended set of rate constants we report may enrich our resources and help advance our understanding of genome dynamics and evolution, with possible implications for the role of spontaneous mutations in the emergence of pathological genotypes and neutral evolution of proteomes.

  3. Sexual selection, germline mutation rate and sperm competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, A P; Cuervo, J J

    2003-04-18

    An important component of sexual selection arises because females obtain viability benefits for their offspring from their mate choice. Females choosing extra-pair fertilization generally favor males with exaggerated secondary sexual characters, and extra-pair paternity increases the variance in male reproductive success. Furthermore, females are assumed to benefit from 'good genes' from extra-pair sires. How additive genetic variance in such viability genes is maintained despite strong directional selection remains an evolutionary enigma. We propose that sexual selection is associated with elevated mutation rates, changing the balance between mutation and selection, thereby increasing variance in fitness and hence the benefits to be obtained from good genes sexual selection. Two hypotheses may account for such elevated mutation: (1) Increased sperm production associated with sperm competition may increase mutation rate. (2) Mutator alleles increase mutation rates that are revealed by the expression of condition-dependent secondary sexual characters used by choosy females during their mate choice. M Petrie has independently developed the idea that mutator alleles may account for the maintenance of genetic variation in viability despite strong directional selection. A comparative study of birds revealed a positive correlation between mutation rate at minisatellite loci and extra-pair paternity, but not between mutation rate and relative testes mass which is a measure of relative sperm production. Minisatellite mutation rates were not related to longevity, suggesting a meiotic rather than a mitotic origin of mutations. We found evidence of increased mutation rate in species with more intense sexual selection. Increased mutation was not associated with increased sperm production, and we suggest that species with intense sexual selection may maintain elevated mutation rates because sexual selection continuously benefits viability alleles expressed in condition

  4. Sexual selection, germline mutation rate and sperm competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Møller AP

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important component of sexual selection arises because females obtain viability benefits for their offspring from their mate choice. Females choosing extra-pair fertilization generally favor males with exaggerated secondary sexual characters, and extra-pair paternity increases the variance in male reproductive success. Furthermore, females are assumed to benefit from 'good genes' from extra-pair sires. How additive genetic variance in such viability genes is maintained despite strong directional selection remains an evolutionary enigma. We propose that sexual selection is associated with elevated mutation rates, changing the balance between mutation and selection, thereby increasing variance in fitness and hence the benefits to be obtained from good genes sexual selection. Two hypotheses may account for such elevated mutation: (1 Increased sperm production associated with sperm competition may increase mutation rate. (2 Mutator alleles increase mutation rates that are revealed by the expression of condition-dependent secondary sexual characters used by choosy females during their mate choice. M Petrie has independently developed the idea that mutator alleles may account for the maintenance of genetic variation in viability despite strong directional selection. Results A comparative study of birds revealed a positive correlation between mutation rate at minisatellite loci and extra-pair paternity, but not between mutation rate and relative testes mass which is a measure of relative sperm production. Minisatellite mutation rates were not related to longevity, suggesting a meiotic rather than a mitotic origin of mutations. Conclusion We found evidence of increased mutation rate in species with more intense sexual selection. Increased mutation was not associated with increased sperm production, and we suggest that species with intense sexual selection may maintain elevated mutation rates because sexual selection continuously

  5. Variable mutation rates as an adaptive strategy in replicator populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Stich

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available For evolving populations of replicators, there is much evidence that the effect of mutations on fitness depends on the degree of adaptation to the selective pressures at play. In optimized populations, most mutations have deleterious effects, such that low mutation rates are favoured. In contrast to this, in populations thriving in changing environments a larger fraction of mutations have beneficial effects, providing the diversity necessary to adapt to new conditions. What is more, non-adapted populations occasionally benefit from an increase in the mutation rate. Therefore, there is no optimal universal value of the mutation rate and species attempt to adjust it to their momentary adaptive needs. In this work we have used stationary populations of RNA molecules evolving in silico to investigate the relationship between the degree of adaptation of an optimized population and the value of the mutation rate promoting maximal adaptation in a short time to a new selective pressure. Our results show that this value can significantly differ from the optimal value at mutation-selection equilibrium, being strongly influenced by the structure of the population when the adaptive process begins. In the short-term, highly optimized populations containing little variability respond better to environmental changes upon an increase of the mutation rate, whereas populations with a lower degree of optimization but higher variability benefit from reducing the mutation rate to adapt rapidly. These findings show a good agreement with the behaviour exhibited by actual organisms that replicate their genomes under broadly different mutation rates.

  6. Disheveled hair and ear (Dhe, a spontaneous mouse Lmna mutation modeling human laminopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Odgren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigations of naturally-occurring mutations in animal models provide important insights and valuable disease models. Lamins A and C, along with lamin B, are type V intermediate filament proteins which constitute the proteinaceous boundary of the nucleus. LMNA mutations in humans cause a wide range of phenotypes, collectively termed laminopathies. To identify the mutation and investigate the phenotype of a spontaneous, semi-dominant mutation that we have named Disheveled hair and ear (Dhe, which causes a sparse coat and small external ears in heterozygotes and lethality in homozygotes by postnatal day 10. FINDINGS: Genetic mapping identified a point mutation in the Lmna gene, causing a single amino acid change, L52R, in the coiled coil rod domain of lamin A and C proteins. Cranial sutures in Dhe/+ mice failed to close. Gene expression for collagen types I and III in sutures was deficient. Skulls were small and disproportionate. Skeletons of Dhe/+ mice were hypomineralized and total body fat was deficient in males. In homozygotes, skin and oral mucosae were dysplastic and ulcerated. Nuclear morphometry of cultured cells revealed gene dose-dependent blebbing and wrinkling. CONCLUSION: Dhe mice should provide a useful new model for investigations of the pathogenesis of laminopathies.

  7. Spontaneous sigh rates during sedentary activity: watching television vs reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, William T; Thompson, William M; McLaughlin, Timothy E; Wheatley, Lisa M; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E

    2005-02-01

    Spontaneous sighs are thought to play an important role in preventing atelectasis and in regulating airway tone. Recent studies have provided a mechanism by which expansion of the lungs could cause relaxation of smooth muscle. To investigate breathing patterns during 2 forms of sedentary behavior: reading and watching television. Breathing patterns were monitored for 1 to 2 hours to document respiratory rates and sigh rates. Each participant was monitored while reading and while watching a movie on videotape. During the first experiment (17 controls), metabolic rates were also measured. In the second experiment (18 controls and 9 patients with mild-to-moderate asthma), only breathing patterns were monitored. There were no significant differences in respiratory or metabolic rates between the 2 activities. In contrast, in the first experiment, 13 of 17 controls had lower sigh rates while watching a videotape than while reading (P < .01). In the second experiment, the sigh rate was significantly lower overall while watching a videotape (mean, 13.7 sighs per hour; range, 1.8-26.0 sighs per hour) than while reading (mean, 19.3 sighs per hour; range, 7.7-30.0 sighs per hour) (P < .001). A similar decrease was observed in patients with asthma (P < .01). Given that many children and adults watch television for 5 or more hours per day, breathing patterns during this time may be relevant to lung function. Our results demonstrate that prolonged periods of watching a videotape are associated with lower sigh rates than while reading. Further research is needed to determine whether these changes are relevant to increased bronchial reactivity.

  8. Human minisatellite mutation rate after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Neumann, R.; Neil, D.L.; Jeffreys, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci has been studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation was found to be twice as high in the exposed families as in the control group. Mutation rate in the Mogilev families was correlated with the level of caesium-137 surface contamination, consistent with radiation induction of germline mutation. (author)

  9. Molecular alterations underlying the spontaneous and γ-ray-induced point mutations at the white locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrova, M.V.; Lapidus, I.L.; Aleksandrov, I.D.; Karpovskij, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The white locus in D.Melanogaster was selected as a target gene for the study of the mutational spectra of spontaneously arising and radiation-induced gene mutations in a whole organism. Analysis of 6 spontaneous and 73 γ-ray-induced white mutations by a combination of cytological, genetic and molecular techniques revealed that on the chromosomal and genetic levels all spontaneous mutations showed themselves to be point mutants. The share of such mutants among all heritable radiation-induced gene mutations is about 40%, whereas the rest ones are due to exchange breaks (8%) as well as multilocus, single-locus or partial-locus (intragenic) deletions (52%). The DNAs from 4 spontaneous and 17 γ-ray-induced point mutants were analysed by Southern blot-hybridization. The three spontaneous and 7 radiation mutants showed an altered DNA sequence at the left (distal) half of the white gene due to insertion or DNA rearrangement. The rest (58%) of the radiation-induced point mutations did not indicate any alternations in this part of the gene as detected by this technique and probes employed. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Identification of a mutation in ADD1/SREBP-1 in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Kostka, Vlastimil; Zídek, Václav; Křen, Vladimír; Forejt, Jiří; Kurtz, T. W.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2001), s. 295-298 ISSN 0938-8990 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/00/1646; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A079; GA ČR(CZ) GV204/98/K015 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : mutations in genes * ADD1/SREBP-1c * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.318, year: 2001

  11. Identification of a mutation in ADD1/SREBP-1 in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Kostka, Vlastimil; Zídek, Václav; Křen, Vladimír; Forejt, Jiří; Kurtz, W. T.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2001), s. 295-298 ISSN 0938-8990 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1646; GA ČR GV204/98/K015; GA MŠk LN00A079 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : mutations in genes * ADD1/SREBP-1c * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.318, year: 2001

  12. Normal mutation rate variants arise in a Mutator (Mut S Escherichia coli population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Carmen Turrientes

    Full Text Available The rate at which mutations are generated is central to the pace of evolution. Although this rate is remarkably similar amongst all cellular organisms, bacterial strains with mutation rates 100 fold greater than the modal rates of their species are commonly isolated from natural sources and emerge in experimental populations. Theoretical studies postulate and empirical studies teort the hypotheses that these "mutator" strains evolved in response to selection for elevated rates of generation of inherited variation that enable bacteria to adapt to novel and/or rapidly changing environments. Less clear are the conditions under which selection will favor reductions in mutation rates. Declines in rates of mutation for established populations of mutator bacteria are not anticipated if such changes are attributed to the costs of augmented rates of generation of deleterious mutations. Here we report experimental evidence of evolution towards reduced mutation rates in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli with an hyper-mutable phenotype due a deletion in a mismatch repair gene, (ΔmutS. The emergence in a ΔmutS background of variants with mutation rates approaching those of the normal rates of strains carrying wild-type MutS was associated with increase in fitness with respect to ancestral strain. We postulate that such an increase in fitness could be attributed to the emergence of mechanisms driving a permanent "aerobic style of life", the negative consequence of this behavior being regulated by the evolution of mechanisms protecting the cell against increased endogenous oxidative radicals involved in DNA damage, and thus reducing mutation rate. Gene expression assays and full sequencing of evolved mutator and normo-mutable variants supports the hypothesis. In conclusion, we postulate that the observed reductions in mutation rate are coincidental to, rather than, the selective force responsible for this evolution.

  13. Haldane and the first estimates of the human mutation rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    3, December 2004. 231. Haldane and the first estimates of the human mutation rate ... in this issue, pages 235–244) was the first to provide a ... population. This provided a straightforward way to esti- mate the mutation rate for deleterious alleles: if the fre- quency of an allele could be measured and if the strength of selection ...

  14. The study of human mutation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode

  15. The study of human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

  16. Effects of meditation practice on spontaneous eyeblink rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Ayla; Slagter, Heleen A; Bachhuber, David R W; Davidson, Richard J; Lutz, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    A rapidly growing body of research suggests that meditation can change brain and cognitive functioning. Yet little is known about the neurochemical mechanisms underlying meditation-related changes in cognition. Here, we investigated the effects of meditation on spontaneous eyeblink rates (sEBR), a noninvasive peripheral correlate of striatal dopamine activity. Previous studies have shown a relationship between sEBR and cognitive functions such as mind wandering, cognitive flexibility, and attention-functions that are also affected by meditation. We therefore expected that long-term meditation practice would alter eyeblink activity. To test this, we recorded baseline sEBR and intereyeblink intervals (IEBI) in long-term meditators (LTM) and meditation-naive participants (MNP). We found that LTM not only blinked less frequently, but also showed a different eyeblink pattern than MNP. This pattern had good to high degree of consistency over three time points. Moreover, we examined the effects of an 8-week course of mindfulness-based stress reduction on sEBR and IEBI, compared to an active control group and a waitlist control group. No effect of short-term meditation practice was found. Finally, we investigated whether different types of meditation differentially alter eyeblink activity by measuring sEBR and IEBI after a full day of two kinds of meditation practices in the LTM. No effect of meditation type was found. Taken together, these findings may suggest either that individual difference in dopaminergic neurotransmission is a self-selection factor for meditation practice, or that long-term, but not short-term meditation practice induces stable changes in baseline striatal dopaminergic functioning. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  17. Mutation accumulation in a selfing population: consequences of different mutation rates between selfers and outcrossers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Nakayama

    Full Text Available Currently existing theories predict that because deleterious mutations accumulate at a higher rate, selfing populations suffer from more intense genetic degradation relative to outcrossing populations. This prediction may not always be true when we consider a potential difference in deleterious mutation rate between selfers and outcrossers. By analyzing the evolutionary stability of selfing and outcrossing in an infinite population, we found that the genome-wide deleterious mutation rate would be lower in selfing than in outcrossing organisms. When this difference in mutation rate was included in simulations, we found that in a small population, mutations accumulated more slowly under selfing rather than outcrossing. This result suggests that under frequent and intense bottlenecks, a selfing population may have a lower risk of genetic extinction than an outcrossing population.

  18. Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome Manifesting as Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Novel Mutation of the Folliculin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Choi, Hang Jun; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Myungshin; Moon, Seok Whan

    2017-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is a rare disease with autosomal dominant inheritance that manifests through skin tumors, pulmonary cystic lesions, and renal tumors. A mutation of FLCN located on chromosome 17p11.2, which encodes a tumor-suppressor protein (folliculin), is responsible for the development of BHDS. We report the case of a patient presenting with spontaneous pneumothorax, in whom a familial genetic study revealed a novel nonsense mutation: p.(Arg379*) in FLCN .

  19. Spontaneous mutations in the flhD operon generate motility heterogeneity in Escherichia coli biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Shelley M; Sayler, Joseph; Scarberry, Nicholas; Schroeder, Meredith; Lynnes, Ty; Prüß, Birgit M

    2016-11-08

    Heterogeneity and niche adaptation in bacterial biofilm involve changes to the genetic makeup of the bacteria and gene expression control. We hypothesized that i) spontaneous mutations in the flhD operon can either increase or decrease motility and that ii) the resulting motility heterogeneity in the biofilm might lead to a long-term increase in biofilm biomass. We allowed the highly motile E. coli K-12 strain MC1000 to form seven- and fourteen-day old biofilm, from which we recovered reduced motility isolates at a substantially greater frequency (5.4 %) than from a similar experiment with planktonic bacteria (0.1 %). Biofilms formed exclusively by MC1000 degraded after 2 weeks. In contrast, biofilms initiated with a 1:1 ratio of MC1000 and its isogenic flhD::kn mutant remained intact at 4 weeks and the two strains remained in equilibrium for at least two weeks. These data imply that an 'optimal' biofilm may contain a mixture of motile and non-motile bacteria. Twenty-eight of the non-motile MC1000 isolates contained an IS1 element in proximity to the translational start of FlhD or within the open reading frames for FlhD or FlhC. Two isolates had an IS2 and one isolate had an IS5 in the open reading frame for FlhD. An additional three isolates contained deletions that included the RNA polymerase binding site, five isolates contained point mutations and small deletions in the open reading frame for FlhC. The locations of all these mutations are consistent with the lack of motility and further downstream within the flhD operon than previously published IS elements that increased motility. We believe that the location of the mutation within the flhD operon determines whether the effect on motility is positive or negative. To test the second part of our hypothesis where motility heterogeneity in a biofilm may lead to a long-term increase in biofilm biomass, we quantified biofilm biomass by MC1000, MC1000 flhD::kn, and mixtures of the two strains at ratios of 1:1, 10

  20. Male mutation rates and the cost of sex for females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Rosemary J.

    1994-05-01

    ALTHOUGH we do not know why sex evolved, the twofold cost of meiosis for females provides a standard against which postulated benefits of sex can be evaluated1. The most reliable benefit is sex's ability to reduce the impact of deleterious mutations2,3. But deleterious mutations may themselves generate a large and previously overlooked female-specific cost of sex. DNA sequence comparisons have confirmed Haldane's suggestion that most mutations arise in the male germ line4,5; recent estimates of α, the ratio of male to female mutation rates, are ten, six and two in humans, primates and rodents, respectively6-8. Consequently, male gametes may give progeny more mutations than the associated sexual recombination eliminates. Here I describe computer simulations showing that the cost of male mutations can easily exceed the benefits of recombination, causing females to produce fitter progeny by parthenogenesis than by mating. The persistence of sexual reproduction by females thus becomes even more problematic.

  1. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Rattray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3 placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts. Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  2. Revising the human mutation rate: implications for understanding human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scally, Aylwyn; Durbin, Richard

    2012-10-01

    It is now possible to make direct measurements of the mutation rate in modern humans using next-generation sequencing. These measurements reveal a value that is approximately half of that previously derived from fossil calibration, and this has implications for our understanding of demographic events in human evolution and other aspects of population genetics. Here, we discuss the implications of a lower-than-expected mutation rate in relation to the timescale of human evolution.

  3. Living on the edge: emergence of spontaneous gac mutations in Pseudomonas protegens during swarming motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunxu; Kidarsa, Teresa A; van de Mortel, Judith E; Loper, Joyce E; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2016-10-01

    Swarming motility is a flagella-driven multicellular behaviour that allows bacteria to colonize new niches and escape competition. Here, we investigated the evolution of specific mutations in the GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system in swarming colonies of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5. Experimental evolution assays showed that repeated rounds of swarming by wildtype Pf-5 drives the accumulation of gacS/gacA spontaneous mutants on the swarming edge. These mutants cannot swarm on their own because they lack production of the biosurfactant orfamide A, but they do co-swarm with orfamide-producing wildtype Pf-5. These co-swarming assays further demonstrated that ΔgacA mutant cells indeed predominate on the edge and that initial ΔgacA:wildtype Pf-5 ratios of at least 2:1 lead to a collapse of the swarming colony. Subsequent whole-genome transcriptome analyses revealed that genes associated with motility, resource acquisition, chemotaxis and efflux were significantly upregulated in ΔgacA mutant on swarming medium. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy showed that ΔgacA mutant cells were longer and more flagellated than wildtype cells, which may explain their predominance on the swarming edge. We postulate that adaptive evolution through point mutations is a common feature of range-expanding microbial populations and that the putative fitness benefits of these mutations during dispersal of bacteria into new territories are frequency-dependent. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Rate of EGFR mutation in patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Shuaib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Contemporary literature on lung adenocarcinoma has demonstrated a genetic difference of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway conferring to ethnicity, such as higher frequency of activated EGFR mutations in East Asian population. This information is missing in some developing countries, and we intend to address this gap in the literature. Methods: We examined the rate of EGFR mutations among Pakistani patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung. Fine-needle aspiration samples were gathered from 73 patients. Polymerase chain reaction was performed on extracted DNA for mutational analysis of EGFR exons 19 and 21. Results: EGFR mutations were discovered in 18 of 73 (24.6% patients. We did not find any significant difference in EGFR mutation rate with regard to patient's age, sex, smoking history, clinical stage of lung cancer, subtypes of adenocarcinoma, and tumor differentiation. Conclusion: Our investigation shows that the EGFR mutation rate in our patient population with adenocarcinoma of the lung was higher than in African-American, Arabian, and white Caucasian patients, and was lower than the East Asian population.

  5. Asymptotics of steady states of a selection–mutation equation for small mutation rate

    KAUST Repository

    Calsina, Àngel

    2013-12-01

    We consider a selection-mutation equation for the density of individuals with respect to a continuous phenotypic evolutionary trait. We assume that the competition term for an individual with a given trait depends on the traits of all the other individuals, therefore giving an infinite-dimensional nonlinearity. Mutations are modelled by means of an integral operator. We prove existence of steady states and show that, when the mutation rate goes to zero, the asymptotic profile of the population is a Cauchy distribution. © Royal Society of Edinburgh 2013.

  6. Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III is responsible for the high level of spontaneous mutations in mutT strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masami; Shimizu, Masatomi; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Grúz, Petr; Fujii, Shingo; Usui, Yukio; Fuchs, Robert P; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2012-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species induce oxidative damage in DNA precursors, i.e. dNTPs, leading to point mutations upon incorporation. Escherichia coli mutT strains, deficient in the activity hydrolysing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP), display more than a 100-fold higher spontaneous mutation frequency over the wild-type strain. 8-oxo-dGTP induces A to C transversions when misincorporated opposite template A. Here, we report that DNA pol III incorporates 8-oxo-dGTP ≈ 20 times more efficiently opposite template A compared with template C. Single, double or triple deletions of pol I, pol II, pol IV or pol V had modest effects on the mutT mutator phenotype. Only the deletion of all four polymerases led to a 70% reduction of the mutator phenotype. While pol III may account for nearly all 8-oxo-dGTP incorporation opposite template A, it only extends ≈ 30% of them, the remaining 70% being extended by the combined action of pol I, pol II, pol IV or pol V. The unique property of pol III, a C-family DNA polymerase present only in eubacteria, to preferentially incorporate 8-oxo-dGTP opposite template A during replication might explain the high spontaneous mutation frequency in E. coli mutT compared with the mammalian counterparts lacking the 8-oxo-dGTP hydrolysing activities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome Manifesting as Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Novel Mutation of the Folliculin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Soo Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS is a rare disease with autosomal dominant inheritance that manifests through skin tumors, pulmonary cystic lesions, and renal tumors. A mutation of FLCN located on chromosome 17p11.2, which encodes a tumor-suppressor protein (folliculin, is responsible for the development of BHDS. We report the case of a patient presenting with spontaneous pneumothorax, in whom a familial genetic study revealed a novel nonsense mutation: p.(Arg379* in FLCN.

  8. Improved adsorption of an Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage ΦEF24C with a spontaneous point mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Some bacterial strains of the multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis can significantly reduce the efficacy of conventional antimicrobial chemotherapy. Thus, the introduction of bacteriophage (phage therapy is expected, where a phage is used as a bioagent to destroy bacteria. E. faecalis phage ΦEF24C is known to be a good candidate for a therapeutic phage against E. faecalis. However, this therapeutic phage still produces nonuniform antimicrobial effects with different bacterial strains of the same species and this might prove detrimental to its therapeutic effects. One solution to this problem is the preparation of mutant phages with higher activity, based on a scientific rationale. This study isolated and analyzed a spontaneous mutant phage, ΦEF24C-P2, which exhibited higher infectivity against various bacterial strains when compared with phage ΦEF24C. First, the improved bactericidal effects of phage ΦEF24C-P2 were attributable to its increased adsorption rate. Moreover, genomic sequence scanning revealed that phage ΦEF24C-P2 had a point mutation in orf31. Proteomic analysis showed that ORF31 (mw, 203 kDa was present in structural components, and immunological analysis using rabbit-derived antibodies showed that it was a component of a long, flexible fine tail fiber extending from the tail end. Finally, phage ΦEF24C-P2 also showed higher bactericidal activity in human blood compared with phage ΦEF24C using the in vitro assay system. In conclusion, the therapeutic effects of phage ΦEF24C-P2 were improved by a point mutation in gene orf31, which encoded a tail fiber component.

  9. Radiation in relation to mutation rate, mutational damage and human ill-health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1976-09-01

    The effect of radiation in increasing the frequency of gene mutations is now reasonably understood. We discuss first how an increase in the mutation rate is reflected in the mutational damage expressed in populations. It is shown that the mutational damage, assessed by the loss of fitness in a population or the number of eventual gene extinctions, is equal to the number of new mutations arising per generation or the mutation rate. In a population of stable size, a dose of 1 rem given to 10 6 people leads to roughly 600 gene extinctions when summed over all ensuing generations if the dose is applied to only one generation; this number of extinctions will occur in each succeeding generation if the dose is given to every generation. However, the concept of genetic extinction, although quantifiable, is of limited value in assessing radiation risks since its impact on human ill-health is very speculative. In particular, no estimate can be made of the total cost of effects which are minor in each individual in which they arise, but which, because they are so minor, persist in the population for many generations. The best current estimate is for 14-140 obvious defects in the first few generations following exposure of 10 6 people to a dose of 1 rem. (auth.)

  10. Prospects for DNA methods to measure human heritable mutation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    A workshop cosponsored by ICPEMC and the US Department of Energy was held in Alta, Utah, December 9-13, 1984 to examine the extent to which DNA-oriented methods might provide new approaches to the important but intractable problem of measuring mutation rates in control and exposed human populations. The workshop identified and analyzed six DNA methods for detection of human heritable mutation, including several created at the meeting, and concluded that none of the methods combine sufficient feasibility and efficiency to be recommended for general application. 8 refs

  11. Modeling aftershock rates using simulations of spontaneous earthquake nucleation on rate and state faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Y.; Lapusta, N.

    2005-12-01

    Large earthquakes are followed by increased seismic activity, usually referred to as aftershock sequences, that decays to the background rate over time. The decay of aftershocks is well-described empirically by Omori's law. Dieterich (1994) proposed that Omori's law could result from perturbing, by static stress steps, a population of nucleation sites governed by laboratory-derived rate and state friction. He used one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider system to represent elastic interactions and made a simplified assumption about frictional behavior during nucleation. The model was further explored in a number of studies (i.e., Gomberg et al., 2000) and used to interpret observations (i.e., Toda et al., 1998). In this study, we explore the consequences of Dieterich's approach using models of faults embedded in elastic continuum, where the nucleation process can be more complicated than assumed in Dieterich's model. Our approach is different from previous studies of aftershock rates with rate and state friction in that here, nucleation processes are simulated as a part of spontaneously occurring earthquake sequences in continuum fault models. We use two 2D models of a vertical strike-slip fault, the depth-variable model (Rice, 1993; Lapusta at el., 2000) and the crustal-plane model (Myers et al., 1996). We find that nucleation processes in continuum models and the resulting aftershock rates are well-described by the model of Dieterich (1994) when Dieterich's assumption that the state variable of the rate and state friction law is significantly behind its steady-state value holds during the entire nucleation process. On the contrary, aftershock rates in models where the state variable assumption is violated for a significant portion of the nucleation process exhibit behavior different from Dieterich's model. The state variable assumption is significantly violated, and hence the aftershock rates are affected, when stress heterogeneities are present within the nucleation

  12. Influence of ciprofloxacin and vancomycin on mutation rate and transposition of IS256 in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Michael; Reuter, Tina; Jansen, Andrea; Szekat, Christiane; Bierbaum, Gabriele

    2011-03-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the development of intermediate resistance to vancomycin is due to an accumulation of mutations. To elucidate the mechanisms involved here, a standard laboratory strain (S. aureus HG001) and a clinical MRSA mutator strain (S. aureus SA1450/94, which is characterized by a spontaneous insertion of IS256 into the gene of the mismatch repair enzyme MutS) were incubated at subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin and vancomycin. Ciprofloxacin increased the mutation rates of both strains, but this effect was inhibited when the SOS response was blocked by the presence of a non-cleavable variant of the LexA repressor. In the presence of vancomycin, the mutation rate was slightly elevated in the mutator strain, and this increase also depended on the strain's ability to induce the SOS response. Furthermore, treatment with subinhibitory concentrations of both antibiotics resulted in an activation of transposition frequency of the insertion element IS256 in S. aureus HG001. Transposition was dependent on the presence of a functional transposase, and the activation of transposition depended on the presence of the functional phosphatase RsbU, which activates SigB transcription activity. An in silico analysis indicated a putative antisense sigma B promoter sequence within the transposase gene. Scrambling of this promoter resulted in an about 20-fold activation of transposition activity of IS256. These data indicate that sigma B is involved in the regulation of IS256 activity by generation of an antisense RNA. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of baroreflex sensitivity from spontaneous oscillations of blood pressure and heart rate: proven clinical value?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinna, Gian Domenico; Maestri, Roberto; La Rovere, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The baroreceptor-heart rate reflex (baroreflex sensitivity, BRS) is a key mechanism contributing to the neural regulation of the cardiovascular system. Several methods have been proposed so far to assess BRS by analyzing the spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. These methods are inherently simple, non-invasive and low-cost. This study is an attempt to address the question of whether spontaneous baroreflex methods have proven to be of value in the clinical setting. In the first part of this article, we critically review most representative clinical studies using spontaneous BRS techniques either for risk stratification or treatment evaluation, these being major issues in the clinical management of the patients. In the second part, we address two important aspects of spontaneous BRS measurements: measurability and reliability. Estimation of BRS in the studies selected for the review was performed according to the sequence, transfer function, alpha-index and phase-rectified signal averaging method. Arterial blood pressure was recorded non-invasively during supine, short-term (<30 min) laboratory recordings. The conclusion from this review is that spontaneous BRS techniques have been shown to be of great value in clinical practice but further work is needed to confirm the validity of previous findings and to widen the field of clinical applications. Measurability and reliability can be a major issue in the measurement of spontaneous BRS, particularly in some patient populations like post-myocardial infarction and heart failure patents. Main causes of poor measurability are: non-sinus rhythm, a high rate of ectopic beats and the need for recorded time series of RR interval and arterial blood pressure to satisfy the constraints of the different BRS estimation algorithms. As for reliability, within-subject variability is rather high in the measurements of spontaneous BRS and, therefore, should be carefully taken into account

  14. Fitness decline under osmotic stress in Caenorhabditis elegans populations subjected to spontaneous mutation accumulation at varying population sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katju, Vaishali; Packard, Lucille B; Keightley, Peter D

    2018-04-01

    The consequences of mutations for population fitness depends on their individual selection coefficients and the effective population size. An earlier study of Caenorhabditis elegans spontaneous mutation accumulation lines evolved for 409 generations at three population sizes found that N e   = 1 populations declined significantly in fitness whereas the fitness of larger populations (N e   = 5, 50) was indistinguishable from the ancestral control under benign conditions. To test if larger MA populations harbor a load of cryptic deleterious mutations that are obscured under benign laboratory conditions, we measured fitness under osmotic stress via exposure to hypersaline conditions. The fitness of N e   = 1 lines exhibited a further decline under osmotic stress compared to benign conditions. However, the fitness of larger populations remained indistinguishable from that of the ancestral control. The average effects of deleterious mutations in N e   = 1 lines were estimated to be 22% for productivity and 14% for survivorship, exceeding values previously detected under benign conditions. Our results suggest that fitness decline is due to large effect mutations that are rapidly removed via selection even in small populations, with implications for conservation practices. Genetic stochasticity may not be as potent and immediate a threat to the persistence of small populations as other demographic and environmental stochastic factors. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution © 2018 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Sectoring patterns of spontaneous and radiation-induced somatic pink mutations in the stamen hairs of a temperature-sensitive mutable clone of Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Sadao

    1994-01-01

    The sectoring patterns of somatic pink mutations were analyzed in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone KU 20, a temperature-sensitive mutable clone. This clone is a blue/pink heterozygote, and its spontaneous pink mutation frequency increases up to about 40-fold at lower temperature. In order to elucidate the mutable nature of this clone, the sectoring patterns were analyzed on 1,123 spontaneous pink mutant events and on 2,725 pink mutant events induced by 0.606 and 1.28 Gy of gamma rays. The average number of pink cells per terminal pink mutant event (a row of pink cells including the terminal cell of a hair) occurred spontaneously was 7.40, whereas the number for the terminal pink mutant event induced by gamma rays varied from 3.33 to 9.88 depending on the post-irradiation days, i.e., increased gradually as the number of days proceeded, then was stabilized at the level of spontaneous mutations after about three weeks. The average number of pink cells per interstitial pink mutant event (a single pink cell or two or more contiguous pink cells between blue cells was 1.97 for spontaneous mutations, while the number for induced mutations varied also depending on the post-irradiation days. The ratio of the number of interstitial pink mutant events against that of terminal pink mutant events was 1.35 for spontaneous mutations, but the ratio for induced mutations varied also with post-irradiation period reaching 2.89 at the peak, indicating that more interstitial pink mutant events are induced by gamma rays than terminal pink mutant events, as compared with spontaneous mutations. The frequency of multiple pink mutant sectors in a hair was more than four times higher than that expected from independent occurrences in case of spontaneous mutations, while the frequency was close to the expectation in induced mutations. suggesting that somatic recombination is involved as one of the major causes of spontaneous mutations in this mutable clone. (author)

  16. The distribution of and complementation relationships between spontaneous X-linked recessive lethal mutations recovered from crossing long-term laboratory stocks of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalet, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster males from a wild-type laboratory stock, were mated with virgin females of the M-6 stock, and 149 spontaneous independent non-mosaically transmitted, as well as 8 incidentally detected, mosaically transmitted, X-linked recessive lethal mutations were recovered from 95 704 F 2 cultures. 152 mutations were mapped over the entire length of the X-chromosome by complementation and/or crossover tests. Although there were far too few spontaneous mutations to make a meaningful comparison of relative mutability on a locus-by-locus basis, those loci displaying a relatively higher X-ray mutability, when taken as a group, tend to display a relatively higher spontaneous mutability, and those loci displaying a relatively lower X-ray mutability, when taken as a group, tend to display a relatively lower spontaneous mutability. (Auth.)

  17. Repeated Loss of Consciousness in a Young Woman: A Suspicious SMAD3 Mutation Underlying Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bermúdez, Míriam; Moustafa, Abdel-Hakim; Barrós-Membrilla, Antonio; Tizón-Marcos, Helena

    2017-02-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequent cause of acute coronary syndrome and is often underdiagnosed. Intramural hematoma is the most frequent angiographic presentation and is a challenging diagnosis that may require intravascular imaging techniques to confirm it and guide treatment. It affects mostly young women without coronary risk factors and is usually associated with fibromuscular dysplasia. SCAD has an underlying disease in 80% of patients. A SMAD3 mutation has been linked to aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome and has been identified as a cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. The first reported case, to our knowledge, of a SMAD3 mutation underlying SCAD is described here. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonstressed antepartum heart-rate monitoring - implications of decelerations after spontaneous contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G. H. A.; REDMAN, CWG; HUISJES, HJ; TURNBULL, AC

    1980-01-01

    Fetal outcome in 98 patients with spontaneous antepartum late decelerations was studied by combining the data of two obstetric departments. Heart rate variability was used to classify the different patterns into two categories: terminal and decelerative. In 14 of the 47 pregnancies in which a

  19. A case of primary familial congenital polycythemia with a novel EPOR mutation: possible spontaneous remission/alleviation by menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Naohisa; Kaneda, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Naoki; Manabe, Hiromi; Okajima, Kazuki; Sakurai, Yukari; Yamamoto, Masayo; Sarashina, Takeo; Ikuta, Katsuya; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2018-04-05

    A 10-year-old girl with persistent erythrocytosis and ruddy complexion was diagnosed with primary familial congenital polycythemia (PFCP) involving a novel heterozygous mutation of c.1220C>A, p.Ser407X in exon 8 of the erythropoietin receptor gene (EPOR). This mutation causes truncation of EPOR, resulting in loss of the cytoplasmic region, which is necessary for negative regulation of erythropoietin signal transmission. Genetic analysis showed that the mutated EPOR was inherited from her mother. Her mother had polycythemia and had undergone venesection several times when she was young, but her polycythemic state appeared to have resolved. Venesection was not needed to maintain Hct levels within normal range. For the case reported here, venesection was also conducted to maintain the blood Hct level below 50%. We observed that after the patient experienced menarche, the volume and frequency of venesection needed to maintain Hct level < 50% were clearly reduced compared with those before menarche. These findings suggest that, in female patients with this type of EPOR mutation, menstruation might reduce blood volume in a manner similar to venesection. Spontaneous remission of erythrocytosis may thus occur after the start of menstrual bleeding.

  20. DNA spontaneous mutation and its role in the evolution of GC-content: assessing the impact of the genetic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-03-28

    The structure of DNA is not constantly at its equilibrium point but evolves with time. It is generally accepted that evolution induces a decrease of the guanine-cytosine (GC) content and a concomitant increase of the adenine-thymine (AT) ratio through a biased GC → AT mutation process. Unfortunately, the mechanism behind this natural alteration of the stored genetic information is not fully understood. Here, we use a hybrid QM:QM' approach to assess the link between one of the sources of the spontaneous mutation, the so-called G*C* rare tautomers that arise from a double proton exchange between the bases, and the evolution of the GC-content. Our simulations indicate that the G*C* mutation is mainly accumulated in GC-rich regions rather than being randomly spread, and consequently the GC → AT error tends to locate in coding fragments. That specific preference is indirectly induced by the base pairs containing the mutated point, as they tune the structure of the first hydration-shell that solvates the reactive base pair undergoing tautomerisation. The reorganisation of the explicit water molecules eventually modifies the energy barriers as well as the stability of the genetic error during the process.

  1. Contributions of intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection to levels of de novo HRAS mutations in the paternal germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; McVean, Gilean; Taylor, Indira B; McGowan, Simon J; Maher, Geoffrey J; Iqbal, Zamin; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Turner, Isaac; Burkitt Wright, Emma M M; Shorto, Jennifer; Itani, Aysha; Turner, Karen; Gregory, Lorna; Buck, David; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Kerr, Bronwyn; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Goriely, Anne

    2013-12-10

    The RAS proto-oncogene Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (HRAS) encodes a small GTPase that transduces signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effectors to control cellular behavior. Although somatic HRAS mutations have been described in many cancers, germline mutations cause Costello syndrome (CS), a congenital disorder associated with predisposition to malignancy. Based on the epidemiology of CS and the occurrence of HRAS mutations in spermatocytic seminoma, we proposed that activating HRAS mutations become enriched in sperm through a process akin to tumorigenesis, termed selfish spermatogonial selection. To test this hypothesis, we quantified the levels, in blood and sperm samples, of HRAS mutations at the p.G12 codon and compared the results to changes at the p.A11 codon, at which activating mutations do not occur. The data strongly support the role of selection in determining HRAS mutation levels in sperm, and hence the occurrence of CS, but we also found differences from the mutation pattern in tumorigenesis. First, the relative prevalence of mutations in sperm correlates weakly with their in vitro activating properties and occurrence in cancers. Second, specific tandem base substitutions (predominantly GC>TT/AA) occur in sperm but not in cancers; genomewide analysis showed that this same mutation is also overrepresented in constitutional pathogenic and polymorphic variants, suggesting a heightened vulnerability to these mutations in the germline. We developed a statistical model to show how both intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection contribute to the mutational burden borne by the paternal germline.

  2. Transfer of spontaneously hatching or hatched blastocyst yields better pregnancy rates than expanded blastocyst transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natachandra M Chimote

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Blastocyst stage embryo transfer (ET has become routine practice in recent years. However, probably due to limitations of assisted hatching techniques, expanded blastocyst transfer (EBT is still the preferred mode. Inexplicably, not much consideration has been given to spontaneously hatching/hatched blastocyst transfer (SHBT. Aim: This study aimed to investigate developmental potential of spontaneously hatching/hatched blastocyst against EBT in in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles. Settings and Design: Prospective study of 146 women undergoing their first IVF- ET cycle. SUBJECTS AND Methods: On the basis of blastocyst status, women were classified into SHBT and EBT groups. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles were excluded to remove male factor bias. Implantation rate (IR, clinical pregnancy rate, and live birth rate were the main outcome measures. Statistical Analysis: Graph-pad Prism 5 statistical package. Results: SHBT group showed significantly higher blastocyst formation rate (53.3 ± 17.5 vs. 43.1 ± 14.5%, P = 0.0098, top-quality blastocysts (71.8 vs. 53.7%, P = 0.0436, IR (43.6 vs. 27.9%, P = 0.0408, pregnancy rate (59.4 vs. 45.1%, P = 0.0173, and live birth rate (36.8 vs. 22.8%, P = 0.003 compared to EBT group. Multiple pregnancy rates remained comparable between the two groups. Implantation correlated strongly with top-quality blastocysts (Pearson, r = 0.4441 in SHBT group, while the correlation was nonsignificant in EBT group. Conclusion: Extending culture of expanded blastocysts by a few hours to allow transfer of spontaneously hatching/hatched blastocysts gives higher implantation and pregnancy rates with no added risk of multiple gestations. Spontaneously hatching/hatched blastocysts have a better potential to implant and develop into a positive pregnancy.

  3. A reeler mutant mouse with a new, spontaneous mutation in the reelin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tom E; Finsen, Bente; Goffinet, Andre M

    2002-01-01

    In one of our mouse colonies a reeler-like phenotype appeared spontaneously. The brain histology was identical to the known reeler phenotype. Northern and Western blot analysis and a complementation test showed that the defect is located to the reelin gene. Southern blot and PCR analysis together...

  4. Endo- and exocytic rate constants for spontaneous and protein kinase C-activated T cell receptor cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, Charlotte; Møller Sørensen, Tine; Siersma, Volkert

    2002-01-01

    To determine the rate constants of spontaneous and activated TCR cycling, we examined TCR endo- and exocytosis in the human T cell line Jurkat by three different methods. Using a simple kinetic model for TCR cycling and non-linear regression analyses, we found that the spontaneous endocytic rate...

  5. Effect of low dose gamma radiation on stamen-hairs of different clones of Tradescantia presenting variability in the frequency of spontaneous mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the frequency of spontaneous somatic mutations were studied for three different clones of Tradescantia heterozygotes for flower and stamen-hair color keeping them under controlled or natural conditions in order to verify the effect of different environmental conditions on the different genotypes. The effect of inflorescence age on the variation of spontaneous mutations was studied choosing young and old inflorescences of a same plant. Low dose irradiation experiments were carried out with those clones to elucidate the radiation effects on the clones presenting changes in the frequency of spontaneous mutations. The chronic-and acute irradiation effects of low dose irradiation of the stamen-hair of Tradescantia were also studied. Results are discussed. (M.A.) [pt

  6. The ducky2J mutation in Cacna2d2 results in reduced spontaneous Purkinje cell activity and altered gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Roberta; Page, Karen M.; Koch, Dietlind; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Foucault, Isabelle; Davies, Anthony; Wilkinson, Tonia; Rees, Michele; Edwards, Frances A.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2006-01-01

    The mouse mutant ducky and its allele ducky2J represent a model for absence epilepsy characterized by spike-wave seizures, and cerebellar ataxia. These mice have mutations in Cacna2d2, which encodes the α2δ-2 calcium channel subunit. Of relevance to the ataxic phenotype, α2δ-2 mRNA is strongly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). The Cacna2d2du2J mutation results in a two base-pair deletion in the coding region and a complete loss of α2δ-2 protein. Here we show that du2J/du2J mice have a 30% reduction in somatic calcium current, and a marked fall in the spontaneous PC firing rate at 22°C, accompanied by a decrease in firing regularity, which is not affected by blocking synaptic input to PCs. At 34°C du2J/du2J PCs show no spontaneous intrinsic activity. Du2J/du2J mice also have alterations in the cerebellar expression of several genes related to PC function. At P21 there is an elevation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and a reduction in tenascin-C gene expression. Although du2J/+ mice have a marked reduction in α2δ-2 protein, they show no fall in PC somatic calcium currents or increase in cerebellar tryrosine hydroxylase gene expression. However, du2J/+ PCs do exhibit a significant reduction in firing rate, correlating with the reduction in α2δ-2. A hypothesis for future study is that effects on gene expression occur as a result of a reduction in somatic calcium currents, whereas effects on PC firing occur as a long-term result of loss of α2δ-2 and/or a reduction in calcium currents and calcium-dependent processes in regions other than the soma. PMID:17135419

  7. The ducky(2J) mutation in Cacna2d2 results in reduced spontaneous Purkinje cell activity and altered gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Roberta; Page, Karen M; Koch, Dietlind; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Foucault, Isabelle; Davies, Anthony; Wilkinson, Tonia; Rees, Michele; Edwards, Frances A; Dolphin, Annette C

    2006-11-29

    The mouse mutant ducky and its allele ducky(2J) represent a model for absence epilepsy characterized by spike-wave seizures and cerebellar ataxia. These mice have mutations in Cacna2d2, which encodes the alpha2delta-2 calcium channel subunit. Of relevance to the ataxic phenotype, alpha2delta-2 mRNA is strongly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). The Cacna2d2(du2J) mutation results in a 2 bp deletion in the coding region and a complete loss of alpha2delta-2 protein. Here we show that du(2J)/du(2J) mice have a 30% reduction in somatic calcium current and a marked fall in the spontaneous PC firing rate at 22 degrees C, accompanied by a decrease in firing regularity, which is not affected by blocking synaptic input to PCs. At 34 degrees C, du(2J)/du(2J) PCs show no spontaneous intrinsic activity. Du(2J)/du(2J) mice also have alterations in the cerebellar expression of several genes related to PC function. At postnatal day 21, there is an elevation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and a reduction in tenascin-C gene expression. Although du(2J)/+ mice have a marked reduction in alpha2delta-2 protein, they show no fall in PC somatic calcium currents or increase in cerebellar tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression. However, du(2J)/+ PCs do exhibit a significant reduction in firing rate, correlating with the reduction in alpha2delta-2. A hypothesis for future study is that effects on gene expression occur as a result of a reduction in somatic calcium currents, whereas effects on PC firing occur as a long-term result of loss of alpha2delta-2 and/or a reduction in calcium currents and calcium-dependent processes in regions other than the soma.

  8. Effects of Mutagen-Sensitive Mus Mutations on Spontaneous Mitotic Recombination in Aspergillus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, P.; Kafer, E.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl methane-sulfonate (MMS)-sensitive, radiation-induced mutants of Aspergillus were shown to define nine new DNA repair genes, musK to musS. To test mus mutations for effects on mitotic recombination, intergenic crossing over was assayed between color markers and their centromeres, and intragenic recombination between two distinguishable adE alleles. Of eight mutants analyzed, four showed significant deviations from mus(+) controls in both tests. Two mutations, musK and musL, reduced reco...

  9. MutS and MutL are dispensable for maintenance of the genomic mutation rate in the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney R Busch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 encodes for homologs of MutS and MutL, which are key proteins of a DNA mismatch repair pathway conserved in Bacteria and Eukarya. Mismatch repair is essential for retaining the fidelity of genetic information and defects in this pathway result in the deleterious accumulation of mutations and in hereditary diseases in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We calculated the spontaneous genomic mutation rate of H. salinarum NRC-1 using fluctuation tests targeting genes of the uracil monophosphate biosynthesis pathway. We found that H. salinarum NRC-1 has a low incidence of mutation suggesting the presence of active mechanisms to control spontaneous mutations during replication. The spectrum of mutational changes found in H. salinarum NRC-1, and in other archaea, appears to be unique to this domain of life and might be a consequence of their adaption to extreme environmental conditions. In-frame targeted gene deletions of H. salinarum NRC-1 mismatch repair genes and phenotypic characterization of the mutants demonstrated that the mutS and mutL genes are not required for maintenance of the observed mutation rate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We established that H. salinarum NRC-1 mutS and mutL genes are redundant to an alternative system that limits spontaneous mutation in this organism. This finding leads to the puzzling question of what mechanism is responsible for maintenance of the low genomic mutation rates observed in the Archaea, which for the most part do not have MutS and MutL homologs.

  10. Living on the edge: emergence of spontaneous gac mutations in Pseudomonas protegens during swarming motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, C.; Kidarsa, Teresa; van de Mortel, J.; Loper, J.E.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Swarming motility is a flagella-driven multicellular behavior that allows bacteria to colonize new niches and escape competition. Here, we investigated the evolution of specific mutations in the GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system in swarming colonies of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

  11. Mutation rates at 42 Y chromosomal short tandem repeats in Chinese Han population in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiwei; Ren, Wenyan; Hao, Honglei; Nan, Hailun; He, Xin; Liu, Qiuling; Lu, Dejian

    2018-01-31

    Mutation analysis of 42 Y chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) loci was performed using a sample of 1160 father-son pairs from the Chinese Han population in Eastern China. The results showed that the average mutation rate across the 42 Y-STR loci was 0.0041 (95% CI 0.0036-0.0047) per locus per generation. The locus-specific mutation rates varied from 0.000 to 0.0190. No mutation was found at DYS388, DYS437, DYS448, DYS531, and GATA_H4. DYS627, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS449 could be classified as rapidly mutating Y-STRs, with mutation rates higher than 1.0 × 10 -2 . DYS458, DYS630, and DYS518 were moderately mutating Y-STRs, with mutation rates ranging from 8 × 10 -3 to 1 × 10 -2 . Although the characteristics of the Y-STR mutations were consistent with those in previous studies, mutation rate differences between our data and previous published data were found at some rapidly mutating Y-STRs. The single-copy loci located on the short arm of the Y chromosome (Yp) showed relatively higher mutation rates more frequently than the multi-copy loci. These results will not only extend the data for Y-STR mutations but also be important for kinship analysis, paternal lineage identification, and family relationship reconstruction in forensic Y-STR analysis.

  12. X-ray-induced bystander response reduce spontaneous mutations in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Matsumoto, Hideki; Usami, Noriko; Tomiya, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    The potential for carcinogenic risks is increased by radiation-induced bystander responses; these responses are the biological effects in unirradiated cells that receive signals from the neighboring irradiated cells. Bystander responses have attracted attention in modern radiobiology because they are characterized by non-linear responses to low-dose radiation. We used a synchrotron X-ray microbeam irradiation system developed at the Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, and showed that nitric oxide (NO)-mediated bystander cell death increased biphasically in a dose-dependent manner. Here, we irradiated five cell nuclei using 10 × 10 µm 2 5.35 keV X-ray beams and then measured the mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanosine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in bystander cells. The mutation frequency with the null radiation dose was 2.6 × 10 -5 (background level), and the frequency decreased to 5.3 × 10 -6 with a dose of approximately 1 Gy (absorbed dose in the nucleus of irradiated cells). At high doses, the mutation frequency returned to the background level. A similar biphasic dose-response effect was observed for bystander cell death. Furthermore, we found that incubation with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO), a specific scavenger of NO, suppressed not only the biphasic increase in bystander cell death but also the biphasic reduction in mutation frequency of bystander cells. These results indicate that the increase in bystander cell death involves mechanisms that suppress mutagenesis. This study has thus shown that radiation-induced bystander responses could affect processes that protect the cell against naturally occurring alterations such as mutations. (author)

  13. Low pesticide rates may hasten the evolution of resistance by increasing mutation frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    At very low pesticide rates, a certain low proportion of pests may receive a sublethal dose, are highly stressed by the pesticide and yet survive. Stress is a general enhancer of mutation rates. Thus, the survivors are likely to have more than normal mutations, which might include mutations leading to pesticide resistance, both for multifactorial (polygenic, gene amplification, sequential allelic mutations) and for major gene resistance. Management strategies should consider how to eliminate the subpopulation of pests with the high mutation rates, but the best strategy is probably to avoid too low application rates of pesticides from the outset. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Studies of human mutation rates, December 1, 1985--November 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    This program seeks to quantify native human mutation rates and to determine how man's activities may affect these rates. The program is divided into six tasks, i.e. The American Indian mutation rate, monitoring populations for frequency of mutation by electrophoresis of blood proteins, application of molecular biological approaches to the detection and study of mutational events in human populations, development of two-dimensional electrophoresis for identification of mutant proteins, co-operative program with the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, and statistical problems associated with the estimation of mutation rates. Progress of each of the above tasks is related in detail. (DT)

  15. nm1054: a spontaneous, recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mutation in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Ohgami, Robert S.; Campagna, Dean R.; Antiochos, Brendan; Wood, Emily B.; Sharp, John J.; Barker, Jane E.; Fleming, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    Hypochromic, microcytic anemias are typically the result of inadequate hemoglobin production because of globin defects or iron deficiency. Here, we describe the phenotypic characteristics and pathogenesis of a new recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mouse mutant, nm1054. Although the mutation nm1054 is pleiotropic, also resulting in sparse hair, male infertility, failure to thrive, and hydrocephaly, the anemia is the focus of this study. Hematologic analysis reveals a moderately severe,...

  16. Effects of mutagen-sensitive mus mutations on spontaneous mitotic recombination in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P; Kafer, E

    1992-04-01

    Methyl methane-sulfonate (MMS)-sensitive, radiation-induced mutants of Aspergillus were shown to define nine new DNA repair genes, musK to musS. To test mus mutations for effects on mitotic recombination, intergenic crossing over was assayed between color markers and their centromeres, and intragenic recombination between two distinguishable adE alleles. Of eight mutants analyzed, four showed significant deviations from mus+ controls in both tests. Two mutations, musK and musL, reduced recombination, while musN and musQ caused increases. In contrast, musO diploids produced significantly higher levels only for intragenic recombination. Effects were relatively small, but averages between hypo- and hyperrec mus differed 15-20-fold. In musL diploids, most of the rare color segregants resulted from mitotic malsegregation rather than intergenic crossing over. This indicates that the musL gene product is required for recombination and that DNA lesions lead to chromosome loss when it is deficient. In addition, analysis of the genotypes of intragenic (ad+) recombinants showed that the musL mutation specifically reduced single allele conversion but increased complex conversion types (especially recombinants homozygous for ad+). Similar analysis revealed differences between the effects of two hyperrec mutations; musN apparently caused high levels solely of mitotic crossing over, while musQ increased various conversion types but not reciprocal crossovers. These results suggest that mitotic gene conversion and crossing over, while generally associated, are affected differentially in some of the mus strains of Aspergillus nidulans.

  17. Mutations in ASPH cause facial dysmorphism, lens dislocation, anterior-segment abnormalities, and spontaneous filtering blebs, or Traboulsi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha; Khan, Arif O; Mansour, Ahmad; Mohamed, Jawahir Y; Al-Assiri, Abdullah; Haddad, Randa; Jia, Xiaofei; Xiong, Yong; Mégarbané, André; Traboulsi, Elias I; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-05-01

    We have previously described a syndrome characterized by facial dysmorphism, lens dislocation, anterior-segment abnormalities, and spontaneous filtering blebs (FDLAB, or Traboulsi syndrome). In view of the consanguineous nature of the affected families and the likely autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern of this syndrome, we undertook autozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify ASPH as the disease locus, in which we identified two homozygous mutations. ASPH encodes aspartyl/asparaginyl β-hydroxylase (ASPH), which has been found to hydroxylate aspartic acid and asparagine residues on epidermal growth factor (EGF)-domain-containing proteins. The truncating and missense mutations we identified are predicted to severely impair the enzymatic function of ASPH, which suggests a possible link to other forms of ectopia lentis given that many of the genes implicated in this phenotype encode proteins that harbor EGF domains. Developmental analysis of Asph revealed an expression pattern consistent with the proposed link to the human syndrome. Indeed, Asph-knockout mice had a foreshortened snout, which corresponds to the facial abnormalities in individuals with Traboulsi syndrome. These data support a genetic basis for a syndromic form of ectopia lentis and the role of aspartyl hydroxylation in human development. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Large social disparities in spontaneous preterm birth rates in transitional Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grjibovski, A M; Bygren, L O; Yngve, A; Sjöström, M

    2005-02-01

    This study estimated the effect of maternal sociodemographic, obstetric and lifestyle factors on the risk of spontaneous preterm birth in a Russian town. All women with singleton pregnancies registered at prenatal care centres in Severodvinsk in 1999 comprised the cohort for this study (n=1559). Analysis was based on spontaneous live singleton births at the maternity home (n=1103). Multivariable logistic regression was applied to quantify the effect of the studied factors on the risk of preterm birth. Differences in gestation duration were studied using multiple linear regression. In total, 5.6% of all spontaneous births were preterm. Increased risks of preterm delivery were found in women with lower levels of education and in students. Placental complications, stress and a history of fetal death in previous pregnancies were also associated with elevated risks for preterm delivery. Smoking, hypertension and multigravidity were associated with reduced length of pregnancy in metric form. In addition to medical risk factors, social factors are important determinants of preterm birth in transitional Russia. Large disparities in preterm birth rates may reflect the level of inequalities in transitional Russia. Social variations in pregnancy outcomes should be monitored.

  19. Adaptive evolution by recombination is not associated with increased mutation rates in Maize streak virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjane, Adérito L; Pande, Daniel; Lakay, Francisco; Shepherd, Dionne N; van der Walt, Eric; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Lett, Jean-Michel; Varsani, Arvind; Rybicki, Edward P; Martin, Darren P

    2012-12-27

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses in the family Geminiviridae are proving to be very useful in real-time evolution studies. The high mutation rate of geminiviruses and other ssDNA viruses is somewhat mysterious in that their DNA genomes are replicated in host nuclei by high fidelity host polymerases. Although strand specific mutation biases observed in virus species from the geminivirus genus Mastrevirus indicate that the high mutation rates in viruses in this genus may be due to mutational processes that operate specifically on ssDNA, it is currently unknown whether viruses from other genera display similar strand specific mutation biases. Also, geminivirus genomes frequently recombine with one another and an alternative cause of their high mutation rates could be that the recombination process is either directly mutagenic or produces a selective environment in which the survival of mutants is favoured. To investigate whether there is an association between recombination and increased basal mutation rates or increased degrees of selection favoring the survival of mutations, we compared the mutation dynamics of the MSV-MatA and MSV-VW field isolates of Maize streak virus (MSV; Mastrevirus), with both a laboratory constructed MSV recombinant, and MSV recombinants closely resembling MSV-MatA. To determine whether strand specific mutation biases are a general characteristic of geminivirus evolution we compared mutation spectra arising during these MSV experiments with those arising during similar experiments involving the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (Begomovirus genus). Although both the genomic distribution of mutations and the occurrence of various convergent mutations at specific genomic sites indicated that either mutation hotspots or selection for adaptive mutations might elevate observed mutation rates in MSV, we found no association between recombination and mutation rates. Importantly, when comparing the mutation spectra of MSV and TYLCV we

  20. Adaptive evolution by recombination is not associated with increased mutation rates in Maize streak virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monjane Adérito L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-stranded (ss DNA viruses in the family Geminiviridae are proving to be very useful in real-time evolution studies. The high mutation rate of geminiviruses and other ssDNA viruses is somewhat mysterious in that their DNA genomes are replicated in host nuclei by high fidelity host polymerases. Although strand specific mutation biases observed in virus species from the geminivirus genus Mastrevirus indicate that the high mutation rates in viruses in this genus may be due to mutational processes that operate specifically on ssDNA, it is currently unknown whether viruses from other genera display similar strand specific mutation biases. Also, geminivirus genomes frequently recombine with one another and an alternative cause of their high mutation rates could be that the recombination process is either directly mutagenic or produces a selective environment in which the survival of mutants is favoured. To investigate whether there is an association between recombination and increased basal mutation rates or increased degrees of selection favoring the survival of mutations, we compared the mutation dynamics of the MSV-MatA and MSV-VW field isolates of Maize streak virus (MSV; Mastrevirus, with both a laboratory constructed MSV recombinant, and MSV recombinants closely resembling MSV-MatA. To determine whether strand specific mutation biases are a general characteristic of geminivirus evolution we compared mutation spectra arising during these MSV experiments with those arising during similar experiments involving the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (Begomovirus genus. Results Although both the genomic distribution of mutations and the occurrence of various convergent mutations at specific genomic sites indicated that either mutation hotspots or selection for adaptive mutations might elevate observed mutation rates in MSV, we found no association between recombination and mutation rates. Importantly, when comparing

  1. Accuracy of rate coding: When shorter time window and higher spontaneous activity help

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Leváková, Marie; Tamborrino, M.; Košťál, Lubomír; Lánský, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 022310. ISSN 2470-0045 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08066S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB17AT048 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rate coding * observation window * spontaneous activity * Fisher information * perfect integrate- and -fire model * Wiener process Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 2.366, year: 2016

  2. Spontaneous mutations in the ammonium transport gene AMT4 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Seo; Feild, Eithne; King, Natalie; Yaoi, Takuro; Kustu, Sydney; Inwood, William

    2005-06-01

    Evidence in several microorganisms indicates that Amt proteins are gas channels for NH(3) and CH(3)NH(2), and this has been confirmed structurally. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has at least four AMT genes, the most reported for a microorganism. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions all AMT genes are transcribed and Chlamydomonas is sensitive to methylammonium toxicity. All 16 spontaneous methylammonium-resistant mutants that we analyzed had defects in accumulation of [(14)C]methylammonium. Genetic crosses indicated that 12 had lesions in a single locus, whereas two each had lesions in other loci. Lesions in different loci were correlated with different degrees of defect in [(14)C]methylammonium uptake. One mutant in the largest class had an insert in the AMT4 gene, and the insert cosegregated with methylammonium resistance in genetic crosses. The other 11 strains in this class also had amt4 lesions, which we characterized at the molecular level. Properties of the amt4 mutants were clearly different from those of rh1 RNAi lines. They indicated that the physiological substrates for Amt and Rh proteins, the only two members of their protein superfamily, are NH(3) and CO(2), respectively.

  3. The application of a linear algebra to the analysis of mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M E; Thomas, S M; Clarke, K

    1999-07-07

    Cells and bacteria growing in culture are subject to mutation, and as this mutation is the ultimate substrate for selection and evolution, the factors controlling the mutation rate are of some interest. The mutational event is not observed directly, but is inferred from the phenotype of the original mutant or of its descendants; the rate of mutation is inferred from the number of such mutant phenotypes. Such inference presumes a knowledge of the probability distribution for the size of a clone arising from a single mutation. We develop a mathematical formulation that assists in the design and analysis of experiments which investigate mutation rates and mutant clone size distribution, and we use it to analyse data for which the classical Luria-Delbrück clone-size distribution must be rejected. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Mutation rate dynamics in a bacterial population reflect tension between adaptation and genetic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgoss, Sébastien; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Tenaillon, Olivier; Wiser, Michael J.; Dittmar, W. James; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Médigue, Claudine; Lenski, Richard E.; Schneider, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Mutations are the ultimate source of heritable variation for evolution. Understanding how mutation rates themselves evolve is thus essential for quantitatively understanding many evolutionary processes. According to theory, mutation rates should be minimized for well-adapted populations living in stable environments, whereas hypermutators may evolve if conditions change. However, the long-term fate of hypermutators is unknown. Using a phylogenomic approach, we found that an adapting Escherichia coli population that first evolved a mutT hypermutator phenotype was later invaded by two independent lineages with mutY mutations that reduced genome-wide mutation rates. Applying neutral theory to synonymous substitutions, we dated the emergence of these mutations and inferred that the mutT mutation increased the point-mutation rate by ∼150-fold, whereas the mutY mutations reduced the rate by ∼40–60%, with a corresponding decrease in the genetic load. Thus, the long-term fate of the hypermutators was governed by the selective advantage arising from a reduced mutation rate as the potential for further adaptation declined. PMID:23248287

  5. Spontaneous HBsAg loss in Korean patients: relevance of viral genotypes, S gene mutations, and covalently closed circular DNA copy numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyun-Hwan Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsOccult HBV infection can persist following HBsAg loss and be transmitted, but the virological features are not well defined.MethodsHere we investigated 25 Korean patients who lost HBsAg during follow up, either spontaneously or subsequent to therapy.ResultsWhereas subtype adr (genotype C was found in 96% of HBsAg positive patients, 75 % of patients who lost HBsAg spontaneously were seemed to be infected with the ayw subtype with sequence similar to genotype D. Mutations in the major hydrophilic region (MHR of HBsAg were found in 7 patients who lost HBsAg spontaneously. The mutations include T123S, M125I/N, C139R, D144E, V177A, L192F, and W196L, some of which have not been reported before. Functional analysis via transfection experiments indicate that the C139R and D144E mutations drastically reduced HBsAg antigenicity, while the Y225del mutation found in one interferon-treated patient impaired HBsAg secretion.ConclusionsLack of detectable HBsAg in patient serum could be explained by low level of ccc DNA in liver tissue, low antigenicity of the surface protein, or its secretion defect.

  6. Anaerobic growth of Bacillus subtilis alters the spectrum of spontaneous mutations in the rpoB gene leading to rifampicin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne L; Park, Roy

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous rifampicin-resistant (RFM(R)) mutants were isolated from Bacillus subtilis 168 cultivated in the presence or absence of oxygen. By DNA sequencing, the mutations were located within Cluster I of the rpoB gene encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase. The spectrum of RFM(R) rpoB mutations isolated from B. subtilis cells grown anaerobically differed from aerobically grown cells, not only with respect to the location of mutations within Cluster I but also in the class of mutation observed (transition versus transversion). In the absence of RFM, RFM(R) mutants exhibited poorer growth under anaerobic conditions than did the wild-type strain, indicating their lower fitness in the absence of antibiotic selection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Molecular analysis of two mouse dilute locus deletion mutations: Spontaneous dilute lethal20J and radiation-induced dilute prenatal lethal Aa2 alleles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, M.C.; Seperack, P.K.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    The dilute (d) coat color locus of mouse chromosome 9 has been identified by more than 200 spontaneous and mutagen-induced recessive mutations. With the advent of molecular probes for this locus, the molecular lesion associated with different dilute alleles can be recognized and precisely defined. In this study, two dilute mutations, dilute-lethal20J (dl20J) and dilute prenatal lethal Aa2, have been examined. Using a dilute locus genomic probe in Southern blot analysis, we detected unique restriction fragments in dl20J and Aa2 DNA. Subsequent analysis of these fragments showed that they represented deletion breakpoint fusion fragments. DNA sequence analysis of each mutation-associated deletion breakpoint fusion fragment suggests that both genomic deletions were generated by nonhomologous recombination events. The spontaneous dl20J mutation is caused by an interstitial deletion that removes a single coding exon of the dilute gene. The correlation between this discrete deletion and the expression of all dilute-associated phenotypes in dl20J homozygotes defines the dl20J mutation as a functional null allele of the dilute gene. The radiation-induced Aa2 allele is a multilocus deletion that, by complementation analysis, affects both the dilute locus and the proximal prenatal lethal-3 (pl-3) functional unit. Molecular analysis of the Aa2 deletion breakpoint fusion fragment has provided access to a previously undefined gene proximal to d. Initial characterization of this new gene suggests that it may represent the genetically defined pl-3 functional unit

  8. Determining Y-STR mutation rates in deep-routing genealogies: Identification of haplogroup differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claerhout, Sofie; Vandenbosch, Michiel; Nivelle, Kelly; Gruyters, Leen; Peeters, Anke; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Decorte, Ronny

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) mutation rates is essential to determine the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in familial searching or genealogy research. Up to now, locus-specific mutation rates have been extensively examined especially for commercially available forensic Y-STRs, while haplogroup specific mutation rates have not yet been investigated in detail. Through 450 patrilineally related namesakes distributed over 212 deep-rooting genealogies, the individual mutation rates of 42 Y-STR loci were determined, including 27 forensic Y-STR loci from the Yfiler ® Plus kit and 15 additional Y-STR loci (DYS388, DYS426, DYS442, DYS447, DYS454, DYS455, DYS459a/b, DYS549, DYS607, DYS643, DYS724a/b and YCAIIa/b). At least 726 mutations were observed over 148,596 meiosis and individual Y-STR mutation rates varied from 2.83 × 10 -4 to 1.86 × 10 -2 . The mutation rate was significantly correlated with the average allele size, the complexity of the repeat motif sequence and the age of the father. Significant differences in average Y-STR mutations rates were observed when haplogroup 'I & J' (4.03 × 10 -3 mutations/generation) was compared to 'R1b' (5.35 × 10 -3 mutations/generation) and to the overall mutation rate (5.03 × 10 -3 mutations/generation). A difference in allele size distribution was identified as the only cause for these haplogroup specific mutation rates. The haplogroup specific mutation rates were also present within the commercially available Y-STR kits (Yfiler ® , PowerPlex ® Y23 System and Yfiler ® Plus). This observation has consequences for applications where an average Y-STR mutation rate is used, e.g. tMRCA estimations in familial searching and genealogy research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A simple algebraic cancer equation: calculating how cancers may arise with normal mutation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this article is to present a relatively easy to understand cancer model where transformation occurs when the first cell, among many at risk within a colon, accumulates a set of driver mutations. The analysis of this model yields a simple algebraic equation, which takes as inputs the number of stem cells, mutation and division rates, and the number of driver mutations, and makes predictions about cancer epidemiology. Methods The equation [p = 1 - (1 - (1 - (1 - udkNm ] calculates the probability of cancer (p and contains five parameters: the number of divisions (d, the number of stem cells (N × m, the number of critical rate-limiting pathway driver mutations (k, and the mutation rate (u. In this model progression to cancer "starts" at conception and mutations accumulate with cell division. Transformation occurs when a critical number of rate-limiting pathway mutations first accumulates within a single stem cell. Results When applied to several colorectal cancer data sets, parameter values consistent with crypt stem cell biology and normal mutation rates were able to match the increase in cancer with aging, and the mutation frequencies found in cancer genomes. The equation can help explain how cancer risks may vary with age, height, germline mutations, and aspirin use. APC mutations may shorten pathways to cancer by effectively increasing the numbers of stem cells at risk. Conclusions The equation illustrates that age-related increases in cancer frequencies may result from relatively normal division and mutation rates. Although this equation does not encompass all of the known complexity of cancer, it may be useful, especially in a teaching setting, to help illustrate relationships between small and large cancer features.

  10. Decreased spontaneous eye blink rates in chronic cannabis users: evidence for striatal cannabinoid-dopamine interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael A Kowal

    Full Text Available Chronic cannabis use has been shown to block long-term depression of GABA-glutamate synapses in the striatum, which is likely to reduce the extent to which endogenous cannabinoids modulate GABA- and glutamate-related neuronal activity. The current study aimed at investigating the effect of this process on striatal dopamine levels by studying the spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR, a clinical marker of dopamine level in the striatum. 25 adult regular cannabis users and 25 non-user controls matched for age, gender, race, and IQ were compared. Results show a significant reduction in EBR in chronic users as compared to non-users, suggesting an indirect detrimental effect of chronic cannabis use on striatal dopaminergic functioning. Additionally, EBR correlated negatively with years of cannabis exposure, monthly peak cannabis consumption, and lifetime cannabis consumption, pointing to a relationship between the degree of impairment of striatal dopaminergic transmission and cannabis consumption history.

  11. Suppression of spontaneous and hydrogen peroxide-induced mutations by a MutT-type nucleotide pool sanitization enzyme, the Escherichia coli Orf135 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Iida, Emiko; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Miki, Takeyoshi; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2003-12-01

    We recently found that the Escherichia coli Orf135 protein, a MutT-type enzyme, hydrolysed 2-hydroxy-dATP (2-OH-dATP), and less efficiently, 8-hydroxy-dGTP. In this study, we examined the effects of the absence of the orf135 gene. Frequencies of spontaneous and H2O2-induced mutations were two- to three-fold higher in the orf135- strain than in the wild-type strain. These mutations include various mutations involving a G:C-->T:A transversion, the same type of mutation elicited by 2-OH-dATP. Over-expression of the Orf135 protein suppressed mutations even in the wild-type strain, as well as in the orf135- strain. The mutator phenotype of bacteria lacking the Orf135 protein suggests that this protein is involved in the suppression of mutations induced by oxidized deoxynucleotides in vivo and that various MutT-type enzymes contribute to nucleotide pool sanitization.

  12. Estimation of mutation rates from paternity cases using a Bayesian network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicard, P.; Dawid, A.P.; Mortera, J.

    We present a statistical model and methodology for making inferences about mutation rates from paternity casework. This takes proper account of a number of sources of potential bias, including hidden mutation, incomplete family triplets, uncertain paternity status and differing maternal and pater......We present a statistical model and methodology for making inferences about mutation rates from paternity casework. This takes proper account of a number of sources of potential bias, including hidden mutation, incomplete family triplets, uncertain paternity status and differing maternal...... and paternal mutation rates, while allowing a wide variety of mutation models. A Bayesian network is constructed to facilitate computation of the likelihood function for the mutation parameters. It can process both full and summary genotypic information, from both complete putative father-mother-child triplets...... and defective cases where only the child and one of its parents are observed. Detailed analysis of a specific dataset is used to illustrate the effects of the various types of biases, and of the assumed mutation model, on inferences about mutation parameters....

  13. Sexual recombination and increased mutation rate expedite evolution of Escherichia coli in varied fitness landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Peabody V, George L.; Li, Hao; Kao, Katy C.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual recombination and mutation rate are theorized to play different roles in adaptive evolution depending on the fitness landscape; however, direct experimental support is limited. Here we examine how these factors affect the rate of adaptation utilizing a “genderless” strain of Escherichia coli capable of continuous in situ sexual recombination. The results show that the populations with increased mutation rate, and capable of sexual recombination, outperform all the other populations. We...

  14. Germline mutation rates in mice following in utero exposure to diesel exhaust particles by maternal inhalation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Caitlin; Ruminski, Wojciech; Hougaard, Karin S.

    2011-01-01

    (PAPs) from industrial environments cause DNA damage and mutations in the sperm of adult male mice. Effects on the female and male germline during critical stages of development (in utero) are unknown. In mice, previous studies have shown that expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci exhibit high rates...... and mated with control CBA mice. The F2 descendents were collected and ESTR germline mutation rates were derived from full pedigrees (mother, father, offspring) of F1 male and female mice. We found no evidence for increased ESTR mutation rates in females exposed in utero to DEP relative to control females...

  15. The rate of beneficial mutations surfing on the wave of a range expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Lehe

    Full Text Available Many theoretical and experimental studies suggest that range expansions can have severe consequences for the gene pool of the expanding population. Due to strongly enhanced genetic drift at the advancing frontier, neutral and weakly deleterious mutations can reach large frequencies in the newly colonized regions, as if they were surfing the front of the range expansion. These findings raise the question of how frequently beneficial mutations successfully surf at shifting range margins, thereby promoting adaptation towards a range-expansion phenotype. Here, we use individual-based simulations to study the surfing statistics of recurrent beneficial mutations on wave-like range expansions in linear habitats. We show that the rate of surfing depends on two strongly antagonistic factors, the probability of surfing given the spatial location of a novel mutation and the rate of occurrence of mutations at that location. The surfing probability strongly increases towards the tip of the wave. Novel mutations are unlikely to surf unless they enjoy a spatial head start compared to the bulk of the population. The needed head start is shown to be proportional to the inverse fitness of the mutant type, and only weakly dependent on the carrying capacity. The precise location dependence of surfing probabilities is derived from the non-extinction probability of a branching process within a moving field of growth rates. The second factor is the mutation occurrence which strongly decreases towards the tip of the wave. Thus, most successful mutations arise at an intermediate position in the front of the wave. We present an analytic theory for the tradeoff between these factors that allows to predict how frequently substitutions by beneficial mutations occur at invasion fronts. We find that small amounts of genetic drift increase the fixation rate of beneficial mutations at the advancing front, and thus could be important for adaptation during species invasions.

  16. High rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence in HIV-infected individuals with spontaneous HCV RNA clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, L.; Mocroft, A.; Soriano, V.; Rockstroh, J. K.; Kirkby, N.; Reiss, P.; Katlama, C.; Zakharova, N.; Flisiak, R.; Lundgren, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    Following resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, recurrence has been shown to occur in some persons with repeated exposure to HCV. We aimed to investigate the rate and factors associated with HCV RNA recurrence among HIV-1-infected patients with prior spontaneous HCV RNA clearance in the

  17. The (B)link Between Creativity and Dopamine: Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates Predict and Dissociate Divergent and Convergent Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermahini, Soghra Akbari; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Human creativity has been claimed to rely on the neurotransmitter dopamine, but evidence is still sparse. We studied whether individual performance (N=117) in divergent thinking (alternative uses task) and convergent thinking (remote association task) can be predicted by the individual spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a clinical marker of…

  18. Coordinated Changes in Mutation and Growth Rates Induced by Genome Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issei Nishimura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome size is determined during evolution, but it can also be altered by genetic engineering in laboratories. The systematic characterization of reduced genomes provides valuable insights into the cellular properties that are quantitatively described by the global parameters related to the dynamics of growth and mutation. In the present study, we analyzed a small collection of W3110 Escherichia coli derivatives containing either the wild-type genome or reduced genomes of various lengths to examine whether the mutation rate, a global parameter representing genomic plasticity, was affected by genome reduction. We found that the mutation rates of these cells increased with genome reduction. The correlation between genome length and mutation rate, which has been reported for the evolution of bacteria, was also identified, intriguingly, for genome reduction. Gene function enrichment analysis indicated that the deletion of many of the genes encoding membrane and transport proteins play a role in the mutation rate changes mediated by genome reduction. Furthermore, the increase in the mutation rate with genome reduction was highly associated with a decrease in the growth rate in a nutrition-dependent manner; thus, poorer media showed a larger change that was of higher significance. This negative correlation was strongly supported by experimental evidence that the serial transfer of the reduced genome improved the growth rate and reduced the mutation rate to a large extent. Taken together, the global parameters corresponding to the genome, growth, and mutation showed a coordinated relationship, which might be an essential working principle for balancing the cellular dynamics appropriate to the environment.

  19. Germline mutation rates at tandem repeat loci in DNA-repair deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Ruth C.; Miccoli, Laurent; Buul, Paul P.W. van; Burr, Karen L.-A.; Duyn-Goedhart, Annemarie van; Angulo, Jaime F.; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2004-01-01

    Mutation rates at two expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci were studied in the germline of non-exposed and irradiated severe combined immunodeficient (scid) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1 -/- ) deficient male mice. Non-exposed scid and PARP -/- male mice showed considerably elevated ESTR mutation rates, far higher than those in wild-type isogenic mice and other inbred strains. The irradiated scid and PARP-1 -/- male mice did not show any detectable increases in their mutation rate, whereas significant ESTR mutation induction was observed in the irradiated wild-type isogenic males. ESTR mutation spectra in the scid and PARP-1 -/- strains did not differ from those in the isogenic wild-type strains. Considering these data and the results of previous studies, we propose that a delay in repair of DNA damage in scid and PARP-1 -/- mice could result in replication fork pausing which, in turn, may affect ESTR mutation rate in the non-irradiated males. The lack of mutation induction in irradiated scid and PARP-1 -/- can be explained by the high cell killing effects of irradiation on the germline of deficient mice

  20. The effect of sexual harassment on lethal mutation rate in female Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklakov, Alexei A; Immler, Simone; Løvlie, Hanne; Flis, Ilona; Friberg, Urban

    2013-01-07

    The rate by which new mutations are introduced into a population may have far-reaching implications for processes at the population level. Theory assumes that all individuals within a population have the same mutation rate, but this assumption may not be true. Compared with individuals in high condition, those in poor condition may have fewer resources available to invest in DNA repair, resulting in elevated mutation rates. Alternatively, environmentally induced stress can result in increased investment in DNA repair at the expense of reproduction. Here, we directly test whether sexual harassment by males, known to reduce female condition, affects female capacity to alleviate DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster fruitflies. Female gametes can repair double-strand DNA breaks in sperm, which allows manipulating mutation rate independently from female condition. We show that male harassment strongly not only reduces female fecundity, but also reduces the yield of dominant lethal mutations, supporting the hypothesis that stressed organisms invest relatively more in repair mechanisms. We discuss our results in the light of previous research and suggest that social effects such as density and courtship can play an important and underappreciated role in mediating condition-dependent mutation rate.

  1. Mutation Rates and Discriminating Power for 13 Rapidly-Mutating Y-STRs between Related and Unrelated Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Boattini

    Full Text Available Rapidly Mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs were recently introduced in forensics in order to increase the differentiation of Y-chromosomal profiles even in case of close relatives. We estimate RM Y-STRs mutation rates and their power to discriminate between related individuals by using samples extracted from a wide set of paternal pedigrees and by comparing RM Y-STRs results with those obtained from the Y-filer set. In addition, we tested the ability of RM Y-STRs to discriminate between unrelated individuals carrying the same Y-filer haplotype, using the haplogroup R-M269 (reportedly characterised by a strong resemblance in Y-STR profiles as a case study. Our results, despite confirming the high mutability of RM Y-STRs, show significantly lower mutation rates than reference germline ones. Consequently, their power to discriminate between related individuals, despite being higher than the one of Y-filer, does not seem to improve significantly the performance of the latter. On the contrary, when considering R-M269 unrelated individuals, RM Y-STRs reveal significant discriminatory power and retain some phylogenetic signal, allowing the correct classification of individuals for some R-M269-derived sub-lineages. These results have important implications not only for forensics, but also for molecular anthropology, suggesting that RM Y-STRs are useful tools for exploring subtle genetic variability within Y-chromosomal haplogroups.

  2. Mutation and evolutionary rates in adélie penguins from the antarctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig D Millar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Precise estimations of molecular rates are fundamental to our understanding of the processes of evolution. In principle, mutation and evolutionary rates for neutral regions of the same species are expected to be equal. However, a number of recent studies have shown that mutation rates estimated from pedigree material are much faster than evolutionary rates measured over longer time periods. To resolve this apparent contradiction, we have examined the hypervariable region (HVR I of the mitochondrial genome using families of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae from the Antarctic. We sequenced 344 bps of the HVR I from penguins comprising 508 families with 915 chicks, together with both their parents. All of the 62 germline heteroplasmies that we detected in mothers were also detected in their offspring, consistent with maternal inheritance. These data give an estimated mutation rate (micro of 0.55 mutations/site/Myrs (HPD 95% confidence interval of 0.29-0.88 mutations/site/Myrs after accounting for the persistence of these heteroplasmies and the sensitivity of current detection methods. In comparison, the rate of evolution (k of the same HVR I region, determined using DNA sequences from 162 known age sub-fossil bones spanning a 37,000-year period, was 0.86 substitutions/site/Myrs (HPD 95% confidence interval of 0.53 and 1.17. Importantly, the latter rate is not statistically different from our estimate of the mutation rate. These results are in contrast to the view that molecular rates are time dependent.

  3. THE ANTIMUTAGENIC EFFECT OF VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON SPONTANEOUS MUTATION IN SALMONELLA TA104 IS DUE TO A REDUCTION IN MUTATIONS AT GC BUT NOT AT SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutagens that, when added to assay plates, reduced the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA104 (hisG428, rfa, uvrB, pKM101) by 50%. To date, no study has demonstrated whether or not...

  4. Spontaneous first trimester miscarriage rates per woman among parous women with 1 or more pregnancies of 24 weeks or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohain, Judy Slome; Buxbaum, Rina E; Mankuta, David

    2017-12-22

    The purpose of this study was to quantify spontaneous first trimester miscarriage rates per woman among parous women. A vast amount of data has accumulated regarding miscarriage rates per recognized pregnancy as well as about recurrent miscarriage. This is the second study of miscarriage rates per woman in a parous population and the first study of recurrent and non-recurrent, spontaneous first trimester miscarriage rates per woman in a large parous population. Extraction of the following variables from all delivery room admissions from both Hadassah Medical Centers in Jerusalem Israel, 2004-2014: # of first trimester spontaneous miscarriages, # live births; # living children; age on admission, pre-pregnancy height and weight, any smoking this pregnancy, any alcohol or drug abuse this pregnancy, blood type, history of ectopic pregnancy, history of cesarean surgery (CS) and use of any fertility treatment(s). Among 53,479 different women admitted to labor and delivery ward, 43% of women reported having had 1 or more first trimester spontaneous miscarriages; 27% reported having had one, 10% two, 4% three, 1.3% four, 0.6% five and 0.05% reported having 6-16 spontaneous first trimester miscarriages. 18.5% had one or more first trimester miscarriages before their first live birth. Eighty-one percent of women with 11 or more living children experienced one or more first trimester miscarriages. First trimester miscarriage rates rose with increasing age, increasing parity, after previous ectopic pregnancy, after previous cesarean surgery, with any smoking during pregnancy and pre-pregnancy BMI ≥30. Miscarriages are common among parous women; 43% of parous women report having experienced one or more first trimester spontaneous miscarriages, rising to 81% among women with 11 or more living children. One in every 17 parous women have three or more miscarriages. Depending on her health, nutrition and lifestyle choices, even a 39 year old parous woman with a history of 3 or

  5. The (1+λ) evolutionary algorithm with self-adjusting mutation rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Benjamin; Witt, Carsten; Gießen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    is then updated to the rate used in that subpopulation which contains the best offspring. We analyze how the (1 + A) evolutionary algorithm with this self-adjusting mutation rate optimizes the OneMax test function. We prove that this dynamic version of the (1 + A) EA finds the optimum in an expected optimization...

  6. Novel mutator mutants of E. coli nrdAB ribonucleotide reductase: insight into allosteric regulation and control of mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Deepti; Bienstock, Rachelle J; Schaaper, Roel M

    2012-05-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is the enzyme critically responsible for the production of the 5'-deoxynucleoside-triphosphates (dNTPs), the direct precursors for DNA synthesis. The dNTP levels are tightly controlled to permit high efficiency and fidelity of DNA synthesis. Much of this control occurs at the level of the RNR by feedback processes, but a detailed understanding of these mechanisms is still lacking. Using a genetic approach in the bacterium Escherichia coli, a paradigm for the class Ia RNRs, we isolated 23 novel RNR mutants displaying elevated mutation rates along with altered dNTP levels. The responsible amino-acid substitutions in RNR reside in three different regions: (i) the (d)ATP-binding activity domain, (ii) a novel region in the small subunit adjacent to the activity domain, and (iii) the dNTP-binding specificity site, several of which are associated with different dNTP pool alterations and different mutational outcomes. These mutants provide new insight into the precise mechanisms by which RNR is regulated and how dNTP pool disturbances resulting from defects in RNR can lead to increased mutation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Using neutron angular anisotropy information to dynamically determine the ratio of the (α,n) rate to spontaneous fission rate for coincidence counting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewa, L.; Charlton, W.; Miller, E.; Pozzi, S.

    2013-02-01

    Typically, when neutron coincidence or multiplicity counting is performed, there are three unknowns: the sample mass, the leakage self-multiplication, and the ratio of the (α,n) rate of the source to the spontaneous fission rate. For a given counting time, the strength of the source or the detector efficiency must be sufficiently high for the singles, doubles, and triples count rates to represent statistically meaningful quantities. Often, the strength of the source and the allotted counting time are such that only the singles and doubles count rates are statistically meaningful. In this latter case, the ratio of (α,n) to the spontaneous fission must be estimated through some other means. With a simulated (α,n) rate, the two equations related to the singles and doubles count rates can be used to determine the sample mass. In order to determine the ratio of (α,n) to spontaneous fission rate of the source, the isotopic composition of the sample as well as the light element impurities inside the source must be known. Ideally, there would be a way to dynamically determine the (α,n) rate of the source from count rate information. In this paper, it is shown that the (α,n) rate of the source can be determined by using information about the ratio of the number of coincident neutrons at 180° to the number at 90°. By using this information, the three aforementioned unknowns can be dynamically determined through the sole use of singles and doubles count rates.

  8. Minisatellite mutation rates increase with extra-pair paternity among birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuervo José J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amos 1 suggested recently that a previously reported positive relationship between minisatellite mutation rates and extra-pair paternity among species of birds 2 was confounded by transcription errors and selective inclusion of studies. Here we attempted to replicate the results reported by Amos 1, but also tested for the relationship by expanding the data base by including studies published after our original paper. Results We were able to replicate the positive association between mutation rate and extra-pair paternity in birds, even after controlling statistically for the confounding effecs of mean number of bands scored, using 133 species, compared to 81 species in our first report 2. We suggest that Amos 1 failed to reach a similar conclusion due to four different potential causes of bias. First, Amos 1 missed 15 studies from the literature that we were able to include. Second, he used estimates of mutation rates that were based on both within- and extra-pair offspring, although the latter will cause bias in estimates. Third, he made a number of transcription errors from the original publications for extra-pair paternity, mutation rates, number of novel bands, and mean number of bands scored per individual. Fourth, he included Vireo olivaceus although the mutation rate estimate was based on one single offspring! Conclusion There was a positive association between mutation rates and extra-pair paternity in birds, accounting for an intermediate effect size that explained 5–11% of the variance; estimates that are bound to be conservative due to many different causes of noise in the data. This result was robust to statistical control for potentially confounding variables, highlighting that it is important to base comparative studies on all available evidence, and that it is crucial to critically transcribe data while simultaneously checking published estimates for their correctness.

  9. A case report of spontaneous mutation (C33>U) in the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin causing hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cao, Wei

    2010-01-15

    The hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by juvenile-onset cataracts and elevated serum ferritin levels. It is caused by mutation in the iron response element (IRE) within the 5\\'UTR of L-ferritin gene. The mutation results in a loss of post-transcriptional negative feedback exerted by the interaction between iron regulatory proteins 1, 2 (IRP1 and IRP2) and IRE, which leads to uncontrolled expression of L-ferritin. In this paper, we describe the molecular pathogenesis of non-hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (non-H-HCS) in a patient with typical HHCS ocular lens morphology and high ferritin levels without obvious family history. Initial sequencing of the full-length L-ferritin cloned from genomic DNA demonstrated a mutation (C33>T) in the IRE of the affected patient but not in her unaffected family members. The mutation (C\\/T heterozygote) was also detected in cDNA derived from her blood mononuclear cells. Structure-prediction-modeling indicates that this mutation would significantly alter the secondary structure of the IRE, resulting in a loss of the interaction between IRP and IRE. By using IRP1\\/IRP2-human IgG1 Fc fusion proteins, we established a novel in vitro report system (modified ELISA) to verify impaired IRE\\/IRP binding. Both the C33>U and A40G mutations (the first identified mutation for HHCS) showed a dramatically decreased binding to IRP1\\/IRP2 protein, compared to the normal IRE RNA. Surprisingly, a decrease in L-ferritin mRNA levels was observed in the affected patient compared to controls suggesting a mechanism of transcriptional negative feedback by high intracellular L-ferritin protein levels not described heretofore. Taken together, spontaneous mutation in the IRE of L-ferritin may cause non-H-HCS by the same mechanism as HHCS. In addition, under abnormal circumstances, the protein level of L-ferritin may be principally controlled by post

  10. Effect of longwall face advance rate on spontaneous heating process in the gob area - CFD modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taraba, B.; Michalec, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 8 (2011), s. 2790-2797 ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/06/0630 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA105/08/1414 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : coal oxidation * spontaneous heating * CFD modelling * Fluent Subject RIV: DH - Mining, incl. Coal Mining Impact factor: 3.248, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016236111001724

  11. Male Mutation Bias Is the Main Force Shaping Chromosomal Substitution Rates in Monotreme Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Vivian; Aguilar-Gómez, Diana; Ramírez-Suástegui, Ciro; Hurst, Laurence D; Cortez, Diego

    2017-09-01

    In many species, spermatogenesis involves more cell divisions than oogenesis, and the male germline, therefore, accumulates more DNA replication errors, a phenomenon known as male mutation bias. The extent of male mutation bias (α) is estimated by comparing substitution rates of the X, Y, and autosomal chromosomes, as these chromosomes spend different proportions of their time in the germlines of the two sexes. Male mutation bias has been characterized in placental and marsupial mammals as well as birds, but analyses in monotremes failed to detect any such bias. Monotremes are an ancient lineage of egg-laying mammals with distinct biological properties, which include unique germline features. Here, we sought to assess the presence and potential characteristics of male mutation bias in platypus and the short-beaked echidna based on substitution rate analyses of X, Y, and autosomes. We established the presence of moderate male mutation bias in monotremes, corresponding to an α value of 2.12-3.69. Given that it has been unclear what proportion of the variation in substitution rates on the different chromosomal classes is really due to differential number of replications, we analyzed the influence of other confounding forces (selection, replication-timing, etc.) and found that male mutation bias is the main force explaining the between-chromosome classes differences in substitution rates. Finally, we estimated the proportion of variation at the gene level in substitution rates that is owing to replication effects and found that this phenomenon can explain >68% of these variations in monotremes, and in control species, rodents, and primates. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Male Mutation Bias Is the Main Force Shaping Chromosomal Substitution Rates in Monotreme Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Vivian; Aguilar-Gómez, Diana; Ramírez-Suástegui, Ciro; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In many species, spermatogenesis involves more cell divisions than oogenesis, and the male germline, therefore, accumulates more DNA replication errors, a phenomenon known as male mutation bias. The extent of male mutation bias (α) is estimated by comparing substitution rates of the X, Y, and autosomal chromosomes, as these chromosomes spend different proportions of their time in the germlines of the two sexes. Male mutation bias has been characterized in placental and marsupial mammals as well as birds, but analyses in monotremes failed to detect any such bias. Monotremes are an ancient lineage of egg-laying mammals with distinct biological properties, which include unique germline features. Here, we sought to assess the presence and potential characteristics of male mutation bias in platypus and the short-beaked echidna based on substitution rate analyses of X, Y, and autosomes. We established the presence of moderate male mutation bias in monotremes, corresponding to an α value of 2.12–3.69. Given that it has been unclear what proportion of the variation in substitution rates on the different chromosomal classes is really due to differential number of replications, we analyzed the influence of other confounding forces (selection, replication-timing, etc.) and found that male mutation bias is the main force explaining the between-chromosome classes differences in substitution rates. Finally, we estimated the proportion of variation at the gene level in substitution rates that is owing to replication effects and found that this phenomenon can explain >68% of these variations in monotremes, and in control species, rodents, and primates. PMID:28922870

  13. Y-chromosome-specific microsatellite mutation rates re-examined using a minisatellite, MSY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, M A; Heyer, E; Dieltjes, P; de Knijff, P

    1999-10-01

    Polymorphic Y-chromosome-specific microsatellites are becoming increasingly used in evolutionary and forensic studies and, in particular, in dating the origins of Y-chromosomal lineages. Previously, haplotyping of Y chromosomes from males belonging to a set of deep-rooting pedigrees was used to estimate a conservative average Y-chromosomal microsatellite mutation rate of 2.1 x 10(-3)per locus per generation. A number of males showed multiple differences in haplotypes compared with other males within their pedigrees, and these were excluded from the calculation of this estimate, on the grounds that non-paternity was a more probable explanation than multiple mutation within a lineage. Here we reanalyse the pedigrees using an independent highly polymorphic system, the Y-specific minisatellite, MSY1. This supports the hypothesis of non-paternity where more than one microsatellite difference was observed, provides further support for the previously deduced microsatellite mutation rate and throws light on the mutation dynamics of MSY1 itself, suggesting that single-step changes are not the only mode of mutation.

  14. Optimal mutation rates for the (1+λ) EA on OneMax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gießen, Christian; Witt, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We study the (1 + λ) EA with mutation probability c/n, where c > 0 is a constant, on the ONEMAX problem. Using an improved variable drift theorem, we show that upper and lower bounds on the expected runtime of the (1+λ) EA obtained from variable drift theorems are at most apart by a small lower o...... rates up to 10% larger than the asymptotically optimal rate 1/n minimize the expected runtime. However, in absolute terms the expected runtime does not change by much when replacing 1/n with the optimal mutation rate....... order term if the exact drift is known. This reduces the analysis of expected optimization time to finding an exact expression for the drift. We then give an exact closed-form expression for the drift and develop a method to approximate it very efficiently, enabling us to determine approximate optimal...... mutation rates for the (1+λ) EA for various parameter settings of c and λ and also for moderate sizes of n. This makes the need for potentially lengthy and costly experiments in order to optimize the parameters unnecessary. Interestingly, even for moderate n and not too small λ it turns out that mutation...

  15. Chronical influence of radiation and lead on mutation rates in plants of Arabidopsis Thaliana (L.) Heynh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukov, V.I.; Shishkin, V.A.; Sokolenko, S.F.

    1996-01-01

    Plants of Arabidopsis thaliana were grown in a laboratory conditions on the soil (black earth, chernozem) which was polluted with a radioactive isotopes of cesium, 134+137 Cs. Increase in specific activity of samples from 217 to 1025 and 2529 Bq/kg resulted in increase of embryonic mutation rate in Arabidopsis from 8.2 to 20.2 and 51.6 % respectively. Bringing Pb 2+ in a dose of 16 mg into the soil resulted in statistically significant decrease in mutation rate. Further increase of lead concentration in radioactive soils to 32, 64, 96, 160 and 320 mg/kg resulted in growth of the mutation rates in the plants which were grown on the soil with low and middle specific activity of cesium, and in decrease of the mutation rates in the plants which were grown on the soil with high specific radioactivity. The last process apparently was connected with the intensive growth in the number of sterile seeds in the pods. 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs

  16. Maximum Likelihood based comparison of the specific growth rates for P. aeruginosa and four mutator strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Mandsberg, Lotte Frigaard

    2008-01-01

    The specific growth rate for P. aeruginosa and four mutator strains mutT, mutY, mutM and mutY–mutM is estimated by a suggested Maximum Likelihood, ML, method which takes the autocorrelation of the observation into account. For each bacteria strain, six wells of optical density, OD, measurements...

  17. Studies on Drosophila radiosensitive strains. 7 Influence of maternal genotype on the rates of recessive and dominant lethal mutations induces by γ-rays in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsova, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    Basc line males have been γ-irradiated and hybridized either with females of radiosensitive mutant rad (2)201sup(G1) of with females of control line Canton-S. Recessive sex linkage lethal mutations (RSLLM) and dominiant lethal mutations (DLM) have been considered. Mother genotype is shown to affect formation of mutations induced in males of tester line. The level of spontaneous and induced dominant lethalies was slightly higher after crotsing with females of radiosenssitive mutant as compared with control line. Differences are not disclosed by spontaneous level of recessive lethal mutations, but the effect of rad (2)201sup(G1) mutation on yield of recessive lethal mutations induces in males is revealed; dose dependence of frequency of arising this type of mutations differs from linear dependence described in literature

  18. NK cells are intrinsically functional in pigs with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by spontaneous mutations in the Artemis gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have identified Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University. These SCID pigs lack B-cells and T-cells, but possess Natural Killer (NK) cells. This SCID phenotype is caused by recessive mutations in the Artemis gene. Interestingly, two human tumor c...

  19. High rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence in HIV-infected individuals with spontaneous HCV RNA clearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, L; Mocroft, A; Soriano, V

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Following resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, recurrence has been shown to occur in some persons with repeated exposure to HCV. We aimed to investigate the rate and factors associated with HCV RNA recurrence among HIV-1-infected patients with prior spontaneous HCV RNA...... clearance in the EuroSIDA cohort. METHODS: All HIV-infected patients with documented prior spontaneous HCV clearance, and at least one subsequently collected plasma sample, were examined. The last sample was tested for HCV RNA and those with HCV RNA ≥ 615 IU/mL were defined as having HCV recurrence...... less likely to have HCV RNA recurrence, whereas IDUs were over 6 times more likely to have HCV RNA recurrence compared with non-IDUs (OR 6.58; 95% CI 1.48-29.28; P = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: Around 1 in 5 HIV-infected patients with prior spontaneous HCV RNA clearance had detectable HCV RNA during follow...

  20. A spontaneous Fatp4/Scl27a4 splice site mutation in a new murine model for congenital ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianning; Koster, Maranke I; Harrison, Wilbur; Moran, Jennifer L; Beier, David R; Roop, Dennis R; Overbeek, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital ichthyoses are life-threatening conditions in humans. We describe here the identification and molecular characterization of a novel recessive mutation in mice that results in newborn lethality with severe congenital lamellar ichthyosis. Mutant newborns have a taut, shiny, non-expandable epidermis that resembles cornified manifestations of autosomal-recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans. The skin is stretched so tightly that the newborn mice are immobilized. The genetic defect was mapped to a region near the proximal end of chromosome 2 by SNP analysis, suggesting Fatp4/Slc27a4 as a candidate gene. FATP4 mutations in humans cause ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS), and mutations of Fatp4 in mice have previously been found to cause a phenotype that resembles human congenital ichthyoses. Characterization of the Fatp4 cDNA revealed a fusion of exon 8 to exon 10, with deletion of exon 9. Genomic sequencing identified an A to T mutation in the splice donor sequence at the 3'-end of exon 9. Loss of exon 9 results in a frame shift mutation upstream from the conserved very long-chain acyl-CoA synthase (VLACS) domain. Histological studies revealed that the mutant mice have defects in keratinocyte differentiation, along with hyperproliferation of the stratum basale of the epidermis, a hyperkeratotic stratum corneum, and reduced numbers of secondary hair follicles. Since Fatp4 protein is present primarily at the stratum granulosum and the stratum spinosum, the hyperproliferation and the alterations in hair follicle induction suggest that very long chain fatty acids, in addition to being required for normal cornification, may influence signals from the stratum corneum to the basal cells that help to orchestrate normal skin differentiation.

  1. Genetic influence of radiation measured by the effect on the mutation rate of human minisatellite genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodaira, Mieko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Human minisatellite genes are composed from 0.1-30 kb with a high frequency of polymorphism. The genes exist in mammalian genomes and mice's ones are well studied after irradiation of their gonad cells by X-ray and {gamma}-ray. Following five reports concerning the significant and/or insignificant increases of the mutation rate of the genes post A-bomb exposure, Chernobyl accident and nuclear weapons test in Semipalatinsk are reviewed and discussed on the subject number, exposed dose, problems of the control group, regions examined of loci and exposure conditions. Genetic influences of radiation examined by the author's facility are not recognized in the mutation rate (3.21% vs 4.94% in the control) of minisatellite genes in children of A-bomb survivors and their parents. The mutation rates are 4.27 vs 2.52% (positive influence) and 4.2-6.01% vs 3.5-6.34% in Chernobyl, and 4.3 (parents) and 3.8% (F{sub 1}) vs 2.5% (positive). Mutation of human minisatellite genes can be an important measure of genetic influences at the medical level. (K.H.)

  2. A Bayesian Approach to Inferring Rates of Selfing and Locus-Specific Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelings, Benjamin D; Kumagai, Seiji; Tatarenkov, Andrey; Wang, Liuyang; Sakai, Ann K; Weller, Stephen G; Culley, Theresa M; Avise, John C; Uyenoyama, Marcy K

    2015-11-01

    We present a Bayesian method for characterizing the mating system of populations reproducing through a mixture of self-fertilization and random outcrossing. Our method uses patterns of genetic variation across the genome as a basis for inference about reproduction under pure hermaphroditism, gynodioecy, and a model developed to describe the self-fertilizing killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus. We extend the standard coalescence model to accommodate these mating systems, accounting explicitly for multilocus identity disequilibrium, inbreeding depression, and variation in fertility among mating types. We incorporate the Ewens sampling formula (ESF) under the infinite-alleles model of mutation to obtain a novel expression for the likelihood of mating system parameters. Our Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm assigns locus-specific mutation rates, drawn from a common mutation rate distribution that is itself estimated from the data using a Dirichlet process prior model. Our sampler is designed to accommodate additional information, including observations pertaining to the sex ratio, the intensity of inbreeding depression, and other aspects of reproduction. It can provide joint posterior distributions for the population-wide proportion of uniparental individuals, locus-specific mutation rates, and the number of generations since the most recent outcrossing event for each sampled individual. Further, estimation of all basic parameters of a given model permits estimation of functions of those parameters, including the proportion of the gene pool contributed by each sex and relative effective numbers. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Experimental estimation of mutation rates in a wheat population with a gene genealogy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raquin, Anne-Laure; Depaulis, Frantz; Lambert, Amaury; Galic, Nathalie; Brabant, Philippe; Goldringer, Isabelle

    2008-08-01

    Microsatellite markers are extensively used to evaluate genetic diversity in natural or experimental evolving populations. Their high degree of polymorphism reflects their high mutation rates. Estimates of the mutation rates are therefore necessary when characterizing diversity in populations. As a complement to the classical experimental designs, we propose to use experimental populations, where the initial state is entirely known and some intermediate states have been thoroughly surveyed, thus providing a short timescale estimation together with a large number of cumulated meioses. In this article, we derived four original gene genealogy-based methods to assess mutation rates with limited bias due to relevant model assumptions incorporating the initial state, the number of new alleles, and the genetic effective population size. We studied the evolution of genetic diversity at 21 microsatellite markers, after 15 generations in an experimental wheat population. Compared to the parents, 23 new alleles were found in generation 15 at 9 of the 21 loci studied. We provide evidence that they arose by mutation. Corresponding estimates of the mutation rates ranged from 0 to 4.97 x 10(-3) per generation (i.e., year). Sequences of several alleles revealed that length polymorphism was only due to variation in the core of the microsatellite. Among different microsatellite characteristics, both the motif repeat number and an independent estimation of the Nei diversity were correlated with the novel diversity. Despite a reduced genetic effective size, global diversity at microsatellite markers increased in this population, suggesting that microsatellite diversity should be used with caution as an indicator in biodiversity conservation issues.

  4. Comment on anomalous dispersion and scattering rates for multiphonon spontaneous decay in He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haavasoja, T.; Narayanamurti, V.; Chin, M. A.

    1984-10-01

    We report on new measurements of the spontaneous decay threshold energy E c for high-frequency phonon propagation in He II at saturated vapor pressure at T=0.1 K. Superconducting tin tunnel generators and aluminum tunnel detectors were used in this study. The measurements show that the mean free path becomes much larger than the propagation length of 1.1 mm for a value of E c =9.8±0.15 K. This agrees with the value originally reported ( E c =9.5±0.4 K) by Dynes and Narayanamurti using aluminum tunnel generators, but is shown to correspond to the point where the phase velocity equals the sound velocity, when the phonons become stable, as first proposed by Pitayevski and Levinson. Evidence for n-phonon decay at energies lower than E c is presented for n≳2 with a short mean free path (neutron data due to Donnelly, Donnelly, and Hills.

  5. Associations between Familial Rates of Psychiatric Disorders and De Novo Genetic Mutations in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyleen Luhrs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the confluence of genetic and familial risk factors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD with distinct de novo genetic events. We hypothesized that gene-disrupting mutations would be associated with reduced rates of familial psychiatric disorders relative to structural mutations. Participants included families of children with ASD in four groups: de novo duplication copy number variations (DUP, n=62, de novo deletion copy number variations (DEL, n=74, de novo likely gene-disrupting mutations (LGDM, n=267, and children without a known genetic etiology (NON, n=2111. Familial rates of psychiatric disorders were calculated from semistructured interviews. Results indicated overall increased rates of psychiatric disorders in DUP families compared to DEL and LGDM families, specific to paternal psychiatric histories, and particularly evident for depressive disorders. Higher rates of depressive disorders in maternal psychiatric histories were observed overall compared to paternal histories and higher rates of anxiety disorders were observed in paternal histories for LGDM families compared to DUP families. These findings support the notion of an additive contribution of genetic etiology and familial factors are associated with ASD risk and highlight critical need for continued work targeting these relationships.

  6. Success and spontaneous pregnancy rates following systemic methotrexate versus laparoscopic surgery for tubal pregnancies: A randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag Moeller, Lars Bo; Moeller, Charlotte; Thomsen, Sten Grove

    2009-01-01

    . A total of 106 women diagnosed with ectopic pregnancy (EP). Methods. Between March 1997 and September 2000, 1,265 women were diagnosed with EP, 395 (31%) were eligible, 109 (9%) were randomized of whom 106 had an EP. The study was originally powered to a sample size of 422 patients. The women were......, subsequent intrauterine, and recurrent ectopic pregnancies. Results. The success rates were 74% following MTX treatment and 87% after surgery (n.s.); the subsequent spontaneous intrauterine pregnancy rate was 73% after MTX and 62% after surgery; and the EP rate was 9.6% after MTX and 17.3% following surgery......Objective. To determine which treatment should be offered to women with a non-ruptured tubal pregnancy: a single dose of methotrexate (MTX) or laparoscopic surgery. Design. Prospective, randomized, open multicenter study. Setting. Seven Danish departments of obstetrics and gynecology. Sample...

  7. EFFECTS OF THE ANTIMUTAGENS VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON SPONTANEOUS MUTATION IN E. COLI LACL STRAINS AND ON GLOBAL GENE EXPRESSION IN SALMONELLA TA104 AND HUMAN HEPG2 CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of the Antimutagens Vanillin and Cinnamaldehyde on Spontaneous Mutation in E. coli lacI Strains and on Global Gene Epression in Salmonella TAlO4 and Human HepG2 Cells In previous work we have shown that vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutag...

  8. Distinct Contributions of Replication and Transcription to Mutation Rate Variation of Human Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2012-03-23

    Here, we evaluate the contribution of two major biological processes—DNA replication and transcription—to mutation rate variation in human genomes. Based on analysis of the public human tissue transcriptomics data, high-resolution replicating map of Hela cells and dbSNP data, we present significant correlations between expression breadth, replication time in local regions and SNP density. SNP density of tissue-specific (TS) genes is significantly higher than that of housekeeping (HK) genes. TS genes tend to locate in late-replicating genomic regions and genes in such regions have a higher SNP density compared to those in early-replication regions. In addition, SNP density is found to be positively correlated with expression level among HK genes. We conclude that the process of DNA replication generates stronger mutational pressure than transcription-associated biological processes do, resulting in an increase of mutation rate in TS genes while having weaker effects on HK genes. In contrast, transcription-associated processes are mainly responsible for the accumulation of mutations in highly-expressed HK genes.

  9. Population carrier rates of pathogenic ARSA gene mutations: is metachromatic leukodystrophy underdiagnosed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Ługowska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD is a severe neurometabolic disease caused mainly by deficiency of arylsulfatase A encoded by the ARSA gene. Based on epidemiological surveys the incidence of MLD per 100,000 live births varied from 0.6 to 2.5. Our purpose was to estimate the birth prevalence of MLD in Poland by determining population frequency of the common pathogenic ARSA gene mutations and to compare this estimate with epidemiological data. METHODOLOGY: We studied two independently ascertained cohorts from the Polish background population (N∼3000 each and determined carrier rates of common ARSA gene mutations: c.459+1G>A, p.P426L, p.I179S (cohort 1 and c.459+1G>A, p.I179S (cohort 2. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Taking into account ARSA gene mutation distribution among 60 Polish patients, the expected MLD birth prevalence in the general population (assuming no selection against homozygous fetuses was estimated as 4.0/100,000 and 4.1/100,000, respectively for the 1(st and the 2(nd cohort with a pooled estimate of 4.1/100,000 (CI: 1.8-9.4 which was higher than the estimate of 0.38 per 100,000 live births based on diagnosed cases. The p.I179S mutation was relatively more prevalent among controls than patients (OR = 3.6, P = 0.0082, for a comparison of p.I179S frequency relative to c.459+1G>A between controls vs. patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The observed discrepancy between the measured incidence of metachromatic leukodystrophy and the predicted carriage rates suggests that MLD is substantially underdiagnosed in the Polish population. The underdiagnosis rate may be particularly high among patients with p.I179S mutation whose disease is characterized mainly by psychotic symptoms.

  10. Spontaneous asj-2J mutant mouse as a model for generalized arterial calcification of infancy: a large deletion/insertion mutation in the Enpp1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    Full Text Available Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene, manifests with extensive mineralization of the cardiovascular system. The affected individuals in most cases die within the first year of life, and there is currently no effective treatment for this disorder. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous mutant mouse, asj-2J, as a model for GACI. These mice were identified as part of a phenotypic deviant search in a large-scale production colony of BALB/cJ mice at The Jackson Laboratory. They demonstrated a characteristic gait due to stiffening of the joints, with phenotypic similarity to a previously characterized asj ("ages with stiffened joints" mouse, caused by a missense mutation in the Enpp1 gene. Complementation testing indicated that asj-2J and asj were allelic. PCR-based mutation detection strategy revealed in asj-2J mice a large, 40,035 bp, deletion spanning from intron 1 to the 3'-untranslated region of the Enpp1 gene, coupled with a 74 bp insertion. This was accompanied with a significant reduction in the plasma PPi concentration and reduced PPi/Pi ratio. As a consequence, extensive aberrant mineralization affecting the arterial vasculature, a number of internal organs, and the dermal sheath of vibrissae, a progressive biomarker of the ectopic mineralization process, was demonstrated by a combination of micro computed tomography, histopathology with calcium-specific stains, and direct chemical assay of calcium. Comparison of the asj and asj-2J mice demonstrated that the latter ones, particularly when placed on an acceleration diet high in phosphate and low in magnesium, had more extensive mineralization. Thus, the asj-2J mouse serves as a novel model for GACI, a currently intractable disorder.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of the family of feline leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) genes, and mutational analysis in familial spontaneous epileptic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Hamamoto, Yuji; Mizoguchi, Shunta; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Fujita, Michio

    2017-12-13

    Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) proteins play a critical role in synaptic transmission. Dysfunction of these genes and encoded proteins is associated with neurological disorders such as genetic epilepsy or autoimmune limbic encephalitis in animals and human. Familial spontaneous epileptic cats (FSECs) are the only feline strain and animal model of familial temporal lobe epilepsy. The seizure semiology of FSECs comprises recurrent limbic seizures with or without evolution into generalized epileptic seizures, while cats with antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channel complexed/LGI1 show limbic encephalitis and recurrent limbic seizures. However, it remains unclear whether the genetics underlying FSECs are associated with LGI family genes. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the feline LGI1-4 genes and examined their association with FSECs. Conventional PCR techniques were performed for cloning and mutational analysis. Characterization was predicted using bioinformatics software. The cDNAs of feline LGI1-4 contained 1674-bp, 1650-bp, 1647-bp, and 1617-bp open reading frames, respectively, and encoded proteins comprising 557, 549, 548, and 538 amino acid residues, respectively. The feline LGI1-4 putative protein sequences showed high homology with Homo sapiens, Canis familiaris, Bos taurus, Sus scrofa, and Equus caballus (92%-100%). Mutational analysis in 8 FSECs and 8 controls for LGI family genes revealed 3 non-synonymous and 14 synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region. Only one non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in LGI4 was found in 3 out of 8 FSECs. Using three separate computational tools, this mutation was not predicted to be disease causing. No co-segregation of the disease was found with any variant. We cloned the cDNAs of the four feline LGI genes, analyzed the amino acid sequences, and revealed that epilepsy in FSEC is not a monogenic disorder associated with LGI genes.

  12. Radiation-induced cell mutations as a function of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review of the data in the literature is presented and forms the background of the experimental data given by the author obtained with exponential long-term cultures of V79 hamster cells exposed over a period of up to 35 days to different dose rates of gamma radiation. The experimental results show that at a dose rate of 40 mGy/hour the number of induced mutations is reduced, - which is in agreement with literature data - , but a dose rate of less than 30 mGy/hour makes the induced mutations leap to a value clearly higher than those induced by acute irradiation. As in addition to the mutations recombination is a significant factor of the radiation risk, experiments with a heterozygotic yeast strain have been made, as there is to date no reliable mammalian cell system available for this kind of research. Long-term radiation exposure of the yeast cells over a period of six weeks drastically increased the rate of recombinations, to a value higher by a factor of about 4 than that induced by acute irradiation. (orig.) [de

  13. Erratum Haldane and the first estimates of the human mutation rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Published on the Web: 1 December 2008. Erratum. Haldane and the first estimates of the human mutation rate. (A commentary on J.B.S. Haldane 1935 J. Genet. 31, 317–326; reprinted in volume 83, 235–244 as a J. Genet. classic). Michael W. Nachman. J. Genet. 83, 231–233. Page 1, right column, para 1, line 6 from ...

  14. Ultrafast modification of the spontaneous decay rate by plasmonic nanostructures: a step toward manipulation of a single atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavareian, N

    2014-01-01

    A controllable method for modifying spontaneous emission of an electric dipole located in close proximity to a plasmonic nanostructure is proposed. The nanostructure constructed of two triangular nanowires, in the form of a dimer, on a substrate in which the gallium film on the micrometer scale is the main layer. The results illustrate that phase transition of the gallium film from the α-crystalline to liquid phase leads to variation of the spectrum of radiative and nonradiative decay rates of the dipole where such a transition depends on parameters of the dipole, e.g. position, orientation and emission wavelength as well as on the nanostructure, e.g. shape and size of the dimer and also properties of the substrate. On the other hand, it is found that during phase transition modification of nanostructure resonances is negligible while the radiative decay rate changes. (letter)

  15. Mutation rates of TGFBR2 and ACVR2 coding microsatellites in human cells with defective DNA mismatch repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heekyung Chung

    Full Text Available Microsatellite instability promotes colonic tumorigenesis through generating frameshift mutations at coding microsatellites of tumor suppressor genes, such as TGFBR2 and ACVR2. As a consequence, signaling through these TGFbeta family receptors is abrogated in DNA Mismatch repair (MMR-deficient tumors. How these mutations occur in real time and mutational rates of these human coding sequences have not previously been studied. We utilized cell lines with different MMR deficiencies (hMLH1-/-, hMSH6-/-, hMSH3-/-, and MMR-proficient to determine mutation rates. Plasmids were constructed in which exon 3 of TGFBR2 and exon 10 of ACVR2 were cloned +1 bp out of frame, immediately after the translation initiation codon of an enhanced GFP (EGFP gene, allowing a -1 bp frameshift mutation to drive EGFP expression. Mutation-resistant plasmids were constructed by interrupting the coding microsatellite sequences, preventing frameshift mutation. Stable cell lines were established containing portions of TGFBR2 and ACVR2, and nonfluorescent cells were sorted, cultured for 7-35 days, and harvested for flow cytometric mutation detection and DNA sequencing at specific time points. DNA sequencing revealed a -1 bp frameshift mutation (A9 in TGFBR2 and A7 in ACVR2 in the fluorescent cells. Two distinct fluorescent populations, M1 (dim, representing heteroduplexes and M2 (bright, representing full mutants were identified, with the M2 fraction accumulating over time. hMLH1 deficiency revealed 11 (5.91 x 10(-4 and 15 (2.18 x 10(-4 times higher mutation rates for the TGFBR2 and ACVR2 microsatellites compared to hMSH6 deficiency, respectively. The mutation rate of the TGFBR2 microsatellite was approximately 3 times higher in both hMLH1 and hMSH6 deficiencies than the ACVR2 microsatellite. The -1 bp frameshift mutation rates of TGFBR2 and ACVR2 microsatellite sequences are dependent upon the human MMR background.

  16. Contributions of intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection to levels of de novo HRAS mutations in the paternal germline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; McVean, Gilean; Taylor, Indira B

    2013-01-01

    The RAS proto-oncogene Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (HRAS) encodes a small GTPase that transduces signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effectors to control cellular behavior. Although somatic HRAS mutations have been described in many cancers, germline mutations cause...

  17. Spontaneous abortion rate and advanced maternal age: Consequences for prenatal diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.E. Cohen-Overbeek (Titia); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); M.E.M. Den Ouden; L. Pijpers (Leendert); M.G. Jahoda (M.); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Maternal age related and procedure-related fetal abortion rates were studied in 384 women aged 36 and over scheduled for transabdominal chorionic villus sampling (TA-CVS) at 12-14 weeks of gestation. The pre-TA-CVS abortion rate within 30 days of intake (at 6-10 weeks of

  18. [The effect of SSH&H on the lifespan and spontaneous cancer development in transgenic mice with HER-2/neu mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndyk, M L; Popovich, I G; Anikin, I V; Egormin, P A; Iurova, M N; Zabezhinskiĭ, M A; Anisimov, V N

    2012-01-01

    10 months old mice receiving SSH&H with daily food increased the lifespan in comparison to the control group. The maximal lifespan was increased by 1,6 months. For the long-living 10% group the mean lifespan increased by 8,7% compared to the control group (pSSH&H on the neoplastic rate in transgenic mice with HER-2/neu mutation.

  19. Mutation rate, spectrum, topology, and context-dependency in the DNA mismatch repair-deficient Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC948.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hongan; Sung, Way; Miller, Samuel F; Ackerman, Matthew S; Doak, Thomas G; Lynch, Michael

    2014-12-23

    High levels of genetic diversity exist among natural isolates of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens, and are especially elevated around the replication terminus of the genome, where strain-specific genes are found. In an effort to understand the role of genetic variation in the evolution of Pseudomonas, we analyzed 31,106 base substitutions from 45 mutation accumulation lines of P. fluorescens ATCC948, naturally deficient for mismatch repair, yielding a base-substitution mutation rate of 2.34 × 10(-8) per site per generation (SE: 0.01 × 10(-8)) and a small-insertion-deletion mutation rate of 1.65 × 10(-9) per site per generation (SE: 0.03 × 10(-9)). We find that the spectrum of mutations in prophage regions, which often contain virulence factors and antibiotic resistance, is highly similar to that in the intergenic regions of the host genome. Our results show that the mutation rate varies around the chromosome, with the lowest mutation rate found near the origin of replication. Consistent with observations from other studies, we find that site-specific mutation rates are heavily influenced by the immediately flanking nucleotides, indicating that mutations are context dependent. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. VANADIUM EXPOSURE ALTERS SPONTANEOUS BEAT RATE AND GENE EXPRESSION OF CULTURED CARDIAC MYOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recent toxicological studies report PM-induced changes in a number of cardiac parameters, including heart rate variability, arrhythmias, repolarization, and internal defib...

  1. The effect of elevated mutation rates on the evolution of cooperation and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racey, Daniel; Inglis, Robert Fredrik; Harrison, Freya; Oliver, Antonio; Buckling, Angus

    2010-02-01

    Within-host competition between parasite genotypes can play an important role in the evolution of parasite virulence. For example, competition can increase virulence by imposing selection for parasites that replicate at a faster absolute rate within the host, but may also decrease virulence by selecting for faster relative growth rates through social exploitation of conspecifics. For many parasites, both outcomes are possible. We investigated how competition affected the evolution of virulence of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in caterpillar hosts, over the course of an approximately 60 generation selection experiment. We initiated infections with clonal populations of either wild-type bacteria or an isogenic mutant with an approximately 100-fold higher mutation rate, resulting in low and high between-genotype competition, respectively. We observed the evolution of increased virulence, growth rate, and public goods cheating (exploitation of extracellular iron scavenging siderophores produced by ancestral populations) in mutator but not wild-type, populations. We conclude increases in absolute within-host growth rates appear to be more important than social cheating in driving virulence evolution in this experimental context.

  2. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sajeewa Amaradasa

    Full Text Available Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor, iprodione (unclear mode of action, thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors. Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50-100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs. SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each. Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001. Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the

  3. Effects of Nanoparticle Morphology and Acyl Chain Length on Spontaneous Lipid Transfer Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Charubin, Kamil; Liu, Ying; Heberle, Frederick A; Katsaras, John; Jing, Benxin; Zhu, Yingxi; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We report on studies of lipid transfer rates between different morphology nanoparticles and lipids with different length acyl chains. The lipid transfer rate of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (di-C14, DMPC) in discoidal "bicelles" (0.156 h(-1)) is 2 orders of magnitude greater than that of DMPC vesicles (ULVs) (1.1 × 10(-3) h(-1)). For both bicellar and ULV morphologies, increasing the acyl chain length by two carbons [going from di-C14 DMPC to di-C16, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)] causes lipid transfer rates to decrease by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Results from small angle neutron scattering (SANS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are in good agreement. The present studies highlight the importance of lipid dynamic processes taking place in different morphology biomimetic membranes.

  4. Rates of Mutation and Host Transmission for an Escherichia coli Clone over 3 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Peter R.; Liu, Bin; Zhou, Zhemin; Li, Dan; Guo, Dan; Ren, Yan; Clabots, Connie; Lan, Ruiting; Johnson, James R.; Wang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Although over 50 complete Escherichia coli/Shigella genome sequences are available, it is only for closely related strains, for example the O55:H7 and O157:H7 clones of E. coli, that we can assign differences to individual evolutionary events along specific lineages. Here we sequence the genomes of 14 isolates of a uropathogenic E. coli clone that persisted for 3 years within a household, including a dog, causing a urinary tract infection (UTI) in the dog after 2 years. The 20 mutations observed fit a single tree that allows us to estimate the mutation rate to be about 1.1 per genome per year, with minimal evidence for adaptive change, including in relation to the UTI episode. The host data also imply at least 6 host transfer events over the 3 years, with 2 lineages present over much of that period. To our knowledge, these are the first direct measurements for a clone in a well-defined host community that includes rates of mutation and host transmission. There is a concentration of non-synonymous mutations associated with 2 transfers to the dog, suggesting some selection pressure from the change of host. However, there are no changes to which we can attribute the UTI event in the dog, which suggests that this occurrence after 2 years of the clone being in the household may have been due to chance, or some unknown change in the host or environment. The ability of a UTI strain to persist for 2 years and also to transfer readily within a household has implications for epidemiology, diagnosis, and clinical intervention. PMID:22046404

  5. A spontaneous dominant-negative mutation within a 35S::AtMYB90 transgene inhibits flower pigment production in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Jeff; Cakir, Cahid; Cazzonelli, Christopher I

    2010-03-29

    In part due to the ease of visual detection of phenotypic changes, anthocyanin pigment production has long been the target of genetic and molecular research in plants. Specific members of the large family of plant myb transcription factors have been found to play critical roles in regulating expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes and these genes continue to serve as important tools in dissecting the molecular mechanisms of plant gene regulation. A spontaneous mutation within the coding region of an Arabidopsis 35S::AtMYB90 transgene converted the activator of plant-wide anthocyanin production to a dominant-negative allele (PG-1) that inhibits normal pigment production within tobacco petals. Sequence analysis identified a single base change that created a premature nonsense codon, truncating the encoded myb protein. The resulting mutant protein lacks 78 amino acids from the wild type C-terminus and was confirmed as the source of the white-flower phenotype. A putative tobacco homolog of AtMYB90 (NtAN2) was isolated and found to be expressed in flower petals but not leaves of all tobacco plants tested. Using transgenic tobacco constitutively expressing the NtAN2 gene confirmed the NtAN2 protein as the likely target of PG-1-based inhibition of tobacco pigment production. Messenger RNA and anthocyanin analysis of PG-1Sh transgenic lines (and PG-1Sh x purple 35S::NtAN2 seedlings) support a model in which the mutant myb transgene product acts as a competitive inhibitor of the native tobacco NtAN2 protein. This finding is important to researchers in the field of plant transcription factor analysis, representing a potential outcome for experiments analyzing in vivo protein function in test transgenic systems that over-express or mutate plant transcription factors.

  6. Fundamental limitations in spontaneous emission rate of single-photon sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Khurgin, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    The rate of single-photon generation by quantum emitters (QEs) can be enhanced by placing a QE inside a resonant structure. This structure can represent an all-dielectric micro-resonator or waveguide and thus be characterized by ultra-low loss and dimensions on the order of wavelength. Or it can ...

  7. Chronic baroreflex activation restores spontaneous baroreflex control and variability of heart rate in obesity-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E

    2013-10-01

    The sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate is depressed in subjects with obesity hypertension, which increases the risk for cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms are not fully known, and there are no therapies to improve this dysfunction. To determine the cardiovascular dynamic effects of progressive increases in body weight leading to obesity and hypertension in dogs fed a high-fat diet, 24-h continuous recordings of spontaneous fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Furthermore, we investigated whether autonomic mechanisms stimulated by chronic baroreflex activation and renal denervation-current therapies in patients with resistant hypertension, who are commonly obese-restore cardiovascular dynamic control. Increases in body weight to ∼150% of control led to a gradual increase in mean arterial pressure to 17 ± 3 mmHg above control (100 ± 2 mmHg) after 4 wk on the high-fat diet. In contrast to the gradual increase in arterial pressure, tachycardia, attenuated chronotropic baroreflex responses, and reduced heart rate variability were manifest within 1-4 days on high-fat intake, reaching 130 ± 4 beats per minute (bpm) (control = 86 ± 3 bpm) and ∼45% and baroreflex activation and renal denervation abolished the hypertension. However, only baroreflex activation effectively attenuated the tachycardia and restored cardiac baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability. These findings suggest that baroreflex activation therapy may reduce the risk factors for cardiac arrhythmias as well as lower arterial pressure.

  8. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis for Combining Information of Several Sources: Application to Estimation of Spontaneous Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Coca, M. D.; Orini, M.; Lázaro, J.; Bailón, R.; Gil, E.

    2013-01-01

    A methodology that combines information from several nonstationary biological signals is presented. This methodology is based on time-frequency coherence, that quantifies the similarity of two signals in the time-frequency domain. A cross time-frequency analysis method, based on quadratic time-frequency distribution, has been used for combining information of several nonstationary biomedical signals. In order to evaluate this methodology, the respiratory rate from the photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal is estimated. The respiration provokes simultaneous changes in the pulse interval, amplitude, and width of the PPG signal. This suggests that the combination of information from these sources will improve the accuracy of the estimation of the respiratory rate. Another target of this paper is to implement an algorithm which provides a robust estimation. Therefore, respiratory rate was estimated only in those intervals where the features extracted from the PPG signals are linearly coupled. In 38 spontaneous breathing subjects, among which 7 were characterized by a respiratory rate lower than 0.15 Hz, this methodology provided accurate estimates, with the median error {0.00; 0.98} mHz ({0.00; 0.31}%) and the interquartile range error {4.88; 6.59} mHz ({1.60; 1.92}%). The estimation error of the presented methodology was largely lower than the estimation error obtained without combining different PPG features related to respiration. PMID:24363777

  9. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis for Combining Information of Several Sources: Application to Estimation of Spontaneous Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Peláez-Coca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology that combines information from several nonstationary biological signals is presented. This methodology is based on time-frequency coherence, that quantifies the similarity of two signals in the time-frequency domain. A cross time-frequency analysis method, based on quadratic time-frequency distribution, has been used for combining information of several nonstationary biomedical signals. In order to evaluate this methodology, the respiratory rate from the photoplethysmographic (PPG signal is estimated. The respiration provokes simultaneous changes in the pulse interval, amplitude, and width of the PPG signal. This suggests that the combination of information from these sources will improve the accuracy of the estimation of the respiratory rate. Another target of this paper is to implement an algorithm which provides a robust estimation. Therefore, respiratory rate was estimated only in those intervals where the features extracted from the PPG signals are linearly coupled. In 38 spontaneous breathing subjects, among which 7 were characterized by a respiratory rate lower than 0.15 Hz, this methodology provided accurate estimates, with the median error {0.00; 0.98} mHz ({0.00; 0.31}% and the interquartile range error {4.88; 6.59} mHz ({1.60; 1.92}%. The estimation error of the presented methodology was largely lower than the estimation error obtained without combining different PPG features related to respiration.

  10. Adrenoleukodystrophy in Norway: high rate of de novo mutations and age-dependent penetrance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Morten A; Retterstøl, Lars; Abdelnoor, Michael; Skjeldal, Ola H; Tallaksen, Chantal M E

    2013-03-01

    To investigate X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in an unselected population, we performed a population based, cross-sectional prevalence study, supplemented by a retrospective study of deceased subjects. Sixty-three subjects (34 males, 29 females) belonging to 22 kindreds were included. Thirty-nine subjects (13 males, 26 females) were alive, and 24 (21 males, 3 females) were deceased on the prevalence day. The point prevalence of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in Norway on July 1, 2011, was 0.8 per 100,000 inhabitants. The incidence at birth in the period 1956-1995 was 1.6 per 100,000 inhabitants. An age-dependent penetrance was observed among males and females, with more severe phenotypes appearing with rising age. Only 5% of deceased males had not developed cerebral leukodystrophy. No female older than 50 years was neurologically intact. Sixteen mutations in the ABCD1 gene were identified. De novo mutations were found in 19% of probands. The frequency of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy was lower in Norway than reported in the literature. A more severe natural course than previously reported was observed, indicating a need for better follow-up of both male and female patients. Given the high rate of de novo mutations, identification programs such as newborn screening may be required to offer timely treatment to all patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of a mutated Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase that increases the production rate of D-tagatose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H-J; Kim, J-H; Oh, H-J; Oh, D-K

    2006-07-01

    Characterization of a mutated Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase used to increase the production rate of D-tagatose. A mutated gene was obtained by an error-prone polymerase chain reaction using L-arabinose isomerase gene from G. stearothermophilus as a template and the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed mutated L-arabinose isomerase exhibited the change of three amino acids (Met322-->Val, Ser393-->Thr, and Val408-->Ala), compared with the wild-type enzyme and was then purified to homogeneity. The mutated enzyme had a maximum galactose isomerization activity at pH 8.0, 65 degrees C, and 1.0 mM Co2+, while the wild-type enzyme had a maximum activity at pH 8.0, 60 degrees C, and 1.0-mM Mn2+. The mutated L-arabinose isomerase exhibited increases in D-galactose isomerization activity, optimum temperature, catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for D-galactose, and the production rate of D-tagatose from D-galactose. The mutated L-arabinose isomerase from G. stearothermophilus is valuable for the commercial production of D-tagatose. This work contributes knowledge on the characterization of a mutated L-arabinose isomerase, and allows an increased production rate for D-tagatose from D-galactose using the mutated enzyme.

  12. Enhancement of spontaneous emission rate and reduction in amplified spontaneous emission threshold in electrodeposited three-dimensional ZnO photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yongchun; Yue, Zhounan; Wong, George K. L.; Xi, Yan Yan; Hsu, Yuk Fan; Djurišić, Aleksandra B.; Dong, Jian-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jie; Wong, Kam Sing

    2010-11-01

    ZnO photonic crystal (PC) with face-center-cube type structure is fabricated by electrodeposition using holographic lithographically made organic (SU-8) template. Photonic band gap effect (reflection peak and transmission dip in infrared spectral region) is clearly seen. Observation of strong enhancement and blueshift of the emission peak (from 383.8 to 378.8 nm), shortening of the exciton photoluminescence lifetime (from 88 to 34 ps), and reduction in amplified spontaneous emission threshold of ZnO PC compared to that of the reference nonstructured electrodeposited ZnO showed clear evidence of PC structure affecting the ZnO exciton emission.

  13. Experimental characterization of true spontaneous emission rate of optically-pumped InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well laser structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.-N. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental approach to acquiring true spontaneous emission rate of optically-pumped InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well laser structure is described. This method is based on a single edge-emitting laser chip with simple sample processing. The photoluminescence spectra are measured at both facets of the edge-emitting device and transformed to the spontaneous emission rate following the theory described here. The unusual double peaks appearing in the spontaneous emission rate spectra are observed for the InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well structure. The result is analyzed in terms of Indium-rich island and Model-Solid theories. The proposed method is suitable for electrically-pumped quantum-well laser structures, as well.

  14. High mutation detection rate in TCOF1 among Treacher Collins syndrome patients reveals clustering of mutations and 16 novel pathogenic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splendore, A; Silva, E O; Alonso, L G; Richieri-Costa, A; Alonso, N; Rosa, A; Carakushanky, G; Cavalcanti, D P; Brunoni, D; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2000-10-01

    Twenty-eight families with a clinical diagnosis of Treacher Collins syndrome were screened for mutations in the 25 coding exons of TCOF1 and their adjacent splice junctions through SSCP and direct sequencing. Pathogenic mutations were detected in 26 patients, yielding the highest detection rate reported so far for this disease (93%) and bringing the number of known disease-causing mutations from 35 to 51. This is the first report to describe clustering of pathogenic mutations. Thirteen novel polymorphic alterations were characterized, confirming previous reports that TCOF1 has an unusually high rate of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within its coding region. We suggest a possible different mechanism leading to TCS or genetic heterogeneity for this condition, as we identified two families with no apparent pathogenic mutation in the gene. Furthermore, our data confirm the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and reinforce that the apparent anticipation often observed in TCS families is due to ascertainment bias. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Increasing Nucleosome Occupancy Is Correlated with an Increasing Mutation Rate so Long as DNA Repair Machinery Is Intact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the multitude of epigenomic and genomic factors that influence the mutation rate is an area of great interest in modern biology. Recently, chromatin has been shown to play a part in this process. To elucidate this relationship further, we integrated our own ultra-deep sequenced human nucleosomal DNA data set with a host of published human genomic and cancer genomic data sets. Our results revealed, that differences in nucleosome occupancy are associated with changes in base-specific mutation rates. Increasing nucleosome occupancy is associated with an increasing transition to transversion ratio and an increased germline mutation rate within the human genome. Additionally, cancer single nucleotide variants and microindels are enriched within nucleosomes and both the coding and non-coding cancer mutation rate increases with increasing nucleosome occupancy. There is an enrichment of cancer indels at the theoretical start (74 bp) and end (115 bp) of linker DNA between two nucleosomes. We then hypothesized that increasing nucleosome occupancy decreases access to DNA by DNA repair machinery and could account for the increasing mutation rate. Such a relationship should not exist in DNA repair knockouts, and we thus repeated our analysis in DNA repair machinery knockouts to test our hypothesis. Indeed, our results revealed no correlation between increasing nucleosome occupancy and increasing mutation rate in DNA repair knockouts. Our findings emphasize the linkage of the genome and epigenome through the nucleosome whose properties can affect genome evolution and genetic aberrations such as cancer.

  16. Heart rate variability and stroke volume variability to detect central hypovolemia during spontaneous breathing and supported ventilation in young, healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elstad, Maja; Walløe, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular oscillations exist in many different variables and may give important diagnostic and prognostic information in patients. Variability in cardiac stroke volume (SVV) is used in clinical practice for diagnosis of hypovolemia, but currently is limited to patients on mechanical ventilation. We investigated if SVV and heart rate variability (HRV) could detect central hypovolemia in spontaneously breathing humans: We also compared cardiovascular variability during spontaneous breathing with supported mechanical ventilation.Ten subjects underwent simulated central hypovolemia by lower body negative pressure (LBNP) with >10% reduction of cardiac stroke volume. The subjects breathed spontaneously and with supported mechanical ventilation. Heart rate, respiratory frequency and mean arterial blood pressure were measured. Stroke volume (SV) was estimated by ModelFlow (Finometer). Respiratory SVV was calculated by: 1) SVV% = (SVmax − SVmin)/SVmean during one respiratory cycle, 2) SVIntegral from the power spectra (Fourier transform) at 0.15–0.4 Hz and 3) SVV-norm = (√SVIntegral)/SVmean. HRV was calculated by the same methods.During spontaneous breathing two measures of SVV and all three measures of HRV were reduced during hypovolemia compared to baseline. During spontaneous breathing SVIntegral and HRV% were best to detect hypovolemia (area under receiver operating curve 0.81). HRV% ≤ 11% and SVIntegral ≤ 12 ml 2 differentiated between hypovolemia and baseline during spontaneous breathing.During supported mechanical ventilation, none of the three measures of SVV changed and two of the HRV measures were reduced during hypovolemia. Neither measures of SVV nor HRV were classified as a good detector of hypovolemia.We conclude that HRV% and SVIntegral detect hypovolemia during spontaneous breathing and both are candidates for further clinical testing. (paper)

  17. Accurate and fast methods to estimate the population mutation rate from error prone sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyamoto Michael M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population mutation rate (θ remains one of the most fundamental parameters in genetics, ecology, and evolutionary biology. However, its accurate estimation can be seriously compromised when working with error prone data such as expressed sequence tags, low coverage draft sequences, and other such unfinished products. This study is premised on the simple idea that a random sequence error due to a chance accident during data collection or recording will be distributed within a population dataset as a singleton (i.e., as a polymorphic site where one sampled sequence exhibits a unique base relative to the common nucleotide of the others. Thus, one can avoid these random errors by ignoring the singletons within a dataset. Results This strategy is implemented under an infinite sites model that focuses on only the internal branches of the sample genealogy where a shared polymorphism can arise (i.e., a variable site where each alternative base is represented by at least two sequences. This approach is first used to derive independently the same new Watterson and Tajima estimators of θ, as recently reported by Achaz 1 for error prone sequences. It is then used to modify the recent, full, maximum-likelihood model of Knudsen and Miyamoto 2, which incorporates various factors for experimental error and design with those for coalescence and mutation. These new methods are all accurate and fast according to evolutionary simulations and analyses of a real complex population dataset for the California seahare. Conclusion In light of these results, we recommend the use of these three new methods for the determination of θ from error prone sequences. In particular, we advocate the new maximum likelihood model as a starting point for the further development of more complex coalescent/mutation models that also account for experimental error and design.

  18. Genetic polymorphisms and mutation rates of 27 Y-chromosomal STRs in a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yong-Ji; Zhang, Chu-chu; Li, Ran; Yang, Yang; Ou, Xue-Ling; Tong, Da-yue; Sun, Hong-Yu

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we collected blood samples from 1033 father-son pairs of a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China, of which 1007 fathers were unrelated male individuals. All together, 2040 male individuals were analyzed at 27 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) with Yfiler(®) Plus system. A total of 1003 different haplotypes were observed among 1007 unrelated fathers, with the overall haplotype diversity (HD) 0.999992 and discrimination capacity (DC) 0.996. The gene diversity (GD) values for the 27 Y-STR loci ranged from 0.4400 at DYS438 to 0.9597 at DYS385a/b. 11 off-ladder alleles and 25 copy number variants were detected in 1007 males. Population relationships were analyzed by comparison with 19 other worldwide populations. With 27,920 allele transfers in 1033 father-son pairs, 124 mutation events occurred, of which 118 were one-step mutations and 6 were two-step mutations. Eleven father-son pairs were found to have mutations at two loci, while one pair at three loci. The estimated locus-specific mutation rates varied from 0 to 1.74×10(-2), with an average estimated mutation rate 4.4×10(-3) (95%CI: 3.7×10(-3) to 5.3×10(-3)). Mutations were most frequently observed at three rapidly mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs), DYS576, DYS518 and DYS627. However, at DYS570, DYS449 and DYF387S1 loci, which were also described as RM Y-STRs, the mutation rates in Guangdong Han population were not as high as estimated in other populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Disruption of the p53-mediated G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint results in elevated rates of spontaneous genetic recombination in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strasfeld, L.; Brainerd, E.; Meyn, M.S. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A key feature of the cancer-prone inherited disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is genetic instability. We recently demonstrated that one aspect of genetic instability in A-T is a marked elevation in the spontaneous rates of intrachromosomal mitotic recombination. We have proposed a model for A-T that attributes these high recombination rates to a lack of DNA damage-sensitive cell cycle checkpoints. One prediction of this model is that disrupting p53 function in normal cells should increase their spontaneous rates of recombination by interfering with their p53-dependent G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint. To test this prediction, we transfected control and A-T fibroblast lines that each harbor a single integrated copy of lacZ-based recombination vector (pLrec) with derivatives of a eukaryotic expression vector (pRep5) that contain either a dominant-negative p53 mutant (143{sup val{yields}ala}) or a human papilloma virus E6 gene (HPV18 E6). Expression of either of these genes results in loss of p53 function and abolition of the G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint. Four independent p53{sup 143ala} transformants of the control line showed 25-80 fold elevations in spontaneous recombination rates when compared to their parent cell line. Elevations in spontaneous recombination rates were also detected following transfection with the HPV18 E6 gene. In contrast, four independent p53{sup 143ala} transformants of the A-T cell line showed no significant changes in their already high spontaneous recombination rates. We are now extending these observations to additional normal human fibroblast lines and carrying out molecular analyses of the products of these recombinational events. Our results support our hypothesis that the lack of a p53-dependent G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint contributes to the hyperrecombination seen in A-T.

  20. Male and female differential reproductive rate could explain parental transmission asymmetry of mutation origin in Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Amiel, Jeanne; Pelet, Anna; Lantieri, Francesca; Fernandez, Raquel M; Verheij, Joke B G M; Garcia-Barcelo, Merce; Arnold, Stacey; Ceccherini, Isabella; Borrego, Salud; Hofstra, Robert M W; Tam, Paul K H; Munnich, Arnold; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    2012-09-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, aganglionic megacolon) is a complex and heterogeneous disease with an incidence of 1 in 5000 live births. Despite the multifactorial determination of HSCR in the vast majority of cases, there is a monogenic subgroup for which private rare RET coding sequence mutations with high penetrance are found (45% of HSCR familial cases). An asymmetrical parental origin is observed for RET coding sequence mutations with a higher maternal inheritance. A parent-of-origin effect is usually assumed. Here we show that a differential reproductive rate for males and females also leads to an asymmetrical parental origin, which was never considered as a possible explanation till now. In the case of HSCR, we show a positive association between penetrance of the mutation and parental transmission asymmetry: no parental transmission asymmetry is observed in sporadic RET CDS mutation carrier cases for which penetrance of the mutation is low, whereas a parental transmission asymmetry is observed in affected sib-pairs for which penetrance of the mutation is higher. This allows us to conclude that the explanation for this parental asymmetry is that more severe mutations have resulted in a differential reproductive rate between male and female carriers.

  1. Mutation Rate, Spectrum, Topology, and Context-Dependency in the DNA Mismatch Repair-Deficient Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC948

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Hongan; Sung, Way; Miller, Samuel F.; Ackerman, Matthew S.; Doak, Thomas G.; Lynch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    High levels of genetic diversity exist among natural isolates of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens, and are especially elevated around the replication terminus of the genome, where strain-specific genes are found. In an effort to understand the role of genetic variation in the evolution of Pseudomonas, we analyzed 31,106 base substitutions from 45 mutation accumulation lines of P. fluorescens ATCC948, naturally deficient for mismatch repair, yielding a base-substitution mutation rate of 2...

  2. Mutations of different molecular origins exhibit contrasting patterns of regional substitution rate variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Elango

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Transitions at CpG dinucleotides, referred to as "CpG substitutions", are a major mutational input into vertebrate genomes and a leading cause of human genetic disease. The prevalence of CpG substitutions is due to their mutational origin, which is dependent on DNA methylation. In comparison, other single nucleotide substitutions (for example those occurring at GpC dinucleotides mainly arise from errors during DNA replication. Here we analyzed high quality BAC-based data from human, chimpanzee, and baboon to investigate regional variation of CpG substitution rates. We show that CpG substitutions occur approximately 15 times more frequently than other single nucleotide substitutions in primate genomes, and that they exhibit substantial regional variation. Patterns of CpG rate variation are consistent with differences in methylation level and susceptibility to subsequent deamination. In particular, we propose a "distance-decaying" hypothesis, positing that due to the molecular mechanism of a CpG substitution, rates are correlated with the stability of double-stranded DNA surrounding each CpG dinucleotide, and the effect of local DNA stability may decrease with distance from the CpG dinucleotide.Consistent with our "distance-decaying" hypothesis, rates of CpG substitution are strongly (negatively correlated with regional G+C content. The influence of G+C content decays as the distance from the target CpG site increases. We estimate that the influence of local G+C content extends up to 1,500 approximately 2,000 bps centered on each CpG site. We also show that the distance-decaying relationship persisted when we controlled for the effect of long-range homogeneity of nucleotide composition. GpC sites, in contrast, do not exhibit such "distance-decaying" relationship. Our results highlight an example of the distinctive properties of methylation-dependent substitutions versus substitutions mostly arising from errors during DNA replication. Furthermore

  3. Altered heart rate variability in spontaneously hypertensive rats is associated with specific particulate matter components in Detroit, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Annette C; Kamal, Ali; Morishita, Masako; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Keeler, Gerald J; Harkema, Jack R; Wagner, James G

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter [aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5)] is linked to adverse cardiopulmonary health effects; however, the responsible constituents are not well defined. We used a rat model to investigate linkages between cardiac effects of concentrated ambient particle (CAP) constituents and source factors using a unique, highly time-resolved data set. Spontaneously hypertensive rats inhaled Detroit Michigan, CAPs during summer or winter (2005-2006) for 13 consecutive days. Electrocardiogram data were recorded continuously, and heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) metrics were derived. Extensive CAP characterization, including use of a Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler (SEAS), was performed, and positive matrix factorization was applied to investigate source factors. Mean CAP exposure concentrations were 518 μg/m(3) and 357 μg/m(3) in the summer and winter, respectively. Significant reductions in the standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) in the summer were strongly associated with cement/lime, iron/steel, and gasoline/diesel factors, whereas associations with the sludge factor and components were less consistent. In winter, increases in HR were associated with a refinery factor and its components. CAP-associated HR decreases in winter were linked to sludge incineration, cement/lime, and coal/secondary sulfate factors and most of their associated components. Specific relationships for increased root mean square of the standard deviation of successive normal-to-normal intervals (RMSSD) in winter were difficult to determine because of lack of consistency between factors and associated constituents. Our results indicate that specific modulation of cardiac function in Detroit was most strongly linked to local industrial sources. Findings also highlight the need to consider both factor analytical results and component-specific results when interpreting findings.

  4. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  5. Molecular analysis using DHPLC of cystic fibrosis: increase of the mutation detection rate among the affected population in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardone Anna

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disorder characterised by mutations of the CFTR gene, which encodes for an important component in the coordination of electrolyte movement across of epithelial cell membranes. Symptoms are pulmonary disease, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, male infertility and elevated sweat concentrations. The CFTR gene has numerous mutations (>1000 and functionally important polymorphisms (>200. Early identification is important to provide appropriate therapeutic interventions, prognostic and genetic counselling and to ensure access to specialised medical services. However, molecular diagnosis by direct mutation screening has proved difficult in certain ethnic groups due to allelic heterogeneity and variable frequency of causative mutations. Methods We applied a gene scanning approach using DHPLC system for analysing specifically all CFTR exons and characterise sequence variations in a subgroup of CF Italian patients from the Lazio region (Central Italy characterised by an extensive allelic heterogeneity. Results We have identified a total of 36 different mutations representing 88% of the CF chromosomes. Among these are two novel CFTR mutations, including one missense (H199R and one microdeletion (4167delCTAAGCC. Conclusion Using this approach, we were able to increase our standard power rate of mutation detection of about 11% (77% vs. 88%.

  6. Effect of calorie restriction on spontaneous physical activity and body mass in mice divergently selected for basal metabolic rate (BMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzęk, Paweł; Gębczyński, Andrzej K; Książek, Aneta; Konarzewski, Marek

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous physical activity (SPA) represents an important component of daily energy expenditures in animals and humans. Intra-specific variation in SPA may be related to the susceptibility to metabolic disease or obesity. In particular, reduced SPA under conditions of limited food availability may conserve energy and prevent loss of body and fat mass ('thrifty genotype hypothesis'). However, both SPA and its changes during food restriction show wide inter-individual variations. We studied the effect of 30% caloric restriction (CR) on SPA in laboratory mice divergently selected for high (H-BMR) and low (L-BMR) basal metabolic rate. Selection increased SPA in the H-BMR line but did not change it in the L-BMR mice. This effect reflected changes in SPA intensity but not SPA duration. CR increased SPA intensity more strongly in the L-BMR line than in the H-BMR line and significantly modified the temporal variation of SPA. However, the initial between-line differences in SPA were not affected by CR. Loss of body mass during CR did not differ between both lines. Our results show that the H-BMR mice can maintain their genetically determined high SPA under conditions of reduced food intake without sacrificing their body mass. We hypothesize that this pattern may reflect the higher flexibility in the energy budget in the H-BMR line, as we showed previously that mice from this line reduced their BMR during CR. These energy savings may allow for the maintenance of elevated SPA in spite of reduced food intake. We conclude that the effect of CR on SPA is in large part determined by the initial level of BMR, whose variation may account for the lack of universal pattern of behavioural responses to CR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of a change in mutation rate on the incidence of dominant and X-linked recessive disorders in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    In order to assess the impact on man of a sustained change in mutation rate that might be caused by ionizing radiation or a chemical mutagen in the environment, it is important to determine the current incidence of genetic disease, the rate at which deleterious mutations arise and the number of generations that mutations persist before eliminated by selection. From these data it should be possible to estimate both the increase in genetic disease in the first generation following the increase in mutation rate, and the rate at which a new equilibrium between mutation and selection would occur. In this paper the results of a survey to determine birth frequency, mutation rate and reproductive fitness for each of the important dominant and X-linked recessive disorders are described. It is estimated that these disorders affect about 0.6% of live-born individuals, including 0.1% of live-borns who carry a newly-arising mutation. (orig.)

  8. Measuring the prevalence of regional mutation rates: an analysis of silent substitutions in mammals, fungi, and insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuch Brian B

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patterns of mutation vary both within and across genomes. It has been shown for a few mammals that mutation rates vary within the genome, while for unknown reasons, the sensu stricto yeasts have uniform rates instead. The generality of these observations has been unknown. Here we examine silent site substitutions in a more expansive set (20 mammals, 27 fungi, 4 insects to determine why some genomes demonstrate this mosaic distribution and why others are uniform. Results We applied several intragene and intergene correlation tests to measure regional substitution patterns. Assuming that silent sites are a reasonable approximation to neutrally mutating sequence, our results show that all multicellular eukaryotes exhibit mutational heterogeneity. In striking contrast, all fungi are mutationally uniform – with the exception of three Candida species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and C. tropicalis. We speculate that aspects of replication timing may be responsible for distinguishing these species. Our analysis also reveals classes of genes whose silent sites behave anomalously with respect to the mutational background in many species, indicating prevalent selective pressures. Genes associated with nucleotide binding or gene regulation have consistently low silent substitution rates in every mammalian species, as well as multiple fungi. On the other hand, receptor genes repeatedly exhibit high silent substitution rates, suggesting they have been influenced by diversifying selection. Conclusion Our findings provide a framework for understanding the regional mutational properties of eukaryotes, revealing a sharp difference between fungi and multicellular species. They also elucidate common selective pressures acting on eukaryotic silent sites, with frequent evidence for both purifying and diversifying selection.

  9. The determination of 210Pb, 210Bi, 210Po by counting gross α and gross β rate of spontaneous deposited samples on Ni foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuxue; Guo Dongfa; Huang Qiuhong

    2012-01-01

    The optimum spontaneous deposition conditions of 210 Bi and 210 Po on Ni foil is studied in this paper, and a simultaneous or continuous testing method of 210 Pb, 210 Bi, 210 Po in samples by counting gross α and gross β rate of spontaneous deposited samples on Ni foil is set up. The research results show that under the conditions of the Ni foil area being 3.14 cm 2 , the concentration of HCl being 1.0 mol/L, the volume of HCl being 25 mL, the constant experiment temperature being 90℃, the vibration frequency being 180/min, the vibration amplitude being 20 mm and the spontaneous deposition time being 60 min, 210 Bi and 210 Po on Ni foil can be simultaneously and quantitatively deposited. The linear correlation coefficient between 210 Po activity and its α-counting rate is 0.9998, 210 Bi activity and its β-counting rate is 0.9997. The effects of 210 Bi and 210 Po short half-time radioisotopes on testing will decrease while standing the Ni foil for a certain length of time before measuring, in case of hydrazine hydrochloride and tartaric acid presence, lots of coexisting elements do not produce interference to testing. Degree of precision of this testing technology si higher than 5%, total recovery rate reaches 99.5%∼100.5%. (authors)

  10. The Effect of Coexistence of a Pair of Mutated Oncogenes on the Survival Rate of Invasive Breast Carcinoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the effect of two mutated oncogenes on the survival rate from invasive breast carcinoma when in comparison to the mutation of a single oncogene on the survival rate. An oncogene is defined as a gene, that when mutated, can lead to cancer. The two oncogenes used in this project were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and c-myc (MYC). HER2 and MYC are both oncogenes that contribute to the formation of cancer. HER2 proteins are receptors on breast cells, and when the HER2 gene is mutated, there is an overexpression of HER2 protein on the breast cell. This makes the breast cells proliferate uncontrollably. MYC is a gene that codes for a transcription factor that plays a role in cell cycle progression. The overexpression of MYC also leads to the proliferation of cells. I hypothesized that if there is a mutation in both the MYC and HER2 genes, then the survival rate of invasive breast carcinoma patients will be lower compared to patients with the mutations of only MYC or HER2. To test this hypothesis, we conducted individual gene searches in CBioPortal for HER2 in the datasets from the studies titled TCGA Nature 2012, TCGA Cell 2015, and TCGA Provisional. We conducted individual gene searches in CBioPortal for MYC in the same datasets. The survival rate data was then exported and analyzed for patients with mutations of either HER2 or MYC and with mutations of both genes. To determine the cases that had both HER2 and MYC mutations, we found the overlapping cases in both HER2 and MYC groups for all three datasets. We calculated the median of the survival data for cases where either HER2 or MYC was mutated and cases where both MYC and HER2 were mutated. From the first dataset, the median of MYC data was 95.53, HER2 data was 95.83, and both HER2 and MYC data was 91.24. In the second dataset, the median of MYC data was 92.17 , HER2 data was 93.5, and both HER2 and MYC data was 87.95 . In the third dataset, the median

  11. K-core decomposition of a protein domain co-occurrence network reveals lower cancer mutation rates for interior cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Arnold I; Andrews, Simeon; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Azis, Thasni Ka; Malek, Joel A

    2015-01-01

    Network biology currently focuses primarily on metabolic pathways, gene regulatory, and protein-protein interaction networks. While these approaches have yielded critical information, alternative methods to network analysis will offer new perspectives on biological information. A little explored area is the interactions between domains that can be captured using domain co-occurrence networks (DCN). A DCN can be used to study the function and interaction of proteins by representing protein domains and their co-existence in genes and by mapping cancer mutations to the individual protein domains to identify signals. The domain co-occurrence network was constructed for the human proteome based on PFAM domains in proteins. Highly connected domains in the central cores were identified using the k-core decomposition technique. Here we show that these domains were found to be more evolutionarily conserved than the peripheral domains. The somatic mutations for ovarian, breast and prostate cancer diseases were obtained from the TCGA database. We mapped the somatic mutations to the individual protein domains and the local false discovery rate was used to identify significantly mutated domains in each cancer type. Significantly mutated domains were found to be enriched in cancer disease pathways. However, we found that the inner cores of the DCN did not contain any of the significantly mutated domains. We observed that the inner core protein domains are highly conserved and these domains co-exist in large numbers with other protein domains. Mutations and domain co-occurrence networks provide a framework for understanding hierarchal designs in protein function from a network perspective. This study provides evidence that a majority of protein domains in the inner core of the DCN have a lower mutation frequency and that protein domains present in the peripheral regions of the k-core contribute more heavily to the disease. These findings may contribute further to drug development.

  12. Effect of low-intensity low-dose rate irradiation on the incidence and the development of spontaneous leukosis in AKR mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlakova, E.B.; Erokhin, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    Development of spontaneous leukosis in AKR mice is accelerated by irradiation with low doses of 1.2-2.4 cGy and low dose rate 0.06 cGy/day. The leukoses incidence rate increases. Deaths of the animals from leukosis occurs earlier, shortening the average and maximum life-spans of the animals. The dynamics of changes in the mass of organs of the immune systems (thymus and spleen) shows extrema. The moment of reaching the extremum correlates with the maximum rate of animals' deaths [ru

  13. Quasi-static method and finite element method for obtaining the modifications of the spontaneous emission rate and energy level shift near a plasmonic nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun-Jin; Tian, Meng; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Hong; Zhao, Heping; Huang, Yong-Gang

    2018-01-22

    We provide numerical demonstrations of the applicability and accuracy of the quasi-static method and the finite-element method in the investigation of the modifications of the spontaneous emission rate and the energy level shift of an emitter placed near a silver-air interface or a silver nano-sphere. The analytical results are presented as a reference. Our calculations show that the finite element method is an accurate and general method. For frequency away from the radiative mode, the quasi-static method can be applied more effectively for calculating the energy level shift than the spontaneous emission rate. But for frequency around, there is a blue shift for both and this shift increases with the increasing of emitter-silver distance. Applying the theory to the nanosphere dimmer, we see similar phenomenon and find extremely large modifications of the spontaneous emission rate and energy level shift. These findings are instructive in the fields of quantum light-matter interactions.

  14. Optimal Mutation Rates for the (1+lambda) EA on OneMax Through Asymptotically Tight Drift Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gießen, Christian; Witt, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    We study the (1+) EA, a classical population-based evolutionary algorithm, with mutation probability c / n, where and are constant, on the benchmark function OneMax, which counts the number of 1-bits in a bitstring. We improve a well-established result that allows to determine the first hitting t...... that mutation rates up to 10% larger than the asymptotically optimal rate 1 / n minimize the expected runtime. However, in absolute terms the expected runtime does not change by much when replacing 1 / n with the optimal mutation rate....... drift is known. This reduces the analysis of expected optimization time to finding an exact expression for the drift. We then give an exact closed-form expression for the drift and develop a method to approximate it very efficiently, enabling us to determine approximate optimal mutation rates for the (1......+) EA for various parameter settings of c and and also for moderate sizes of n. This makes the need for potentially lengthy and costly experiments in order to optimize c for fixed n and for the optimization of OneMax unnecessary. Interestingly, even for moderate n and not too small it turns out...

  15. Differential effect of central command on aortic and carotid sinus baroreceptor-heart rate reflexes at the onset of spontaneous, fictive motor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Kadowaki, Akito; Liang, Nan; Ishida, Tomoko

    2012-08-15

    Our laboratory has reported that central command blunts the sensitivity of the aortic baroreceptor-heart rate (HR) reflex at the onset of voluntary static exercise in conscious cats and spontaneous contraction in decerebrate cats. The purpose of this study was to examine whether central command attenuates the sensitivity of the carotid sinus baroreceptor-HR reflex at the onset of spontaneous, fictive motor activity in paralyzed, decerebrate cats. We confirmed that aortic nerve (AN)-stimulation-induced bradycardia was markedly blunted to 26 ± 4.4% of the control (21 ± 1.3 beats/min) at the onset of spontaneous motor activity. Although the baroreflex bradycardia by electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve (CSN) was suppressed (P activity was much weaker (P abdominal aorta was blunted to 36% of the control (36 ± 1.6 beats/min) during spontaneous motor activity, suggesting that central command is able to inhibit the cardiomotor sensitivity of arterial baroreflexes as the net effect. Mechanical stretch of the triceps surae muscle never affected the baroreflex bradycardia elicited by AN or CSN stimulation and by aortic occlusion, suggesting that muscle mechanoreflex did not modify the cardiomotor sensitivity of aortic and carotid sinus baroreflex. Since the inhibitory effect of central command on the carotid baroreflex pathway, associated with spontaneous motor activity, was much weaker compared with the aortic baroreflex pathway, it is concluded that central command does not force a generalized modulation on the whole pathways of arterial baroreflexes but provides selective inhibition for the cardiomotor component of the aortic baroreflex.

  16. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations survive ovarian cancer at higher rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored multicenter study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on January 25, 2012, provides strong evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers with ovarian cancer were more

  17. Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Antimicrobial Resistance and Fitness under Low and High Mutation Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Gabriel; Zamorano, Laura; Moyà, Bartolomé; Juan, Carlos; Navas, Alfonso; Blázquez, Jesús; Oliver, Antonio

    2016-01-04

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major cause of nosocomial and chronic infections, is considered a paradigm of antimicrobial resistance development. However, the evolutionary trajectories of antimicrobial resistance and the impact of mutator phenotypes remain mostly unexplored. Therefore, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed in lineages of wild-type and mutator (ΔmutS) strains exposed to increasing concentrations of relevant antipseudomonal agents. WGS provided a privileged perspective of the dramatic effect of mutator phenotypes on the accumulation of random mutations, most of which were transitions, as expected. Moreover, a frameshift mutagenic signature, consistent with error-prone DNA polymerase activity as a consequence of SOS system induction, was also seen. This effect was evidenced for all antibiotics tested, but it was higher for fluoroquinolones than for cephalosporins or carbapenems. Analysis of genotype versus phenotype confirmed expected resistance evolution trajectories but also revealed new pathways. Classical mechanisms included multiple mutations leading to AmpC overexpression (ceftazidime), quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) mutations (ciprofloxacin), oprD inactivation (meropenem), and efflux pump overexpression (ciprofloxacin and meropenem). Groundbreaking findings included gain-of-function mutations leading to the structural modification of AmpC (ceftazidime), novel DNA gyrase (GyrA) modification (ciprofloxacin), and the alteration of the β-lactam binding site of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) (meropenem). A further striking finding was seen in the evolution of meropenem resistance, selecting for specific extremely large (>250 kb) genomic deletions providing a growth advantage in the presence of the antibiotic. Finally, fitness and virulence varied within and across evolved antibiotic-resistant populations, but mutator lineages showed a lower biological cost for some antibiotics. Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  18. Bcl11b mutations identified in murine lymphomas increase the proliferation rate of hematopoietic progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderkvist Peter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The telomeric region of mouse chromosome 12 has previously shown frequent allelic loss in murine lymphoma. The Bcl11b gene has been identified and suggested as a candidate tumor suppressor gene within this region. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether Bcl11b is mutated in lymphomas with allelic loss, and whether the mutations we detected conferred any effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods Mouse lymphomas induced by 1,3-butadiene or 2',3'-dideoxycytidine were analysed for mutations in the Bcl11b gene using single strand conformation analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Effects on cell proliferation by the detected mutations were studied by expressing wild-type and mutant Bcl11b in the cytokine-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line FDC-P1, lacking endogenous Bcl11b expression. Results Missense and frameshift (FS mutations were identified in 7 of 47 tumors (15%. Interestingly, all mutations were found between amino acids 778–844 which encode the three C-terminal DNA-binding zinc fingers. In FDC-P1 cells, wild-type Bcl11b suppressed cell proliferation, whereas the mutated versions (S778N, K828T, Y844C and FS823 enhanced proliferation several-fold. Conclusion The genetic alterations detected in this study suggest that the three C-terminal zinc fingers of Bcl11b are important for the DNA-binding. Cell proliferation was suppressed by overexpression of wild-type Bcl11b but enhanced by mutant Bcl11b, indicating that these mutations may be an important contributing factor to lymphomagenesis in a subset of tumors.

  19. Effects of a hot-water extract of porcini (Boletus aestivalis) mushrooms on the blood pressure and heart rate of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midoh, Naoki; Miyazawa, Noriko; Eguchi, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    The repeated once-daily oral administration of a hot-water extract of porcini, Boletus aestivalis, mushrooms (WEP) to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) for 18 weeks decreased the systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate. The WEP administration also decreased blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cre), and triglyceride (TG), and increased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) in the blood, suggesting that WEP improved the status of hypertension, as well as the high heart rate and metabolic abnormalities involved in hypertension.

  20. A trade-off between oxidative stress resistance and DNA repair plays a role in the evolution of elevated mutation rates in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Cabot, Gabriel; Oliver, Antonio; Buckling, Angus; MacLean, R. Craig

    2013-01-01

    The dominant paradigm for the evolution of mutator alleles in bacterial populations is that they spread by indirect selection for linked beneficial mutations when bacteria are poorly adapted. In this paper, we challenge the ubiquity of this paradigm by demonstrating that a clinically important stressor, hydrogen peroxide, generates direct selection for an elevated mutation rate in the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a consequence of a trade-off between the fidelity of DNA repair and hydrogen peroxide resistance. We demonstrate that the biochemical mechanism underlying this trade-off in the case of mutS is the elevated secretion of catalase by the mutator strain. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence that direct selection can favour mutator alleles in bacterial populations, and pave the way for future studies to understand how mutation and DNA repair are linked to stress responses and how this affects the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. PMID:23446530

  1. A consideration of two biochemical approaches to monitoring human populations for a change in germ cell mutation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.; Mohrenweiser, H.; Satoh, Chiyoko; Hamilton, H.B.

    1978-10-01

    This report presents two different strategies for monitoring increased mutation rates resulting from exposure to an environmental mutagen, both of which are based on the detection of biochemical variants of polypeptides. Using the first strategy, one monitors a defined population continuously for the rate at which children with such a variant are born to normal parents. An increase in this rate implies increasing exposure to a mutagen. With the second strategy, one contrasts the findings in the children born to a control group or groups with the findings in the children born to an exposed group, however this is defined. An example of each strategy is included. The alternatives to mutation which must be considered when a child with a variant is found to have nonaffected parents are considered. The numbers of individuals necessary to detect an increase of a specified magnitude are discussed. (author)

  2. Preconception Optimization of Glucose and Insulin Metabolism in Women Wanting to Conceive - High Rate of Spontaneous Conception Prior to Planned Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fill Malfertheiner, Sara; Gutknecht, Dagmar; Bals-Pratsch, Monika

    2017-12-01

    A hyperglycemic metabolic status with insulin resistance can have a negative effect on fertility and pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate disorders of glucose and insulin metabolism in women wanting to conceive who conceived spontaneously prior to planned assisted reproduction (ART). Associated risk factors of patients in terms of live births and miscarriages were also analyzed. Out of total study population of 589 pregnancies, the pregnancies of 129 women wishing to have children who conceived spontaneously prior to planned ART were analyzed in more detail. A 75 g OGTT (OGTT: oral glucose tolerance test) was carried out prior to conception and after determination of pregnancy, including glucose measurement and testing of insulin resistance. If anomalies or risk factors for gestational diabetes (GDM) were detected, patients received metformin therapy prior to conception (off-label use). The course and outcome of pregnancies in the defined cohort were recorded. The rate of spontaneous conception before planned ART after treatment for disorders of glucose/insulin metabolism was 21.9% (n = 129/589). 66.7% of the 129 pregnancies resulted in a live birth, 32 patients had a miscarriage. 76.0% of patients were treated with metformin (off-label use) for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), positive risk profile for GDM, or abnormal glucose/insulin metabolism prior to conception. 55.8% of the cohort developed GDM. The insulin requirements of patients with GDM differed significantly depending on their metformin intake. 24.6% of GDM patients receiving metformin treatment developed GDM requiring insulin treatment compared to 53.8% who did not receive metformin medication. The PCOS rate in the study population who had live births was significantly higher (57.0%) than in the group who had miscarriages (31.3%). There were no significant differences with regard to rate of live births and rate of miscarriages with/without metformin treatment

  3. Fitness is strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect in a microbial mutation accumulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, Karl; Toll-Riera, Macarena; Kojadinovic, Mila; MacLean, R Craig

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of the evolutionary consequences of mutation relies heavily on estimates of the rate and fitness effect of spontaneous mutations generated by mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. We performed a classic MA experiment in which frequent sampling of MA lines was combined with whole genome resequencing to develop a high-resolution picture of the effect of spontaneous mutations in a hypermutator (ΔmutS) strain of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After ∼644 generations of mutation accumulation, MA lines had accumulated an average of 118 mutations, and we found that average fitness across all lines decayed linearly over time. Detailed analyses of the dynamics of fitness change in individual lines revealed that a large fraction of the total decay in fitness (42.3%) was attributable to the fixation of rare, highly deleterious mutations (comprising only 0.5% of fixed mutations). Furthermore, we found that at least 0.64% of mutations were beneficial and probably fixed due to positive selection. The majority of mutations that fixed (82.4%) were base substitutions and we failed to find any signatures of selection on nonsynonymous or intergenic mutations. Short indels made up a much smaller fraction of the mutations that were fixed (17.4%), but we found evidence of strong selection against indels that caused frameshift mutations in coding regions. These results help to quantify the amount of natural selection present in microbial MA experiments and demonstrate that changes in fitness are strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. The erratic mitochondrial clock: variations of mutation rate, not population size, affect mtDNA diversity across birds and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galtier Nicolas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last ten years, major advances have been made in characterizing and understanding the evolution of mitochondrial DNA, the most popular marker of molecular biodiversity. Several important results were recently reported using mammals as model organisms, including (i the absence of relationship between mitochondrial DNA diversity and life-history or ecological variables, (ii the absence of prominent adaptive selection, contrary to what was found in invertebrates, and (iii the unexpectedly large variation in neutral substitution rate among lineages, revealing a possible link with species maximal longevity. We propose to challenge these results thanks to the bird/mammal comparison. Direct estimates of population size are available in birds, and this group presents striking life-history trait differences with mammals (higher mass-specific metabolic rate and longevity. These properties make birds the ideal model to directly test for population size effects, and to discriminate between competing hypotheses about the causes of substitution rate variation. Results A phylogenetic analysis of cytochrome b third-codon position confirms that the mitochondrial DNA mutation rate is quite variable in birds, passerines being the fastest evolving order. On average, mitochondrial DNA evolves slower in birds than in mammals of similar body size. This result is in agreement with the longevity hypothesis, and contradicts the hypothesis of a metabolic rate-dependent mutation rate. Birds show no footprint of adaptive selection on cytochrome b evolutionary patterns, but no link between direct estimates of population size and cytochrome b diversity. The mutation rate is the best predictor we have of within-species mitochondrial diversity in birds. It partly explains the differences in mitochondrial DNA diversity patterns observed between mammals and birds, previously interpreted as reflecting Hill-Robertson interferences with the W

  5. Rates, Distribution, and Implications of Post-zygotic Mosaic Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Elaine T.; Uddin, Mohammed; De Rubeis, Silvia; Chan, Yingleong; Kamumbu, Anne S.; Zhang, Xiaochang; D'Gama, Alissa; Kim, Sonia N.; Hill, Robert Sean; Goldberg, Arthur P.; Poultney, Christopher; Minshew, Nancy J.; Kushima, Itaru; Aleksic, Branko; Ozaki, Norio; Parellada, Mara; Arango, Celso; Penzol, Maria J.; Carracedo, Angel; Kolevzon, Alexander; Hultman, Christina M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Fromer, Menachem; Chiocchetti, Andreas G.; Freitag, Christine M.; Church, George M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    We systematically analyzed post-zygotic mutations (PZMs) in whole-exome sequences from the largest collection of trios (5,947) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) available, including 282 unpublished trios, and performed re-sequencing using multiple independent technologies. We identified 7.5% of de novo mutations as PZMs, with 83.3% of these PZMs not discovered in previous studies. Damaging, non-synonymous PZMs within critical exons of prenatally-expressed genes were more common in ASD probands than controls (P<1×10-6), and genes carrying these PZMs were enriched for expression in the amygdala (P=5.4×10-3). Two genes (KLF16 and MSANTD2) were significantly enriched for PZMs genome-wide, and other PZMs involved genes (SCN2A, HNRNPU, SMARCA4) known to cause ASD or other neurodevelopmental disorders. PZMs constitute a significant proportion of de novo mutations and contribute importantly to ASD risk. PMID:28714951

  6. The study of human mutation rates. Progress report, 1989--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-12-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

  7. Mutation of Spirulina sp. by nuclear irradiation to improve growth rate under 15% carbon dioxide in flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Lu, Hongxiang; He, Xin; Yang, Weijuan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-08-01

    Spirulina sp. was mutated by γ-rays from 60 Co nuclear irradiation to improve growth and CO 2 fixation rate under 15vol.% CO 2 (in flue gas from a power plant). Mutants with enhanced growth phenotype were obtained, with the best strain exhibiting 310% increment in biomass yield on day 4. The mutant was then domesticated with elevated CO 2 concentration, and the biomass yield increased by 500% after domestication under 15vol.% CO 2 , with stable inheritance. Ultrastructure of Spirulina sp. shows that the fractal dimension of Spirulina cells decreased by 23% after mutation. Pore size in the cell wall of Spirulina mutant increased by 33% after 15vol.% CO 2 domestication. This characteristic facilitated the direct penetration of CO 2 into cells, thus improving CO 2 biofixation rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Elevated heart rate triggers action potential alternans and sudden death. translational study of a homozygous KCNH2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigmann, Ulrich; Biliczki, Peter; Ramirez, Rafael J; Marschall, Christoph; Takac, Ina; Brandes, Ralf P; Kotzot, Dieter; Girmatsion, Zenawit; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Ehrlich, Joachim R

    2014-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) leads to arrhythmic events and increased risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). Homozygous KCNH2 mutations underlying LQTS-2 have previously been termed "human HERG knockout" and typically express severe phenotypes. We studied genotype-phenotype correlations of an LQTS type 2 mutation identified in the homozygous index patient from a consanguineous Turkish family after his brother died suddenly during febrile illness. Clinical work-up, DNA sequencing, mutagenesis, cell culture, patch-clamp, in silico mathematical modelling, protein biochemistry, confocal microscopy were performed. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous C-terminal KCNH2 mutation (p.R835Q) in the index patient (QTc ∼506 ms with notched T waves). Parents were I° cousins - both heterozygous for the mutation and clinically unremarkable (QTc ∼447 ms, father and ∼396 ms, mother). Heterologous expression of KCNH2-R835Q showed mildly reduced current amplitudes. Biophysical properties of ionic currents were also only nominally changed with slight acceleration of deactivation and more negative V50 in R835Q-currents. Protein biochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed similar expression patterns and trafficking of WT and R835Q, even at elevated temperature. In silico analysis demonstrated mildly prolonged ventricular action potential duration (APD) compared to WT at a cycle length of 1000 ms. At a cycle length of 350 ms M-cell APD remained stable in WT, but displayed APD alternans in R835Q. Kv11.1 channels affected by the C-terminal R835Q mutation display mildly modified biophysical properties, but leads to M-cell APD alternans with elevated heart rate and could precipitate SCD under specific clinical circumstances associated with high heart rates.

  9. Non-uniform Mutation Rates for Problems with Unknown Solution Lengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathabard, Stephan; Lehre, Per Kristian; Yao, Xin

    2011-01-01

    distribution, and show that the new operator can yield exponentially faster runtimes for some parameters of this distribution. The experimental results show that the new mutation operator leads to dramatically shorter runtimes on a class of instances of the software engi- neering problem that is conjectured...

  10. Studies of human mutation rates. Progress report, November 1992--October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, J.V.; Hanash, S.M.

    1993-10-27

    The progress during 1992--1993 with respect to ER 60533 is summarized in this report under three headings: The development of two-dimensional DNA gels for the detection of mutation, the mitochondrial DNA of American Indians, and molecular verification of a suggested polyogeny for the eight most common phospheglucomutose-1 (POM1)alleles.

  11. Fluoroquinolone-associated anaphylaxis in spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports in Germany: differences in reporting rates between individual fluoroquinolones and occurrence after first-ever use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Bernhardt; Riegel, Stefan; Seebeck, Jörg; Beier, Rainer; Schichler, Dagmar; Barger, Antina; Merk, Hans F; Erdmann, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    The frequency of fluoroquinolone-associated anaphylaxis has been estimated to be 1.8-23 per 10 million days of treatment based on spontaneous reports. It is unknown whether there are differences between the reporting rates of anaphylaxis with individual fluoroquinolones. According to pathophysiology, anaphylaxis may be immune mediated (anaphylactic) or not (anaphylactoid). The latter may occur after first-ever intake since no sensitisation phase is necessary. To analyse spontaneous reports of fluoroquinolone-associated anaphylaxis contained in the spontaneous adverse drug reaction database of the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices in Germany with regard to differences in reporting rates between various fluoroquinolones, the previous intake and the time to onset of the reaction. All fluoroquinolone-associated cases of anaphylaxis, anaphylactic shock, and anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reaction spontaneously reported to the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2004 were identified and assessed with regard to the correctness of the diagnosis of anaphylaxis, the causal relationship with the drug, the previous intake of fluoroquinolones and the time to onset of the reaction. In 166 of 204 cases identified, the diagnosis of anaphylaxis and a causal relationship with the drug were considered at least possible. Moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin accounted for 90 (54%), 25 (15%), 21 (13%) and 16 (10%) of the 166 cases, respectively. The corresponding reporting rates per 1 million defined daily doses based on crude estimates of exposure were 3.3, 0.6, 0.2 and 0.2 for moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin, respectively. The occurrence of anaphylaxis after the first dose or within the first three days was reported in 71 of 166 (43%) cases, but no information on prior exposure with this or any other fluoroquinolone was provided with these reports. In 21 of 166 (13%) cases, the

  12. Proteomic analysis of the low mutation rate of diploid male gametes induced by colchicine in Ginkgo biloba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Yang

    Full Text Available Colchicine treatment of G. biloba microsporocytes results in a low mutation rate in the diploid (2n male gamete. The mutation rate is significantly lower as compared to other tree species and impedes the breeding of new economic varieties. Proteomic analysis was done to identify the proteins that influence the process of 2n gamete formation in G. biloba. The microsporangia of G. biloba were treated with colchicine solution for 48 h and the proteins were analyzed using 2-D gel electrophoresis and compared to protein profiles of untreated microsporangia. A total of 66 proteins showed difference in expression levels. Twenty-seven of these proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Among the 27 proteins, 14 were found to be up-regulated and the rest 13 were down-regulated. The identified proteins belonged to five different functional classes: ATP generation, transport and carbohydrate metabolism; protein metabolism; ROS scavenging and detoxifying enzymes; cell wall remodeling and metabolism; transcription, cell cycle and signal transduction. The identification of these differentially expressed proteins and their function could help in analysing the mechanism of lower mutation rate of diploid male gamete when the microsporangium of G. biloba was induced by colchicine.

  13. Germline mutation rates in families residing in high level natural radiation areas of Kerala coast in southwest India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Birajalaxmi; Ghosh, Anu; Ahmad, Shazia; Saini, DivyaIakshmi; Chauhan, P.S.; Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    For this study, 200 nuclear families have been analyzed using over 40 mini- and microsatellite markers. Cord blood samples for the child and peripheral blood samples for the parent(s) were collected in EDTA vacuutainers from the hospital units located in High Level Natural Radiation Areas (HLNRA) and Normal Level Natural Radiation Areas (NLNRA). Both the parents of the newborn were exposed to the background dose. The families were grouped into four distinct dose groups - NLNRA group 5.00 mGy/year. An overall mutation rate of 2.08 X 10 -3 per cell per generation was observed for NLNRA and 2.12 X 10 -3 per cell per generation for HLNRA families. No radiation induced dose response was observed for the stratified groups. Thus, this study shows that mutation rates at mini- and microsatellites in the off springs of the parents living in the high background radiation areas of Kerala does not vary with radiation exposure. This is the first report to understand germline mutation rates at hypervariable loci in families residing in high level natural radiation areas of the world

  14. A compositional segmentation of the human mitochondrial genome is related to heterogeneities in the guanine mutation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, David C.; Boys, Richard J.; Henderson, Daniel A.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2003-01-01

    We applied a hidden Markov model segmentation method to the human mitochondrial genome to identify patterns in the sequence, to compare these patterns to the gene structure of mtDNA and to see whether these patterns reveal additional characteristics important for our understanding of genome evolution, structure and function. Our analysis identified three segmentation categories based upon the sequence transition probabilities. Category 2 segments corresponded to the tRNA and rRNA genes, with a greater strand-symmetry in these segments. Category 1 and 3 segments covered the protein- coding genes and almost all of the non-coding D-loop. Compared to category 1, the mtDNA segments assigned to category 3 had much lower guanine abundance. A comparison to two independent databases of mitochondrial mutations and polymorphisms showed that the high substitution rate of guanine in human mtDNA is largest in the category 3 segments. Analysis of synonymous mutations showed the same pattern. This suggests that this heterogeneity in the mutation rate is partly independent of respiratory chain function and is a direct property of the genome sequence itself. This has important implications for our understanding of mtDNA evolution and its use as a ‘molecular clock’ to determine the rate of population and species divergence. PMID:14530452

  15. Investigation of the epidermal growth factor receptor mutation rate in non-small cell lung cancer patients and the analysis of associated risk factors using logistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qinshi; Wang, Yumin; Chen, Jie; Xu, Gang; Chen, Bicheng; Pan, Jingye; Huang, Kate

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mutation rate of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and to apply logistic regression analysis to investigate the factors associated with EGFR gene mutation to provide data for the treatment of NSCLC. Paraffin tissue, bronchoscopy or pleural effusion specimens were collected from 176 NSCLC patients following pathological diagnosis. The EGFR gene exon 19 delL747-S75linss and delL747-S752ins deletion mutations, and the exon 20 T790M and exon 21 L858R mutations were identified using amplification refractory mutation system analysis. The clinical data and laboratory results of the patients were collected, and the total mutation rate of the EGFR gene in exons 19, 20 and 21 in the 176 NSCLC patients was found to be 48.3% (85/176). In addition, the EGFR gene mutation rate in adenocarcinoma was found to be significantly higher than that in squamous cell and large cell carcinoma (χ 2 =12.454; P=0.002). Furthermore, the mutation rate was found to be significantly higher in females than in males (χ 2 =13.78; P=0.001). The rate of exon 19 mutation was 21.0% (37/176), whereas the rate of exon 20 T90M mutation was 1.7% (3/176) and that of exon 21 L858R mutation was 29.0% (51/176). The logistic regression analysis revealed that the female gender, adenocarcinoma, distant metastasis and chemotherapy are factors associated with EGFR gene mutation (P<0.05). The female gender resulted in an increased incidence (2.438 times that of males) of EGFR mutation. Similarly, adenocarcinoma, distant metastasis and chemotherapy exhibited an increase in EGFR mutation risk (by 2.571, 2.810 and 0.367 times, respectively). The rate of EGFR mutation was high in the NSCLC patients, predominantly in exons 21 and 19. Therefore, these factors (female gender, adenocarcinoma, distant metastasis and chemotherapy) may increase the probability of EGFR gene mutations.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of the family of feline leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) genes, and mutational analysis in familial spontaneous epileptic cats

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Hamamoto, Yuji; Mizoguchi, Shunta; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Fujita, Michio

    2017-01-01

    Background Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) proteins play a critical role in synaptic transmission. Dysfunction of these genes and encoded proteins is associated with neurological disorders such as genetic epilepsy or autoimmune limbic encephalitis in animals and human. Familial spontaneous epileptic cats (FSECs) are the only feline strain and animal model of familial temporal lobe epilepsy. The seizure semiology of FSECs comprises recurrent limbic seizures with or without evolution into...

  17. Spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davari R

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A case with bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax was presented. Etiology, mechanism, and treatment were discussed on the review of literature. Spontaneous Pneumothorax is a clinical entity resulting from a sudden non traumatic rupture of the lung. Biach reported in 1880 that 78% of 916 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax had tuberculosis. Kjergaard emphasized 1932 the primary importance of subpleural bleb disease. Currently the clinical spectrum of spontaneous pneumothorax seems to have entered a third era with the recognition of the interstitial lung disease and AIDS as a significant etiology. Standard treatment is including: observation, thoracocentesis, tube thoracostomy. Chemical pleurodesis, bullectomy or wedge resection of lung with pleural abrasion and occasionally pleurectomy. Little information has been reported regarding the efficacy of such treatment in spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to non bleb disease

  18. Spontaneous Unfolding-Refolding of Fibronectin Type III Domains Assayed by Thiol Exchange: THERMODYNAMIC STABILITY CORRELATES WITH RATES OF UNFOLDING RATHER THAN FOLDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Riddhi; Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P; Oas, Terrence G

    2017-01-20

    Globular proteins are not permanently folded but spontaneously unfold and refold on time scales that can span orders of magnitude for different proteins. A longstanding debate in the protein-folding field is whether unfolding rates or folding rates correlate to the stability of a protein. In the present study, we have determined the unfolding and folding kinetics of 10 FNIII domains. FNIII domains are one of the most common protein folds and are present in 2% of animal proteins. FNIII domains are ideal for this study because they have an identical seven-strand β-sandwich structure, but they vary widely in sequence and thermodynamic stability. We assayed thermodynamic stability of each domain by equilibrium denaturation in urea. We then assayed the kinetics of domain opening and closing by a technique known as thiol exchange. For this we introduced a buried Cys at the identical location in each FNIII domain and measured the kinetics of labeling with DTNB over a range of urea concentrations. A global fit of the kinetics data gave the kinetics of spontaneous unfolding and refolding in zero urea. We found that the folding rates were relatively similar, ∼0.1-1 s -1 , for the different domains. The unfolding rates varied widely and correlated with thermodynamic stability. Our study is the first to address this question using a set of domains that are structurally homologous but evolved with widely varying sequence identity and thermodynamic stability. These data add new evidence that thermodynamic stability correlates primarily with unfolding rate rather than folding rate. The study also has implications for the question of whether opening of FNIII domains contributes to the stretching of fibronectin matrix fibrils. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Use of spontaneously mutated human DNA as competitive internal standard for nucleic acid quantification by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnicka, L.; Diaz, A.; Varga, J.; Jimenez, S.A.; Christiano, A.; Uitto, J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantification of gene expression is of increasing interest in many medical sciences. Methods based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) are timesaving and require only very small amounts of RNA. A limiting factor, however, is the significant fluctuation in the efficacy of reverse transcription as well in the polymerase chain reactions. Various external and internal standards have been suggested for correcting these fluctuations. We describe a novel way of creating an internal standard for assessing the expression of type VII collagen in human cells. The total RNA of a patient with hereditary 'epidermilysis bulosa dystrophica' associated with a homozygous T to A point mutation in type VII collagen gene was reverse transcribed and a 382bp fragment of type VII collagen cDNA containing the mutation was amplified. The mutated cDNA, unlike normal type VII collagen cDNA could be cleaved by 'Ear I' endonuclease into 244bp and 138bp fragments. Semiquantitative PCR was performed with the mutated cDNA as internal standard and the studied cDNA sample in the same tube in the presence of α 32 P-labelled dCTP. The reaction was followed by 'Ear I' digestion, electrophoresis on a polyacrylamide gel and exposure to a X-ray film. In conclusion, we describe a timesaving method for creating internal standards for semiquantitative RT-PCR. (author). 12 refs, 3 figs

  20. Highly efficient bi-allelic mutation rates using TALENs in Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Ishibashi

    2012-10-01

    In the past decade, Xenopus tropicalis has emerged as a powerful new amphibian genetic model system, which offers all of the experimental advantages of its larger cousin, Xenopus laevis. Here we investigated the efficiency of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs for generating targeted mutations in endogenous genes in X. tropicalis. For our analysis we targeted the tyrosinase (oculocutaneous albinism IA (tyr gene, which is required for the production of skin pigments, such as melanin. We injected mRNA encoding TALENs targeting the first exon of the tyr gene into two-cell-stage embryos. Surprisingly, we found that over 90% of the founder animals developed either partial or full albinism, suggesting that the TALENs induced bi-allelic mutations in the tyr gene at very high frequency in the F0 animals. Furthermore, mutations tyr gene were efficiently transmitted into the F1 progeny, as evidenced by the generation of albino offspring. These findings have far reaching implications in our quest to develop efficient reverse genetic approaches in this emerging amphibian model.

  1. A Site Specific Model And Analysis Of The Neutral Somatic Mutation Rate In Whole-Genome Cancer Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertl, Johanna; Guo, Qianyun; Rasmussen, Malene Juul

    2017-01-01

    Detailed modelling of the neutral mutational process in cancer cells is crucial for identifying driver mutations and understanding the mutational mechanisms that act during cancer development. The neutral mutational process is very complex: whole-genome analyses have revealed that the mutation ra...

  2. Performance Evaluation of WMN-GA for Different Mutation and Crossover Rates Considering Number of Covered Users Parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Oda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Node placement problems have been long investigated in the optimization field due to numerous applications in location science and classification. Facility location problems are showing their usefulness to communication networks, and more especially from Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs field. Recently, such problems are showing their usefulness to communication networks, where facilities could be servers or routers offering connectivity services to clients. In this paper, we deal with the effect of mutation and crossover operators in GA for node placement problem. We evaluate the performance of the proposed system using different selection operators and different distributions of router nodes considering number of covered users parameter. The simulation results show that for Linear and Exponential ranking methods, the system has a good performance for all rates of crossover and mutation.

  3. Estimation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) microsatellite mutation rate based on pedigree and single-seed descent analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslarová, Jaroslava; Hanáček, Pavel; Fialová, Eva; Hýbl, Miroslav; Smýkal, Petr

    2011-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread class of repetitive DNA sequences, used in population genetics, genetic diversity and mapping studies. In spite of the SSR utility, the genetic and evolutionary mechanisms are not fully understood. We have investigated three microsatellite loci with different position in the pea (Pisum sativum L.) genome, the A9 locus residing in LTR region of abundant retrotransposon, AD270 as intergenic and AF016458 located in 5'untranslated region of expressed gene. Comparative analysis of a 35 pair samples from seven pea varieties propagated by single-seed descent for ten generations, revealed single 4 bp mutation in 10th generation sample at AD270 locus corresponding to stepwise increase in one additional ATCT repeat unit. The estimated mutation rate was 4.76 × 10(-3) per locus per generation, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.2 × 10(-4) to 2.7 × 10(-2). The comparison of cv. Bohatýr accessions retrieved from different collections, showed intra-, inter-accession variation and differences in flanking and repeat sequences. Fragment size and sequence alternations were also found in long term in vitro organogenic culture, established at 1983, indicative of somatic mutation process. The evidence of homoplasy was detected across of unrelated pea genotypes, which adversaly affects the reliability of diversity estimates not only for diverse germplasm but also highly bred material. The findings of this study have important implications for Pisum phylogeny studies, variety identification and registration process in pea breeding where mutation rate influences the genetic diversity and the effective population size estimates.

  4. Spontaneous mutations of the UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase gene confers pale- and dull-colored flowers in the Japanese and common morning glories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yasumasa; Ishiguro, Kanako; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Iida, Shigeru; Hoshino, Atsushi

    2015-09-01

    UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3- O -glucosyltransferase is essential for maintaining proper production quantity, acylation, and glucosylation of anthocyanin, and defects cause pale and dull flower pigmentation in morning glories. The Japanese (Ipomoea nil) and the common (I. purpurea) morning glory display bright blue and dark purple flowers, respectively. These flowers contain acylated and glucosylated anthocyanin pigments, and a number of flower color mutants have been isolated in I. nil. Of these, the duskish mutants of I. nil produce pale- and dull-colored flowers. We found that the Duskish gene encodes UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (3GT). The duskish-1 mutation is a frameshift mutation caused by a 4-bp insertion, and duskish-2 is an insertion of a DNA transposon, Tpn10, at 1.3 kb upstream of the 3GT start codon. In the duskish-2 mutant, excision of Tpn10 is responsible for restoration of the expression of the 3GT gene. The recombinant 3GT protein displays expected 3GT enzymatic activities to catalyze 3-O-glucosylation of anthocyanidins in vitro. Anthocyanin analysis of a duskish-2 mutant and its germinal revertant showing pale and normal pigmented flowers, respectively, revealed that the mutation caused around 80 % reduction of anthocyanin accumulation. We further characterized two I. purpurea mutants showing pale brownish-red flowers, and found that they carry the same frameshift mutation in the 3GT gene. Most of the flower anthocyanins in the mutants were previously found to be anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosides lacking several caffeic acid and glucose moieties that are attached to the anthocyanins in the wild-type plants. These results indicated that 3GT is essential not only for production, but also for proper acylation and glucosylation, of anthocyanin in the morning glories.

  5. High Rate of Recurrent De Novo Mutations in Developmental and Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Fadi F; Myers, Candace T; Cossette, Patrick; Lemay, Philippe; Spiegelman, Dan; Laporte, Alexandre Dionne; Nassif, Christina; Diallo, Ousmane; Monlong, Jean; Cadieux-Dion, Maxime; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Meloche, Caroline; Retterer, Kyle; Cho, Megan T; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bi, Weimin; Massicotte, Christine; Miguet, Marguerite; Brunga, Ledia; Regan, Brigid M; Mo, Kelly; Tam, Cory; Schneider, Amy; Hollingsworth, Georgie; FitzPatrick, David R; Donaldson, Alan; Canham, Natalie; Blair, Edward; Kerr, Bronwyn; Fry, Andrew E; Thomas, Rhys H; Shelagh, Joss; Hurst, Jane A; Brittain, Helen; Blyth, Moira; Lebel, Robert Roger; Gerkes, Erica H; Davis-Keppen, Laura; Stein, Quinn; Chung, Wendy K; Dorison, Sara J; Benke, Paul J; Fassi, Emily; Corsten-Janssen, Nicole; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Mau-Them, Frederic T; Bruel, Ange-Line; Verloes, Alain; Õunap, Katrin; Wojcik, Monica H; Albert, Dara V F; Venkateswaran, Sunita; Ware, Tyson; Jones, Dean; Liu, Yu-Chi; Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Bizargity, Peyman; Bacino, Carlos A; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Martinelli, Simone; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Tartaglia, Marco; Blumkin, Lubov; Wierenga, Klaas J; Purcarin, Gabriela; O'Byrne, James J; Stockler, Sylvia; Lehman, Anna; Keren, Boris; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Mignot, Cyril; Auvin, Stéphane; Nava, Caroline; Hiatt, Susan M; Bebin, Martina; Shao, Yunru; Scaglia, Fernando; Lalani, Seema R; Frye, Richard E; Jarjour, Imad T; Jacques, Stéphanie; Boucher, Renee-Myriam; Riou, Emilie; Srour, Myriam; Carmant, Lionel; Lortie, Anne; Major, Philippe; Diadori, Paola; Dubeau, François; D'Anjou, Guy; Bourque, Guillaume; Berkovic, Samuel F; Sadleir, Lynette G; Campeau, Philippe M; Kibar, Zoha; Lafrenière, Ronald G; Girard, Simon L; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Boelman, Cyrus; Rouleau, Guy A; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Mefford, Heather C; Andrade, Danielle M; Rossignol, Elsa; Minassian, Berge A; Michaud, Jacques L

    2017-11-02

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE) is a group of conditions characterized by the co-occurrence of epilepsy and intellectual disability (ID), typically with developmental plateauing or regression associated with frequent epileptiform activity. The cause of DEE remains unknown in the majority of cases. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in 197 individuals with unexplained DEE and pharmaco-resistant seizures and in their unaffected parents. We focused our attention on de novo mutations (DNMs) and identified candidate genes containing such variants. We sought to identify additional subjects with DNMs in these genes by performing targeted sequencing in another series of individuals with DEE and by mining various sequencing datasets. We also performed meta-analyses to document enrichment of DNMs in candidate genes by leveraging our WGS dataset with those of several DEE and ID series. By combining these strategies, we were able to provide a causal link between DEE and the following genes: NTRK2, GABRB2, CLTC, DHDDS, NUS1, RAB11A, GABBR2, and SNAP25. Overall, we established a molecular diagnosis in 63/197 (32%) individuals in our WGS series. The main cause of DEE in these individuals was de novo point mutations (53/63 solved cases), followed by inherited mutations (6/63 solved cases) and de novo CNVs (4/63 solved cases). De novo missense variants explained a larger proportion of individuals in our series than in other series that were primarily ascertained because of ID. Moreover, these DNMs were more frequently recurrent than those identified in ID series. These observations indicate that the genetic landscape of DEE might be different from that of ID without epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Return of spontaneous Circulation Is Not Affected by Different Chest Compression Rates Superimposed with Sustained Inflations during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Newborn Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott S.; Cheung, Po-Yin; Lee, Tze-Fun; Lu, Min; O'Reilly, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recently, sustained inflations (SI) during chest compression (CC) have been suggested as an alternative to the current approach during neonatal resuscitation. However, the optimal rate of CC during SI has not yet been established. Our aim was to determine whether different CC rates during SI reduce time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and improve hemodynamic recovery in newborn piglets with asphyxia-induced bradycardia. Intervention and measurements Term newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented and exposed to 45-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Piglets were randomized into three groups: CC superimposed by SI at a rate of 90 CC per minute (SI+CC 90, n = 8), CC superimposed by SI at a rate of 120 CC per minute (SI+CC 120, n = 8), or a sham group (n = 6). Cardiac function, carotid blood flow, cerebral oxygenation and respiratory parameters were continuously recorded throughout the experiment. Main results Both treatment groups had similar time of ROSC, survival rates, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The hemodynamic recovery in the subsequent 4h was similar in both groups and was only slightly lower than sham-operated piglets at the end of experiment. Conclusion Newborn piglets resuscitated by SI+CC 120 did not show a significant advantage in ROSC, survival, and hemodynamic recovery as compared to those piglets resuscitated by SI+CC 90. PMID:27304210

  7. Effects of a tumor promoter and an anti-promoter on spontaneous and UV-induced 6-thioguanine-resistant mutations and sister-chromatid exchanges in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Kano, Y.; Tatsumi, M.; Paul, P.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of a tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and/or an anti-promoter antipain (protease inhibitor) on spontaneous and ultraviolet-induced sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and 6-thioguanine-resistant (6TGsup(r)) recessive mutations were examined in V79 Chinese hamster cells in culture. TPA and/or antipain neither significantly altered base-line and UV-induced immediate SCE frequencies, nor decreased the level of delayed SCEs which persisted 6-7 days after irradiation. TPA and/or antipain appeared to enhance the recovery of UV-induced 6TGsup(r) colonies at the plateau expression phase despite non-mutagenicity by themselves and unaltered metabolic cooperation. Thus, the results conceivably imply that the 6TGsup(r)-recessive mutation expression, but not fixation, can be modulated at the cell level by TPA and/or antipain. Our results, together with the recent results of Loveday and Latt, may argue against the notion that TPA enhances the antipain-suppressible SCEs as an index of mitotic recombination in relevance with a tumor-promotion mechanism. (orig.)

  8. Immunological responses during a virologically failing antiretroviral regimen are associated with in vivo synonymous mutation rates of HIV type-1 env

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Kronborg, Gitte

    2009-01-01

    .02). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that minor PI mutations and NRTI mutations present early during therapy failure are predictive of the CD4+ T-cell count slopes. Synonymous mutation rates of the env gene suggested that underlying differences in fitness could cause this association........ METHODS: Individuals with MDR HIV-1 receiving therapy for > or =3 months were included. CD4+ T-cell count slopes and pol and clonal env sequences were determined. Genetic analyses were performed using distance-based and maximum likelihood methods. Synonymous mutations rates of env were used to estimate...... for analysis. In a longitudinal mixed-effects model, plasma HIV-1 RNA only tended to predict immunological response (P=0.06), whereas minor protease inhibitor (PI) and nucleoside reverse transcriptase (NRTI) mutations at baseline correlated significantly with CD4+ T-cell count slopes (r= -0.56, P=0.04 and r...

  9. Molecular Clock of Neutral Mutations in a Fitness-Increasing Evolutionary Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Leo; Suzuki, Shingo; Hashimoto, Tomomi; Oyake, Ayana; Kobayashi, Hisaka; Someya, Yuki; Narisawa, Dai; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The molecular clock of neutral mutations, which represents linear mutation fixation over generations, is theoretically explained by genetic drift in fitness-steady evolution or hitchhiking in adaptive evolution. The present study is the first experimental demonstration for the molecular clock of neutral mutations in a fitness-increasing evolutionary process. The dynamics of genome mutation fixation in the thermal adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli were evaluated in a prolonged evolution experiment in duplicated lineages. The cells from the continuously fitness-increasing evolutionary process were subjected to genome sequencing and analyzed at both the population and single-colony levels. Although the dynamics of genome mutation fixation were complicated by the combination of the stochastic appearance of adaptive mutations and clonal interference, the mutation fixation in the population was simply linear over generations. Each genome in the population accumulated 1.6 synonymous and 3.1 non-synonymous neutral mutations, on average, by the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate, while only a single genome in the population occasionally acquired an adaptive mutation. The neutral mutations that preexisted on the single genome hitchhiked on the domination of the adaptive mutation. The successive fixation processes of the 128 mutations demonstrated that hitchhiking and not genetic drift were responsible for the coincidence of the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate in the genome with the fixation rate of neutral mutations in the population. The molecular clock of neutral mutations to the fitness-increasing evolution suggests that the numerous neutral mutations observed in molecular phylogenetic trees may not always have been fixed in fitness-steady evolution but in adaptive evolution. PMID:26177190

  10. An evaluation of fresh gas flow rates for spontaneously breathing cats and small dogs on the Humphrey ADE semi-closed breathing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Elizabeth; Ticehurst, Kim E; Zaki, Sanaa

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the fresh gas flow (FGF) rate requirements for the Humphrey ADE semi-closed breathing system in the Mapleson A mode; to determine the FGF at which rebreathing occurs, and compare the efficiency of this system to the Bain (Mapleson D) system in spontaneously breathing cats and small dogs. Prospective clinical study. Twenty-five healthy (ASA score I or II) client-owned cats and dogs (mean ± SD age 4.7 ± 5.0 years, and body weight 5.64 ± 3.26 kg) undergoing elective surgery or minor procedures. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane delivered via the Humphrey ADE system in the A mode using an oxygen FGF of 100 mL kg(-1) minute(-1). The FGF was then reduced incrementally by 5-10 mL kg(-1) minute(-1) at approximately five-minute intervals, until rebreathing (inspired CO(2) >5 mmHg (0.7 kPa)) was observed, after which flow rates were increased. In six animals, once the minimum FGF at which rebreathing occurred was found, the breathing system was changed to the Bain, and the effects of this FGF delivery examined, before FGF was increased. Rebreathing did not occur at the FGF recommended by the manufacturer for the ADE. The mean ± SD FGF that resulted in rebreathing was 60 ± 20 mL kg(-1) minute(-1). The mean minimum FGF at which rebreathing did not occur with the ADE was 87 ± 39 mL kg(-1) minute(-1). This FGF resulted in significant rebreathing (inspired CO(2) 8.8 ± 2.6 mmHg (1.2 ± 0.3 kPa)) on the Bain system. The FGF rates recommended for the Humphrey ADE are adequate to prevent rebreathing in spontaneously breathing cats and dogs cats and small dogs. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  11. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  12. Paternal Age Explains a Major Portion of De Novo Germline Mutation Rate Variability in Healthy Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon L Girard

    Full Text Available De novo mutations (DNM are an important source of rare variants and are increasingly being linked to the development of many diseases. Recently, the paternal age effect has been the focus of a number of studies that attempt to explain the observation that increasing paternal age increases the risk for a number of diseases. Using disease-free familial quartets we show that there is a strong positive correlation between paternal age and germline DNM in healthy subjects. We also observed that germline CNVs do not follow the same trend, suggesting a different mechanism. Finally, we observed that DNM were not evenly distributed across the genome, which adds support to the existence of DNM hotspots.

  13. Analysis of dominant and recessive sex-linked lethal mutations induced by low radiation doses in genetically different strains of Drosophila melanogaster w and MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, M.M.; Kim, A.I.; Magomedova, M.A.; Fatkulbayanova, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    Frequencies of induced recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) and dominant lethal mutations (DLM) were analyzed in genetically different Drosophila melanogaster strains w and MS after their exposure to radiation on radioactive soil in laboratory conditions. The RSLLM test applied to males after their 14-day radiation exposure yielded controversial results. An analysis of induced and spontaneous DLM demonstrated an increase in the frequency of early embryonic lethal mutations in the experiment (radiation exposure) in comparison with the control (spontaneous mutation rate) in both strains examined

  14. Dominant optic atrophy in Denmark – report of 15 novel mutations in OPA1, using a strategy with a detection rate of 90%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almind Gitte J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of the OPA1 mutation spectrum in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA in Denmark. Methods Index patients from 93 unrelated ADOA families were assessed for a common Danish founder mutation (c.2826_2836delinsGGATGCTCCA inOPA1. If negative, direct DNA sequencing of the coding sequence and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA were performed. Results from MLPA analysis have been previously reported. Haplotype analysis was carried out analysing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. Retrospective clinical data were retrieved from medical files. Results Probably causative mutations were identified in 84 out of 93 families (90% including 15 novel mutations. Three mutations c.983A > G, c.2708_2711delTTAG and c.2826_2836delinsGGATGCTCCA, were responsible for ADOA in10, 11 and 28 families, respectively, corresponding to 11%, 12% and 30%. A common haplotype in nine of ten c.983A > G families suggests that they descend from a single founder. The c.2708_2711delTTAG mutation was present on at least two haplotypes and has been repeatedly reported in various ethnic groups,thus represents a mutational hotspot. Clinical examinations of index patients with the two latter mutations demonstrated large inter- and intra-familial variations apparently. Conclusions Genetic testing for OPA1mutations assist in the diagnosis. We have identified mutations in OPA1 in 90% of families including 15 novel mutations. Both DNA sequencing and MLPA analysis are necessary to achieve a high detection rate. More than half of the affected families in Denmark are represented by three common mutations, at least two of which are due to a founder effect, which may account for the high prevalence of ADOA in Denmark.

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 acutely affects renal blood flow and urinary flow rate in spontaneously hypertensive rats despite significantly reduced renal expression of GLP-1 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronn, Jonas; Jensen, Elisa P; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J

    2017-01-01

    in the kidney from SHR. However, acute intrarenal infusion of GLP-1 increased MAP, RBF, dieresis, and natriuresis without affecting heart rate in both rat strains. These results suggest that the acute renal effects of GLP-1 in SHR are caused either by extrarenal GLP-1 receptors activating other mechanisms (e...... to increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and increased renal blood flow (RBF). In hypertensive animal models, GLP-1 has been reported both to increase and decrease MAP. The aim of this study was to examine expression of renal GLP-1 receptors in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and to assess the effect...... of acute intrarenal infusion of GLP-1. We hypothesized that GLP-1 would increase diuresis and natriuresis and reduce MAP in SHR. Immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization for the GLP-1 receptor were used to localize GLP-1 receptors in the kidney. Sevoflurane-anesthetized normotensive Sprague...

  16. Evidence of circadian rhythm, oxygen regulation capacity, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between forced and spontaneous maximal metabolic rates in lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jon C; Genz, Janet; Anderson, W Gary; Stol, Jennifer A; Watkinson, Douglas A; Enders, Eva C

    2014-01-01

    Animal metabolic rate is variable and may be affected by endogenous and exogenous factors, but such relationships remain poorly understood in many primitive fishes, including members of the family Acipenseridae (sturgeons). Using juvenile lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), the objective of this study was to test four hypotheses: 1) A. fulvescens exhibits a circadian rhythm influencing metabolic rate and behaviour; 2) A. fulvescens has the capacity to regulate metabolic rate when exposed to environmental hypoxia; 3) measurements of forced maximum metabolic rate (MMR(F)) are repeatable in individual fish; and 4) MMR(F) correlates positively with spontaneous maximum metabolic rate (MMR(S)). Metabolic rates were measured using intermittent flow respirometry, and a standard chase protocol was employed to elicit MMR(F). Trials lasting 24 h were used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR) and MMR(S). Repeatability and correlations between MMR(F) and MMR(S) were analyzed using residual body mass corrected values. Results revealed that A. fulvescens exhibit a circadian rhythm in metabolic rate, with metabolism peaking at dawn. SMR was unaffected by hypoxia (30% air saturation (O(2sat))), demonstrating oxygen regulation. In contrast, MMR(F) was affected by hypoxia and decreased across the range from 100% O(2sat) to 70% O(2sat). MMR(F) was repeatable in individual fish, and MMR(F) correlated positively with MMR(S), but the relationships between MMR(F) and MMR(S) were only revealed in fish exposed to hypoxia or 24 h constant light (i.e. environmental stressor). Our study provides evidence that the physiology of A. fulvescens is influenced by a circadian rhythm and suggests that A. fulvescens is an oxygen regulator, like most teleost fish. Finally, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between MMR(F) and MMR(S) support the conjecture that MMR(F) represents a measure of organism performance that could be a target of natural selection.

  17. Evidence of circadian rhythm, oxygen regulation capacity, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between forced and spontaneous maximal metabolic rates in lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon C Svendsen

    Full Text Available Animal metabolic rate is variable and may be affected by endogenous and exogenous factors, but such relationships remain poorly understood in many primitive fishes, including members of the family Acipenseridae (sturgeons. Using juvenile lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens, the objective of this study was to test four hypotheses: 1 A. fulvescens exhibits a circadian rhythm influencing metabolic rate and behaviour; 2 A. fulvescens has the capacity to regulate metabolic rate when exposed to environmental hypoxia; 3 measurements of forced maximum metabolic rate (MMR(F are repeatable in individual fish; and 4 MMR(F correlates positively with spontaneous maximum metabolic rate (MMR(S. Metabolic rates were measured using intermittent flow respirometry, and a standard chase protocol was employed to elicit MMR(F. Trials lasting 24 h were used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR and MMR(S. Repeatability and correlations between MMR(F and MMR(S were analyzed using residual body mass corrected values. Results revealed that A. fulvescens exhibit a circadian rhythm in metabolic rate, with metabolism peaking at dawn. SMR was unaffected by hypoxia (30% air saturation (O(2sat, demonstrating oxygen regulation. In contrast, MMR(F was affected by hypoxia and decreased across the range from 100% O(2sat to 70% O(2sat. MMR(F was repeatable in individual fish, and MMR(F correlated positively with MMR(S, but the relationships between MMR(F and MMR(S were only revealed in fish exposed to hypoxia or 24 h constant light (i.e. environmental stressor. Our study provides evidence that the physiology of A. fulvescens is influenced by a circadian rhythm and suggests that A. fulvescens is an oxygen regulator, like most teleost fish. Finally, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between MMR(F and MMR(S support the conjecture that MMR(F represents a measure of organism performance that could be a target of natural selection.

  18. Spontaneous breathing trial in T-tube negatively impact on autonomic modulation of heart rate compared with pressure support in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntzel Chiappa, Adriana M; Chiappa, Gaspar R; Cipriano, Gerson; Moraes, Ruy S; Ferlin, Elton L; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Vieira, Silvia R

    2017-07-01

    Spontaneous breathing with a conventional T-piece (TT) connected to the tracheal tube orotraqueal has been frequently used in clinical setting to weaning of mechanical ventilation (MV), when compared with pressure support ventilation (PSV). However, the acute effects of spontaneous breathing with TT versus PSV on autonomic function assessed through heart rate variability (HRV) have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of spontaneous breathing in TT vs PSV in critically ill patients. Twenty-one patients who had received MV for ≥ 48 h and who met the study inclusion criteria for weaning were assessed. Eligible patients were randomized to TT and PSV. Cardiorespiratory responses (respiratory rate -ƒ, tidal volume-V T , mean blood pressure (MBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), end tidal dioxide carbone (P ET CO 2 ), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and HRV indices in frequency domain (low-LF, high frequency (HF) and LF/HF ratio were evaluated. TT increased ƒ (20 ± 5 vs 25 ± 4 breaths/min, P<0.05), MBP (90 ± 14 vs 94 ± 18 mmHg, P<0.05), HR (90 ± 17 vs 96 ± 12 beats/min, P<0.05), P ET CO 2 (33 ± 8 vs 48 ± 10 mmHg, P<0.05) and reduced SpO 2 (98 ± 1.6 vs 96 ± 1.6%, P<0.05). In addition, LF increased (47 ± 18 vs 38 ± 12 nu, P<0.05) and HF reduced (29 ± 13 vs 32 ± 16 nu, P<0.05), resulting in higher LF/HF ratio (1.62 ± 2 vs 1.18 ± 1, P<0.05) during TT. Conversely, V T increased with PSV (0.58 ± 0.16 vs 0.50 ± 0.15 L, P<0.05) compared with TT. Acute effects of TT mode may be closely linked to cardiorespiratory mismatches and cardiac autonomic imbalance in critically ill patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Relatively high rates of G:C → A:T transitions at CpG sites were observed in certain epithelial tissues including pancreas and submaxillary gland of adult big blue® mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prtenjaca, Anita; Tarnowski, Heather E; Marr, Alison M; Heney, Melanie A; Creamer, Laura; Sathiamoorthy, Sarmitha; Hill, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    With few exceptions, spontaneous mutation frequency and pattern are similar across tissue types and relatively constant in young to middle adulthood in wild type mice. Underrepresented in surveys of spontaneous mutations across murine tissues is the diversity of epithelial tissues. For the first time, spontaneous mutations were detected in pancreas and submaxillary gland and compared with kidney, lung, and male germ cells from five adult male Big Blue® mice. Mutation load was assessed quantitatively through measurement of mutant and mutation frequency and qualitatively through identification of mutations and characterization of recurrent mutations, multiple mutations, mutation pattern, and mutation spectrum. A total of 9.6 million plaque forming units were screened, 226 mutants were collected, and 196 independent mutations were identified. Four novel mutations were discovered. Spontaneous mutation frequency was low in pancreas and high in the submaxillary gland. The submaxillary gland had multiple recurrent mutations in each of the mice and one mutant had two independent mutations. Mutation patterns for epithelial tissues differed from that observed in male germ cells with a striking bias for G:C to A:T transitions at CpG sites. A comprehensive review of lacI spontaneous mutation patterns in young adult mice and rats identified additional examples of this mutational bias. An overarching observation about spontaneous mutation frequency in adult tissues of the mouse remains one of stability. A repeated observation in certain epithelial tissues is a higher rate of G:C to A:T transitions at CpG sites and the underlying mechanisms for this bias are not known. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Male-biased mutation rates and the overestimation of extrapair paternity: problem, solution, and illustration using thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia, Alcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarguchi, G; Gissing, G J; Gaston, A J; Boag, P T; Friesen, V L

    2004-01-01

    The widespread utility of hypervariable loci in genetic studies derives from the high mutation rate, and thus the high polymorphism, of these loci. Recent evidence suggests that mutation rates can be extremely high and may be male biased (occurring in the male germ-line). These two factors combined may result in erroneous overestimates of extrapair paternity, since legitimate offspring with novel alleles will have more mismatches with respect to the biological father than the biological mother. As mutations are male driven, increasing the number of hypervariable loci screened may simply increase the number of mismatches between fathers and their legitimate offspring. Here we describe a simple statistic, the probability of resemblance (PR), to distinguish between mismatches due to parental misassignment versus mutation in either sex or null alleles. We apply this method to parentage data on thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia), and demonstrate that, without considering either mutations or male-biased mutation rates, cases of extrapair paternity (7% in this study) would be grossly overestimated (14.5%-22%). The probability of resemblance can be utilized in parentage studies of any sexually reproducing species when allele or haplotype frequency data are available for putative parents and offspring. We suggest calculating this probability to correctly categorize legitimate offspring when mutations and null alleles may cause mismatches. Copyright 2004 The American Genetic Association

  1. Radiation-induced dominant skeletal mutations in mice: mutation rate, characteristics, and usefulness in estimating genetic hazard to humans from radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.

    1979-01-01

    The work discussed in this paper represents a major advance in the difficult task of trying to estimate the effects that an increase in mutation frequency would have on human health. Male mice were bred to three females prior to being killed and skeleton studies made. Guidelines were instituted for checking progeny mutations. Surprising results showed a mutation frequency of 1.4% per gamete where none would have been expected. It is now clear that mice can be greatly deformed without showing external effects

  2. Population data and mutation rates of 19 STR loci in seven provinces from China based on Goldeneye™ DNA ID System 20A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ling; Chen, Ye-Fei; Huang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Kai-Yan; Zhao, Hu; Lu, De-Jian

    2017-05-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis is a primary tool in forensic casework. Population data and mutation rates of STRs are very important for paternity testing and forensic genetics. However, the population data and mutation rates of STRs in Han nationality based on large samples have still not been fully described in China. In this study, the allelic frequencies, forensic parameters, and mutation rate of 19 STR loci (D19S433, D5S818, D21S11, D18S51, D6S1043, D3S1358, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, CSFIPO, PentaD, vWA, D8S1179, TPOX, Penta E, TH01, D12S391, D2S1338, and FGA) based on the Goldeneye™ DNA ID System 20A in Southern China Han nationality among seven provinces were investigated. Furthermore, population stratification of Southern China Han nationality among seven provinces was established. The multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot based on genetic distances (Fst) showed that the studied populations can be clustered into two major groups. However, relationships among populations were weak (Fst < 0.0043). A total of 376 cases of mutation were detected from the 19 selected loci in 15,396 meioses. The average mutation rate for the 19 loci was estimated to be 1.3 × 10 -3 per meiosis. The mutation was mainly single step; the paternal mutation rate was higher than the maternal; and paternal mutation rate increases with paternal age.

  3. High mutation detection rate in the COL4A5 collagen gene in suspected Alport syndrome using PCR and direct DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, P; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J

    1998-01-01

    -amplified and sequenced from DNA of 50 randomly chosen patients with suspected Alport syndrome. Mutations were found in 41 patients, giving a mutation detection rate of 82%. Retrospective analysis of clinical data revealed that two of the cases might be autosomal. Although it could not be determined whether the remaining...... seven cases (14%) were autosomal or X chromosome-linked, it is likely that some of them were autosomal. It is concluded that PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing of the promoter and exons is currently the best procedure to detect mutations in COL4A5 in Alport syndrome.......Approximately 85% of patients with Alport syndrome (hereditary nephritis) have been estimated to have mutations in the X chromosomal COL4A5 collagen gene; the remaining cases are autosomal with mutations in the COL4A3 or COL4A4 genes located on chromosome 2. In the present work, the promoter...

  4. High mutation detection rate in the COL4A5 collagen gene in suspected Alport syndrome using PCR and direct DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, P; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J

    1998-01-01

    sequence and previously unknown intron sequences flanking exons 2 and 37 of COL4A5 were determined. Furthermore, intron sequences flanking the other 49 exons were expanded from 35 to 190 to facilitate mutation analysis of the gene. Using this information, all 51 exons and the promoter region were PCR......Approximately 85% of patients with Alport syndrome (hereditary nephritis) have been estimated to have mutations in the X chromosomal COL4A5 collagen gene; the remaining cases are autosomal with mutations in the COL4A3 or COL4A4 genes located on chromosome 2. In the present work, the promoter......-amplified and sequenced from DNA of 50 randomly chosen patients with suspected Alport syndrome. Mutations were found in 41 patients, giving a mutation detection rate of 82%. Retrospective analysis of clinical data revealed that two of the cases might be autosomal. Although it could not be determined whether the remaining...

  5. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessendorf, Petra; Vijg, Jan; Nussenzweig, André; Digweed, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin

  6. The success rate of bupivacaine and lidocaine as anesthetic agents in inferior alveolar nerve block in teeth with irreversible pulpitis without spontaneous pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosefi, Mohammad Hosein; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Achieving adequate anesthesia with inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB) is of great importance during dental procedures. The aim of the present study was to assess the success rate of two anesthetic agents (bupivacaine and lidocaine) for IANB when treating teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods Sixty volunteer male and female patients who required root canal treatment of a mandibular molar due to caries participated in the present study. The inclusion criteria included prolonged pain to thermal stimulus but no spontaneous pain. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine or 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine as an IANB injection. The sensitivity of the teeth to a cold test as well as the amount of pain during access cavity preparation and root canal instrumentation were recorded. Results were statistically analyzed with the Chi-Square and Fischer's exact tests. Results At the final step, fifty-nine patients were included in the study. The success rate for bupivacaine and lidocaine groups were 20.0% and 24.1%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups at any stage of the treatment procedure. Conclusions There was no difference in success rates of anesthesia when bupivacaine and lidocaine were used for IANB injections to treat mandibular molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Neither agent was able to completely anesthetize the teeth effectively. Therefore, practitioners should be prepared to administer supplemental anesthesia to overcome pain during root canal treatment. PMID:25984478

  7. The success rate of bupivacaine and lidocaine as anesthetic agents in inferior alveolar nerve block in teeth with irreversible pulpitis without spontaneous pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Parirokh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Achieving adequate anesthesia with inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB is of great importance during dental procedures. The aim of the present study was to assess the success rate of two anesthetic agents (bupivacaine and lidocaine for IANB when treating teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods Sixty volunteer male and female patients who required root canal treatment of a mandibular molar due to caries participated in the present study. The inclusion criteria included prolonged pain to thermal stimulus but no spontaneous pain. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine or 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine as an IANB injection. The sensitivity of the teeth to a cold test as well as the amount of pain during access cavity preparation and root canal instrumentation were recorded. Results were statistically analyzed with the Chi-Square and Fischer's exact tests. Results At the final step, fifty-nine patients were included in the study. The success rate for bupivacaine and lidocaine groups were 20.0% and 24.1%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups at any stage of the treatment procedure. Conclusions There was no difference in success rates of anesthesia when bupivacaine and lidocaine were used for IANB injections to treat mandibular molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Neither agent was able to completely anesthetize the teeth effectively. Therefore, practitioners should be prepared to administer supplemental anesthesia to overcome pain during root canal treatment.

  8. Cerebral correlates of heart rate variations during a spontaneous panic attack in the fMRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhalder, Kai; Hornyak, Magdolna; Kyle, Simon David; Paul, Dominik; Blechert, Jens; Seifritz, Erich; Hennig, Jürgen; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Riemann, Dieter; Feige, Bernd

    2009-12-01

    We report the first published case study of a suddenly occurring panic attack in a patient with no prior history of panic disorder during combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, 1.5 Tesla) and electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. The single case was a 46-year-old woman who developed a panic attack near the planned end of the fMRI acquisition session, which therefore had to be aborted. Correlational analysis of heart rate fluctuations and fMRI data revealed a significant negative association in the left middle temporal gyrus. Additionally, regions-of-interest (ROI) analyses indicated significant positive associations in the left amygdala, and trends towards significance in the right amygdala and left insula.

  9. Spontaneous deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, Benjamin; Geradin, Damien

    Platform businesses such as Airbnb and Uber have risen to success partly by sidestepping laws and regulations that encumber their traditional competitors. Such rule flouting is what the authors call “spontaneous private deregulation,” and it’s happening in a growing number of industries. The authors

  10. Random mtDNA mutations modulate proliferation capacity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukat, Alexandra; Edgar, Daniel; Bratic, Ivana; Maiti, Priyanka; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Increased mtDNA mutations in MEFs lead to high level of spontaneous immortalization. → This process is independent of endogenous ROS production. → Aerobic glycolysis significantly contributes to spontaneous immortalization of MEFs. -- Abstract: An increase in mtDNA mutation load leads to a loss of critical cells in different tissues thereby contributing to the physiological process of organismal ageing. Additionally, the accumulation of senescent cells that display changes in metabolic function might act in an active way to further disrupt the normal tissue function. We believe that this could be the important link missing in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of premature ageing in the mtDNA mutator mice. We tested proliferation capacity of mtDNA mutator cells in vitro. When cultured in physiological levels of oxygen (3%) their proliferation capacity is somewhat lower than wild-type cells. Surprisingly, in conditions of increased oxidative stress (20% O 2 ) mtDNA mutator mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit continuous proliferation due to spontaneous immortalization, whereas the same conditions promote senescence in wild-type cells. We believe that an increase in aerobic glycolysis observed in mtDNA mutator mice is a major mechanism behind this process. We propose that glycolysis promotes proliferation and allows a fast turnover of metabolites, but also leads to energy crisis due to lower ATP production rate. This could lead to compromised replication and/or repair and therefore, in rare cases, might lead to mutations in tumor suppressor genes and spontaneous immortalization.

  11. Random mtDNA mutations modulate proliferation capacity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukat, Alexandra [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Edgar, Daniel [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Bratic, Ivana [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Maiti, Priyanka [Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Trifunovic, Aleksandra, E-mail: aleksandra.trifunovic@ki.se [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Increased mtDNA mutations in MEFs lead to high level of spontaneous immortalization. {yields} This process is independent of endogenous ROS production. {yields} Aerobic glycolysis significantly contributes to spontaneous immortalization of MEFs. -- Abstract: An increase in mtDNA mutation load leads to a loss of critical cells in different tissues thereby contributing to the physiological process of organismal ageing. Additionally, the accumulation of senescent cells that display changes in metabolic function might act in an active way to further disrupt the normal tissue function. We believe that this could be the important link missing in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of premature ageing in the mtDNA mutator mice. We tested proliferation capacity of mtDNA mutator cells in vitro. When cultured in physiological levels of oxygen (3%) their proliferation capacity is somewhat lower than wild-type cells. Surprisingly, in conditions of increased oxidative stress (20% O{sub 2}) mtDNA mutator mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit continuous proliferation due to spontaneous immortalization, whereas the same conditions promote senescence in wild-type cells. We believe that an increase in aerobic glycolysis observed in mtDNA mutator mice is a major mechanism behind this process. We propose that glycolysis promotes proliferation and allows a fast turnover of metabolites, but also leads to energy crisis due to lower ATP production rate. This could lead to compromised replication and/or repair and therefore, in rare cases, might lead to mutations in tumor suppressor genes and spontaneous immortalization.

  12. Mutations in Cas9 Enhance the Rate of Acquisition of Viral Spacer Sequences during the CRISPR-Cas Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heler, Robert; Wright, Addison V; Vucelja, Marija; Bikard, David; Doudna, Jennifer A; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2017-01-05

    CRISPR loci and their associated (Cas) proteins encode a prokaryotic immune system that protects against viruses and plasmids. Upon infection, a low fraction of cells acquire short DNA sequences from the invader. These sequences (spacers) are integrated in between the repeats of the CRISPR locus and immunize the host against the matching invader. Spacers specify the targets of the CRISPR immune response through transcription into short RNA guides that direct Cas nucleases to the invading DNA molecules. Here we performed random mutagenesis of the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to look for variants that provide enhanced immunity against viral infection. We identified a mutation, I473F, that increases the rate of spacer acquisition by more than two orders of magnitude. Our results highlight the role of Cas9 during CRISPR immunization and provide a useful tool to study this rare process and develop it as a biotechnological application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Jackprot Simulation Couples Mutation Rate with Natural Selection to Illustrate How Protein Evolution Is Not Random.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Y-Miño C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina; Bai, Chunyan Y

    2011-09-01

    Protein evolution is not a random process. Views which attribute randomness to molecular change, deleterious nature to single-gene mutations, insufficient geological time, or population size for molecular improvements to occur, or invoke "design creationism" to account for complexity in molecular structures and biological processes, are unfounded. Scientific evidence suggests that natural selection tinkers with molecular improvements by retaining adaptive peptide sequence. We used slot-machine probabilities and ion channels to show biological directionality on molecular change. Because ion channels reside in the lipid bilayer of cell membranes, their residue location must be in balance with the membrane's hydrophobic/philic nature; a selective "pore" for ion passage is located within the hydrophobic region. We contrasted the random generation of DNA sequence for KcsA, a bacterial two-transmembrane-domain (2TM) potassium channel, from Streptomyces lividans, with an under-selection scenario, the "jackprot," which predicted much faster evolution than by chance. We wrote a computer program in JAVA APPLET version 1.0 and designed an online interface, The Jackprot Simulation http://faculty.rwu.edu/cbai/JackprotSimulation.htm, to model a numerical interaction between mutation rate and natural selection during a scenario of polypeptide evolution. Winning the "jackprot," or highest-fitness complete-peptide sequence, required cumulative smaller "wins" (rewarded by selection) at the first, second, and third positions in each of the 161 KcsA codons ("jackdons" that led to "jackacids" that led to the "jackprot"). The "jackprot" is a didactic tool to demonstrate how mutation rate coupled with natural selection suffices to explain the evolution of specialized proteins, such as the complex six-transmembrane (6TM) domain potassium, sodium, or calcium channels. Ancestral DNA sequences coding for 2TM-like proteins underwent nucleotide "edition" and gene duplications to generate the 6

  14. Comparison of substitution rates in ZFX and ZFY introns of sheep and goat related species supports the hypothesis of male-biased mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Lori-Jayne; Hewitt, Godfrey M

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that males serve as the major generators of mutations, due to the larger number of cell divisions involved in sperm compared to egg production. In mammals, this hypothesis (referred to as "male-driven evolution") has been tested by comparison of nucleotide substitution rates on the X and Y sex chromosomes in a limited number of taxa, predominantly primates and rodents. This study asks whether male-driven evolution is a more general phenomenon among mammals, by comparison of paralogous ZFX and ZFY intron sequences in sheep and goat species (the tribe Caprini). The male-to-female mutation ratio, alpha(m), was estimated to be between 2.93 (95% CI, 1.51-8.61) and 3.94 (95% CI, 1.25-32.29) when calculated using pairwise distance and branch length, respectively, suggesting that the Caprini are subject to weak, male-driven evolution. Comparison to published values for primates, felids, and rodents implies that there may be some correlation with reproductive life span. However, this is difficult to test with current data because confidence intervals are large and overlapping. Nonindependent evolution of paralogous sequences and/or the presence of selective constraints could lead to inaccurate estimates of alpha(m). No evidence for gene conversion between the ZFX and the ZFY introns was found, and this suggests that they have evolved independently during the radiation of the Caprini. Finally, there was no apparent evidence that these introns are subject to selective constraints, although low levels of intraspecific polymorphism reduce the power of neutrality tests.

  15. Albino mutation rates in red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle L.) as a bioassay of contamination history in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffitt, C.E.; Travis, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the sensitivity of a viviparous estuarine tree species, Rhizophora mangle, to historic sublethal mutagenic stress across a fine spatial scale by comparing the frequency of trees producing albino propagules in historically contaminated (n=4) and uncontaminated (n=11) forests in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Data from uncontaminated forests were used to provide estimates of background mutation rates. We also determined whether other fitness parameters were negatively correlated with mutagenic stress (e.g., degree of outcrossing and numbers of reproducing trees km-1). Contaminated sites in Tampa Bay had significantly higher frequencies of trees that were heterozygous for albinism per 1000 total reproducing trees (FHT) than uncontaminated forests (mean ?? SE: 11.4 ?? 4.3 vs 4.3 ?? 0.73, P 25 yrs of subsequent recruitment and tree replacement may have allowed an initial elevation in the FHT to decay. Patterns of FHT were not explained by distance from the bay mouth or the degree of urbanization. However, there was a significant positive relationship between tree size and FHT (r=0.83, P<0.018), which suggests that forests with older or larger trees provide a more lasting record of cumulative mutagenic stress. No other fitness parameters correlated with FHT. There was a difference in FHT between two latitudes, as determined by comparing Tampa Bay with literature values for Puerto Rico. The sensitivity of this bioassay for the effects of mutagens will facilitate future monitoring of contamination events and comparisons of bay-wide recovery in future decades. Development of a database of FHT values for a range of subtropical and tropical estuaries is underway that will provide a baseline against which to compare mutational consequences of global change. ?? 2005, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  16. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel P Sharp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health.

  17. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Nathaniel P.; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  18. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Edna; Caly, Wanda Regina

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs in 30% of patients with ascites due to cirrhosis leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. The pathogenesis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is related to altered host defenses observed in end-stage liver disease, overgrowth of microorganisms, and bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to mesenteric lymph nodes. Clinical manifestations vary from severe to slight or absent, demanding analysis of the ascitic fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by a number of neutrophils over 250/mm3 associated or not to bacterial growth in culture of an ascites sample. Enterobacteriae prevail and Escherichia coli has been the most frequent bacterium reported. Mortality rates decreased markedly in the last two decades due to early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment. Third generation intravenous cephalosporins are effective in 70% to 95% of the cases. Recurrence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is common and can be prevented by the continuous use of oral norfloxacin. The development of bacterial resistance demands the search for new options in the prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; probiotics are a promising new approach, but deserve further evaluation. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients with cirrhosis and ascites shortly after an acute episode of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 acutely affects renal blood flow and urinary flow rate in spontaneously hypertensive rats despite significantly reduced renal expression of GLP-1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronn, Jonas; Jensen, Elisa P; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Holst, Jens Juul; Sorensen, Charlotte M

    2017-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone increasing postprandial insulin release. GLP-1 also induces diuresis and natriuresis in humans and rodents. The GLP-1 receptor is extensively expressed in the renal vascular tree in normotensive rats where acute GLP-1 treatment leads to increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and increased renal blood flow (RBF). In hypertensive animal models, GLP-1 has been reported both to increase and decrease MAP. The aim of this study was to examine expression of renal GLP-1 receptors in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and to assess the effect of acute intrarenal infusion of GLP-1. We hypothesized that GLP-1 would increase diuresis and natriuresis and reduce MAP in SHR. Immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization for the GLP-1 receptor were used to localize GLP-1 receptors in the kidney. Sevoflurane-anesthetized normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats and SHR received a 20 min intrarenal infusion of GLP-1 and changes in MAP, RBF, heart rate, dieresis, and natriuresis were measured. The vasodilatory effect of GLP-1 was assessed in isolated interlobar arteries from normo- and hypertensive rats. We found no expression of GLP-1 receptors in the kidney from SHR. However, acute intrarenal infusion of GLP-1 increased MAP, RBF, dieresis, and natriuresis without affecting heart rate in both rat strains. These results suggest that the acute renal effects of GLP-1 in SHR are caused either by extrarenal GLP-1 receptors activating other mechanisms (e.g., insulin) to induce the renal changes observed or possibly by an alternative renal GLP-1 receptor. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  20. Waved with open eyelids 2 (woe2 is a novel spontaneous mouse mutation in the protein phosphatase 1, regulatory (inhibitor subunit 13 like (Ppp1r13l gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toonen Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Waved with open eyelids 2 (woe2 is a novel autosomal recessive mouse mutation that arose spontaneously in our animal facility. Upon initial evaluation, mutant mice exhibited eyelids open at birth (EOB and wavy fur phenotypes. The goals of this study were to phenotypically characterize the woe2 mice and to identify the gene harboring the mutation responsible for the woe2 phenotype. Results Histological analysis of woe2 embryos identified the failure of embryonic eyelid closure. Clinical and histological analysis of woe2 adult eyes identified severe corneal opacities, abnormalities of the anterior segment of the eye, and the absence of meibomian glands. Abnormalities in the fur texture and the absence of meibomian glands prompted us to evaluate other epidermal appendages: skin, teeth, and nails--as well as lacrimal, mammary, salivary, sebaceous and sweat glands. No obvious morphological differences between WT and woe2 mice were identified in these tissues. However, the analysis of woe2 identified cardiac abnormalities. Positional cloning of the woe2 locus identified a 1308 bp deletion in the Ppp1r13l gene. The deletion resulted in an aberrant Ppp1r13lΔexon9-11 transcript that lacks exons 9, 10 and 11 resulting in a premature stop and a loss of 223 amino acids from the C-terminal end of the putative mutant PPP1R13L protein. Immunohistological analysis during eye development identified expression of PPP1R13L in the palpebral epidermis, palpebral and bulbar conjunctiva, corneal epithelium and meibomian glands. Conclusions The woe2 mouse harbors a novel deletion within the Ppp1r13l gene, likely resulting in a complete loss of PPP1R13L function. Results from this study provide evidence that PPP1R13L has an essential role in embryonic eyelid closure as well in development of meibomian glands and the anterior segment of the eye. The woe2 mice are a useful model for investigation of the role of PPP1R13L, especially during ocular and

  1. International variation in rates of uptake of preventive options in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. Metcalfe (Kelly); D. Birenbaum-Carmeli (Daphna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); H. Lynch (Henry); P. Moller (Pal); P. Ghadirian (Parviz); W.D. Foulkes (William); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan); E. Friedman (Eitan); C. Kim-Sing (Charmaine); P.J. Ainsworth (Peter); B. Rosen (Barry); S.M. Domchek (Susan); T. Wagner (Teresa); N. Tung (Nadine); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); F.J. Couch (Fergus); P. Sun (Ping); S. Narod (Steven); M.J. Daly (Mark); A. Eisen (Andrea); H.M. Saal; K. Sweet; D. Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Rennen; J. McLennan; R. Gershoni-Baruch; J. Garber; S. Cummings; J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); B. Karlan; R.N. Kurz; W. McKinnon; M. Wood; M. Osborne (Michael); D. Gilchrist; A. Chudley; D. Fishman (David); W.S. Meschino; E. Lemire; C. Maugard; G. Mills; S.D. Merajver (Sofia); D. Rayson; J.M. Collée (Margriet)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSeveral options for cancer prevention are available for women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, including prophylactic surgery, chemoprevention and screening. The authors report on preventive practices in women with mutations from 9 countries and examine differences in uptake according to

  2. Large Variation in the Ratio of Mitochondrial to Nuclear Mutation Rate across Animals: Implications for Genetic Diversity and the Use of Mitochondrial DNA as a Molecular Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allio, Remi; Donega, Stefano; Galtier, Nicolas; Nabholz, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    It is commonly assumed that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolves at a faster rate than nuclear DNA (nuDNA) in animals. This has contributed to the popularity of mtDNA as a molecular marker in evolutionary studies. Analyzing 121 multilocus data sets and four phylogenomic data sets encompassing 4,676 species of animals, we demonstrate that the ratio of mitochondrial over nuclear mutation rate is highly variable among animal taxa. In nonvertebrates, such as insects and arachnids, the ratio of mtDNA over nuDNA mutation rate varies between 2 and 6, whereas it is above 20, on average, in vertebrates such as scaled reptiles and birds. Interestingly, this variation is sufficient to explain the previous report of a similar level of mitochondrial polymorphism, on average, between vertebrates and nonvertebrates, which was originally interpreted as reflecting the effect of pervasive positive selection. Our analysis rather indicates that the among-phyla homogeneity in within-species mtDNA diversity is due to a negative correlation between mtDNA per-generation mutation rate and effective population size, irrespective of the action of natural selection. Finally, we explore the variation in the absolute per-year mutation rate of both mtDNA and nuDNA using a reduced data set for which fossil calibration is available, and discuss the potential determinants of mutation rate variation across genomes and taxa. This study has important implications regarding DNA-based identification methods in predicting that mtDNA barcoding should be less reliable in nonvertebrates than in vertebrates. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Active site mutations in yeast protein disulfide isomerase cause dithiothreitol sensitivity and a reduced rate of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, B; Tachibana, C; Winther, Jakob R.

    1997-01-01

    . Such mutations had no significant effect on growth. The domains however, were not equivalent since the rate of folding of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) in vivo was reduced by inactivation of the a domain but not the a' domain. To investigate the relevance of PDI redox potential, the G and H positions of each CGHC...

  4. The influence of continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate on the survival rote and induction of gene mutations in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feoktistova, T.P.; Elisova, E.V.; Stavrakova, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    Continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate was shown to be less effective than acute exposure with regard to the lethal effect and frequency of mutations of resistance to 6-thioguanine in cultured Chinese hamster cells. The cell population subjected to continuons irradiation was d more radioresistant than the intact one. Lethal and genetic effects of continuous irradiation at decreasing dose-rate were mainly determined by the contribution of the radiation dose received during the first 24 h of exposure

  5. Differences in Adverse Event Reporting Rates of Therapeutic Failure Between Two Once-daily Extended-release Methylphenidate Medications in Canada: Analysis of Spontaneous Adverse Event Reporting Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Wyllie, Laura; van Stralen, Judy; Castillon, Genaro; Sherman, Stephen E; Almagor, Doron

    2017-10-01

    premature loss of efficacy (shorter duration of action) was described in 98 cases (42.6%) and occurred primarily in the afternoon. Impacts on social functioning, such as disruption in work or school performance or adverse social behaviors, were found in 51 cases (22.2%). The ~10-fold higher reporting rate of therapeutic failure with the generic product relative to its reference product in the present Canadian study resembles findings with US-marketed generic products. While these results should be interpreted with caution due to the limitations of spontaneous adverse event reporting, which may confound comparisons across products, similar findings nonetheless led the US Food and Drug Administration to declare in 2014 that 2 methylphenidate ER generic products in the United States were neither bioequivalent nor interchangeable with OROS methylphenidate-their reference product. Our results indicate a potential safety issue with the Canadian-marketed generic and suggest a need for further investigation by Health Canada. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, "background selection" against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 10(12) individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m = 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate of Ne, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne × s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force if s is above 10(-7) or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10(-9) per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more sophisticated theory considers that bacterial genomes have millions of sites each and selection events on these many sites could interfere with each other, so that only larger effects would be important. However, bacteria can exchange genetic material, and in principle, this exchange could eliminate the interference between the evolution of the sites. We used simulations to confirm that during multisite evolution with realistic levels of recombination, only larger effects are important. We propose that advantages of less than 10(-7) are effectively neutral

  7. Evolution in Fast Forward: a Potential Role for Mutators in Accelerating Staphylococcus aureus Pathoadaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Gregory S.; Schwingel, Johanna M.; Foley, Matthew H.; Vore, Kelly L.; Boonanantanasarn, Kanitsak; Gill, Ann L.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogen evolution and subsequent phenotypic heterogeneity during chronic infection are proposed to enhance Staphylococcus aureus survival during human infection. We tested this theory by genetically and phenotypically characterizing strains with mutations constructed in the mismatch repair (MMR) and oxidized guanine (GO) system, termed mutators, which exhibit increased spontaneous-mutation frequencies. Analysis of these mutators revealed not only strain-dependent increases in the spontaneous-mutation frequency but also shifts in mutational type and hot spots consistent with loss of GO or MMR functions. Although the GO and MMR systems are relied upon in some bacterial species to prevent reactive oxygen species-induced DNA damage, no deficit in hydrogen peroxide sensitivity was found when either of these DNA repair pathways was lost in S. aureus. To gain insight into the contribution of increased mutation supply to S. aureus pathoadaptation, we measured the rate of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation during serial passage. Detection of increased rates of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation in GO and MMR mutants suggests that these strains are capable of modifying virulence phenotypes implicated in mediating infection. Accelerated derivation of altered virulence phenotypes, combined with the absence of increased ROS sensitivity, highlights the potential of mutators to drive pathoadaptation in the host and serve as catalysts for persistent infections. PMID:23204459

  8. A novel 'splice site' HCN4 Gene mutation, c.1737+1 G>T, causes familial bradycardia, reduced heart rate response, impaired chronotropic competence and increased short-term heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, Lidia; Csányi, Beáta; Ördög, Balázs; Kákonyi, Kornél; Tringer, Annamária; Kiss, Orsolya; Orosz, Andrea; Sághy, László; Nagy, István; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Rudas, László; Széll, Márta; Varró, András; Forster, Tamás; Sepp, Róbert

    2017-08-15

    The most important molecular determinant of heart rate regulation in sino-atrial pacemaker cells includes hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, the major isoform of which is encoded by the HCN4 gene. Mutations affecting the HCN4 gene are associated primarily with sick sinus syndrome. A novel c.1737+1 G>T 'splice-site' HCN4 mutation was identified in a large family with familial bradycardia which co-segregated with the disease providing a two-point LOD score of 4.87. Twelve out of the 22 investigated family members [4 males, 8 females average age 36 (SD 6) years] were considered as clinically affected (heart rateheart rates [62 (SD 8) vs. 73 (SD 8) bpm, p=0.0168) were significantly lower in carriers on 24-hour Holter recordings. Under maximum exercise test carriers achieved significantly lower heart rates than non-carrier family members, and percent heart rate reserve and percent corrected heart rate reserve were significantly lower in carriers. Applying rigorous criteria for chronotropic incompetence a higher number of carriers exhibited chronotropic incompetence. Parameters, characterizing short-term variability of heart rate (i.e. rMSSD and pNN50%) were increased in carrier family members, even after normalization for heart rate, in the 24-hour ECG recordings with the same relative increase in 5-minute recordings. The identified novel 'splice site' HCN4 gene mutation, c.1737+1 G>T, causes familial bradycardia and leads to reduced heart rate response, impaired chronotropic competence and increased short-term heart rate variability in the mutation carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytologic anaplasia is a prognostic factor in osteosarcoma biopsies, but mitotic rate or extent of spontaneous tumor necrosis are not: a critique of the College of American Pathologists Bone Biopsy template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Justin Mm; Dupont, William D

    2017-01-01

    The current College of American Pathologists cancer template for reporting biopsies of bone tumors recommends including information that is of unproven prognostic significance for osteosarcoma, such as the presence of spontaneous tumor necrosis and mitotic rate. Conversely, the degree of cytologic anaplasia (degree of differentiation) is not reported in this template. This retrospective cohort study of 125 patients with high-grade osteosarcoma was performed to evaluate the prognostic impact of these factors in diagnostic biopsy specimens in predicting the clinical outcome and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to adjust survival analyses for well-established prognostic factors. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine odds ratios for good chemotherapy response (≥90% tumor necrosis). Osteosarcomas with severe anaplasia were independently associated with increased overall and disease-free survival, but mitotic rate and spontaneous necrosis had no prognostic impact after controlling for other confounding factors. Mitotic rate showed a trend towards increased odds of a good histologic response, but this effect was diminished after controlling for other predictive factors. Neither spontaneous necrosis nor the degree of cytologic anaplasia observed in biopsy specimens was predictive of a good response to chemotherapy. Mitotic rate and spontaneous tumor necrosis observed in pretreatment biopsy specimens of high-grade osteosarcoma are not strong independent prognostic factors for clinical outcome or predictors of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Therefore, reporting these parameters for osteosarcoma, as recommended in the College of American Pathologists Bone Biopsy template, does not appear to have clinical utility. In contrast, histologic grading schemes for osteosarcoma based on the degree of cytologic anaplasia may have independent prognostic value and should continue to be evaluated.

  10. Reversed dose-rate effect and RBE of 252-californium radiation in the induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutations in mouse L5178Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N; Sawada, S

    1988-09-01

    The effects of californium-252 radiation (average neutron energy E = 2.13 MeV) were investigated using mouse leukemia L5178Y cells. No dose-rate effect was detected for cell killing, but a 'reversed' dose-rate effect was observed for mutation induction. The frequency of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutations increased linearly up to 100 cGy (1 Gy = 100 rad), then began to level off at a dose rate of 1.2 cGy/min, while it increased continuously up to 200 cGy at a reduced dose rate of 0.16 cGy/min. Compared with results obtained using 60Co gamma-rays, the ratio of the initial slope of each dose-response curve was 4-5 for cell killing, and more than 11 for mutagenesis. Since one-third of 252Cf radiation consists of gamma-rays, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 252Cf neutrons would be even greater, 16 or more, for mutation induction in the present assay.

  11. Reduced rates of gene loss, gene silencing, and gene mutation in Dnmt1-deficient embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, M.F.; van Amerongen, R.; Nijjar, T.; Cuppen, E.; Jones, P.A.; Laird, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene inactivation is a crucial event in oncogenesis. Gene inactivation mechanisms include events resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH), gene mutation, and transcriptional silencing. The contribution of each of these different pathways varies among tumor suppressor genes and by

  12. Male and female differential reproductive rate could explain parental transmission asymmetry of mutation origin in Hirschsprung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Amiel, Jeanne; Pelet, Anna; Lantieri, Francesca; Fernandez, Raquel M.; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Garcia-Barcelo, Merce; Arnold, Stacey; Ceccherini, Isabella; Borrego, Salud; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Tam, Paul K. H.; Munnich, Arnold; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clerget-Darpoux, Francoise; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, aganglionic megacolon) is a complex and heterogeneous disease with an incidence of 1 in 5000 live births. Despite the multifactorial determination of HSCR in the vast majority of cases, there is a monogenic subgroup for which private rare RET coding sequence mutations

  13. Familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism associated with germline GCM2 mutations is more aggressive and has a lesser rate of biochemical cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Lakis, Mustapha; Nockel, Pavel; Guan, Bin; Agarwal, Sunita; Welch, James; Simonds, William F; Marx, Stephen; Li, Yulong; Nilubol, Naris; Patel, Dhaval; Yang, Lily; Merkel, Roxanne; Kebebew, Electron

    2018-01-01

    Hereditary primary hyperparathyroidism may be syndromic or nonsyndromic (familial isolated hyperparathyroidism). Recently, germline activating mutations in the GCM2 gene were identified in a subset of familial isolated hyperparathyroidism. This study examined the clinical and biochemical characteristics and the treatment outcomes of GCM2 mutation-positive familial isolated hyperparathyroidism as compared to sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical features, parathyroid pathology, and operative outcomes in 18 patients with GCM2 germline mutations and 457 patients with sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism. Age at diagnosis, sex distribution, race/ethnicity, and preoperative serum calcium concentrations were similar between the 2 groups. The preoperative serum levels of intact parathyroid hormone was greater in patients with GCM2-associated primary hyperparathyroidism (239 ± 394 vs 136 ± 113, P = .005) as were rates of multigland disease and parathyroid carcinoma in the GCM2 group (78% vs 14.3%, P hyperparathyroidism patients have greater preoperative parathyroid hormone levels, a greater rate of multigland disease, a lesser rate of biochemical cure, and a substantial risk of parathyroid carcinoma. Knowledge of these clinical characteristics could optimize the surgical management of GCM2-associated familial isolated hyperparathyroidism. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The use of PIG-A as a sentinel gene for the study of the somatic mutation rate and of mutagenic agents in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzi, Benedetta; Araten, David J; Notaro, Rosario; Luzzatto, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    Mutations are an inherent risk of cell duplication. On one hand, inheritable mutations are the driving force of biological evolution; on the other hand, their accumulation in somatic cells plays a key role in the development of cancer. The frequency of mutants (f) and the rate of mutation (mu) are biological features of any cell population: their measurement could provide important information about the risk of oncogenesis and the exposure to carcinogenic agents. However, the measurement of these parameters is not trivial. To measure f and mu, a potential sentinel gene is the PIG-A gene, which encodes one of the subunits of an enzyme essential in the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). Since PIG-A is X-linked, mutational inactivation of the one single copy active in somatic cells entails absence from the cell surface of all the proteins that require GPI for attachment to the membrane: thus, mutant cells display a GPI-negative surface phenotype that can be easily detected by flow cytometry. The measurement of PIG-A mutants by counting cells with the GPI-negative phenotype has proved to be effective to measure mutant frequency in peripheral blood cells of humans and of others animals. Up to now, mu has been exceedingly difficult to measure in human cells; however, by using as a sentinel the PIG-A gene in lymphoblastoid cell lines we now have a test that makes it practical to measure mu in human cells. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic data and de novo mutation rates in father-son pairs of 23 Y-STR loci in Southern Brazil population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Fré, Nicole Nascimento; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gastaldo, André Zoratto; Hanson, Erin; Ballantyne, Jack; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated haplotype and allele frequencies, as well as statistical forensic parameters, for 23 Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) loci of the PowerPlex®Y23 system (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, Y-GATA-H4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, DYS643) in a sample of 150 apparently healthy males, resident in South Brazil. A total of 150 different haplotypes were identified. The highest gene diversity (GD) was observed for the single locus marker DYS570 (GD = 0.7888) and for a two-locus system DYS385 (GD = 0.9009). We also examined 150 father-son pairs by the same system, and a total of 13 mutations were identified in the 3450 father-son allelic transfers, with an overall mutation rate across the 23 loci of 3.768 × 10(-3) (95% CI: 3.542 × 10(-3) to 3.944 × 10(-3)). In all cases there was only one locus mutated with gain/loss of repeats in the son (5 one-repeat gains, and 7 one-repeat and 1 two-repeat losses); we observed no instances of mutations involving a non-integral number of repeats.

  16. Association of mutator activity with UV sensitivity in an aphidicolin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.K.; Chang, C.; Trosko, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation rates of an ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitive aphidicolin-resistant mutant (aphsup(r)-4-2) and its revertants have been determined by 2 techniques. By using the fluctuation analysis, the mutant and its thymidine (TdR)-prototrophic 'revertant' were found to exhibit elevated spontaneous mutation rates at the 6-thioguanine- and diphtheria-toxin-resistant loci. In contrast, the TdR-auxotrophic 'revertant' did not show this property. Similar results were obtained by the multiple replating technique. From these comparative studies and other previous characterizations, it appears that a single gene mutation is responsible for the following pleiotropic phenotype: slow growth, UV sensitivity, high UV-induced mutability, high frequency of site-specific bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-dependent chromosome breaks and enhanced spontaneous mutation rate. Recent studies indicate that the mutation may be on the gene for DNA polymerase α. The results further indicate that thymidine auxotrophy or imbalance in nucleotide pools is not necessarily associated with the mutator activity in mammalian cells. (orig.)

  17. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters August 12, 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks ... have a high number of spontaneous mutations in genes that form a network in the front region ...

  18. Mutations to R. sphaeroides Reaction Center Perturb Energy Levels and Vibronic Coupling but Not Observed Energy Transfer Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Moira L; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Rolczynski, Brian S; Massey, Sara C; Engel, Gregory S

    2016-03-10

    The bacterial reaction center is capable of both efficiently collecting and quickly transferring energy within the complex; therefore, the reaction center serves as a convenient model for both energy transfer and charge separation. To spectroscopically probe the interactions between the electronic excited states on the chromophores and their intricate relationship with vibrational motions in their environment, we examine coherences between the excited states. Here, we investigate this question by introducing a series of point mutations within 12 Å of the special pair of bacteriochlorophylls in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center. Using two-dimensional spectroscopy, we find that the time scales of energy transfer dynamics remain unperturbed by these mutations. However, within these spectra, we detect changes in the mixed vibrational-electronic coherences in these reaction centers. Our results indicate that resonance between bacteriochlorophyll vibrational modes and excitonic energy gaps promote electronic coherences and support current vibronic models of photosynthetic energy transfer.

  19. Neurobiological correlates of impulsivity in healthy adults: Lower prefrontal gray matter volume and spontaneous eye-blink rate but greater resting-state functional connectivity in basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korponay, Cole; Dentico, Daniela; Kral, Tammi; Ly, Martina; Kruis, Ayla; Goldman, Robin; Lutz, Antoine; Davidson, Richard J

    2017-08-15

    Studies consistently implicate aberrance of the brain's reward-processing and decision-making networks in disorders featuring high levels of impulsivity, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, substance use disorder, and psychopathy. However, less is known about the neurobiological determinants of individual differences in impulsivity in the general population. In this study of 105 healthy adults, we examined relationships between impulsivity and three neurobiological metrics - gray matter volume, resting-state functional connectivity, and spontaneous eye-blink rate, a physiological indicator of central dopaminergic activity. Impulsivity was measured both by performance on a task of behavioral inhibition (go/no-go task) and by self-ratings of attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). Overall, we found that less gray matter in medial orbitofrontal cortex and paracingulate gyrus, greater resting-state functional connectivity between nodes of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical network, and lower spontaneous eye-blink rate were associated with greater impulsivity. Specifically, less prefrontal gray matter was associated with higher BIS-11 motor and non-planning impulsivity scores, but was not related to task performance; greater correlated resting-state functional connectivity between the basal ganglia and thalamus, motor cortices, and prefrontal cortex was associated with worse no-go trial accuracy on the task and with higher BIS-11 motor impulsivity scores; lower spontaneous eye-blink rate was associated with worse no-go trial accuracy and with higher BIS-11 motor impulsivity scores. These data provide evidence that individual differences in impulsivity in the general population are related to variability in multiple neurobiological metrics in the brain's reward-processing and decision-making networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reversion of somatic mutations of the respiratory syncytial virus-specific human monoclonal antibody Fab19 reveal a direct relationship between association rate and neutralizing potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, John T; Keefer, Christopher J; Utley, Thomas J; Correia, Bruno E; Schief, William R; Crowe, James E

    2013-04-01

    The role of affinity in determining neutralizing potency of mAbs directed against viruses is not well understood. We investigated the kinetic, structural, and functional advantage conferred by individual naturally occurring somatic mutations in the Ab H chain V region of Fab19, a well-described neutralizing human mAb directed to respiratory syncytial virus. Comparison of the affinity-matured Ab Fab19 with recombinant Fab19 Abs that were variants containing reverted amino acids from the inferred unmutated ancestor sequence revealed the molecular basis for affinity maturation of this Ab. Enhanced binding was achieved through mutations in the third H chain CDR (HCDR3) that conferred a markedly faster on-rate and a desirable increase in antiviral neutralizing activity. In contrast, most somatic mutations in the HCDR1 and HCDR2 regions did not significantly enhance Ag binding or antiviral activity. We observed a direct relationship between the measured association rate (Kon) for F protein and antiviral activity. Modeling studies of the structure of the Ag-Ab complex suggested the HCDR3 loop interacts with the antigenic site A surface loop of the respiratory syncytial virus F protein, previously shown to contain the epitope for this Ab by experimentation. These studies define a direct relationship of affinity and neutralizing activity for a viral glycoprotein-specific human mAb.

  1. Retrospective genetic study of germinative mutations in Str loci of individuals potentially exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Emilia Oliveira Alves

    2010-01-01

    The Brazilian radiological accident that occurred in 1987, in Goiania, it was a terrible radiation episode. As a consequence, hundreds of people were contaminated due to the Cesium-137 radiation. Recently, many studies had shown that genome instabilities, such as, mutations, chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei formation and micro satellite instability and a delay on cellular death are usually reported on mammal cells exposed to ionizing radiation, being considered as a manly risk to humans. Mutations can be spontaneous, and the occurrence is dependent on the organism, or, induced, being associated to mutagenic exposition. Ionizing radiations are an example of physical and mutagenic agents that could harm the cell repair and could cause the development of many types of cancer. The evaluation of the biological effects of the ionizing radiation, in somatic and germ line cells, with a consequent determination of the radio-induced mutations, it is extremely important to estimate the genetic risks, manly in population exposed to radiation. The analyses of repetitive DNA sequences have been demonstrated that such sequences are prone to high rates of spontaneous mutations. The minisatellites and microsatellites have been used to demonstrate the induction of germ line mutation rates on mouse, humans, among others organisms. The aim of the present study was to analyze the frequency of microsatellite alterations to determine the mutation rates occurred in germ cells of the parents exposed to the ionizing radiation of the Cesium-137. The studied group was constitute of 10 families of individuals accidentally exposed to Cesium-137 and by the control group constituted by 645 healthy individuals who carried out paternity tests on 2009. We found only one mutation of paternal origin in the D8S1179 locus on the exposed group, being the mutation rate of 0.002. In the control group, we found 01 mutation on D16S539 loei and on D3S1358; 02 mutations on Penta E loeus; 04 mutations on D

  2. Mutation rate switch inside Eurasian mitochondrial haplogroups: impact of selection and consequences for dating settlement in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Pierron

    Full Text Available R-lineage mitochondrial DNA represents over 90% of the European population and is significantly present all around the planet (North Africa, Asia, Oceania, and America. This lineage played a major role in migration "out of Africa" and colonization in Europe. In order to determine an accurate dating of the R lineage and its sublineages, we analyzed 1173 individuals and complete mtDNA sequences from Mitomap. This analysis revealed a new coalescence age for R at 54.500 years, as well as several limitations of standard dating methods, likely to lead to false interpretations. These findings highlight the association of a striking under-accumulation of synonymous mutations, an over-accumulation of non-synonymous mutations, and the phenotypic effect on haplogroup J. Consequently, haplogroup J is apparently not a Neolithic group but an older haplogroup (Paleolithic that was subjected to an underestimated selective force. These findings also indicated an under-accumulation of synonymous and non-synonymous mutations localized on coding and non-coding (HVS1 sequences for haplogroup R0, which contains the major haplogroups H and V. These new dates are likely to impact the present colonization model for Europe and confirm the late glacial resettlement scenario.

  3. Relative rates at which dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations are induced by alkylating chemicals in postmeiotic male germ cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generoso, W M; Huff, S W; Cain, K T

    1979-09-01

    There is a close relationship between the rates at which dominant lethal mutations and heritable translocations are induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) or triethylenemelamine (TEM) in male postmeiotic germ cells. This relationship does not hold for isopropyl methanesulfonate (IMS), which induced only negligible frequencies of heritable translocations at doses that induced high levels of dominant lethal mutations. Nor does IMS behave like EMS and TEM in the degree to which eggs of different stocks of females repair premutational lesions that are carried in the sperm-large differences between stocks for IMS treatment and small differences for EMS or TEM treatment. These dissimilarities between IMS and the other two alkylating chemicals are postulated to be attributable to differences in the types of lesions present at the time of repair activity and to whether or not chromosomal aberrations are already fixed prior to postfertilization pronuclear DNA synthesis.

  4. Active site mutations in yeast protein disulfide isomerase cause dithiothreitol sensitivity and a reduced rate of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, B; Tachibana, C; Winther, Jakob R.

    1997-01-01

    . Such mutations had no significant effect on growth. The domains however, were not equivalent since the rate of folding of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) in vivo was reduced by inactivation of the a domain but not the a' domain. To investigate the relevance of PDI redox potential, the G and H positions of each CGHC...... active site were randomly mutagenized. The resulting mutant PDIs were ranked by their growth phenotype on medium containing increasing concentrations of DTT. The rate of CPY folding in the mutants showed the same ranking as the DTT sensitivity, suggesting that the oxidative power of PDI is an important...... factor in folding in vivo. Mutants with a PDI that cannot perform oxidation reactions on its own (CGHS) had a strongly reduced growth rate. The growth rates, however, did not correlate with CPY folding, suggesting that the protein(s) required for optimal growth are dependent on PDI for oxidation. pdi1...

  5. Assaying Mutations Associated With Gene Conversion Repair of a Double-Strand Break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Gajendrahar; Haber, James E

    2018-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) is a cytotoxic lesion and needs to be repaired immediately. There are several metabolic pathways evolved to repair a DSB. Gene conversion is one of the least error-prone pathway for repair of a DNA DSB. Despite this there is nearly 1000-fold increase in mutation rate associated with gene conversion. Not only higher mutation rate is associated with gene conversion but also there is a very distinct mutation profile compared to spontaneous mutation events. Gene conversion is characterized by the presence of very high frameshift mutation events and other complex mutations that are not present during regular DNA replication. Another DNA DSB repair pathway widely studied is "break-induced replication" (BIR). BIR has been shown to be highly mutagenic in nature. BIR may lead to chromosomal rearrangement and has potential to cause cluster mutations with serious disease implications. In this chapter, the design of assay systems to study various mutation types and experimental procedures to measure specific mutation frequency associated with gene conversion are discussed. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Mutation in a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Gene (Rad3) Required for Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription Increases the Efficiency of Mismatch Correction

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Y.; Johnson, A. L.; Johnston, L. H.; Siede, W.; Friedberg, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Kunz, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    RAD3 functions in DNA repair and transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and particular rad3 alleles confer a mutator phenotype, possibly as a consequence of defective mismatch correction. We assessed the potential involvement of the Rad3 protein in mismatch correction by comparing heteroduplex repair in isogenic rad3-1 and wild-type strains. The rad3-1 allele increased the spontaneous mutation rate but did not prevent heteroduplex repair or bias its directionality. Instead, the efficiency ...

  7. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency.

  8. Rates of spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions for drugs reported in children: a cross-sectional study with data from the Swedish adverse drug reaction database and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstedt, Susanna M; Brunlöf, Gertrud; Sundström, Anders

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of drug safety is limited in the paediatric population, especially for drugs not used as labelled. Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) may be an important source for increased knowledge, but the extent of the overall rate of reporting in children is not known. The main objective of the study was to determine the extent of the spontaneous reporting of ADRs in children with a focus on drugs not used as labelled; this involved investigations of reporting rates of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) per 1000 treated individuals for drugs reported in children, to compare these between drugs labelled and not labelled for use in children, and to compare the rates for children with those of adults. ICSRs (extracted from the Swedish ADR database) and number of treated individuals (extracted from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register) were analysed for a 2-year period (2006-7). For drugs with one or more ICSR regarding children, rates of ICSRs per 1000 treated individuals were determined and compared between children (10% of the volume was sold over-the-counter or for in-hospital use were excluded. The overall reporting ratio of aggregated ICSRs per 1000 treated individuals was calculated between drugs not labelled and drugs labelled for use in children, separately for children and adults. The overall reporting ratio was also calculated between children and adults, separately for drugs labelled and drugs not labelled for use in children. A total of 255 (children) and 1402 (adults) ICSRs concerning 94 drugs were included in the analysis. Seventy-four (29%) and 711 (51%) ICSRs in children and adults, respectively, were registered as serious (p rates of ICSRs per 1000 treated individuals varied between (range) 0.01-6.45 (children) and 0.01-6.39 (adults). For 17 of the drugs (18%) the rates of ICSRs per treated individual were significantly higher for children than for adults, and for 2 of the drugs (2%) the result was the opposite. The overall

  9. Specific-locus experiments show that female mice exposed near the time of birth to low-LET ionizing radiation exhibit both a low mutational response and a dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.; Lee, S.S.; Kelly, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Raymer, G.D.; Hunsicker, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    Female mice were exposed to 300 R of 73-93 R/min X-radiation either as fetuses at 18.5d post conception (p.c.) or within 9h after birth. Combining the similar results from these 2 groups yielded a specific-locus mutation frequency of 9.4x10 -8 mutation/locus/R, which is statistically significantly higher than the historical-control mutation frequency, but much lower than the rate obtained by irradiating mature and maturing oocytes in adults. Other females, exposed at 18.5 days p.c. to 300 R of 0.79 R/min γ-radiation, yielded a mutation frequency that was statistically significantly lower than the frequency at high dose rates. The low-dose-rate group also had markedly higher fertility. It appears that the doe-rate effect for mutations induced near the time of birth may be more pronounced than that reported for mature and maturing oocytes of adults. A hypothesis sometimes advanced to explain low mutation frequencies recovered from cell populations that experience considerable radiation-induced cell killing is that there is selection against mutant cells. The reason for the relatively low mutational response following acute irradiation in the experiments is unknown; however, the finding of a dose-rate effect in these oocytes in the presence of only minor radiation-induced cell killing (as judged from fertility) makes it seem unlikely that selection was responsible for the low mutational response following acute exposure. Had selection been an important factor, the mutation frequency should have increased when oocyte killing was markedly reduced. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  10. Spontaneous pneumothorax in weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnejon, T; Sarac, S; Cropp, A J

    1995-06-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is infrequently caused by strenuous exertion. To our knowledge there has only been one case of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting reported in the medical literature. We describe three consecutive cases of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting. We postulate that spontaneous pneumothorax in these patients may be secondary to improper breathing techniques. It is important that physicians and weight trainers be aware of the association between weight lifting and spontaneous pneumothorax and assure that proper instruction is given to athletes who work with weights.

  11. Spontaneous transition rates for electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions for He-like calcium and sulfur ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, A.E.; Norrington, P.H.; Boone, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The spontaneous decay rates for the electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions between all of the 1s 2 , 1s2 l and 1s3 l states have been obtained for helium-like calcium and sulfur ions. To assess the accuracy of the calculations, the transition probabilities were calculated using two sets of configuration interaction wavefunctions. One set of wavefunctions was generated using the fully relativistic GRASP code and the other was obtained using CIV3, in which relativistic effects are introduced using the Breit-Pauli approximation. The transition rates, A values, oscillator strengths and line strengths from our two calculations are found to be similar and to compare very well with other recent results for Δn=1 or 2 transitions. For Δn=0 transitions the agreement is much less good; this is mainly due to differences in the calculated excitation energies. (author)

  12. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Detecting p53 Gene Mutations in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong CHEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that p53 gene was related to many human cancers. The mutations in p53 gene play an important role in carcinogensis and mostly happened in exon 5-8. The aim of this study is to establish a high resolution melting (HRM assay to detect p53 mutations from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, to investigate the characteristics of p53 gene mutations, and to analyze the relationship between p53 mutations and evolution regularity of pathogenesis. Methods p53 mutations in exon 5-8 were detected by HRM assay on DNA insolated from 264 NSCLC samples derived from tumor tissues and 54 control samples from pericancerous pulmonary tissues. The mutation samples by the HRM assay were confirmed by sequencing technique. Samples which were positive by HRM but wild type by sequencing were further confirmed by sub-clone and sequencing. Results No mutation was found in 54 pericancerous pulmonary samples by HRM assay. 104 of the 264 tumor tissues demonstrated mutation curves by HRM assay, 102 samples were confirmed by sequencing, including 95 point mutations and 7 frame shift mutations by insertion or deletion. The mutation rate of p53 gene was 39.4%. The mutation rate from exon 5-8 were 11.7%, 8%, 12.5% and 10.6%, respectively and there was no statistically significant difference between them (P=0.35. p53 mutations were significantly more frequent in males than that in females, but not related to the other clinicopathologic characteristics. Conclusion The results indicate that HRM is a sensitive in-tube methodology to detect for mutations in clinical samples. The results suggest that the arising p53 mutations in NSCLC may be due to spontaneous error in DNA synthesis and repair.

  13. Role of metabolic rate and DNA-repair in Drosophila aging Implications for the mitochondrial mutation theory of aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Binnard, R.; Fleming, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The notion that injury to mitochondrial DNA is a cause of intrinsic aging was tested by correlating the different respiration rates of several wild strains of Drosophila melanogaster with the life-spans. Respiration rate and aging in a mutant of D. melanogaster deficient in postreplication repair were also investigated. In agreement with the rate of living theory, there was an inverse relation between oxygen consumption and median life-span in flies having normal DNA repair. The mutant showed an abnormally low life-span as compared to the controls and also exhibited significant deficiency in mating fitness and a depressed metabolic rate. Therefore, the short life-span of the mutant may be due to the congenital condition rather than to accelerated aging.

  14. Detecting Mutations in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pyrazinamidase Gene pncA to Improve Infection Control and Decrease Drug Resistance Rates in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Matthew Z.; Sheen, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Ticona, Eduardo; Friedland, Jon S.; Kirwan, Daniela E.; Caviedes, Luz; Rodriguez, Richard; Cabrera, Lilia Z.; Coronel, Jorge; Grandjean, Louis; Moore, David A. J.; Evans, Carlton A.; Huaroto, Luz; Chávez-Pérez, Víctor; Zimic, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Hospital infection control measures are crucial to tuberculosis (TB) control strategies within settings caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive patients, as these patients are at heightened risk of developing TB. Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a potent drug that effectively sterilizes persistent Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli. However, PZA resistance associated with mutations in the nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase coding gene, pncA, is increasing. A total of 794 patient isolates obtained from four sites in Lima, Peru, underwent spoligotyping and drug resistance testing. In one of these sites, the HIV unit of Hospital Dos de Mayo (HDM), an isolation ward for HIV/TB coinfected patients opened during the study as an infection control intervention: circulating genotypes and drug resistance pre- and postintervention were compared. All other sites cared for HIV-negative outpatients: genotypes and drug resistance rates from these sites were compared with those from HDM. HDM patients showed high concordance between multidrug resistance, PZA resistance according to the Wayne method, the two most common genotypes (spoligotype international type [SIT] 42 of the Latino American-Mediterranean (LAM)-9 clade and SIT 53 of the T1 clade), and the two most common pncA mutations (G145A and A403C). These associations were absent among community isolates. The infection control intervention was associated with 58–92% reductions in TB caused by SIT 42 or SIT 53 genotypes (odds ratio [OR] = 0.420, P = 0.003); multidrug-resistant TB (OR = 0.349, P < 0.001); and PZA-resistant TB (OR = 0.076, P < 0.001). In conclusion, pncA mutation typing, with resistance testing and spoligotyping, was useful in identifying a nosocomial TB outbreak and demonstrating its resolution after implementation of infection control measures. PMID:27928075

  15. Resistance mechanisms of linezolid-nonsusceptible enterococci in Korea: low rate of 23S rRNA mutations in Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sae-Mi; Huh, Hee Jae; Song, Dong Joon; Shim, Hyang Jin; Park, Kyung Sun; Kang, Cheol-In; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2017-12-01

    To investigate linezolid-resistance mechanisms in linezolid-nonsusceptible enterococci (LNSE) isolated from a tertiary hospital in Korea. Enterococcal isolates exhibiting linezolid MICs ≥4 mg l -1 that were isolated between December 2011 and May 2016 were investigated by PCR and sequencing for mutations in 23S rRNA or ribosomal proteins (L3, L4 and L22) and for the presence of cfr, cfr(B) and optrA genes.Results/Key findings. Among 135 LNSE (87 Enterococcus faecium and 48 Enterococcus faecalis isolates), 39.1 % (34/87) of E. faecium and 18.8 % (9/48) of E. faecalis isolates were linezolid-resistant. The optrA carriage was the dominant mechanism in E. faecalis: 13 isolates, including 10 E. faecalis [70 % (7/10) linezolid-resistant and 30 % (3/10) linezolid-intermediate] and three E. faecium [33.3 % (1/3) linezolid-resistant and 66.7 % (2/3) linezolid-intermediate], contained the optrA gene. G2576T mutations in the 23S rRNA gene were detected only in E. faecium [14 isolates; 71.4 % (10/14) linezolid-resistant and 28.6 % (4/14) linezolid-intermediate]. One linezolid-intermediate E. faecium harboured a L22 protein alteration (Ser77Thr). No isolates contained cfr or cfr(B) genes and any L3 or L4 protein alterations. No genetic mechanism of resistance was identified for 67.6 % (23/34) of linezolid-resistant E. faecium. A low rate of 23S rRNA mutations and the absence of known linezolid-resistance mechanisms in the majority of E. faecium isolates suggest regional differences in the mechanisms of linezolid resistance and the possibility of additional mechanisms.

  16. Rating

    OpenAIRE

    Karas, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Charakteristika ratingu. Dělení a druhy ratingu (rating emise × rating emitenta; dlouhodobý rating × krátkodobý rating; mezinárodní rating × lokální rating). Obecné požadavky kladené na rating. Proces tvorby ratingu. Vyžádaný rating. Nevyžádaný rating. Ratingový proces na bázi volně přístupných informací. Uplatňované ratingové systémy. Ratingová kriteria. Využití a interpretace ratingové známky. Funkce ratingu. Rating v souvislosti s BASEL II. Rating v souvislosti s hospodářskými krizemi....

  17. Clinical Application of Screening for GJB2 Mutations before Cochlear Implantation in a Heterogeneous Population with High Rate of Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical application of mutation screening and its effect on the outcome of cochlear implantation is widely debated. We investigated the effect of mutations in GJB2 gene on the outcome of cochlear implantation in a population with a high rate of consanguineous marriage and autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss. Two hundred and one children with profound prelingual sensorineural hearing loss were included. Forty-six patients had 35delG in GJB2. Speech awareness thresholds (SATs and speech recognition thresholds (SRTs improved following implantation, but there was no difference in performance between patients with GJB2-related deafness versus control (all >0.10. Both groups had produced their first comprehensible words within the same period of time following implantation (2.27 months in GJB2-related deaf versus 2.62 months in controls, =0.22. Although our findings demonstrate the need to uncover unidentified genetic causes of hereditary deafness, they do not support the current policy for genetic screening before cochlear implantation, nor prove a prognostic value.

  18. "Impact of Smoking Cessation Treatment" on Lung Function and Response Rate in EGFR Mutated Patients: A Short-Term Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzuto, Aldo; Stumbo, Luciano; Russano, Marco; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Scarlata, Simone; Caricato, Marco; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Erlotinib is a validated drug "for the treatment of patients affected by advanced unresectable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutations". We want to focus on potential functional benefits deriving from a combined therapy containing TKI (erlotinib) and a nicotinic partial agonist (varenicicline) in smokers. we analyzed the records of patients affected by NSCLC treated undergoing "first line therapy with Erlotinib" and smoking cessation (with varenicicline). Response to therapy was evaluated by CT scan. Data concerning clinical history, smoking habit, nicotine dependence were collected after three months from the beginning of the recruitment. Pulmonary function tests including spirometry with pletismographic technique and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) were performed with recording of resistances, flows, volumes. A group of ten current smokers affected by NSCLC with EGFR activating mutation and concurrent mild COPD undergoing anti-EGFR treatment without smoking cessation was used to compare clinical and functional data. A control group of NSCLC wild type with mild COPD undergoing smoking cessation was assessed for functional data. Twenty-five patients were enrolled. All of them reported partial response at CT re-evaluation. All functional indexes and parameters were improved after combined treatment a significant increase of FEV1 level and a decrease of exhaled CO. In particular, a mean increase of FEV1 from 1.93 (SD 0.48) to 2.03(SD 0.46) liters was recorded. A notable reduction of sRAW (specific resistances) was also observed. The improvement of some parameters such as CO, heart rate (HR), sRAW and FEV1 resulted statistically significant. A better response to therapy was found "in the study group compared to the second group of mutated NSCLC patients". In this second group, we also observed an improvement of functional obstructive parameters although it was less remarkable than study group. Only sRAW and FEF 25/75 were significantly increased. The group

  19. The experience of mutation rate quantitative evaluation in connection with environmental pollution (based on studies of congenital anomalies in human populations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipenko YeN; Kogut, N N

    1993-10-01

    relation between average annual general emission of atmospheric pollutants (M./Z.) was 2.21, the frequency of dominant and X-linked CA 2.20 and of new skeleton mutations 2.24. The difference of mutation rate in the towns studied was due to the dynamics of demographic processes.

  20. Dominant optic atrophy in Denmark - report of 15 novel mutations in OPA1, using a strategy with a detection rate of 90%

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Ek, Jakob; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of the OPA1 mutation spectrum in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) in Denmark.......Investigation of the OPA1 mutation spectrum in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) in Denmark....

  1. Sigma virus and mutation in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquin, S.L.A.

    1977-01-01

    - The objectives of these experiments have been (1) to verify and evidence more fully the action of sigma in causing recessive lethal mutation on the X chromosome of Drosophila, both in the male and the female germ line; (2) to extend the study of sigma-induced recessive lethal mutation to the Drosophila autosomes; (3) to explore the possibility that this mutagenesis is site-directed; (4) to study the effects of sigma virus in conjunction with radiation in increasing non-disjunction and dominant lethality. The virus increases the rate of radiation-induced nondisjunction by altering meiotic chromosomal behavior. Percentage of non-disjunction with 500 rads of x-rays in the virus-free flies was 0.176, while in sigma-containing lines it was 0.333. With high doses of either x or neutron radiation, the presence of the virus enhances the frequency of dominant lethality. The difference is especially significant with the fast neutrons. The results indicate that sigma, and presumably other viruses, are indeed environmental mutagens and are, therefore, factors in the rate of background or spontaneous mutation

  2. Spontaneous emission by moving atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meystre, P.; Wilkens, M.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that spontaneous emission is not an intrinsic atomic property, but rather results from the coupling of the atom to the vacuum modes of the electromagnetic field. As such, it can be modified by tailoring the electromagnetic environment into which the atom can radiate. This was already realized by Purcell, who noted that the spontaneous emission rate can be enhanced if the atom placed inside a cavity is resonant with one of the cavity is resonant with one of the cavity modes, and by Kleppner, who discussed the opposite case of inhibited spontaneous emission. It has also been recognized that spontaneous emission need not be an irreversible process. Indeed, a system consisting of a single atom coupled to a single mode of the electromagnetic field undergoes a periodic exchange of excitation between the atom and the field. This periodic exchange remains dominant as long as the strength of the coupling between the atom and a cavity mode is itself dominant. 23 refs., 6 figs

  3. Relevance of spontaneous fabT mutations to a streptococcal toxic shock syndrome to non-streptococcal toxic shock syndrome transition in the novel-type Streptococcus pyogenes isolates that lost a salRK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Matsumoto, Masakado; Hata, Nanako; Matsui, Hideyuki; Zhang, Yan; Isaka, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a causative agent of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). Mutations in covR/S or rgg, negative regulators, can reportedly modulate the severity of infection in this pathogen. Recently, we showed that the regions encoding the SalR-SalK, a two-component regulatory system, were deleted in some emm 1-type isolates (named as 'novel-type'). In this study, the two novel 'STSS' isolates 10-85stss and 11-171stss were more virulent than the two novel 'non-STSS' isolates 11O-2non and 11T-3non when examined using a mouse model of invasive infection. Genome-sequencing experiments using the three strains 10-85stss , 11-171stss , and 11O-2non detected only one single nucleotide polymorphism that causes a non-synonymous mutation in fabT encoding a transcriptional regulator in strain 11O-2non . Loss of fabT reduced the high level of virulence observed in the STSS isolates to that in the non-STSS isolates, and introduction of an intact fabT compensated the lower virulence of 11O-2non , suggesting that the mutation in fabT, but not in covR/S or rgg, is involved in the differential virulence among the novel-type clinical isolates. This type of non-synonymous fabT mutation was also identified in 12 non-STSS isolates (including 11O-2non and 11T-3non ), and most of those 12 isolates showed impaired FabT function. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cultivation of Staphylococcus epidermidis in the Human Spaceflight Environment Leads to Alterations in the Frequency and Spectrum of Spontaneous Rifampicin-Resistance Mutations in the rpoB Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are persistent inhabitants of human spaceflight habitats and represent potential opportunistic pathogens. The effect of the human spaceflight environment on the growth and the frequency of mutations to antibiotic resistance in the model organism Staphylococcus epidermidis strain ATCC12228 was investigated. Six cultures of the test organism were cultivated in biological research in canisters-Petri dish fixation units for 122 h on orbit in the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the SpaceX-3 resupply mission. Asynchronous ground controls (GCs) consisted of identical sets of cultures cultivated for 122 h in the ISS Environmental Simulator at Kennedy Space Center. S. epidermidis exhibited significantly lower viable counts but significantly higher frequencies of mutation to rifampicin (Rif) resistance in space vs. GC cultures. The spectrum of mutations in the rpoB gene leading to Rif(R) was altered in S. epidermidis isolates cultivated in the ISS compared to GCs. The results suggest that the human spaceflight environment induces unique physiologic stresses on growing bacterial cells leading to changes in mutagenic potential.

  5. Spontaneous uterine rupture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Rupture of a gravid uterus is a surgical emergency. Predisposing factors include a scarred uterus. Spontaneous rupture of an unscarred uterus during pregnancy is a rare occurrence. We hereby present the case of a spontaneous complete uterine rupture at a gestational age of 34 weeks in a 35 year old patient ...

  6. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  7. Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli paradigm. R. Jayaraman*. R. H. 35, Palaami Enclave, New Natham Road, Madurai 625 014, India. Abstract. Mutators (also called hypermutators) are mutants which show higher than normal spontaneous mutation frequencies, ranging from 10–20 fold to ...

  8. Clock frequency estimation under spontaneous emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xi-Zhou; Huang, Jia-Hao; Zhong, Hong-Hua; Lee, Chaohong

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of a driven two-level system under spontaneous emission and its application in clock frequency estimation. By using the Lindblad equation to describe the system, we analytically obtain its exact solutions, which show three different regimes: Rabi oscillation, damped oscillation, and overdamped decay. From the analytical solutions, we explore how the spontaneous emission affects the clock frequency estimation. We find that under a moderate spontaneous emission rate, the transition frequency can still be inferred from the Rabi oscillation. Our results enable potential practical applications in frequency measurement and quantum control under decoherence.

  9. Spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hassan, S J

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin predominantly affecting elderly Caucasians. It has a high rate of local recurrence and regional lymph node metastases. It is associated with a poor prognosis. Complete spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma has been reported but is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here we present a case of complete spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma demonstrating a markedly different pattern of events from those previously published.

  10. Management of intractable spontaneous epistaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epistaxis is a common otolaryngology emergency and is often controlled with first-line interventions such as cautery, hemostatic agents, or anterior nasal packing. A subset of patients will continue to bleed and require more aggressive therapy. Methods: Intractable spontaneous epistaxis was traditionally managed with posterior nasal packing and prolonged hospital admission. In an effort to reduce patient morbidity and shorten hospital stay, surgical and endovascular techniques have gained popularity. A literature review was conducted. Results: Transnasal endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation and arterial embolization provide excellent control rates but the decision to choose one over the other can be challenging. The role of transnasal endoscopic anterior ethmoid artery ligation is unclear but may be considered in certain cases when bleeding localizes to the ethmoid region. Conclusion: This article will focus on the management of intractable spontaneous epistaxis and discuss the role of endoscopic arterial ligation and embolization as it pertains to this challenging clinical scenario. PMID:22391084

  11. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couce, Alejandro; Guelfo, Javier R; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  12. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Couce

    Full Text Available Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  13. Evaluation of discriminating power of 13 Y chromosome markers with high rate of mutation (RM Y-STR) in the Costa Rican population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano Matamoros, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The Y chromosome microsatellites analysis has had among its purposes the obtaining of a male haplotype from mixtures with high prevalence of female genetic material, such as sexual offenses. The currently available markers set as AmpFISTR® Yfiler® have offered haplotype resolution to level of incomplete patrilineal line. This limitation has been particularly important when is needed to supplement paternity studies. The implementation expected of the 13 Y chromosome microsatellites with high mutation rate (RM Y-STR) recently described, has improved the discriminating power of microsatellite analysis of Y in the forensic context. However, for implemetation it has been necessary to obtain the frequencies of haplotypes in the Costa Rican population. In addition, the discriminating power of the new markers is evaluated and compared with current markers set, such as AmpFISTR® Yfile®, to determine whether the former have an advantage over the latter. The use of a powerful new tool has been claimed for a more efficient and effective application of justice in Costa Rica, specially in sexual offenses [es

  14. Circumsporozoite protein rates, blood-feeding pattern and frequency of knockdown resistance mutations in Anopheles spp. in two ecological zones of Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekweiry, Khadijetou Mint; Salem, Mohamed Salem Ould Ahmedou; Cotteaux-Lautard, Christelle; Jarjaval, Fanny; Marin-Jauffre, Adeline; Bogreau, Hervé; Basco, Leonardo; Briolant, Sébastien; Boukhary, Ali Ould Mohamed Salem; Brahim, Khyarhoum Ould; Pagès, Frédéric

    2016-05-05

    Mosquitoes belonging to Anopheles gambiae species complex are the main malaria vector in Mauritania but data on their vector capacities, feeding habits and insecticide susceptibility are still scanty. The objectives of this study were to fill this gap. Adult Anopheles spp. mosquitoes were collected using pyrethrum spray catch method from two ecological zones of Mauritania: Nouakchott (Saharan zone) and Hodh Elgharbi region (Sahelian zone). Circumsporozoite proteins (CSP) for P. falciparum, P. vivax VK210 and P. vivax VK247 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from the female anopheline mosquitoes. To confirm CSP-ELISA results, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also performed. Blood meal identification was performed in all engorged females by partial sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Molecular assessments of pyrethroid knockdown resistance (kdr) and insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance (ace-1) were conducted. In Nouakchott, the only species of Anopheles identified during the survey was Anopheles arabiensis (356 specimens). In Hodh Elgharbi, 1016 specimens of Anopheles were collected, including 578 (56.9%) Anopheles rufipes, 410 (40.35%) An. arabiensis, 20 (1.96%) An. gambiae, 5 (0.5%) An. pharoensis and 3 (0.3 %) An. funestus. Three of 186 female An. arabiensis collected in Nouakchott and tested by ELISA were found positive for Plasmodium vivax VK210, corresponding to a sporozoite rate of 1.6%; however PCR confirmed infection by P. vivax sporozoite in only one of these. In Hodh Elgharbi, no mosquito was found positive for Plasmodium spp. infection. There was a statistically significant difference in the percentage of human blood-fed Anopheles spp. between Nouakchott (58.7%, 47 of 80 blood-engorged An. arabiensis females) and Hodh Elgharbi (11.1%, 2 of 18 blood-engorged mosquitoes). Analysis of the kdr polymorphisms showed 48.2% (70/145) of East African kdr mutation (L1014S) in Nouakchott compared to 10% (4/40) in Hodh

  15. The Decrease in Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Load Parallels Visual Recovery in a Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Emperador

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The onset of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is relatively rare in childhood and, interestingly, the rate of spontaneous visual recovery is very high in this group of patients. Here, we report a child harboring a rare pathological mitochondrial DNA mutation, present in heteroplasmy, associated with the disease. A patient follow-up showed a rapid recovery of the vision accompanied by a decrease of the percentage of mutated mtDNA. A retrospective study on the age of recovery of all childhood-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients reported in the literature suggested that this process was probably related with pubertal changes.

  16. INHIBITION OF SPONTANEOUS MUTAGENESIS BY VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE IN ESCHERICHIA COLI: DEPENDENCE ON RECOMBINATIONAL REPAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutagens that effectively inhibit both induced and spontaneous mutations. We have shown previously that VAN and CIN reduced the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella TA104 (hisG428, rfa, ¿uvrB, pKM101) by approximately...

  17. Spontaneous oscillations in microfluidic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Daniel; Angilella, Jean-Regis; Motter, Adilson

    2017-11-01

    Precisely controlling flows within microfluidic systems is often difficult which typically results in systems being heavily reliant on numerous external pumps and computers. Here, I present a simple microfluidic network that exhibits flow rate switching, bistablity, and spontaneous oscillations controlled by a single pressure. That is, by solely changing the driving pressure, it is possible to switch between an oscillating and steady flow state. Such functionality does not rely on external hardware and may even serve as an on-chip memory or timing mechanism. I use an analytic model and rigorous fluid dynamics simulations to show these results.

  18. Induction of somatic mutations by low-dose X-rays: the challenge in recognizing radiation-induced events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Haruki; Shiraishi, Kumiko; Ohkawa, Saori; Sakamoto, Yuki; Komatsu, Kenshi; Matsuura, Shinya; Tachibana, Akira; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2017-10-19

    It is difficult to distinguish radiation-induced events from spontaneous events during induction of stochastic effects, especially in the case of low-dose or low-dose-rate exposures. By using a hypersensitive system for detecting somatic mutations at the HPRT1 locus, we investigated the frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by low-dose X-rays. The mutant frequencies induced by doses of >0.15 Gy were statistically significant when compared with the spontaneous frequency, and a clear dose dependency was also observed for mutant frequencies at doses of >0.15 Gy. In contrast, mutant frequencies at doses of 0.2 Gy. Our observations suggest that there could be a critical dose for mutation induction at between 0.1 Gy and 0.2 Gy, where mutagenic events are induced by multiple DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These observations also suggest that low-dose radiation delivered at doses of <0.1 Gy may not result in DSB-induced mutations but may enhance spontaneous mutagenesis events. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  19. Spontaneous Atraumatic Mediastinal Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morkos Iskander BSc, BMBS, MRCS, PGCertMedEd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous atraumatic mediastinal hematomas are rare. We present a case of a previously fit and well middle-aged lady who presented with acute breathlessness and an increasing neck swelling and spontaneous neck bruising. On plain chest radiograph, widening of the mediastinum was noted. The bruising was later confirmed to be secondary to mediastinal hematoma. This life-threatening diagnostic conundrum was managed conservatively with a multidisciplinary team approach involving upper gastrointestinal and thoracic surgeons, gastroenterologists, radiologists, intensivists, and hematologists along with a variety of diagnostic modalities. A review of literature is also presented to help surgeons manage such challenging and complicated cases.

  20. Loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 markedly increases the rate of base substitution mutagenesis and has distinct effects on genomic deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamborszky, J.; Szikriszt, B.; Gervai, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes increase the risk of cancer. Owing to their function in homologous recombination repair, much research has focused on the unstable genomic phenotype of BRCA1/2 mutant cells manifest mainly as large-scale rearrangements. We used whole......-genome sequencing of multiple isogenic chicken DT40 cell clones to precisely determine the consequences of BRCA1/2 loss on all types of genomic mutagenesis. Spontaneous base substitution mutation rates increased sevenfold upon the disruption of either BRCA1 or BRCA2, and the arising mutation spectra showed strong....... Spontaneously arising and MMS-induced insertion/deletion mutations and large rearrangements were also more common in BRCA1/2 mutant cells compared with the wild-type control. A difference in the short deletion phenotypes of BRCA1 and BRCA2 suggested distinct roles for the two proteins in the processing of DNA...

  1. Disease-modifying polymorphisms and C609Y mutation of RET associated with high penetrance of phaeochromocytoma and low rate of MTC in MEN2A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena Speak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the rearranged during transfection (RET proto-oncogene, located on chromosome 10q11.2, cause multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A. Patients with mutations at the codon 609 usually exhibit a high penetrance of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC, but a sufficiently low penetrance of phaeochromocytoma that screening for this latter complication has been called to question. Patients with other RET mutations are at higher risk of younger age onset phaeochromocytoma if they also possess other RET polymorphisms (L769L, S836S, G691S and S904S, but there are no similar data for patients with 609 mutations. We investigated the unusual phenotypic presentation in a family with MEN2A due to a C609Y mutation in RET. Sanger sequencing of the entire RET-coding region and exon–intron boundaries was performed. Five family members were C609Y mutation positive: 3/5 initially presented with phaeochromocytoma, but only 1/5 had MTC. The index case aged 73 years had no evidence of MTC, but presented with phaeochromocytoma. Family members also possessed the G691S and S904S RET polymorphisms. We illustrate a high penetrance of phaeochromocytoma and low penetrance of MTC in patients with a RET C609Y mutation and polymorphisms G691S and S904S. These data highlight the need for life-long screening for the complications of MEN2A in these patients and support the role for the screening of RET polymorphisms for the purposes of risk stratification.

  2. Spontaneous Appendicocutaneous Fistula I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M T0k0de* MB, BS and. Dr 0. A. AWOj0bi+ FMCS (Nig). ABSTRACT. Ruptured appendicitis is not a common cause of spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula. A case of ruptured retrocaecal appendicitis presenting as an enterocutaneous fistula in a Nigerian woman is presented. The literature on this disorder is also reviewed.

  3. Spontaneous Grammar Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoo, Hong Sing; Lewis, Marilyn

    1998-01-01

    Describes one New Zealand university language teacher's reflection on her own grammar explanations to university-level students of Bahasa Indonesian. Examines form-focused instruction through the teacher's spontaneous answers to students' questions about the form of the language they are studying. The teacher's experiences show that it takes time…

  4. EDITORIAL SPONTANEOUS BACTERIAL PERITONITIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequent]y occurs in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites. It is defined as an infection of previously sterile ascitic fluid without any demonstrable intrabdominal source of infection. It is now internationally agreed that a polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell count in the ascitic fluid of over 250 ...

  5. Spontaneous dimensional reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlip, Steven

    2012-10-01

    Over the past few years, evidence has begun to accumulate suggesting that spacetime may undergo a "spontaneous dimensional reduction" to two dimensions near the Planck scale. I review some of this evidence, and discuss the (still very speculative) proposal that the underlying mechanism may be related to short-distance focusing of light rays by quantum fluctuations.

  6. Men at increased risk of developing breast cancer: language preferences for naming a cancer-related mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Claire E; Juan, Anne S; Kasparian, Nadine A

    2009-06-01

    Patients attending familial cancer clinics may find the term "mutation" offensive and potentially stigmatizing, yet there is little consensus in the literature as to the most appropriate alternative terms to describe a cancer-related mutation to individuals considering genetic testing for cancer risk. This study aimed to describe a cancer-related mutation in a rare group of familial cancer clinic patients: men at increased risk of carrying a breast cancer-related mutation. Twenty-seven men completed a self-report questionnaire that assessed their preferences for language to describe a cancer-related mutation. Overall, men were most likely to spontaneously suggest the term "faulty gene" to describe a cancer-related mutation when asked an open-ended question about their language preferences. When asked to rate the term "faulty gene" in comparison to the terms "altered gene," "mutation," "nonworking gene," "malfunctioning gene," and "gene change," the term "faulty gene" received the highest mean preference rating in this sample of men at increased risk of developing breast cancer. This area of investigation remains controversial and would benefit from more formal and larger-scale investigations of the language preferences of individuals at increased risk of developing cancer.

  7. Missed therapeutic and prevention opportunities in women with BRCA-mutated epithelial ovarian cancer and their families due to low referral rates for genetic counseling and BRCA testing: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Paul J; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2017-11-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Fifteen percent of women with epithelial ovarian cancer have inherited mutations in the BRCA breast cancer susceptibility genes. Knowledge of her BRCA status has value both for the woman and for her family. A therapeutic benefit exists for the woman with cancer, because a new family of oral drugs, the poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, has recently been approved, and these drugs have the greatest efficacy in women who carry the mutation. For her family, there is the potential to prevent ovarian cancer in those carrying the mutation by using risk-reducing surgery. Such surgery significantly reduces the chance of developing this, for the most part, incurable cancer. Despite these potential benefits, referral rates for genetic counseling and subsequent BRCA testing are low, ranging from 10% to 30%, indicating that these therapeutic and prevention opportunities are being missed. The authors have reviewed the relevant available literature. Topics discussed are BRCA and its relation to ovarian cancer, the rates of referral for genetic counseling/BRCA testing, reasons for these low rates, potential strategies to improve on those rates, lack of effectiveness of current screening strategies, the pros and cons of risk-reducing surgery, other prevention options, and the role and value of PARP inhibitors. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:493-506. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. X-ray-induced recessive lethal mutations in adult and foetal female mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luening, K.G.; Eiche, A.

    1982-01-01

    Tests of X-ray-induced recessive lethal mutations in adult and foetal mouse females were performed. The tests were based on family analysis which provided a possibility of making a distinction between pre-existing recessive lethal mutations and newly arisen (spontaneous + induced) ones. The way the tests were carried out provided material for the estimation of the frequency of spontaneous lethal mutations per genome. The two different estimates from this material, 0.72 and 0.91%, respectively, are similar and fall within the range previously suggested by Luening. The difference, though statistically non-significant, between data from irradiated mature and maturing oocytes in adult females and material from the unirradiated part, indicates a mutation rate of 13 x 10 -5 per rad per gamete according to one estimate and 8-12 x 10 -5 according to the other in comparison with 9 x 10 -5 from irradiated spermatogonia. In the limited data obtained after foetal irradiation, there is no indication of oogonia and developing oocytes being more sensitive to irradiation than oocytes in adult females fertilized within 6 weeks of treatment. (orig.)

  9. Clusters of nucleotide substitutions and insertion/deletion mutations are associated with repeat sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J McDonald

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The genome-sequencing gold rush has facilitated the use of comparative genomics to uncover patterns of genome evolution, although their causal mechanisms remain elusive. One such trend, ubiquitous to prokarya and eukarya, is the association of insertion/deletion mutations (indels with increases in the nucleotide substitution rate extending over hundreds of base pairs. The prevailing hypothesis is that indels are themselves mutagenic agents. Here, we employ population genomics data from Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces paradoxus, and Drosophila to provide evidence suggesting that it is not the indels per se but the sequence in which indels occur that causes the accumulation of nucleotide substitutions. We found that about two-thirds of indels are closely associated with repeat sequences and that repeat sequence abundance could be used to identify regions of elevated sequence diversity, independently of indels. Moreover, the mutational signature of indel-proximal nucleotide substitutions matches that of error-prone DNA polymerases. We propose that repeat sequences promote an increased probability of replication fork arrest, causing the persistent recruitment of error-prone DNA polymerases to specific sequence regions over evolutionary time scales. Experimental measures of the mutation rates of engineered DNA sequences and analyses of experimentally obtained collections of spontaneous mutations provide molecular evidence supporting our hypothesis. This study uncovers a new role for repeat sequences in genome evolution and provides an explanation of how fine-scale sequence contextual effects influence mutation rates and thereby evolution.

  10. Lymphocytes from wasted mice express enhanced spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Chung, Jen; Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wasted (wst/wst) display a disease pattern including faulty repair of DNA damage in lymphocytes after radiation exposure, neurologic abnormalities, and immunodeficiency. Many of the features of this mouse model have suggested a premature or increased spontaneous frequency of apoptosis in thymocytes; past work has shown an inability to establish cultured T cell lines, an abnormally high death rate of stimulated T cells in culture, and an increased sensitivity of T cells to the killing effects of ionizing radiations in wst/wst mice relative to controls. The experiments reported here were designed to examine splenic and thymic lymphocytes from wasted and control mice for signs of early apoptosis. Our results revealed enhanced expression of Rp-8 mRNA (associated with apoptosis) in thymic lymphocytes and reduced expression in splenic lymphocytes of wst/wst mice relative to controls; expression of Rp-2 and Td-30 mRNA (induced during apoptosis) were not detectable in spleen or thymus. Higher spontaneous DNA fragmentation was observed in wasted mice than in controls; however, {gamma}-ray-induced DNA fragmentation peaked at a lower dose and occurred to a greater extent in wasted mice relative to controls. These results provide evidence for high spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis in T cells of wasted mice as a mechanism underlying the observed lymphocyte and DNA repair abnormalities.

  11. Recurrent spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 15% of stroke cases in the US and Europe and up to 30% in Asian populations. Intracerebral hemorrhage is a relatively uncommon form of stroke-it causes only 10 to 15 percent of all strokes. It is more disabling and has a higher mortality rate than ischemic stroke, ...

  12. Spontaneous splenic rupture in pregnancy: a case report | Makwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous splenic rupture in pregnancy is a rare condition, associated with very high maternal mortality rate and fetal wastage. It is frequently misdiagnosed at presentation. We report a case of a 33-year-old, gravida 2, para 1 lady at 29 weeks' gestation with spontaneous splenic rupture, which was initially diagnosed as ...

  13. Retrospective genetic study of germinative mutations in Str loci of individuals potentially exposed to ionizing radiation;Estudo genetico retrospectivo de mutacoes germinativas em Loci Str de individuos potencialmente expostos a radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Emilia Oliveira Alves

    2010-07-01

    The Brazilian radiological accident that occurred in 1987, in Goiania, it was a terrible radiation episode. As a consequence, hundreds of people were contaminated due to the Cesium-137 radiation. Recently, many studies had shown that genome instabilities, such as, mutations, chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei formation and micro satellite instability and a delay on cellular death are usually reported on mammal cells exposed to ionizing radiation, being considered as a manly risk to humans. Mutations can be spontaneous, and the occurrence is dependent on the organism, or, induced, being associated to mutagenic exposition. Ionizing radiations are an example of physical and mutagenic agents that could harm the cell repair and could cause the development of many types of cancer. The evaluation of the biological effects of the ionizing radiation, in somatic and germ line cells, with a consequent determination of the radio-induced mutations, it is extremely important to estimate the genetic risks, manly in population exposed to radiation. The analyses of repetitive DNA sequences have been demonstrated that such sequences are prone to high rates of spontaneous mutations. The minisatellites and microsatellites have been used to demonstrate the induction of germ line mutation rates on mouse, humans, among others organisms. The aim of the present study was to analyze the frequency of microsatellite alterations to determine the mutation rates occurred in germ cells of the parents exposed to the ionizing radiation of the Cesium-137. The studied group was constitute of 10 families of individuals accidentally exposed to Cesium-137 and by the control group constituted by 645 healthy individuals who carried out paternity tests on 2009. We found only one mutation of paternal origin in the D8S1179 locus on the exposed group, being the mutation rate of 0.002. In the control group, we found 01 mutation on D16S539 loei and on D3S1358; 02 mutations on Penta E loeus; 04 mutations on D

  14. Spontaneous healing of spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almafragi, Amar; Convens, Carl; Heuvel, Paul Van Den

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome and sudden cardiac death. It should be suspected in every healthy young woman without cardiac risk factors, especially during the peripartum or postpartum periods. It is important to check for a history of drug abuse, collagen vascular disease or blunt trauma of the chest. Coronary angiography is essential for diagnosis and early management. We wonder whether thrombolysis might aggravate coronary dissection. All types of treatment (medical therapy, percutaneous intervention or surgery) improve the prognosis without affecting survival times if used appropriately according to the clinical stability and the angiographic features of the involved coronary arteries. Prompt recognition and targeted treatment improve outcomes. We report a case of SCAD in a young female free of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, who presented six hours after thrombolysis for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed a dissection of the left anterior descending and immediate branch. She had successful coronary artery bypass grafting, with complete healing of left anterior descending dissection.

  15. A loss-of-function mutation in the PAS kinase Rim15p is related to defective quiescence entry and high fermentation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Araki, Yuya; Zhou, Yan; Maeya, Naoki; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Sake yeast cells have defective entry into the quiescent state, allowing them to sustain high fermentation rates. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated the PAS kinase Rim15p, which orchestrates initiation of the quiescence program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that Rim15p is truncated at the carboxyl terminus in modern sake yeast strains as a result of a frameshift mutation. Introduction of this mutation or deletion of the full-length RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain led to a defective stress response, decreased synthesis of the storage carbohydrates trehalose and glycogen, and impaired G(1) arrest, which together closely resemble the characteristic phenotypes of sake yeast. Notably, expression of a functional RIM15 gene in a modern sake strain suppressed all of these phenotypes, demonstrating that dysfunction of Rim15p prevents sake yeast cells from entering quiescence. Moreover, loss of Rim15p or its downstream targets Igo1p and Igo2p remarkably improved the fermentation rate in a laboratory strain. This finding verified that Rim15p-mediated entry into quiescence plays pivotal roles in the inhibition of ethanol fermentation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene may be the key genetic determinant of the increased ethanol production rates in modern sake yeast strains.

  16. Computed tomographic findings of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung Sook; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Young Chul [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was a reliable technique to evaluate the exact size and location of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and to predict it's prognosis. Fifty-nine cases of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage were evaluated and reviewed by CT scan. The following results were obtained. 1. The sex ratio of male to female was 1 to 1.4, The highest incidence was in 6th and 7th decades. 2. The most common cause of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage was hypertension (74.6%), followed by the aneurysm (13.5%), arteriovenous malformation (5.1%), occlusive vascular disease (3.4%), and blood dyscrasia (3.4%). 3. The most common location was basal ganglia and thalamic hemorrhage (37.3%), followed by lobar hemorrhage (27.1%), cerebellar hemorrhage (13.5%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (11.9%). 4. Primary intraventricular hemorrhage carried the highest mortality. 5. The larger volume of hematoma, the higher the mortality rate.

  17. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  18. A Low Frequency of Losses in 11q Chromosome Is Associated with Better Outcome and Lower Rate of Genomic Mutations in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ángel Hernández

    Full Text Available To analyze the impact of the 11q deleted (11q- cells in CLL patients on the time to first therapy (TFT and overall survival (OS, 2,493 patients with CLL were studied. 242 patients (9.7% had 11q-. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies showed a threshold of 40% of deleted cells to be optimal for showing that clinical differences in terms of TFT and OS within 11q- CLLs. In patients with ≥40% of losses in 11q (11q-H (74%, the median TFT was 19 months compared with 44 months in CLL patients with <40% del(11q (11q-L (P<0.0001. In the multivariate analysis, only the presence of 11q-L, mutated IGHV status, early Binet stage and absence of extended lymphadenopathy were associated with longer TFT. Patients with 11q-H had an OS of 90 months, while in the 11q-L group the OS was not reached (P = 0.008. The absence of splenomegaly (P = 0.02, low LDH (P = 0.018 or β2M (P = 0.006, and the presence of 11q-L (P = 0.003 were associated with a longer OS. In addition, to detect the presence of mutations in the ATM, TP53, NOTCH1, SF3B1, MYD88, FBXW7, XPO1 and BIRC3 genes, a select cohort of CLL patients with losses in 11q was sequenced by next-generation sequencing of amplicons. Eighty % of CLLs with 11q- showed mutations and fewer patients with low frequencies of 11q- had mutations among genes examined (50% vs 94.1%, P = 0.023. In summary, CLL patients with <40% of 11q- had a long TFT and OS that could be associated with the presence of fewer mutated genes.

  19. Rapid evolution of the human mutation spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kelley; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2017-04-25

    DNA is a remarkably precise medium for copying and storing biological information. This high fidelity results from the action of hundreds of genes involved in replication, proofreading, and damage repair. Evolutionary theory suggests that in such a system, selection has limited ability to remove genetic variants that change mutation rates by small amounts or in specific sequence contexts. Consistent with this, using SNV variation as a proxy for mutational input, we report here that mutational spectra differ substantially among species, human continental groups and even some closely related populations. Close examination of one signal, an increased TCC→TTC mutation rate in Europeans, indicates a burst of mutations from about 15,000 to 2000 years ago, perhaps due to the appearance, drift, and ultimate elimination of a genetic modifier of mutation rate. Our results suggest that mutation rates can evolve markedly over short evolutionary timescales and suggest the possibility of mapping mutational modifiers.

  20. Multiple genetic switches spontaneously modulating bacterial mutability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Randal N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All life forms need both high genetic stability to survive as species and a degree of mutability to evolve for adaptation, but little is known about how the organisms balance the two seemingly conflicting aspects of life: genetic stability and mutability. The DNA mismatch repair (MMR system is essential for maintaining genetic stability and defects in MMR lead to high mutability. Evolution is driven by genetic novelty, such as point mutation and lateral gene transfer, both of which require genetic mutability. However, normally a functional MMR system would strongly inhibit such genomic changes. Our previous work indicated that MMR gene allele conversion between functional and non-functional states through copy number changes of small tandem repeats could occur spontaneously via slipped-strand mis-pairing during DNA replication and therefore may play a role of genetic switches to modulate the bacterial mutability at the population level. The open question was: when the conversion from functional to defective MMR is prohibited, will bacteria still be able to evolve by accepting laterally transferred DNA or accumulating mutations? Results To prohibit allele conversion, we "locked" the MMR genes through nucleotide replacements. We then scored changes in bacterial mutability and found that Salmonella strains with MMR locked at the functional state had significantly decreased mutability. To determine the generalizability of this kind of mutability 'switching' among a wider range of bacteria, we examined the distribution of tandem repeats within MMR genes in over 100 bacterial species and found that multiple genetic switches might exist in these bacteria and may spontaneously modulate bacterial mutability during evolution. Conclusions MMR allele conversion through repeats-mediated slipped-strand mis-pairing may function as a spontaneous mechanism to switch between high genetic stability and mutability during bacterial evolution.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of induced-mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    The outcome of recent studies on mechanisms of induced-mutations is outlined with particular emphasis on the dependence of recA gene function in Escherichia coli. Genes involved in spontaneous mutation and x-ray- and chemical-induced mutation and genes involved in adaptive response are presented. As for SOS mutagenesis, SOS-induced regulation mechanisms and mutagenic routes are described. Furthermore, specificity of mutagens themselves are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base substitution, frameshift, and deletion mutagenesis. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Molecular analysis of two Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) spontaneous self-compatible mutants, Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M F; Li, X F; Han, Zh H; Shu, H R; Li, T Zh

    2009-09-01

    Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui are spontaneous bud mutants of Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) from Ya Li. Both fruit set rate and seed number after self-pollination, together with pollen tube growth, prove that Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui are self-compatible. The fruit set rate and seed number after cross-pollination suggest that the self-compatibility of Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui may be due to natural mutations of the stylar S allele and pollen S allele, respectively. PCR amplification of the S-RNase gene in self-pollinated progeny of Yan Zhuang and Jin Zhui show that they contain point mutations in the stylar S(21) allele and pollen S(34) allele, respectively. The cDNA sequence of the Yan Zhuang stylar S-RNase gene revealed that the 182nd nucleotide of the S(21)-RNase (cDNA) sequence had been substituted resulting in a Gly to Val mutation, and this might affect the stability of the S-RNase. In addition, Western blotting showed that one Yan Zhuang stylar S-RNase was absent and the expression level of another S-RNase protein was decreased compared to Ya Li. Therefore, we suggest that the self-compatibility of Yan Zhuang is caused by a point mutation in an S(21)-RNase nucleotide.

  3. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described......, and that spontaneous recovery may occur in cases harboring an exon 5b mutation Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  4. Spontaneous Thigh Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan, Sameer K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A young man presented with a painful and swollen thigh, without any history of trauma, illness, coagulopathic medication or recent exertional exercise. Preliminary imaging delineated a haematoma in the anterior thigh, without any fractures or muscle trauma. Emergent fasciotomies were performed. No pathology could be identified intra-operatively, or on follow-up imaging. A review of thigh compartment syndromes described in literature is presented in a table. Emergency physicians and traumatologists should be cognisant of spontaneous atraumatic presentations of thigh compartment syndrome, to ensure prompt referral and definitive management of this limb-threatening condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:134-138].

  5. Spontaneous sensorimotor coupling with multipart music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Brian K; Martens, Peter A; Janata, Petr

    2014-08-01

    Music often evokes spontaneous movements in listeners that are synchronized with the music, a phenomenon that has been characterized as being in "the groove." However, the musical factors that contribute to listeners' initiation of stimulus-coupled action remain unclear. Evidence suggests that newly appearing objects in auditory scenes orient listeners' attention, and that in multipart music, newly appearing instrument or voice parts can engage listeners' attention and elicit arousal. We posit that attentional engagement with music can influence listeners' spontaneous stimulus-coupled movement. Here, 2 experiments-involving participants with and without musical training-tested the effect of staggering instrument entrances across time and varying the number of concurrent instrument parts within novel multipart music on listeners' engagement with the music, as assessed by spontaneous sensorimotor behavior and self-reports. Experiment 1 assessed listeners' moment-to-moment ratings of perceived groove, and Experiment 2 examined their spontaneous tapping and head movements. We found that, for both musically trained and untrained participants, music with more instruments led to higher ratings of perceived groove, and that music with staggered instrument entrances elicited both increased sensorimotor coupling and increased reports of perceived groove. Although untrained participants were more likely to rate music as higher in groove, trained participants showed greater propensity for tapping along, and they did so more accurately. The quality of synchronization of head movements with the music, however, did not differ as a function of training. Our results shed new light on the relationship between complex musical scenes, attention, and spontaneous sensorimotor behavior.

  6. Connexin 50 Mutation Lowers Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šeda, Ondřej; Liška, F.; Pravenec, Michal; Vernerová, Z.; Kazdová, L.; Křenová, D.; Zídek, Václav; Šedová, Lucie; Krupková, M.; Křen, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 1 (2017), s. 15-28 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/12/0696 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : Connexin * Hypertension * Transcriptome * Animal models * Insulin resistance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cardiac and Cardiovascular systems; Cardiac and Cardiovascular systems (FGU-C) Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  7. Acquisition of Sign Language by Autistic Children II: Spontaneity and Generalization Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Edward G.; Kologinsky, Eileen

    1983-01-01

    Six autistic children were trained to use their sign repertoire to make spontaneous requests of adults. Training consisted of imitative prompting, fading, and differential reinforcement, with aspects of incidental teaching. Ss displayed increased rate and variety of spontaneous sign requests and generalization of spontaneity across different…

  8. Spontaneous Tumor Lysis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia C. Weeks MD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS is a known complication of malignancy and its treatment. The incidence varies on malignancy type, but is most common with hematologic neoplasms during cytotoxic treatment. Spontaneous TLS is thought to be rare. This case study is of a 62-year-old female admitted with multisystem organ failure, with subsequent diagnosis of aggressive B cell lymphoma. On admission, laboratory abnormalities included renal failure, elevated uric acid (20.7 mg/dL, and 3+ amorphous urates on urinalysis. Oliguric renal failure persisted despite aggressive hydration and diuretic use, requiring initiation of hemodialysis prior to chemotherapy. Antihyperuricemic therapy and hemodialysis were used to resolve hyperuricemia. However, due to multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome with extremely poor prognosis, the patient ultimately expired in the setting of a terminal ventilator wean. Although our patient did not meet current TLS criteria, she required hemodialysis due to uric acid nephropathy, a complication of TLS. This poses the clinical question of whether adequate diagnostic criteria exist for spontaneous TLS and if the lack of currently accepted guidelines has resulted in the underestimation of its incidence. Allopurinol and rasburicase are commonly used for prevention and treatment of TLS. Although both drugs decrease uric acid levels, allopurinol mechanistically prevents formation of the substrate rasburicase acts to solubilize. These drugs were administered together in our patient, although no established guidelines recommend combined use. This raises the clinical question of whether combined therapy is truly beneficial or, conversely, detrimental to patient outcomes.

  9. Genome analysis of a transmissible lineage of pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals pathoadaptive mutations and distinct evolutionary paths of hypermutators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Lykke Marvig

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing of bacterial pathogens has advanced our understanding of their evolution, epidemiology, and response to antibiotic therapy. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of the molecular changes in in vivo evolving bacterial populations in relation to long-term, chronic infections. For example, it remains unclear what genes are mutated to facilitate the establishment of long-term existence in the human host environment, and in which way acquisition of a hypermutator phenotype with enhanced rates of spontaneous mutations influences the evolutionary trajectory of the pathogen. Here we perform a retrospective study of the DK2 clone type of P. aeruginosa isolated from Danish patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF, and analyze the genomes of 55 bacterial isolates collected from 21 infected individuals over 38 years. Our phylogenetic analysis of 8,530 mutations in the DK2 genomes shows that the ancestral DK2 clone type spread among CF patients through several independent transmission events. Subsequent to transmission, sub-lineages evolved independently for years in separate hosts, creating a unique possibility to study parallel evolution and identification of genes targeted by mutations to optimize pathogen fitness (pathoadaptive mutations. These genes were related to antibiotic resistance, the cell envelope, or regulatory functions, and we find that the prevalence of pathoadaptive mutations correlates with evolutionary success of co-evolving sub-lineages. The long-term co-existence of both normal and hypermutator populations enabled comparative investigations of the mutation dynamics in homopolymeric sequences in which hypermutators are particularly prone to mutations. We find a positive exponential correlation between the length of the homopolymer and its likelihood to acquire mutations and identify two homopolymer-containing genes preferentially mutated in hypermutators. This homopolymer facilitated differential

  10. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarz, Krzysztof

    2007-04-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  11. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Malarz, K.

    2006-01-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  12. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  13. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of γ-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure 137 Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed

  14. Individual differences in spontaneous analogical transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubricht, James R; Lu, Hongjing; Holyoak, Keith J

    2017-05-01

    Research on analogical problem solving has shown that people often fail to spontaneously notice the relevance of a semantically remote source analog when solving a target problem, although they are able to form mappings and derive inferences when given a hint to recall the source. Relatively little work has investigated possible individual differences that predict spontaneous transfer, or how such differences may interact with interventions that facilitate transfer. In this study, fluid intelligence was measured for participants in an analogical problem-solving task, using an abridged version of the Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM) test. In two experiments, we systematically compared the effect of augmenting verbal descriptions of the source with animations or static diagrams. Solution rates to Duncker's radiation problem were measured across varying source presentation conditions, and participants' understanding of the relevant source material was assessed. The pattern of transfer was best fit by a moderated mediation model: the positive impact of fluid intelligence on spontaneous transfer was mediated by its influence on source comprehension; however, this path was in turn modulated by provision of a supplemental animation via its influence on comprehension of the source. Animated source depictions were most beneficial in facilitating spontaneous transfer for those participants with low scores on the fluid intelligence measure.

  15. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  16. Spontaneous wave packet reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    There are taken into account the main conceptual difficulties met by standard quantum mechanics in dealing with physical processes involving macroscopic system. It is stressed how J.A.Wheeler's remarks and lucid analysis have been relevant to pinpoint and to bring to its extreme consequences the puzzling aspects of quantum phenomena. It is shown how the recently proposed models of spontaneous dynamical reduction represent a consistent way to overcome the conceptual difficulties of the standard theory. Obviously, many nontrivial problems remain open, the first and more relevant one being that of generalizing the model theories considered to the relativistic case. This is the challenge of the dynamical reduction program. 43 refs, 2 figs

  17. In vivo mutation analysis using the ΦX174 transgenic mouse and comparisons with other transgenes and endogenous genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Carrie R; Delongchamp, Robert R; Pearce, Mason G; Rainey, Heather F; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Malling, Heinrich V; Heflich, Robert H

    2010-12-01

    The ΦX174 transgenic mouse was first developed as an in vivo Ames test, detecting base pair substitution (bps) at a single bp in a reversion assay. A forward mutational assay was also developed, which is a gain of function assay that also detects bps exclusively. Later work with both assays focused on establishing that a mutation was fixed in vivo using single-burst analysis: determining the number of mutant progeny virus from an electroporated cell by dividing the culture into aliquots before scoring mutants. We review results obtained from single-burst analysis, including testing the hypothesis that high mutant frequencies (MFs) of G:C to A:T mutation recovered by transgenic targets include significant numbers of unrepaired G:T mismatches. Comparison between the ΦX174 and lacI transgenes in mouse spleen indicates that the spontaneous bps mutation frequency per nucleotide (mf(n)) is not significantly lower for ΦX174 than for lacI; the response to ENU is also comparable. For the lacI transgene, the spontaneous bps mf(n) is highly age-dependent up to 12 weeks of age and the linear trend extrapolates at conception to a frequency close to the human bps mf(n) per generation of 1.7 × 10(-8). Unexpectedly, we found that the lacI somatic (spleen) bps mf(n) per cell division at early ages was estimated to be the same as for the human germ-line. The bps mf(n) in bone marrow for the gpt transgene is comparable to spleen for the lacI and ΦX174 transgenes. We conclude that the G:C to A:T transition is characteristic of spontaneous in vivo mutation and that the MFs measured in these transgenes at early ages reflect the expected accumulation of in vivo mutation typical of endogenous mammalian mutation rates. However, spontaneous and induced mf(n)s per nucleotide for the cII gene in spleen are 5-10 times higher than for these other transgenes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Self energy QED: Multipole spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamin, Y.I.

    1990-08-01

    Within the context of Barut's self-field approach, we write the exact expression of the spontaneous atomic decay rate (Phys. Rev. A37, 2284 (1988)), in the long wavelength approximation, in terms of electric- and magnetic-like multipole contributions which are related to the matrix elements of the transition charge and current distributions of the relativistic electron. A number of features of these expressions are discussed and their generalization to interacting composite systems is also pointed out. (author). 8 refs

  19. Simultaneous bilateral primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arife Zeybek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous bilateral primary pneumothorax is a very rare (1.6 / 100,000 and life-threatening condition. Clinical presentation may vary from mild dyspnea to tension pneumothorax. It may be milder particularly in younger patients, but more severe in patients with advanced age, and tube thoracostomy is a life preserver in the latter group. Since mortality and recurrence rates following tube thoracostomy are high, endoscopic approaches to bilateral hemithorax have been reported in literature. Apical wedge resection and pleural procedures are recommended in video thoracoscopy or mini thoracotomy even if no bulla and/or bleb are detected. Bilateral surgical interventions and additional pleural procedures are associated with increased rate of post-operative complications and longer postoperative hospital-stays. As a first-line approach, the surgical method toward any side of lung with air leakage following a previous tube thoracostomy is considered less invasive, especially in younger patients. Here, we present a case of simultaneous bilateral primary spontaneous pneumothorax (SBPSP in a 21-year old male with no history of smoking and chronic pulmonary disease. A unilateral surgical intervention was performed, and no recurrence was observed during 5-year follow up.

  20. Spontaneous compactification to homogeneous spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous compactification of extra dimensions to compact homogeneous spaces is studied. The methods developed within the framework of coset space dimensional reduction scheme and the most general form of invariant metrics are used to find solutions of spontaneous compactification equations

  1. Screening for spontaneous preterm birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, M.A.; van Dam, A.J.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is the most important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this thesis studies on spontaneous preterm birth are presented. The main objective was to investigate the predictive capacity of mid-trimester cervical length measurement for spontaneous preterm birth in a

  2. High rates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutational profiles by single-genome amplification after 48-hour propagation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at different levels of cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Cristiano Teodoro; Alkmim, Wagner; Munerato, Patricia; Zukurov, Jean; Maricato, Juliana T; Sucupira, M Cecília; Diaz, Ricardo S; Janini, Luiz Mário

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity is one of the most important features of HIV-1 infections and the result of error accumulation during reverse transcription and of high viral turnover. HIV-1 reverse transcription is influenced by factors such as the level of nucleotides and/or the cellular activation state. HIV-1 diversity was investigated after 48 h of viral propagation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy donors in three different cell culture conditions: (1) resting PBMCs, (2) simultaneous infection and PBMC activation, and (3) PBMC activation 72 h before infection. Cellular DNA was extracted and proviruses of each culture condition were amplified. Single-genome PCR clones were obtained and the protease and reverse transcriptase of the pol gene were sequenced. An elevated number of nucleotide substitutions in all three culture conditions were observed. In condition 1, the mutational rate observed ranged from 1.0 × 10(-3) to 2.1 × 10(-2), the genetic diversity was 0.6%, and hypermutation was observed in 7.1% of sequenced clones. In condition 2, the mutational rate ranged from 1.0 × 10(-3) to 1.0 × 10(-2), the genetic diversity was 0.8%, and hypermutation affected 6.7% of clones. In condition 3, the mutational rate ranged from 2.8 × 10(-3) to 1.1 × 10(-2), the genetic diversity was 1%, and 5.9% of clones were hypermutated. Substitutions occurred more frequently in some specific nucleotide stretches, and a common pattern for substitutions in all the different conditions was identified. There was a significant accumulation of mutations during the initial periods of in vitro HIV-1 propagation irrespective of culture conditions. The rapid accumulation of virus diversity might represent a viral strategy when colonizing new hosts. Complementary studies are necessary to allow for a better understanding of the initial periods of infection, which represent a crucial event related to disease progression.

  3. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: Hamman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushank Chadha, BS

    2018-04-01

    significant fat stranding. The image also showed an intraluminal stent traversing the gastric antrum and gastric pylorus with no indication of obstruction. Circumferential mural thickening of the gastric antrum and body were consistent with the patient’s history of gastric adenocarcinoma. The shotty perigastric lymph nodes with associated fat stranding, along the greater curvature of the distal gastric body suggested local regional nodal metastases and possible peritoneal carcinomatosis. The thoracic CT scans showed extensive pneumomediastinum that tracked into the soft tissues of the neck, which given the history of vomiting also raised concern for esophageal perforation. There was still no evidence of mediastinal abscess or fat stranding. Additionally, a left subclavian vein port catheter, which terminates with tip at the cavoatrial junction of the superior vena cava can also be seen on the image. Discussion: Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum, also known as Hamman syndrome, is defined by the uncommon incidence of free air in the mediastinum due to the bursting of alveoli, as a result of extended spells of shouting, coughing, or vomiting.1,2 The condition is diagnosed when a clear cause (aerodigestive rupture, barotrauma, infection secondary to gas-forming organisms3 for pneumomediastinum cannot be clearly identified on diagnostic studies. Macklin and Macklin were the first to note the pathogenesis of the syndrome and explained that the common denominator to spontaneous pneumomediastinum was that increased alveolar pressure leads to alveolar rupture.3 Common clinical findings for spontaneous pneumomediastinum include: chest pain, dyspnea, cough, and emesis.4 The condition is not always readily recognized on initial presentation in part for its rare incidence, estimated to be approximately 1 in every 44,500 ED patients3and also because of the non-specific presenting symptoms. For this patient, there was no clear singular cause, and therefore she received care for spontaneous

  4. Clinical and laboratory features of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP) is a complication of cirrhosis. The mortality rate is approximately 30-50%. SBP is defined as an ascitic fluid infection in the absence of any obvious intraabdominal infectious foci. While earlier reports of SBP emphasized high mortality rates, recently lower mortality rates ...

  5. Volatility of Mutator Phenotypes at Single Cell Resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Kennedy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutator phenotypes accelerate the evolutionary process of neoplastic transformation. Historically, the measurement of mutation rates has relied on scoring the occurrence of rare mutations in target genes in large populations of cells. Averaging mutation rates over large cell populations assumes that new mutations arise at a constant rate during each cell division. If the mutation rate is not constant, an expanding mutator population may contain subclones with widely divergent rates of evolution. Here, we report mutation rate measurements of individual cell divisions of mutator yeast deficient in DNA polymerase ε proofreading and base-base mismatch repair. Our data are best fit by a model in which cells can assume one of two distinct mutator states, with mutation rates that differ by an order of magnitude. In error-prone cell divisions, mutations occurred on the same chromosome more frequently than expected by chance, often in DNA with similar predicted replication timing, consistent with a spatiotemporal dimension to the hypermutator state. Mapping of mutations onto predicted replicons revealed that mutations were enriched in the first half of the replicon as well as near termination zones. Taken together, our findings show that individual genome replication events exhibit an unexpected volatility that may deepen our understanding of the evolution of mutator-driven malignancies.

  6. Environmental modulation of somatic mutations: nature of interactions. Final report, 1 June 1974--31 May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mericle, L.W.

    1977-05-01

    Research on this project has had as a major goal a combined ecologic-genetic investigation of somatic mutations in order to evaluate the impacts of certain changing environmental parameters. The ultimate aim, to better understand how such environmental-mutation interactions operate and to assure the information obtained be extrapolatable to conditions and events in nature. Higher plants delineate reproductive tissues late in development from meristematic, somatic tissues. Moreover, the prevailing method of reproduction may be without sexual fusion of gametes and/or wholly asexual (vegetative). Therefore, somatic mutations can have as far-reaching genetic significance for a plant population as when germ cells, themselves, are directly affected. Our data show diurnal temperature differences (DTD) of greater than or equal to 22.2 C-degrees to be very effective mutagenic agents in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system. Further, these ranges of DTD were found to occur often in important seed production areas. A DTD of 22.2 in magnitude can increase mutations 10-fold. And, durations short as 1-day can induce significant increases in mutation rate. Whether interaction of 22.2 DTD with low-level radiation (800 mR/day) is synergistic or attenuative is still debatable. We believe, however, that spontaneous, and 22.2 DTD induced, mutations occur mainly via the genetic mechanism of somatic crossing-over; mutations from acute ionizing radiation (e.g., 30-60 R γ) via chromosome breakage, producing micronuclei. Requirements for maximizing the Discriminatory Response Capability (DRC) in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system are set forth

  7. Teaching Spontaneous Responses to Young Children With Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Emily A; Feeley, Kathleen M; Takacs, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Using a multiple probe design across responses, we demonstrated the effectiveness of intensive intervention in establishing spontaneous verbal responses to 2 3-year-old children with autism with generalization to novel settings involving novel persons. Intervention involved discrete-trial instruction (i.e., repeated instructional opportunities presented in close proximity to high rates of reinforcement), specific prompts, and error correction. Spontaneous responses were defined as specific ve...

  8. Spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumino, B.

    1981-12-01

    There has been recently a revival of interest in supersymmetric gauge theories, stimulated by the hope that supersymmetry might help in clarifying some of the questions which remain unanswered in the so called Grand Unified Theories and in particular the gauge hierarchy problem. In a Grand Unified Theory one has two widely different mass scales: the unification mass M approx. = 10/sup 15/GeV at which the unification group (e.g. SU(5)) breaks down to SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) and the mass ..mu.. approx. = 100 GeV at which SU(2) x U(1) is broken down to the U(1) of electromagnetism. There is at present no theoretical understanding of the extreme smallness of the ratio ..mu../M of these two numbers. This is the gauge hierarchy problem. This lecture attempts to review the various mechanisms for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in gauge theories. Most of the discussions are concerned with the tree approximation, but what is presently known about radiative correction is also reviewed.

  9. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  10. Spontaneous lateral temporal encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncbilek, Gokhan; Calis, Mert; Akalan, Nejat

    2013-01-01

    A spontaneous encephalocele is one that develops either because of embryological maldevelopment or from a poorly understood postnatal process that permits brain herniation to occur. We here report a rare case of lateral temporal encephalocele extending to the infratemporal fossa under the zygomatic arch. At birth, the infant was noted to have a large cystic mass in the right side of the face. After being operated on initially in another center in the newborn period, the patient was referred to our clinic with a diagnosis of temporal encephalocele. He was 6 months old at the time of admission. Computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed a 8 × 9 cm fluid-filled, multiloculated cystic mass at the right infratemporal fossa. No intracranial pathology or connection is seen. The patient was operated on to reduce the distortion effect of the growing mass. The histopathological examination of the sac revealed well-differentiated mature glial tissue stained with glial fibrillary acid protein. This rare clinical presentation of encephaloceles should be taken into consideration during the evaluation of the lateral facial masses in the infancy period, and possible intracranial connection should be ruled out before surgery to avoid complications.

  11. Comparison of uncommon EGFR exon 21 L858R compound mutations with single mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liang; Song, Zhigang; Jiao, Shunchang

    2015-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation is sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). But little is known about the response to EGFR TKIs and the prognostic role of compound mutations. This study compared the uncommon EGFR exon 21 L858R compound mutations with single mutation to characterize EGFR compound mutations and investigated their response to EGFR TKI treatment. We retrospectively screened 799 non-small-cell lung cancer patients from August 1, 2009 to June 1, 2012 by EGFR mutation testing. EGFR mutations were detected in 443 patients, with 22 (4.97%) compound mutations. Subsequently, six patients with EGFR exon 21 L858R compound mutations and 18 paired patients with single L858R mutation were well characterized. Finally, we also analyzed the EGFR TKI treatment response and patients' outcomes of compound or single L858R mutations. There was no differential treatment effect on the disease control rate and objective response rate between the L858R compound mutations and single mutation groups. No significant difference in overall survival or progression-free survival of these two groups was found by log-rank test. In conclusion, we demonstrated that no significant difference was detected in the response to EGFR TKIs and patients' outcomes in the compound and single mutation groups.

  12. Spontaneous light emission from fibers in MINOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avvakumov, S.; Barrett, W.L.; Belias, T.; Bower, C.; Erwin, A.; Kordosky, M.; Lang, K.; Lee, R.; Liu, J.; Miller, W.; Mualem, L.; Nichol, R.; Nelson, J.; Pearce, G.; Proga, M.; Rebel, B.; Ruddick, K.; Smith, C.; Thomas, J.; Vahle, P.; Webb, R.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the observation and measurements of unexpected background rates in the MINOS Far Detector. The noise level at the Far Detector is significantly greater than that expected from natural radioactivity and intrinsic photomultiplier dark current. We have conducted a series of additional tests which demonstrate that the excess rate is caused by spontaneous light emission in the wavelength-shifting fibers, which are used to read out signals from scintillator strips. This noise due to fibers exhibits an exponential fall off with time with a decay time constant of the order of 100 days

  13. Bilateral spontaneous carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townend, Bradley Scott; Traves, Laura; Crimmins, Denis

    2005-06-01

    Bilateral internal carotid artery dissections have been reported, but spontaneous bilateral dissections are rare. Internal carotid artery dissection can present with a spectrum of symptoms ranging from headache to completed stroke. Two cases of spontaneous bilateral carotid artery dissection are presented, one with headache and minimal symptoms and the other with a stroke syndrome. No cause could be found in either case, making the dissections completely spontaneous. Bilateral internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) should be considered in young patients with unexplained head and neck pain with or without focal neurological symptoms and signs. The increasing availability of imaging would sustain the higher index of suspicion.

  14. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → There exists a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. → This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. → A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

  15. Corticomuscular Coherence Is Tuned to the Spontaneous Rhythmicity of Speech at 2-3 Hz

    OpenAIRE

    Ruspantini, I.; Saarinen, T.; Belardinelli, P.; Jalava, A.; Parviainen, T.; Kujala, J.; Salmelin, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    Human speech features rhythmicity that frames distinctive, fine-grained speech patterns. Speech can thus be counted among rhythmic motor behaviors that generally manifest characteristic spontaneous rates. However, the critical neural evidence for tuning of articulatory control to a spontaneous rate of speech has not been uncovered. The present study examined the spontaneous rhythmicity in speech production and its relationship to cortex–muscle neurocommunication, which is essential for speech...

  16. Two Gαi1 Rate-Modifying Mutations Act in Concert to Allow Receptor-Independent, Steady-State Measurements of RGS Protein Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZIELINSKI, THOMAS; KIMPLE, ADAM J.; HUTSELL, STEPHANIE Q.; KOEFF, MARK D.; SIDEROVSKI, DAVID P.; LOWERY, ROBERT G.

    2009-01-01

    RGS proteins are critical modulators of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling given their ability to deactivate Gα subunits via “GTPase-accelerating protein” (GAP) activity. Their selectivity for specific GPCRs makes them attractive therapeutic targets. However, measuring GAP activity is complicated by slow GDP release from Gα and lack of solution-phase assays for detecting free GDP in the presence of excess GTP. To overcome these hurdles, we developed a Gαi1 mutant with increased GDP dissociation and decreased GTP hydrolysis, enabling detection of GAP activity using steady-state GTP hydrolysis. Gαi1(R178M/A326S) GTPase activity was stimulated 6~12 fold by RGS proteins known to act on Gαi subunits, and not affected by those unable to act on Gαi, demonstrating that the Gα/RGS domain interaction selectivity was not altered by mutation. Gαi1(R178M/A326S) interacted with RGS proteins with expected binding specificity and affinities. To enable non-radioactive, homogenous detection of RGS protein effects on Gαi1(R178M/A326S), we developed a Transcreener® fluorescence polarization immunoassay based on a monoclonal antibody that recognizes GDP with greater than 100-fold selectivity over GTP. Combining Gαi1(R178M/A326S) with a homogenous, fluorescence-based GDP detection assay provides a facile means to explore the targeting of RGS proteins as a new approach for selective modulation of GPCR signaling. PMID:19820068

  17. Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodan Paramanathan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Vinodan Paramanathan, Ardalan ZolnourianQueen's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Burton on Trent, Staffordshire DE13 0RB, UKAbstract: Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma is an uncommon clinical entity seen in ophthalmology practice. It is poorly represented in the literature. Current evidence attributes it to orbital trauma, neoplasm, vascular malformations, acute sinusitis, and systemic abnormalities. A 65-year-old female presented with spontaneous intraorbital hematoma manifesting as severe ocular pains, eyelid edema, proptosis, and diplopia, without a history of trauma. Computer tomography demonstrated a fairly well defined extraconal lesion with opacification of the paranasal sinuses. The principal differential based on all findings was that of a spreading sinus infection and an extraconal tumor. An unprecedented finding of a spontaneous orbital hematoma was discovered when the patient was taken to theater. We discuss the rarity of this condition and its management.Keywords: hemorrhage, ophthalmology, spontaneous, intra-orbital, hematoma

  18. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  19. Spontaneity and international marketing performance

    OpenAIRE

    Souchon, Anne L.; Hughes, Paul; Farrell, Andrew M.; Nemkova, Ekaterina; Oliveira, Joao S.

    2016-01-01

    The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to ascertain how today’s international marketers can perform better on the global scene by harnessing spontaneity. Design/methodology/approach – The authors draw on contingency theory to develop a model of the spontaneity – international marketing performance relationship, and identify three potential m...

  20. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Czech Cystic Fibrosis Patients: High Rate of Ribosomal Mutation Conferring Resistance to MLS(B) Antibiotics as a Result of Long-Term and Low-Dose Azithromycin Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkadlec, Jan; Vařeková, Eva; Pantůček, Roman; Doškař, Jiří; Růžičková, Vladislava; Botka, Tibor; Fila, Libor; Melter, Oto

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens infecting the respiratory tract of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study was the first to examine S. aureus isolates from CF patients in the Czech Republic. Among 100 S. aureus isolates from 92 of 107 observed patients, we found a high prevalence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) antibiotics (56%). More than half of the resistant strains (29 of 56) carried a mutation in the MLS(B) target site. The emergence of MLS(B) resistance and mutations conferring resistance to MLS(B) antibiotics was associated with azithromycin treatment (p=0.000000184 and p=0.000681, respectively). Methicillin resistance was only detected in 3% of isolates and the rate of resistance to other antibiotics did not exceed 12%. The prevalence of small-colony variant (SCV) strains was relatively low (9%) and eight of nine isolates with the SCV phenotype were thymidine dependent. The study population of S. aureus was heterogeneous in structure and both the most prevalent community-associated and hospital-acquired clonal lineages were represented. Of the virulence genes, enterotoxin genes seg (n=52), sei (n=49), and sec (n=16) were the most frequently detected among the isolates. The PVL genes (lukS-PV and lukF-PV) have not been revealed in any of the isolates.

  1. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Růžička

    Full Text Available Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs rarely associated with mutations (coldspots and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  2. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Michal; Kulhánek, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Čechová, Andrea; Špačková, Naďa; Fajkusová, Lenka; Réblová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs) rarely associated with mutations (coldspots) and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots) exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  3. Observation time and spontaneous resolution of primary phimosis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz Toledo de Arruda Lourenção

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate spontaneous resolution rate of a series of patients with physiologic phimosis in relation to observation time and presence of symptoms. Methods: retrospective and longitudinal follow-up study of patients with physiologic phimosis, that did not apply topic treatment. These patients were invited for a new visit for reevaluation, or recent data were obtained by chart analysis. Spontaneous resolution rate was determined and statistically compared to age, presence of symptoms at first medical visit and time until reevaluation. Results: seventy one patients were included. Medium time of observation from first visit to reevaluation was 37.4 months. There was spontaneous resolution of phimosis in 32 (45% patients. Children with spontaneous resolution were younger at initial diagnosis and were observed during a longer period of time. Most asymptomatic patients at first visit presented spontaneous resolution. However, it was not possible to stablish a significant relationship between presence of symptoms and evolution of physiologic phimosis. Conclusions: time of observation was the main determinant of spontaneous resolution of patients with physiologic phimosis, reinforcing the current more conservative approach regarding circumcision of those patients.

  4. Spontaneous unscheduled DNA synthesis in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forell, B.; Myers, L.S. Jr.; Norman, A.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous unscheduled DNA synthesis in human lymphocytes was estimated from measurements of tritiated thymidine incorporation into double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) during incubation of cells in vitro. The contribution of scheduled DNA synthesis to the observed incorporation was reduced by inhibiting replication with hydroxyurea and by separating freshly replicated single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) from repaired ds-DNA by column chromatography. The residual contribution of scheduled DNA synthesis was estimated by observing effects on thymidine incorporation of: (a) increasing the rate of production of apurinic sites, and alternatively, (b) increasing the number of cells in S-phase. Corrections based on estimates of endogenous pool size were also made. The rate of spontaneous unscheduled DNA synthesis is estimated to be 490 +- 120 thymidine molecules incorporated per cell per hour. These results compare favorably with estimates made from rates of depurination and depyrimidination of DNA, measured in molecular systems if we assume thymidine is incorporated by a short patch mechanism which incorporates an average of four bases per lesion

  5. Colon cancer-associated mutator DNA polymerase δ variant causes expansion of dNTP pools increasing its own infidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Tony M; Sharma, Sushma; Chabes, Andrei; Shcherbakova, Polina V

    2015-05-12

    Defects in DNA polymerases δ (Polδ) and ε (Polε) cause hereditary colorectal cancer and have been implicated in the etiology of some sporadic colorectal and endometrial tumors. We previously reported that the yeast pol3-R696W allele mimicking a human cancer-associated variant, POLD1-R689W, causes a catastrophic increase in spontaneous mutagenesis. Here, we describe the mechanism of this extraordinary mutator effect. We found that the mutation rate increased synergistically when the R696W mutation was combined with defects in Polδ proofreading or mismatch repair, indicating that pathways correcting DNA replication errors are not compromised in pol3-R696W mutants. DNA synthesis by purified Polδ-R696W was error-prone, but not to the extent that could account for the unprecedented mutator phenotype of pol3-R696W strains. In a search for cellular factors that augment the mutagenic potential of Polδ-R696W, we discovered that pol3-R696W causes S-phase checkpoint-dependent elevation of dNTP pools. Abrogating this elevation by strategic mutations in dNTP metabolism genes eliminated the mutator effect of pol3-R696W, whereas restoration of high intracellular dNTP levels restored the mutator phenotype. Further, the use of dNTP concentrations present in pol3-R696W cells for in vitro DNA synthesis greatly decreased the fidelity of Polδ-R696W and produced a mutation spectrum strikingly similar to the spectrum observed in vivo. The results support a model in which (i) faulty synthesis by Polδ-R696W leads to a checkpoint-dependent increase in dNTP levels and (ii) this increase mediates the hypermutator effect of Polδ-R696W by facilitating the extension of mismatched primer termini it creates and by promoting further errors that continue to fuel the mutagenic pathway.

  6. Novel variation and de novo mutation rates in population-wide de novo assembled Danish trios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, Søren; Liu, Siyang; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria

    2015-01-01

    Building a population-specific catalogue of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels andstructural variants (SVs) with frequencies, termed a national pan-genome, is critical forfurther advancing clinical and public health genetics in large cohorts. Here we report a Danishpan-genome obtained from...... sequencing 10 trios to high depth (50). We report 536k novelSNVs and 283k novel short indels from mapping approaches and develop a population-widede novo assembly approach to identify 132k novel indels larger than 10 nucleotides with lowfalse discovery rates. We identify a higher proportion of indels and SVs...

  7. Spontaneous evolution of an unusual cortical malformation in SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Desai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain malformations such as agenesis and dysgenesis of corpus callosum, pituitary hypoplasia, hypothalamic hamartoma, mesial temporal periventricular heterotopia, and abnormally oriented and misshapen hippocampi have been described with SOX2 gene mutations. A neocortical malformation is presented here in association with SOX2 deletion that over time underwent spontaneous evolution and decrease in size.

  8. Mutation in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, N.; Okada, S.

    1982-01-01

    Mammalian cell cultures were exposed to gamma-rays at various dose rates. Dose-rate effects were observed in cultured somatic cells of the mouse for cell killing and mutations resistant to 6-thioguanine (TGsup(r)) and to methotrexate (MTXsup(r)). Linear quadratic model may be applied to cell killing and TGsup(r) mutations in some cases but can not explain the whole data. Results at low doses with far low dose-rate were not predictable from data at high doses with acute or chronic irradiation. Radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide were seen only after acute exposure but not after chronic one, suggesting that damages by indirect action of radiations may be potentially reparable by cells. TGsup(r) mutations seem to contain gross structural changes whereas MTXsup(r) ones may have smaller alterations. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: revival of Löwdin mutation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-06-10

    Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C→A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Löwdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Löwdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. BRAF mutations in conjunctival melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Dahl, Christina; Dahmcke, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    with atypia. BRAF mutations were identified in 39 of 111 (35%) cases. The rate ratio of BRAF-mutated versus BRAF-wild-type melanoma did not change over time. BRAF mutations were associated with T1 stage (p = 0.007), young age (p = 0.001), male gender (p = 0.02), sun-exposed location (p = 0.01), mixed....../non-pigmented tumour colour (p = 0.02) and nevus origin (p = 0.005), but did not associate with prognosis. BRAF status in conjunctival melanoma and paired premalignant lesions corresponded in 19 of 20 cases. Immunohistochemistry detected BRAF V600E mutations with a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 1...

  11. A case of spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Kanji; Yoshimoto, Hisanori; Harada, Kiyoshi; Uozumi, Tohru; Kuwabara, Satoshi.

    1983-01-01

    The authors experienced a case of spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy diagnosed by CT scan with metrizamide and Conray. Patient was 23-year-old male who had been in good health until one month before admission, when he began to have headache and tinnitus. He noticed bilateral visual acuity was decreased about one week before admission and vomiting appeared two days before admission. He was admitted to our hospital because of bilateral papilledema and remarkable hydrocephalus diagnosed by CT scan. On admission, no abnormal neurological signs except for bilateral papilledema were noted. Immediately, right ventricular drainage was performed. Pressure of the ventricle was over 300mmH 2 O and CSF was clear. PVG and PEG disclosed an another cavity behind the third ventricle, which was communicated with the third ventricle, and occlusion of aqueduct of Sylvius. Metrizamide CT scan and Conray CT scan showed a communication between this cavity and quadrigeminal and supracerebellar cisterns. On these neuroradiological findings, the diagnosis of obstructive hydrocephalus due to benign aqueduct stenosis accompanied with spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy was obtained. Spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy was noticed to produce arrest of hydrocephalus, but with our case, spontaneous regression of such symptoms did not appeared. By surgical ventriculocisternostomy (method by Torkildsen, Dandy, or Scarff), arrest of hydrocephalus was seen in about 50 to 70 per cent, which was the same results as those of spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy. It is concluded that VP shunt or VA shunt is thought to be better treatment of obstructive hydrocephalus than the various kinds of surgical ventriculocisternostomy. (J.P.N.)

  12. Progesterone to prevent spontaneous preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Roberto; Yeo, Lami; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Preterm birth is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide, and its prevention is an important healthcare priority. Preterm parturition is one of the ‘great obstetrical syndromes’ and is caused by multiple etiologies. One of the mechanisms of disease is the untimely decline in progesterone action, which can be manifested by a sonographic short cervix in the midtrimester. The detection of a short cervix in the midtrimester is a powerful risk factor for preterm delivery. Vaginal progesterone can reduce the rate of preterm delivery by 45%, and the rate of neonatal morbidity (admission to neonatal intensive care unit, respiratory distress syndrome, need for mechanical ventilation, etc.). To prevent one case of spontaneous preterm birth birth in women with a short cervix both with and without a prior history of preterm birth. In patients with a prior history of preterm birth, vaginal progesterone is as effective as cervical cerclage to prevent preterm delivery. 17α-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate has not been shown to be effective in reducing the rate of spontaneous preterm birth in women with a short cervix. PMID:24315687

  13. Body Mass Index and spontaneous miscarriage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Turner, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: We compared the incidence of spontaneous miscarriage in women categorised as obese, based on a Body Mass Index (BMI) >29.9 kg\\/m(2), with women in other BMI categories. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective observational study conducted in a university teaching hospital, women were enrolled at their convenience in the first trimester after a sonogram confirmed an ongoing singleton pregnancy with fetal heart activity present. Maternal height and weight were measured digitally and BMI calculated. Maternal body composition was measured by advanced bioelectrical impedance analysis. RESULTS: In 1200 women, the overall miscarriage rate was 2.8% (n=33). The mean gestational age at enrolment was 9.9 weeks. In the obese category (n=217), the miscarriage rate was 2.3% compared with 3.3% in the overweight category (n=329), and 2.3% in the normal BMI group (n=621). There was no difference in the mean body composition parameters, particularly fat mass parameters, between those women who miscarried and those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: In women with sonographic evidence of fetal heart activity in the first trimester, the rate of spontaneous miscarriage is low and is not increased in women with BMI>29.9 kg\\/m(2) compared to women in the normal BMI category.

  14. Spontaneous Pregnancy Loss in Denmark Following Economic Downturns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruckner, Tim A.; Mortensen, Laust H.; Catalano, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    ,449) and the unemployment rate in Denmark beginning in January 1995 and ending in December 2009. Our statistical methods controlled for temporal patterns in spontaneous abortion (e.g., seasonality, trend) and changes in the population of pregnancies at risk of loss. Unexpected increases in the unemployment rate preceded...... in elective abortions and in the cohort composition of high-risk pregnancies did not account for results. It appears that in Denmark, ambient stressors as common as increasing unemployment may precede a population-level increase in spontaneous abortion....

  15. Spontaneous emission near non-trivial conducting surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo e Souza, Reinaldo de; Kort-Kamp, W.J.M.; Taddei, M.M.; Farina, C.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: One of the remarkable phenomena associated with the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field is the spontaneous emission, which accounts for the emission of photons by an excited atom placed in vacuum. As discovered by Purcell in the 1940's, the spontaneous emission rate depends not only on the atomic properties but also on the nearby bodies. This should be expected once the electromagnetic field modes are affected by the boundary conditions imposed by these bodies. We begin our presentation reviewing a method which establishes a striking connection between the spontaneous emission of an excited atom and the classical radiation emitted by an oscillating real dipole. In fact, it can be shown, the influence of the neighbouring bodies is the same in both cases. We use this approach to evaluate the influence of an infinite conducting plane with a circular aperture on the spontaneous emission rate of the atom. This geometry will be particularly interesting if the atom is placed on the axis of symmetry of the hole and if it is predominantly polarizable in this axis, once this configuration is one of the those rare configurations that give rise to repulsive dispersive interactions. It would be very interesting to establish some connection between how the spontaneous emission rate of an excited atom is influenced by the presence of material bodies and the attractive or repulsive character of the dispersive force between that atom (in its ground state) and those material bodies. (author)

  16. Detection of Folliculin Gene Mutations in Two Chinese Families with Birt-Hogg-Dube Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHD, OMIM#135150 is a rare disease in clinic; it is characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts with an increased risk of recurrent pneumothorax, renal cysts, and renal neoplasms. Previous studies have demonstrated that variants in folliculin (FLCN, NM_144997 are mainly responsible for this disease. In this research, we enrolled two BHD families and applied direct sequencing of FLCN to explore the genetic lesions in them. Two FLCN mutations were identified: one is a novel deletion variant (c.668delA/p.N223TfsX19, while the other is a previously reported insertion mutation (c.1579_1580insA/p.R527QfsX75. And the pathogenicity of both variants was confirmed by cosegregation assay. Bioinformatics analysis showed that c.668delA may lead to functional haploinsufficiency of FLCN because mRNA carrying this mutation exhibits a faster degradation rate comparing to the wild type. Real-time qPCR also confirmed that the mRNA level of FLCN expression in the proband was decreased significantly compared with the controls, which may disrupt the mTOR pathway and lead to BHD. The insertion mutation (c.1579_1580insA was predicted to cause a prolonged amino acid sequence of FLCN. The present identification of two mutations not only further supports the important role of tumor suppressor FLCN in BHD and primary spontaneous pneumothorax, but also expands the spectrum of FLCN mutations and will provide insight into genetic diagnosis and counseling of families with BHD.

  17. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova University, were studied for 19 different CFTR mutations by the strip assay method which is based on reverse hybridization. Results: In cystic fibrosis diagnosed patients, 19 mutations were observed of which 9 were homozygous and 10 were heterozygous. ∆F508 frequency was found as 11.9%, and rate of homozygous was found as 66.7%. Mutation frequencies of W1282X and N1303K were found as 2.40% and 4.80% respectively and rate of homozygous mutations were 50% for both. I148T mutation frequency was found as 3.20% and all were heterozygous. For the whole 19 mutations, frequency of mutation in 63 subjects was 22.3%. Conclusion: Detection of CFTR gene mutations by the strip assay method by reverse hybridization is an easy, fast and informative method. However, due to improvability of the common mutations in probable cystic fibrosis patients because of heterogenity in this region, it is still a major problem and does not exclude cystic fibrosis diagnosis. But this problematic issue can be overcome by evaluating the whole exons of CFTR mutations by advanced molecular tecniques. Key words: CFTR, cystic fibrosis, molecular diagnosis, reverse hibridisation [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 202-208

  18. Spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, M.J.; Saez, J.; Perez-Paya, F.J.; Fernandez, F.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of CT in the etiologic diagnosis of spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage. The CT findings are described in 13 patients presenting subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage. Those patients in whom the bleeding was not spontaneous were excluded. Surgical confirmation was obtained in nine cases. In 11 of the 13 cases (84.6%), involving five adenocarcinomas, five angiomyolipoma, two complicated cysts and one case of panarterities nodosa, CT disclosed the underlying pathology. In two cases (15.4%), it only revealed the extension of the hematoma, but gave no clue to its origin. CT is the technique of choice when spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage is suspected since, in most cases, it reveals the underlying pathology. (Author)

  19. DNA sequence analysis of X-ray induced Adh null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, J.; Fossett, N.G.; Arbour-Reily, P.; McDaniel, M.; Tucker, A.; Chang, S.H.; Lee, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The mutational spectrum for 28 X-ray induced mutations and 2 spontaneous mutations, previously determined by genetic and cytogenetic methods, consisted of 20 multilocus deficiencies (19 induced and 1 spontaneous) and 10 intragenic mutations (9 induced and 1 spontaneous). One of the X-ray induced intragenic mutations was lost, and another was determined to be a recombinant with the allele used in the recovery scheme. The DNA sequence of two X-ray induced intragenic mutations has been published. This paper reports the results of DNA sequence analysis of the remaining intragenic mutations and a summary of the X-ray induced mutational spectrum. The combination of DNA sequence analysis with genetic complementation analysis shows a continuous distribution in size of deletions rather than two different types of mutations consisting of deletions and 'point mutations'. Sequencing is shown to be essential for detecting intragenic deletions. Of particular importance for future studies is the observation that all of the intragenic deletions consist of a direct repeat adjacent to the breakpoint with one of the repeats deleted

  20. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection Associated With Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweet, Marysia S; Hayes, Sharonne N; Codsi, Elisabeth; Gulati, Rajiv; Rose, Carl H; Best, Patricia J M

    2017-07-25

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is the most common cause of pregnancy-associated myocardial infarction and remains poorly characterized. This study sought to assess presentation, clinical factors, and outcomes of pregnancy-associated spontaneous coronary artery dissection (P-SCAD) compared with spontaneous coronary artery dissection not associated with pregnancy (NP-SCAD). A Mayo Clinic registry was established in 2010 to include comprehensive retrospective and prospective SCAD data. Records were reviewed to identify women who were pregnant or ≤12 weeks postpartum at time of SCAD. Complete records were available for 323 women; 54 women met criteria for P-SCAD (4 during pregnancy) and they were compared with 269 women with NP-SCAD. Most events occurred within the first month postpartum (35 of 50). Compared with NP-SCAD, P-SCAD patients more frequently presented with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (57% vs. 36%; p = 0.009), left main or multivessel SCAD (24% vs. 5%; p vs. 14%; p = 0.0027, respectively), and left ventricular function ≤35% (26% vs. 10%; p = 0.0071). Among women with imaging of other vascular territories, P-SCAD was less likely with a diagnosis of fibromuscular dysplasia and extracoronary vascular abnormalities (42% vs. 64%; p = 0.047; and 46% vs. 77%; p = 0.0032, respectively). Compared with U.S. birth data, women with P-SCAD were more often multiparous (p = 0.0167), had a history of infertility therapies (p = 0.0004), and had pre-eclampsia (p = 0.001). On long-term follow-up (median 2.3 years) recurrent SCAD occurred in 51 patients, with no difference in the Kaplan Meier 5-year recurrence rates (10% vs. 23%; p = 0.18). P-SCAD patients had more acute presentations and high-risk features than women with NP-SCAD did. The highest frequency of P-SCAD occurred during the first postpartum month and P-SCAD patients less often had extracoronary vascular abnormalities. Hormonal, hemodynamic variations, and yet

  1. Quantitative study of spontaneous eye blinks and eye tics in Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.M. Tulen (Joke); M. Azzolini; J.A. de Vries; W.H. Groeneveld; J. Passchier (Jan); B.J.M. van de Wetering (Ben)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractSpontaneous eye blink rate and frequency of eye tics were studied in nine Tourette patients during periods of rest, conversation, and video watching. In comparison with controls, the Tourette patients showed a significantly higher blink rate during rest

  2. Phosphomimetic mutation of cysteine string protein-α increases the rate of regulated exocytosis by modulating fusion pore dynamics in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Chiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cysteine string protein-α (CSPα is a chaperone to ensure protein folding. Loss of CSPα function associates with many neurological diseases. However, its function in modulating regulated exocytosis remains elusive. Although cspα-knockouts exhibit impaired synaptic transmission, overexpression of CSPα in neuroendocrine cells inhibits secretion. These seemingly conflicting results lead to a hypothesis that CSPα may undergo a modification that switches its function in regulating neurotransmitter and hormone secretion. Previous studies implied that CSPα undergoes phosphorylation at Ser10 that may influence exocytosis by altering fusion pore dynamics. However, direct evidence is missing up to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using amperometry, we investigated how phosphorylation at Ser10 of CSPα (CSPα-Ser10 modulates regulated exocytosis and if this modulation involves regulating a specific kinetic step of fusion pore dynamics. The real-time exocytosis of single vesicles was detected in PC12 cells overexpressing control vector, wild-type CSPα (WT, the CSPα phosphodeficient mutant (S10A, or the CSPα phosphomimetic mutants (S10D and S10E. The shapes of amperometric signals were used to distinguish the full-fusion events (i.e., prespike feet followed by spikes and the kiss-and-run events (i.e., square-shaped flickers. We found that the secretion rate was significantly increased in cells overexpressing S10D or S10E compared to WT or S10A. Further analysis showed that overexpression of S10D or S10E prolonged fusion pore lifetime compared to WT or S10A. The fraction of kiss-and-run events was significantly lower but the frequency of full-fusion events was higher in cells overexpressing S10D or S10E compared to WT or S10A. Advanced kinetic analysis suggests that overexpression of S10D or S10E may stabilize open fusion pores mainly by inhibiting them from closing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CSPα may modulate fusion pore dynamics

  3. A comparison of mutations induced by accelerated iron particles versus those induced by low earth orbit space radiation in the FEM-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, P. S.; Hlavacek, A.; Wilde, H.; Lewicki, D.; Schubert, W.; Kern, R. G.; Kazarians, G. A.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans was employed to determine the mutation frequency as well as the nature of mutations induced by low earth orbit space radiation ambient to Space Shuttle flight STS-76. Recovered mutations were compared to those induced by accelerated iron ions generated by the AGS synchrotron accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For logistical reasons, dauer larvae were prepared at TCU, transported to either Kennedy Space Center or Brookhaven National Laboratory, flown in space or irradiated, returned to TCU and screened for mutants. A total of 25 fem-3 mutants were recovered after the shuttle flight and yielded a mutation frequency of 2.1x10(-5), roughly 3.3-fold higher than the spontaneous rate of 6.3x10(-6). Four of the mutations were homozygous inviable, suggesting that they were large deletions encompassing fem-3 as well as neighboring, essential genes. Southern blot analyses revealed that one of the 25 contained a polymorphism in fem-3, further evidence that space radiation can induce deletions. While no polymorphisms were detected among the iron ion-induced mutations, three of the 15 mutants were homozygous inviable, which is in keeping with previous observations that high LET iron particles generate deficiencies. These data provide evidence, albeit indirect, that an important mutagenic component of ambient space radiation is high LET charged particles such as iron ions.

  4. Spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Cimilli Ozturk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspepsia with mild, stabbing epigastric discomfort without history of trauma is a very common symptom that emergency physicians see in their daily practice. Vascular emergencies, mostly the aortic dissection and aneurysm, are always described in the differential diagnosis with persistent symptoms. Isolated celiac artery dissection occurring spontaneously is a very rare diagnosis. The involvement of branch vessels is generally observed and patients show various clinical signs and symptoms according to the involved branch vessel. Here we are presenting a case with spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection, without any branch vessel involvement or visceral damage, detected by computed tomography scans taken on admission.

  5. Spontaneous waves in muscle fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten [Department of Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Street 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Mechanical oscillations are important for many cellular processes, e.g. the beating of cilia and flagella or the sensation of sound by hair cells. These dynamic states originate from spontaneous oscillations of molecular motors. A particularly clear example of such oscillations has been observed in muscle fibers under non-physiological conditions. In that case, motor oscillations lead to contraction waves along the fiber. By a macroscopic analysis of muscle fiber dynamics we find that the spontaneous waves involve non-hydrodynamic modes. A simple microscopic model of sarcomere dynamics highlights mechanical aspects of the motor dynamics and fits with the experimental observations.

  6. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk; Filiz Kibar; Esin Damla Ziyanoglu Karacor; Salih Cetiner; Gulhan Sahin; Akgun Yaman

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men) who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova Universi...

  7. Spontaneous abortion: a prospective cohort study of younger women from the general population in Denmark. Validation, occurrence and risk determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, L; Tolstrup, J; Munk, C; Bergholt, T; Ottesen, B; Grønbaek, M; Kjaer, S K

    2006-01-01

    To assess the occurrence of spontaneous abortion, comparing two different data sources. To estimate the rate of spontaneous abortion over a 2-year period, and examine potential predictors of the risk for incident spontaneous abortion. We used interview data from a population-based prospective cohort study comprising 11,088 women and data from a linkage of the cohort with the Hospital Discharge Register to compare spontaneous abortions as reported in the interview with those identified in the register. Based on interview data, we estimated the rate of spontaneous abortion during the two-year follow-up. Finally, risk determinants for incident spontaneous abortion were analyzed by means of logistic regression. A total of 654 spontaneous abortions before enrolment in the study were reported by the women compared to 531 abortions found in the register. More than 80% of the spontaneous abortions identified from both sources were recorded in the same year. During follow-up a total of 20.9% of pregnancies intended to be carried to term ended as a spontaneous abortion. In the risk factor analysis, we found that previous spontaneous abortion, being single, never having used oral contraceptives, and use of intrauterine device were associated with increased risk of subsequent spontaneous abortion. In addition, it was indicated that a short interpregnancy interval following a spontaneous abortion may confer an increased risk of abortion in the subsequent pregnancy. We found a high rate of spontaneous abortion in the present study and an acceptable agreement between information obtained by interview and register information. More than 25% of the spontaneous abortions were only reported by the women, and this could not be explained by erroneously reported induced abortions, and may be early, nonhospitalized abortions. We confirm that number of previous spontaneous abortions is a strong determinant, and our data may also indicate a role of previous contraceptive habits. A role of

  8. Genome Analysis of a Transmissible Lineage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals Pathoadaptive Mutations and Distinct Evolutionary Paths of Hypermutators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Molin, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing of bacterial pathogens has advanced our understanding of their evolution, epidemiology, and response to antibiotic therapy. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of the molecular changes in in vivo evolving bacterial populations in relation to long-term, chronic...... infections. For example, it remains unclear what genes are mutated to facilitate the establishment of long-term existence in the human host environment, and in which way acquisition of a hypermutator phenotype with enhanced rates of spontaneous mutations influences the evolutionary trajectory of the pathogen...... genomes shows that the ancestral DK2 clone type spread among CF patients through several independent transmission events. Subsequent to transmission, sub-lineages evolved independently for years in separate hosts, creating a unique possibility to study parallel evolution and identification of genes...

  9. Dynamics and Fate of Beneficial Mutations Under Lineage Contamination by Linked Deleterious Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pénisson, Sophie; Singh, Tanya; Sniegowski, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Beneficial mutations drive adaptive evolution, yet their selective advantage does not ensure their fixation. Haldane’s application of single-type branching process theory showed that genetic drift alone could cause the extinction of newly arising beneficial mutations with high probability. With linkage, deleterious mutations will affect the dynamics of beneficial mutations and might further increase their extinction probability. Here, we model the lineage dynamics of a newly arising beneficial mutation as a multitype branching process. Our approach accounts for the combined effects of drift and the stochastic accumulation of linked deleterious mutations, which we call lineage contamination. We first study the lineage-contamination phenomenon in isolation, deriving dynamics and survival probabilities (the complement of extinction probabilities) of beneficial lineages. We find that survival probability is zero when U≳sb, where U is deleterious mutation rate and sb is the selective advantage of the beneficial mutation in question, and is otherwise depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by ∼1−U/sb. We then put the lineage contamination phenomenon into the context of an evolving population by incorporating the effects of background selection. We find that, under the combined effects of lineage contamination and background selection, ensemble survival probability is never zero but is depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by e−εU/s¯b, where s¯b is mean selective advantage of beneficial mutations, and ε=1−e−1≈0.63. This factor, and other bounds derived from it, are independent of the fitness effects of deleterious mutations. At high enough mutation rates, lineage contamination can depress fixation probabilities to values that approach zero. This fact suggests that high mutation rates can, perhaps paradoxically, (1) alleviate competition among beneficial mutations, or (2) potentially even shut

  10. Spontaneous pneumothorax as indicator for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesma, Paul C; van den Borne, Ben E E M; Gille, Johannes J P; Nagelkerke, Ad F; van Waesberghe, JanHein T M; Paul, Marinus A; van Moorselaar, R Jeroen A; Menko, Fred H; Postmus, Pieter E

    2014-07-03

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene. Clinical manifestations of BHD include skin fibrofolliculomas, renal cell cancer, lung cysts and (recurrent) spontaneous pneumothorax (SP). All clinical manifestations usually present in adults > 20 years of age. Two non-related patients with (recurrent) pneumothorax starting at age 14 accompanied by multiple basal lung cysts on thoracic CT underwent FLCN germline mutation analysis. A pathogenic FLCN mutation was found in both patients confirming suspected BHD. The family history was negative for spontaneous pneumothorax in both families. Although childhood occurrence of SP in BHD is rare, these two cases illustrate that BHD should be considered as cause of SP in children.

  11. Environmental modulation of somatic mutations: nature of interactions. Final report, 1 June 1974--31 May 1977. [Effects of diurnal temperature changes in Tradescantia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mericle, L.W.

    1977-05-01

    Research on this project has had as a major goal a combined ecologic-genetic investigation of somatic mutations in order to evaluate the impacts of certain changing environmental parameters. The ultimate aim, to better understand how such environmental-mutation interactions operate and to assure the information obtained be extrapolatable to conditions and events in nature. Higher plants delineate reproductive tissues late in development from meristematic, somatic tissues. Moreover, the prevailing method of reproduction may be without sexual fusion of gametes and/or wholly asexual (vegetative). Therefore, somatic mutations can have as far-reaching genetic significance for a plant population as when germ cells, themselves, are directly affected. Our data show diurnal temperature differences (DTD) of greater than or equal to 22.2 C-degrees to be very effective mutagenic agents in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system. Further, these ranges of DTD were found to occur often in important seed production areas. A DTD of 22.2 in magnitude can increase mutations 10-fold. And, durations short as 1-day can induce significant increases in mutation rate. Whether interaction of 22.2 DTD with low-level radiation (800 mR/day) is synergistic or attenuative is still debatable. We believe, however, that spontaneous, and 22.2 DTD induced, mutations occur mainly via the genetic mechanism of somatic crossing-over; mutations from acute ionizing radiation (e.g., 30-60 R ..gamma..) via chromosome breakage, producing micronuclei. Requirements for maximizing the Discriminatory Response Capability (DRC) in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system are set forth.

  12. Human Papillomavirus Infection as a Possible Cause of Spontaneous Abortion and Spontaneous Preterm Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambühl, Lea Maria Margareta; Baandrup, Ulrik; Dybkær, Karen

    2016-01-01

    , and 10.9% (95% CI; 10.1–11.7) for umbilical cord blood. Summary estimates for HPV prevalence of spontaneous abortions and spontaneous preterm deliveries, in cervix (spontaneous abortions: 24.5%, and pretermdeliveries: 47%, resp.) and placenta (spontaneous abortions: 24.9%, and preterm deliveries: 50......%, resp.), were identified to be higher compared to normal full-term pregnancies (푃 spontaneous abortion, spontaneous preterm...

  13. Spontaneous Development of Moral Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M.

    1975-01-01

    Moral competence is more difficult to attain than scientific competence. Since language comprehension plays a central role in conceptual development, and moral language is difficult to learn, there is a common deficiency in moral conceptual development. This suggests a theory of non-spontaneous solutions to moral problems. (Author/MS)

  14. Shell theorem for spontaneous emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mortensen, Jakob Egeberg; Lodahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    and therefore is given exactly by the dipole approximation theory. This surprising result is a spontaneous emission counterpart to the shell theorems of classical mechanics and electrostatics and provides insights into the physics of mesoscopic emitters as well as great simplifications in practical calculations....

  15. Prediction of Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Karolien

    2002-01-01

    Preterm birth is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. It is a major goal in obstetrics to lower the incidence of spontaneous preterm birth (SPB) and related neonatal morbidity and mortality. One of the principal objectives is to discover early markers that would allow us to identify

  16. EAMJ Dec. Spontaneous.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... surgical abortion at one month gestation without any complication. The second pregnancy which was a year prior resulted in a spontaneous miscarriage at two months followed by evacuation of retained products of conception with no post abortion complications. Antibiotics were taken following both.

  17. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential. The microscopic shell and pairing corrections are obtained using the Strutinsky and BCS approaches and the cranking formulae yield the inertia tensor. Finally, the WKB method is used to calculate penetrabilities and spontaneous fission half-lives. Calculations are performed for the ...

  18. Gamma-ray induced mutation breeding in tree fruit crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    In many vegetatively propagated crops and tree fruit crops, spontaneous mutations have played an important role in the development of cultivars. Thus, induced mutation breeding has been thought to be a promising way to improve commercially important cultivars. At the Institute of Radiation Breeding (IRB), studies on induced mutation breeding of temperate zone fruit trees using gamma-rays have been performed since 1962. Black spot disease, caused by Alternaria alternata Japanese pear pathotype, is one of the most serious diseases of Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia NAKAI var. culta NAKAI) in Japan. It is known that some Japanese pear cultivars are completely resistant to the disease. The pathogenic fungi produces host-specific toxins (named AK-toxin) (Tanaka 1993, Otani et al. 1973). The susceptibility of Japanese pear is controlled by a single dominant gene (Kozaki 1973). To improve the Japanese pear cultivar 'Nijisseiki', which is highly susceptible to black spot disease, young grafted plants of 'Nijisseiki' have been irradiated chronically in the Gamma Field of the IRB since 1962. In 1981, one twig of a tree planted at a distance of 53 m from the 60 Co source with an exposure rate of 0.138 Gy/day (20hr-irradiation) was selected as the first resistant mutant. It was designated as cultivar 'Gold Nijisseiki' and released in 1990. A selection method for mutants resistant to black spot disease using the pathogen produced toxin and pear leaf disks was established. It is a simple and stable selection method. Up to the present, three mutant cultivars resistant to black spot disease have been bred at the IRB by chronic and acute gamma-ray irradiation. They showed intermediate resistance compared with the completely resitan cultivar 'Choujuurou' and highly susceptible cultivar 'Nijisseiki'. We obtained some apple mutants resistant to alternaria leaf blotch disease using toxin and leaf disks and are also attempting to obtain mutant resistant to some disease in other temperate

  19. Is Increased Low-dose somatic Radiosensitivity Associated with Increased Transgenerational Germline Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2008-10-02

    Using single-molecule polymerase chain reaction, the frequency of spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation at an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus was studied in DNA samples extracted from sperm and bone marrow of Atm knockout (Atm+/–) heterozygous male mice. The frequency of spontaneous mutation in sperm and bone marrow in Atm+/– males did not significantly differ from that in wild-type BALB/c mice. Acute gamma-ray exposure did not affect ESTR mutation frequency in bone marrow and resulted in similar increases in sperm samples taken from Atm+/– and BALB/c males. Taken together, these results suggest that the Atm haploinsufficiency analyzed in our study does not affect spontaneous and radiation-induced ESTR mutation frequency in mice.

  20. Is Increased Low-dose somatic Radiosensitivity Associated with Increased Transgenerational Germline Mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Using single-molecule polymerase chain reaction, the frequency of spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation at an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus was studied in DNA samples extracted from sperm and bone marrow of Atm knockout (Atm+/-) heterozygous male mice. The frequency of spontaneous mutation in sperm and bone marrow in Atm+/- males did not significantly differ from that in wild-type BALB/c mice. Acute gamma-ray exposure did not affect ESTR mutation frequency in bone marrow and resulted in similar increases in sperm samples taken from Atm+/- and BALB/c males. Taken together, these results suggest that the Atm haploinsufficiency analyzed in our study does not affect spontaneous and radiation-induced ESTR mutation frequency in mice

  1. Folliculin mutations are not associated with severe COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litonjua Augusto A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rare loss-of-function folliculin (FLCN mutations are the genetic cause of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, a monogenic disorder characterized by spontaneous pneumothorax, fibrofolliculomas, and kidney tumors. Loss-of-function folliculin mutations have also been described in pedigrees with familial spontaneous pneumothorax. Because the majority of patients with folliculin mutations have radiographic evidence of pulmonary cysts, folliculin has been hypothesized to contribute to the development of emphysema. To determine whether folliculin sequence variants are risk factors for severe COPD, we genotyped seven previously reported Birt-Hogg-Dubé or familial spontaneous pneumothorax associated folliculin mutations in 152 severe COPD probands participating in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study. We performed bidirectional resequencing of all 14 folliculin exons in a subset of 41 probands and subsequently genotyped four identified variants in an independent sample of345 COPD subjects from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (cases and 420 male smokers with normal lung function from the Normative Aging Study (controls. Results None of the seven previously reported Birt-Hogg-Dubé or familial spontaneous pneumothorax mutations were observed in the 152 severe, early-onset COPD probands. Exon resequencing identified 31 variants, including two non-synonymous polymorphisms and two common non-coding polymorphisms. No significant association was observed for any of these four variants with presence of COPD or emphysema-related phenotypes. Conclusion Genetic variation in folliculin does not appear to be a major risk factor for severe COPD. These data suggest that familial spontaneous pneumothorax and COPD have distinct genetic causes, despite some overlap in radiographic characteristics.

  2. Is The Ribosome Targeted By Adaptive Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Fernandez, Alicia; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    by the antibiotic treatment of the patient. However, other mutations cannot be directly associated with antibiotic resistance. Conclusions: Clarification of the potential pleiotropic consequences of the specific mutations in ribosomal proteins is important for our understanding of biological evolution......, and will have impacts on the design of new treatment strategies to combat microbial infections....... in specific ribosomal genes. The bacterial phenotypes of the mutated strains will be investigated. Results: Preliminary assays show that mutant strains have reduced growth rate and an altered antibiotic resistance pattern. The selection for mutations in ribosomal protein genes is partly explainable...

  3. A propulsion injury following a spontaneous electronic cigarette explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherrie Chan Yiru

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes have become increasingly popular at an alarming rate. This coincides with the public perception that they are a safer mean of nicotine consumption. Unregulated devices carry unrecognized safety risks that have led to numerous cases of burns, associating with spontaneous combustions of e-cigarettes.

  4. Spontaneous emission of quantum dots in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapienza, Luca; Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup; Stobbe, Søren

    2010-01-01

    We report on the enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of single semiconductor quantum dots embedded in a photonic crystal waveguide with engineered disorder. Random high-Q cavities, that are signature of Anderson localization, are measured in photoluminescence experiments and appear in th...

  5. Spontaneous Emission Enhancement at Finite-length Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filonenko, K.; Willatzen, Morten; Bordo, V.

    2013-01-01

    We study spontaneous emission enhancement of a two-level atomic emitter placed in a dielectric medium near a finite-length cylindrical metal nanowire. We calculate the dependence of the Purcell factor and the normalized decay rate to a continuous spectrum on the nanowire radius for several emitter...

  6. Spontaneous Retropharyngeal Emphysema: A Case Report | Chi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... is a rare clinical condition in pediatric otolaryngology. The predominant symptoms are sore throat, odynophagia, dysphagia, and neck pain. Here, we report a case of spontaneous retropharyngeal emphysema. Keywords: Iatrogenic injury, retropharyngeal emphysema, spontaneous retropharyngeal emphysem, trauma ...

  7. La maladie de Grisel : Spontaneous atlantoaxial subluxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Robinson, PH; Hermens, RAEC

    Objective: "La maladie de Grisel" (Grisel's syndrome) is a spontaneously occurring atlantoaxial subluxation with torticollis. We present a case of atlantoaxial subluxation occurring in a 20-year period of pharyngoplasty surgery. The occurrence of a "spontaneous" atlantoaxial subluxation after oral

  8. Repair-resistant mutation in Neurospora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, D.; Macleod, H.; Loo, M.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic UV treatment produces severalfold fewer mutations in Neurospora conidia than does the same total dose of acute UV. Experiments were designed to determine the conditions required for chronic UV mutagenesis. Measurement of the coincidence frequency for two independent mutations revealed the existence of a subset of cells which are mutable by chronic UV. Analysis of forward mutation at the mtr locus showed that the genetic alterations produced by chronic UV were virtually all point mutants, even though the assay system could detect alterations or deletions extending into neighboring genes. A significant fraction of the mutants produced by acute UV were multigenic deletions. The size of the dose-rate effect (acute UV mutation frequency divided by chronic UV mutation frequency) was compared for several different mutation assay systems. Forward mutations (recessive lethals and mtr) gave values ranging from four to nine. For events which were restricted to specific molecular sites (specific reversions and nonsense suppressor mutations), there was a wider range of dose-rate ratios. This suggests that chronic UV mutation may be restricted to certain molecular sequences or configurations

  9. Controlling the spontaneous emission of a superconducting transmon qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, A A; Schreier, J A; Johnson, B R; Chow, J M; Koch, Jens; Gambetta, J M; Schuster, D I; Frunzio, L; Devoret, M H; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2008-08-22

    We present a detailed characterization of coherence in seven transmon qubits in a circuit QED architecture. We find that spontaneous emission rates are strongly influenced by far off-resonant modes of the cavity and can be understood within a semiclassical circuit model. A careful analysis of the spontaneous qubit decay into a microwave transmission-line cavity can accurately predict the qubit lifetimes over 2 orders of magnitude in time and more than an octave in frequency. Coherence times T1 and T_{2};{*} of more than a microsecond are reproducibly demonstrated.

  10. Evolution of eukaryotic genome architecture: Insights from the study of a rapidly evolving metazoan, Oikopleura dioica: Non-adaptive forces such as elevated mutation rates may influence the evolution of genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Sreenivas; Morais, David A de Lima; Gough, Julian; Babu, M Madan

    2011-08-01

    Recent sequencing of the metazoan Oikopleura dioica genome has provided important insights, which challenges the current understanding of eukaryotic genome evolution. Many genomic features of O. dioica show deviation from the commonly observed trends in other eukaryotic genomes. For instance, O. dioica has a rapidly evolving, highly compact genome with a divergent intron-exon organization. Additionally, O. dioica lacks the minor spliceosome and key DNA repair pathway genes. Even with a compact genome, O. dioica contains tandem repeats, comparable to other eukaryotes, and shows lineage-specific expansion of certain protein domains. Here, we review its genomic features in the context of current knowledge, discuss implications for contemporary biology and identify areas for further research. Analysis of the O. dioica genome suggests that non-adaptive forces such as elevated mutation rates might influence the evolution of genome architecture. The knowledge of unique genomic features and splicing mechanisms in O. dioica may be exploited for synthetic biology applications, such as generation of orthogonal splicing systems. Copyright © 2011 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Spontaneous Immortalization of Clinically Normal Colon-Derived Fibroblasts from a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R. Forsyth

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal human diploid cells do not spontaneously immortalize in culture, but instead enter replicative senescence after a finite number of population doublings. Ablation of key checkpoint arrest or cancersuppressor genes, through dominantly inherited germline mutation (p53+/-, Li-Fraumeni or viral oncogene expression (SV40 large T, HPV16/18, E6/E7 can lead to escape from senescence, additional doublings, entrance into crisis phase, where immortal clones emerge at low frequency. In the vast majority of cases, telomerase is reactivated and telomeres are stabilized. Here we describe the spontaneous immortalization of clinically normal fibroblasts derived from colonic stroma of a familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP patient. The preimmortal (C26C and the spontaneously immortalized derivative (C26Ci cells are heterozygous for a characterized germline mutation in exon 15 of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene. Immortalization was accompanied by spontaneous reactivation of endogenous telomerase and establishment of telomeres at presenescent lengths. Normal checkpoint behavior is retained and a diploid karyotype is maintained. These cells provide a valuable new addition to the limited number of spontaneously immortalized human cell types, particularly fibroblast cells, will be useful in experimentally determining the functional pathways in neoplastic development and in the identification of potential molecular targets for cancer chemoprevention.

  12. Confidence-based somatic mutation evaluation and prioritization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Löwer

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR, to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence. All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50, none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set.

  13. Systematics of spontaneous positron lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.; Reus, T. de; Reinhardt, J.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.

    1985-08-01

    Dynamical and spontaneous positron emission are investigated for heavy-ion collisions with long time delay using a semiclassical description. Numerical results and analytical expressions for the characteristic quantities of the resulting spontaneous positron line, i.e., its position, width, and cross section, are compared. The expected behaviour of the line position and cross section and its visibility against the spectrum of dynamically created positrons is discussed in dependence of the united charge Zsub(u) of projectile and target nucleus in a range of systems from Zsub(u)=180 up to Zsub(u)=188. The results are confronted with presently available experimental data, and possible implications on further experiments are worked out. (orig.)

  14. Spontaneous Rotational Inversion in Phycomyces

    KAUST Repository

    Goriely, Alain

    2011-03-01

    The filamentary fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus undergoes a series of remarkable transitions during aerial growth. During what is known as the stagea IV growth phase, the fungus extends while rotating in a counterclockwise manner when viewed from above (stagea IVa) and then, while continuing to grow, spontaneously reverses to a clockwise rotation (stagea IVb). This phase lasts for 24-48Ah and is sometimes followed by yet another reversal (stageAIVc) before the overall growth ends. Here, we propose a continuum mechanical model of this entire process using nonlinear, anisotropic, elasticity and show how helical anisotropy associated with the cell wall structure can induce spontaneous rotation and, under appropriate circumstances, the observed reversal of rotational handedness. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  15. Spontaneous regression of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Kyoichi; Fujita, Shin; Ohshiro, Taihei; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Sekine, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    A case of spontaneous regression of transverse colon cancer is reported. A 64-year-old man was diagnosed as having cancer of the transverse colon at a local hospital. Initial and second colonoscopy examinations revealed a typical cancer of the transverse colon, which was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy 6 weeks after the initial colonoscopy. The resected specimen showed only a scar at the tumor site, and no cancerous tissue was proven histologically. The patient is alive with no evidence of recurrence 1 year after surgery. Although an antitumor immune response is the most likely explanation, the exact nature of the phenomenon was unclear. We describe this rare case and review the literature pertaining to spontaneous regression of colorectal cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Spontaneous and mutagen-induced deletions: mechanistic studies in Salmonella tester strain TA102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, D.E.; Marnett, L.J.; Ames, B.N.

    1984-01-01

    Salmonella tester strain TA102 carries the hisG428 ochre mutation on the multicopy plasmid pAQ1. DNA sequence analysis of 45 spontaneous revertants of hisG428 on the chromosome in the presence of pKM101 (strain TA103) indicates that hisG428 revertants fall into three major categories: (i) small, in-frame deletions (3 or 6 base pairs) that remove part or all of the ochre triplet; (ii) base substitution mutations at the ochre site; (iii) extragenic ochre suppressors. Deletion revertants are identified in a simple phenotypic screen by their resistance to the inhibitory histidine analog thiazolealanine, which feedback inhibits the wild-type hisG enzyme but not the enzyme resulting from the deletions. The effect of various genetic backgrounds on the generation of spontaneous deletion revertants was examined. The presence of a uvrB mutation or a recA mutation suppressed the generation of spontaneous deletion revertants to approximately 1/2.5. When hisG428 was in multiple copies on pAQ1, the frequency of spontaneous deletion revertants increased by 40-fold, which is the approximate copy number of pAQ1. Mutagenic agents that induce single-strand breaks in DNA (e.g., x-rays, bleomycin, and nalidixic acid) induced deletion revertants in TA102. These agents induced deletion revertants only in hisG428 on pAQ1 and only in the presence of pKM101. Deletion revertants were not induced by frameshift mutagens (i.e., ICR-191 and 9aminoacridine). These results indicate that different pathways exist for the generation of spontaneous and mutagen-induced deletion revertants of hisG428. 41 references, 2 figures, 3 tables

  17. Spontaneous baryogenesis in warm inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Brandenberger, Robert H.; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2003-01-01

    We discuss spontaneous baryogenesis in the warm inflation scenario. In contrast with standard inflation models, radiation always exists in the warm inflation scenario, and the inflaton must be directly coupled to it. Also, the transition to the post-inflationary radiation dominated phase is smooth and the entropy is not significantly increased at the end of the period of inflation. In addition, after the period of warm inflation ends, the inflaton does not oscillate coherently but slowly roll...

  18. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture in Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Mirfazaelian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous rupture of spleen due to malignant melanoma is a rare situation, with only a few case reports in the literature. This study reports a previously healthy, 30-year-old man who came with chief complaint of acute abdominal pain to emergency room. On physical examination, abdominal tenderness and guarding were detected to be coincident with hypotension. Ultrasonography revealed mild splenomegaly with moderate free fluid in abdominopelvic cavity. Considering acute abdominal pain and hemodynamic instability, he underwent splenectomy with splenic rupture as the source of bleeding. Histologic examination showed diffuse infiltration by tumor. Immunohistochemical study (positive for S100, HMB45, and vimentin and negative for CK, CD10, CK20, CK7, CD30, LCA, EMA, and chromogranin confirmed metastatic malignant melanoma. On further questioning, there was a past history of a nasal dark skin lesion which was removed two years ago with no pathologic examination. Spontaneous (nontraumatic rupture of spleen is an uncommon situation and it happens very rarely due to neoplastic metastasis. Metastasis of malignant melanoma is one of the rare causes of the spontaneous rupture of spleen.

  19. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  20. Higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KRAS mutation is widely accepted as a key factor in colorectal tumorigenesis. Although KRAS mutation is widely studied in CRC limited data are available about mutation rates and spectrum in CRC from developing countries like Saudi Arabia where epidemiological features of the disease are different. We studied ...

  1. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  2. The role of radiation induced mutations in crop Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souframanien, J.

    2017-01-01

    Sudden, heritable changes in the genetic material, DNA, are known as mutations. Selection of naturally occurring mutations in wild, ancestral species helped humans in the domestication and further improvement of today's crop plants. Gregor Mendel in 1865 used several such natural mutants in his experiments with garden pea to formulate the laws of inheritance. The term mutation itself was used for the first time by Hugo de Vries in 1901 in his mutation theory. Plant breeding based on the science of genetics, as practiced over the past 100 years, exploited the available genetic variability in the primary gene pool of crop plants, and sometimes in related species. Primarily, simple selection of desirable offspring and cross breeding were the earlier methods of breeding and this utilized the occurrence of spontaneous mutations. In nature, occurrence of natural variability in the form of spontaneous mutations is extremely low (about 10 -6 ), which can be enhanced several fold (∼10 -3 ) by using ionizing radiations or chemical mutagens

  3. Spontaneous Loss of Virulence in Natural Populations of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Mylène M; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Bracq-Dieye, Hélène; Han, Lei; Leclercq, Alexandre; Vales, Guillaume; Moura, Alexandra; Gouin, Edith; Scortti, Mariela; Disson, Olivier; Vázquez-Boland, José A; Lecuit, Marc

    2017-11-01

    The pathogenesis of Listeria monocytogenes depends on the ability of this bacterium to escape from the phagosome of the host cells via the action of the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO). Expression of the LLO-encoding gene ( hly ) requires the transcriptional activator PrfA, and both hly and prfA genes are essential for L. monocytogenes virulence. Here, we used the hemolytic activity of LLO as a phenotypic marker to screen for spontaneous virulence-attenuating mutations in L. monocytogenes Sixty nonhemolytic isolates were identified among a collection of 57,820 confirmed L. monocytogenes strains isolated from a variety of sources (0.1%). In most cases (56/60; 93.3%), the nonhemolytic phenotype resulted from nonsense, missense, or frameshift mutations in prfA Five strains carried hly mutations leading to a single amino acid substitution (G299V) or a premature stop codon causing strong virulence attenuation in mice. In one strain, both hly and gshF (encoding a glutathione synthase required for full PrfA activity) were missing due to genomic rearrangements likely caused by a transposable element. The PrfA/LLO loss-of-function (PrfA - /LLO - ) mutants belonged to phylogenetically diverse clades of L. monocytogenes , and most were identified among nonclinical strains (57/60). Consistent with the rare occurrence of loss-of-virulence mutations, we show that prfA and hly are under purifying selection. Although occurring at a low frequency, PrfA - /LLO - mutational events in L. monocytogenes lead to niche restriction and open an evolutionary path for obligate saprophytism in this facultative intracellular pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Maury et al.

  4. Ionizing radiation and genetic risks. Part VIII. The concept of mutation component and its use in risk estimation for multifactorial diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denniston, C. [Laboratory of Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison (United States); Chakraborty, R. [Human Genetics Center, University of Texas School of Public Health, P.O. Box 20334, Houston, TX (United States); Sankaranarayanan, K. [Department of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis, Sylvius Laboratories, Leiden University Medical Centre, Wassenaarseweg 72, 2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands)

    1998-08-31

    mutation rate. Our investigation shows that, for a permanent increase in mutation rate of 15%, MC in the first few generations is of the order of 1-2%. This conclusion holds over a broad range of heritability values above about 30%. At equilibrium, however, MC reaches 100%. For a one-time increase in mutation rate, MC reaches its maximum value (of 1-2%) in the first generation, followed by a decline to zero in subsequent generations. These conclusions hold for so many combinations of parameter values (i.e., threshold, selection coefficient, number of loci, environmental variance, spontaneous mutation rate, increases in mutation rate, levels of `interaction` between genes and recombination rates) that it can be considered to be relatively robust. We also investigated the biological validity of the FLTM in terms of the minimum number of loci, their mutation rates and selection coefficients needed to explain the incidence of multifactorial diseases using the theory of genetic loads. We argue that for common multifactorial diseases, selection coefficients are small in present-day human populations. Consequently, with mutation rates of the order known for Mendelian genes, the FLTM with a few loci and weak selection provides a good approximation for studying the responsiveness of multifactorial diseases to radiation exposures

  5. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  6. Null mutation of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase subunit p67phox protects the Dahl-S rat from salt-induced reductions in medullary blood flow and glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Louise C; Ryan, Robert P; Broadway, Elizabeth; Skelton, Meredith M; Kurth, Theresa; Cowley, Allen W

    2015-03-01

    Null mutations in the p67(phox) subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase confer protection from salt sensitivity on Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Here, we track the sequential changes in medullary blood flow (MBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinary protein, and mean arterial pressure in SSp67(phox) null rats and wild-type littermates during 21 days of 4.0% NaCl high-salt (HS) diet. Optical fibers were implanted in the renal medulla and MBF was measured in conscious rats by laser Doppler flowmetry. Separate groups of rats were prepared with femoral venous catheters and GFR was measured by the transcutaneous assessment of fluorescein isothiocyanate-sinistrin disappearance curves. Mean arterial blood pressure was measured by telemetry. In wild-type rats, HS caused a rapid reduction in MBF, which was significantly lower than control values by HS day-6. Reduced MBF was associated with a progressive increase in mean arterial pressure, averaging 170±5 mm Hg by HS salt day-21. A significant reduction in GFR was evident on day-14 HS, after the onset of hypertension and reduced MBF. In contrast, HS had no significant effect on MBF in SSp67(phox) null rats and the pressor response to sodium was blunted, averaging 150±3 mm Hg on day-21 HS. GFR was maintained throughout the study and proteinuria was reduced. In summary, when p67(phox) is not functional in the salt-sensitive rats, HS does not cause reduced MBF and salt-sensitive hypertension is attenuated, and consequently renal injury is reduced and GFR is maintained. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Ulcerogenicity of piroxicam: an analysis of spontaneously reported data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A C; Hsu, J P; Faich, G A

    1987-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that piroxicam may be more ulcerogenic than other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in use. Critics have attributed this putative relation to flawed comparisons of spontaneously reported data. In this study cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation, and ulcer reported to the Food and Drug Administration's spontaneous reporting system over 12 years were examined. Reporting rates for eight NSAIDs were compared over identical periods of their marketing life cycles. After adjustments were made for the heterogeneity in the underlying reporting rates the difference in rates between piroxicam and the other drugs was considerably reduced but piroxicam retained its top ranking among the drugs; however, large and clinically important differences in the frequency of cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation, and ulcer between piroxicam and the rest of the NSAIDs compared probably do not exist. PMID:3109543

  8. General features of spontaneous baryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuzova, Elena

    2017-04-01

    The classical version of spontaneous baryogenesis is studied in details. It is shown that the relation between the time derivative of the (pseudo)goldstone field and the baryonic chemical potential essentially depends upon the representation chosen for the fermionic fields with non-zero baryonic number (quarks). The kinetic equation, used for the calculations of the cosmological baryon asymmetry, is generalized to the case of non-stationary background. The effects of the finite interval of the integration over time are also included into consideration.

  9. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattapuram, Taj M. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Kattapuram, Susan V. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)], E-mail: skattapuram@partners.org

    2008-07-15

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee presents with acute onset of severe, pain in elderly patients, usually female and usually without a history of trauma. Originally described as idiopathic osteonecrosis, the exact etiology is still debated. Evidence suggests that an acute fracture occurs as a result of chronic stress or minor trauma to a weakened subchondral bone plate. The imaging characteristics on MR reflect the age of the lesion and the symptoms. More appropriate terminology may be ' subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee' or 'focal subchondral osteonecrosis'.

  10. Identification of a polymorphic site as a mutational site in exon VI of the mouse p53 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paunesku, T.; Gemmell, M.A.; Crkvenjakov, R.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-07-01

    Sequencing by hybridization techniques are being used to analyze the incidence of specific p53 mutations associated with radiation-induced and spontaneous lymphosarcomas in mice. One sequence difference noted as being a mouse strain-specific polymorphism has been identified through these experiments as being a mutational, rather than a polymorphic, site

  11. Generalized arterial calcification of infancy and pseudoxanthoma elasticum can be caused by mutations in either ENPP1 or ABCC6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nitschke, Y.; Baujat, G.; Botschen, U.; Wittkampf, T.; du Moulin, M.; Stella, J.; Le Merrer, M.; Guest, G.; Lambot, K.; Tazarourte-Pinturier, M.F.; Chassaing, N.; Roche, O.; Feenstra, I.; Loechner, K.; Deshpande, C.; Garber, S.J.; Chikarmane, R.; Steinmann, B.; Shahinyan, T.; Martorell, L.; Davies, J.; Smith, W.E.; Kahler, S.G.; McCulloch, M.; Wraige, E.; Loidi, L.; Hohne, W.; Martin, L.; Hadj-Rabia, S.; Terkeltaub, R.; Rutsch, F.

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous pathologic arterial calcifications in childhood can occur in generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) or in pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE). GACI is associated with biallelic mutations in ENPP1 in the majority of cases, whereas mutations in ABCC6 are known to cause PXE.

  12. Spontaneous usage of different shortcuts based on the commutativity principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gaschler

    Full Text Available Based on research on expertise a person can be said to possess integrated conceptual knowledge when she/he is able to spontaneously identify task relevant information in order to solve a problem efficiently. Despite the lack of instruction or explicit cueing, the person should be able to recognize which shortcut strategy can be applied--even when the task context differs from the one in which procedural knowledge about the shortcut was originally acquired. For mental arithmetic, first signs of such adaptive flexibility should develop already in primary school. The current study introduces a paper-and-pencil-based as well as an eyetracking-based approach to unobtrusively measure how students spot and apply (known shortcut options in mental arithmetic. We investigated the development and the relation of the spontaneous use of two strategies derived from the mathematical concept of commutativity. Children from grade 2 to grade 7 and university students solved three-addends addition problems, which are rarely used in class. Some problems allowed the use of either of two commutativity-based shortcut strategies. Results suggest that from grade three onwards both of the shortcuts were used spontaneously and application of one shortcut correlated positively with application of the other. Rate of spontaneous usage was substantial but smaller than in an instructed variant. Eyetracking data suggested similar fixation patterns for spontaneous an instructed shortcut application. The data are consistent with the development of an integrated concept of the mathematical principle so that it can be spontaneously applied in different contexts and strategies.

  13. Genetic characterization of an adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus that reveals improved replication rates in human lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wörmann, Xenia [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Lesch, Markus [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Steinbeis Innovation gGmbH, Center for Systems Biomedicine, Falkensee (Germany); Welke, Robert-William [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Abdurishid, Mirshat [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Sieben, Christian [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Geissner, Andreas [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Brinkmann, Volker [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Kastner, Markus [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Karner, Andreas [Center for Advanced Bioanalysis GmbH (CBL), Linz (Austria); Zhu, Rong; Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Anish, Chakkumkal [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Seeberger, Peter H. [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, Andreas [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); and others

    2016-05-15

    The 2009 influenza pandemic originated from a swine-origin H1N1 virus, which, although less pathogenic than anticipated, may acquire additional virulence-associated mutations in the future. To estimate the potential risk, we sequentially passaged the isolate A/Hamburg/04/2009 in A549 human lung epithelial cells. After passage 6, we observed a 100-fold increased replication rate. High-throughput sequencing of viral gene segments identified five dominant mutations, whose contribution to the enhanced growth was analyzed by reverse genetics. The increased replication rate was pinpointed to two mutations within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene segment (HA{sub 1} D130E, HA{sub 2} I91L), near the receptor binding site and the stem domain. The adapted virus also replicated more efficiently in mice in vivo. Enhanced replication rate correlated with increased fusion pH of the HA protein and a decrease in receptor affinity. Our data might be relevant for surveillance of pre-pandemic strains and development of high titer cell culture strains for vaccine production. - Highlights: • We observed a spontaneous mutation of a 2009-pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in vitro. • The adaptation led to a 100-fold rise in replication rate in human A549 cells. • Adaptation was caused by two mutations in the HA gene segment. • Adaptation correlates with increased fusion pH and decreased receptor affinity.

  14. Genetic characterization of an adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus that reveals improved replication rates in human lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wörmann, Xenia; Lesch, Markus; Welke, Robert-William; Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Abdurishid, Mirshat; Sieben, Christian; Geissner, Andreas; Brinkmann, Volker; Kastner, Markus; Karner, Andreas; Zhu, Rong; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H.; Herrmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The 2009 influenza pandemic originated from a swine-origin H1N1 virus, which, although less pathogenic than anticipated, may acquire additional virulence-associated mutations in the future. To estimate the potential risk, we sequentially passaged the isolate A/Hamburg/04/2009 in A549 human lung epithelial cells. After passage 6, we observed a 100-fold increased replication rate. High-throughput sequencing of viral gene segments identified five dominant mutations, whose contribution to the enhanced growth was analyzed by reverse genetics. The increased replication rate was pinpointed to two mutations within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene segment (HA 1 D130E, HA 2 I91L), near the receptor binding site and the stem domain. The adapted virus also replicated more efficiently in mice in vivo. Enhanced replication rate correlated with increased fusion pH of the HA protein and a decrease in receptor affinity. Our data might be relevant for surveillance of pre-pandemic strains and development of high titer cell culture strains for vaccine production. - Highlights: • We observed a spontaneous mutation of a 2009-pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in vitro. • The adaptation led to a 100-fold rise in replication rate in human A549 cells. • Adaptation was caused by two mutations in the HA gene segment. • Adaptation correlates with increased fusion pH and decreased receptor affinity.

  15. Dynamics of Spontaneous Emission Controlled by Local Density of States in Photonic Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter; Nikolaev, Ivan S.; van Driel, A. Floris

    2006-01-01

    We have measured time-resolved spontaneous emission from quantum dots in 3D photonic crystals. Due to the spatially dependent local density of states, the distribution of decay rates varies strongly with the photonic crystal lattice parameter.......We have measured time-resolved spontaneous emission from quantum dots in 3D photonic crystals. Due to the spatially dependent local density of states, the distribution of decay rates varies strongly with the photonic crystal lattice parameter....

  16. Risk of spontaneous pneumothorax due to air travel and diving in patients with Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johannesma, P.C.; Beek, I. van de; Wel, J.W. van der; Paul, M.A.; Houweling, A.C.; Jonker, M.A.; Waesberghe, J.H. van; Reinhard, R.; Starink, T.M.; Moorselaar, R.J. van; Menko, F.H.; Postmus, P.E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cell cancer due to germline folliculin (FLCN) mutations (Menko et al. in Lancet Oncol 10(12):1199-1206, 2009). The aim of this

  17. UV Signature Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  18. An exhaustive study of mutation process in 139 sequences of dengue virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo Duarte, R. S.; Chumakov, S.

    2012-10-01

    We perform an analysis of entropies of n-mer distributions (n = 1,2, ..., 10) in 139 genomes of dengue virus of all serotypes. We propose a mutation model for these viruses. Due to the fact that virus mutations must preserve some information that characterizes the pathogen, entropies Hn of n-mer distributions must have some inequalities, so that the mutations of these genomes don't result in loss of information which characterizes the virus. This work focuses on the analysis of n-mer frequency distribution entropies, allowing to establish numeric limits, identifying the point until which a spontaneous mutation becomes a random genome.

  19. Mutational analysis and genetic cloning of the agnostic locus, which regulates learning ability in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peresleni, A I; Savvateeva, E V; Peresleni, I V; Sharagina, L M

    1997-01-01

    P-insertion mutations were obtained and localized by in situ methods at the agnostic gene (agn: 1-38.9; 11AB) in Drosophila. All agn mutants showed a wide spectrum of pleiotropic effects: an EMS-induced mutation of the agn-ts398 improved the ability to develop a conditioned defensive response and increased the activity of cAMP metabolic enzymes; spontaneous mutation of agnX1 showed morphological defects of the brain. P-insertion mutations were used to clone the gene; a restriction map of 80 kb in length was determined, and the insertion was localized to a fragment of 9 kb.

  20. DNA sequence analysis of spontaneous and γ-radiation (anoxic)-induced lacId mutations in Escherichia coli umuC122::Tn5: Differential requirement for umuC at G·C vs. A·T sites and for the production of transversions vs. transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargentini, Neil J.; Smith, Kendric C.

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli umuC122::Tn5 cells were γ-irradiated ( 137 Cs, 750 Gy, under N 2 ), and lac-constitutive mutants were produced at 36% of the wild-type level. The specific nature of the umuC strain's partial radiation mutability was determined by sequencing 325 radiation-induced lacI d mutations. The yields of radiation-induced mutation classes in the umuC strain (as a percentage of the wild-type yield) were: 80% for A·T approaches G·C transitions, 70% for multi-base additions, 60% for single-base deletions, 53% for A·T approaches C·G transversions, 36% for G·C approaches A·T transitions, 25% for multi-base deletions, 21% for A·T approaches T·A transversions, 11% for G·C approaches C·G transversions, 9% for G·C approaches T·A transversions, and 0% for multiple mutations. Based on these deficiencies and other factors, it is concluded that the umuC strain is near-normal for A·T approaches G·C transitions, single-base deletions and possibly A·T approaches C·G transversions; is generally deficient for mutagenesis at G·C sites and for transversions, and is grossly deficient in multiple mutations. Damage at G·C sites seems more difficult for translesion DNA synthesis to bypass than damage at A·T sites, and especially when trying to produce a transversion. The yield of G·C approaches A·T transitions in the umuC strain (36% of the wild-type level) argues that abasic sites are involved in no more than 64% of γ-radiation-induced base substitutions in the wild-type strain. Altogether, these data suggest that the UmuC and UmuD' proteins facilitate, rather than being absolutely required for, translesion DNA synthesis; with the degree of facilitation being dependent both on the nature of the non-coding DNA damage, i.e., at G·C vs. A·T sites, and on the nature of the mis-incorporated base, i.e., whether it induces transversions or transitions

  1. Radiological evaluation of spontaneous pneumoperitoneum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. D.; Rhee, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    112 cases of spontaneous penumoperitoneum, the causes of which were confirmed by clinical and surgical procedure at Presbyterian Medical Center from January, 1977 to July, 1981 were reviewed radiologically. The results were as follows: 1. Perforation of duodenal ulcer (46/112: 41.1%), stomach ulcer (22/112: 19.6%), and stomach cancer (11/112: 9.8%) were the three most common causes of spontaneous penumoperitoneum. These were 70.5% of all causes. 2. The most common site of free gas was both subdiaphragmatic areas (46: 41.1%). Others were Rt. subdiaphragmatic only (31: 27.7%), both subdiaphragmatic with subhepatic (16: 14.3%), Rt. subdiaphragmatic with subhepatic (7: 6.2%), Rt. subdiaphragmatic only (5: 4.4%), diffuse in abdomen (4: 3.6%), and subhepatic only (3: 2.7%). So 92.0% (103/112) were located in RUQ. 3. The radiological shape of free gas was classified: crescent (52: 46.4%) of small amount; half-moon (21: 18.8%) of moderate amount; large or diffuse (39: 34.8%) of large amount.4. The age between 31 and 60 occupied 69.1% (77/112), and male was predominant (5.2 times). 5. The patient's position showing free air most frequently was erect

  2. Control of spontaneous emission rate in luminescent resonant diamond particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelev, R.; Zalogina, A.; Kudryashov, S.; Ivanova, A.; Levchenko, A.; Makarov, S.; Zuev, D.; Shadrivov, I.

    2018-01-01

    We study the properties of luminescent diamond particles of different sizes (up to ~1.5 μm) containing multiple NV-centers. We theoretically predict that the average liftetime in such particles is decreased by several times as compared to optically small subwavelength nanodiamonds. In our experiments, samples were obtained by milling the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited diamond film, and characterized by Raman spectroscopy and dark- field spectroscopy methods. Time-resolved luminescence measurements of the excited state of NV-centers showed that their average lifetime varies from 10 to 17 ns in different samples. By comparing this data to the values of the lifetime of the NV-centers in optically small nanodiamonds, known from literature, we confirm a severalfold decrease of the lifetime in resonant particles.

  3. Computational analysis of the human sinus node action potential: model development and effects of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Alan; Fantini, Matteo; Wilders, Ronald; Severi, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    We constructed a comprehensive mathematical model of the spontaneous electrical activity of a human sinoatrial node (SAN) pacemaker cell, starting from the recent Severi-DiFrancesco model of rabbit SAN cells. Our model is based on electrophysiological data from isolated human SAN pacemaker cells and closely matches the action potentials and calcium transient that were recorded experimentally. Simulated ion channelopathies explain the clinically observed changes in heart rate in corresponding mutation carriers, providing an independent qualitative validation of the model. The model shows that the modulatory role of the 'funny current' (I f ) in the pacing rate of human SAN pacemaker cells is highly similar to that of rabbit SAN cells, despite its considerably lower amplitude. The model may prove useful in the design of experiments and the development of heart-rate modulating drugs. The sinoatrial node (SAN) is the normal pacemaker of the mammalian heart.  Over several decades, a large amount of data on the ionic mechanisms underlying the spontaneous electrical activity of SAN pacemaker cells has been obtained, mostly in experiments on single cells isolated from rabbit SAN. This wealth of data has allowed the development of mathematical models of the electrical activity of rabbit SAN pacemaker cells. The present study aimed to construct a comprehensive model of the electrical activity of a human SAN pacemaker cell using recently obtained electrophysiological data from human SAN pacemaker cells.  We based our model on the recent Severi-DiFrancesco model of a rabbit SAN pacemaker cell. The action potential and calcium transient of the resulting model are close to the experimentally recorded values. The model has a much smaller 'funny current' (I f ) than do rabbit cells, although its modulatory role is highly similar. Changes in pacing rate upon the implementation of mutations associated with sinus node dysfunction agree with the clinical observations. This agreement

  4. Mutation induction in Haemophilus influenzae by ICR-191. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdue, S.W.; Kimball, R.F.; McGray, P.C.; Tennessee Univ., Oak Ridge

    1981-01-01

    The investigation of mutagenic mechanisms in Haemophilus influenzae has been confined until now to mutagens that normally produce mainly base pair substitutions. This paper describes the development of a system suitable for detecting frameshift mutations induced by ICR-191. The system involves reversions from thymidine dependence to thymidine independence. Evidence is presented from a comparison of the responses to ICR-191 and to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine that the system is specific for frameshift mutations. The genetic recombination involved in transformation leads to a marked increase in spontaneous reversion of the frameshift mutations but not of the base substitution mutations. Presumably, this is a consequence of mispairing, with consequent change in the number of bases, during the recombination. (orig.)

  5. A Case of Multiple Spontaneous Keloid Scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhadi Jfri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Keloid scars result from an abnormal healing response to cutaneous injury or inflammation that extends beyond the borders of the original wound. Spontaneous keloid scars forming in the absence of any previous trauma or surgical procedure are rare. Certain syndromes have been associated with this phenomenon, and few reports have discussed the evidence of single spontaneous keloid scar, which raises the question whether they are really spontaneous. Here, we present a 27-year-old mentally retarded single female with orbital hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, repaired cleft lip and high-arched palate who presented with progressive multiple spontaneous keloid scars in different parts of her body which were confirmed histologically by the presence of typical keloidal collagen. This report supports the fact that keloid scars can appear spontaneously and are possibly linked to a genetic factor. Furthermore, it describes a new presentation of spontaneous keloid scars in the form of multiple large lesions in different sites of the body.

  6. Spontaneity of communication in individuals with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsu-Min; Carter, Mark

    2008-04-01

    This article provides an examination of issues related to spontaneity of communication in children with autism. Deficits relating to spontaneity or initiation are frequently reported in individuals with autism, particularly in relation to communication and social behavior. Nevertheless, spontaneity is not necessarily clearly conceptualized or measured. Several approaches to conceptualization of communicative spontaneity are examined with a particular focus on the continuum model and how it might be practically applied. A range of possible explanations for deficits in spontaneity of communication in children with autism is subsequently explored, including external factors (highly structured teaching programs, failure to systematically instruct for spontaneity) and intrinsic characteristics (intellectual disability, stimulus overselectivity, weak central coherence). Possible implications for future research are presented.

  7. Spontaneous cryptococcal peritonitis in cirrhotic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkanuparph S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a common complication in patients with cirrhosis and ascites. However, spontaneous peritonitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans is uncommon. Delayed diagnosis of cryptococcal peritonitis often results in death. We describe three cases of spontaneous cryptococcal peritonitis in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. One case had associated symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection. Clinical awareness of this entity may lead to the early diagnosis and proper treatment.

  8. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension without Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kansu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that presented with unilateral abducens nerve palsy, without orthostatic headache. While sixth nerve palsies improved without any intervention, subdural hematoma was detected with magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude that headache may be absent in spontaneous intracranial hypotension and spontaneous improvement of sixth nerve palsy can occur, even after the development of a subdural hematoma

  9. Spontaneous renal hematoma - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrzut, M.; Obrzut, M.; Homa, J.; Obrzut, B.

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous pararenal hematoma is a rare pathology most frequently coexisting with renal tumours, vascular anomalies and inflammatory processes. In some cases one cannot establish its etiology. The paper describes a case of a 58-year-old man with a spontaneous pararenal hematoma and presents a diagnostic algorithm. Ultrasonography and CT play an important role in diagnostics of spontaneous pararenal haemorrhages. These methods enable a precise evaluation of size and location of hematoma and its evolution. (author)

  10. Life history and the male mutation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosch-Härlid, Anna; Berlin, Sofia; Smith, Nick G C; Møller, Anders P; Ellegren, Hans

    2003-10-01

    If DNA replication is a major cause of mutation, then those life-history characters, which are expected to affect the number of male germline cell divisions, should also affect the male to female mutation bias (alpha(m)). We tested this hypothesis by comparing several clades of bird species, which show variation both in suitable life-history characters (generation time as measured by age at first breeding and sexual selection as measured by frequency of extrapair paternity) and in alpha(m), which was estimated by comparing Z-linked and W-linked substitution rates in gametologous introns. Alpha(m) differences between clades were found to positively covary with both generation time and sexual selection, as expected if DNA replication causes mutation. The effects of extrapair paternity frequency on alpha(m) suggests that increased levels of sexual selection cause higher mutation rates, which offers an interesting solution to the paradox of the loss of genetic variance associated with strong directional sexual selection. We also used relative rate tests to examine whether the observed differences in alpha(m) between clades were due to differences in W-linked or Z-linked substitution rates. In one case, a significant difference in alpha(m) between two clades was shown to be due to W-linked rates and not Z-linked rates, a result that suggests that mutation rates are not determined by replication alone.

  11. Biological effects of dyes on bacteria. VI. Mutation induction by acridine orange and methylene blue in the dark with special reference to Escherichia coli WP6 (polA1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, R.B.; Hass, B.S.

    1984-01-01

    Acridine orange (AO) and methylene blue (MB) in the dark were shown to be weak to moderate mutagens (induction of resistance to T5 phage) in repair-deficient strains of Escherichia coli B/r. However, strain WP2, (wild-type) was not mutated by AO in the dark, in confirmation of earlier data. The presence of 2 ..mu..M AO reduced by 41% the spontaneous mutation rate in strain WP2, from 4.1 to 2.4 mutants/10/sup 8/ cells/generation. In the polymerase I-deficient strain WP6 (polA1), 2 ..mu..M AO increased the mutation rate in the dark 14-fold. It is proposed that both spontaneous and AO-induced mutagenesis in the absence of light occur at the site of semiconservative DNA replication. If the intercalation mechanism for the effects in the absence of light is valid, the wild-type strain (WP2) may be resistant to frameshift mutagenesis induced by intercalated compounds, while the polymerase I-deficient strain (WP6) may be highly susceptible to the presence of an intercalated dye such as AO at the DNA-replication fork. MB and AO likely act through different mechanisms since MB is only a moderate mutagen in strain WP6 and the other repair-deficient strains tested.

  12. Comparative genetic mutation frequencies based on amino acid composition differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Amandio

    2006-08-30

    Genetic variation inferred from large-scale amino acid composition comparisons among genomes and chromosomes of several species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Ceanorhabditis elegans, H. sapiens, is shown to be correlated (highest, r(2)=0.9855, p<0.01) with reported mutation rates for various genes in these species. This study, based largely on pseudogene data, helps to establish reference mutation frequencies that are likely to be representative of overall genome mutation rates in each of the species examined, and provides further insight into heterogeneity of mutation rates among genomes.

  13. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

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    Kuppareddi Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7 mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04×10-4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18×10-5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77×10-5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM. In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  14. Spontaneous Clearance of Hepatitis C after Liver and Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CH Dale

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV is rare in immunocompromised patients, such as those who have undergone organ transplantation. It has been recognized that patients receiving liver transplantation for HCV-related disease have decreased graft and patient survival compared with those transplanted for other etiologies. There is a growing trend toward treating HCV recurrence aggressively after liver transplantation. For other organ transplant recipients with concurrent HCV, treatment is not often an option, given the high rates of graft rejection and loss secondary to interferon and its immunomodulatory effects. Although spontaneous clearance of HCV has been reported in recipients of solitary liver and renal transplants, a common factor arising in these cases has been previous exposure to interferon. To date, no reports of spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA have been reported in a multiorgan transplant recipient. A case of spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA in an immunocompromised patient, within five months of simultaneous liver and kidney retransplantation is described. Importantly, this patient had no previous exposure to interferon.

  15. Biomarkers of spontaneous preterm birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polettini, Jossimara; Cobo, Teresa; Kacerovsky, Marian

    2017-01-01

    predictors of pregnancy outcome. This systematic review was conducted to synthesize the knowledge on PTB biomarkers identified using multiplex analysis. Three electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science) were searched for studies in any language reporting the use of multiplex assays for maternal......Despite decades of research on risk indicators of spontaneous preterm birth (PTB), reliable biomarkers are still not available to screen or diagnose high-risk pregnancies. Several biomarkers in maternal and fetal compartments have been mechanistically linked to PTB, but none of them are reliable......) followed by MIP-1β, GM-CSF, Eotaxin, and TNF-RI (two studies) were reported more than once in maternal serum. However, results could not be combined due to heterogeneity in type of sample, study population, assay, and analysis methods. By this systematic review, we conclude that multiplex assays...

  16. Spontaneous Strategies in Innovation Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Husted, Emil Krastrup

    and a site ontology, we show how physical sites and objects become constitutive of the inside of virtual worlds through innovation processes. This argument is in line with ANT’s perspective on strategy, where sites and objects are considered a strategically relevant resource in the innovation process...... of materiality in relation to the organization and structuring of virtual worlds. We examine various innovation processes in five Danish entrepreneurial companies where actors continuously struggle to stabilize virtual worlds as platforms for professional communication. With inspiration from actor-network theory....... Empirically, the analysis is founded on descriptive accounts from the five entrepreneurs. By highlighting the spontaneous strategies described by actors, we show how sites and objects are actively used as an element in their strategy, and also how the sites and objects end up facilitating new ways of thinking...

  17. Ultraviolet light protection, enhancement of ultraviolet light mutagenesis, and mutator effect of plasmid R46 in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortelmans, K.E.; Stocker, B.A.D.

    1976-01-01

    Plasmid R46 partially protected Salmonella typhimurium, wild type or uvrB or polA, against the lethal effect of ultraviolet (uv) irradiation, but did not protect recA mutants. The plasmid also increased frequency of uv-induced reversion to His + in all tested his point mutants (wild type for uv sensitivity), including amber, ochre, UGA, missense, and frame-shift mutants. Plasmid R46 also increased uv-induced reversion to His + in uvrB and polA strains, but no uv mutagenic effect was detected in R - or R46-carrying recA derivatives of a his(amber) mutant. The spontaneous reversion frequency of his nonsense mutants of all classes, and of some his missense mutants, was increased about 10-fold when the strains carried R46, but the plasmid had no effect on the spontaneous reversion frequency of some other his missense mutations or of reversion rate of his frame-shift mutants (except for two uvrB derivatives of one single-base insertion mutant). The plasmid increased the ability of wild type, polA, and uvrB hosts to support plaque production by uv-irradiated phage, and made strain LT2 his G46 less sensitive to methyl methane sulfonate and to x rays and more responsive to the mutagenic effect of visible-light irradiation. R46 increased spontaneous reversion frequency of a his(amber) rec + strain, but had no such effect in its recA sublines. Since the plasmid in the absence of host recA function fails to produce its mutator effect, or to confer uv protection or to enhance uv mutagenesis, these three effects may be produced via some mechanism involved in recA-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid repair, perhaps by an increase in activity of the ''error-prone'' component of the inducible repair pathway

  18. Recurrent spontaneous attacks of dizziness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This article describes the common causes of recurrent vertigo and dizziness that can be diagnosed largely on the basis of history. Ninety percent of spontaneous recurrent vertigo and dizziness can be explained by six disorders: (1) Ménière disease is characterized by vertigo attacks, lasting 20 minutes to several hours, with concomitant hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. Aural symptoms become permanent during the course of the disease. (2) Attacks of vestibular migraine may last anywhere from minutes to days. Most patients have a previous history of migraine headaches, and many experience migraine symptoms during the attack. (3) Vertebrobasilar TIAs affect older adults with vascular risk factors. Most attacks last less than 1 hour and are accompanied by other symptoms from the posterior circulation territory. (4) Vestibular paroxysmia is caused by vascular compression of the eighth cranial nerve. It manifests itself with brief attacks of vertigo that recur many times per day, sometimes with concomitant cochlear symptoms. (5) Orthostatic hypotension causes brief episodes of dizziness lasting seconds to a few minutes after standing up and is relieved by sitting or lying down. In older adults, it may be accompanied by supine hypertension. (6) Panic attacks usually last minutes, occur in specific situations, and are accompanied by choking, palpitations, tremor, heat, and anxiety. Less common causes of spontaneous recurrent vertigo and dizziness include perilymph fistula, superior canal dehiscence, autoimmune inner ear disease, otosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmia, and medication side effects. Neurologists need to venture into otolaryngology, internal medicine, and psychiatry to master the differential diagnosis of recurrent dizziness.

  19. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Vacuum stability with spontaneous violation of lepton number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Bonilla

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The vacuum of the Standard Model is known to be unstable for the measured values of the top and Higgs masses. Here we show how vacuum stability can be achieved naturally if lepton number is violated spontaneously at the TeV scale. More precise Higgs measurements in the next LHC run should provide a crucial test of our symmetry breaking scenario. In addition, these schemes typically lead to enhanced rates for processes involving lepton flavor violation.

  1. Spontaneous changes a basis for new ornamental woody plant cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Matilda

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In nursery stock production of some ornamental woody plants the appearance of spontaneous variability was identified in the form of atypical pigmentation of leaves (albinism, variegated, red colored, leaves shape (jaggy and dwarfs. Mutated plants with variegated leaves were observed among hybrid plane (Platanus x acerifolia (Ait. Willd., Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila L., laurel cherry (Prunus laurocerasus L. and Lawson false-cypress (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Murr. Parl. Seedlings. The type of variegation and frequency were analyzed. Among plane tree and Siberian elm seedlings there were observed red colored leaves. Atypical, jaggy shaped leaves were found among laurel cherry seedlings. Dwarf growth was identified at Siberian elm and birch (Betula pendula Roth. where also found fruits at one year seedling. There were not significant differences in some morphological and physiological properties in plane tree seedlings with various pigmented leaves. .

  2. Radiation mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected.

  3. Enhancement of Pleasure during Spontaneous Dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò F. Bernardi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dancing emphasizes the motor expression of emotional experiences. The bodily expression of emotions can modulate the subjective experience of emotions, as when adopting emotion-specific postures and faces. Thus, dancing potentially offers a ground for emotional coping through emotional enhancement and regulation. Here we investigated the emotional responses to music in individuals without any prior dance training while they either freely danced or refrained from movement. Participants were also tested while imitating their own dance movements but in the absence of music as a control condition. Emotional ratings and cardio-respiratory measures were collected following each condition. Dance movements were recorded using motion capture. We found that emotional valence was increased specifically during spontaneous dance of groovy excerpts, compared to both still listening and motor imitation. Furthermore, parasympathetic-related heart rate variability (HRV increased during dance compared to motor imitation. Nevertheless, subjective and physiological arousal increased during movement production, regardless of whether participants were dancing or imitating. Significant correlations were found between inter-individual differences in the emotions experienced during dance and whole-body acceleration profiles. The combination of movement and music during dance results in a distinct state characterized by acutely heightened pleasure, which is of potential interest for the use of dance in therapeutic settings.

  4. Spontaneous canine hydrocephalus: cerebrospinal fluid dynamics1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar, A.; Hochwald, G. M.; Kay, W. J.; Ransohoff, J.

    1971-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics were studied in 14 dogs with spontaneous hydrocephalus. In nine of the dogs aqueductal obstruction was observed and the remainder had a `communicating type' hydrocephalus. The major histological findings consisted of severe ependymal destruction, spongy changes in the periventricular white matter, increased density of capillaries in this area, and varying degrees of thickening, fibrosis, and fusion of the choroid villi. The formation and absorption of CSF were studied by perfusion of the cerebral ventricles. The rate of formation of CSF was found to decrease with perfusion pressure by Vf = 0·02595−0·00022 P ml./min (P = pressure in cm H2O). The absorption of spinal fluid was found to increase linearly with pressure by Va = 0·0165 + 0·00050 P. The various factors influencing the formation and absorption of the spinal fluid are discussed. The meaning and attainment of `arrest' of the hydrocephalic process in terms of the measured rates of CSF formation and absorption in these animals are considered. Images PMID:5571319

  5. Spontaneous Blinking from a Tribological Viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pult, Heiko; Tosatti, Samuele G P; Spencer, Nicholas D; Asfour, Jean-Michel; Ebenhoch, Michael; Murphy, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical forces between the lid wiper and the ocular surface, and between a contact lens and the lid wiper, are reported to be related to dry eye symptoms. Furthermore, the mechanical forces between these sliding partners are assumed to be related to the ocular signs of lid-wiper epitheliopathy (LWE) and lid-parallel conjunctival folds (LIPCOF). Recent literature provides some evidence that a contact lens with a low coefficient of friction (CoF) improves wearing comfort by reducing the mechanical forces between the contact lens surface and the lid wiper. This review discusses the mechanical forces during spontaneous blinks from a tribological perspective, at both low and high sliding velocities, in a healthy subject. It concludes that the coefficient of friction of the ocular surfaces appears to be strongly comparable to that of hydrophilic polymer brushes at low sliding velocity, and that, with increased sliding velocity, there is no wear at the sliding partners' surfaces thanks to the presence of a fluid film between the two sliding partners. In contrast, in the case of dry eye, the failure to maintain a full fluid film lubrication regime at high blinking speeds may lead to increased shear rates, resulting in deformation and wear of the sliding pairs. These shear rates are most likely related to tear film viscosity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancement of Pleasure during Spontaneous Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Nicolò F.; Bellemare-Pepin, Antoine; Peretz, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Dancing emphasizes the motor expression of emotional experiences. The bodily expression of emotions can modulate the subjective experience of emotions, as when adopting emotion-specific postures and faces. Thus, dancing potentially offers a ground for emotional coping through emotional enhancement and regulation. Here we investigated the emotional responses to music in individuals without any prior dance training while they either freely danced or refrained from movement. Participants were also tested while imitating their own dance movements but in the absence of music as a control condition. Emotional ratings and cardio-respiratory measures were collected following each condition. Dance movements were recorded using motion capture. We found that emotional valence was increased specifically during spontaneous dance of groovy excerpts, compared to both still listening and motor imitation. Furthermore, parasympathetic-related heart rate variability (HRV) increased during dance compared to motor imitation. Nevertheless, subjective and physiological arousal increased during movement production, regardless of whether participants were dancing or imitating. Significant correlations were found between inter-individual differences in the emotions experienced during dance and whole-body acceleration profiles. The combination of movement and music during dance results in a distinct state characterized by acutely heightened pleasure, which is of potential interest for the use of dance in therapeutic settings. PMID:29238298

  7. Dominant cataract mutations and specific-locus mutations in mice induced by radiation or ethylnitrosourea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehling, U.H.; Favor, J.; Kratochvilova, J.; Neuhaeuser-Klaus, A.

    1982-01-01

    In a combined experiment, dominant cataract mutations and specific-locus mutations were scored in the same offspring. In radiation experiments, a total of 15 dominant cataract and 38 specific-locus mutations was scored in 29396 offspring. In experiments with ethylnitrosourea (ENU), a total of 12 dominant cataracts and 54 specific-locus mutations was observed in 12712 offspring. The control frequency for dominant cataracts was 0 in 9954 offspring and for specific-locus mutations 11 in 169955 offspring. The two characteristic features of radiation-induced specific-locus mutations - the augmenting effect of dose fractionation and the quantitative differences in the mutation rates between spermatogonial and post-spermatogonial stages - can also be demonstrated for the induction of dominant cataracts. The dominant cataract mutations recovered can be categorized into 7 phenotypic classes. The only noteworthy difference observed between the radiation- and ENU-induced mutations recovered was that, of the 2 radiation-induced total lens opacities, both were associated with an iris anomaly and microphthalmia whereas the ENU-induced total opacities were not. (orig./MG)

  8. Spontaneous preterm birth: advances toward the discovery of genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jerome F; Romero, Roberto; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Haymond-Thornburg, Hannah; Modi, Bhavi P; Teves, Maria E; Pearson, Laurel N; York, Timothy P; Schenkein, Harvey A

    2018-03-01

    Evidence from family and twin-based studies provide strong support for a significant contribution of maternal and fetal genetics to the timing of parturition and spontaneous preterm birth. However, there has been only modest success in the discovery of genes predisposing to preterm birth, despite increasing sophistication of genetic and genomic technology. In contrast, DNA variants associated with other traits/diseases have been identified. For example, there is overwhelming evidence that suggests that the nature and intensity of an inflammatory response in adults and children are under genetic control. Because inflammation is often invoked as an etiologic factor in spontaneous preterm birth, the question of whether spontaneous preterm birth has a genetic predisposition in the case of pathologic inflammation has been of long-standing interest to investigators. Here, we review various genetic approaches used for the discovery of preterm birth genetic variants in the context of inflammation-associated spontaneous preterm birth. Candidate gene studies have sought genetic variants that regulate inflammation in the mother and fetus; however, the promising findings have often not been replicated. Genome-wide association studies, an approach to the identification of chromosomal loci responsible for complex traits, have also not yielded compelling evidence for DNA variants predisposing to preterm birth. A recent genome-wide association study that included a large number of White women (>40,000) revealed that maternal loci contribute to preterm birth. Although none of these loci harbored genes directly related to innate immunity, the results were replicated. Another approach to identify DNA variants predisposing to preterm birth is whole exome sequencing, which examines the DNA sequence of protein-coding regions of the genome. A recent whole exome sequencing study identified rare mutations in genes encoding for proteins involved in the negative regulation (dampening) of the

  9. Better plants through mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a public relations film describing problems associated with the genetic improvement of crop plants through induced mutations. Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation in plants. Mutation induction is now established as a practical tool in plant breeding. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division and the IAEA's laboratory at Seibersdorf have supported research and practical implementation of mutation breeding of both seed propagated and vegetatively propagated plants. Plant biotechnology based on in vitro culture and recombinant DNA technology will make a further significant contribution to plant breeding