WorldWideScience

Sample records for spontaneous mutation homozygous

  1. Homozygous Desmocollin-2 Mutations and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzon, Alessandra; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Rigato, Ilaria; Vazza, Giovanni; De Bortoli, Marzia; Calore, Martina; Occhi, Gianluca; Carturan, Elisa; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Cason, Marco; Mazzotti, Elisa; Poloni, Giulia; Mostacciuolo, Maria Luisa; Daliento, Luciano; Thiene, Gaetano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina; Bauce, Barbara; Rampazzo, Alessandra

    2015-10-15

    Dominant mutations in desmocollin-2 (DSC2) gene cause arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), a progressive heart muscle disease characterized by ventricular tachyarrhythmias, heart failure, and risk of juvenile sudden death. Recessive mutations are rare and are associated with a cardiac or cardiocutaneous phenotype. Here, we evaluated the impact of a homozygous founder DSC2 mutation on clinical expression of ACM. An exon-by-exon analysis of the DSC2 coding region was performed in 94 ACM index patients. The c.536A>G (p.D179G) mutation was identified in 5 patients (5.3%), 4 of which resulted to be homozygous carriers. The 5 subjects shared a conserved haplotype, strongly indicating a common founder. Genetic and clinical investigation of probands' families revealed that p.D179G homozygous carriers displayed severe forms of biventricular cardiomyopathy without hair or skin abnormalities. The only heterozygous proband, who carried an additional variant of unknown significance in αT-catenin gene, showed a mild form of ACM without left ventricular involvement. All heterozygous family members were clinically asymptomatic. In conclusion, this is the first homozygous founder mutation in DSC2 gene identified among Italian ACM probands. Our findings provide further evidence of the occurrence of recessive DSC2 mutations in patients with ACM predominantly presenting with biventricular forms of the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Homozygous mutation in the NPHP3 gene causing foetal nephronophthisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullah, Uzma; Farooq, Muhammad; Fatima, Ambrin

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of a foetal sonographic finding of hyper-echogenic kidneys, which led to a strategic series of genetic tests and identified a homozygous mutation (c.424C > T, p. R142*) in the NPHP3 gene. Our study provides a rare presentation of NPHP3-related ciliopathy and adds to the mutation...

  3. Homozygous STIL mutation causes holoprosencephaly and microcephaly in two siblings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Mouden

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly (HPE is a frequent congenital malformation of the brain characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been identified in HPE patients that account for only 30% of HPE cases, suggesting the existence of other HPE genes. Data from homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family were combined to identify a homozygous missense mutation (c.2150G>A; p.Gly717Glu in STIL, common to the two affected children. STIL has a role in centriole formation and has previously been described in rare cases of microcephaly. Rescue experiments in U2OS cells showed that the STIL p.Gly717Glu mutation was not able to fully restore the centriole duplication failure following depletion of endogenous STIL protein indicating the deleterious role of the mutation. In situ hybridization experiments using chick embryos demonstrated that expression of Stil was in accordance with a function during early patterning of the forebrain. It is only the second time that a STIL homozygous mutation causing a recessive form of HPE was reported. This result also supports the genetic heterogeneity of HPE and increases the panel of genes to be tested for HPE diagnosis.

  4. Homozygous tyrosinase gene mutation in an American black with tyrosinase-negative (type IA) oculocutaneous albinism.

    OpenAIRE

    Spritz, R A; Strunk, K M; Hsieh, C L; Sekhon, G S; Francke, U

    1991-01-01

    We have identified a tyrosinase gene mutation in an American black with classic, tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism. This mutation results in an amino acid substitution (Cys----Arg) at codon 89 of the tyrosinase polypeptide. The proband is homozygous for the substitution, suggesting that this mutation may be frequently associated with tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism in blacks.

  5. Early onset obesity and adrenal insufficiency associated with a homozygous POMC mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Mendiratta, Meenal S; Yang, Yaping; Balazs, Andrea E; Willis, Alecia S; Eng, Christine M; Karaviti, Lefkothea P; Potocki, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Isolated hypocortisolism due to ACTH deficiency is a rare condition that can be caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin (POMC). Loss of function mutations of POMC gene typically results in adrenal insufficiency, obesity and red hair. We describe an 18 month old Hispanic female with congenital adrenal insufficiency, a novel POMC mutation and atypical clinical features. The patient presented at the age of 9 months with hypoglycem...

  6. Early onset obesity and adrenal insufficiency associated with a homozygous POMC mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng Christine M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Isolated hypocortisolism due to ACTH deficiency is a rare condition that can be caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin (POMC. Loss of function mutations of POMC gene typically results in adrenal insufficiency, obesity and red hair. We describe an 18 month old Hispanic female with congenital adrenal insufficiency, a novel POMC mutation and atypical clinical features. The patient presented at the age of 9 months with hypoglycemia and the endocrine evaluation resulted in a diagnosis of ACTH deficiency. She developed extreme weight gain prompting sequence analysis of POMC, which revealed a homozygous c.231C > A change which is predicted to result in a premature termination codon. The case we report had obesity, hypocortisolism but lacked red hair which is typical for subjects with POMC mutations. Mutations of POMC should be considered in individuals with severe early onset obesity and adrenal insufficiency even when they lack the typical pigmentary phenotype.

  7. How much do we know about spontaneous human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, J.F. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The much larger number of cell divisions between zygote and sperm than between zygote and egg, the increased age of fathers of children with new dominant mutations, and the greater evolution rate of pseudogenes on the Y chromosome than of those on autosomes all point to a much higher mutation rate in human males than in females, as first pointed out by Haldane in his classical study of X-linked hemophilia. The age of the father is the main factor determining the human spontaneous mutation rate, and probably the total mutation rate. The total mutation rate in Drosophila males of genes causing minor reduction in viability is at least 0.4 per sperm and may be considerably higher. The great mutation load implied by a rate of [approx] 1 per zygote can be greatly ameliorated by quasi-transition selection. Corresponding data are not available for the human population. The evolution rate of pseudogenes in primates suggests some 10[sup 2] new mutations per zygote. Presumably the overwhelming majority of these are neutral, but even the approximate fraction is not known. Statistical evidence in Drosophilia shows that mutations with minor effects cause about the same heterozygous impairment of fitness as those that are lethal when homozygous. The magnitude of heterozygous effect is such that almost all mutant genes are eliminated as heterozygotes before ever becoming homozygous. Although quantitative data in the human species are lacking, anecdotal information supports the conclusion that partial dominance is the rule here as well. This suggests that if the human mutation rate were increased or decreased, the effects would be spread over a period of 50-100 generations. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A homozygous mutation in the NDUFS1 gene presents with a mild cavitating leukoencephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kashani, A.; Thiffault, I.; Dilenge, M.E.; Saint-Martin, C.; Guerrero, K.; Tran, L.T.; Shoubridge, E.; van der Knaap, M.S.; Braverman, N.; Bernard, G.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of mild cavitating leukoencephalopathy associated with a homozygous c.755A > G (p.Asp252Gly) NDUFS1 mutation in a 7-year old boy. Biochemical analysis confirmed an isolated reduction in complex I activity. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a diffuse cystic

  9. Spinal motor neuron involvement in a patient with homozygous PRUNE mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacomino, Michele; Fiorillo, Chiara; Torella, Annalaura; Severino, Mariasavina; Broda, Paolo; Romano, Catia; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Pozzolini, Giulia; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Nigro, Vincenzo; Zara, Federico

    2018-05-01

    In the last few years, whole exome sequencing (WES) allowed the identification of PRUNE mutations in patients featuring a complex neurological phenotype characterized by severe neurodevelopmental delay, microcephaly, epilepsy, optic atrophy, and brain or cerebellar atrophy. We describe an additional patient with homozygous PRUNE mutation who presented with spinal muscular atrophy phenotype, in addition to the already known brain developmental disorder. This novel feature expands the clinical consequences of PRUNE mutations and allow to converge PRUNE syndrome with previous descriptions of neurodevelopmental/neurodegenerative disorders linked to altered microtubule dynamics. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The construction and application of diploid sake yeast with a homozygous mutation in the FAS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaka, Atsushi; Sahara, Hiroshi; Hata, Yoji

    2010-12-01

    In Japanese sake brewing, cerulenin-resistant sake yeasts produce elevated levels of ethyl caproate, an important flavor component. The FAS2 mutation FAS2-1250S of Saccharomyces cerevisiae generates a cerulenin-resistant phenotype. This mutation is dominant, and, in general, cerulenin-resistant diploid sake yeast strains carry this mutation heterozygously. Here we constructed diploid sake yeast with a homozygous mutation of FAS2 using the high-efficiency loss of heterozygosity method. The homozygous mutants grew more slowly in YPD medium than did the wild-type and heterozygous mutants, and they produced more ethyl caproate during sake brewing. In addition, although both the wild-type and heterozygous mutant were sensitive to 4 mg/l cerulenin, the homozygous mutant was resistant to more than 4 mg/l cerulenin. Next, we obtained a homozygous mutant of FAS2 without inducing genetic modification. After cultivating the heterozygous FAS2 mutant K-1801 in YPD, homozygous mutants were selected on medium containing high concentrations of cerulenin. Non-genetically modified yeast with a homozygous mutation of FAS2 produced 2.2-fold more ethyl caproate than did heterozygous yeast. Moreover, high-quality Japanese sake with a very rich flavor could be brewed using yeast containing a homozygous mutation in the FAS2 gene. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. One-step noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for autosomal recessive homozygous point mutations using digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mun Young; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Min Young; Han, Jin Hee; Park, Hye-Rim; Seo, Han Kyu; Yoon, Jinsun; Lee, Seungmin; Oh, Doo-Yi; Kang, Changsoo; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2018-02-13

    Previously, we introduced a noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) protocol for diagnosing compound heterozygous autosomal recessive point mutations via maternal plasma DNA and simulated control genomic DNA sampling based on fetal DNA fraction. In our present study, we have improved our NIPT protocol to make it possible to diagnose homozygous autosomal recessive point mutations without the need to acquire fetal DNA fraction. Moreover, chi-squared test and empirical statistical range based on the proportion of mutant allele reads among the total reads served as the gatekeeping method. If this method yielded inconclusive results, then the Bayesian method was performed; final conclusion was drawn from the results of both methods. This protocol was applied to three families co-segregating congenital sensorineural hearing loss with monogenic homozygous mutations in prevalent deafness genes. This protocol successfully predicted the fetal genotypes from all families without the information about fetal DNA fraction using one-step dPCR reactions at least for these three families. Furthermore, we suspect that confirmatory diagnosis under this protocol is possible, not only by using picodroplet dPCR, but also by using the more readily available chip-based dPCR, making our NIPT protocol more useful in the diagnosis of autosomal recessive point mutations in the future.

  12. Homozygous Mutations in WEE2 Cause Fertilization Failure and Female Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Qing; Li, Bin; Kuang, Yanping; Wang, Xueqian; Zhang, Zhihua; Chen, Biaobang; Wu, Ling; Lyu, Qifeng; Fu, Yonglun; Yan, Zheng; Mao, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yao; Mu, Jian; Li, Qiaoli; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Wang, Lei

    2018-04-05

    Fertilization is a fundamental process of development and is a prerequisite for successful human reproduction. In mice, although several receptor proteins have been shown to play important roles in the process of fertilization, only three genes have been shown to cause fertilization failure and infertility when deleted in vivo. In clinical practice, some infertility case subjects suffer from recurrent failure of in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection attempts due to fertilization failure, but the genetic basis of fertilization failure in humans remains largely unknown. Wee2 is a key oocyte-specific kinase involved in the control of meiotic arrest in mice, but WEE2 has not been associated with any diseases in humans. In this study, we identified homozygous mutations in WEE2 that are responsible for fertilization failure in humans. All four independent affected individuals had homozygous loss-of-function missense mutations or homozygous frameshift protein-truncating mutations, and the phenotype of fertilization failure was shown to follow a Mendelian recessive inheritance pattern. All four mutations significantly decreased the amount of WEE2 protein in vitro and in affected individuals' oocytes in vivo, and they all led to abnormal serine phosphorylation of WEE2 and reduced tyrosine 15 phosphorylation of Cdc2 in vitro. In addition, injection of WEE2 cRNA into affected individuals' oocytes rescued the fertilization failure phenotype and led to the formation of blastocysts in vitro. This work presents a novel gene responsible for human fertilization failure and has implications for future therapeutic treatments for infertility cases. Copyright © 2018 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: description of two novel homozygous missense mutations causing divergent clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Guiu, Isabel; Antón, Ana I; García-Barberá, Nuria; Navarro-Fernández, José; Martínez, Constantino; Fuster, Jose L; Couselo, Jose M; Ortuño, Francisco J; Vicente, Vicente; Rivera, Jose; Lozano, Maria L

    2014-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease resulting from mutations in the LYST/CHS1 gene, which encodes for a 429 kDa protein, CHS1/LYST, that regulates vesicle trafficking and determines the size of lysosomes and other organelles. To date, 60 different mutations have been characterized, and a reasonably straightforward phenotype-genotype correlation has been suggested. We describe two patients on opposite ends of the CHS clinical spectrum with novel missense mutations. We characterized these patients in terms of their mutations, protein localization and expression, mRNA stability, and electrostatic potential. Patient 1 is the first report of a severe early-onset CHS with a homozygous missense mutation (c.11362 G>A, p.G3725R) in the LYST/CHS1 gene. This molecular change results in a reduction at the CHS1 protein level, not due to an mRNA effect, but maybe a consequence of both, a change in the structure of the protein and most likely attributable to the remarkable serious perturbation in the electrostatic potential. Patient 2, who exhibited the adolescence form of the disease, was found to be homozygous for a novel missense mutation c.961 T>C, p.C258R, which seemed to have minor effect on the structure of the CHS1/LYST protein. Reexamining accepted premises of missense mutant alleles being reported among patients with clinically mild forms of the disorder should be carried out, and attempts to link genotype and clinical phenotype require identifying the actual molecular effect of the mutation. Early and accurate diagnosis of the severity of the disease is extremely important to early differentiate patients who would benefit from premature enrollment into a transplantation protocol. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Homozygous LIPE mutation in siblings with multiple symmetric lipomatosis, partial lipodystrophy, and myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Sagit; Xing, Chao; Mahamid, Riad; Shalata, Adel; Sheikh-Ahmad, Mohammed; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying causal genes for lipodystrophy syndromes, the molecular basis of some peculiar adipose tissue disorders remains obscure. In an Israeli-Arab pedigree with a novel autosomal recessive, multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), partial lipodystrophy and myopathy, we conducted exome sequencing of two affected siblings to identify the disease-causing mutation. The 41-year-old female proband and her 36-year-old brother reported marked accumulation of subcutaneous fat in the face, neck, axillae, and trunk but loss of subcutaneous fat from the lower extremities and progressive distal symmetric myopathy during adulthood. They had increased serum creatine kinase levels, hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous NC_000019.9:g.42906092C>A variant on chromosome 19, leading to a NM_005357.3:c.3103G>T nucleotide change in coding DNA and corresponding p.(Glu1035*) protein change in hormone sensitive lipase (LIPE) gene as the disease-causing variant. Sanger sequencing further confirmed the segregation of the mutation in the family. Hormone sensitive lipase is the predominant regulator of lipolysis from adipocytes, releasing free fatty acids from stored triglycerides. The homozygous null LIPE mutation could result in marked inhibition of lipolysis from some adipose tissue depots and thus may induce an extremely rare phenotype of MSL and partial lipodystrophy in adulthood associated with complications of insulin resistance, such as diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Recurrent and Prolonged Infections in a Child with a Homozygous IFIH1 Nonsense Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Zaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In an Egyptian girl born to consanguineous parents, whole-exome sequencing (WES identified a homozygous mutation in PHGDH, c.1273G>A (p.Val425Met, indicating 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency. This diagnosis was compatible with the patient’s microcephaly, severe psychomotor retardation, seizures and cataracts. However, she additionally suffered from recurrent (at least monthly episodes of prolonged and severe chest infections requiring hospitalization, suggesting a secondary, predisposing and potentially Mendelian, condition. A local reactivation of an EBV infection in the respiratory tract was detected after a recent chest infection, likely representing an opportunistic infection based on a compromised immune system. Further inspection of WES data revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation, c.2665A>T (p.Lys889∗, in IFIH1, encoding MDA5. MDA5 detects long viral double-stranded RNA that is generated during replication of picorna viruses, and thereby activates the type I interferon signaling pathway. The results of Western blot analysis of protein from cultured fibroblasts of the patient indicates absence of wild type MDA5/IFIH1, compatible with NMD. We propose that, analogous to the severe course of primary influenza infection due to biallelic deficiency of a downstream effector, IRF7, homozygous loss of IFIH1 defines a novel Mendelian immunodeficiency disorder that increases susceptibility to severe viral infections. This is contrasted to heterozygous gain-of-function IFIH1 mutations in autoimmune diseases. Our findings highlight the potential of comprehensive genomic investigations in patients from consanguineous families to identify monogenic predispositions to severe infections.

  16. Identification of a novel WFS1 homozygous nonsense mutation in Jordanian children with Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoor, Khaldon; Batiha, Osama; Abu-Awad, Ayman; Al-Sarihin, Khaldon; Ziad, Haya; Jarun, Yousef; Abu-Sheikha, Aya; Abu Jalboush, Sara; Alibrahim, Khoulod S

    2016-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presentation of early onset type I diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy with later onset diabetes insipidus and deafness. WFS1 gene was identified on chromosome 4p16.1 as the gene responsible for WS disease given that most of the WS patients were found to carry mutations in this gene. This study was carried out to investigate the molecular spectrum of WFS1 gene in Jordanian families. Molecular and clinical characterization was performed on five WS patients from two unrelated Jordanian families. Our data indicated that WS patients of the first family harbored two deletion mutations (V415del and F247fs) located in exon 8 and exon 7 respectively, with a compound heterozygous pattern of inheritance; while in the second family, we identified a novel nonsense mutation (W185X) located in exon 5 in the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain with a homozygous pattern of inheritance. This mutation can be considered as loss of function mutation since the resulting truncated protein lost both the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal domain. Additionally, the W185X mutation lies within the CaM binding domain in wolframin protein which is thought to have a role in the regulation of wolframin function in response to calcium levels.

  17. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome with homozygous missense mutation of the KCNQ1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Esra; Ertuğrul, İlker; Özer, Sema; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Aktaş, Dilek; Boduroğlu, Koray; Ütine, Gülen Eda

    2014-01-01

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) is an autosomal recessive cardioauditory ion channel disorder characterized by congenital bilateral sensorineural deafness and long QT interval. JLNS is a ventricular repolarization abnormality and is caused by mutations in the KCNQ1 or KCNE1 gene. It has a high mortality rate in childhood due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, episodes of torsade de pointes which may cause syncope or sudden cardiac death. Here, we present a 4.5-year-old female patient who had a history of syncope and congenital sensorineural deafness. She had a cochlear implant operation at 15 months of age and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) at 3 years of age because of recurrent syncope attacks. Five months after cochlear implant placement, she could say her first words and is now able to speak. With β-blocker therapy and ICD, she has remained syncope-free for a year. On the current admission, the family visited the genetics department to learn about the possibility of prenatal diagnosis of sensorineural deafness, as the mother was 9 weeks pregnant. A diagnosis of JLNS was established for the first time, and a homozygous missense mutation in the KCNQ1 gene (c.128 G>A, p.R243H) was detected. Heterozygous mutations of KCNQ1 were identified in both parents, thereby allowing future prenatal diagnoses. The family obtained prenatal diagnosis for the current pregnancy, and fetal KCNQ1 analysis revealed the same homozygous mutation. The pregnancy was terminated at the 12th week of gestation. The case presented here is the third molecularly confirmed Turkish JLNS case; it emphasizes the importance of timely genetic diagnosis, which allows appropriate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, as well as proper management of the condition.

  18. Early presentation of cystic kidneys in a family with a homozygous INVS mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Machteld M; van Bon, Bregje W; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Hoischen, Alexander; Marcelis, Carlo L; de Leeuw, Nicole; Mol, Suzanne J J; Mortier, Geert; Knoers, Nine V A M; Brunner, Han G; Roepman, Ronald; Arts, Heleen H

    2014-07-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease that is the most frequent monogenic cause of end-stage renal disease in children. Infantile NPHP, often in combination with other features like situs inversus, are commonly caused by mutations in the INVS gene. INVS encodes the ciliary protein inversin, and mutations induce dysfunction of the primary cilia. In this article, we present a family with two severely affected fetuses that were aborted after discovery of grossly enlarged cystic kidneys by ultrasonography before 22 weeks gestation. Exome sequencing showed that the fetuses were homozygous for a previously unreported nonsense mutation, resulting in a truncation in the IQ1 domain of inversin. This mutation induces nonsense-mediated RNA decay, as suggested by a reduced RNA level in fibroblasts derived from the fetus. However, a significant amount of mutant INVS RNA was present in these fibroblasts, yielding mutant inversin protein that was mislocalized. In control fibroblasts, inversin was present in the ciliary axoneme as well as at the basal body, whereas in the fibroblasts from the fetus, inversin could only be detected at the basal body. The phenotype of both fetuses is partly characteristic of infantile NPHP and Potter sequence. We also identified that the fetuses had mild skeletal abnormalities, including shortening and bowing of long bones, which may expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with INVS mutations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Novel homozygous AIRE mutation in a German patient with severe APECED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schnurbein, J; Lahr, G; Posovszky, C; Debatin, K M; Wabitsch, M

    2008-10-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder typically presenting with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and adrenal failure variably accompanied by other symptoms. APECED is caused by a mutation in the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE). Today over 60 different mutations are known world-wide, most of them localized in exons 2, 8, and 10. We report here a German girl with rheumatoid factor positive arthritis, chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, autoimmune hepatitis, chronic diarrhea, vitiligo, hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, and adrenal failure who is homozygous for a novel mutation at the end of exon 3 of the AIRE gene (c.462G>A), within the conserved splice donor sequence. This mutation probably introduces a frameshift after amino acid 154 (p.Pro154fs) by skipping exon 4. In addition, we analyzed five other family members out of three generations for the AIRE gene mutation and for polymorphisms in the cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4) gene region and lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPN22) gene, which are associated with the occurrence of sporadic autoimmune Addison's disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and generalized vitiligo.

  20. Homozygous EDNRB mutation in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Noriko; Mutai, Hideki; Namba, Kazunori; Kaneko, Hiroki; Kosaki, Rika; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2018-04-01

    To examine and expand the genetic spectrum of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). Clinical features related to Waardenburg syndrome (WS) were examined in a five-year old patient. Mutation analysis of genes related to WS was performed in the proband and her parents. Molecular modeling of EDNRB and the p.R319W mutant was conducted to predict the pathogenicity of the mutation. The proband showed sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis, and dystopia canthorum, fulfilling the clinical criteria of WS1. Genetic analyses revealed that the proband had no mutation in PAX3 which has been known as the cause of WS1, but had a homozygous missense mutation (p.R319W) in endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB) gene. The asymptomatic parents had the mutation in a heterozygote state. This mutation has been previously reported in a heterozygous state in a patient with Hirschsprung's disease unaccompanied by WS, but the patient and her parents did not show any symptoms in gastrointestinal tract. Molecular modeling of EDNRB with the p.R319W mutation demonstrated reduction of the positively charged surface area in this region, which might reduce binding ability of EDNRB to G protein and lead to abnormal signal transduction underlying the WS phenotype. Our findings suggested that autosomal recessive mutation in EDNRB may underlie a part of WS1 with the current diagnostic criteria, and supported that Hirschsprung's disease is a multifactorial genetic disease which requires additional factors. Further molecular analysis is necessary to elucidate the gene interaction and to reappraise the current WS classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel Homozygous LRP5 Mutations in Mexican Patients with Osteoporosis-Pseudoglioma Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astiazarán, Mirena C; Cervantes-Sodi, María; Rebolledo-Enríquez, Erick; Chacón-Camacho, Oscar; Villegas, Vanessa; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2017-12-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is an uncommon autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the rare association of early-onset osteoporosis and severe ocular abnormalities such as persistent fetal vasculature and microphthalmia. Biallelic mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-5 gene (LRP5) have been associated with OPPG. We present clinical and genetic data from three Mexican OPPG patients, a pair of sibs, and a sporadic case. Three patients underwent clinical examination, including a complete ophthalmic evaluation. Based on the clinical diagnosis of OPPG, the entire coding sequence of LRP5 was polymerase chain reaction-amplified and directly Sanger-sequenced. Genetic testing was extended to the parents of the affected patients. Phenotypic variability was observed in the familial case and molecular analysis identified a novel homozygous c.1145C>T, p.(Pro382Leu) variant in both sibs. As expected, their parents were heterozygous carriers. The sporadic patient exhibited a severe osseous phenotype, microphthalmia, and neurological symptoms. In this patient, homozygosity for the c.442C>T, p.(Gln148*) variant was demonstrated, whereas her parents were heterozygous carriers. The p.(Pro382Leu) pathogenic mutation has been previously reported only in a compound heterozygous state in OPPG patients. Two novel homozygous missense and nonsense variants were demonstrated in three OPPG cases from Mexico. Our results expand the spectrum of disease-causing LRP5 mutations. This is the first report of OPPG in our population and our findings may potentially add to a genotype-phenotype correlation.

  2. A novel homozygous mutation causing hereditary tyrosinemia type I in yakut patient in russia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, Nadezda R; Gurinova, Elizaveta E; Sukhomyasova, Aitalina L; Danilova, Anastasia L; Kaimonov, Vladimir S; Savvina, Mira T; Yakovleva, Aleksandra E; Alekseeva, Elena I

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) (OM IM 276700) is an inborn error of tyrosine catabolism caused be fumarylacetoacetate hedralase deficiency (FAH). In tyrosinemia type I, dietary therapy and nitisinone (Orfandin®), liver transplantation are effective . We present here the first report on identification of FAH mutation in HT1 Yakut patient from Russia with a novel one. The material for the clinical study is based on the genetic data of the patient card with tyrosinemia type 1, which is observed in the medical-genetic consultations Republican Hospital №1-National Medical Center of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia). For molecular genetic analysis has been used venous whole blood, taken with the written consent from the patient, his relatives and 200 healthy Yakuts. All regions of the FAH gene spanning exons were amplified by PCR and mutational analyses was carried out by direct sequencing. Results of sequencing were confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RELF) analyses. 1 one-year-old child was identified with a diagnosis hereditary tyrosinemia type Ia, acute form. In exon 13 of the FAH gene a novel mutation c.1090 G>C (GLu364GLn) in the homozygous state was found in patient, and in heterozygous state in both parents. The child is treated Nitisinone therapy. DNA diagnostics of c.1090 G>C mutation frequency in the FAH gene was conducted using PCR and RFLP analysis in 200 unrelated Yakuts. The frequency of heterozygous carrier was 1.0%.

  3. Homozygous and compound-heterozygous mutations in TGDS cause Catel-Manzke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmke, Nadja; Caliebe, Almuth; Koenig, Rainer; Kant, Sarina G; Stark, Zornitza; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hoff, Kirstin; Kawalia, Amit; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Knaus, Alexej; Zhu, Na; Heinrich, Verena; Huber, Celine; Harabula, Izabela; Spielmann, Malte; Horn, Denise; Kornak, Uwe; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter M; Nürnberg, Peter; Siebert, Reiner; Manzke, Hermann; Mundlos, Stefan

    2014-12-04

    Catel-Manzke syndrome is characterized by Pierre Robin sequence and a unique form of bilateral hyperphalangy causing a clinodactyly of the index finger. We describe the identification of homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in TGDS in seven unrelated individuals with typical Catel-Manzke syndrome by exome sequencing. Six different TGDS mutations were detected: c.892A>G (p.Asn298Asp), c.270_271del (p.Lys91Asnfs(∗)22), c.298G>T (p.Ala100Ser), c.294T>G (p.Phe98Leu), c.269A>G (p.Glu90Gly), and c.700T>C (p.Tyr234His), all predicted to be disease causing. By using haplotype reconstruction we showed that the mutation c.298G>T is probably a founder mutation. Due to the spectrum of the amino acid changes, we suggest that loss of function in TGDS is the underlying mechanism of Catel-Manzke syndrome. TGDS (dTDP-D-glucose 4,6-dehydrogenase) is a conserved protein belonging to the SDR family and probably plays a role in nucleotide sugar metabolism. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Homozygous Inactivating Mutation in NANOS3 in Two Sisters with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariza G. Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing understanding of female reproduction, the molecular diagnosis of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI is seldom obtained. The RNA-binding protein NANOS3 poses as an interesting candidate gene for POI since members of the Nanos family have an evolutionarily conserved function in germ cell development and maintenance by repressing apoptosis. We performed mutational analysis of NANOS3 in a cohort of 85 Brazilian women with familial or isolated POI, presenting with primary or secondary amenorrhea, and in ethnically-matched control women. A homozygous p.Glu120Lys mutation in NANOS3 was identified in two sisters with primary amenorrhea. The substituted amino acid is located within the second C2HC motif in the conserved zinc finger domain of NANOS3 and in silico molecular modelling suggests destabilization of protein-RNA interaction. In vitro analyses of apoptosis through flow cytometry and confocal microscopy show that NANOS3 capacity to prevent apoptosis was impaired by this mutation. The identification of an inactivating missense mutation in NANOS3 suggests a mechanism for POI involving increased primordial germ cells (PGCs apoptosis during embryonic cell migration and highlights the importance of NANOS proteins in human ovarian biology.

  5. Homozygous mutation in the APOA1BP is associated with a lethal infantile leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Ronen; Shaag, Avraham; Shalev, Stavit; Elpeleg, Orly

    2016-07-01

    Febrile-induced neurodegenerative diseases are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders most commonly inborn errors of metabolism that result in irreversible damage involving the central nervous system. Here, we report on five siblings of consanguineous family who developed normally for the first 6-12 months of life then presented with a severe leukoencephalopathy following a trivial febrile illness. Using homozygosity mapping followed by whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous c. 281C>A mutation in the APOA1BP gene resulting in substitution of a highly conserved alanine residue with aspartic acid (p.Ala94Asp). APOA1BP encodes for epimerase that catalyzes the R to S epimerization of NAD(P)XH, a crucial step in the dehydration of these toxic metabolites accumulating during cellular metabolism. This is the first report of a defect in the nicotinamide nucleotide repair system in humans.

  6. Late-onset polyglucosan body myopathy in five patients with a homozygous mutation in GYG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, H Orhan; Aykit, Yavuz; Amuk, Ozge Ceren; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma B; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Piras, Rachele; DiMauro, Salvatore; Marrosu, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Five Sardinian patients presented in their 5th or 6th decade with progressive limb girdle muscle weakness but their muscle biopsies showed vacuolar myopathy. The more or less abundant subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar vacuoles showed intense, partially α-amylase resistant, PAS-positive deposits consistent with polyglucosan. The recent description of late-onset polyglucosan myopathy has prompted us to find new genetic defects in the gene (GYG1) encoding glycogenin-1, the crucial primer enzyme of glycogen synthesis in muscle. We found a single homozygous intronic mutation harbored by five patients, who, except for two siblings, appear to be unrelated but all five live in central or south Sardinian villages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Homozygous ARHGEF2 mutation causes intellectual disability and midbrain-hindbrain malformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethiraj Ravindran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mid-hindbrain malformations can occur during embryogenesis through a disturbance of transient and localized gene expression patterns within these distinct brain structures. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARHGEF family members are key for controlling the spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPase, to modulate cytoskeleton dynamics, cell division, and cell migration. We identified, by means of whole exome sequencing, a homozygous frameshift mutation in the ARHGEF2 as a cause of intellectual disability, a midbrain-hindbrain malformation, and mild microcephaly in a consanguineous pedigree of Kurdish-Turkish descent. We show that loss of ARHGEF2 perturbs progenitor cell differentiation and that this is associated with a shift of mitotic spindle plane orientation, putatively favoring more symmetric divisions. The ARHGEF2 mutation leads to reduction in the activation of the RhoA/ROCK/MLC pathway crucial for cell migration. We demonstrate that the human brain malformation is recapitulated in Arhgef2 mutant mice and identify an aberrant migration of distinct components of the precerebellar system as a pathomechanism underlying the midbrain-hindbrain phenotype. Our results highlight the crucial function of ARHGEF2 in human brain development and identify a mutation in ARHGEF2 as novel cause of a neurodevelopmental disorder.

  8. Type B mandibuloacral dysplasia with congenital myopathy due to homozygous ZMPSTE24 missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yaou, Rabah; Navarro, Claire; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Bertrand, Anne T; Massart, Catherine; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Cadiñanos, Juan; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Estournet, Brigitte; Richard, Pascale; Barois, Annie; Lévy, Nicolas; Bonne, Gisèle

    2011-06-01

    Mutation in ZMPSTE24 gene, encoding a major metalloprotease, leads to defective prelamin A processing and causes type B mandibuloacral dysplasia, as well as the lethal neonatal restrictive dermopathy syndrome. Phenotype severity is correlated with the residual enzyme activity of ZMPSTE24 and accumulation of prelamin A. We had previously demonstrated that a complete loss of function in ZMPSTE24 was lethal in the neonatal period, whereas compound heterozygous mutations including one PTC and one missense mutation were associated with type B mandibuloacral dysplasia. In this study, we report a 30-year longitudinal clinical survey of a patient harboring a novel severe and complex phenotype, combining an early-onset progeroid syndrome and a congenital myopathy with fiber-type disproportion. A unique homozygous missense ZMPSTE24 mutation (c.281T>C, p.Leu94Pro) was identified and predicted to produce two possible ZMPSTE24 conformations, leading to a partial loss of function. Western blot analysis revealed a major reduction of ZMPSTE24, together with the presence of unprocessed prelamin A and decreased levels of lamin A, in the patient's primary skin fibroblasts. These cells exhibited significant reductions in lifespan associated with major abnormalities of the nuclear shape and structure. This is the first report of MAD presenting with confirmed myopathic abnormalities associated with ZMPSTE24 defects, extending the clinical spectrum of ZMPSTE24 gene mutations. Moreover, our results suggest that defective prelamin A processing affects muscle regeneration and development, thus providing new insights into the disease mechanism of prelamin A-defective associated syndromes in general.

  9. Efficacy of Rosuvastatin in Children With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Association With Underlying Genetic Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Evan A; Dann, Eldad J; Wiegman, Albert

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a rare genetic disorder, is characterized by extremely elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Statin treatment starts at diagnosis, but no statin has been f...... and adults was related to underlying genetic mutations. (A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Rosuvastatin in Children and Adolescents With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia [HYDRA]; NCT02226198).......BACKGROUND: Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a rare genetic disorder, is characterized by extremely elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Statin treatment starts at diagnosis, but no statin has been...... formally evaluated in, or approved for, HoFH children. OBJECTIVES: The authors sought to assess the LDL-C efficacy of rosuvastatin versus placebo in HoFH children, and the relationship with underlying genetic mutations. METHODS: This was a randomized, double-blind, 12-week, crossover study of rosuvastatin...

  10. A homozygous PMS2 founder mutation with an attenuated constitutional mismatch repair deficiency phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Hamel, Nancy; Baker, Kristi; McGuffin, Michael J; Couillard, Martin; Gologan, Adrian; Marcus, Victoria A; Chodirker, Bernard; Chudley, Albert; Stefanovici, Camelia; Durandy, Anne; Hegele, Robert A; Feng, Bing-Jian; Goldgar, David E; Zhu, Jun; De Rosa, Marina; Gruber, Stephen B; Wimmer, Katharina; Young, Barbara; Chong, George; Tischkowitz, Marc D; Foulkes, William D

    2015-05-01

    Inherited mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes predispose to different cancer syndromes depending on whether they are mono-allelic or bi-allelic. This supports a causal relationship between expression level in the germline and phenotype variation. As a model to study this relationship, our study aimed to define the pathogenic characteristics of a recurrent homozygous coding variant in PMS2 displaying an attenuated phenotype identified by clinical genetic testing in seven Inuit families from Northern Quebec. Pathogenic characteristics of the PMS2 mutation NM_000535.5:c.2002A>G were studied using genotype-phenotype correlation, single-molecule expression detection and single genome microsatellite instability analysis. This PMS2 mutation generates a de novo splice site that competes with the authentic site. In homozygotes, expression of the full-length protein is reduced to a level barely detectable by conventional diagnostics. Median age at primary cancer diagnosis is 22 years among 13 NM_000535.5:c.2002A>G homozygotes, versus 8 years in individuals carrying bi-allelic truncating mutations. Residual expression of full-length PMS2 transcript was detected in normal tissues from homozygotes with cancers in their 20s. Our genotype-phenotype study of c.2002A>G illustrates that an extremely low level of PMS2 expression likely delays cancer onset, a feature that could be exploited in cancer preventive intervention. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. A Novel Homozygous Mutation in FOXC1 Causes Axenfeld Rieger Syndrome with Congenital Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Micheal

    Full Text Available Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD disorders are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotypes in which frequently cornea, iris, and lens are affected. This study aimed to identify novel mutations in PAX6, PITX2 and FOXC1 in families with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders.We studied 14 Pakistani and one Mexican family with Axenfeld Rieger syndrome (ARS; n = 10 or aniridia (n = 5. All affected and unaffected family members underwent full ophthalmologic and general examinations. Total genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed for the exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FOXC1, PAX6, and PITX2 genes.Mutations were identified in five of the 15 probands; four variants were novel and one variant was described previously. A novel de novo variant (c.225C>A; p.Tyr75* was identified in the PAX6 gene in two unrelated probands with aniridia. In addition, a known variant (c.649C>T; p.Arg217* in PAX6 segregated in a family with aniridia. In the FOXC1 gene, a novel heterozygous variant (c.454T>C; p.Trp152Arg segregated with the disease in a Mexican family with ARS. A novel homozygous variant (c.92_100del; p.Ala31_Ala33del in the FOXC1 gene segregated in a Pakistani family with ARS and congenital glaucoma.Our study expands the mutation spectrum of the PAX6 and FOXC1 genes in individuals with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders. In addition, our study suggests that FOXC1 mutations, besides typical autosomal dominant ARS, can also cause ARS with congenital glaucoma through an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. Our results thus expand the disease spectrum of FOXC1, and may lead to a better understanding of the role of FOXC1 in development.

  12. Lens subluxation and retinal dysfunction in a girl with homozygous VSX2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif O; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Noor, Jawaher; Salem, Ahmed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-03-01

    To describe a unique lens subluxation phenotype in a child from a consanguineous family and to determine its genetic basis. Ophthalmologic examination (including ocular biometry and electroretinography [ERG] for the proband) and autozygosity-analysis-guided exome sequencing for the family; confirmatory candidate gene sequencing in the family and ethnically matched controls. An otherwise healthy 3-year-old Saudi Arabian girl with poor vision since birth had smooth irides, lens subluxation, cone-rod dysfunction, and high myopia - features resembling Knobloch syndrome but differing in regard to direction of lens subluxation (superior rather than temporal) and the pattern of chorioretinal atrophy (without vitreous condensations or distinct macular atrophy). Autozygome-guided exome sequencing revealed the girl to harbor a homozygous exon 5 mutation in the ocular transcription factor gene visual homeobox 2 (VSX2) [c.773delA; p.Lys258SerfsX44] that was heterozygous in the unaffected brother and parents and absent in 100 healthy ethnically matched controls and on-line databases. Previously reported VSX2 mutations have affected the DNA-binding domains and only been associated with microphthalmia. Unlike previously reported mutations, the current VSX2 mutation is downstream to the protein's DNA binding domains. The phenotype of this girl is unique and suggests a normal regulatory role for VSX2 in iris, zonule, and cone-rod development. For a consanguineous family with suspected recessive ocular disease but without a clear candidate gene, autozygome-guided exome analysis is a powerful technique, even when only a single patient is affected.

  13. Lethal/severe osteogenesis imperfecta in a large family: a novel homozygous LEPRE1 mutation and bone histological findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; den Hollander, Nicolette S.; Nesbitt, Isabel M.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Cobben, Jan M.; Pals, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    We report a large consanguineous Turkish family in which multiple individuals are affected with autosomal recessive lethal or severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) due to a novel homozygous LEPRE1 mutation. In one affected individual histological studies of bone tissue were performed, which may

  14. Life-threatening aortic thrombosis in a trauma patient homozygous for factor V Leiden mutation: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopterides Petros

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of near fatal aortic thrombosis in a trauma patient homozygous for mutation of Factor V Leiden. He responded well to vascular surgery and intensive care unit management and was discharged successfully from the hospital one month later.

  15. Chronic pancreatitis with pancreaticolithiasis and pseudocyst in a 5-year-old boy with homozygous SPINK1 mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Axel C.; Hirsch, Wolfgang [University of Leipzig, Department of Diagnostic Radiology - Pediatric Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Teich, Niels; Caca, Karel [University of Leipzig, Department of Internal Medicine II - Gastroenterology / Hepatology, Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Limbach, Anne [University of Leipzig, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy with a 5-month history of symptoms owing to chronic pancreatitis. Abdominal imaging revealed a large pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail and concretions in the main pancreatic duct. Successful endoscopic papillotomy and stent implantation were performed. Genetic testing showed homozygous SPINK1-N34S mutation, which is an established risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. (orig.)

  16. Chronic pancreatitis with pancreaticolithiasis and pseudocyst in a 5-year-old boy with homozygous SPINK1 mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Axel C.; Hirsch, Wolfgang; Teich, Niels; Caca, Karel; Limbach, Anne

    2005-01-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy with a 5-month history of symptoms owing to chronic pancreatitis. Abdominal imaging revealed a large pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail and concretions in the main pancreatic duct. Successful endoscopic papillotomy and stent implantation were performed. Genetic testing showed homozygous SPINK1-N34S mutation, which is an established risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. (orig.)

  17. Growth hormone secretion and immunological function of a male patient with a homozygous STAT5b mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenkamp, Marie J. E.; Vidarsdottir, Solrun; Pereira, Alberto M.; Karperien, Marcel; van Doorn, Jaap; van Duyvenvoorde, Hermine A.; Breuning, Martijn H.; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Kruithof, M. Femke; van Dissel, Jaap; Janssen, Riny; Wit, Jan M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2007-01-01

    STAT5b is a component of the GH signaling pathway. Recently, we described a 31-year-old male patient (height, -5.9 SDS) with a novel homozygous inactivating mutation in the STAT5b gene. The purpose of this study is to describe the phenotype in detail, including GH secretion and immunological

  18. Homozygous Mutations in PXDN Cause Congenital Cataract, Corneal Opacity, and Developmental Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kamron; Rudkin, Adam; Parry, David A.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; McKibbin, Martin; Logan, Clare V.; Abdelhamed, Zakia I.A.; Muecke, James S.; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Laurie, Kate J.; Shires, Mike; Fogarty, Rhys; Carr, Ian M.; Poulter, James A.; Morgan, Joanne E.; Mohamed, Moin D.; Jafri, Hussain; Raashid, Yasmin; Meng, Ngy; Piseth, Horm; Toomes, Carmel; Casson, Robert J.; Taylor, Graham R.; Hammerton, Michael; Sheridan, Eamonn; Johnson, Colin A.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Craig, Jamie E.; Ali, Manir

    2011-01-01

    Anterior segment dysgenesis describes a group of heterogeneous developmental disorders that affect the anterior chamber of the eye and are associated with an increased risk of glaucoma. Here, we report homozygous mutations in peroxidasin (PXDN) in two consanguineous Pakistani families with congenital cataract-microcornea with mild to moderate corneal opacity and in a consanguineous Cambodian family with developmental glaucoma and severe corneal opacification. These results highlight the diverse ocular phenotypes caused by PXDN mutations, which are likely due to differences in genetic background and environmental factors. Peroxidasin is an extracellular matrix-associated protein with peroxidase catalytic activity, and we confirmed localization of the protein to the cornea and lens epithelial layers. Our findings imply that peroxidasin is essential for normal development of the anterior chamber of the eye, where it may have a structural role in supporting cornea and lens architecture as well as an enzymatic role as an antioxidant enzyme in protecting the lens, trabecular meshwork, and cornea against oxidative damage. PMID:21907015

  19. Homozygous indel mutation in CDH11 as the probable cause of Elsahy-Waters syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskiran, Ekim Z; Karaosmanoglu, Beren; Koşukcu, Can; Doğan, Özlem A; Taylan-Şekeroğlu, Hande; Şimşek-Kiper, Pelin Ö; Utine, Eda G; Boduroğlu, Koray; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet

    2017-12-01

    Two sisters from a consanguineous couple were seen in genetics department for facial dysmorphic features and glaucoma. They both had broad foreheads, hypertelorism, megalocorneas, thick eyebrows with synophrys, flat malar regions, broad and bulbous noses, and mild prognathism. Both had glaucoma, younger one also had cataracts and phthisis bulbi. Other findings included bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly of 2nd and 3rd fingers, history of impacted teeth with dentigerous cyst in the elder one, and intellectual disability (mild and borderline). The sisters were considered to have Elsahy-Waters syndrome. In order to elucidate the underlying molecular cause, sisters and their healthy parents were genotyped by SNP arrays, followed by homozygosity mapping. Homozygous regions were further analyzed by exome sequencing in one affected individual. A homozygous indel variant segregating with the condition was detected in CDH11 (c.1116_1117delinsGATCATCAG, p.(Ile372MetfsTer9)), which was then validated by using Sanger sequencing. CDH11 encodes cadherin 11 (osteo-cadherin) that regulates cell-cell adhesion, cell polarization and migration, as well as osteogenic differentiation. Further experiments revealed that CDH11 expression was decreased in patient-derived fibroblasts as compared to the heterozygous parent and another healthy donor. Immunostaining showed absence of the protein expression in patient fibroblasts. In addition, cell proliferation rate was slow and osteogenic differentiation potential was delayed. We consider that this study reveals loss-of-function mutations in CDH11 as a probable cause of this phenotype. Next generation sequencing in further patients would both prove this gene as causative, and finely delineate this clinical spectrum further contributing in identification of other possibly involved gene(s). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A novel homozygous AP4B1 mutation in two brothers with AP-4 deficiency syndrome and ocular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accogli, Andrea; Hamdan, Fadi F; Poulin, Chantal; Nassif, Christina; Rouleau, Guy A; Michaud, Jacques L; Srour, Myriam

    2018-04-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP-4) is a heterotetrameric protein complex which plays a key role in vesicle trafficking in neurons. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been recently associated with an autosomal recessive phenotype, consisting of spastic tetraplegia, and intellectual disability (ID). The overlapping clinical picture among individuals carrying mutations in any of these genes has prompted the terms "AP-4 deficiency syndrome" for this clinically recognizable phenotype. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a novel homozygous mutation (c.991C>T, p.Q331*, NM_006594.4) in AP4B1 in two siblings from a consanguineous Pakistani couple, who presented with severe ID, progressive spastic tetraplegia, epilepsy, and microcephaly. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation was homozygous in the siblings and heterozygous in the parents. Similar to previously reported individuals with AP4B1 mutations, brain MRI revealed ventriculomegaly and white matter loss. Interestingly, in addition to the typical facial gestalt reported in other AP-4 deficiency cases, the older brother presented with congenital left Horner syndrome, bilateral optic nerve atrophy and cataract, which have not been previously reported in this condition. In summary, we report a novel AP4B1 homozygous mutation in two siblings and review the phenotype of AP-4 deficiency, speculating on a possible role of AP-4 complex in eye development. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A homozygous mutation in a consanguineous family consolidates the role of ALDH1A3 in autosomal recessive microphthalmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, L; Fang, M; Dali, C

    2013-01-01

    to the identification of new genes. Very recently, homozygous variations within ALDH1A3 have been associated with autosomal recessive microphthalmia with or without cysts or coloboma, and with variable subphenotypes of developmental delay/autism spectrum disorder in eight families. In a consanguineous family where...... three of the five siblings were affected with microphthalmia/coloboma, we identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in ALDH1A3 using exome sequencing. Of the three affected siblings, one had intellectual disability and one had intellectual disability and autism, while the last one presented...

  2. Spontaneous mutation rates and the rate-doubling dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Borstel, R.C.; Moustaccki, E.; Latarjet, R.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of radiation required to double the frequency of mutations or tumours over the rate of those that occur spontaneously is called the rate-doubling dose. An equivalent concept has been proposed for exposure to other environmental mutagens. The doubling dose concept is predicated on the assumption that all human populations have the same spontaneous mutation rate, and that this spontaneous mutation rate is known. It is now established for prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes that numerous genes control the spontaneous mutation rate, and it is likely that the same is true for human cells as well. Given that the accepted mode of evolution of human populatons is from small, isolated groups of individuals, it seems likely that each population would have a different spontaneous mutation rate. Given that a minimum of twenty genes control or affect the spontaneous mutation rate, and that each of these in turn is susceptible to spontaneously arising or environmentally induced mutations, it seems likely that every individual within a population (except for siblings from identical multiple births) will have a unique spontaneous mutation rate. If each individual in a population does have a different spontaneous mutation rate, the doubling dose concept, in rigorous terms, is fallacious. Therefore, as with other concepts of risk evaluation, the doubling dose concept is subject to criticism. Nevertheless, until we know individual spontaneous mutation rates with precision, and can evaluate risks based on this information, the doubling dose concept has a heuristic value and is needed for practical assessment of risks for defined populations. (author)

  3. A homozygous mutation in SLC1A4 in siblings with severe intellectual disability and microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, M; Hamdan, F F; Gan-Or, Z; Labuda, D; Nassif, C; Oskoui, M; Gana-Weisz, M; Orr-Urtreger, A; Rouleau, G A; Michaud, J L

    2015-07-01

    We performed exome analysis in two affected siblings with severe intellectual disability (ID), microcephaly and spasticity from an Ashkenazi Jewish consanguineous family. We identified only one rare variant, a missense in SLC1A4 (c. 766G>A [p. E256K]), that is homozygous in both siblings but not in any of their 11 unaffected siblings or their parents (Logarithm of odds, LOD score: 2.6). This variant is predicted damaging. We genotyped 450 controls of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry and identified only 5 individuals who are heterozygous for this variant (minor allele frequency: 0.0056). SLC1A4 (ASCT1) encodes a transporter for neutral aminoacids such as alanine, serine, cysteine and threonine. L-Serine is essential for neuronal survival and differentiation. Indeed, L-serine biosynthesis disorders affect brain development and cause severe ID. In the brain, L-serine is synthesized in astrocytes but not in neurons. It has been proposed that ASCT1 mediates the uptake of L-serine into neurons and the release of glia-borne L-serine to neighboring cells. SLC1A4 disruption may thus impair brain development and function by decreasing the levels of L-serine in neurons. The identification of additional families with mutations in SLC1A4 would be necessary to confirm its involvement in ID. © 2015 John Wiley | Clinical Exome Genome Reports.

  4. Identification of 2 novel homozygous mutations in the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene in Saudi patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarar Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report is to analyze the clinical features, and mutations of the methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MUT gene in 2 patients with methylmalonic aciduria (MMA attending King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in January 2014. The infants aged 6 days (patient 1 and 3 months (patient 2 with sepsis-like picture, metabolic acidosis, and hyperammonemia were presented. Investigations revealed high propionylcarnitine (C3, elevated urinary methylmalonic acids, 3-hydroxypropionic acids and methylcitrate, consistent with MMA. Sanger-sequencing detected a homozygous novel mutation (c.329A>G; p.Y110C in the MUT gene in patient 1 and a heterozygous in parents. This mutation is predicted to have a damaging effect on the protein structure and function. In patient 2, we detected a novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.2200C>T; p.Q734X and a heterozygous in parents. This mutation leads to a premature stop-codon at codon 734 of the MUT gene. We identified 2 novel mutations in the MUT gene causing isolated MMA.

  5. A homozygous PIGN missense mutation in Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers with a canine paroxysmal dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolicheski, Ana L; Johnson, Gary S; Mhlanga-Mutangadura, Tendai; Taylor, Jeremy F; Schnabel, Robert D; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko; O'Brien, Dennis P

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary paroxysmal dyskinesias (PxD) are a heterogeneous group of movement disorders classified by frequency, duration, and triggers of the episodes. A young-adult onset canine PxD has segregated as an autosomal recessive trait in Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers. The medical records and videos of episodes from 25 affected dogs were reviewed. The episodes of hyperkinesia and dystonia lasted from several minutes to several hours and could occur as often as >10/day. They were not associated with strenuous exercise or fasting but were sometimes triggered by excitement. The canine PxD phenotype most closely resembled paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) of humans. Whole genome sequences were generated with DNA from 2 affected dogs and analyzed in comparison to 100 control canid whole genome sequences. The two whole genome sequences from dogs with PxD had a rare homozygous PIGN:c.398C > T transition, which predicted the substitution of an isoleucine for a highly conserved threonine in the encoded enzyme. All 25 PxD-affected dogs were PIGN:c.398T allele homozygotes, whereas there were no c.398T homozygotes among 1185 genotyped dogs without known histories of PxD. PIGN encodes an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI), which anchors a variety of proteins including CD59 to the cell surface. Flow cytometry of PIGN-knockout HEK239 cells expressing recombinant human PIGN with the c.398T variant showed reduced CD59 expression. Mutations in human PIGN have been associated with multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome-1 (MCAHS1). Movement disorders can be a part of MCAHS1, but this is the first PxD associated with altered GPI anchor function.

  6. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in the FBN1 gene: unexpected findings in molecular diagnosis of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Pauline; Hanna, Nadine; Aubart, Mélodie; Leheup, Bruno; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Naudion, Sophie; Lacombe, Didier; Milleron, Olivier; Odent, Sylvie; Faivre, Laurence; Bal, Laurence; Edouard, Thomas; Collod-Beroud, Gwenaëlle; Langeois, Maud; Spentchian, Myrtille; Gouya, Laurent; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal-dominant connective tissue disorder usually associated with heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Homozygous and compound heterozygous cases are rare events and have been associated with a clinical severe presentation. Report unexpected findings of homozygosity and compound heterozygosity in the course of molecular diagnosis of heterozygous MFS and compare the findings with published cases. In the context of molecular diagnosis of heterozygous MFS, systematic sequencing of the FBN1 gene was performed in 2500 probands referred nationwide. 1400 probands carried a heterozygous mutation in this gene. Unexpectedly, among them four homozygous cases (0.29%) and five compound heterozygous cases (0.36%) were identified (total: 0.64%). Interestingly, none of these cases carried two premature termination codon mutations in the FBN1 gene. Clinical features for these carriers and their families were gathered and compared. There was a large spectrum of severity of the disease in probands carrying two mutated FBN1 alleles, but none of them presented extremely severe manifestations of MFS in any system compared with carriers of only one mutated FBN1 allele. This observation is not in line with the severe clinical features reported in the literature for four homozygous and three compound heterozygous probands. Homozygotes and compound heterozygotes were unexpectedly identified in the course of molecular diagnosis of MFS. Contrary to previous reports, the presence of two mutated alleles was not associated with severe forms of MFS. Although homozygosity and compound heterozygosity are rarely found in molecular diagnosis, they should not be overlooked, especially among consanguineous families. However, no predictive evaluation of severity should be provided. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. "Homozygous, and compound heterozygous mutation in 3 Turkish family with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: case reports".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Fahrettin; Turkgenc, Burcu; Toksoy, Guven; Bostan, Ozlem M; Evke, Elif; Uyguner, Oya; Yakicier, Cengiz; Kayserili, Hulya; Cil, Ergun; Temel, Sehime G

    2017-10-16

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) isa recessive model of long QT syndrome which might also be related to possible hearing loss. Although the syndrome has been demonstrated to be originated from homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in either the KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes, additional mutations in other genetic loci should be considered, particularly in malignant course patients. Three patients were admitted into hospital due to recurrent seizures/syncope, intrauterine and postnatal bradycardia respectively; moreover all three patients had congenital sensorineural hearing-loss. Their electrocardiograms showed markedly prolonged QT interval. Implantable defibrillator was implanted and left cardiac sympathetic denervation was performed due to the progressive disease in case 1. She had countless ventricular fibrillation and appropriate shock while using an implantable defibrillator. The DNA sequencing analysis of the KCNQ1 gene disclosed a homozygous c.728G > A (p.Arg243His) missense mutation in case1. Further targeted next generation sequencing of cardiac panel comprising 68 gene revealed a heterozygous c.1346 T > G (p.Ile449Arg) variant in RYR2 gene and a heterozygous c.809G > A (p.Cys270Tyr) variant in NKX2-5 gene in the same patient. Additional gene alterations in RYR2 and NKX2-5 genes were thought to be responsible for progressive and malignant course of the disease. As a result of DNA sequencing analysis of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 genes, a compound heterozygosity for two mutations had been detected in KCNQ1 gene in case 2: a maternally derived c.477 + 1G > A splice site mutation and a paternally derived c.520C > T (p.Arg174Cys) missense mutation. Sanger sequencing of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 genes displayed a homozygous c.1097G > A (p.Arg366Gln) mutation in KCNQ1 gene in case 3. β-blocker therapy was initiated to all the index subjects. Three families of JLNS who presented with long QT and deafness and who carry homozygous, or compound heterozygous

  8. Several homozygous mutations in the gene for 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 in patients with apparent mineralocorticoid excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.C.; Harbison, M.D.; Hanauske-Abel, H.M.; Licholai, T. [New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Four deleterious mutations are described in the gene for HSD11B2, which encodes the type 2 isoenzyme of 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11{beta}HSD2). In seven families with one or more members affected by apparent mineralocortiocoid excess, this disorder is shown to be the result of a deficiency in 11{beta}HSD2. Surprisingly, the patients are all homozygous for their mutation. This results from consanguinity in two families and possibly from endogamy or a founder effect in four of the other five families. The absence of compound heterozygotes remains to be investigated. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Costs of insensitive acetylcholinesterase insecticide resistance for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae homozygous for the G119S mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G119S mutation responsible for insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides has recently been reported from natural populations of Anopheles gambiae in West Africa. These reports suggest there are costs of resistance associated with this mutation for An. gambiae, especially for homozygous individuals, and these costs could be influential in determining the frequency of carbamate resistance in these populations. Methods Life-history traits of the AcerKis and Kisumu strains of An. gambiae were compared following the manipulation of larval food availability in three separate experiments conducted in an insecticide-free laboratory environment. These two strains share the same genetic background, but differ in being homozygous for the presence or absence of the G119S mutation at the ace-1 locus, respectively. Results Pupae of the resistant strain were significantly more likely to die during pupation than those of the susceptible strain. Ages at pupation were significantly earlier for the resistant strain and their dry starved weights were significantly lighter; this difference in weight remained when the two strains were matched for ages at pupation. Conclusions The main cost of resistance found for An. gambiae mosquitoes homozygous for the G119S mutation was that they were significantly more likely to die during pupation than their susceptible counterparts, and they did so across a range of larval food conditions. Comparing the frequency of G119S in fourth instar larvae and adults emerging from the same populations would provide a way to test whether this cost of resistance is being expressed in natural populations of An. gambiae and influencing the dynamics of this resistance mutation.

  10. Elevated heart rate triggers action potential alternans and sudden death. translational study of a homozygous KCNH2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigmann, Ulrich; Biliczki, Peter; Ramirez, Rafael J; Marschall, Christoph; Takac, Ina; Brandes, Ralf P; Kotzot, Dieter; Girmatsion, Zenawit; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Ehrlich, Joachim R

    2014-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) leads to arrhythmic events and increased risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). Homozygous KCNH2 mutations underlying LQTS-2 have previously been termed "human HERG knockout" and typically express severe phenotypes. We studied genotype-phenotype correlations of an LQTS type 2 mutation identified in the homozygous index patient from a consanguineous Turkish family after his brother died suddenly during febrile illness. Clinical work-up, DNA sequencing, mutagenesis, cell culture, patch-clamp, in silico mathematical modelling, protein biochemistry, confocal microscopy were performed. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous C-terminal KCNH2 mutation (p.R835Q) in the index patient (QTc ∼506 ms with notched T waves). Parents were I° cousins - both heterozygous for the mutation and clinically unremarkable (QTc ∼447 ms, father and ∼396 ms, mother). Heterologous expression of KCNH2-R835Q showed mildly reduced current amplitudes. Biophysical properties of ionic currents were also only nominally changed with slight acceleration of deactivation and more negative V50 in R835Q-currents. Protein biochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed similar expression patterns and trafficking of WT and R835Q, even at elevated temperature. In silico analysis demonstrated mildly prolonged ventricular action potential duration (APD) compared to WT at a cycle length of 1000 ms. At a cycle length of 350 ms M-cell APD remained stable in WT, but displayed APD alternans in R835Q. Kv11.1 channels affected by the C-terminal R835Q mutation display mildly modified biophysical properties, but leads to M-cell APD alternans with elevated heart rate and could precipitate SCD under specific clinical circumstances associated with high heart rates.

  11. Novel homozygous nonsense mutations in the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) gene associated with 46,XY primary amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hadj Hmida, Imen; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Hadded, Anis; Dimassi, Sarra; Kammoun, Molka; Bignon-Topalovic, Joelle; Bibi, Mohamed; Saad, Ali; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken

    2016-07-01

    To determine the genetic cause of 46,XY primary amenorrhea in three 46,XY girls. Whole exome sequencing. University cytogenetics center. Three patients with unexplained 46,XY primary amenorrhea were included in the study. Potentially pathogenic variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing, and familial segregation was determined where parents' DNA was available. Exome sequencing was performed in the three patients, and the data were analyzed for potentially pathogenic mutations. The functional consequences of mutations were predicted. Three novel homozygous nonsense mutations in the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) gene were identified:c.1573 C→T, p.Gln525Ter, c.1435 C→T p.Arg479Ter, and c.508 C→T, p.Gln170Ter. Inactivating mutations of the LHCGR gene may be a more common cause of 46,XY primary amenorrhea than previously considered. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Ковальова

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

  13. A Novel Homozygous Missense Mutation in HOXC13 Leads to Autosomal Recessive Pure Hair and Nail Ectodermal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Orseth, Meredith Lee; Smith, J Michael; Brehm, Mary Abigail; Agim, Nnenna Gebechi; Glass, Donald Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) is a rare disorder that presents with hypotrichosis and nail dystrophy while sparing other ectodermal structures such as teeth and sweat glands. We describe a homozygous novel missense mutation in the HOXC13 gene that resulted in autosomal recessive PHNED in a Hispanic child. The mutation c.812A>G (p.Gln271Arg) is located within the DNA-binding domain of the HOXC13 gene, cosegregates within the family, and is predicted to be maximally damaging. This is the first reported case of a missense HOXC13 mutation resulting in PHNED and the first reported case of PHNED identified in a North American family. Our findings illustrate the critical role of HOXC13 in human hair and nail development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Efficacy of Rosuvastatin in Children With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Association With Underlying Genetic Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Evan A.; Dann, Eldad J.; Wiegman, Albert; Skovby, Flemming; Gaudet, Daniel; Sokal, Etienne; Charng, Min-Ji; Mohamed, Mafauzy; Luirink, Ilse; Raichlen, Joel S.; Sundén, Mattias; Carlsson, Stefan C.; Raal, Frederick J.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a rare genetic disorder, is characterized by extremely elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Statin treatment starts at diagnosis, but no statin has been

  15. SPONTANEOUS MUTATIONAL GENOTYPE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION FOR FITNESS-RELATED TRAITS IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Jesús; López-Fanjul, Carlos

    1997-06-01

    Spontaneous mutations were allowed to accumulate for 104-161 generations in 113-176 inbred lines, independently maintained by a single brother-sister mating per generation, all of them derived from a completely homozygous population of Drosophila melanogaster. In each of two to three consecutive generations, all lines were scored for fecundity, egg-to-pupa and pupa-to-adult viabilities, both in the standard laboratory culture medium (ST) and in three harsh media differing from the former by a single factor: higher temperature (HT), higher NaCl concentration (HSC), or a much reduced concentration of nutrients (D). Relative to the standard medium, productivity (fecundity × viability) decreased by 25% (HT), 66% (HSC), and 80% (D). In each medium, mutational variances of those traits and mutational covariances between all possible pairs were calculated from the between-line divergence (codivergence). Mutational correlations between character states in different media were also obtained. Because we used inbred lines, those estimates were mainly due to the accumulation of mildly detrimental mutations, deleterious mutations of large effect being underrepresented. For all traits, mutational heritabilities ranged from 1.41 × 10 -4 to 11.24 × 10 -4 , and did not increase with intensified environmental harshness. Mutational correlations between character states in different media were usually not large (average absolute value 0.31), reflecting a high degree of environmental specificity of the mutations involved. In our results, mutations quasi-neutral in ST conditions and mildly detrimental in more stressful media were not, as a class, important. Mutational correlations between fecundity and egg-to-pupa viability were small and positive in all media. Those involving pupa-to-adult viability were positive in HT, nonsignificant in HSC, and negative in ST and D, showing how the genetic covariance structure of quantitative traits in populations may change in variable

  16. Severe growth deficiency, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features are due to a homozygous QARS mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Ling, Jiqiang; Wu, Jiang; Vinkler, Chana; Yosovich, Keren; Bahar, Sarit; Yanoov-Sharav, Miri; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Lev, Dorit

    2017-07-01

    Glutaminyl tRNA synthase is highly expressed in the developing fetal human brain. Mutations in the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (QARS) gene have been reported in patients with progressive microcephaly, cerebral-cerebellar atrophy, and intractable seizures. We have previously reported a new recessive syndrome of severe linear growth retardation, poor weight gain, microcephaly, characteristic facial features, cutaneous syndactyly of the toes, high myopia, and intellectual disability in two sisters of Ashkenazi-Jewish origin (Eur J Med Genet 2014;57(6):288-92). Homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous missense (V476I) mutation in the QARS gene, located in the catalytic domain. The patient's fibroblasts demonstrated markedly reduced QARS amino acylation activity in vitro. Furthermore, the same homozygous mutation was found in an unrelated girl of Ashkenazi origin with the same phenotype. The clinical presentation of our patients differs from the original QARS-associated syndrome in the severe postnatal growth failure, absence of epilepsy, and minor MRI findings, thus further expanding the phenotypic spectrum of the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase deficiency syndromes.

  17. Identification of a Novel Homozygous Nonsense Mutation Confirms the Implication of GNAT1 in Rod-Cone Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Méjécase

    Full Text Available GNAT1, encoding the transducin subunit Gα, is an important element of the phototransduction cascade. Mutations in this gene have been associated with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness. Recently, a homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation was identified in a patient with late-onset rod-cone dystrophy. After exclusion of mutations in genes underlying progressive inherited retinal disorders, by targeted next generation sequencing, a 32 year-old male sporadic case with severe rod-cone dystrophy and his unaffected parents were investigated by whole exome sequencing. This led to the identification of a homozygous nonsense variant, c.963C>A p.(Cys321* in GNAT1, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was heterozygous for this variant whereas the variant was absent in the father. c.963C>A p.(Cys321* is predicted to produce a shorter protein that lacks critical sites for the phototransduction cascade. Our work confirms that the phenotype and the mode of inheritance associated with GNAT1 variants can vary from autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness to autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy.

  18. The effects of MSH2 deficiency on spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation rates in the mouse germline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, Karen L-A.; Duyn-Goedhart, Annemarie van; Hickenbotham, Peter; Monger, Karen; Buul, Paul P.W. van; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2007-01-01

    Mutation rates at two expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci were studied in the germline of mismatch repair deficient Msh2 knock-out mice. Spontaneous mutation rates in homozygous Msh2 -/- males were significantly higher than those in isogenic wild-type (Msh2 +/+ ) and heterozygous (Msh2 +/- ) mice. In contrast, the irradiated Msh2 -/- mice did not show any detectable increases in their mutation rate, whereas significant ESTR mutation induction was observed in the irradiated Msh2 +/+ and Msh2 +/- animals. Considering these data and the results of other publications, we propose that the Msh2-deficient mice possess a mutator phenotype in their germline and somatic tissues while the loss of a single Msh2 allele does not affect the stability of heterozygotes

  19. Estimating spontaneous mutation rates at enzyme loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Terumi; Yamazaki, Tsuneyuki; Harada, Ko; Kusakabe, Shin-ichi

    1990-04-01

    Spontaneous mutations were accumulated for 1,620,826 allele-generations on chromosomes that originated from six stem second chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster. Only null-electromorph mutations were detected. Band-electromorph mutations were not found. The average rate of null-electromorph mutations was 2.71 x 10 -5 per locus per generation. The 95% confidence interval (μ n ) was 1.97 x 10 -5 n -5 per locus per generation. The upper 95% confidence limit of the band-electromorph mutation rate (μ B ) was 2.28 x 10 -6 per locus per generation. It appeared that null mutations were induced by movable genetic elements and that the mutation rates were different from chromosome to chromosome. (author)

  20. TP53 p.R337H is a conditional cancer-predisposing mutation: further evidence from a homozygous patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomazzi, Juliana; Hainaut, Pierre; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Selistre, Simone; Duarte, Juliana; Ribeiro, Jorge Pinto; Vieira, Paulo JC; Souza Macedo, Gabriel de; Rossi, Cristina; Czepielewski, Mauro; Netto, Cristina Brinkmann Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs) are among the most common childhood cancers occurring in infants affected with the Li-Fraumeni and Li- Fraumeni-like (LFS/LFL) syndromes, which are caused by dominant germline mutations in the TP53 gene. In Brazil, a particular mutation, occurring in the tetramerisation domain of the gene, p.R337H, is exceedingly common due to a founder effect and is strongly associated with ACC. In this report, we describe the phenotype and long-term clinical follow-up of a female child diagnosed with ACC and homozygous for the TP53 p.R337H founder mutation. At age 11 months, the patient was diagnosed with a virilising anaplastic adrenal cortical tumour, which was completely excised without disturbing the adrenal capsule. Family history was consistent with an LFL tumour pattern, and genotyping identified the TP53 p.R337H mutation in both alleles in genomic DNA from lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Haplotype analysis confirmed the occurrence of the mutation in the same founder haplotype previously described in other Brazilian patients. No other germline or somatic TP53 mutations or rearrangements were identified. At age 9 years, the child was asymptomatic and had no evidence of endocrine derangements. Full body and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) failed to detect any suspicious proliferative lesions, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing results were within the normal reference for the child’s age, ruling out a major exercise capacity deficiency. This is the first clinical and aerobic functional capacity documentation of a patient who carries two mutant TP53 alleles and no wild-type allele. Our results support the hypothesis that TP53 p.R337H, the most common TP53 mutation ever described in any population, is a conditional mutant. Furthermore, our observations over a long period of clinical follow-up suggest that TP53 p.R337H homozygotes do not have a more severe disease phenotype than do heterozygote carriers of the same mutation. Patients with

  1. Identification of a novel homozygous TRAPPC9 gene mutation causing non-syndromic intellectual disability, speech disorder, and secondary microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Ansar A; Blaesius, Kathrin; Hu, Hao; Latif, Zahid; Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Khan, Muhammad N; Farooq, Sundas; Khan, Muzammil A; Kaindl, Angela M

    2017-12-01

    TRAPPC9 gene mutations have been linked recently to autosomal recessive mental retardation 13 (MRT13; MIM#613192) with only eight families reported world-wide. We assessed patients from two consanguineous pedigrees of Pakistani descent with non-syndromic intellectual disability and postnatal microcephaly through whole exome sequencing (WES) and cosegregation analysis. Here we report six further patients from two pedigrees with homozygous TRAPPC9 gene mutations, the novel nonsense mutation c.2065G>T (p.E689*) and the previously identified nonsense mutation c.1423C>T (p.R475*). We provide an overview of previously reported clinical features and highlight common symptoms and variability of MRT13. Common findings are intellectual disability and absent speech, and frequently microcephaly, motor delay and pathological findings on MRI including diminished cerebral white matter volume are present. Mutations in TRAPPC9 should be considered in non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability with severe speech disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Krüppel-like factor 1 mutations and expression of hemoglobins F and A2 in homozygous hemoglobin E syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepakhan, Wanicha; Yamsri, Supawadee; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Supan

    2015-07-01

    The basis for variability of hemoglobin (Hb) F in homozygous Hb E disease is not well understood. We have examined multiple mutations of the Krüppel-like factor 1 (KLF1) gene; an erythroid specific transcription factor and determined their associations with Hbs F and A2 expression in homozygous Hb E. Four KLF1 mutations including G176AfsX179, T334R, R238H, and -154 (C-T) were screened using specific PCR assays on 461 subjects with homozygous Hb E and 100 normal controls. None of these four mutations were observed in 100 normal controls. Among 461 subjects with homozygous Hb E, 306 had high (≥5 %) and 155 had low (<5 %) Hb F. DNA analysis identified the KLF1 mutations in 35 cases of the former group with high Hb F, including the G176AfsX179 mutation (17/306 = 5.6 %), T334R mutation (9/306 = 2.9 %), -154 (C-T) mutation (7/306 = 2.3 %), and R328H mutation (2/306 = 0.7 %). Only two subjects in the latter group with low Hb F carried the G176AfsX179 and -154 (C-T) mutations. Significant higher Hb A2 level was observed in those of homozygous Hb E with the G176AfsX179 mutation as compared to those without KLF1 mutations. These results indicate that KLF1 is among the genetic factors associated with increased Hbs F and A2, and in combination with other factors could explain the variabilities of these Hb expression in Hb E syndrome.

  3. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with a heterozygous deactivating LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) mutation and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Fiona J; Mumm, Steven; Whyte, Michael P; Wenkert, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) is a rare, idiopathic disorder that usually presents with vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) within 6 months of a first pregnancy and delivery. Spontaneous improvement is typical. There is no known genetic basis for PAO. A 26-year-old primagravida with a neonatal history of unilateral blindness attributable to hyperplastic primary vitreous sustained postpartum VCFs consistent with PAO. Her low bone mineral density (BMD) seemed to respond to vitamin D and calcium therapy, with no fractures after her next successful pregnancy. Investigation of subsequent fetal losses revealed homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism associated both with fetal loss and with osteoporosis (OP). Because her neonatal unilateral blindness and OP were suggestive of loss-of-function mutation(s) in the gene that encodes LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), LRP5 exon and splice site sequencing was also performed. This revealed a unique heterozygous 12-bp deletion in exon 21 (c.4454_4465del, p.1485_1488del SSSS) in the patient, her mother and sons, but not her father or brother. Her mother had a normal BMD, no history of fractures, PAO, ophthalmopathy, or fetal loss. Her two sons had no ophthalmopathy and no skeletal issues. Her osteoporotic father (with a family history of blindness) and brother had low BMDs first documented at ages ∼40 and 32 years, respectively. Serum biochemical and bone turnover studies were unremarkable in all subjects. We postulate that our patient's heterozygous LRP5 mutation together with her homozygous MTHFR polymorphism likely predisposed her to low peak BMD. However, OP did not cosegregate in her family with the LRP5 mutation, the homozygous MTHFR polymorphism, or even the combination of the two, implicating additional genetic or nongenetic factors in her PAO. Nevertheless, exploration for potential genetic contributions to PAO may explain part of the pathogenesis of this

  4. The spontaneous chlorophyll mutation frequency in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms; Jensen, Hans Peter

    1986-01-01

    materials and the resulting estimate of the chlorophyll mutant frequency is 1.6 .times. 10-4 in about 1.43 million seedlings. The estimate of the chlorophyll mutation rate per generation is close to 67.3 .times. 10-4 per diploid genome or in the order of 6 .times. 10-7 per locus and haploid genome....

  5. Two homozygous mutations in the exon 5 of BCKDHB gene that may cause the classic form of maple syrup urine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ling; Lu, Zhikun; Li, Fatao; Shao, Yongxian; Sheng, Huiying; Cai, Yanna; Liu, Li

    2017-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defects in the catabolism of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). Classic form of MSUD (CMSUD) is caused by mutations in BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT genes mostly. In this study, we analyzed the clinical and genetic characteristics of two patients with CMSUD. Two homozygous mutations, c.517G > T (p.Asp173Tyr) and c.503G > A (p.Arg168His), both in the exon 5 of BCKDHB were detected respectively. The novel mutation p.Asp173Tyr of patient A, inherited from his parents, is predicted to affect conformation of protein by computer analysis. The reported mutation p.Arg168His observed in patient B seemed to occur in a maternal uniparental disomy inheritance manner. Review of related literature revealed that most missense mutations in exon 5 of BCKDHB in homozygous genotype often result in CMSUD because of its incorrect conformation, and exon 5 of BCKDHB might be a susceptible region. Thus the novel homozygous mutation p.Asp173Tyr and the founder homozygous mutation p.Arg168His may be responsible for the clinical presentation of the two CMSUD patients, facilitating the future genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis.

  6. A New Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2I Homozygous for the Common L276I Mutation Mimicking the Mild Phenotype in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) is caused by mutations in the Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene, leading to inadequate glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, an important protein linking the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton. We created a mouse model of the common FKRP L276I...... mutation and a hemizygous FKRP L276I knockout model. We studied histopathology and protein expression in the models at different ages and found that homozygous FKRP L276I mice developed a mild progressive myopathy with increased muscle regeneration and fibrosis starting from 1 year of age. This was likely...... in maintaining proper glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. The mild progression in the homozygous FKRP L276I model resembles that in patients with LGMD2I who are homozygous for the L276I mutation. This animal model could, therefore, be relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of and developing a treatment...

  7. Homozygous FOXE3 mutations cause non-syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea, aphakia, microphthalmia and optic disc coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Manir; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; McKibbin, Martin; Rocha-Medina, J Alberto; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Koga-Nakamura, Wilson; Ashiq, Aruna; Khan, Kamron; Booth, Adam P; Williams, Grange; Raashid, Yasmin; Jafri, Hussain; Rice, Aine; Inglehearn, Chris F; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2010-06-23

    To investigate the genetic basis of recessively-inherited congenital, non syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea in two consanguineous pedigrees, one from the Punjab province of Pakistan and the other from the Tlaxcala province of Mexico. Ophthalmic examinations were conducted on each family member to confirm their diagnosis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasonography of the eyes was performed on some family members. Genomic DNA was analyzed by homozygosity mapping using the Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array and linkage was confirmed with polymorphic microsatellite markers. Candidate genes were sequenced. A diagnosis of autosomal recessive sclerocornea was established for 7 members of the Pakistani and 8 members of the Mexican pedigrees. In the Pakistani family we established linkage to a region on chromosome 1p that contained Forkhead Box E3 (FOXE3), a strong candidate gene since FOXE3 mutations had previously been associated with various anterior segment abnormalities. Sequencing FOXE3 identified the previously reported nonsense mutation, c.720C>A, p.C240X, in the Pakistani pedigree and a novel missense mutation which disrupts an evolutionarily conserved residue in the forkhead domain, c.292T>C, p.Y98H, in the Mexican pedigree. Individuals with heterozygous mutations had no ocular abnormalities. MRI or ultrasonography confirmed that the patients with sclerocornea were also aphakic, had microphthalmia and some had optic disc coloboma. This is the fourth report detailing homozygous FOXE3 mutations causing anterior segment abnormalities in human patients. Previous papers have emphasized aphakia and microphthalmia as the primary phenotype, but we find that the initial diagnosis - and perhaps the only one possible in a rural setting - is one of non-syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea. Dominantly inherited anterior segment defects have also been noted in association with heterozygous FOXE3 mutations. However the absence of any abnormalities in the FOXE3

  8. Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia in a patient homozygous for a WNT10A nonsense mutation and mild manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia in carriers of the mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Clemmensen, Ole; Gjørup, Hans

    2016-01-01

    in the WNT10A gene result in highly variable phenotypes, ranging from isolated tooth agenesis to OODD and Schöpf-Schulz-Passarge syndrome (SSPS). CASE PRESENTATION: We identified a female patient, with consanguineous parents, who was clinically diagnosed with OODD. Genetic testing showed that she...... was homozygous for a previously reported pathogenic mutation in the WNT10A gene, c.321C > A, p.Cys107*. The skin and nail abnormalities were for many years interpreted as psoriasis and treated accordingly. A thorough clinical examination revealed hypotrichosis and hyperhidrosis of the soles and dental...

  9. Homozygous mutation of focal adhesion kinase in embryonic stem cell derived neurons: normal electrophysiological and morphological properties in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komiyama NH

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically manipulated embryonic stem (ES cell derived neurons (ESNs provide a powerful system with which to study the consequences of gene manipulation in mature, synaptically connected neurons in vitro. Here we report a study of focal adhesion kinase (FAK, which has been implicated in synapse formation and regulation of ion channels, using the ESN system to circumvent the embryonic lethality of homozygous FAK mutant mice. Results Mouse ES cells carrying homozygous null mutations (FAK-/- were generated and differentiated in vitro into neurons. FAK-/- ESNs extended axons and dendrites and formed morphologically and electrophysiologically intact synapses. A detailed study of NMDA receptor gated currents and voltage sensitive calcium currents revealed no difference in their magnitude, or modulation by tyrosine kinases. Conclusion FAK does not have an obligatory role in neuronal differentiation, synapse formation or the expression of NMDA receptor or voltage-gated calcium currents under the conditions used in this study. The use of genetically modified ESNs has great potential for rapidly and effectively examining the consequences of neuronal gene manipulation and is complementary to mouse studies.

  10. Exclusion of homozygous PLCE1 (NPHS3) mutations in 69 families with idiopathic and hereditary FSGS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gbadegesin, Rasheed

    2009-02-01

    Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is the most common glomerular cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Although the etiology of FSGS has not been fully elucidated, recent results from the positional cloning of genes mutated in nephrotic syndromes are now beginning to provide insight into the pathogenesis of these diseases. Mutations in PLCE1\\/NPHS3 have recently been reported as a cause of nephrotic syndrome characterized by diffuse mesangial sclerosis (DMS) histology. One single family with a missense mutation had late onset of the disease that was characterized by FSGS. To further define the role of PLCE1 mutations in the etiology of FSGS, we performed mutational analysis in 69 families with FSGS. A total of 69 families with 231 affected individuals were examined. The median age of disease onset was 26 years (range 1-66 years). Onset of ESKD was at a median age of 35.5 years. Seven variants leading to non-synonymous changes were found, of which only two are new variants (exon 4 c.1682 G>A R561Q, exon 31 c.6518A>G K2173R). No known disease-causing mutations were identified in the families screened. PLCE1\\/NPHS3 mutations are not a cause of FSGS in this cohort. The absence of mutations in PLCE1\\/NPHS3 in this study indicates that there are additional genetic causes of FSGS and that hereditary FSGS is a heterogeneous disease. Kindreds appropriate for genome-wide screening are currently being subjected to analysis with the aim of identifying other genetic causes of FSGS.

  11. Time course of ultraviolet B-induced erythema in people with red hair harbouring homozygous melanocortin 1 receptor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Thomas K K; Waterston, Karen; Bisset, Yvonne; Ray, Amanda; Rees, Jonathan L

    2003-08-01

    It has previously been reported that the time course of erythema may be delayed in those with sun-sensitive skin types and those with skin cancer. One molecular explanation for this putative phenotype would be that it is caused by mutations of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R). In the present study of 20 persons, 10 of whom were MC1R homozygous, we measured erythema over a 21-day period in response to a range of ultraviolet B doses using methods that improved on previous studies. We could detect no consistent differences in ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema between the groups studied. The pharmacological mechanisms underpinning such prolonged inflammatory responses merit further investigation.

  12. Generalized pustular psoriasis in a 92-year-old man with a homozygous nonsense mutation in IL36RN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshitaka; Komine, Mayumi; Kamiya, Koji; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Maekawa, Takeo; Murata, Satoru; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2018-03-01

    A 92-year-old man developed an erythematous eruption on the trunk and extremities with numerous pustules accompanied by fever. He had never experienced pustular eruption or been diagnosed with psoriasis previously. Skin biopsy revealed Kogoj's spongiform pustule, and he was diagnosed with generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP). Genomic DNA was extracted from his peripheral blood and the sequence of IL36RN gene was analyzed, which revealed a p.Arg10X homozygous mutation. Several cases of elderly-onset GPP have been reported, however, this is the oldest case of GPP. The existence of splice variants of IL36RN was suspected, but we could not detect any splice variants of IL36RN in this case or in a healthy control from peripheral blood samples. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  13. Valproate Treatment in an ALS Patient Carrying a c.194G>A Spastin Mutation and SMN2 Homozygous Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Tremolizzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the case of an ALS patient found to carry both a novel heterozygous change (c.194G>A within the spastin gene and a homozygous deletion of the SMN2 gene. The patient was started on valproic acid (VPA, 600 mg/die per os considering the capacity of this drug of increasing survival motor neuron through an epigenetic mechanism. Patient clinical course and molecular effects of VPA on skin fibroblasts obtained from the proband are described. This c.194G>A spastin mutation might expand the previously known borders of type 4 spastic paraplegia (SPG4 and we suggest the intriguing possibility that the absence of SMN2 might have acted as a contributory risk factor for starting lower motor neuron damage. Exploring the relationship genocopy-phenocopy in selected ALS patients might represent an interesting strategy for understanding its clinical variability.

  14. First Description of Phosphofructokinase Deficiency In Spain: Identification Of A Novel Homozygous Missense Mutation In The PFKM Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan-Lluis eVives Corrons

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphofructokinase deficiency is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder, which belongs to group of rare inborn errors of metabolism called glycogen storage disease. Here we report on a new mutation in the phosphofructokinase (PFK gene PFKM identified in a 65-year-old woman who suffered from lifelong intermittent muscle weakness and painful spasms of random occurrence, episodic dark urines, and slight haemolytic anaemia. After ruling out the most common causes of chronic haemolytic anaemia, the study of a panel of 24 enzyme activities showed a markedly decreased PFK activity in red blood cells from the patient. DNA sequence analysis of the PFKM gene subsequently revealed a novel homozygous mutation: c.926A>G; p.Asp309Gly. This mutation is predicted to severely affect enzyme catalysis thereby accounting for the observed enzyme deficiency. This case represents a prime example of classical PFK deficiency and is the first reported case of this very rare red blood cell disorder in Spain.

  15. Novel homozygous RARS2 mutation in two siblings without pontocerebellar hypoplasia – further expansion of the phenotypic spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lühl

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6 is a mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in the RARS2 gene. RARS2 encodes mitochondrial arginyl transfer RNA synthetase, an enzyme involved in mitochondrial protein translation. A total of 27 patients from 14 families have been reported so far. Characteristic clinical features comprise neonatal lactic acidosis, severe encephalopathy, intractable seizures, feeding problems and profound developmental delay. Most patients show typical neuroradiologic abnormalities including cerebellar hypoplasia and progressive pontocerebellar atrophy. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular features of 2 siblings with a novel homozygous mutation in RARS2. Both patients presented neonatally with lactic acidosis. While the older sibling had severe neurological symptoms with microcephaly, seizures and developmental delay, the younger patient was still neurologically asymptomatic at the age of 2 months. Results MRI studies in both children lacked pontocerebellar involvement. The expression of the OXPHOS complex proteins was decreased in both patients, whereas oxygen consumption was increased. Conclusions Characteristic neuroradiological abnormalities of PCH6 such as vermis and cerebellar hypoplasia and progressive pontocerebellar atrophy may be missing in patients with RARS2 mutations. RARS2 testing should therefore also be performed in patients without pontocerebellar hypoplasia but otherwise typical clinical symptoms.

  16. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 caused by homozygous MME gene mutation superimposed by chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Miwako; Sano, Yasuteru; Omoto, Masatoshi; Ogasawara, Jyun-Ichi; Koga, Michiaki; Takashima, Hiroshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2017-09-30

    We report a 59-year-old Japanese male who developed gradually worsening weakness and numbness of distal four extremities since age 50. His parents were first cousins, and blood and cerebral spinal examinations were unremarkable. Homozygous mutation of MME gene was detected and thus he was diagnosed as autosomal-recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2T (AR-CMT2T); however, electrophysiological examinations revealed scattered demyelinative changes including elongated terminal latency in several peripheral nerve trunks. Sural nerve biopsy showed endoneurial edema and a lot of thinly myelinated nerve fibers with uneven distribution of remnant myelinated fibers within and between fascicles. Immunoglobulin treatment was initiated considering the possibility of superimposed inflammation and demyelination, and immediate clinical as well as electrophysiological improvements were noted. Our findings indicate that AR-CMT2T caused by MME mutation predisposes to a superimposed inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy. This is the first report which documented the co-existence of CMT2 and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP); however, in the peripheral nervous system, neprilysin, a product of MME gene, is more abundant in myelin sheath than in axonal component. The fragility of myelin sheath due to mutated neprilysin may trigger the detrimental immune response against peripheral myelin in this patient.

  17. Homozygous EEF1A2 mutation causes dilated cardiomyopathy, failure to thrive, global developmental delay, epilepsy and early death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Siqi; Smith, Laura L; Padilla-Lopez, Sergio R; Guida, Brandon S; Blume, Elizabeth; Shi, Jiahai; Morton, Sarah U; Brownstein, Catherine A; Beggs, Alan H; Kruer, Michael C; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2017-09-15

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (EEF1A), is encoded by two distinct isoforms, EEF1A1 and EEF1A2; whereas EEF1A1 is expressed almost ubiquitously, EEF1A2 expression is limited such that it is only detectable in skeletal muscle, heart, brain and spinal cord. Currently, the role of EEF1A2 in normal cardiac development and function is unclear. There have been several reports linking de novo dominant EEF1A2 mutations to neurological issues in humans. We report a pair of siblings carrying a homozygous missense mutation p.P333L in EEF1A2 who exhibited global developmental delay, failure to thrive, dilated cardiomyopathy and epilepsy, ultimately leading to death in early childhood. A third sibling also died of a similar presentation, but DNA was unavailable to confirm the mutation. Functional genomic analysis was performed in S. cerevisiae and zebrafish. In S. cerevisiae, there was no evidence for a dominant-negative effect. Previously identified putative de novo mutations failed to complement yeast strains lacking the EEF1A ortholog showing a major growth defect. In contrast, the introduction of the mutation seen in our family led to a milder growth defect. To evaluate its function in zebrafish, we knocked down eef1a2 expression using translation blocking and splice-site interfering morpholinos. EEF1A2-deficient zebrafish had skeletal muscle weakness, cardiac failure and small heads. Human EEF1A2 wild-type mRNA successfully rescued the morphant phenotype, but mutant RNA did not. Overall, EEF1A2 appears to be critical for normal heart function in humans, and its deficiency results in clinical abnormalities in neurologic function as well as in skeletal and cardiac muscle defects. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. An infant with cartilage-hair hypoplasia due to a novel homozygous mutation in the promoter region of the RMRP gene associated with chondrodysplasia and severe immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatanavicharn, N; Visitsunthorn, N; Pho-iam, T; Jirapongsananuruk, O; Pacharn, P; Chokephaibulkit, K; Limwongse, C; Wasant, P

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, sparse hair, and immune deficiency. It is caused by mutations in the RMRP gene, which encodes the RNA component of the mitochondrial RNA-processing ribonuclease (RNase MRP). Several mutations have been identified in its promoter region or transcribed sequence. However, homozygous mutations in the promoter region have been only reported in a patient with primary immunodeficiency without other features of CHH. We report on a Thai girl who first presented with chronic diarrhea, recurrent pneumonia, and severe failure to thrive, without apparently disproportionate dwarfism. The diagnosis of CHH was made after the severe wasting was corrected, and disproportionate growth became noticeable. The patient had the typical features of CHH, including sparse hair and metaphyseal abnormalities. The immunologic profiles were consistent with combined immune deficiency. Mutation analysis identified a novel homozygous mutation, g.-19_-25 dupACTACTC, in the promoter region of the RMRP gene. Identification of the mutation enabled us to provide a prenatal diagnosis in the subsequent pregnancy. This patient is the first CHH case with the characteristic features due to the homozygous mutation in the promoter region of the RMRP gene. The finding of severe immunodeficiency supports that promoter mutations markedly disrupt mRNA cleavage function, which causes cell-cycle impairment.

  19. Homozygous factor V Leiden mutation in type IV Ehlers-Danlos patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Marwan; Hotait, Mostafa; Winston, Brion

    2014-03-16

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. Several hemostatic abnormalities have been described in EDS patients that increase the bleeding tendencies of these patients. This case report illustrates a patient with an unusual presentation of a patient with type IV EDS, platelet δ-storage pool disease and factor V Leiden mutation. Young woman having previous bilateral deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli coexisting with ruptured splenic aneurysm and multiple other aneurysms now presented with myocardial infarction. Presence of factor V Leiden mutation raises the possibility that the infarct was due to acute coronary thrombosis, although coronary artery aneurysm and dissection with myocardial infarction is known to occur in vascular type EDS. This is the first report in the medical literature of factor V Leiden mutation in an EDS patient which made the management of our patient challenging with propensity to both bleeding and clotting.

  20. A Novel Homozygous Mutation in FOXC1 Causes Axenfeld Rieger Syndrome with Congenital Glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Siddiqui, S.N.; Zafar, S.N.; Villanueva-Mendoza, C.; Cortes-Gonzalez, V.; Khan, M.I.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) disorders are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotypes in which frequently cornea, iris, and lens are affected. This study aimed to identify novel mutations in PAX6, PITX2 and FOXC1 in families with anterior segment dysgenesis

  1. Absent Thalami Caused by a Homozygous EARS2 Mutation: Expanding Disease Spectrum of LTBL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kevelam, Sietske H.; Klouwer, Femke C. C.; Fock, Johanna M.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Bugiani, Marianna; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2016-01-01

    Leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate (LTBL) is caused by autosomal recessive EARS2 mutations. Onset is most often in infancy, but in severe cases in the neonatal period. Patients typically have magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal abnormalities involving

  2. Absent Thalami Caused by a Homozygous EARS2 Mutation : Expanding Disease Spectrum of LTBL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kevelam, Sietske H.; Klouwer, Femke C. C.; Fock, Johanna M.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Bugiani, Marianna; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    Leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate (LTBL) is caused by autosomal recessive EARS2 mutations. Onset is most often in infancy, but in severe cases in the neonatal period. Patients typically have magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal abnormalities involving

  3. A homozygous missense mutation in the IRBP gene (RBP3) associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.I. den; McGee, T.L.; Ziviello, C.; Banfi, S.; Dryja, T.P.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, F.; Ghosh, D.; Berson, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) has been considered essential for normal rod and cone function, as it mediates the transport of retinoids between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium. This study was performed to determine whether mutations in the IRBP

  4. Homozygous PARK7 Mutation in Parkinson’s Disease: Case Report of Two Brothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Apaydın

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Genetic studies for Parkinson’s disease (PD which have been increased during last few years have shown that parkin (PARK2, DJ-1 (PARK7 and PINK-1 (PARK6 mutations can cause autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate by genetic screening methods, the presence of possible genetic mutations in two siblings who have developed PD. METHODS: In these two brothers, PD started at the age of 48 with cervical dystonia and bradykinesia on the left arm, and 56 with tremor on the right hand, respectively. Although they had a favorable response to levodopa, they developed wearing-off phenomenon without dyskinesia on the 4th year. Besides dystonia, the younger brother experienced psychosis and impulse control disorder, as well. Family history revealed first degree consanguinity and the father had also a diagnosis of PD. PD progressed rather slowly in both, but unfortunately the older brother died due to lung cancer 10 years after the initial diagnosis of PD, while he was on the stage 2 of Hoehn-Yahr scale. The younger brother is still on our follow-up at the 7th year of his PD. Informed consent was obtained and blood samples were sent to the genetic department of Juntendo University in Japan for genetic analysis. Parkin gene mutation and DJ-1 gene mutation were analyzed on the PARK7 locus, by automated direct nucleotide sequencing and performed gene dosage assay using TaqMan real-time quantitive PCR. RESULTS: After excluding the parkin mutation the presence of PARK7 was detected in both siblings with haplotype analysis. DJ-1 gene mutation analysis responsible for PARK7, revealed a deletion on intron 1. CONCLUSION: A rarely encountered PARK7 mutation was identified in two brothers having slowly progressive PD and a favorable response to levodopa, one of whom also had psychotic symptoms. As in the presented cases, the genetic studies performed on early-onset PD patients with positive family

  5. Homozygous TBC1D24 mutation in two siblings with familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy (FIME) and moderate intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulat, Anne-Lise; Ville, Dorothée; de Bellescize, Julitta; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Cacciagli, Pierre; Milh, Mathieu; Villard, Laurent; Lesca, Gaetan

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in the TBC1D24 gene were first reported in an Italian family with a unique epileptic phenotype consisting of drug-responsive, early-onset idiopathic myoclonic seizures. Patients presented with isolated bilateral or focal myoclonia, which could evolve to long-lasting attacks without loss of consciousness, with a peculiar reflex component, and were associated with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. This entity was named "familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy" (FIME). More recently, TBC1D24 mutations have been shown to cause a variable range of disorders, including epilepsy of various seizure types and severity, non-syndromic deafness, and DOORS syndrome. We report on the electro-clinical features of two brothers, born to first-cousin parents, affected with infantile-onset myoclonic epilepsy. The peculiar epileptic presentation prompted us to perform direct sequencing of the TBC1D24 gene. The patients had very early onset of focal myoclonic fits with variable topography, lasting a few minutes to several hours, without loss of consciousness, which frequently evolved to generalized myoclonus or myoclonic status. Reflex myoclonia were noticed in one patient. Neurological outcome was marked by moderate intellectual disability. Despite the high frequency of seizures, repeated EEG recordings showed normal background rhythm and rare interictal spikes and waves. We found a homozygous missense mutation, c.457G>A/p.Glu153Lys, in the two affected brothers. This observation combined with recent data from the literature, suggest that mutations in TBCD24 cause a pathological continuum, with FIME at the "benign" end and severe drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathy on the severe end. Early-onset myoclonic epilepsy with focal and generalized myoclonic seizures is a common characteristic of this continuum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Venous thromboembolism at a young age in a brother and sister with coinheritance of homozygous 20210A/A prothrombin mutation and heterozygous 1691G/A factor V Leiden mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbmayer, W M; Kalhs, T; Haushofer, A; Breier, F; Fischer, M

    1999-07-01

    We report on members of a Turkish thrombophilic family with coinheritance of the prothrombin mutation PT20210A and the factor V Leiden mutation. The 23-year-old propositus and his elder sister both had episodes of venous theomboembolism at a young age (23 years and 26 years, respectively) and are homozygous for the PT20210A mutation and heterozygous for the factor V Leiden mutation. The 51-year-old father is suffering from coronary heart disease and is heterozygous for both thrombophilic mutations. The asymptomatic 43-year-old mother is heterozygous for the PT20210A mutation, but without activated protein C resistance. Two other children, a 20-year-old girl who is homozygous for the PT20210A mutation and a 13-year-old boy who is heterozygous for the PT20210A mutation, are both free from activated protein C resistance and thrombosis. This report provides further evidence for an early onset of thromboembolic disorders in individuals with an homozygous state of the prothrombin variant 20210A/A and coinheritance of another thrombophilic mutation. Consensus guidelines are required for the treatment and prophylaxis of patients and subjects who remain asymptomatic with homozygous or more than one heterozygous genetic defect associated with thrombophilia.

  7. A homozygous frameshift mutation in the HOXC13 gene underlies pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia in a Syrian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Kurban, Mazen; Fujimoto, Atsushi; Fujikawa, Hiroki; Abbas, Ossama; Nemer, Georges; Saliba, Jessica; Sleiman, Rima; Tofaili, Mona; Kibbi, Abdul-Ghani; Ito, Masaaki; Shimomura, Yutaka

    2013-04-01

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by hypotrichosis or complete alopecia, as well as nail dystrophy. Mutations in the type II hair keratin gene KRT85 and the HOXC13 gene on chromosome 12q have recently been identified in families with autosomal-recessive PHNED. In the present study, we have analyzed a consanguineous Syrian family with an affected girl having complete alopecia and nail dystrophy since birth. The family clearly showed linkage to chromosome 12q13.13-12q14.3, which excluded the KRT85 gene. Sequencing of another candidate gene HOXC13 within the linkage interval identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.355delC; p.Leu119Trpfs*20). Expression studies in cultured cells revealed that the mutant HOXC13 protein mislocalized within the cytoplasm, and failed to upregulate the promoter activities of its target genes. Our results strongly suggest crucial roles of the HOXC13 gene in the development of hair and nails in humans. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Identification of a homozygous PSTPIP1 mutation in a patient with a PAPA-like syndrome responding to canakinumab treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geusau, Alexandra; Mothes-Luksch, Nadine; Nahavandi, Hesam; Pickl, Winfried F; Wise, Carol A; Pourpak, Zahra; Ponweiser, Elisabeth; Eckhart, Leopold; Sunder-Plassmann, Raute

    2013-02-01

    Pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome (OMIM 604416) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by pyogenic sterile arthritis and less frequently accompanied by pyoderma gangrenosum and acne. It is associated with dominant missense mutations in the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 gene (PSTPIP1) located on chromosome 15. The patient was diagnosed as having features of a PAPA-like syndrome in which cutaneous manifestations, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and acne fulminans, predominated. Sequencing of the PSTPIP1 gene was performed in the patient and his extended family. The patient's DNA analysis revealed a homozygous nucleotide exchange c.773G>C in the PSTPIP1 gene, leading to the substitution of glycine 258 by alanine (p.Gly258Ala), a previously reported heterozygous polymorphism. Heterozygous changes were identified in both of the patient's parents and in 7 other family members, all of whom were asymptomatic. The patient was treated with canakinumab, a human anti-interleukin 1β monoclonal antibody, which led to rapid remission of the symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the resolution of dermatological symptoms associated with a PAPA-like syndrome using canakinumab treatment. Further study of the p.Gly258Ala variant is warranted to determine whether this mutation has a role in causing an apparently recessive cutaneous syndrome resembling PAPA syndrome.

  9. High proportion of genetic cases in patients with advanced cardiomyopathy including a novel homozygous Plakophilin 2-gene mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerbel Klauke

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies might lead to end-stage heart disease with the requirement of drastic treatments like bridging up to transplant or heart transplantation. A not precisely known proportion of these diseases are genetically determined. We genotyped 43 index-patients (30 DCM, 10 ARVC, 3 RCM with advanced or end stage cardiomyopathy using a gene panel which covered 46 known cardiomyopathy disease genes. Fifty-three variants with possible impact on disease in 33 patients were identified. Of these 27 (51% were classified as likely pathogenic or pathogenic in the MYH7, MYL2, MYL3, NEXN, TNNC1, TNNI3, DES, LMNA, PKP2, PLN, RBM20, TTN, and CRYAB genes. Fifty-six percent (n = 24 of index-patients carried a likely pathogenic or pathogenic mutation. Of these 75% (n = 18 were familial and 25% (n = 6 sporadic cases. However, severe cardiomyopathy seemed to be not characterized by a specific mutation profile. Remarkably, we identified a novel homozygous PKP2-missense variant in a large consanguineous family with sudden death in early childhood and several members with heart transplantation in adolescent age.

  10. Sensory ataxic neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoparesis (SANDO) in a sibling pair with a homozygous p.A467T POLG mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, John C

    2012-02-01

    Two siblings who developed fifth-decade-onset, concurrent progressive sensory ataxia, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis were found to be homozygous for the p.A467T mutation of the polymerase gamma (POLG) gene. The clinical course in both subjects was progression to severe disability. The enlarging spectrum of sensory ataxic neuropathies associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability and POLG mutations should be recognized and considered in the differential diagnosis of this unusual presentation.

  11. Identification of a novel homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, in a Tibetan family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dongyan; Zhu, Wei; Li, Dejun; Ji, De; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Different ethnic groups have distinct mutation spectrums associated with inheritable deafness. In order to identify the mutations responsible for congenital hearing loss in the Tibetan population, mutation screening for 98 deafness-related genes by microarray and massively parallel sequencing of captured target exons was conducted in one Tibetan family with familiar hearing loss. A homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, was identified in two affected brothers. Both parents are heterozygotes and an unaffected sister carries wild type alleles. The same mutation was not detected in 101 control Tibetan individuals. This missense mutation results in an amino acid change (p.Ala179Thr) at a highly conserved site in the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domain of the TMPRSS3 protein, which is essential for protein-protein interactions. Thus, this mutation likely affects the interactions of this transmembrane protein with extracellular molecules. According to our bioinformatic analyses, the TMPRSS3: c.535G>A mutation might damage protein function and lead to hearing loss. These data suggest that the homozygous mutation TMPRSS3: c.535G>A causes prelingual hearing loss in this Tibetan family. This is the first TMPRSS3 mutation found in the Chinese Tibetan population.

  12. Identification of a novel homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, in a Tibetan family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Fan

    Full Text Available Different ethnic groups have distinct mutation spectrums associated with inheritable deafness. In order to identify the mutations responsible for congenital hearing loss in the Tibetan population, mutation screening for 98 deafness-related genes by microarray and massively parallel sequencing of captured target exons was conducted in one Tibetan family with familiar hearing loss. A homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, was identified in two affected brothers. Both parents are heterozygotes and an unaffected sister carries wild type alleles. The same mutation was not detected in 101 control Tibetan individuals. This missense mutation results in an amino acid change (p.Ala179Thr at a highly conserved site in the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR domain of the TMPRSS3 protein, which is essential for protein-protein interactions. Thus, this mutation likely affects the interactions of this transmembrane protein with extracellular molecules. According to our bioinformatic analyses, the TMPRSS3: c.535G>A mutation might damage protein function and lead to hearing loss. These data suggest that the homozygous mutation TMPRSS3: c.535G>A causes prelingual hearing loss in this Tibetan family. This is the first TMPRSS3 mutation found in the Chinese Tibetan population.

  13. Identification of a novel WFS1 homozygous nonsense mutation in Jordanian children with Wolfram syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Khaldon Bodoor; Osama Batiha; Ayman Abu-Awad; Khaldon Al-Sarihin; Haya Ziad; Yousef Jarun; Aya Abu-sheikha; Sara Abu Jalboush; Khoulod S. Alibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presentation of early onset type I diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy with later onset diabetes insipidus and deafness. WFS1 gene was identified on chromosome 4p16.1 as the gene responsible for WS disease given that most of the WS patients were found to carry mutations in this gene. This study was carried out to investigate the molecular spectrum of WFS1 gene in Jordanian families. Molecular a...

  14. Hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia and severe glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency in an Indian patient homozygous for the L487F mutation in the human GPI gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warang, Prashant; Kedar, Prabhakar; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Colah, Roshan B

    2012-08-01

    Homozygous glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is one of the most important erythroenzymopathies causing hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia (HNSHA). We report an Indian patient with HNSHA showing 85 % reduction in GPI activity resulting from a homozygous missense replacement g.1459C > T in exon 16, leading to a substitution of the protein residue L487F mutation. This mutation has been detected previously in a compound heterozygous state along with another mutation in a GPI deficient patient elsewhere. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HNSHA associated with GPI deficiency with the homozygous L487F mutation, as well as the first report from India of GPI deficiency. Molecular modeling using the human crystal structure of GPI as a model was performed to determine how this mutation could affect enzyme structure and function. The enzyme is present in a dimeric form necessary for normal activity; the L487F mutation causes a loss of the ability of GPI to dimerize, which decreases the thermostability of the enzyme and results in significant changes in erythrocyte metabolism.

  15. Recurrent Intrauterine Fetal Loss due to Near Absence of HERG: Clinical and Functional Characterization of a Homozygous Non-sense HERG mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Momenah, Tarek S.; Gong, Qiuming; Amin, A. S.; Al Ghamdi, Saleh; Carvalho, Julene S.; Homfray, Tessa; Mannens, Marcel M.A.M.; Zhou, Zhengfeng; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Inherited arrhythmias may underlie intrauterine and neonatal arrhythmias. Resolving the molecular genetic nature of these rare cases provides significant insight into the role of the affected proteins in arrhythmogenesis and (extra-) cardiac development. OBJECTIVES We have performed clinical, molecular and functional investigation in a consanguineous Arabian family with repeated early miscarriages and two intrauterine fetal losses in the early part of the 3rd trimester of pregnancy due to persistent arrhythmias. METHODS In-depth clinical investigation was performed in two siblings, both developed severe arrhythmia during the 2nd trimester of pregnancy. Homozygosity mapping with microsatellite repeat polymorphic markers encompassing various cardiac ion channel genes linked to electrical instability of the heart was performed. Screening of the candidate gene in the homozygous locus was done. Biochemical and Electrophysiology analysis was performed to elucidate the function of the mutated gene. RESULTS Screening of the HERG gene in the homozygous locus detected a homozygous non-sense mutation Q1070X in the HERG C-terminus in the affected children. Biochemical and functional analysis of the Q1070X mutant showed that the mutant HERG though have the properties to traffick to the plasma membrane and could form functional channels, are destroyed by the Non-sense Mediated Decay (NMD) pathway before its translation. NMD leads to near absence of HERG in the homozygous Q1070X mutation carriers causing debilitating arrhythmias (already prior to birth) in the homozygous carriers and apparently without any phenotype in the heterozygous carriers. CONCLUSIONS Homozygous HERG Q1070X is equivalent to a near functional knockout of HERG and clinical consequences appear early, originating at the early stages of embryonic life. HERG Q1070X is rendered functionless by the NMD pathway before it could form a functional ion channel. PMID:18362022

  16. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araten, David J.; Krejci, Ondrej; DiTata, Kimberly; Wunderlich, Mark; Sanders, Katie J.; Zamechek, Leah; Mulloy, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10 −7 per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10 −7 (range ∼3.6–23 × 10 −7 ) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis

  17. Type 1 rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata with a homozygous PEX7 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratoğlu Şahin, Nursel; Bilici, Meliha Esra; Kurnaz, Erdal; Pala Akdoğan, Melek; Ceylaner, Serdar; Aycan, Zehra

    2017-08-28

    Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) is a rare peroxisomal disease characterised by punctate calcifications of non-ossified cartilage epiphyseal centres. The main biochemical marker of all RCDP types is a decrease in the levels of plasmalogens. Additionally, the accumulation of phytanic acid can be used as a differential marker between types of RDCP. Due to the biochemical overlap between types 1 and 5 RCDP, a genetic analysis of these genes should be performed in patients to identify the type. A 2-month-19-day-old male child presented with symptoms of limited movement and discomfort with movement in the extremities. His sister, who had similar clinical findings, was diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot and died at 6 months of age. A physical examination revealed an atypical facial appearance, bilateral cataracts, sensitivity to touch in the extremities, shortness in the proximal segments of the long bones, limited movement in both knees and elbows and axial hypotonicity. Laboratory analyses revealed normal ammonia, lactate, plasma and urine amino acids, long chain fatty acids and phytanic acid levels. Rhizomelia, significant metaphyseal expansion, irregularities in the cortex, loss of ossification, fragmented appearance and punctate calcifications in both elbows, both knees and in the femoral epiphysis were seen on the skeletal survey. A homozygote p.L70W (c.209T>G) mutation was found in the PEX7 gene. Plasma phytanic acid levels can be normal in a patient with type 1 RCDP that develops as a result of a PEX7 gene mutation, as in our case. A molecular genetic analysis and/or fibroblast culture must be conducted in clinically suspicious cases. While no cardiac pathology was found in our case, tetralogy of Fallot was present in his sister with similar clinical findings. The presence of different cardiological phenotypes in the sibling suggested that the genotype-phenotype correlation may not be complete in this disorder.

  18. Normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to a novel homozygous nonsense c.C969A (p.Y323X) mutation in the KISS1R gene in three unrelated families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbilek, Huseyin; Ozbek, M Nuri; Demir, Korcan; Kotan, L Damla; Cesur, Yasar; Dogan, Murat; Temiz, Fatih; Mengen, Eda; Gurbuz, Fatih; Yuksel, Bilgin; Topaloglu, A Kemal

    2015-03-01

    The spectrum of genetic alterations in cases of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism continue to expand. However, KISS1R mutations remain rare. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular basis of normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Clinical characteristics, hormonal studies and genetic analyses of seven cases with idiopathic normosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH) from three unrelated consanguineous families are presented. One male presented with absence of pubertal onset and required surgery for severe penoscrotal hypospadias and cryptorchidism, while other two males had absence of pubertal onset. Two of four female cases required replacement therapy for pubertal onset and maintenance, whereas the other two had spontaneous pubertal onset but incomplete maturation. In sequence analysis, we identified a novel homozygous nonsense (p.Y323X) mutation (c.C969A) in the last exon of the KISS1R gene in all clinically affected cases. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in the KISS1R gene in three unrelated families with nIHH, which enabled us to observe the phenotypic consequences of this rare condition. Escape from nonsense-mediated decay, and thus production of abnormal proteins, may account for the variable severity of the phenotype. Although KISS1R mutations are extremely rare and can cause a heterogeneous phenotype, analysis of the KISS1R gene should be a part of genetic analysis of patients with nIHH, to allow better understanding of phenotype-genotype relationship of KISS1R mutations and the underlying genetic basis of patients with nIHH. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Phenotypic Variation in Patients with Homozygous c.1678G>T Mutation in EVC Gene: Report of Two Mexican Families with Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Ramirez, Marisol; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Lugo-Trampe, Jose; Martínez-Garza, Laura E; Martinez-Glez, Víctor; Valencia-Benitez, María; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ruiz-Peréz, Víctor

    2017-12-12

    BACKGROUND Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is an autosomal recessive chondro-ectodermal dysplasia characterized by disproportionate short stature, limb shortening, narrow chest, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. In addition, 60% of cases present congenital heart defects. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is predominantly caused by mutations in the EVC or EVC2 (4p16) genes, with only a few cases caused by mutations in WDR35.  CASE REPORT Here, we report on two Mexican families with patients diagnosed with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Family 1 includes four patients: three females of 15, 18, and 23 years of age and a 7-year old male. Family 2 has only one affected newborn male. All patients exhibited multiple features including hypodontia, dysplastic teeth, extra frenula, mild short stature, distal limb shortening, postaxial polydactyly of hands and feet, nail dystrophy, and knee joint abnormalities. Only two patients had an atrial septal defect. In all cases, molecular analysis by Sanger sequencing identified the same homozygous mutation in exon 12 of EVC, c.1678G>T, which leads to a premature stop codon.  CONCLUSIONS The mutation c.1678G>T has been previously reported in another Mexican patient and it appears to be a recurrent mutation in Mexico which could represent a founder mutation. The large number of patients in this case allows the clinical variability and spectrum of manifestations present in individuals with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome even if they carry the same homozygous mutation in a same family.

  20. EFFECT OF THE ANTIMUTAGENS VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON THE SPONTANEOUS MUTATION SPECTRA OF SALMONELLA TA104

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effect of the Antimutagens Vanillin and Cinnamaldehyde on the / Spontaneous Mutation Spectra of Salmonella TAlO4 Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutagens that, when added to assay plates, reduced the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella typhi...

  1. Mutation rate and spectrum of spontaneous mutations of deinococcus radiodurans under rifampin stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Xiaoting; Wang Chao; Huang Lifen

    2010-01-01

    An rpoB/Rif r mutation analysis system has been developed from D. radiodurans based on the conservation of rpoB gene. To investigate the concentration effect of rifampin on the spontaneous mutation rate and spectrum of D. radiodurans, the mutation frequencies and rates of D. radiodurans were measured under a wide concentration range of 5∼50 μg /ml of rifampin. It was found that the mutation rate of the bacterium in 5μg /ml of rifampin was significantly higher than those in 25 and 50μg /ml rifampin. Rifampin had concentration-dependent effect not only on the mutation rate but also on the mutation spectrum. The different mutation spectrum under different concentration of rifampin suggested that D. radiodurans might change its anti-mutant strategy under reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress caused by low concentration of rifampin. It is speculated that D. radiodurans focuses on preventing base substitution mutation under low concentration of rifampin as ROS induces mainly oxidative base damage. (authors)

  2. The three faces of riboviral spontaneous mutation: spectrum, mode of genome replication, and mutation rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libertad García-Villada

    Full Text Available Riboviruses (RNA viruses without DNA replication intermediates are the most abundant pathogens infecting animals and plants. Only a few riboviral infections can be controlled with antiviral drugs, mainly because of the rapid appearance of resistance mutations. Little reliable information is available concerning i kinds and relative frequencies of mutations (the mutational spectrum, ii mode of genome replication and mutation accumulation, and iii rates of spontaneous mutation. To illuminate these issues, we developed a model in vivo system based on phage Qß infecting its natural host, Escherichia coli. The Qß RT gene encoding the Read-Through protein was used as a mutation reporter. To reduce uncertainties in mutation frequencies due to selection, the experimental Qß populations were established after a single cycle of infection and selection against RT(- mutants during phage growth was ameliorated by plasmid-based RT complementation in trans. The dynamics of Qß genome replication were confirmed to reflect the linear process of iterative copying (the stamping-machine mode. A total of 32 RT mutants were detected among 7,517 Qß isolates. Sequencing analysis of 45 RT mutations revealed a spectrum dominated by 39 transitions, plus 4 transversions and 2 indels. A clear template•primer mismatch bias was observed: A•C>C•A>U•G>G•U> transversion mismatches. The average mutation rate per base replication was ≈9.1×10(-6 for base substitutions and ≈2.3×10(-7 for indels. The estimated mutation rate per genome replication, μ(g, was ≈0.04 (or, per phage generation, ≈0.08, although secondary RT mutations arose during the growth of some RT mutants at a rate about 7-fold higher, signaling the possible impact of transitory bouts of hypermutation. These results are contrasted with those previously reported for other riboviruses to depict the current state of the art in riboviral mutagenesis.

  3. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of a 12.5 Mb Homozygous Region Reveals ANO10 Mutations in Patients with Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Sascha; Hoischen, Alexander; Meijer, Rowdy P.P.; Gilissen, Christian; Neveling, Kornelia; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Brouwer, Arjan; Koenig, Michel; Anheim, Mathieu; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Todorovic, Slobodanka; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Lochmüller, Hanns; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril; David, Albert; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Kremer, Berry; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.C.; Schijvenaars, Mascha M.V.A.P.; Heister, Angelien; Kwint, Michael; Arts, Peer; van der Wijst, Jenny; Veltman, Joris; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Knoers, Nine

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations provide incomplete coverage for genotyping of patients. By combining SNP array-based linkage analysis and targeted resequencing of relevant sequences in the linkage interval with the use of next-generation sequencing technology, we identified a mutation in a gene and have shown its association with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia. In a Dutch consanguineous family with three affected siblings a homozygous 12.5 Mb region on chromosome 3 was targeted by array-based sequence capture. Prioritization of all detected sequence variants led to four candidate genes, one of which contained a variant with a high base pair conservation score (phyloP score: 5.26). This variant was a leucine-to-arginine substitution in the DUF 590 domain of a 16K transmembrane protein, a putative calcium-activated chloride channel encoded by anoctamin 10 (ANO10). The analysis of ANO10 by Sanger sequencing revealed three additional mutations: a homozygous mutation (c.1150_1151del [p.Leu384fs]) in a Serbian family and a compound-heterozygous splice-site mutation (c.1476+1G>T) and a frameshift mutation (c.1604del [p.Leu535X]) in a French family. This illustrates the power of using initial homozygosity mapping with next-generation sequencing technology to identify genes involved in autosomal-recessive diseases. Moreover, identifying a putative calcium-dependent chloride channel involved in cerebellar ataxia adds another pathway to the list of pathophysiological mechanisms that may cause cerebellar ataxia. PMID:21092923

  4. Adult siblings with homozygous G6PC3 mutations expand our understanding of the severe congenital neutropenia type 4 (SCN4 phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Bridget A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe congenital neutropenia type 4 (SCN4 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the third subunit of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC3. Its core features are congenital neutropenia and a prominent venous skin pattern, and affected individuals have variable birth defects. Oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4 is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in SLC45A2. Methods We report a sister and brother from Newfoundland, Canada with complex phenotypes. The sister was previously reported by Cullinane et al., 2011. We performed homozygosity mapping, next generation sequencing and conventional Sanger sequencing to identify mutations that cause the phenotype in this family. We have also summarized clinical data from 49 previously reported SCN4 cases with overlapping phenotypes and interpret the medical histories of these siblings in the context of the literature. Results The siblings’ phenotype is due in part to a homozygous mutation in G6PC3, [c.829C > T, p.Gln277X]. Their ages are 38 and 37 years respectively and they are the oldest SCN4 patients published to date. Both presented with congenital neutropenia and later developed Crohn disease. We suggest that the latter is a previously unrecognized SCN4 manifestation and that not all affected individuals have an intellectual disability. The sister also has a homozygous mutation in SLC45A2, which explains her severe oculocutaneous hypopigmentation. Her brother carried one SLC45A2 mutation and was diagnosed with “partial OCA” in childhood. Conclusions This family highlights that apparently novel syndromes can in fact be caused by two known autosomal recessive disorders.

  5. Influence of temperature on spontaneous and radiation-induced somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauman, C.H.; Schairer, L.A.; Sparrow, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    Three diploid clones of Tradescantia which are heterozygous or hemizygous for flower color, and which exhibit a 35-fold range in spontaneous mutation frequency, have been compared in their response to increased temperatures. The endpoint studied is the expression of pink and colorless mutations, which arise in stamen hair cells spontaneously and following exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens. Increased temperature (26.5 or 28 0 vs. 16 or 19 0 ) significantly increased the spontaneous pink mutation frequency in stamen hair cells of all three clones. Colorless mutations in clone 0106 were not increased significantly at the higher temperature. The influence of increased temperature on radiation-induced pink mutation frequency was examined in clone 02. Temperatures in the range of 16-28 0 did not influence the magnitude of mutation response after exposure to 100 rad of X-rays; however, the timing of the mutation response was altered both in time of onset and duration. (Auth.)

  6. Teaching the Fluctuation Test "In Silico" by Using Mutate: A Program to Distinguish between the Adaptive and Spontaneous Mutation Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Rodriguez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary…

  7. A case of early-onset obesity, hypocortisolism, and skin pigmentation problem due to a novel homozygous mutation in the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene in an Indian boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Ngar; Poon, Wing-Tat; Lee, Ching-Yin; Law, Chun-Yiu; Chan, Albert Yan-Wo

    2012-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is the polypeptide precursor of several biologically active melanocortin peptides that have important roles in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis, adrenal steroidogenesis, melanocyte stimulation, and immune modulation. Mutation of the POMC gene has been associated with adrenal insufficiency, early-onset obesity, and red hair pigmentation. We describe an Indian boy with secondary hypocortisolism, hyperphagia, early-onset obesity, and skin pigmentation problem. Genetics analysis revealed a novel homozygous mutation in the POMC gene (p.Arg86Term). The boy also had central hypothyroidism in addition to the secondary hypocortisolism. Genetics analysis for the POMC gene should be considered in patients with secondary hypocortisolism, early-onset obesity, and pigmentary problems.

  8. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor, a novel agent for the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients who are homozygous for the F580del CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulloch, Marilyn N; Hanna, Cameron; Giovane, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting up to 90,000 people worldwide. Approximately 73% of patients are homozygous for the F508del cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] mutation. Traditionally treatment has only included supportive care. Therefore, there is a need for safe and effective novel therapies targeting the underlying molecular defects seen with CF. Areas covered: In 2016, the Food and Drug Administration and the European Commission approved LUM/IVA (Orkambi), a CFTR modulator that includes both a CFTR corrector and potentiator, for CF patients homozygous for the F508del CFTR mutation. This article reviews the pharmacologic features, clinical efficacy, and safety of LUM/IVA and summarize the available pre-clinical and clinical data of LUM/IVA use. Expert commentary: LUM/IVA showed modest, but significant improvements from baseline in percent predicted FEV 1 (ppFEV 1 ) as well as a reduction in pulmonary exacerbations by 35% It was shown to be safe for short- and long-term use. Currently, LUM/IVA is the only oral agent in its class available and represents a milestone the development of therapies for the management of CF. Nonetheless, pharmacoeconomic data are necessary to justify its high cost before is use becomes standard of care.

  9. Spontaneous mutation rate in Chinese hamster cell clones differing in UV-sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuilova, E.S.; Bagrova, A.M.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.

    1983-01-01

    The spontaneous rate of appearance of mutations to 6-mercaptopurine (6 MP) resistence in the cells of CHR2 and CHs2 clones dofferent in sensitivity to lethal and matagenous effect of UV-rays, is investigated. Increased UV-sensitivity of CHs2 clone is caused by the violation of postreplicative DNA reparation. It is established that the purity of spontaneously occuring mutations in both clones turns out to be similar, i.e. (1.5-1.8)x10 -5 for the cell pergeneration. It is shown that the effect of postreplicative DNA reparation in the cells of chinese hamster is not connected with the increase of spontaneous mutation ability. The problem on the possible role of reparation in the mechanism of appearance of spontaneous and induced mutations in the cells of Chinese hamster with increased UV-sensitivity is discussed

  10. Recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces and bullous emphysema. A novel mutation causing Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Andrew; Coffey, Niamh; Tomiak, Eva; Voduc, Nha

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHDS) is a rare form of classically cystic lung disease that may present with spontaneous pneumothorax. The associated skin manifestations (fibrofolliculomas) are not always present. This article describes a case of spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to bullous emphysema in an otherwise healthy gentleman caused by a novel mutation in the folliculin (FLCN) gene.

  11. Posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa coexisting with sensory-autonomic neuropathy and leukemia due to the homozygous p.Pro221Ser FLVCR1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Ungelenk, Martin; Pareyson, Davide; Salsano, Ettore; Grammatico, Paola; Tolosano, Emanuela; Kurth, Ingo; Chiabrando, Deborah

    2017-10-01

    FLVCR1 encodes for a ubiquitous heme exporter, whose recessive mutations cause posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa (PCARP). Recently, FLVCR1 recessive mutations were also found in two sporadic children with hereditary sensory-autonomic neuropathy (HSAN). We report the unique case of a 33-year-old Italian woman with a combination of typical PCARP, sensory-autonomic neuropathy with sensory loss to all modalities and multiple autonomic dysfuctions, and acute lymphocytic leukemia. Molecular analysis demonstrated homozygosity for the previously identified FLVCR1 p.Pro221Ser variation. The same variation, in combination with a frameshift mutation, was previously identified in an Italian child with HSAN. Functional studies carried out on patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines showed decreased FLVCR1a transcript, increased reactive oxygen species, excessive intracellular heme accumulation, and increased number of Annexin V positive cells. This indicates that the homozygous p.Pro221Ser FLVCR1 variation compromises the ability of FLVCR1a to export heme leading to enhanced susceptibility to programmed cell death. Our study demonstrates the existence of a phenotypic continuum among the discrete disorders previously linked to FLVCR1 mutations, and suggests that the related alteration of heme metabolism may lead to the degeneration of specific neuronal cell populations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Microbial Disease Spectrum Linked to a Novel IL-12Rβ1 N-Terminal Signal Peptide Stop-Gain Homozygous Mutation with Paradoxical Receptor Cell-Surface Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvain de Souza, Thais; de Souza Campos Fernandes, Regina C.; Azevedo da Silva, Juliana; Gomes Alves Júnior, Vladimir; Gomes Coelho, Adelia; Souza Faria, Afonso C.; Moreira Salomão Simão, Nabia M.; Souto Filho, João T.; Deswarte, Caroline; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Torgerson, Dara; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Medina-Acosta, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Diseases (MSMD) exhibit variable vulnerability to infections by mycobacteria and other intramacrophagic bacteria (e.g., Salmonella and Klebsiella) and fungi (e.g., Histoplasma, Candida, Paracoccidioides, Coccidioides, and Cryptococcus). The hallmark of MSMD is the inherited impaired production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) or the lack of response to it. Mutations in the interleukin (IL)-12 receptor subunit beta 1 (IL12RB1) gene accounts for 38% of cases of MSMD. Most IL12RB1 pathogenic allele mutations, including ten known stop-gain variants, cause IL-12Rβ1 complete deficiency (immunodeficiency-30, IMD30) by knocking out receptor cell-surface expression. IL12RB1 loss-of-function genotypes impair both IL-12 and IL-23 responses. Here, we assess the health effects of a rare, novel IL12RB1 stop-gain homozygous genotype with paradoxical IL-12Rβ1 cell-surface expression. We appraise four MSMD children from three unrelated Brazilian kindreds by clinical consultation, medical records, and genetic and immunologic studies. The clinical spectrum narrowed down to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine-related suppurative adenitis in all patients with one death, and recrudescence in two, histoplasmosis, and recurrence in one patient, extraintestinal salmonellosis in one child, and cutaneous vasculitis in another. In three patients, we established the homozygous Trp7Ter predicted loss-of-function inherited genotype and inferred it from the heterozygote parents of the fourth case. The Trp7Ter mutation maps to the predicted IL-12Rβ1 N-terminal signal peptide sequence. BCG- or phytohemagglutinin-blasts from the three patients have reduced cell-surface expression of IL-12Rβ1 with impaired production of IFN-γ and IL-17A. Screening of 227 unrelated healthy subjects from the same geographic region revealed one heterozygous genotype (allele frequency 0.0022) vs. one in over 841,883 public genome/exomes. We also show that the

  13. Mutations in ASPH cause facial dysmorphism, lens dislocation, anterior-segment abnormalities, and spontaneous filtering blebs, or Traboulsi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha; Khan, Arif O; Mansour, Ahmad; Mohamed, Jawahir Y; Al-Assiri, Abdullah; Haddad, Randa; Jia, Xiaofei; Xiong, Yong; Mégarbané, André; Traboulsi, Elias I; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-05-01

    We have previously described a syndrome characterized by facial dysmorphism, lens dislocation, anterior-segment abnormalities, and spontaneous filtering blebs (FDLAB, or Traboulsi syndrome). In view of the consanguineous nature of the affected families and the likely autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern of this syndrome, we undertook autozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify ASPH as the disease locus, in which we identified two homozygous mutations. ASPH encodes aspartyl/asparaginyl β-hydroxylase (ASPH), which has been found to hydroxylate aspartic acid and asparagine residues on epidermal growth factor (EGF)-domain-containing proteins. The truncating and missense mutations we identified are predicted to severely impair the enzymatic function of ASPH, which suggests a possible link to other forms of ectopia lentis given that many of the genes implicated in this phenotype encode proteins that harbor EGF domains. Developmental analysis of Asph revealed an expression pattern consistent with the proposed link to the human syndrome. Indeed, Asph-knockout mice had a foreshortened snout, which corresponds to the facial abnormalities in individuals with Traboulsi syndrome. These data support a genetic basis for a syndromic form of ectopia lentis and the role of aspartyl hydroxylation in human development. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A homozygous FITM2 mutation causes a deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression and signs of ichthyosis and sensory neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Zazo Seco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A consanguineous family from Pakistan was ascertained to have a novel deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression, ichthyosis-like features and signs of sensory neuropathy. By applying a combined strategy of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in the presented family, a homozygous nonsense mutation, c.4G>T (p.Glu2*, in FITM2 was identified. FITM2 and its paralog FITM1 constitute an evolutionary conserved protein family involved in partitioning of triglycerides into cellular lipid droplets. Despite the role of FITM2 in neutral lipid storage and metabolism, no indications for lipodystrophy were observed in the affected individuals. In order to obtain independent evidence for the involvement of FITM2 in the human pathology, downregulation of the single Fitm ortholog, CG10671, in Drosophila melanogaster was pursued using RNA interference. Characteristics of the syndrome, including progressive locomotor impairment, hearing loss and disturbed sensory functions, were recapitulated in Drosophila, which supports the causative nature of the FITM2 mutation. Mutation-based genetic counseling can now be provided to the family and insight is obtained into the potential impact of genetic variation in FITM2.

  15. A homozygous FITM2 mutation causes a deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression and signs of ichthyosis and sensory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazo Seco, Celia; Castells-Nobau, Anna; Joo, Seol-Hee; Schraders, Margit; Foo, Jia Nee; van der Voet, Monique; Velan, S Sendhil; Nijhof, Bonnie; Oostrik, Jaap; de Vrieze, Erik; Katana, Radoslaw; Mansoor, Atika; Huynen, Martijn; Szklarczyk, Radek; Oti, Martin; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van Wijk, Erwin; Scheffer-de Gooyert, Jolanda M; Siddique, Saadat; Baets, Jonathan; de Jonghe, Peter; Kazmi, Syed Ali Raza; Sadananthan, Suresh Anand; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Göpfert, Martin C; Qamar, Raheel; Schenck, Annette; Kremer, Hannie; Siddiqi, Saima

    2017-02-01

    A consanguineous family from Pakistan was ascertained to have a novel deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression, ichthyosis-like features and signs of sensory neuropathy. By applying a combined strategy of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in the presented family, a homozygous nonsense mutation, c.4G>T (p.Glu2*), in FITM2 was identified. FITM2 and its paralog FITM1 constitute an evolutionary conserved protein family involved in partitioning of triglycerides into cellular lipid droplets. Despite the role of FITM2 in neutral lipid storage and metabolism, no indications for lipodystrophy were observed in the affected individuals. In order to obtain independent evidence for the involvement of FITM2 in the human pathology, downregulation of the single Fitm ortholog, CG10671, in Drosophila melanogaster was pursued using RNA interference. Characteristics of the syndrome, including progressive locomotor impairment, hearing loss and disturbed sensory functions, were recapitulated in Drosophila, which supports the causative nature of the FITM2 mutation. Mutation-based genetic counseling can now be provided to the family and insight is obtained into the potential impact of genetic variation in FITM2. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Homozygous mutation, p.Pro304His, in IDH3A, encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase subunit is associated with severe encephalopathy in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Eliyahu, Hila; Fraenkel, NItai D; Elmaliach, Ganit; Hausman-Kedem, Moran; Shaag, Avraham; Mandel, Dror; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders which generally carries a grave prognosis. Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous mutation, Pro-304-His in the IDH3A gene, in a patient suffering from infantile encephalopathy with peripheral and autonomic nervous system involvement. Mammalian isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 3 is a heterotetramer of 2alfa, 1beta, and 1gamma subunits, and IDH3A encodes the alfa subunit of the mitochondrial NAD + -dependent IDH. Here we show that in contrast to wild-type human IDH3A, the human IDH3A which harbor the p.Pro304His mutation does not complement the yeast Δidh1/Δidh2 growth defect on ethanol-acetate. We therefore propose that homozygosity for the p.Pro304His mutation is deleterious for mitochondrial NAD + -specific IDH3A activity in human. IDH3A now joins the list of TCA cycle-related proteins, which includes ACO2, DLD, SLC25A19, FH, and succinate dehydrogenase subunits, all associated with neurological disorders.

  17. Identification of a point mutation in growth factor repeat C of the low density lipoprotein-receptor gene in a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soutar, A.K.; Knight, B.L.; Patel, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The coding region of the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene from a patient (MM) with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) has been sequenced from six overlapping 500-base-pair amplified fragments of the cDNA from cultured skin fibroblasts. Two separate single nucleotide base changes from the normal sequence were detected. The first involved substitution of guanine for adenine in the third position of the codon for amino acid residue Cys-27 and did not affect the protein sequence. The second mutation was substitution of thymine for cytosine in the DNA for the codon for amino acid residue 664, changing the codon from CCG (proline) to CTG (leucine) and introducing a new site for the restriction enzyme PstI. MM is a true homozygote with two identical genes, and the mutation cosegregated with clinically diagnosed FH in his family in which first cousin marriages occurred frequently. LDL receptors in MM's skin fibroblasts bind less LDL than normal and with reduced affinity. Thus this naturally occurring single point mutation affects both intracellular transport of the protein and ligand binding and occurs in growth factor-like repeat C, a region that has not previously been found to influence LDL binding

  18. Next-generation sequencing unravels homozygous mutation in glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, GPIc.1040G>A (p.Arg347His) causing hemolysis in an Indian infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Manu; Aggarwal, Anu; Das, Anirban; Maitra, Arindam; Sharma, Prashant; Krishnan, Shekhar; Arora, Neeraj; Bansal, Deepak; Das, Reena

    2017-05-01

    Inherited anemias diagnostic workup requires a step-wise algorithm. Causal genes implicated in congenital hemolytic anemia are numerous, making a gene-by-gene approach by Sanger sequencing time consuming, expensive and labour intensive. Targeted resequencing can be of great use in explaining these cases. Six months female presented with neonatal jaundice and negative family history. Clinical and laboratory evidences were suggestive of hemolytic anemia. G6PD deficiency, thalassemias, hemoglobinopathies, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, hereditary spherocytosis and pyruvate kinase deficiency were excluded. Targeted resequencing on Illumina MiSeq using TruSight One sequencing panel was performed to identify the causative mutations. 35-40% of RBCs were acanthocytes and echinocytes. A missense homozygous mutation was found inglucose-6-phosphate isomerase, GPI [c.1040G>A (p.Arg347His), rs137853583] which results in nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. This study describes GPI p.Arg347His mutation for the first time from India and is the first report of red cell GPI deficiency diagnosed using NGS-based resequencing and highlights the potential of this technique in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. A homozygous FITM2 mutation causes a deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression and signs of ichthyosis and sensory neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazo Seco, Celia; Castells-Nobau, Anna; Joo, Seol-hee; Schraders, Margit; Foo, Jia Nee; van der Voet, Monique; Velan, S. Sendhil; Nijhof, Bonnie; Oostrik, Jaap; de Vrieze, Erik; Katana, Radoslaw; Mansoor, Atika; Huynen, Martijn; Szklarczyk, Radek; Oti, Martin; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van Wijk, Erwin; Scheffer-de Gooyert, Jolanda M.; Siddique, Saadat; Baets, Jonathan; de Jonghe, Peter; Sadananthan, Suresh Anand; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Göpfert, Martin C.; Qamar, Raheel; Schenck, Annette

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A consanguineous family from Pakistan was ascertained to have a novel deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression, ichthyosis-like features and signs of sensory neuropathy. By applying a combined strategy of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in the presented family, a homozygous nonsense mutation, c.4G>T (p.Glu2*), in FITM2 was identified. FITM2 and its paralog FITM1 constitute an evolutionary conserved protein family involved in partitioning of triglycerides into cellular lipid droplets. Despite the role of FITM2 in neutral lipid storage and metabolism, no indications for lipodystrophy were observed in the affected individuals. In order to obtain independent evidence for the involvement of FITM2 in the human pathology, downregulation of the single Fitm ortholog, CG10671, in Drosophila melanogaster was pursued using RNA interference. Characteristics of the syndrome, including progressive locomotor impairment, hearing loss and disturbed sensory functions, were recapitulated in Drosophila, which supports the causative nature of the FITM2 mutation. Mutation-based genetic counseling can now be provided to the family and insight is obtained into the potential impact of genetic variation in FITM2. PMID:28067622

  20. Forecasting the Long-Term Clinical and Economic Outcomes of Lumacaftor/Ivacaftor in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Homozygous phe508del Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Patidar, Mausam; Campbell, Jonathan D

    2017-12-01

    To forecast lifetime outcomes and cost of lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with homozygous phe508del mutation from the US payer perspective. A lifetime Markov model was developed from a US payer perspective. The model included five health states: 1) mild lung disease (percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV 1 ] >70%), 2) moderate lung disease (40% ≤ FEV 1 ≤ 70%), 3) severe lung disease (FEV 1 < 40%), 4) lung transplantation, and 5) death. All inputs were derived from published literature. We estimated lumacaftor/ivacaftor's improvement in outcomes compared with a non-CF referent population as well as CF-specific mortality estimates. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor was associated with additional 2.91 life-years (95% credible interval 2.55-3.56) and additional 2.42 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (95% credible interval 2.10-2.98). Lumacaftor/ivacaftor was associated with improvements in survival and QALYs equivalent to 27.6% and 20.7%, respectively, for the survival and QALY gaps between CF usual care and their non-CF peers. The incremental lifetime cost was $2,632,249. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor increased life-years and QALYs in CF patients with the homozygous phe508del mutation and moved morbidity and mortality closer to that of their non-CF peers but it came with higher cost. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An atypical case of familial glucocorticoid deficiency without pigmentation caused by coexistent homozygous mutations in MC2R (T152K) and MC1R (R160W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Serap; Hughes, Claire; Atay, Zeynep; Guran, Tulay; Haliloglu, Belma; Clark, Adrian J L; Bereket, Abdullah; Metherell, Louise A

    2012-05-01

    Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by isolated cortisol deficiency. Mutations in the gene encoding the ACTH receptor (MC2R) account for 25% of cases. One significant feature is generalized skin hyperpigmentation, which is thought to be due to elevated ACTH acting on the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R). The aim of the study was to determine the cause of a nonhyperpigmented case of FGD. The patient presented at 4 yr of age with hypoglycemia after prolonged fasting during a respiratory tract infection. She had further hypoglycemic attacks and was diagnosed with isolated glucocorticoid deficiency at 6 yr of age. Her parents were consanguineous, and she had two unaffected sisters. Her physical examination was normal, except that her height and weight were greater than the 97th centile for a sex- and age-matched reference population. Interestingly, she had no hyperpigmentation despite very high ACTH levels. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed homozygous mutations c.478C>T in MC1R and c.455C>A in MC2R leading to R160W and T152K changes in the amino acid sequences, respectively. The R160W MC1R change has previously been implicated in a red hair/pale skin phenotype, and MC2R -T152K is trafficking defective. Both parents and two unaffected sisters were heterozygous for the MC1R mutation; additionally, one unaffected sister was heterozygous for the MC2R mutation, and the other was wild-type. We report an unusual case of FGD without hyperpigmentation due to coexistent MC1R/MC2R mutations. This case is important because it demonstrates for the first time that the assumption that the action of ACTH on MC1R causes skin hyperpigmentation is correct.

  2. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Homozygous Mutations in RAI1, OTOF, and SLC26A4 Genes Associated with Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in Altaian Families (South Siberia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Y Сhurbanov

    Full Text Available Hearing loss (HL is one of the most common sensorineural disorders and several dozen genes contribute to its pathogenesis. Establishing a genetic diagnosis of HL is of great importance for clinical evaluation of deaf patients and for estimating recurrence risks for their families. Efforts to identify genes responsible for HL have been challenged by high genetic heterogeneity and different ethnic-specific prevalence of inherited deafness. Here we present the utility of whole exome sequencing (WES for identifying candidate causal variants for previously unexplained nonsyndromic HL of seven patients from four unrelated Altaian families (the Altai Republic, South Siberia. The WES analysis revealed homozygous missense mutations in three genes associated with HL. Mutation c.2168A>G (SLC26A4 was found in one family, a novel mutation c.1111G>C (OTOF was revealed in another family, and mutation c.5254G>A (RAI1 was found in two families. Sanger sequencing was applied for screening of identified variants in an ethnically diverse cohort of other patients with HL (n = 116 and in Altaian controls (n = 120. Identified variants were found only in patients of Altaian ethnicity (n = 93. Several lines of evidences support the association of homozygosity for discovered variants c.5254G>A (RAI1, c.1111C>G (OTOF, and c.2168A>G (SLC26A4 with HL in Altaian patients. Local prevalence of identified variants implies possible founder effect in significant number of HL cases in indigenous population of the Altai region. Notably, this is the first reported instance of patients with RAI1 missense mutation whose HL is not accompanied by specific traits typical for Smith-Magenis syndrome. Presumed association of RAI1 gene variant c.5254G>A with isolated HL needs to be proved by further experimental studies.

  3. A Homozygous [Cys25]PTH(1-84) Mutation That Impairs PTH/PTHrP Receptor Activation Defines a Novel Form of Hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sihoon; Mannstadt, Michael; Guo, Jun; Kim, Seul Min; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Khatri, Ashok; Dean, Thomas; Okazaki, Makoto; Gardella, Thomas J; Jüppner, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia are encountered in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IHP) and pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B). In contrast to PHP1B, which is caused by resistance toward parathyroid hormone (PTH), the genetic defects leading to IHP impair production of this important regulator of mineral ion homeostasis. So far, only five PTH mutations were shown to cause IHP, each of which is located in the hormone's pre-pro leader segment and thus impair hormone secretion. In three siblings affected by IHP, we now identified a homozygous arginine-to-cysteine mutation at position 25 (R25C) of the mature PTH(1-84) polypeptide; heterozygous family members are healthy. Depending on the assay used for evaluating these patients, plasma PTH levels were either low or profoundly elevated, thus leading to ambiguities regarding the underlying diagnosis, namely IHP or PHP1B. Consistent with increased PTH levels, recombinant [Cys25]PTH(1-84) and wild-type PTH(1-84) were secreted equally well by transfected COS-7 cells. However, synthetic [Cys25]PTH(1-34) was found to have a lower binding affinity for the PTH receptor type-1 (PTH1R) than PTH(1-34) and consequently a lower efficiency for stimulating cAMP formation in cells expressing this receptor. Consistent with these in vitro findings, long-term infusion of [Cys25]PTH(1-34) resulted only in minimal calcemic and phosphaturic responses, despite readily detectable levels of [Cys25]PTH(1-34) in plasma. The mineral ion abnormalities observed in the three IHP patients are thus most likely caused by the inherited homozygous missense PTH mutation, which reduces bioactivity of the secreted hormone. Based on these findings, screening for PTH(1-84) mutations should be considered when clinical and laboratory findings are consistent with PHP1B, but GNAS methylation changes have been excluded. Differentiating between IHP and PHP1B has considerable implications for genetic counseling, therapy, and long-term outcome because

  4. Renal transplantation experience in a patient with factor V Leiden homozygous, MTHFR C677T heterozygous, and PAI heterozygous mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülhan, Bora; Tavil, Betül; Gümrük, Fatma; Aki, Tuncay F; Topaloglu, Rezan

    2015-08-01

    Vascular complications are important causes of allograft loss in renal transplantation. A two and a half-month-old boy was diagnosed with posterior urethral valve and progressed to end-stage renal disease at eight yr of age. During the HD period, a central venous catheter was replaced three times for repeated thrombosis. The boy was found to be homozygous for FVL and heterozygous for both MTHFR (C677T) and PAI. At the age of 12, renal transplantation was performed from a deceased donor. Postoperative anticoagulation therapy was initiated with continuous intravenous administration of heparin at the dose of 10 IU/kg/h. HD was performed for the first three days. By the fourth day of transplantation, his urine output had increased gradually. Heparin infusion was continued for 18 days during hospitalization at the same dosage. Thereafter, he was discharged with LMWH. On the third month after transplantation, his serum creatinine level was 1.1 mg/dL and eGFR was 75.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2). He has still been using LMWH, and his eGFR was 78.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2) eight months after transplantation. Postoperative low-dose heparin treatment is a safe strategy for managing a patient with multiple thrombotic risk factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Mitochondrial Mutation Rate, Spectrum and Heteroplasmy in Caenorhabditis elegans Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation Lines of Differing Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Anke; Thompson, Owen; Waterston, Robert H; Moerman, Donald G; Keightley, Peter D; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Katju, Vaishali

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of metazoans, given their elevated rates of evolution, have served as pivotal markers for phylogeographic studies and recent phylogenetic events. In order to determine the dynamics of spontaneous mitochondrial mutations in small populations in the absence and presence of selection, we evolved mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Caenorhabditis elegans in parallel over 409 consecutive generations at three varying population sizes of N = 1, 10, and 100 hermaphrodites. The N =1 populations should have a minimal influence of natural selection to provide the spontaneous mutation rate and the expected rate of neutral evolution, whereas larger population sizes should experience increasing intensity of selection. New mutations were identified by Illumina paired-end sequencing of 86 mtDNA genomes across 35 experimental lines and compared with published genomes of natural isolates. The spontaneous mitochondrial mutation rate was estimated at 1.05 × 10-7/site/generation. A strong G/C→A/T mutational bias was observed in both the MA lines and the natural isolates. This suggests that the low G + C content at synonymous sites is the product of mutation bias rather than selection as previously proposed. The mitochondrial effective population size per worm generation was estimated to be 62. Although it was previously concluded that heteroplasmy was rare in C. elegans, the vast majority of mutations in this study were heteroplasmic despite an experimental regime exceeding 400 generations. The frequencies of frameshift and nonsynonymous mutations were negatively correlated with population size, which suggests their deleterious effects on fitness and a potent role for selection in their eradication. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Whole-exome sequencing identifies homozygous AFG3L2 mutations in a spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome linked to mitochondrial m-AAA proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Mark Pierson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28, a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2(Y616C gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2(Y616C complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other "mitochondrial" features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias.

  7. Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism caused by homozygous mutation in CASR: A rare cause of life-threatening hypercalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Heidi; Patrick, Jessica; Báez-Irizarry, Eileen; Lacassie, Yves; Gómez, Ricardo; Vargas, Alfonso; Barkemeyer, Brian; Kanotra, Sohit; Zambrano, Regina M

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) is a rare, life-threatening condition that presents with severe hypercalcemia, hyperparathyroidism, and osteopenia in the newborn period. Treatment of NSHPT traditionally includes hydration and bisphosphonates; however newer calcimimetic agents, such as cinacalcet, are now being utilized to prevent or delay parathyroidectomy which is technically difficult in the newborn. Medical treatment success is related to calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) genotype. We report a 4-day-old infant who presented with hyperbilirubinemia, poor feeding, weight loss, severe hypotonia and was ultimately diagnosed with NSHPT. The patient's total serum calcium level of 36.8 mg/dL (reference range: 8.5-10.4 mg/dL) is, to our knowledge, the highest ever documented in this setting. Exome data previously obtained on the infant's parents was re-analyzed demonstrating bi-parental heterozygosity for a mutation of the CASR gene: c.206G > A, and Sanger sequencing data confirmed the patient was a homozygote for the same mutation. Though a patient with the same CaSR gene mutation described here has responded to cinacalcet, our patient did not respond and required parathyroidectomy. Though this case has previously been published as a surgical case report, a full report of the medical management and underlying genetic etiology is warranted; this case underscores the importance of disclosing bi-parental heterozygosity for a gene causing severe neonatal disease particularly when treatment is available and illustrates the need for further in vitro studies of this CaSR mutation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A Spontaneous Mutation in Contactin 1 in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Davisson, Muriel T.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Tadenev, Abigail L. D.; Motley, William W.; Krishnaswamy, Arjun; Seburn, Kevin L.; Burgess, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the immunoglobulin-superfamily member cell adhesion molecule contactin1 (CNTN1) cause lethal congenital myopathy in human patients and neurodevelopmental phenotypes in knockout mice. Whether the mutant mice provide an accurate model of the human disease is unclear; resolving this will require additional functional tests of the neuromuscular system and examination of Cntn1 mutations on different genetic backgrounds that may influence the phenotype. Toward these e...

  9. Identification of homozygous WFS1 mutations (p.Asp211Asn, p.Gln486*) causing severe Wolfram syndrome and first report of male fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Amirreza; Haghighi, Alireza; Setoodeh, Aria; Saleh-Gohari, Nasrollah; Astuti, Dewi; Barrett, Timothy G

    2013-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a neurodegenerative genetic condition characterized by juvenile-onset of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. We studied clinical features and the molecular basis of severe WFS (neurodegenerative complications) in two consanguineous families from Iran. A clinical and molecular genetic investigation was performed in the affected and healthy members of two families. The clinical diagnosis of WFS was confirmed by the existence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy in the affected patients, who in addition had severe neurodegenerative complications. Sequencing of WFS1 was undertaken in one affected member from each family. Targeted mutations were tested in all members of relevant families. Patients had most of the reported features of WFS. Two affected males in the first family had fathered unaffected children. We identified two homozygous mutations previously reported with apparently milder phenotypes: family 1: c.631G>A (p.Asp211Asn) in exon 5, and family 2: c.1456C>T (p.Gln486*) in exon 8. Heterozygous carriers were unaffected. This is the first report of male Wolfram patients who have successfully fathered children. Surprisingly, they also had almost all the complications associated with WFS. Our report has implications for genetic counseling and family planning advice for other affected families. PMID:22781099

  10. A novel homozygous p.R1105X mutation of the AP4E1 gene in twins with hereditary spastic paraplegia and mycobacterial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fei Kong

    Full Text Available We report identical twins with intellectual disability, progressive spastic paraplegia and short stature, born to a consanguineous family. Intriguingly, both children presented with lymphadenitis caused by the live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine. Two syndromes - hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP and mycobacterial disease - thus occurred simultaneously. Whole-exome sequencing (WES revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation (p.R1105X of the AP4E1 gene, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The p.R1105X mutation has no effect on AP4E1 mRNA levels, but results in lower levels of AP-4ε protein and of the other components of the AP-4 complex, as shown by western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. Thus, the C-terminal part of the AP-4ε subunit plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of the AP-4 complex. No abnormalities of the IL-12/IFN-γ axis or oxidative burst pathways were identified. In conclusion, we identified twins with autosomal recessive AP-4 deficiency associated with HSP and mycobacterial disease, suggesting that AP-4 may play important role in the neurological and immunological systems.

  11. Identification of homozygous WFS1 mutations (p.Asp211Asn, p.Gln486*) causing severe Wolfram syndrome and first report of male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Amirreza; Haghighi, Alireza; Setoodeh, Aria; Saleh-Gohari, Nasrollah; Astuti, Dewi; Barrett, Timothy G

    2013-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a neurodegenerative genetic condition characterized by juvenile-onset of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. We studied clinical features and the molecular basis of severe WFS (neurodegenerative complications) in two consanguineous families from Iran. A clinical and molecular genetic investigation was performed in the affected and healthy members of two families. The clinical diagnosis of WFS was confirmed by the existence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy in the affected patients, who in addition had severe neurodegenerative complications. Sequencing of WFS1 was undertaken in one affected member from each family. Targeted mutations were tested in all members of relevant families. Patients had most of the reported features of WFS. Two affected males in the first family had fathered unaffected children. We identified two homozygous mutations previously reported with apparently milder phenotypes: family 1: c.631G>A (p.Asp211Asn) in exon 5, and family 2: c.1456C>T (p.Gln486*) in exon 8. Heterozygous carriers were unaffected. This is the first report of male Wolfram patients who have successfully fathered children. Surprisingly, they also had almost all the complications associated with WFS. Our report has implications for genetic counseling and family planning advice for other affected families.

  12. Is there a proportionality between the spontaneous and the X-ray-induction rates of mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.T.; Sankaranarayanan, K.; Sobels, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray induction of recessive visible specific locus mutations at 14 X-chromosome loci was studied in Drosophila melanogaster using the 'Maxy' technique. The X-ray exposure was 3000 R to 5 day-old males and the sampling of germ cells was restricted to mature spermatozoa. Presumptive mutant females recovered in the F 1 generation were tested for transmission, allelism, fertility and viability in males. A total of 128 mutations (115 completes and 13 mosaics including those that were male-viable as well as male-lethal) recovered among 38 898 female progeny were found to be transmitted. On the basis of the above frequency, the average mutation rate can be estimated as 7.8 X 10 -8 /locus/R; for mutations that were viable and fertile in males, the rate is 3.0 X 10 -8 /locus/R(49 mutations among 38 898 progeny). The frequency of mutations at the different loci encompassed a wide range: while no mutations were recovered at the raspberry and carnation loci, at others, the numbers ranged from 1 at echinus to 31 at garnet; in addition, the proportion of mutations that was male-viable was also different, depending on the locus. Schalet's extensive data on spontaneous mutations at 13 (of the 14 loci employed in the present study) loci permit an estimate of the spontaneous rate which is 6.1 X 10 -6 /locus (a total of 39 mutations among 490 000 progeny); for mutations that were viable and fertile in males, the rate is 3.0 X 10 -6 /locus (19 mutations among 490 000 progeny). The mutability of the different loci varied over a 9-fold range. (Auth.)

  13. How variable is a spontaneous mutation rate in cultured mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesen, Jan J.B.; Niericker, Matthieu J.; Dieteren, Nicole; Simons, Jo W.I.M. (MGC-Dept. of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis, State Univ. of Leiden (Netherlands))

    1994-05-01

    The Luria-Delbrueck fluctuation analysis provides a method to estimate mutation rates and is commonly applied in somatic cell genetics and in cancer biology. We developed an assay for a Luria-Delbrueck fluctuation analysis using the mouse lymphoma cell line, GRSL13. As these cells grow in suspension, one can handle hundreds of parallel cultures using multiwell dishes and dispensers. This assay thereby allows not only an accurate determination of the mutation rate per cell generation but also makes it possible to determine at which time after seeding mutations take place. Using approx. 8000 parallel cultures it has been possible to test whether the mutation rate is constant during the assay. It has been found that the spontaneous mutation rate of GRSL13 cells decreases in the course of a fluctuation test from 2x10[sup -6] to about 2x10[sup -7]/cell/generation. It was shown that this increased replication fidelity may partly be caused by cell density: maintenance of cells at high cell density resulted in a spontaneous mutation rate of 0.7[+-]4.0x10[sup -7] compared to 4.0[+-]3.1x10[sup -7] for the standard protocol. In contrast, growing the cells at extremely low cell density resulted in an enhanced mutation rate of 7.7[+-]1.3x10[sup -7]. Thus altogether the mutation rate can vary from 2x10[sup -6] to 0.7x10[sup -7] (approx. 30-fold). These results show that the spontaneous mutation rate is not constant, but highly dependent on experimental conditions. As incomplete expression and metabolic cooperation cannot explain the findings, the data suggest that the fidelity of DNA replication is not fixed but open to variation. Hence, determination of replication infidelity in cultured cells needs rigorous standardization or/and application of controlled variation in culture conditions.

  14. A deletion mutation in GDF9 in sisters with spontaneous DZ twins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montgomery, GW; Zhao, Z.Z.; Marsh, A.J.; Mayne, R.; Treloar, S.A.; James, M.; Martin, N.G.; Boomsma, D.I.; Duffy, DL

    2004-01-01

    A loss of function mutation in growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) in sheep causes increased ovulation rate and infertility in a dosage-sensitive manner. Spontaneous dizygotic (DZ) twinning in the human is under genetic control and women with a history of DZ twinning have an increased incidence

  15. A spontaneous mutation characterized by chronic proliferative dermatitis in C57BL mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HogenEsch, H.; Gijbels, M. J.; Offerman, E.; van Hooft, J.; van Bekkum, D. W.; Zurcher, C.

    1993-01-01

    Chronic proliferative dermatitis is a new spontaneous mutation in C57BL/Ka mice. Breeding results suggest an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Mutant mice develop skin lesions at the age of 5 to 6 weeks. The lesions occur in the ventral and dorsal skin of the body, whereas ears, footpads, and

  16. Sexual selection on spontaneous mutations strengthens the between-sex genetic correlation for fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Scott L; McGuigan, Katrina; Connallon, Tim; Blows, Mark W; Chenoweth, Stephen F

    2017-10-01

    A proposed benefit to sexual selection is that it promotes purging of deleterious mutations from populations. For this benefit to be realized, sexual selection, which is usually stronger on males, must purge mutations deleterious to both sexes. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that sexual selection on males purges deleterious mutations that affect both male and female fitness. We measured male and female fitness in two panels of spontaneous mutation-accumulation lines of the fly, Drosophila serrata, each established from a common ancestor. One panel of mutation accumulation lines limited both natural and sexual selection (LS lines), whereas the other panel limited natural selection, but allowed sexual selection to operate (SS lines). Although mutation accumulation caused a significant reduction in male and female fitness in both the LS and SS lines, sexual selection had no detectable effect on the extent of the fitness reduction. Similarly, despite evidence of mutational variance for fitness in males and females of both treatments, sexual selection had no significant impact on the amount of mutational genetic variance for fitness. However, sexual selection did reshape the between-sex correlation for fitness: significantly strengthening it in the SS lines. After 25 generations, the between-sex correlation for fitness was positive but considerably less than one in the LS lines, suggesting that, although most mutations had sexually concordant fitness effects, sex-limited, and/or sex-biased mutations contributed substantially to the mutational variance. In the SS lines this correlation was strong and could not be distinguished from unity. Individual-based simulations that mimick the experimental setup reveal two conditions that may drive our results: (1) a modest-to-large fraction of mutations have sex-limited (or highly sex-biased) fitness effects, and (2) the average fitness effect of sex-limited mutations is larger than the average fitness effect of

  17. Spontaneous mutation rate is a plastic trait associated with population density across domains of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krašovec, Rok; Richards, Huw; Gifford, Danna R; Hatcher, Charlie; Faulkner, Katy J; Belavkin, Roman V; Channon, Alastair; Aston, Elizabeth; McBain, Andrew J; Knight, Christopher G

    2017-08-01

    Rates of random, spontaneous mutation can vary plastically, dependent upon the environment. Such plasticity affects evolutionary trajectories and may be adaptive. We recently identified an inverse plastic association between mutation rate and population density at 1 locus in 1 species of bacterium. It is unknown how widespread this association is, whether it varies among organisms, and what molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis or repair are required for this mutation-rate plasticity. Here, we address all 3 questions. We identify a strong negative association between mutation rate and population density across 70 years of published literature, comprising hundreds of mutation rates estimated using phenotypic markers of mutation (fluctuation tests) from all domains of life and viruses. We test this relationship experimentally, determining that there is indeed density-associated mutation-rate plasticity (DAMP) at multiple loci in both eukaryotes and bacteria, with up to 23-fold lower mutation rates at higher population densities. We find that the degree of plasticity varies, even among closely related organisms. Nonetheless, in each domain tested, DAMP requires proteins scavenging the mutagenic oxidised nucleotide 8-oxo-dGTP. This implies that phenotypic markers give a more precise view of mutation rate than previously believed: having accounted for other known factors affecting mutation rate, controlling for population density can reduce variation in mutation-rate estimates by 93%. Widespread DAMP, which we manipulate genetically in disparate organisms, also provides a novel trait to use in the fight against the evolution of antimicrobial resistance. Such a prevalent environmental association and conserved mechanism suggest that mutation has varied plastically with population density since the early origins of life.

  18. Spontaneous mutation rate is a plastic trait associated with population density across domains of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Krašovec

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rates of random, spontaneous mutation can vary plastically, dependent upon the environment. Such plasticity affects evolutionary trajectories and may be adaptive. We recently identified an inverse plastic association between mutation rate and population density at 1 locus in 1 species of bacterium. It is unknown how widespread this association is, whether it varies among organisms, and what molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis or repair are required for this mutation-rate plasticity. Here, we address all 3 questions. We identify a strong negative association between mutation rate and population density across 70 years of published literature, comprising hundreds of mutation rates estimated using phenotypic markers of mutation (fluctuation tests from all domains of life and viruses. We test this relationship experimentally, determining that there is indeed density-associated mutation-rate plasticity (DAMP at multiple loci in both eukaryotes and bacteria, with up to 23-fold lower mutation rates at higher population densities. We find that the degree of plasticity varies, even among closely related organisms. Nonetheless, in each domain tested, DAMP requires proteins scavenging the mutagenic oxidised nucleotide 8-oxo-dGTP. This implies that phenotypic markers give a more precise view of mutation rate than previously believed: having accounted for other known factors affecting mutation rate, controlling for population density can reduce variation in mutation-rate estimates by 93%. Widespread DAMP, which we manipulate genetically in disparate organisms, also provides a novel trait to use in the fight against the evolution of antimicrobial resistance. Such a prevalent environmental association and conserved mechanism suggest that mutation has varied plastically with population density since the early origins of life.

  19. Mutation Rates, Spectra, and Genome-Wide Distribution of Spontaneous Mutations in Mismatch Repair Deficient Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gregory I.; Parsons, Lance; Gammie, Alison E.

    2013-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a highly conserved DNA repair pathway. In humans, germline mutations in hMSH2 or hMLH1, key components of mismatch repair, have been associated with Lynch syndrome, a leading cause of inherited cancer mortality. Current estimates of the mutation rate and the mutational spectra in mismatch repair defective cells are primarily limited to a small number of individual reporter loci. Here we use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a genome-wide view of the rates, spectra, and distribution of mutation in the absence of mismatch repair. We performed mutation accumulation assays and next generation sequencing on 19 strains, including 16 msh2 missense variants implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. The mutation rate for DNA mismatch repair null strains was approximately 1 mutation per genome per generation, 225-fold greater than the wild-type rate. The mutations were distributed randomly throughout the genome, independent of replication timing. The mutation spectra included insertions/deletions at homopolymeric runs (87.7%) and at larger microsatellites (5.9%), as well as transitions (4.5%) and transversions (1.9%). Additionally, repeat regions with proximal repeats are more likely to be mutated. A bias toward deletions at homopolymers and insertions at (AT)n microsatellites suggests a different mechanism for mismatch generation at these sites. Interestingly, 5% of the single base pair substitutions might represent double-slippage events that occurred at the junction of immediately adjacent repeats, resulting in a shift in the repeat boundary. These data suggest a closer scrutiny of tumor suppressors with homopolymeric runs with proximal repeats as the potential drivers of oncogenesis in mismatch repair defective cells. PMID:23821616

  20. A Mutator Phenotype Promoting the Emergence of Spontaneous Oxidative Stress-Resistant Mutants in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Sahin, Orhan; Tang, Yizhi; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-12-15

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of foodborne illnesses worldwide. As a microaerophilic organism, C. jejuni must be able to defend against oxidative stress encountered both in the host and in the environment. How Campylobacter utilizes a mutation-based mechanism for adaptation to oxidative stress is still unknown. Here we present a previously undescribed phenotypic and genetic mechanism that promotes the emergence of oxidative stress-resistant mutants. Specifically, we showed that a naturally occurring mutator phenotype, resulting from a loss of function mutation in the DNA repair enzyme MutY, increased oxidative stress resistance (OX R ) in C. jejuni We further demonstrated that MutY malfunction did not directly contribute to the OX R phenotype but increased the spontaneous mutation rate in the peroxide regulator gene perR , which functions as a repressor for multiple genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Mutations in PerR resulted in loss of its DNA binding function and derepression of PerR-controlled oxidative stress defense genes, thereby conferring an OX R phenotype and facilitating Campylobacter survival under oxidative stress. These findings reveal a new mechanism that promotes the emergence of spontaneous OX R mutants in bacterial organisms. IMPORTANCE Although a mutator phenotype has been shown to promote antibiotic resistance in many bacterial species, little is known about its contribution to the emergence of OX R mutants. This work describes the link between a mutator phenotype and the enhanced emergence of OX R mutants as well as its underlying mechanism involving DNA repair and mutations in PerR. Since DNA repair systems and PerR are well conserved in many bacterial species, especially in Gram positives, the same mechanism may operate in multiple bacterial species. Additionally, we developed a novel method that allows for rapid quantification of spontaneous OX R mutants in a bacterial population. This method represents a technical

  1. Effects of mutagen-sensitive mus mutations on spontaneous mitotic recombination in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P; Kafer, E

    1992-04-01

    Methyl methane-sulfonate (MMS)-sensitive, radiation-induced mutants of Aspergillus were shown to define nine new DNA repair genes, musK to musS. To test mus mutations for effects on mitotic recombination, intergenic crossing over was assayed between color markers and their centromeres, and intragenic recombination between two distinguishable adE alleles. Of eight mutants analyzed, four showed significant deviations from mus+ controls in both tests. Two mutations, musK and musL, reduced recombination, while musN and musQ caused increases. In contrast, musO diploids produced significantly higher levels only for intragenic recombination. Effects were relatively small, but averages between hypo- and hyperrec mus differed 15-20-fold. In musL diploids, most of the rare color segregants resulted from mitotic malsegregation rather than intergenic crossing over. This indicates that the musL gene product is required for recombination and that DNA lesions lead to chromosome loss when it is deficient. In addition, analysis of the genotypes of intragenic (ad+) recombinants showed that the musL mutation specifically reduced single allele conversion but increased complex conversion types (especially recombinants homozygous for ad+). Similar analysis revealed differences between the effects of two hyperrec mutations; musN apparently caused high levels solely of mitotic crossing over, while musQ increased various conversion types but not reciprocal crossovers. These results suggest that mitotic gene conversion and crossing over, while generally associated, are affected differentially in some of the mus strains of Aspergillus nidulans.

  2. Disheveled hair and ear (Dhe, a spontaneous mouse Lmna mutation modeling human laminopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Odgren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigations of naturally-occurring mutations in animal models provide important insights and valuable disease models. Lamins A and C, along with lamin B, are type V intermediate filament proteins which constitute the proteinaceous boundary of the nucleus. LMNA mutations in humans cause a wide range of phenotypes, collectively termed laminopathies. To identify the mutation and investigate the phenotype of a spontaneous, semi-dominant mutation that we have named Disheveled hair and ear (Dhe, which causes a sparse coat and small external ears in heterozygotes and lethality in homozygotes by postnatal day 10. FINDINGS: Genetic mapping identified a point mutation in the Lmna gene, causing a single amino acid change, L52R, in the coiled coil rod domain of lamin A and C proteins. Cranial sutures in Dhe/+ mice failed to close. Gene expression for collagen types I and III in sutures was deficient. Skulls were small and disproportionate. Skeletons of Dhe/+ mice were hypomineralized and total body fat was deficient in males. In homozygotes, skin and oral mucosae were dysplastic and ulcerated. Nuclear morphometry of cultured cells revealed gene dose-dependent blebbing and wrinkling. CONCLUSION: Dhe mice should provide a useful new model for investigations of the pathogenesis of laminopathies.

  3. A homozygous FITM2 mutation causes a deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression and signs of ichthyosis and sensory neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zazo Seco, Celia; Castells-Nobau, Anna; Joo, Seol-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A consanguineous family from Pakistan was ascertained to have a novel deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression, ichthyosis-like features and signs of sensory neuropathy. By applying a combined strategy of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in the presented family, a homozygous...

  4. Assessing the contribution of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase to spontaneous mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leary Jeffry J

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thymidine kinase (tk mutagenesis assay is often utilized to determine the frequency of herpes simplex virus (HSV replication-mediated mutations. Using this assay, clinical and laboratory HSV-2 isolates were shown to have a 10- to 80-fold higher frequency of spontaneous mutations compared to HSV-1. Methods A panel of HSV-1 and HSV-2, along with polymerase-recombinant viruses expressing type 2 polymerase (Pol within a type 1 genome, were evaluated using the tk and non-HSV DNA mutagenesis assays to measure HSV replication-dependent errors and determine whether the higher mutation frequency of HSV-2 is a distinct property of type 2 polymerases. Results Although HSV-2 have mutation frequencies higher than HSV-1 in the tk assay, these errors are assay-specific. In fact, wild type HSV-1 and the antimutator HSV-1 PAAr5 exhibited a 2–4 fold higher frequency than HSV-2 in the non-HSV DNA mutatagenesis assay. Furthermore, regardless of assay, HSV-1 recombinants expressing HSV-2 Pol had error rates similar to HSV-1, whereas the high mutator virus, HSV-2 6757, consistently showed signficant errors. Additionally, plasmid DNA containing the HSV-2 tk gene, but not type 1 tk or LacZ DNA, was shown to form an anisomorphic DNA stucture. Conclusions This study suggests that the Pol is not solely responsible for the virus-type specific differences in mutation frequency. Accordingly, it is possible that (a mutations may be modulated by other viral polypeptides cooperating with Pol, and (b the localized secondary structure of the viral genome may partially account for the apparently enhanced error frequency of HSV-2.

  5. Molecular alterations underlying the spontaneous and γ-ray-induced point mutations at the white locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrova, M.V.; Lapidus, I.L.; Aleksandrov, I.D.; Karpovskij, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The white locus in D.Melanogaster was selected as a target gene for the study of the mutational spectra of spontaneously arising and radiation-induced gene mutations in a whole organism. Analysis of 6 spontaneous and 73 γ-ray-induced white mutations by a combination of cytological, genetic and molecular techniques revealed that on the chromosomal and genetic levels all spontaneous mutations showed themselves to be point mutants. The share of such mutants among all heritable radiation-induced gene mutations is about 40%, whereas the rest ones are due to exchange breaks (8%) as well as multilocus, single-locus or partial-locus (intragenic) deletions (52%). The DNAs from 4 spontaneous and 17 γ-ray-induced point mutants were analysed by Southern blot-hybridization. The three spontaneous and 7 radiation mutants showed an altered DNA sequence at the left (distal) half of the white gene due to insertion or DNA rearrangement. The rest (58%) of the radiation-induced point mutations did not indicate any alternations in this part of the gene as detected by this technique and probes employed. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Identification of a mutation in ADD1/SREBP-1 in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Kostka, Vlastimil; Zídek, Václav; Křen, Vladimír; Forejt, Jiří; Kurtz, T. W.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2001), s. 295-298 ISSN 0938-8990 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/00/1646; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A079; GA ČR(CZ) GV204/98/K015 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : mutations in genes * ADD1/SREBP-1c * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.318, year: 2001

  7. Identification of a mutation in ADD1/SREBP-1 in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Kostka, Vlastimil; Zídek, Václav; Křen, Vladimír; Forejt, Jiří; Kurtz, W. T.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2001), s. 295-298 ISSN 0938-8990 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1646; GA ČR GV204/98/K015; GA MŠk LN00A079 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : mutations in genes * ADD1/SREBP-1c * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.318, year: 2001

  8. [A novel homozygous mutation p.E25X in the HSD3B2 gene causing salt wasting 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases deficiency in a Chinese pubertal girl: a delayed diagnosis until recurrent ovary cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yonglan; Zheng, Jipeng; Xie, Ting; Xiao, Qing; Lu, Shaomei; Li, Xiuzhen; Cheng, Jing; Chen, Lihe; Liu, Li

    2014-12-01

    3β- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (3βHSD), a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) resulted from mutations in the HSD3B2 gene that impair steroidogenesis in both adrenals and gonads. We report clinical features and the results of HSD3B2 gene analysis of a Chinese pubertal girl with salt wasting 3βHSD deficiency. We retrospectively reviewed clinical presentations and steroid profiles of the patient diagnosed in Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center in 2013. PCR and direct sequencing were used to identify any mutation in the HSD3B2 gene. A 13-year-old girl was diagnosed as CAH after birth because of salt-wasting with mild clitorimegaly and then was treated with glucocorticoid replacement. Breast and pubic hair development were normal, and menarche occurred at 12 yr, followed by menstrual bleeding about every 45 days. In the last one year laparoscopic operation and ovariocentesis were performed one after another for recurrent ovary cysts. Under corticoid acetate therapy, ACTH 17.10 pmol/L (normal 0-10.12), testosterone 1.31 nmol/L (normal T (p.E25X) was identified in HSD3B2 gene. The girl was homozygous and her mother was heterozygous, while her father was not identified with this mutation. A classic 3βHSD deficiency is characterized by salt wasting and mild virilization in female. Ovary cysts may be the one of features of gonad phenotype indicating ovary 3βHSD deficiency. A novel homozygous mutation c.73G >T(p.E25X) was related to the classical phenotype.

  9. Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome Manifesting as Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Novel Mutation of the Folliculin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Choi, Hang Jun; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Myungshin; Moon, Seok Whan

    2017-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is a rare disease with autosomal dominant inheritance that manifests through skin tumors, pulmonary cystic lesions, and renal tumors. A mutation of FLCN located on chromosome 17p11.2, which encodes a tumor-suppressor protein (folliculin), is responsible for the development of BHDS. We report the case of a patient presenting with spontaneous pneumothorax, in whom a familial genetic study revealed a novel nonsense mutation: p.(Arg379*) in FLCN .

  10. Spontaneous mutations in the flhD operon generate motility heterogeneity in Escherichia coli biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Shelley M; Sayler, Joseph; Scarberry, Nicholas; Schroeder, Meredith; Lynnes, Ty; Prüß, Birgit M

    2016-11-08

    Heterogeneity and niche adaptation in bacterial biofilm involve changes to the genetic makeup of the bacteria and gene expression control. We hypothesized that i) spontaneous mutations in the flhD operon can either increase or decrease motility and that ii) the resulting motility heterogeneity in the biofilm might lead to a long-term increase in biofilm biomass. We allowed the highly motile E. coli K-12 strain MC1000 to form seven- and fourteen-day old biofilm, from which we recovered reduced motility isolates at a substantially greater frequency (5.4 %) than from a similar experiment with planktonic bacteria (0.1 %). Biofilms formed exclusively by MC1000 degraded after 2 weeks. In contrast, biofilms initiated with a 1:1 ratio of MC1000 and its isogenic flhD::kn mutant remained intact at 4 weeks and the two strains remained in equilibrium for at least two weeks. These data imply that an 'optimal' biofilm may contain a mixture of motile and non-motile bacteria. Twenty-eight of the non-motile MC1000 isolates contained an IS1 element in proximity to the translational start of FlhD or within the open reading frames for FlhD or FlhC. Two isolates had an IS2 and one isolate had an IS5 in the open reading frame for FlhD. An additional three isolates contained deletions that included the RNA polymerase binding site, five isolates contained point mutations and small deletions in the open reading frame for FlhC. The locations of all these mutations are consistent with the lack of motility and further downstream within the flhD operon than previously published IS elements that increased motility. We believe that the location of the mutation within the flhD operon determines whether the effect on motility is positive or negative. To test the second part of our hypothesis where motility heterogeneity in a biofilm may lead to a long-term increase in biofilm biomass, we quantified biofilm biomass by MC1000, MC1000 flhD::kn, and mixtures of the two strains at ratios of 1:1, 10

  11. A novel homozygous no-stop mutation in G6PC gene from a Chinese patient with glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lei-Lei; Li, Xin-Hua; Han, Yue; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Gong, Qi-Ming; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2014-02-25

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly and growth retardation. It is caused by mutations in the G6PC gene encoding Glucose-6-phosphatase. To date, over 80 mutations have been identified in the G6PC gene. Here we reported a novel mutation found in a Chinese patient with abnormal transaminases, hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly and short stature. Direct sequencing of the coding region and splicing-sites in the G6PC gene revealed a novel no-stop mutation, p.*358Yext*43, leading to a 43 amino-acid extension of G6Pase. The expression level of mutant G6Pase transcripts was only 7.8% relative to wild-type transcripts. This mutation was not found in 120 chromosomes from 60 unrelated healthy control subjects using direct sequencing, and was further confirmed by digestion with Rsa I restriction endonuclease. In conclusion, we revealed a novel no-stop mutation in this study which expands the spectrum of mutations in the G6PC gene. The molecular genetic analysis was indispensable to the diagnosis of GSD-Ia for the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeted next-generation sequencing of a 12.5 Mb homozygous region reveals ANO10 mutations in patients with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, S.; Hoischen, A.; Meijer, R.P.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Neveling, K.; Wieskamp, N.A.W.; Brouwer, A.; Koenig, M.; Anheim, M.; Assoum, M.; Drouot, N.; Todorovic, S.; Milic-Rasic, V.; Lochmuller, H.; Stevanin, G.; Goizet, C.; David, A.; Durr, A.; Brice, A.; Kremer, B.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Schijvenaars, M.M.V.A.P.; Heister, A.; Kwint, M.P.; Arts, P.J.W.; Wijst, J.A.J. van der; Veltman, J.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Scheffer, H.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations

  13. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of a 12.5 Mb Homozygous Region Reveals ANO10 Mutations in Patients with Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, Sascha; Hoischen, Alexander; Meijer, Rowdy P. P.; Gilissen, Christian; Neveling, Kornelia; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Brouwer, Arjan; Koenig, Michel; Anheim, Mathieu; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Todorovic, Slobodanka; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Lochmueller, Hanns; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril; David, Albert; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Kremer, Berry; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Schijvenaars, Mascha M. V. A. P.; Heister, Angelien; Kwint, Michael; Arts, Peer; van der Wijst, Jenny; Veltman, Joris; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Knoers, Nine

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations

  14. Living on the edge: emergence of spontaneous gac mutations in Pseudomonas protegens during swarming motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunxu; Kidarsa, Teresa A; van de Mortel, Judith E; Loper, Joyce E; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2016-10-01

    Swarming motility is a flagella-driven multicellular behaviour that allows bacteria to colonize new niches and escape competition. Here, we investigated the evolution of specific mutations in the GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system in swarming colonies of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5. Experimental evolution assays showed that repeated rounds of swarming by wildtype Pf-5 drives the accumulation of gacS/gacA spontaneous mutants on the swarming edge. These mutants cannot swarm on their own because they lack production of the biosurfactant orfamide A, but they do co-swarm with orfamide-producing wildtype Pf-5. These co-swarming assays further demonstrated that ΔgacA mutant cells indeed predominate on the edge and that initial ΔgacA:wildtype Pf-5 ratios of at least 2:1 lead to a collapse of the swarming colony. Subsequent whole-genome transcriptome analyses revealed that genes associated with motility, resource acquisition, chemotaxis and efflux were significantly upregulated in ΔgacA mutant on swarming medium. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy showed that ΔgacA mutant cells were longer and more flagellated than wildtype cells, which may explain their predominance on the swarming edge. We postulate that adaptive evolution through point mutations is a common feature of range-expanding microbial populations and that the putative fitness benefits of these mutations during dispersal of bacteria into new territories are frequency-dependent. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Individuals who are homozygous for the 2282del4 and R501X filaggrin null mutations do not always develop dermatitis and complete long-term remission is possible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jp; Carlsen, Bc; Bisgaard, H

    2012-01-01

    develop dermatitis. Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the natural history of individuals with no filaggrin expression. Materials Three study populations were included: (i) a random sample of 3335 subjects aged 18-69 years from the general population in Copenhagen who underwent general...... health examination; (ii) a total of 499 patients seen in our dermatitis clinic since 2009 and who were filaggrin genotyped as a part of the routine diagnostic work up; and (iii) a prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study of 411 children born to mothers with a history of asthma. Filaggrin genotyping...... was performed for the 2282del4 and R501X mutations. Results Filaggrin homozygous/compound heterozygous individuals accounted for 0.3% of adults, 3% of dermatitis patients and 0.7% of children. Respectively, one of nine adults and one of three children never experienced dermatitis until now. All hospital...

  16. Novel homozygous mutations in the EVC and EVC2 genes in two consanguineous families segregating autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul; Raza, Syed I; Ali, Salman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, teeth, oral and cardiac abnormalities. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene, separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study, we have investigated two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, segregating EVC in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 4p16. Subsequently, sequence analysis identified a novel nonsense mutation (p.Trp234*) in exon 8 of the EVC2 gene and 15 bp duplication in exon 14 of the EVC gene in the two families. This further expands the mutations in the EVC or EVC2 genes resulting in the EVC syndrome.

  17. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B on chromosome 3 (FTD3, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III. We have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into both alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3.

  18. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Schmid, Benjamin; Nielsen, Troels T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B) on chromosome 3 (FTD3), a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III). ...... have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into both alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3....

  19. Impact of a novel homozygous mutation in nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase on mitochondrial DNA integrity in a case of familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Fujisawa

    2015-06-01

    General significance: By studying a family affected with a novel point mutation in the NNT gene, a gene–dose response was found for various mitochondrial outcomes providing for novel insights into the role of NNT in the maintenance of mtDNA integrity beyond that described for preventing oxidative stress.

  20. Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Patients With Identical Mutations Variably Express the LDLR (Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor): Implications for the Efficacy of Evolocumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thedrez, Aurélie; Blom, Dirk J; Ramin-Mangata, Stéphane; Blanchard, Valentin; Croyal, Mikaël; Chemello, Kévin; Nativel, Brice; Pichelin, Matthieu; Cariou, Bertrand; Bourane, Steeve; Tang, Lihua; Farnier, Michel; Raal, Frederick J; Lambert, Gilles

    2018-03-01

    Evolocumab, a PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9)-neutralizing antibody, lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic (HoFH) patients with reduced LDLR (low-density lipoprotein receptor) function. However, their individual responses are highly variable, even among carriers of identical LDLR genetic defects. We aimed to elucidate why HoFH patients variably respond to PCSK9 inhibition. Lymphocytes were isolated from 22 HoFH patients enrolled in the TAUSSIG trial (Trial Assessing Long Term Use of PCSK9 Inhibition in Subjects With Genetic LDL Disorders). Ten patients were true homozygotes (FH1/FH1) and 5 identical compound heterozygotes (FH1/FH2). Lymphocytes were plated with or without mevastatin, recombinant PCSK9 (rPCSK9), or a PCSK9-neutralizing antibody. Cell surface LDLR expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. All HoFH lymphocytes had reduced cell surface LDLR expression compared with non-FH lymphocytes, for each treatment modality. Lymphocytes from FH1/FH2 patients (LDLR defective/negative) displayed the lowest LDLR expression levels followed by lymphocytes from FH1/FH1 patients (defective/defective). Mevastatin increased, whereas rPCSK9 reduced LDLR expression. The PCSK9-neutralizing antibody restored LDLR expression. Lymphocytes displaying higher LDLR expression levels were those isolated from patients presenting with lowest levels of LDL-C and apolipoprotein B, before and after 24 weeks of evolocumab treatment. These negative correlations remained significant in FH1/FH1 patients and appeared more pronounced when patients with apolipoprotein E3/E3 genotypes were analyzed separately. Significant positive correlations were found between the levels of LDLR expression and the percentage reduction in LDL-C on evolocumab treatment. Residual LDLR expression in HoFH is a major determinant of LDL-C levels and seems to drive their individual response to evolocumab. © 2017 American Heart Association

  1. Inherent properties of adenylosuccinate lyase could explain S-Ado/SAICAr ratio due to homozygous R426H and R303C mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Stephen P; Duval, Nathan; Wilkinson, Terry G; Shaheen, Sean E; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Patterson, David

    2013-08-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) is a homotetrameric enzyme involved in the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway and purine nucleotide cycle. Missense mutations in the protein lead to ADSL deficiency, an inborn error of purine metabolism characterized by neurological and physiological symptoms. ADSL deficiency is biochemically diagnosed by elevated levels of succinylaminoimidazolecarboxamide riboside (SAICAr) and succinyladenosine (S-Ado), the dephosphorylated derivatives of the substrates. S-Ado/SAICAr ratios have been associated with three phenotypic groups. Different hypotheses to explain these ratios have been proposed. Recent studies have focused on measuring activity on the substrates independently. However, it is important to examine mixtures of the substrates to determine if mutations affect enzyme activity on both substrates similarly in these conditions. The two substrates may experience an indirect communication due to being acted upon by the same enzyme, altering their activities from the non-competitive case. In this study, we investigate this hidden coupling between the two substrates. We chose two mutations that represent extremes of the phenotype, R426H and R303C. We describe a novel electrochemical-detection method of measuring the kinetic activity of ADSL in solution with its two substrates at varying concentration ratios. Furthermore, we develop an enzyme kinetic model to predict substrate activity from a given ratio of substrate concentrations. Our findings indicate a non-linear dependence of the activities on the substrate ratios due to competitive binding, distinct differences in the behaviors of the different mutations, and S-Ado/SAICAr ratios in patients could be explained by inherent properties of the mutant enzyme. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel homozygous missense mutation in GAN associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 in a large consanguineous family from Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Sharon; Barwick, Katy E S; Straussberg, Rachel; Harlalka, Gaurav V; Nevo, Yoram; Chioza, Barry A; McEntagart, Meriel M; Mimouni-Bloch, Aviva; Weedon, Michael; Crosby, Andrew H

    2016-11-16

    CMT-2 is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral axonal neuropathies characterized by slowly progressive weakness and atrophy of distal limb muscles resulting from length-dependent motor and sensory neurodegeneration. Classical giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is an autosomal recessively inherited progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the peripheral and central nervous systems, typically diagnosed in early childhood and resulting in death by the end of the third decade. Distinctive phenotypic features are the presence of "kinky" hair and long eyelashes. The genetic basis of the disease has been well established, with over 40 associated mutations identified in the gene GAN, encoding the BTB-KELCH protein gigaxonin, involved in intermediate filament regulation. An Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 array followed by whole exome sequence analysis was used to identify the disease associated gene mutation in a large consanguineous family diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT-2) from which all but one affected member had straight hair. Here we report the identification of a novel GAN missense mutation underlying the CMT-2 phenotype observed in this family. Although milder forms of GAN, with and without the presence of kinky hair have been reported previously, a phenotype distinct from that was investigated in this study. All family members lacked common features of GAN, including ataxia, nystagmus, intellectual disability, seizures, and central nervous system involvement. Our findings broaden the spectrum of phenotypes associated with GAN mutations and emphasize a need to proceed with caution when providing families with diagnostic or prognostic information based on either clinical or genetic findings alone.

  3. Hepatosplenomegalic lipidosis: what unless Gaucher? Adult cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) with anemia, mesenteric lipodystrophy, increased plasma chitotriosidase activity and a homozygous lysosomal acid lipase -1 exon 8 splice junction mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Dahl, S; Harzer, K; Rolfs, A; Albrecht, B; Niederau, C; Vogt, C; van Weely, S; Aerts, J; Müller, G; Häussinger, D

    1999-10-01

    A 36-year-old woman was admitted for hepatosplenomegaly and anemia. Bone marrow cytology showed "sea-blue histiocytes", vacuolated macrophages and plasma cells. As primary liver disease, malignancy or hematologic disorders were excluded, and plasma chitotriosidase activity was increased 27-fold over control, the presence of a lysosomal storage disease was suspected. Biochemical analysis of skin fibroblasts revealed normal glucocerebrosidase and sphingomyelinase activity, but lipid analysis showed a more than 15-fold accumulation of cholesterol esters within the cells. The activity of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) in fibroblast homogenates was decreased to 12% of control subjects. Mutational analysis of the patient's blood showed the homozygous G-->A mutation at position -1 of the exon 8 splice donor site (E8SJM-allele) known for adult cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD); the polymorphic background was that of the complex haplotype -6Thr, 2Gly, 894 G-->A. Based on clinical, laboratory, cytological and and biochemical findings, CESD can clearly be separated from other more frequent inherited lysosomal storage diseases, e.g. atypical forms of Gaucher disease.

  4. Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III is responsible for the high level of spontaneous mutations in mutT strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masami; Shimizu, Masatomi; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Grúz, Petr; Fujii, Shingo; Usui, Yukio; Fuchs, Robert P; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2012-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species induce oxidative damage in DNA precursors, i.e. dNTPs, leading to point mutations upon incorporation. Escherichia coli mutT strains, deficient in the activity hydrolysing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP), display more than a 100-fold higher spontaneous mutation frequency over the wild-type strain. 8-oxo-dGTP induces A to C transversions when misincorporated opposite template A. Here, we report that DNA pol III incorporates 8-oxo-dGTP ≈ 20 times more efficiently opposite template A compared with template C. Single, double or triple deletions of pol I, pol II, pol IV or pol V had modest effects on the mutT mutator phenotype. Only the deletion of all four polymerases led to a 70% reduction of the mutator phenotype. While pol III may account for nearly all 8-oxo-dGTP incorporation opposite template A, it only extends ≈ 30% of them, the remaining 70% being extended by the combined action of pol I, pol II, pol IV or pol V. The unique property of pol III, a C-family DNA polymerase present only in eubacteria, to preferentially incorporate 8-oxo-dGTP opposite template A during replication might explain the high spontaneous mutation frequency in E. coli mutT compared with the mammalian counterparts lacking the 8-oxo-dGTP hydrolysing activities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome Manifesting as Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Novel Mutation of the Folliculin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Soo Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS is a rare disease with autosomal dominant inheritance that manifests through skin tumors, pulmonary cystic lesions, and renal tumors. A mutation of FLCN located on chromosome 17p11.2, which encodes a tumor-suppressor protein (folliculin, is responsible for the development of BHDS. We report the case of a patient presenting with spontaneous pneumothorax, in whom a familial genetic study revealed a novel nonsense mutation: p.(Arg379* in FLCN.

  6. Homozygous germ-line mutation of the PMS2 mismatch repair gene: a unique case report of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchander, N C; Ryan, N A J; Crosbie, E J; Evans, D G

    2017-04-05

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome results from bi-allelic inheritance of mutations affecting the key DNA mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Individuals with bi-allelic mutations have a dysfunctional mismatch repair system from birth; as a result, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome is characterised by early onset malignancies. Fewer than 150 cases have been reported in the literature over the past 20 years. This is the first report of the founder PMS2 mutation - NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11 and its associated cancers in this family. The proband is 30 years old and is alive today. She is of Pakistani ethnic origin and a product of consanguinity. She initially presented aged 24 with painless bleeding per-rectum from colorectal polyps and was referred to clinical genetics. Clinical examination revealed two café-au-lait lesions, lichen planus, and a dermoid cyst. Her sister had been diagnosed in childhood with an aggressive brain tumour followed by colorectal cancer. During follow up, the proband developed 37 colorectal adenomatous polyps, synchronous ovarian and endometrial adenocarcinomas, and ultimately a metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma. DNA sequencing of peripheral lymphocytes revealed a bi-allelic inheritance of the PMS2 mutation NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11. Ovarian tumour tissue demonstrated low microsatellite instability. To date, she has had a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and a total gastrectomy. Aspirin and oestrogen-only hormone replacement therapy provide some chemoprophylaxis and manage postmenopausal symptoms, respectively. An 18-monthly colonoscopy surveillance programme has led to the excision of three high-grade dysplastic colorectal tubular adenomatous polyps. The proband's family pedigree displays multiple relatives with cancers including a likely case of 'true' Turcot syndrome. Constitutional mismatch repair

  7. Truncating Homozygous Mutation of Carboxypeptidase E (CPE in a Morbidly Obese Female with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Intellectual Disability and Hypogonadotrophic Hypogonadism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne I M Alsters

    Full Text Available Carboxypeptidase E is a peptide processing enzyme, involved in cleaving numerous peptide precursors, including neuropeptides and hormones involved in appetite control and glucose metabolism. Exome sequencing of a morbidly obese female from a consanguineous family revealed homozygosity for a truncating mutation of the CPE gene (c.76_98del; p.E26RfsX68. Analysis detected no CPE expression in whole blood-derived RNA from the proband, consistent with nonsense-mediated decay. The morbid obesity, intellectual disability, abnormal glucose homeostasis and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism seen in this individual recapitulates phenotypes in the previously described fat/fat and Cpe knockout mouse models, evidencing the importance of this peptide/hormone-processing enzyme in regulating body weight, metabolism, and brain and reproductive function in humans.

  8. Oral manifestations, dental management, and a rare homozygous mutation of the PRDM12 gene in a boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Karim; Reda, Seif; Finke, Christian; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Bartzela, Theodosia

    2017-08-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disorder. Chen et al. recently identified the causative gene and characterized biallelic mutations in the PR domain-containing protein 12 gene, which plays a role in the development of pain-sensing nerve cells. Our patient's family was included in Chen and colleagues' study. We performed a literature review of the PubMed library (January 1985 to December 2016) on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I to VIII genetic disorders and their orofacial manifestations. This case report is the first to describe the oral manifestations, and their treatment, of the recently discovered hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII in the medical and dental literature. We report on the oral manifestations and dental management of an 8-month-old white boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy-VIII over a period of 16 years. Our patient was homozygous for a mutation of PR domain-containing protein 12 gene and was characterized by insensitivity to pain and thermal stimuli, self-mutilation behavior, reduced sweat and tear production, absence of corneal reflexes, and multiple skin and bone infections. Oral manifestations included premature loss of teeth, associated with dental traumata and self-mutilation, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and submucosal abscesses, hypomineralization of primary teeth, and mandibular osteomyelitis. The lack of scientific knowledge on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy due to the rarity of the disease often results in a delay in diagnosis, which is of substantial importance for the prevention of many complications and symptoms. Interdisciplinary work of specialized medical and dental teams and development of a standardized treatment protocols are essential for the management of the disease. There are many knowledge gaps concerning the management of patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy

  9. Possible homozygous Waardenburg syndrome in a fetus with exencephaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-06

    This paper describes a pedigree with Waardenburg syndrome and an aborted fetus who had severe congenital malformations but no detected genetic mutations. The authors concluded that despite the fact that no homozygosity of the fetus was demonstrated, the phenotype pointed to homozygous mutations of the PAX3 gene. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Fitness decline under osmotic stress in Caenorhabditis elegans populations subjected to spontaneous mutation accumulation at varying population sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katju, Vaishali; Packard, Lucille B; Keightley, Peter D

    2018-04-01

    The consequences of mutations for population fitness depends on their individual selection coefficients and the effective population size. An earlier study of Caenorhabditis elegans spontaneous mutation accumulation lines evolved for 409 generations at three population sizes found that N e   = 1 populations declined significantly in fitness whereas the fitness of larger populations (N e   = 5, 50) was indistinguishable from the ancestral control under benign conditions. To test if larger MA populations harbor a load of cryptic deleterious mutations that are obscured under benign laboratory conditions, we measured fitness under osmotic stress via exposure to hypersaline conditions. The fitness of N e   = 1 lines exhibited a further decline under osmotic stress compared to benign conditions. However, the fitness of larger populations remained indistinguishable from that of the ancestral control. The average effects of deleterious mutations in N e   = 1 lines were estimated to be 22% for productivity and 14% for survivorship, exceeding values previously detected under benign conditions. Our results suggest that fitness decline is due to large effect mutations that are rapidly removed via selection even in small populations, with implications for conservation practices. Genetic stochasticity may not be as potent and immediate a threat to the persistence of small populations as other demographic and environmental stochastic factors. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution © 2018 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Sectoring patterns of spontaneous and radiation-induced somatic pink mutations in the stamen hairs of a temperature-sensitive mutable clone of Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Sadao

    1994-01-01

    The sectoring patterns of somatic pink mutations were analyzed in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone KU 20, a temperature-sensitive mutable clone. This clone is a blue/pink heterozygote, and its spontaneous pink mutation frequency increases up to about 40-fold at lower temperature. In order to elucidate the mutable nature of this clone, the sectoring patterns were analyzed on 1,123 spontaneous pink mutant events and on 2,725 pink mutant events induced by 0.606 and 1.28 Gy of gamma rays. The average number of pink cells per terminal pink mutant event (a row of pink cells including the terminal cell of a hair) occurred spontaneously was 7.40, whereas the number for the terminal pink mutant event induced by gamma rays varied from 3.33 to 9.88 depending on the post-irradiation days, i.e., increased gradually as the number of days proceeded, then was stabilized at the level of spontaneous mutations after about three weeks. The average number of pink cells per interstitial pink mutant event (a single pink cell or two or more contiguous pink cells between blue cells was 1.97 for spontaneous mutations, while the number for induced mutations varied also depending on the post-irradiation days. The ratio of the number of interstitial pink mutant events against that of terminal pink mutant events was 1.35 for spontaneous mutations, but the ratio for induced mutations varied also with post-irradiation period reaching 2.89 at the peak, indicating that more interstitial pink mutant events are induced by gamma rays than terminal pink mutant events, as compared with spontaneous mutations. The frequency of multiple pink mutant sectors in a hair was more than four times higher than that expected from independent occurrences in case of spontaneous mutations, while the frequency was close to the expectation in induced mutations. suggesting that somatic recombination is involved as one of the major causes of spontaneous mutations in this mutable clone. (author)

  12. The distribution of and complementation relationships between spontaneous X-linked recessive lethal mutations recovered from crossing long-term laboratory stocks of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalet, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster males from a wild-type laboratory stock, were mated with virgin females of the M-6 stock, and 149 spontaneous independent non-mosaically transmitted, as well as 8 incidentally detected, mosaically transmitted, X-linked recessive lethal mutations were recovered from 95 704 F 2 cultures. 152 mutations were mapped over the entire length of the X-chromosome by complementation and/or crossover tests. Although there were far too few spontaneous mutations to make a meaningful comparison of relative mutability on a locus-by-locus basis, those loci displaying a relatively higher X-ray mutability, when taken as a group, tend to display a relatively higher spontaneous mutability, and those loci displaying a relatively lower X-ray mutability, when taken as a group, tend to display a relatively lower spontaneous mutability. (Auth.)

  13. Repeated Loss of Consciousness in a Young Woman: A Suspicious SMAD3 Mutation Underlying Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bermúdez, Míriam; Moustafa, Abdel-Hakim; Barrós-Membrilla, Antonio; Tizón-Marcos, Helena

    2017-02-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequent cause of acute coronary syndrome and is often underdiagnosed. Intramural hematoma is the most frequent angiographic presentation and is a challenging diagnosis that may require intravascular imaging techniques to confirm it and guide treatment. It affects mostly young women without coronary risk factors and is usually associated with fibromuscular dysplasia. SCAD has an underlying disease in 80% of patients. A SMAD3 mutation has been linked to aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome and has been identified as a cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. The first reported case, to our knowledge, of a SMAD3 mutation underlying SCAD is described here. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Late failure of a split-thickness skin graft in the setting of homozygous factor V Leiden mutation: a case report and correlative animal model from the Wound Etiology and Healing (WE-HEAL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; McNish, Sean; Duncan, Joanna; Root, Brandy; Tassi, Elena; Wellstein, Anton; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Attinger, Christopher E

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian male smoker with remote history of left lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and a strong family history of thrombosis, who presented to the Center for Wound Healing at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital with spontaneous left leg ulceration. Prothrombotic evaluation showed homozygosity for the factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation. Therapeutic anticoagulation was commenced with warfarin (Coumadin®) and the patient underwent successful debridement and Apligraf® followed by split-thickness skin graft (STSG) of two wounds. He had an uneventful postoperative course and on the 27th postoperative day the grafts were 95% intact. However, by postoperative day 41 there was 10% graft loss, and over the subsequent 2 weeks both grafts necrosed. On further questioning, it transpired that the patient had discontinued his warfarin on postoperative day 37 because he thought that it was no longer necessary. The patient is enrolled in the Wound Etiology and Healing (WE-HEAL) study, and at the time of the original graft, residual skin fragments from the STSG were transplanted onto a nude mouse for development of an animal model of wound healing. The mouse graft was successful and was harvested at postoperative day 87 for pathological examination. We review the mechanisms by which prothrombotic states, particularly FVL mutation, can contribute to skin graft failure and delayed wound healing. This case highlights the importance of considering prothrombotic conditions in patients with spontaneous leg ulcerations and the impact of therapeutic anticoagulation on healing. It further allows us to demonstrate the efficacy of the animal model in which residual fragments of STSG tissue are utilised for transplant onto nude mice for manipulation in the laboratory. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A case of primary familial congenital polycythemia with a novel EPOR mutation: possible spontaneous remission/alleviation by menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Naohisa; Kaneda, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Naoki; Manabe, Hiromi; Okajima, Kazuki; Sakurai, Yukari; Yamamoto, Masayo; Sarashina, Takeo; Ikuta, Katsuya; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2018-04-05

    A 10-year-old girl with persistent erythrocytosis and ruddy complexion was diagnosed with primary familial congenital polycythemia (PFCP) involving a novel heterozygous mutation of c.1220C>A, p.Ser407X in exon 8 of the erythropoietin receptor gene (EPOR). This mutation causes truncation of EPOR, resulting in loss of the cytoplasmic region, which is necessary for negative regulation of erythropoietin signal transmission. Genetic analysis showed that the mutated EPOR was inherited from her mother. Her mother had polycythemia and had undergone venesection several times when she was young, but her polycythemic state appeared to have resolved. Venesection was not needed to maintain Hct levels within normal range. For the case reported here, venesection was also conducted to maintain the blood Hct level below 50%. We observed that after the patient experienced menarche, the volume and frequency of venesection needed to maintain Hct level < 50% were clearly reduced compared with those before menarche. These findings suggest that, in female patients with this type of EPOR mutation, menstruation might reduce blood volume in a manner similar to venesection. Spontaneous remission of erythrocytosis may thus occur after the start of menstrual bleeding.

  16. DNA spontaneous mutation and its role in the evolution of GC-content: assessing the impact of the genetic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-03-28

    The structure of DNA is not constantly at its equilibrium point but evolves with time. It is generally accepted that evolution induces a decrease of the guanine-cytosine (GC) content and a concomitant increase of the adenine-thymine (AT) ratio through a biased GC → AT mutation process. Unfortunately, the mechanism behind this natural alteration of the stored genetic information is not fully understood. Here, we use a hybrid QM:QM' approach to assess the link between one of the sources of the spontaneous mutation, the so-called G*C* rare tautomers that arise from a double proton exchange between the bases, and the evolution of the GC-content. Our simulations indicate that the G*C* mutation is mainly accumulated in GC-rich regions rather than being randomly spread, and consequently the GC → AT error tends to locate in coding fragments. That specific preference is indirectly induced by the base pairs containing the mutated point, as they tune the structure of the first hydration-shell that solvates the reactive base pair undergoing tautomerisation. The reorganisation of the explicit water molecules eventually modifies the energy barriers as well as the stability of the genetic error during the process.

  17. A reeler mutant mouse with a new, spontaneous mutation in the reelin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tom E; Finsen, Bente; Goffinet, Andre M

    2002-01-01

    In one of our mouse colonies a reeler-like phenotype appeared spontaneously. The brain histology was identical to the known reeler phenotype. Northern and Western blot analysis and a complementation test showed that the defect is located to the reelin gene. Southern blot and PCR analysis together...

  18. Effect of low dose gamma radiation on stamen-hairs of different clones of Tradescantia presenting variability in the frequency of spontaneous mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the frequency of spontaneous somatic mutations were studied for three different clones of Tradescantia heterozygotes for flower and stamen-hair color keeping them under controlled or natural conditions in order to verify the effect of different environmental conditions on the different genotypes. The effect of inflorescence age on the variation of spontaneous mutations was studied choosing young and old inflorescences of a same plant. Low dose irradiation experiments were carried out with those clones to elucidate the radiation effects on the clones presenting changes in the frequency of spontaneous mutations. The chronic-and acute irradiation effects of low dose irradiation of the stamen-hair of Tradescantia were also studied. Results are discussed. (M.A.) [pt

  19. A mutation in Myo15 leads to Usher-like symptoms in LEW/Ztm-ci2 rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Held, N.; Smits, B.M.; Gockeln, R.; Schubert, S.; Nave, H.; Northrup, E.; Cuppen, E.; Hedrich, H.J.; Wedekind, D.

    2011-01-01

    The LEW/Ztm-ci2 rat is an animal model for syndromal deafness that arose from a spontaneous mutation. Homozygous animals show locomotor abnormalities like lateralized circling behavior. Additionally, an impaired vision can be observed in some animals through behavioral studies. Syndromal deafness as

  20. Effects of Mutagen-Sensitive Mus Mutations on Spontaneous Mitotic Recombination in Aspergillus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, P.; Kafer, E.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl methane-sulfonate (MMS)-sensitive, radiation-induced mutants of Aspergillus were shown to define nine new DNA repair genes, musK to musS. To test mus mutations for effects on mitotic recombination, intergenic crossing over was assayed between color markers and their centromeres, and intragenic recombination between two distinguishable adE alleles. Of eight mutants analyzed, four showed significant deviations from mus(+) controls in both tests. Two mutations, musK and musL, reduced reco...

  1. Living on the edge: emergence of spontaneous gac mutations in Pseudomonas protegens during swarming motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, C.; Kidarsa, Teresa; van de Mortel, J.; Loper, J.E.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Swarming motility is a flagella-driven multicellular behavior that allows bacteria to colonize new niches and escape competition. Here, we investigated the evolution of specific mutations in the GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system in swarming colonies of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

  2. X-ray-induced bystander response reduce spontaneous mutations in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Matsumoto, Hideki; Usami, Noriko; Tomiya, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    The potential for carcinogenic risks is increased by radiation-induced bystander responses; these responses are the biological effects in unirradiated cells that receive signals from the neighboring irradiated cells. Bystander responses have attracted attention in modern radiobiology because they are characterized by non-linear responses to low-dose radiation. We used a synchrotron X-ray microbeam irradiation system developed at the Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, and showed that nitric oxide (NO)-mediated bystander cell death increased biphasically in a dose-dependent manner. Here, we irradiated five cell nuclei using 10 × 10 µm 2 5.35 keV X-ray beams and then measured the mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanosine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in bystander cells. The mutation frequency with the null radiation dose was 2.6 × 10 -5 (background level), and the frequency decreased to 5.3 × 10 -6 with a dose of approximately 1 Gy (absorbed dose in the nucleus of irradiated cells). At high doses, the mutation frequency returned to the background level. A similar biphasic dose-response effect was observed for bystander cell death. Furthermore, we found that incubation with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO), a specific scavenger of NO, suppressed not only the biphasic increase in bystander cell death but also the biphasic reduction in mutation frequency of bystander cells. These results indicate that the increase in bystander cell death involves mechanisms that suppress mutagenesis. This study has thus shown that radiation-induced bystander responses could affect processes that protect the cell against naturally occurring alterations such as mutations. (author)

  3. Programmed cell death in the leaves of the Arabidopsis spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D) mutant correlates with increased expression of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4B2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaussand, G.M.D.J.-M; Jia, Q.; van der Graaff, E.; Lamers, G.E.M.; Fransz, P.F.; Hooykaas, P.J.J.; de Pater, S.

    2011-01-01

    From a pool of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants harboring an activator T-DNA construct, one mutant was identified that developed spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D) on the rosette leaves under aseptic conditions. The sns-D mutation is dominant and homozygous plants are embryo

  4. nm1054: a spontaneous, recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mutation in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Ohgami, Robert S.; Campagna, Dean R.; Antiochos, Brendan; Wood, Emily B.; Sharp, John J.; Barker, Jane E.; Fleming, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    Hypochromic, microcytic anemias are typically the result of inadequate hemoglobin production because of globin defects or iron deficiency. Here, we describe the phenotypic characteristics and pathogenesis of a new recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mouse mutant, nm1054. Although the mutation nm1054 is pleiotropic, also resulting in sparse hair, male infertility, failure to thrive, and hydrocephaly, the anemia is the focus of this study. Hematologic analysis reveals a moderately severe,...

  5. Spontaneous mutations in the ammonium transport gene AMT4 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Seo; Feild, Eithne; King, Natalie; Yaoi, Takuro; Kustu, Sydney; Inwood, William

    2005-06-01

    Evidence in several microorganisms indicates that Amt proteins are gas channels for NH(3) and CH(3)NH(2), and this has been confirmed structurally. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has at least four AMT genes, the most reported for a microorganism. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions all AMT genes are transcribed and Chlamydomonas is sensitive to methylammonium toxicity. All 16 spontaneous methylammonium-resistant mutants that we analyzed had defects in accumulation of [(14)C]methylammonium. Genetic crosses indicated that 12 had lesions in a single locus, whereas two each had lesions in other loci. Lesions in different loci were correlated with different degrees of defect in [(14)C]methylammonium uptake. One mutant in the largest class had an insert in the AMT4 gene, and the insert cosegregated with methylammonium resistance in genetic crosses. The other 11 strains in this class also had amt4 lesions, which we characterized at the molecular level. Properties of the amt4 mutants were clearly different from those of rh1 RNAi lines. They indicated that the physiological substrates for Amt and Rh proteins, the only two members of their protein superfamily, are NH(3) and CO(2), respectively.

  6. Improved adsorption of an Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophage ΦEF24C with a spontaneous point mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Some bacterial strains of the multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis can significantly reduce the efficacy of conventional antimicrobial chemotherapy. Thus, the introduction of bacteriophage (phage therapy is expected, where a phage is used as a bioagent to destroy bacteria. E. faecalis phage ΦEF24C is known to be a good candidate for a therapeutic phage against E. faecalis. However, this therapeutic phage still produces nonuniform antimicrobial effects with different bacterial strains of the same species and this might prove detrimental to its therapeutic effects. One solution to this problem is the preparation of mutant phages with higher activity, based on a scientific rationale. This study isolated and analyzed a spontaneous mutant phage, ΦEF24C-P2, which exhibited higher infectivity against various bacterial strains when compared with phage ΦEF24C. First, the improved bactericidal effects of phage ΦEF24C-P2 were attributable to its increased adsorption rate. Moreover, genomic sequence scanning revealed that phage ΦEF24C-P2 had a point mutation in orf31. Proteomic analysis showed that ORF31 (mw, 203 kDa was present in structural components, and immunological analysis using rabbit-derived antibodies showed that it was a component of a long, flexible fine tail fiber extending from the tail end. Finally, phage ΦEF24C-P2 also showed higher bactericidal activity in human blood compared with phage ΦEF24C using the in vitro assay system. In conclusion, the therapeutic effects of phage ΦEF24C-P2 were improved by a point mutation in gene orf31, which encoded a tail fiber component.

  7. Spontaneous HBsAg loss in Korean patients: relevance of viral genotypes, S gene mutations, and covalently closed circular DNA copy numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyun-Hwan Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsOccult HBV infection can persist following HBsAg loss and be transmitted, but the virological features are not well defined.MethodsHere we investigated 25 Korean patients who lost HBsAg during follow up, either spontaneously or subsequent to therapy.ResultsWhereas subtype adr (genotype C was found in 96% of HBsAg positive patients, 75 % of patients who lost HBsAg spontaneously were seemed to be infected with the ayw subtype with sequence similar to genotype D. Mutations in the major hydrophilic region (MHR of HBsAg were found in 7 patients who lost HBsAg spontaneously. The mutations include T123S, M125I/N, C139R, D144E, V177A, L192F, and W196L, some of which have not been reported before. Functional analysis via transfection experiments indicate that the C139R and D144E mutations drastically reduced HBsAg antigenicity, while the Y225del mutation found in one interferon-treated patient impaired HBsAg secretion.ConclusionsLack of detectable HBsAg in patient serum could be explained by low level of ccc DNA in liver tissue, low antigenicity of the surface protein, or its secretion defect.

  8. Use of spontaneously mutated human DNA as competitive internal standard for nucleic acid quantification by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnicka, L.; Diaz, A.; Varga, J.; Jimenez, S.A.; Christiano, A.; Uitto, J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantification of gene expression is of increasing interest in many medical sciences. Methods based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) are timesaving and require only very small amounts of RNA. A limiting factor, however, is the significant fluctuation in the efficacy of reverse transcription as well in the polymerase chain reactions. Various external and internal standards have been suggested for correcting these fluctuations. We describe a novel way of creating an internal standard for assessing the expression of type VII collagen in human cells. The total RNA of a patient with hereditary 'epidermilysis bulosa dystrophica' associated with a homozygous T to A point mutation in type VII collagen gene was reverse transcribed and a 382bp fragment of type VII collagen cDNA containing the mutation was amplified. The mutated cDNA, unlike normal type VII collagen cDNA could be cleaved by 'Ear I' endonuclease into 244bp and 138bp fragments. Semiquantitative PCR was performed with the mutated cDNA as internal standard and the studied cDNA sample in the same tube in the presence of α 32 P-labelled dCTP. The reaction was followed by 'Ear I' digestion, electrophoresis on a polyacrylamide gel and exposure to a X-ray film. In conclusion, we describe a timesaving method for creating internal standards for semiquantitative RT-PCR. (author). 12 refs, 3 figs

  9. Anaerobic growth of Bacillus subtilis alters the spectrum of spontaneous mutations in the rpoB gene leading to rifampicin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne L; Park, Roy

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous rifampicin-resistant (RFM(R)) mutants were isolated from Bacillus subtilis 168 cultivated in the presence or absence of oxygen. By DNA sequencing, the mutations were located within Cluster I of the rpoB gene encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase. The spectrum of RFM(R) rpoB mutations isolated from B. subtilis cells grown anaerobically differed from aerobically grown cells, not only with respect to the location of mutations within Cluster I but also in the class of mutation observed (transition versus transversion). In the absence of RFM, RFM(R) mutants exhibited poorer growth under anaerobic conditions than did the wild-type strain, indicating their lower fitness in the absence of antibiotic selection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Molecular analysis of two mouse dilute locus deletion mutations: Spontaneous dilute lethal20J and radiation-induced dilute prenatal lethal Aa2 alleles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, M.C.; Seperack, P.K.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    The dilute (d) coat color locus of mouse chromosome 9 has been identified by more than 200 spontaneous and mutagen-induced recessive mutations. With the advent of molecular probes for this locus, the molecular lesion associated with different dilute alleles can be recognized and precisely defined. In this study, two dilute mutations, dilute-lethal20J (dl20J) and dilute prenatal lethal Aa2, have been examined. Using a dilute locus genomic probe in Southern blot analysis, we detected unique restriction fragments in dl20J and Aa2 DNA. Subsequent analysis of these fragments showed that they represented deletion breakpoint fusion fragments. DNA sequence analysis of each mutation-associated deletion breakpoint fusion fragment suggests that both genomic deletions were generated by nonhomologous recombination events. The spontaneous dl20J mutation is caused by an interstitial deletion that removes a single coding exon of the dilute gene. The correlation between this discrete deletion and the expression of all dilute-associated phenotypes in dl20J homozygotes defines the dl20J mutation as a functional null allele of the dilute gene. The radiation-induced Aa2 allele is a multilocus deletion that, by complementation analysis, affects both the dilute locus and the proximal prenatal lethal-3 (pl-3) functional unit. Molecular analysis of the Aa2 deletion breakpoint fusion fragment has provided access to a previously undefined gene proximal to d. Initial characterization of this new gene suggests that it may represent the genetically defined pl-3 functional unit

  11. Suppression of spontaneous and hydrogen peroxide-induced mutations by a MutT-type nucleotide pool sanitization enzyme, the Escherichia coli Orf135 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Iida, Emiko; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Miki, Takeyoshi; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2003-12-01

    We recently found that the Escherichia coli Orf135 protein, a MutT-type enzyme, hydrolysed 2-hydroxy-dATP (2-OH-dATP), and less efficiently, 8-hydroxy-dGTP. In this study, we examined the effects of the absence of the orf135 gene. Frequencies of spontaneous and H2O2-induced mutations were two- to three-fold higher in the orf135- strain than in the wild-type strain. These mutations include various mutations involving a G:C-->T:A transversion, the same type of mutation elicited by 2-OH-dATP. Over-expression of the Orf135 protein suppressed mutations even in the wild-type strain, as well as in the orf135- strain. The mutator phenotype of bacteria lacking the Orf135 protein suggests that this protein is involved in the suppression of mutations induced by oxidized deoxynucleotides in vivo and that various MutT-type enzymes contribute to nucleotide pool sanitization.

  12. Prenatal diagnosis and molecular genetic analysis of short rib-polydactyly syndrome type III (Verma-Naumoff in a second-trimester fetus with a homozygous splice site mutation in intron 4 in the NEK1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Polydactyly, micromelia, metaphyseal spurs, widened humeral metaphyses, and shortened ribs can be prominent prenatal ultrasound findings of SRPS III. The present case provides evidence for a correlation of a mutation in the NEK1 gene with SRPS III.

  13. Novel Homozygous Mutation of the Internal Translation Initiation Start Site of VHL is Exclusively Associated with Erythrocytosis : Indications for Distinct Functional Roles of von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, M; van der Zalm, M.M.; van Oirschot - Hermans, B.A.; Lee, Frank S.; Giles, R; Kruip, Marieke J. H. A.; Gitz-Francois, Jerney J. J. M.; Van Solinge, Wouter W.; Bierings, MB; van Wijk, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Congenital secondary erythrocytosis is a rare disorder characterized by increased red blood cell production. An important cause involves defects in the oxygen sensing pathway, in particular the PHD2-VHL-HIF axis. Mutations in VHL are also associated with the von Hippel-Lindau tumor predisposition

  14. THE ANTIMUTAGENIC EFFECT OF VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON SPONTANEOUS MUTATION IN SALMONELLA TA104 IS DUE TO A REDUCTION IN MUTATIONS AT GC BUT NOT AT SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutagens that, when added to assay plates, reduced the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA104 (hisG428, rfa, uvrB, pKM101) by 50%. To date, no study has demonstrated whether or not...

  15. Homozygous partial genomic triplication of the parkin gene in early-onset parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Ignacio F; Alvarez, Victoria; Coto, Eliecer; Blazquez, Marta; Guisasola, Luis M; Salvador, Carlos; Kachergus, Jennifer M; Lincoln, Sarah J; Farrer, Matthew

    2005-06-03

    Autosomal recessive mutations in the parkin gene are the predominant cause of familial, early-onset parkinsonism; missense mutations involving one or a few nucleotides, exonic deletions and duplications have been described. Here we report a family with two affected brothers. Direct sequencing of parkin did not detect mutations, but semi-quantitative analysis identified a novel exonic rearrangement of exons 2-4. Both patients were homozygous for unique genomic triplications of the parkin gene.

  16. A case report of spontaneous mutation (C33>U) in the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin causing hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cao, Wei

    2010-01-15

    The hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by juvenile-onset cataracts and elevated serum ferritin levels. It is caused by mutation in the iron response element (IRE) within the 5\\'UTR of L-ferritin gene. The mutation results in a loss of post-transcriptional negative feedback exerted by the interaction between iron regulatory proteins 1, 2 (IRP1 and IRP2) and IRE, which leads to uncontrolled expression of L-ferritin. In this paper, we describe the molecular pathogenesis of non-hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (non-H-HCS) in a patient with typical HHCS ocular lens morphology and high ferritin levels without obvious family history. Initial sequencing of the full-length L-ferritin cloned from genomic DNA demonstrated a mutation (C33>T) in the IRE of the affected patient but not in her unaffected family members. The mutation (C\\/T heterozygote) was also detected in cDNA derived from her blood mononuclear cells. Structure-prediction-modeling indicates that this mutation would significantly alter the secondary structure of the IRE, resulting in a loss of the interaction between IRP and IRE. By using IRP1\\/IRP2-human IgG1 Fc fusion proteins, we established a novel in vitro report system (modified ELISA) to verify impaired IRE\\/IRP binding. Both the C33>U and A40G mutations (the first identified mutation for HHCS) showed a dramatically decreased binding to IRP1\\/IRP2 protein, compared to the normal IRE RNA. Surprisingly, a decrease in L-ferritin mRNA levels was observed in the affected patient compared to controls suggesting a mechanism of transcriptional negative feedback by high intracellular L-ferritin protein levels not described heretofore. Taken together, spontaneous mutation in the IRE of L-ferritin may cause non-H-HCS by the same mechanism as HHCS. In addition, under abnormal circumstances, the protein level of L-ferritin may be principally controlled by post

  17. The Rate and Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a Bacterium Naturally Devoid of the Postreplicative Mismatch Repair Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Kucukyildirim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium smegmatis is a bacterium that is naturally devoid of known postreplicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR homologs, mutS and mutL, providing an opportunity to investigate how the mutation rate and spectrum has evolved in the absence of a highly conserved primary repair pathway. Mutation accumulation experiments of M. smegmatis yielded a base-substitution mutation rate of 5.27 × 10−10 per site per generation, or 0.0036 per genome per generation, which is surprisingly similar to the mutation rate in MMR-functional unicellular organisms. Transitions were found more frequently than transversions, with the A:T→G:C transition rate significantly higher than the G:C→A:T transition rate, opposite to what is observed in most studied bacteria. We also found that the transition-mutation rate of M. smegmatis is significantly lower than that of other naturally MMR-devoid or MMR-knockout organisms. Two possible candidates that could be responsible for maintaining high DNA fidelity in this MMR-deficient organism are the ancestral-like DNA polymerase DnaE1, which contains a highly efficient DNA proofreading histidinol phosphatase (PHP domain, and/or the existence of a uracil-DNA glycosylase B (UdgB homolog that might protect the GC-rich M. smegmatis genome against DNA damage arising from oxidation or deamination. Our results suggest that M. smegmatis has a noncanonical Dam (DNA adenine methylase methylation system, with target motifs differing from those previously reported. The mutation features of M. smegmatis provide further evidence that genomes harbor alternative routes for improving replication fidelity, even in the absence of major repair pathways.

  18. The Rate and Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a Bacterium Naturally Devoid of the Postreplicative Mismatch Repair Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukyildirim, Sibel; Long, Hongan; Sung, Way; Miller, Samuel F; Doak, Thomas G; Lynch, Michael

    2016-07-07

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is a bacterium that is naturally devoid of known postreplicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR) homologs, mutS and mutL, providing an opportunity to investigate how the mutation rate and spectrum has evolved in the absence of a highly conserved primary repair pathway. Mutation accumulation experiments of M. smegmatis yielded a base-substitution mutation rate of 5.27 × 10(-10) per site per generation, or 0.0036 per genome per generation, which is surprisingly similar to the mutation rate in MMR-functional unicellular organisms. Transitions were found more frequently than transversions, with the A:T→G:C transition rate significantly higher than the G:C→A:T transition rate, opposite to what is observed in most studied bacteria. We also found that the transition-mutation rate of M. smegmatis is significantly lower than that of other naturally MMR-devoid or MMR-knockout organisms. Two possible candidates that could be responsible for maintaining high DNA fidelity in this MMR-deficient organism are the ancestral-like DNA polymerase DnaE1, which contains a highly efficient DNA proofreading histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain, and/or the existence of a uracil-DNA glycosylase B (UdgB) homolog that might protect the GC-rich M. smegmatis genome against DNA damage arising from oxidation or deamination. Our results suggest that M. smegmatis has a noncanonical Dam (DNA adenine methylase) methylation system, with target motifs differing from those previously reported. The mutation features of M. smegmatis provide further evidence that genomes harbor alternative routes for improving replication fidelity, even in the absence of major repair pathways. Copyright © 2016 Kucukyildirim et al.

  19. NK cells are intrinsically functional in pigs with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by spontaneous mutations in the Artemis gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have identified Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University. These SCID pigs lack B-cells and T-cells, but possess Natural Killer (NK) cells. This SCID phenotype is caused by recessive mutations in the Artemis gene. Interestingly, two human tumor c...

  20. A spontaneous Fatp4/Scl27a4 splice site mutation in a new murine model for congenital ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianning; Koster, Maranke I; Harrison, Wilbur; Moran, Jennifer L; Beier, David R; Roop, Dennis R; Overbeek, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital ichthyoses are life-threatening conditions in humans. We describe here the identification and molecular characterization of a novel recessive mutation in mice that results in newborn lethality with severe congenital lamellar ichthyosis. Mutant newborns have a taut, shiny, non-expandable epidermis that resembles cornified manifestations of autosomal-recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans. The skin is stretched so tightly that the newborn mice are immobilized. The genetic defect was mapped to a region near the proximal end of chromosome 2 by SNP analysis, suggesting Fatp4/Slc27a4 as a candidate gene. FATP4 mutations in humans cause ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS), and mutations of Fatp4 in mice have previously been found to cause a phenotype that resembles human congenital ichthyoses. Characterization of the Fatp4 cDNA revealed a fusion of exon 8 to exon 10, with deletion of exon 9. Genomic sequencing identified an A to T mutation in the splice donor sequence at the 3'-end of exon 9. Loss of exon 9 results in a frame shift mutation upstream from the conserved very long-chain acyl-CoA synthase (VLACS) domain. Histological studies revealed that the mutant mice have defects in keratinocyte differentiation, along with hyperproliferation of the stratum basale of the epidermis, a hyperkeratotic stratum corneum, and reduced numbers of secondary hair follicles. Since Fatp4 protein is present primarily at the stratum granulosum and the stratum spinosum, the hyperproliferation and the alterations in hair follicle induction suggest that very long chain fatty acids, in addition to being required for normal cornification, may influence signals from the stratum corneum to the basal cells that help to orchestrate normal skin differentiation.

  1. The ducky2J mutation in Cacna2d2 results in reduced spontaneous Purkinje cell activity and altered gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Roberta; Page, Karen M.; Koch, Dietlind; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Foucault, Isabelle; Davies, Anthony; Wilkinson, Tonia; Rees, Michele; Edwards, Frances A.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2006-01-01

    The mouse mutant ducky and its allele ducky2J represent a model for absence epilepsy characterized by spike-wave seizures, and cerebellar ataxia. These mice have mutations in Cacna2d2, which encodes the α2δ-2 calcium channel subunit. Of relevance to the ataxic phenotype, α2δ-2 mRNA is strongly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). The Cacna2d2du2J mutation results in a two base-pair deletion in the coding region and a complete loss of α2δ-2 protein. Here we show that du2J/du2J mice have a 30% reduction in somatic calcium current, and a marked fall in the spontaneous PC firing rate at 22°C, accompanied by a decrease in firing regularity, which is not affected by blocking synaptic input to PCs. At 34°C du2J/du2J PCs show no spontaneous intrinsic activity. Du2J/du2J mice also have alterations in the cerebellar expression of several genes related to PC function. At P21 there is an elevation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and a reduction in tenascin-C gene expression. Although du2J/+ mice have a marked reduction in α2δ-2 protein, they show no fall in PC somatic calcium currents or increase in cerebellar tryrosine hydroxylase gene expression. However, du2J/+ PCs do exhibit a significant reduction in firing rate, correlating with the reduction in α2δ-2. A hypothesis for future study is that effects on gene expression occur as a result of a reduction in somatic calcium currents, whereas effects on PC firing occur as a long-term result of loss of α2δ-2 and/or a reduction in calcium currents and calcium-dependent processes in regions other than the soma. PMID:17135419

  2. The ducky(2J) mutation in Cacna2d2 results in reduced spontaneous Purkinje cell activity and altered gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Roberta; Page, Karen M; Koch, Dietlind; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Foucault, Isabelle; Davies, Anthony; Wilkinson, Tonia; Rees, Michele; Edwards, Frances A; Dolphin, Annette C

    2006-11-29

    The mouse mutant ducky and its allele ducky(2J) represent a model for absence epilepsy characterized by spike-wave seizures and cerebellar ataxia. These mice have mutations in Cacna2d2, which encodes the alpha2delta-2 calcium channel subunit. Of relevance to the ataxic phenotype, alpha2delta-2 mRNA is strongly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). The Cacna2d2(du2J) mutation results in a 2 bp deletion in the coding region and a complete loss of alpha2delta-2 protein. Here we show that du(2J)/du(2J) mice have a 30% reduction in somatic calcium current and a marked fall in the spontaneous PC firing rate at 22 degrees C, accompanied by a decrease in firing regularity, which is not affected by blocking synaptic input to PCs. At 34 degrees C, du(2J)/du(2J) PCs show no spontaneous intrinsic activity. Du(2J)/du(2J) mice also have alterations in the cerebellar expression of several genes related to PC function. At postnatal day 21, there is an elevation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and a reduction in tenascin-C gene expression. Although du(2J)/+ mice have a marked reduction in alpha2delta-2 protein, they show no fall in PC somatic calcium currents or increase in cerebellar tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression. However, du(2J)/+ PCs do exhibit a significant reduction in firing rate, correlating with the reduction in alpha2delta-2. A hypothesis for future study is that effects on gene expression occur as a result of a reduction in somatic calcium currents, whereas effects on PC firing occur as a long-term result of loss of alpha2delta-2 and/or a reduction in calcium currents and calcium-dependent processes in regions other than the soma.

  3. EFFECTS OF THE ANTIMUTAGENS VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON SPONTANEOUS MUTATION IN E. COLI LACL STRAINS AND ON GLOBAL GENE EXPRESSION IN SALMONELLA TA104 AND HUMAN HEPG2 CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of the Antimutagens Vanillin and Cinnamaldehyde on Spontaneous Mutation in E. coli lacI Strains and on Global Gene Epression in Salmonella TAlO4 and Human HepG2 Cells In previous work we have shown that vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutag...

  4. Spontaneous asj-2J mutant mouse as a model for generalized arterial calcification of infancy: a large deletion/insertion mutation in the Enpp1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    Full Text Available Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene, manifests with extensive mineralization of the cardiovascular system. The affected individuals in most cases die within the first year of life, and there is currently no effective treatment for this disorder. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous mutant mouse, asj-2J, as a model for GACI. These mice were identified as part of a phenotypic deviant search in a large-scale production colony of BALB/cJ mice at The Jackson Laboratory. They demonstrated a characteristic gait due to stiffening of the joints, with phenotypic similarity to a previously characterized asj ("ages with stiffened joints" mouse, caused by a missense mutation in the Enpp1 gene. Complementation testing indicated that asj-2J and asj were allelic. PCR-based mutation detection strategy revealed in asj-2J mice a large, 40,035 bp, deletion spanning from intron 1 to the 3'-untranslated region of the Enpp1 gene, coupled with a 74 bp insertion. This was accompanied with a significant reduction in the plasma PPi concentration and reduced PPi/Pi ratio. As a consequence, extensive aberrant mineralization affecting the arterial vasculature, a number of internal organs, and the dermal sheath of vibrissae, a progressive biomarker of the ectopic mineralization process, was demonstrated by a combination of micro computed tomography, histopathology with calcium-specific stains, and direct chemical assay of calcium. Comparison of the asj and asj-2J mice demonstrated that the latter ones, particularly when placed on an acceleration diet high in phosphate and low in magnesium, had more extensive mineralization. Thus, the asj-2J mouse serves as a novel model for GACI, a currently intractable disorder.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of the family of feline leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) genes, and mutational analysis in familial spontaneous epileptic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Hamamoto, Yuji; Mizoguchi, Shunta; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Fujita, Michio

    2017-12-13

    Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) proteins play a critical role in synaptic transmission. Dysfunction of these genes and encoded proteins is associated with neurological disorders such as genetic epilepsy or autoimmune limbic encephalitis in animals and human. Familial spontaneous epileptic cats (FSECs) are the only feline strain and animal model of familial temporal lobe epilepsy. The seizure semiology of FSECs comprises recurrent limbic seizures with or without evolution into generalized epileptic seizures, while cats with antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channel complexed/LGI1 show limbic encephalitis and recurrent limbic seizures. However, it remains unclear whether the genetics underlying FSECs are associated with LGI family genes. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the feline LGI1-4 genes and examined their association with FSECs. Conventional PCR techniques were performed for cloning and mutational analysis. Characterization was predicted using bioinformatics software. The cDNAs of feline LGI1-4 contained 1674-bp, 1650-bp, 1647-bp, and 1617-bp open reading frames, respectively, and encoded proteins comprising 557, 549, 548, and 538 amino acid residues, respectively. The feline LGI1-4 putative protein sequences showed high homology with Homo sapiens, Canis familiaris, Bos taurus, Sus scrofa, and Equus caballus (92%-100%). Mutational analysis in 8 FSECs and 8 controls for LGI family genes revealed 3 non-synonymous and 14 synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region. Only one non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in LGI4 was found in 3 out of 8 FSECs. Using three separate computational tools, this mutation was not predicted to be disease causing. No co-segregation of the disease was found with any variant. We cloned the cDNAs of the four feline LGI genes, analyzed the amino acid sequences, and revealed that epilepsy in FSEC is not a monogenic disorder associated with LGI genes.

  6. Disruption of NBS1 gene leads to early embryonic lethality in homozygous null mice and induces specific cancer in heterozygous mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Henrie, Melinda; Ouyang, Honghai; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Ito, Hisao; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B.; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Gloria C.; Chen, David J.

    2002-04-15

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal recessive chromosome instability syndrome characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition, with cellular features similar to that of ataxia telangiectasia (AT). NBS results from mutations in the mammalian gene Nbs1 that codes for a 95-kDa protein called nibrin, NBS1, or p95. To establish an animal model for NBS, we attempted to generate NBS1 knockout mice. However, NBS1 gene knockouts were lethal at an early embryonic stage. NBS1 homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured in vitro showed retarded growth and subsequently underwent growth arrest within 5 days of culture. Apoptosis, assayed by TUNEL staining, was observed in NBSI homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured for four days. NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice were normal, and exhibited no specific phenotype for at least one year. However, fibroblast cells from NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice displayed an enhanced frequency of spontaneous transformation to anchorage-independent growth as compared to NBS1 wild-type(+/+) cells. Furthermore, heterozygous(+/-) mice exhibited a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after one year compared to wild-type mice, even though no significant differences in the incidence of other tumors such as lung adenocarcinoma and lymphoma were observed. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that NBS1 heterozygosity and reduced NBSI expression induces formation of specific tumors in mice.

  7. A spontaneous dominant-negative mutation within a 35S::AtMYB90 transgene inhibits flower pigment production in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Jeff; Cakir, Cahid; Cazzonelli, Christopher I

    2010-03-29

    In part due to the ease of visual detection of phenotypic changes, anthocyanin pigment production has long been the target of genetic and molecular research in plants. Specific members of the large family of plant myb transcription factors have been found to play critical roles in regulating expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes and these genes continue to serve as important tools in dissecting the molecular mechanisms of plant gene regulation. A spontaneous mutation within the coding region of an Arabidopsis 35S::AtMYB90 transgene converted the activator of plant-wide anthocyanin production to a dominant-negative allele (PG-1) that inhibits normal pigment production within tobacco petals. Sequence analysis identified a single base change that created a premature nonsense codon, truncating the encoded myb protein. The resulting mutant protein lacks 78 amino acids from the wild type C-terminus and was confirmed as the source of the white-flower phenotype. A putative tobacco homolog of AtMYB90 (NtAN2) was isolated and found to be expressed in flower petals but not leaves of all tobacco plants tested. Using transgenic tobacco constitutively expressing the NtAN2 gene confirmed the NtAN2 protein as the likely target of PG-1-based inhibition of tobacco pigment production. Messenger RNA and anthocyanin analysis of PG-1Sh transgenic lines (and PG-1Sh x purple 35S::NtAN2 seedlings) support a model in which the mutant myb transgene product acts as a competitive inhibitor of the native tobacco NtAN2 protein. This finding is important to researchers in the field of plant transcription factor analysis, representing a potential outcome for experiments analyzing in vivo protein function in test transgenic systems that over-express or mutate plant transcription factors.

  8. The production of homozygous tree material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard F. Stettler; George E. Howe

    1966-01-01

    Homozygous trees will never be the desired ultimate step in a forest tree improvement program. However, they will serve many purposes in forest genetics research: (1) in the detection of genetic markers; (2) in the isolation of traits under simple genetic control for the study of growth and differentiation phenomena; (3) as a tool as well as reference material in the...

  9. SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF HOMOZYGOUS CYSTINURIA WITH

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    experienced recurrent nephrolithiasis or adverse drug effects. Conclusion: We conclude that captopril can significantly decrease urinary cystine excretion in patients with homozygous cystinuria. Captopril should be considered an alternative to traditional drug management of cystinuria. Key Words: lithiasis, captopril, urinary ...

  10. A homozygous RET K666N genotype with an MEN2A phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Tania; Hyde, Samuel M; Cote, Gilbert J; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Giles, Wesley H; Stevens, Cathy A; Dadu, Ramona

    2018-02-02

    Germline RET K666N mutation has been described as a pathogenic mutation with low disease penetrance for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) without other features of MEN2A. We describe a patient with homozygous RET K666N mutation with MTC and bilateral pheochromocytoma (PHEO). A 59-year-old female was diagnosed with MTC after biopsy of two thyroid nodules. Coincident biochemical and radiologic testing was suspicious for bilateral PHEO, confirmed after bilateral adrenalectomy. There was no evidence for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). She had a total thyroidectomy with neck dissection revealing bilateral MTC with lymph node metastases. Germline RET testing identified homozygous K666N mutations. Genetic testing of family members expectedly showed that both adult children harbor a heterozygous K666N mutation. Her 32-year-old son had an elevated calcitonin level and underwent thyroidectomy which identified MTC. Her 30-year-old daughter had a normal calcitonin level. Prophylactic thyroidectomy showed C-cell hyperplasia only. Three of seven other family members were tested and found to carry the mutation. All had normal calcitonin levels and none had biochemical evidence for PHEO or PHPT. Given the absence of PHEO in reported RET K666N families, our proband underwent genetic testing for causes of hereditary paragangliomas/PHEO. No additional mutations were identified. This is the first reported case of a homozygous RET K666N mutation leading to coincident MTC and PHEO. Heterozygous presentation of RET K666N mutations have low penetrance for isolated MTC. We believe that the gene dosage associated with the homozygosity of this variant contributed to the occurrence of bilateral PHEO. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society

  11. Generation of an ASGR1 homozygous mutant human embryonic stem cell line WAe001-A-6 using CRISPR/Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The gene asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 (ASGR1 encodes a subunit of the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Here we report the generation of a human embryonic stem cell line WAe001-A-6 harbouring homozygous ASGR1 mutations using CRISPR/Cas9. The mutation involves a 37 bp deletion, resulting in a frame shift. The homozygous knockout WA01 cell line maintains a normal karyotype, typical stem cell morphology, pluripotency and differentiation potential in vitro.

  12. Homozygous c.1160C>T (P38L) in the MECP2 gene in a female Rett syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanushali, Aparna A; Mandsaurwala, A; Das, Bibhu R

    2016-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder. Mutations in the MECP2 gene on chromosome Xq28 have been shown to be the cause of Rett syndrome. Sequencing of the MECP2 gene in a patient with clinical suspicion of Rett syndrome revealed c.1160C>T (P387L) in exon 4 of the MECP2 gene homozygously. Females with Rett syndrome are usually heterozygous for a mutation in MECP2. Uniparental disomy as a probable cause for the homozygous presence of this mutation was ruled out by quantitative fluorescence-polymerase chain reaction. Moreover to our knowledge this mutation has only been reported in males with X-linked mental retardation (MRX). We hypothesize that the presence of this mutation c.1160C>T (P387L) in the homozygous form is responsible for the Rett syndrome-like phenotype seen in this patient. This novel report reveals for the first time the homozygous presence of a mutation which has hitherto only been reported in males with MRX. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Progression of subtle motor signs in PINK1 mutation carriers with mild dopaminergic deficit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggers, C; Schmidt, A; Hagenah, J

    2010-01-01

    While homozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene cause recessively inherited early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), heterozygous mutations have been suggested as a susceptibility factor.......While homozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene cause recessively inherited early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), heterozygous mutations have been suggested as a susceptibility factor....

  14. Presentation of Complex Homozygous Allele in ABCA4 Gene in a Patient with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Māreta Audere

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa is a degenerative retinal disease characterized by progressive photoreceptor damage, which causes loss of peripheral and night vision and the development of tunnel vision and may result in loss of central vision. This study describes a patient with retinitis pigmentosa caused by a mutation in the ABCA4 gene with complex allele c.1622T>C, p.L541P; c.3113C>T, p.A1038V in homozygous state.

  15. Brittle Cornea Syndrome: Case Report with Novel Mutation in the PRDM5 Gene and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Avgitidou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old boy presented with acute corneal hydrops on the left eye and spontaneous corneal rupture on the right eye. A diagnosis of brittle cornea syndrome was confirmed by molecular analysis. A novel mutation, the homozygous variant c.17T>G, p.V6G, was found in the gene for PR-domain-containing protein 5 (PRDM5 in exon 1. Brittle cornea syndrome is a rare connective tissue disease with typical ocular, auditory, musculoskeletal, and cutaneous disorders. Almost all patients suffer from declined vision due to corneal scarring, thinning, and rupture. The most common ophthalmologic findings include keratoconus, progressive central corneal thinning, high myopia, irregular astigmatism, retinal detachment, and high risk for spontaneous corneal or scleral rupture. In addition to describing the case with a novel mutation here we review the current literature on brittle cornea syndrome pathogenesis, clinical findings, and therapy.

  16. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T

  17. Spontaneous 8bp Deletion in Nbeal2 Recapitulates the Gray Platelet Syndrome in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberg, Kärt; Khoriaty, Rami; Westrick, Randal J.; Fairfield, Heather E.; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Brodsky, Gary L.; Davizon-Castillo, Pavel; Ginsburg, David; Di Paola, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    During the analysis of a whole genome ENU mutagenesis screen for thrombosis modifiers, a spontaneous 8 base pair (bp) deletion causing a frameshift in exon 27 of the Nbeal2 gene was identified. Though initially considered as a plausible thrombosis modifier, this Nbeal2 mutation failed to suppress the synthetic lethal thrombosis on which the original ENU screen was based. Mutations in NBEAL2 cause Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS), an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and gray-appearing platelets due to lack of platelet alpha granules. Mice homozygous for the Nbeal2 8 bp deletion (Nbeal2gps/gps) exhibit a phenotype similar to human GPS, with significantly reduced platelet counts compared to littermate controls (p = 1.63 x 10−7). Nbeal2gps/gps mice also have markedly reduced numbers of platelet alpha granules and an increased level of emperipolesis, consistent with previously characterized mice carrying targeted Nbeal2 null alleles. These findings confirm previous reports, provide an additional mouse model for GPS, and highlight the potentially confounding effect of background spontaneous mutation events in well-characterized mouse strains. PMID:26950939

  18. Spontaneous 8bp Deletion in Nbeal2 Recapitulates the Gray Platelet Syndrome in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kärt Tomberg

    Full Text Available During the analysis of a whole genome ENU mutagenesis screen for thrombosis modifiers, a spontaneous 8 base pair (bp deletion causing a frameshift in exon 27 of the Nbeal2 gene was identified. Though initially considered as a plausible thrombosis modifier, this Nbeal2 mutation failed to suppress the synthetic lethal thrombosis on which the original ENU screen was based. Mutations in NBEAL2 cause Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS, an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and gray-appearing platelets due to lack of platelet alpha granules. Mice homozygous for the Nbeal2 8 bp deletion (Nbeal2gps/gps exhibit a phenotype similar to human GPS, with significantly reduced platelet counts compared to littermate controls (p = 1.63 x 10-7. Nbeal2gps/gps mice also have markedly reduced numbers of platelet alpha granules and an increased level of emperipolesis, consistent with previously characterized mice carrying targeted Nbeal2 null alleles. These findings confirm previous reports, provide an additional mouse model for GPS, and highlight the potentially confounding effect of background spontaneous mutation events in well-characterized mouse strains.

  19. The ter mutation in the rat Dnd1 gene initiates gonadal teratomas and infertility in both genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Emily; Zschemisch, Nils-Holger; Eisenblätter, Regina; Glage, Silke; Wedekind, Dirk; Cuppen, Edwin; Dorsch, Martina; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    A spontaneous mutation leading to the formation of congenital ovarian and testicular tumors was detected in the WKY/Ztm rat strain. The histological evaluation revealed derivatives from all three germ layers, thereby identifying these tumors as teratomas. Teratocarcinogenesis was accompanied by infertility and the underlying mutation was termed ter. Linkage analysis of 58 (WKY-ter×SPRD-Cu3) F2 rats associated the ter mutation with RNO18 (LOD = 3.25). Sequencing of candidate genes detected a point mutation in exon 4 of the dead-end homolog 1 gene (Dnd1), which introduces a premature stop codon assumed to cause a truncation of the Dnd1 protein. Genotyping of the recessive ter mutation revealed a complete penetrance of teratocarcinogenesis and infertility in homozygous ter rats of both genders. Morphologically non-tumorous testes of homozygous ter males were reduced in both size and weight. This testicular malformation was linked to a lack of spermatogenesis using immunohistochemical and histological staining. Our WKY-Dnd1(ter)/Ztm rat is a novel animal model to investigate gonadal teratocarcinogenesis and the molecular mechanisms involved in germ cell development of both genders.

  20. Identification of homozygous deletions at chromosome 16q23 in aflatoxin B1 exposed hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakicier, M C; Legoix, P; Vaury, C; Gressin, L; Tubacher, E; Capron, F; Bayer, J; Degott, C; Balabaud, C; Zucman-Rossi, J

    2001-08-23

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) represents the most frequent genetic alteration observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Chromosome 16q is of particular interest as it exhibits LOH in 29% of HCC tumors and is frequently lost in breast, prostate, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. We genotyped 157 HCC tumors for 17 microsatellite markers distributed on chromosome 16q and determined a common region of LOH localized between the markers D16S518 and D16S504. By refining the boundaries of two interstitial LOH and two homozygous deletions, the critical region was delimited to 180 kb between D16S3096 and D16S3029. This region is located in intron 8 of the WWOX/FOR gene, but a search for mutations in all coding exons of this gene in 27 HCC tumors and cell lines did not reveal any tumor somatic alterations. Furthermore, by RT-PCR, no abnormal transcripts of this WWOX/FOR gene was detected in nine HCC cell lines. Finally, analysis of the p53 gene mutations with the clinical parameters of all tumors revealed that the two homozygous deletions have occurred in tumors presenting a R249S mutation. Our data revealed a relationship between chromosome 16q homozygous deletions and R249S p53 mutations in tumors where the patient had been exposed to aflatoxin B1 (P=0.002). These results are consistent with a role of aflatoxin B1 in the instability of chromosome 16q at the fragile site FRA16D. However, the nature of the specific gene that is altered during hepatocarcinogenesis remains to be elucidated.

  1. A comparison of mutations induced by accelerated iron particles versus those induced by low earth orbit space radiation in the FEM-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, P. S.; Hlavacek, A.; Wilde, H.; Lewicki, D.; Schubert, W.; Kern, R. G.; Kazarians, G. A.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans was employed to determine the mutation frequency as well as the nature of mutations induced by low earth orbit space radiation ambient to Space Shuttle flight STS-76. Recovered mutations were compared to those induced by accelerated iron ions generated by the AGS synchrotron accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For logistical reasons, dauer larvae were prepared at TCU, transported to either Kennedy Space Center or Brookhaven National Laboratory, flown in space or irradiated, returned to TCU and screened for mutants. A total of 25 fem-3 mutants were recovered after the shuttle flight and yielded a mutation frequency of 2.1x10(-5), roughly 3.3-fold higher than the spontaneous rate of 6.3x10(-6). Four of the mutations were homozygous inviable, suggesting that they were large deletions encompassing fem-3 as well as neighboring, essential genes. Southern blot analyses revealed that one of the 25 contained a polymorphism in fem-3, further evidence that space radiation can induce deletions. While no polymorphisms were detected among the iron ion-induced mutations, three of the 15 mutants were homozygous inviable, which is in keeping with previous observations that high LET iron particles generate deficiencies. These data provide evidence, albeit indirect, that an important mutagenic component of ambient space radiation is high LET charged particles such as iron ions.

  2. Viremic control and viral coreceptor usage in two HIV-1-infected persons homozygous for CCR5 Δ32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hanhauser, Emily; Hu, Zixin; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-05-15

    To determine viral and immune factors involved in transmission and control of HIV-1 infection in persons without functional CCR5. Understanding transmission and control of HIV-1 in persons homozygous for CCR5(Δ32) is important given efforts to develop HIV-1 curative therapies aimed at modifying or disrupting CCR5 expression. We identified two HIV-infected CCR5(Δ32/Δ32) individuals among a cohort of patients with spontaneous control of HIV-1 infection without antiretroviral therapy and determined coreceptor usage of the infecting viruses. We assessed genetic evolution of full-length HIV-1 envelope sequences by single-genome analysis from one participant and his sexual partner, and explored HIV-1 immune responses and HIV-1 mutations following virologic escape and disease progression. Both participants experienced viremia of less than 4000 RNA copies/ml with preserved CD4(+) T-cell counts off antiretroviral therapy for at least 3.3 and 4.6 years after diagnosis, respectively. One participant had phenotypic evidence of X4 virus, had no known favorable human leukocyte antigen alleles, and appeared to be infected by minority X4 virus from a pool that predominately used CCR5 for entry. The second participant had virus that was unable to use CXCR4 for entry in phenotypic assay but was able to engage alternative viral coreceptors (e.g., CXCR6) in vitro. Our study demonstrates that individuals may be infected by minority X4 viruses from a population that predominately uses CCR5 for entry, and that viruses may bypass traditional HIV-1 coreceptors (CCR5 and CXCR4) completely by engaging alternative coreceptors to establish and propagate HIV-1 infection.

  3. A novel homozygous variant in the SMOC1 gene underlying Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Asmat; Umair, Muhammad; Ahmad, Farooq; Muhammad, Dost; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS), also known as ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome or anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare congenital disorder that segregates in an autosomal recessive pattern. Clinical features of the syndrome include malformation of the eyes and the skeleton. Mostly, WAS is caused by mutations in the SMOC-1 gene. The present report describes a large consanguineous family of Pakistani origin segregating Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome in an autosomal recessive pattern. Genotyping followed by Sanger sequencing was performed to search for a candidate gene. SNP genotyping using AffymetrixGeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array established a single homozygous region among affected members on chromosome 14q23.1-q24.3 harboring the SMOC1 gene. Sequencing of the gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.812G>A; p.Cys271Tyr) in the family. This is the first report of Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome caused by a SMOC1 variant in a Pakistani population. The mutation identified in the present investigation extends the body of evidence implicating the gene SMOC-1 in causing WAS.

  4. Rab geranylgeranyl transferase alpha mutation in the gunmetal mouse reduces Rab prenylation and platelet synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detter, J C; Zhang, Q; Mules, E H; Novak, E K; Mishra, V S; Li, W; McMurtrie, E B; Tchernev, V T; Wallace, M R; Seabra, M C; Swank, R T; Kingsmore, S F

    2000-04-11

    Few molecular events important to platelet biogenesis have been identified. Mice homozygous for the spontaneous, recessive mutation gunmetal (gm) have prolonged bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and reduced platelet alpha- and delta-granule contents. Here we show by positional cloning that gm results from a G-->A substitution mutation in a splice acceptor site within the alpha-subunit of Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (Rabggta), an enzyme that attaches geranylgeranyl groups to Rab proteins. Most Rabggta mRNAs from gm tissues skipped exon 1 and lacked a start codon. Rabggta protein and Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (GGTase) activity were reduced 4-fold in gm platelets. Geranylgeranylation and membrane association of Rab27, a Rab GGTase substrate, were significantly decreased in gm platelets. These findings indicate that geranylgeranylation of Rab GTPases is critical for hemostasis. Rab GGTase inhibition may represent a new treatment for thrombocytosis and clotting disorders.

  5. Rab geranylgeranyl transferase α mutation in the gunmetal mouse reduces Rab prenylation and platelet synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detter, John C.; Zhang, Qing; Mules, Emilie H.; Novak, Edward K.; Mishra, Vishnu S.; Li, Wei; McMurtrie, Elzbieta B.; Tchernev, Velizar T.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Seabra, Miguel C.; Swank, Richard T.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2000-01-01

    Few molecular events important to platelet biogenesis have been identified. Mice homozygous for the spontaneous, recessive mutation gunmetal (gm) have prolonged bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and reduced platelet α- and δ-granule contents. Here we show by positional cloning that gm results from a G→A substitution mutation in a splice acceptor site within the α-subunit of Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (Rabggta), an enzyme that attaches geranylgeranyl groups to Rab proteins. Most Rabggta mRNAs from gm tissues skipped exon 1 and lacked a start codon. Rabggta protein and Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (GGTase) activity were reduced 4-fold in gm platelets. Geranylgeranylation and membrane association of Rab27, a Rab GGTase substrate, were significantly decreased in gm platelets. These findings indicate that geranylgeranylation of Rab GTPases is critical for hemostasis. Rab GGTase inhibition may represent a new treatment for thrombocytosis and clotting disorders. PMID:10737774

  6. Inactivation and inducible oncogenic mutation of p53 in gene targeted pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Leuchs

    Full Text Available Mutation of the tumor suppressor p53 plays a major role in human carcinogenesis. Here we describe gene-targeted porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and live pigs carrying a latent TP53(R167H mutant allele, orthologous to oncogenic human mutant TP53(R175H and mouse Trp53(R172H, that can be activated by Cre recombination. MSCs carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele were analyzed in vitro. Homozygous cells were p53 deficient, and on continued culture exhibited more rapid proliferation, anchorage independent growth, and resistance to the apoptosis-inducing chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, all characteristic of cellular transformation. Cre mediated recombination activated the latent TP53(R167H allele as predicted, and in homozygous cells expressed mutant p53-R167H protein at a level ten-fold greater than wild-type MSCs, consistent with the elevated levels found in human cancer cells. Gene targeted MSCs were used for nuclear transfer and fifteen viable piglets were produced carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele in heterozygous form. These animals will allow study of p53 deficiency and expression of mutant p53-R167H to model human germline, or spontaneous somatic p53 mutation. This work represents the first inactivation and mutation of the gatekeeper tumor suppressor gene TP53 in a non-rodent mammal.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of the family of feline leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) genes, and mutational analysis in familial spontaneous epileptic cats

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Hamamoto, Yuji; Mizoguchi, Shunta; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Fujita, Michio

    2017-01-01

    Background Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) proteins play a critical role in synaptic transmission. Dysfunction of these genes and encoded proteins is associated with neurological disorders such as genetic epilepsy or autoimmune limbic encephalitis in animals and human. Familial spontaneous epileptic cats (FSECs) are the only feline strain and animal model of familial temporal lobe epilepsy. The seizure semiology of FSECs comprises recurrent limbic seizures with or without evolution into...

  8. Spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davari R

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A case with bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax was presented. Etiology, mechanism, and treatment were discussed on the review of literature. Spontaneous Pneumothorax is a clinical entity resulting from a sudden non traumatic rupture of the lung. Biach reported in 1880 that 78% of 916 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax had tuberculosis. Kjergaard emphasized 1932 the primary importance of subpleural bleb disease. Currently the clinical spectrum of spontaneous pneumothorax seems to have entered a third era with the recognition of the interstitial lung disease and AIDS as a significant etiology. Standard treatment is including: observation, thoracocentesis, tube thoracostomy. Chemical pleurodesis, bullectomy or wedge resection of lung with pleural abrasion and occasionally pleurectomy. Little information has been reported regarding the efficacy of such treatment in spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to non bleb disease

  9. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations, atopic dermatitis and risk of actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Y M F; Egeberg, A; Balslev, E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin gene (FLG) represent a strong genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Homozygous mutation carriers typically display ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and many have concomitant AD. Previously, homozygous, but not heterozygous, filaggrin gene...

  10. A Point Mutation in a lincRNA Upstream of GDNF Is Associated to a Canine Insensitivity to Pain: A Spontaneous Model for Human Sensory Neuropathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Plassais

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathies (HSANs are characterized by insensitivity to pain, sometimes combined with self-mutilation. Strikingly, several sporting dog breeds are particularly affected by such neuropathies. Clinical signs appear in young puppies and consist of acral analgesia, with or without sudden intense licking, biting and severe self-mutilation of the feet, whereas proprioception, motor abilities and spinal reflexes remain intact. Through a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS with 24 affected and 30 unaffected sporting dogs using the Canine HD 170K SNP array (Illumina, we identified a 1.8 Mb homozygous locus on canine chromosome 4 (adj. p-val = 2.5x10-6. Targeted high-throughput sequencing of this locus in 4 affected and 4 unaffected dogs identified 478 variants. Only one variant perfectly segregated with the expected recessive inheritance in 300 sporting dogs of known clinical status, while it was never present in 900 unaffected dogs from 130 other breeds. This variant, located 90 kb upstream of the GDNF gene, a highly relevant neurotrophic factor candidate gene, lies in a long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA, GDNF-AS. Using human comparative genomic analysis, we observed that the canine variant maps onto an enhancer element. Quantitative RT-PCR of dorsal root ganglia RNAs of affected dogs showed a significant decrease of both GDNF mRNA and GDNF-AS expression levels (respectively 60% and 80%, as compared to unaffected dogs. We thus performed gel shift assays (EMSA that reveal that the canine variant significantly alters the binding of regulatory elements. Altogether, these results allowed the identification in dogs of GDNF as a relevant candidate for human HSAN and insensitivity to pain, but also shed light on the regulation of GDNF transcription. Finally, such results allow proposing these sporting dog breeds as natural models for clinical trials with a double benefit for human and veterinary medicine.

  11. Spontaneous mutations of the UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase gene confers pale- and dull-colored flowers in the Japanese and common morning glories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yasumasa; Ishiguro, Kanako; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Iida, Shigeru; Hoshino, Atsushi

    2015-09-01

    UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3- O -glucosyltransferase is essential for maintaining proper production quantity, acylation, and glucosylation of anthocyanin, and defects cause pale and dull flower pigmentation in morning glories. The Japanese (Ipomoea nil) and the common (I. purpurea) morning glory display bright blue and dark purple flowers, respectively. These flowers contain acylated and glucosylated anthocyanin pigments, and a number of flower color mutants have been isolated in I. nil. Of these, the duskish mutants of I. nil produce pale- and dull-colored flowers. We found that the Duskish gene encodes UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (3GT). The duskish-1 mutation is a frameshift mutation caused by a 4-bp insertion, and duskish-2 is an insertion of a DNA transposon, Tpn10, at 1.3 kb upstream of the 3GT start codon. In the duskish-2 mutant, excision of Tpn10 is responsible for restoration of the expression of the 3GT gene. The recombinant 3GT protein displays expected 3GT enzymatic activities to catalyze 3-O-glucosylation of anthocyanidins in vitro. Anthocyanin analysis of a duskish-2 mutant and its germinal revertant showing pale and normal pigmented flowers, respectively, revealed that the mutation caused around 80 % reduction of anthocyanin accumulation. We further characterized two I. purpurea mutants showing pale brownish-red flowers, and found that they carry the same frameshift mutation in the 3GT gene. Most of the flower anthocyanins in the mutants were previously found to be anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosides lacking several caffeic acid and glucose moieties that are attached to the anthocyanins in the wild-type plants. These results indicated that 3GT is essential not only for production, but also for proper acylation and glucosylation, of anthocyanin in the morning glories.

  12. [The effect of SSH&H on the lifespan and spontaneous cancer development in transgenic mice with HER-2/neu mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndyk, M L; Popovich, I G; Anikin, I V; Egormin, P A; Iurova, M N; Zabezhinskiĭ, M A; Anisimov, V N

    2012-01-01

    10 months old mice receiving SSH&H with daily food increased the lifespan in comparison to the control group. The maximal lifespan was increased by 1,6 months. For the long-living 10% group the mean lifespan increased by 8,7% compared to the control group (pSSH&H on the neoplastic rate in transgenic mice with HER-2/neu mutation.

  13. Lumacaftor-Ivacaftor in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Homozygous for Phe508del CFTR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wainwright, Claire E; Elborn, J Stuart; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting disease that is caused by defective or deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity. Phe508del is the most common CFTR mutation. METHODS: We conducted two phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo......-controlled studies that were designed to assess the effects of lumacaftor (VX-809), a CFTR corrector, in combination with ivacaftor (VX-770), a CFTR potentiator, in patients 12 years of age or older who had cystic fibrosis and were homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. In both studies, patients were randomly......-ivacaftor and placebo groups. The rate of discontinuation due to an adverse event was 4.2% among patients who received lumacaftor-ivacaftor versus 1.6% among those who received placebo. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that lumacaftor in combination with ivacaftor provided a benefit for patients with cystic fibrosis...

  14. Effects of a tumor promoter and an anti-promoter on spontaneous and UV-induced 6-thioguanine-resistant mutations and sister-chromatid exchanges in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Kano, Y.; Tatsumi, M.; Paul, P.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of a tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and/or an anti-promoter antipain (protease inhibitor) on spontaneous and ultraviolet-induced sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and 6-thioguanine-resistant (6TGsup(r)) recessive mutations were examined in V79 Chinese hamster cells in culture. TPA and/or antipain neither significantly altered base-line and UV-induced immediate SCE frequencies, nor decreased the level of delayed SCEs which persisted 6-7 days after irradiation. TPA and/or antipain appeared to enhance the recovery of UV-induced 6TGsup(r) colonies at the plateau expression phase despite non-mutagenicity by themselves and unaltered metabolic cooperation. Thus, the results conceivably imply that the 6TGsup(r)-recessive mutation expression, but not fixation, can be modulated at the cell level by TPA and/or antipain. Our results, together with the recent results of Loveday and Latt, may argue against the notion that TPA enhances the antipain-suppressible SCEs as an index of mitotic recombination in relevance with a tumor-promotion mechanism. (orig.)

  15. Novel mutations in the transmembrane natriuretic peptide receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is an autosomal recessive disorder due to mutation in NPR2 gene which impairs skeletal growth. To screen the mutations in the gene NPR2, all of its coding exons and splice junction sites were PCR amplified from genomic DNA of affected individuals of four families and sequenced. Four homozygous mutations in four ...

  16. Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin and MTHFR Mutation in Patients with Preeclamsia, Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Placental Abruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Livrinova

    2015-09-01

    CONCLUSION: The presence of mutation MTHFR homozygous could increase the risk for development of IUGR and mutation of Factor V Leiden for placental abruption. Further investigations with more patients are warranted.

  17. Spontaneous deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, Benjamin; Geradin, Damien

    Platform businesses such as Airbnb and Uber have risen to success partly by sidestepping laws and regulations that encumber their traditional competitors. Such rule flouting is what the authors call “spontaneous private deregulation,” and it’s happening in a growing number of industries. The authors

  18. Hepatitis B Virus Infection In Patients With Homozygous Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nnebe-Agumadu U H, and Abiodun P O. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease (HbSS): Need for Intervention. Annals Biomedical Sciences 2002; 1:79-87. This is a prospective study of 213 patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) (112 males and 101 females) aged 6 months to 18 years ...

  19. Avascular necrosis in sickle cell (homozygous S) patients: Predictive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with the development of AVN. Conclusion: In conclusion, patients with a raised steady state platelet count may have a higher tendency to develop AVN and may require closer orthopedic review and prophylactic intervention. Key words: Avascular necrosis, homozygous S, platelet count, sickle cell anemia, white cell count ...

  20. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  1. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences

  2. Loss of the chromatin modifier Kdm2aa causes BrafV600E-independent spontaneous melanoma in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Scahill

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available KDM2A is a histone demethylase associated with transcriptional silencing, however very little is known about its in vivo role in development and disease. Here we demonstrate that loss of the orthologue kdm2aa in zebrafish causes widespread transcriptional disruption and leads to spontaneous melanomas at a high frequency. Fish homozygous for two independent premature stop codon alleles show reduced growth and survival, a strong male sex bias, and homozygous females exhibit a progressive oogenesis defect. kdm2aa mutant fish also develop melanomas from early adulthood onwards which are independent from mutations in braf and other common oncogenes and tumour suppressors as revealed by deep whole exome sequencing. In addition to effects on translation and DNA replication gene expression, high-replicate RNA-seq in morphologically normal individuals demonstrates a stable regulatory response of epigenetic modifiers and the specific de-repression of a group of zinc finger genes residing in constitutive heterochromatin. Together our data reveal a complex role for Kdm2aa in regulating normal mRNA levels and carcinogenesis. These findings establish kdm2aa mutants as the first single gene knockout model of melanoma biology.

  3. Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy associated with a deleterious mutation in the ATRN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrour, Maher Awni; Ashhab, Motee; Edvardson, Simon; Gur, Michal; Abu-Libdeh, Bassam; Elpeleg, Orly

    2017-07-01

    Hypomyelinating leukodystrophies are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that affect proper formation of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system. They are characterized by developmental delay, hypotonia, spasticity, and variable intellectual disability. We used whole exome analysis to study the molecular basis of hypomyelinating leukodystrophy in two sibs from a consanguineous family. A homozygous mutation, c.3068+5G>A, was identified in the ATRN gene, with the consequent insertion of an intronic sequence into the patients' cDNA and a predicted premature termination of the ATRN polypeptide. ATRN encodes Attractin, which was previously shown to play a critical role in central myelination. Several spontaneous ATRN rodent mutants exhibited impaired myelination which was attributed to oxidative stress and accelerated apoptosis. ATRN can now be added to the growing list of genes associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy. The disease seems to be confined to the CNS; however, given the young age of our patients, longer follow-up may be required.

  4. Tezacaftor-Ivacaftor in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Homozygous for Phe508del.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Munck, Anne; McKone, Edward F; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Moeller, Alexander; Simard, Christopher; Wang, Linda T; Ingenito, Edward P; McKee, Charlotte; Lu, Yimeng; Lekstrom-Himes, Julie; Elborn, J Stuart

    2017-11-23

    Combination treatment with the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators tezacaftor (VX-661) and ivacaftor (VX-770) was designed to target the underlying cause of disease in patients with cystic fibrosis. In this phase 3, randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial, we evaluated combination therapy with tezacaftor and ivacaftor in patients 12 years of age or older who had cystic fibrosis and were homozygous for the CFTR Phe508del mutation. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either 100 mg of tezacaftor once daily and 150 mg of ivacaftor twice daily or matched placebo for 24 weeks. The primary end point was the absolute change in the percentage of the predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) through week 24 (calculated in percentage points); relative change in the percentage of the predicted FEV 1 through week 24 (calculated as a percentage) was a key secondary end point. Of the 510 patients who underwent randomization, 509 received tezacaftor-ivacaftor or placebo, and 475 completed 24 weeks of the trial regimen. The mean FEV 1 at baseline was 60.0% of the predicted value. The effects on the absolute and relative changes in the percentage of the predicted FEV 1 in favor of tezacaftor-ivacaftor over placebo were 4.0 percentage points and 6.8%, respectively (Pcystic fibrosis and were homozygous for the CFTR Phe508del mutation. (Funded by Vertex Pharmaceuticals; EVOLVE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02347657 .).

  5. Spontaneous appearance of Tay-Sachs disease in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, B J; Torres, P A; Viner, T C; Wang, Z H; Raghavan, S S; Alroy, J; Pastores, G M; Kolodny, E H

    2008-01-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder due to an autosomal recessively inherited deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A). Deficiency of Hex A in TSD is caused by a defect of the alpha-subunit resulting from mutations of the HEXA gene. To date, there is no effective treatment for TSD. Animal models of genetic diseases, similar to those known to exist in humans, are valuable and essential research tools for the study of potentially effective therapies. However, there is no ideal animal model of TSD available for use in therapeutic trials. In the present study, we report an animal model (American flamingo; Phoenicopterus ruber) of TSD with Hex A deficiency occurring spontaneously in nature, with accumulation of G(M2)-ganglioside, deficiency of Hex A enzymatic activity, and a homozygous P469L mutation in exon 12 of the hexa gene. In addition, we have isolated the full-length cDNA sequence of the flamingo, which consists of 1581 nucleotides encoding a protein of 527 amino acids. Its coding sequence indicates approximately 71% identity at the nucleotide level and about 72.5% identity at the amino acid level with the encoding region of the human HEXA gene. This animal model, with many of the same features as TSD in humans, could represent a valuable resource for investigating therapy of TSD.

  6. Malabsorption of vitamin B12 in homozygous β-thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlachos, P.; Liakakos, D.

    1976-01-01

    Schilling tests were performed in ten children aged 5-12 years suffering from homozygous β-thalassemia. 57 Co labelled vitamin B 12 values excreted in the urine have been found much lower than normal and remained low when the same procedure was repeated with the addition of intrinsic factor. The possible factors responsible for this malabsorption of vitamin B 12 seemed to be liver damage and folic acid deficiency. (orig.) [de

  7. Bilateral leukocoria in a patient with homozygous protein C deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Nasrat M.; Al-Dohayan, Noura D.; Al-Batiniji, Fatima S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a bilateral leukocoria and neonatal purpura fulminans in a male infant, born at full term after an unremarkable pregnancy to a healthy consanguineous married couple. Multiple hemorrhagic skin bullae were found at birth on various parts of the body with bilateral leukocoria, organized vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and intracranial hemorrhage with undetectable levels of protein C activity. We report a clinical case of homozygous protein-C deficiency with severe purpura fulminans and bilateral leukocoria. (author)

  8. Production of viable homozygous, doubled haploid channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbieser, Geoffrey C; Bosworth, Brian G; Quiniou, Sylvie M A

    2010-08-01

    Production of doubled haploids via mitotic gynogenesis is a useful tool for the creation of completely inbred fish. In order to produce viable doubled haploid channel catfish, we utilized hydrostatic pressure or thermal treatments on eggs fertilized with sperm that had been exposed to ultraviolet light. At 1.5 h post-fertilization, the embryos were exposed to either 590 kg/cm(2) hydrostatic pressure for 3 min, 37 degrees C for 5 min, or 41 degrees C for 3 min. In the pressure-treated group, only 21 offspring hatched from five spawns with family sizes of one, two, two, four, and 12 offspring each. Eight embryos from the 37 degrees C treatment and 32 embryos from the 41 degrees C treatment survived to hatch. Genotype analysis using microsatellite loci demonstrated all 21 offspring resulting from pressure treatment were homozygous at the 64 loci tested, and none contained alleles unique to the donor male. Eleven of 32 offspring from the 41 degrees C treatment were homozygous at the 18 loci tested, while 21 offspring were heterozygous at six to 12 of these loci. Again, no offspring contained alleles unique to the donor male. However, all eight offspring from the 37 degrees C treatment were heterozygous at multiple loci, and one contained unambiguous paternal alleles. These experiments demonstrated our ability to produce viable homozygous, doubled haploid channel catfish. Doubled haploid catfish can be used to create completely inbred populations for genetic analyses, and homozygous genomic templates will be useful in gene identification and genome characterization.

  9. Waved with open eyelids 2 (woe2 is a novel spontaneous mouse mutation in the protein phosphatase 1, regulatory (inhibitor subunit 13 like (Ppp1r13l gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toonen Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Waved with open eyelids 2 (woe2 is a novel autosomal recessive mouse mutation that arose spontaneously in our animal facility. Upon initial evaluation, mutant mice exhibited eyelids open at birth (EOB and wavy fur phenotypes. The goals of this study were to phenotypically characterize the woe2 mice and to identify the gene harboring the mutation responsible for the woe2 phenotype. Results Histological analysis of woe2 embryos identified the failure of embryonic eyelid closure. Clinical and histological analysis of woe2 adult eyes identified severe corneal opacities, abnormalities of the anterior segment of the eye, and the absence of meibomian glands. Abnormalities in the fur texture and the absence of meibomian glands prompted us to evaluate other epidermal appendages: skin, teeth, and nails--as well as lacrimal, mammary, salivary, sebaceous and sweat glands. No obvious morphological differences between WT and woe2 mice were identified in these tissues. However, the analysis of woe2 identified cardiac abnormalities. Positional cloning of the woe2 locus identified a 1308 bp deletion in the Ppp1r13l gene. The deletion resulted in an aberrant Ppp1r13lΔexon9-11 transcript that lacks exons 9, 10 and 11 resulting in a premature stop and a loss of 223 amino acids from the C-terminal end of the putative mutant PPP1R13L protein. Immunohistological analysis during eye development identified expression of PPP1R13L in the palpebral epidermis, palpebral and bulbar conjunctiva, corneal epithelium and meibomian glands. Conclusions The woe2 mouse harbors a novel deletion within the Ppp1r13l gene, likely resulting in a complete loss of PPP1R13L function. Results from this study provide evidence that PPP1R13L has an essential role in embryonic eyelid closure as well in development of meibomian glands and the anterior segment of the eye. The woe2 mice are a useful model for investigation of the role of PPP1R13L, especially during ocular and

  10. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova University, were studied for 19 different CFTR mutations by the strip assay method which is based on reverse hybridization. Results: In cystic fibrosis diagnosed patients, 19 mutations were observed of which 9 were homozygous and 10 were heterozygous. ∆F508 frequency was found as 11.9%, and rate of homozygous was found as 66.7%. Mutation frequencies of W1282X and N1303K were found as 2.40% and 4.80% respectively and rate of homozygous mutations were 50% for both. I148T mutation frequency was found as 3.20% and all were heterozygous. For the whole 19 mutations, frequency of mutation in 63 subjects was 22.3%. Conclusion: Detection of CFTR gene mutations by the strip assay method by reverse hybridization is an easy, fast and informative method. However, due to improvability of the common mutations in probable cystic fibrosis patients because of heterogenity in this region, it is still a major problem and does not exclude cystic fibrosis diagnosis. But this problematic issue can be overcome by evaluating the whole exons of CFTR mutations by advanced molecular tecniques. Key words: CFTR, cystic fibrosis, molecular diagnosis, reverse hibridisation [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 202-208

  11. Secondary polycythaemia in a Malay girl with homozygous Hb Tak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amran, H S; Aziz, M A; George, E; Mahmud, N; Lee, T Y; Md Noor, S

    2017-12-01

    Hb Tak is one of more than 200 high affinity haemoglobin variants reported worldwide. It results from the insertion of two nucleotides (AC) at the termination codon, between codon 146 and codon 147 of the beta-globin gene [Beta 147 (+AC)]. Polycythaemia is the main clinical feature although affected carriers are usually asymptomatic and do not require intervention. Several case studies in this region have reported the co-inheritance of Hb Tak with Hb E, delta beta and beta thalassaemia with one case of homozygous Hb Tak in a Thai boy. In this case report, a cluster of haemoglobin Tak was found in a family of Malay ethnic origin. Cascade family screening was conducted while investigating a 4-year old girl who presented with symptomatic polycythaemia. She had 2 previous Hb analysis done, at 7-month and 2-year-old with the diagnosis of possible Hb Q Thailand and Homozygous Hb D, respectively. Both diagnosis did not fit her clinical presentations. She was plethoric, had reduced exercise tolerance as well as cardiomyopathy. Her parents were consanguineously married and later diagnosed as asymptomatic carriers of Hb Tak. Consequently, re-analysis of the girl's blood sample revealed a homozygous state of Hb Tak. In conclusion, high oxygen affinity haemoglobin like Hb Tak should be considered in the investigation of polycythaemic patients with abnormal Hb analyses. In this case, DNA analysis was crucial in determining the correct diagnosis.

  12. Premature Valvular Heart Disease in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akl C. Fahed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Valvular heart disease frequently occurs as a consequence of premature atherosclerosis in individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH. Studies have primarily focused on aortic valve calcification in heterozygous FH, but there is paucity of data on the incidence of valvular disease in homozygous FH. We performed echocardiographic studies in 33 relatively young patients (mean age: 26 years with homozygous FH (mean LDL of 447 mg/dL, 73% on LDL apheresis to look for subclinical valvulopathy. Twenty-one patients had evidence of valvulopathy of the aortic or mitral valves, while seven subjects showed notable mitral regurgitation. Older patients were more likely to have aortic valve calcification (>21 versus ≤21 years: 59% versus 12.5%; p = 0.01 despite lower LDL levels at the time of the study (385 versus 513 mg/dL; p = 0.016. Patients with valvulopathy were older and had comparable LDL levels and a lower carotid intima-media thickness. Our data suggests that, in homozygous FH patients, valvulopathy (1 is present across a wide age spectrum and LDL levels and (2 is less likely to be influenced by lipid-lowering treatment. Echocardiographic studies that focused on aortic root thickening and stenosis and regurgitation are thus likely an effective modality for serial follow-up of subclinical valvular heart disease.

  13. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration initially presenting as postural tremor alone in a Japanese family with homozygous N245S substitutions in the pantothenate kinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Maeda, Yasushi; Ohmori, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Yuji; Hirano, Teruyuki; Yonemura, Kiminobu; Uyama, Eiichiro; Uchino, Makoto

    2004-10-15

    We describe a 24-year-old Japanese woman with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) whose only early symptom was postural tremor in the right hand at around 18 years of age, leading to a diagnosis of essential tremor at age 21. Although she was treated with arotinolol hydrochloride and clonazepam, she gradually progressed to extrapyramidal and pyramidal signs several years later. T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed bilaterally marked hypointensity with a central region of hyperintensity in the globus pallidus, or the so-called "eye-of-the-tiger" sign. Six years have passed since the initial appearance of postural tremor, whereas she has not shown choreoathetosis, retinitis pigmentosa, optic atrophy, or seizure. Direct sequencing of the patient's genomic DNA revealed homozygous base substitutions in the pantothenate kinase gene (PANK2): the A764-->G substitution (N245S) due to consanguinity of her parents. Although the heterozygous form of this mutation has already been reported among several families, this is the first report of the homozygous mutation in a patient with atypical-type PKAN. This detailed description of the clinical features of a Japanese patient with PKAN arising from homozygous N245S mutations in PANK2 would be useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of PKAN.

  14. Progressive cerebellar atrophy and polyneuropathy: expanding the spectrum of PNKP mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulton, C.; Oegema, R.; Heijsman, D.; Hoogeboom, J.; Schot, R.; Stroink, H.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Verheijen, F.W.; Spek, P. van der; Kremer, A.; Mancini, G.M.S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a neurodegenerative disorder starting in early childhood of two brothers consisting of severe progressive polyneuropathy, severe progressive cerebellar atrophy, microcephaly, mild epilepsy, and intellectual disability. The cause of this rare syndrome was found to be a homozygous mutation

  15. Mild recessive epidermolytic hyperkeratosis associated with a novel keratin 10 donor splice-site mutation in a family of Norfolk terrier dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credille, K M; Barnhart, K F; Minor, J S; Dunstan, R W

    2005-07-01

    Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis in humans is caused by dominant-negative mutations in suprabasal epidermal keratins 1 and 10. However, spontaneous keratin mutations have not been confirmed in a species other than human. To describe an autosomal recessive, mild, nonpalmar/plantar epidermolytic ichthyosis segregating in an extended pedigree of Norfolk terrier dogs due to a splice-site mutation in the gene encoding keratin 10 (KRT10). Dogs were evaluated clinically, and skin samples were examined by light and electron microscopy. Genomic DNA samples and cDNA from skin RNA were sequenced and defined a mutation in KRT10. Consequences of the mutation were evaluated by assessing protein expression with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and gene expression with real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction). Adult dogs with the disease had generalized, pigmented hyperkeratosis with epidermal fragility. Light microscopic examination defined epidermolysis with hyperkeratosis; ultrastructural changes included a decrease in tonofilaments and abnormal filament aggregation in upper spinous and granular layer keratinocytes. Affected dogs were homozygous for a single base GT-->TT change in the consensus donor splice site of intron 5 in KRT10. Keratin 10 protein was not detected with immunoblotting in affected dogs. Heterozygous dogs were normal based on clinical and histological appearance and keratin 10 protein expression. The mutation caused activation of at least three cryptic or alternative splice sites. Use of the cryptic sites resulted in transcripts containing premature termination codons. One transcript could result in shortening of the proximal portion of the 2B domain before the stutter region. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated a significant decrease in KRT10 mRNA levels in affected dogs compared with wild-type dogs. This disease is the first confirmed spontaneous keratin mutation in a nonhuman species and is the first reported recessive form

  16. Effect of transgene number of spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in lacl transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Loughlin, K.G.; Hamer, J.D.; Winegar, R.A.; Mirsalis, J.C.; Short, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Lacl transgenic mice are widely used for the measurement of mutations in specific target issues. The lacl transgene is present in mice as 40 tandem repeats; this sequence is homozygous (contained in both copies of chromosome 5) in C57Bl/6 mice, and is hemizygous in B6C3F1 mice. Previous reports have indicated that tandem repeats can produce chromosome instability, fragile sites, and other effects. To determine whether the presence of the transgene effects micronucleus induction we compared the response of nontransgenic (NTR) to hemizygous (HEMI) transgenic B6C3F1 mice and to hemizygous and homozygous (HOMO) transgenic C57Bl/6 mice. Five mice/group were irradiated with 500 cGy from a 137 Cs source. Bone marrow was harvested 24 hr after treatment and 2000 polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were analyzed per animal. The presence or absence of the lacl transgene had no effect in unirradiated mice on the percent of micronucleated PCE (MN) or on the ratio of PCE to total red blood cells for either strain: B6C3F1 mice had MN frequencies of 0.26% and 0.20% for NTR and HEMI mice, respectively; C57Bl/6 mice had MN frequencies of 0.34%, 0.32%, and 0.38% for NTR, HEMI, and HOMO mice, respectively. Radiation-induced micronucleus frequencies were significantly higher in HEMI lacl B6C3F1 mice (2.85%) than in NTR litter mates (1.59%); the converse was true in C57Bl/6 mice: NTR were 2.45%, HEMI were 1.25%, HOMO were 1.65%. These data suggest that the lacl transgene does not cause chromosome instability as measured by spontaneous micronucleus levels. However, the response of these transgenic mice to a variety of clastogenic agents needs to be investigated before they are integrated into standard in vivo assays for chromosome damage

  17. Homozygous deletion of SUN5 in three men with decapitated spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhatib, Razan A; Paci, Marine; Longepied, Guy; Saias-Magnan, Jacqueline; Courbière, Blandine; Guichaoua, Marie-Roberte; Lévy, Nicolas; Metzler-Guillemain, Catherine; Mitchell, Michael J

    2017-08-15

    A recent study of 17 men with decapitated spermatozoa found that 8 carried two rare SUN5 alleles, and concluded that loss of SUN5 function causes the acephalic spermatozoa syndrome. Consistent with this, the SUN5 protein localises to the head-tail junction in normal spermatozoa, and SUN proteins are known to form links between the cytoskeleton and the nucleus. However, six of the ten SUN5 variants reported were missense with an unknown effect on function, and only one man carried two high confidence loss-of-function (LOF) alleles: p.Ser284* homozygozity. One potential exonic splice mutation, homozygous variant p.Gly114Arg, was not tested experimentally. Thus, definitive proof that loss of SUN5 function causes the acephalic spermatozoa syndrome is still lacking. Based on these findings, we determined the sequence of the SUN5 gene in three related men of North African origin with decapitated spermatozoa. We found all three men to be homozygous for a deletion-insertion variant (GRCh38 - chr20:32995761_32990672delinsTGGT) that removes 5090 base pairs including exon 8 of SUN5, predicting the frameshift, p.(Leu143Serfs*30), and the inactivation of SUN5. We therefore present the second case where the acephalic spermatozoa syndrome is associated with two LOF alleles of SUN5. We also show that the p.Gly114Arg variant has a strong inhibitory effect on splicing in HeLa cells, evidence that homozygozity for p.Gly114Arg causes acephalic spermatozoa syndrome through loss of SUN5 function. Our results, together with those of the previous study, show that SUN5 is required for the formation of the sperm head-tail junction and male fertility. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Frequency of Gγ-globin promoter -158 (C>T) XmnI polymorphism in patients with homozygous/compound heterozygous beta thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadir; Ayyub, Muhammad; Khan, Saleem Ahmed; Ahmed, Suhaib; Abbas, Kazim; Malik, Hamid Saeed; Tashfeen, Sunila

    2015-03-01

    Response to hydroxyurea therapy in homozygous or compound heterozygous beta thalassaemia (BT) has been reported as more favourable in the presence of XmnI polymorphism. The prevalence of XmnI polymorphism may vary with BT phenotypes and genotypes, and differs geographically in distribution. Prevalence of XmnI polymorphism is not known in northern Pakistan. To determine the frequency of Gγ-globin promoter -158 (C>T) XmnI polymorphism (XmnI polymorphism) in patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous beta thalassaemia. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for common beta thalassaemia mutations and Gγ-globin promoter -158 (C>T) XmnI polymorphism was performed on 107 blood samples of transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia (BT) patients in Pakistan. One hundred samples of unrelated BT traits and 94 samples of healthy subjects as controls were also analysed for BT mutations and XmnI polymorphism. Out of 301 DNA samples, XmnI polymorphism was detected in 71(24%); in normal controls, XmnI polymorphism was detected in 34/94 (36%) subjects; while in homozygous/compound heterozygous BT, it was detected in 14/107(13%) patients (Fisher's exact test, p=.0002). In heterozygous BT group, XmnI polymorphism was detected in 23/100 subjects (Fisher's exact test, p=.03 with normal controls, and p=.049 with homozygous/compound heterozygous BT). The most common BT genotype was Frame Shift (Fr) 8-9/Fr 8-9, and none of the patients with this genotype had XmnI polymorphism. The second most common genotype was IVSI-5/IVSI-5; 4/26 (15%). Cases with this genotype had XmnI polymorphism. XmnI polymorphism in homozygous/compound heterozygous BT group is 13%. The most common genotype associated with XmnI polymorphism was IVSI-5/IVSI-5. Copyright © 2015 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. STAT3 mutations correlated with hyper-IgE syndrome lead to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Of all the causes identified for the disease hyper-immunoglobulinemia E syndrome (HIES), a homozygous mutation in tyrosine kinase2 (TYK2) and heterozygous mutations in STAT3 are implicated the defects in Jak/STAT signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIES. Mutations of STAT3 have been frequently clinically ...

  20. STAT3 mutations correlated with hyper-IgE syndrome lead to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-28

    Apr 28, 2012 ... Of all the causes identified for the disease hyper-immunoglobulinemia E syndrome (HIES), a homozygous mutation in tyrosine kinase2 (TYK2) and heterozygous mutations in STAT3 are implicated the defects in Jak/STAT signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIES. Mutations of STAT3 have been ...

  1. Successful Treatment Of Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Using Cascade Filtration Plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Kardas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study is to discuss the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C apheresis procedure using the cascade filtration system for pediatric patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, and to clarify the adverse effects and difficulties. METHODS: LDL apheresis using the cascade filtration system was performed in 3 pediatric patients with homozygous FH. In total, 120 apheresis sessions were performed for all patients. RESULTS: Cascade filtration therapy significantly reduced the mean LDL-C values from 418 ± 62 mg/dl to 145 ± 43 mg/dl (p<0.05. We determined an acute mean reduction in the plasma levels of total cholesterol (57.9%, LDL cholesterol (70.8%, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol (40.7%. Treatments were well tolerated. The most frequent clinical adverse effects were hypotension in 3 sessions (2.5%, chills/feeling cold (1.7% in 2 sessions, and nausea and vomiting in 3 sessions (2.5%. CONCLUSION: Our experience with three patients using the cascade filtration system were, good clinical outcomes, laboratory findings, safety of usage, minor adverse effects and technical problems.

  2. A mutation in Myo15 leads to Usher-like symptoms in LEW/Ztm-ci2 rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Held

    Full Text Available The LEW/Ztm-ci2 rat is an animal model for syndromal deafness that arose from a spontaneous mutation. Homozygous animals show locomotor abnormalities like lateralized circling behavior. Additionally, an impaired vision can be observed in some animals through behavioral studies. Syndromal deafness as well as retinal degeneration are features of the Usher syndrome in humans. In the present study, the mutation was identified as a base substitution (T->C in exon 56 of Myo15, leading to an amino acid exchange from leucine (Leu to proline (Pro within the carboxy-terminal MyTH4 domain in the proteins' tail region. Myo15 mRNA was expressed in the retina as demonstrated for the first time with the help of in-situ hybridization and PCR. To characterize the visual phenotype, rats were examined by scotopic and photopic electroretinography and, additionally, histological analyses of the retinas were conducted. The complete loss of sight was detected along with a severe degeneration of photoreceptor cells. Interestingly, the manifestation of the disease does not solely depend on the mutation, but also on environmental factors. Since the LEW/Ztm-ci2 rat features the entire range of symptoms of the human Usher syndrome we think that this strain is an appropriate model for this disease. Our findings display that mutations in binding domains of myosin XV do not only cause non-syndromic hearing loss but can also lead to syndromic disorders including retinal dysfunction.

  3. Three novel mutations in the CFTR gene identified in Galician patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana-Díez, P; Colón, C; Alonso-Fernández, J R; Solar, A; Barros-Tizón, J C; Barros-Casas, D; Sirvent, J; Carracedo, A; Barros, F

    2008-11-01

    We report three novel CFTR missense mutations detected in Spanish patients from Galicia (North West of Spain). In the first case, a patient homozygous for a novel S1045Y mutation died due to pulmonary problems. In the other two cases, both heterozygous for novel mutations combined with the F508del mutation, clinical symptoms were different depending on the mutation, detected as M595I and A107V.

  4. Homozygous mutation in SPATA16 is associated with male infertility in human globozoospermia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, A.H.D.M.; Koscinski, I.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Moutou, C.; Jaeger, A.S.; Oudakker, A.R.; Tournaye, H.; Charlet, N.; Lagier-Tourenne, C.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Viville, S.

    2007-01-01

    Globozoospermia is a rare (incidence <0.1% in male infertile patients) form of teratozoospermia, mainly characterized by round-headed spermatozoa that lack an acrosome. It originates from a disturbed spermiogenesis, which is expected to be induced by a genetic factor. Several family cases and

  5. Homozygous LIPE Mutation in Siblings with Multiple Symmetric Lipomatosis, Partial Lipodystrophy, and Myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Zolotov, Sagit; Xing, Chao; Mahamid, Riad; Shalata, Adel; Sheikh-Ahmad, Mohammed; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying causal genes for lipodystrophy syndromes, the molecular basis of some peculiar adipose tissue disorders remains obscure. In an Israeli–Arab pedigree with a novel autosomal recessive, multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), partial lipodystrophy and myopathy, we conducted exome sequencing of two affected siblings to identify the disease-causingmutation. The 41-year-old female proband and her 36-year-old brother reported marked accumulation of subcutan...

  6. A novel homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation implicated in retinal degeneration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carrigan, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The GNAT1 gene encodes the α subunit of the rod transducin protein, a key element in the rod phototransduction cascade. Variants in GNAT1 have been implicated in stationary night-blindness in the past, but unlike other proteins in the same pathway, it has not previously been implicated in retinitis pigmentosa.

  7. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, JBGM; Kunze, J; Osinga, J; van Essen, AJ; Hofstra, RMW

    2002-01-01

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural

  8. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Deficiency Due to a Homozygous Missense Mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. J.; Mijnhout, G. S.; Rondeel, J. M. M.; Baron, W.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.

    Context: SHBG is known as the major sex steroid binding protein in plasma, and it regulates the bioavailability of both T and estradiol levels required for effects on target tissues. We identified a man with an undetectable SHBG concentration in combination with low total T. He presented with a

  9. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters August 12, 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks ... have a high number of spontaneous mutations in genes that form a network in the front region ...

  10. Somatic LKB1 mutations promote cervical cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana N Wingo

    Full Text Available Human Papilloma Virus (HPV is the etiologic agent for cervical cancer. Yet, infection with HPV is not sufficient to cause cervical cancer, because most infected women develop transient epithelial dysplasias that spontaneously regress. Progression to invasive cancer has been attributed to diverse host factors such as immune or hormonal status, as no recurrent genetic alterations have been identified in cervical cancers. Thus, the pressing question as to the biological basis of cervical cancer progression has remained unresolved, hampering the development of novel therapies and prognostic tests. Here we show that at least 20% of cervical cancers harbor somatically-acquired mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor. Approximately one-half of tumors with mutations harbored single nucleotide substitutions or microdeletions identifiable by exon sequencing, while the other half harbored larger monoallelic or biallelic deletions detectable by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA. Biallelic mutations were identified in most cervical cancer cell lines; HeLa, the first human cell line, harbors a homozygous 25 kb deletion that occurred in vivo. LKB1 inactivation in primary tumors was associated with accelerated disease progression. Median survival was only 13 months for patients with LKB1-deficient tumors, but >100 months for patients with LKB1-wild type tumors (P = 0.015, log rank test; hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.083 to 0.77. LKB1 is thus a major cervical tumor suppressor, demonstrating that acquired genetic alterations drive progression of HPV-induced dysplasias to invasive, lethal cancers. Furthermore, LKB1 status can be exploited clinically to predict disease recurrence.

  11. Very mild features of dysequilibrium syndrome associated with a novel VLDLR missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micalizzi, Alessia; Moroni, Isabella; Ginevrino, Monia; Biagini, Tommaso; Mazza, Tommaso; Romani, Marta; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-07-01

    Dysequilibrium syndrome (DES) is a non-progressive congenital ataxia characterized by severe intellectual deficit, truncal ataxia and markedly delayed, quadrupedal or absent ambulation. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene represent the most common cause of DES. Only two families have been reported harbouring homozygous missense mutations, both with a similarly severe phenotype. We report an Italian girl with very mild DES caused by the novel homozygous VLDLR missense mutation p.(C419Y). This unusually benign phenotype possibly relates to a less disruptive effect of the mutation, falling within a domain (EGF-B) not predicted as crucial for the protein function.

  12. Efficacy and safety of lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis homozygous for Phe508del CFTR by pulmonary function subgroup: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elborn, J Stuart; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Boyle, Michael P; Konstan, Michael W; Huang, Xiaohong; Marigowda, Gautham; Waltz, David; Wainwright, Claire E

    2016-08-01

    Lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination therapy has shown clinical benefits in patients with cystic fibrosis homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation; however, pretreatment lung function is a confounding factor that potentially affects the efficacy and safety of this therapy. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of lumacaftor/ivacaftor therapy in these patients, defined by specific categories of lung function. Both trials (TRAFFIC and TRANSPORT) included in this pooled analysis were multinational, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, phase 3 studies. Eligible patients from 187 participating centres in North America, Australia, and the European Union (both trials) were aged 12 years or older with a confirmed diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation, and with a percent predicted FEV1 (ppFEV1) of 40-90 at the time of screening. Patients were randomly assigned with an interactive web response system (1:1:1) to receive placebo, lumacaftor (600 mg once daily) plus ivacaftor (250 mg every 12 h), or lumacaftor (400 mg every 12 h) plus ivacaftor (250 mg every 12 h) for 24 weeks. Prespecified subgroup analyses of pooled efficacy and safety data by lung function, as measured by ppFEV1, were done for patients with baseline ppFEV1 (cystic fibrosis homozygous for Phe508del CFTR who have varying degrees of lung function impairment. Vertex Pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Personalized Stem Cell Therapy to Correct Corneal Defects Due to a Unique Homozygous-Heterozygous Mosaicism of Ectrodactyly-Ectodermal Dysplasia-Clefting Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Vanessa; Nasti, Annamaria Assunta; Raffa, Paolo; Migliorati, Angelo; Nespeca, Patrizia; Ferrari, Stefano; Palumbo, Elisa; Bertolin, Marina; Breda, Claudia; Miceli, Francesco; Russo, Antonella; Caenazzo, Luciana; Ponzin, Diego; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina; Di Iorio, Enzo

    2016-08-01

    : Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting (EEC) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the p63 gene. To date, approximately 40 different p63 mutations have been identified, all heterozygous. No definitive treatments are available to counteract and resolve the progressive corneal degeneration due to a premature aging of limbal epithelial stem cells. Here, we describe a unique case of a young female patient, aged 18 years, with EEC and corneal dysfunction, who was, surprisingly, homozygous for a novel and de novo R311K missense mutation in the p63 gene. A detailed analysis of the degree of somatic mosaicism in leukocytes from peripheral blood and oral mucosal epithelial stem cells (OMESCs) from biopsies of buccal mucosa showed that approximately 80% were homozygous mutant cells and 20% were heterozygous. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses excluded genomic alterations, thus suggesting a de novo mutation followed by an allelic gene conversion of the wild-type allele by de novo mutant allele as a possible mechanism to explain the homozygous condition. R311K-p63 OMESCs were expanded in vitro and heterozygous holoclones selected following clonal analysis. These R311K-p63 OMESCs were able to generate well-organized and stratified epithelia in vitro, resembling the features of healthy tissues. This study supports the rationale for the development of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial stem cell sheets obtained by selected heterozygous R311K-p63 stem cells, as an effective and personalized therapy for reconstructing the ocular surface of this unique case of EEC syndrome, thus bypassing gene therapy approaches. This case demonstrates that in a somatic mosaicism context, a novel homozygous mutation in the p63 gene can arise as a consequence of an allelic gene conversion event, subsequent to a de novo mutation. The heterozygous mutant R311K-p63 stem cells can be isolated by means of clonal analysis and given their good regenerative

  14. Risk of recurrent venous thrombosis in homozygous carriers and double heterozygous carriers of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijfering, Willem M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Veeger, Nic J G M; Hamulyák, Karly; Prins, Martin H; Büller, Harry R; van der Meer, Jan

    2010-04-20

    Homozygous or double heterozygous factor V Leiden and/or prothrombin G20210A is a rare inherited thrombophilic trait. Whether individuals with this genetic background have an increased risk of recurrent venous thrombosis is uncertain. A case-control design within a large cohort of families with thrombophilia was chosen to calculate the risk of recurrent venous thrombosis in individuals with homozygosity or double heterozygosity of factor V Leiden and/or prothrombin G20210A. Cases were individuals with recurrent venous thrombosis, and controls were those with only 1 venous thrombosis. The cohort consisted of 788 individuals with venous thrombosis; 357 had factor V Leiden, 137 had prothrombin G20210A, 27 had factor V Leiden and/or prothrombin G20210A homozygosity, and 49 had double heterozygosity for both mutations. We identified 325 cases with recurrent venous thrombosis and 463 controls with only 1 venous thrombosis. Compared with noncarriers, crude odds ratio for recurrence was 1.2 (95% confidence interval, 0.9 to 1.6) for heterozygous carriers of factor V Leiden, 0.7 (95% confidence interval, 0.4 to 1.2) for prothrombin G20210A, 1.2 (95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 2.6) for homozygous carriers of factor V Leiden and/or prothrombin G20210A, and 1.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.6 to 1.9) for double heterozygotes of both mutations. Adjustments for age, sex, family status, first event type, and concomitance of natural anticoagulant deficiencies did not alter the risk estimates. In this study, individuals with homozygous factor V Leiden and/or homozygous prothrombin G20210A or double heterozygous carriers of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A did not have a high risk of recurrent venous thrombosis.

  15. Co-inheritance of novel ATRX gene mutation and globin (α & β) gene mutations in transfusion dependent beta-thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nafie, Awatif N; Borgio, J Francis; AbdulAzeez, Sayed; Al-Suliman, Ahmed M; Qaw, Fuad S; Naserullah, Zaki A; Al-Jarrash, Sana; Al-Madan, Mohammed S; Al-Ali, Rudaynah A; AlKhalifah, Mohammed A; Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Steinberg, Martin H; Al-Ali, Amein K

    2015-06-01

    α-Thalassemia X-linked mental retardation syndrome is a rare inherited intellectual disability disorder due to mutations in the ATRX gene. In our previous study of the prevalence of β-thalassemia mutations in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, we confirmed the widespread coinheritance of α-thalassemia mutation. Some of these subjects have a family history of mental retardation, the cause of which is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the presence or absence of mutations in the ATRX gene in these patients. Three exons of the ATRX gene and their flanking regions were directly sequenced. Only four female transfusion dependent β-thalassemia patients were found to be carriers of a novel mutation in the ATRX gene. Two of the ATRX gene mutations, c.623delA and c.848T>C were present in patients homozygous for IVS I-5(G→C) and homozygous for Cd39(C → T) β-thalassemia mutation, respectively. While the other two that were located in the intronic region (flanking regions), were present in patients homozygous for Cd39(C → T) β-thalassemia mutation. The two subjects with the mutations in the coding region had family members with mental retardation, which suggests that the novel frame shift mutation and the missense mutation at coding region of ATRX gene are involved in ATRX syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic screening for PRA-associated mutations in multiple dog breeds shows that PRA is heterogeneous within and between breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Louise M; Hitti, Rebekkah; Pregnolato, Silvia; Mellersh, Cathryn S

    2014-03-01

    To assess the extent of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) genetic heterogeneity within and between domestic dog breeds. DNA from 231 dogs with PRA, representing 36 breeds, was screened for 17 mutations previously associated with PRA in at least one breed of dog. Screening methods included amplified fragment size discrimination using gel electrophoresis or detection of fluorescence, (TaqMan(®) ; Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA, USA) allelic discrimination, and Sanger sequencing. Of the 231 dogs screened, 129 were homozygous for a PRA-associated mutation, 29 dogs were carriers, and 73 were homozygous for the wild-type allele at all loci tested. In two of the 129 dogs, homozygous mutations were identified that had not previously been observed in the respective breeds: one Chinese Crested dog was homozygous for the RCD3-associated mutation usually found in the Cardigan Welsh Corgi, and one Standard Poodle was homozygous for the RCD4-associated mutation previously reported to segregate in Gordon and Irish Setters. In the majority of the breeds (15/21) in which a PRA-associated mutation is known to segregate, cases were identified that did not carry any of the known PRA-associated mutations. Progressive retinal atrophy in the dog displays significant genetic heterogeneity within as well as between breeds. There are also several instances where PRA-associated mutations segregate among breeds with no known close ancestry. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  17. Spontaneous pneumothorax in weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnejon, T; Sarac, S; Cropp, A J

    1995-06-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is infrequently caused by strenuous exertion. To our knowledge there has only been one case of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting reported in the medical literature. We describe three consecutive cases of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting. We postulate that spontaneous pneumothorax in these patients may be secondary to improper breathing techniques. It is important that physicians and weight trainers be aware of the association between weight lifting and spontaneous pneumothorax and assure that proper instruction is given to athletes who work with weights.

  18. The spontaneous ataxic mouse mutant tippy is characterized by a novel Purkinje cell morphogenesis and degeneration phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Evelyn K.; Sekerková, Gabriella; Ohtsuki, Gen; Aldinger, Kimberly A.; Chizhikov, Victor V.; Hansel, Christian; Mugnaini, Enrico; Millen, Kathleen J.

    2015-01-01

    This study represents the first detailed analysis of the spontaneous neurological mouse mutant, tippy, uncovering its unique cerebellar phenotype. Homozygous tippy mutant mice are small, ataxic and die around weaning. Although the cerebellum shows grossly normal foliation, tippy mutants display a complex cerebellar Purkinje cell phenotype consisting of abnormal dendritic branching with immature spine features and patchy, non-apoptotic cell death that is associated with widespread dystrophy and degeneration of the Purkinje cell axons throughout the white matter, the cerebellar nuclei and the vestibular nuclei. Moderate anatomical abnormalities of climbing fiber innervation of tippy mutant Purkinje cells were not associated with changes in climbing fiber-EPSC amplitudes. However, decreased ESPC amplitudes were observed in response to parallel fiber stimulation and correlated well with anatomical evidence for patchy dark cell degeneration of Purkinje cell dendrites in the molecular layer. The data suggest that the Purkinje neurons are a primary target of the tippy mutation. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the Purkinje cell axonal pathology together with disruptions in the balance of climbing fiber and parallel fiber Purkinje cell input in the cerebellar cortex underlie the ataxic phenotype in these mice. The constellation of Purkinje cell dendritic malformation and degeneration phenotypes in tippy mutants is unique and has not been reported in any other neurologic mutant. Fine mapping of the tippy mutation to a 2.1MB region of distal chromosome 9, which does not encompass any gene previously implicated in cerebellar development or neuronal degeneration, confirms that the tippy mutation identifies novel biology and gene function. PMID:25626522

  19. A novel missense mutation in SUCLG1 associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion, encephalomyopathic form, with methylmalonic aciduria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elsebet; Schwartz, Marianne; Batbayli, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion, encephalomyopathic form, with methylmalonic aciduria is associated with mutations in SUCLA2, the gene encoding a beta subunit of succinate-CoA ligase, where 17 patients have been reported. Mutations in SUCLG1, encoding the alpha subunit of the enzyme, have been reported...... in only one family, where a homozygous 2 bp deletion was associated with fatal infantile lactic acidosis. We here report a patient with a novel homozygous missense mutation in SUCLG1, whose phenotype is similar to that of patients with SUCLA2 mutations....

  20. Production of Fully Homozygous Genotypes from Various Edible Alliums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. ALAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Allium is a very large genus containing over 700 distinct species including the various edible onions, garlics, chives, and leeks. About a dozen of the species are economically important as crops or garden vegetables where as many others are cultivated as ornamental plants. Allium breeding programs generally take very long time with low success due to problems such as long life cycle, sterility, polyploidy, high levels of heterozygosity. Development of inbreed lines is a very difficult process due to severe inbreeding depression. Doubled haploid (DH techniques can be utilized to obtain fully homozygous Allium materials. In Alliums, gynogenesis is the major technique used to produce haploid and DH plants from unfertilized female gamets with reduced chromosome number. We are in the process of developing gynogenesis induction protocols for several edible Allium species. We showed that gynogenic embryos can be obtained from a wide range of Allium materials. About half of the gynogenic embryos continue to grow and become plantlets. In general, gynogenic plantlets are green, but some of them show chlorophyll abnomalities. Results obtained from flow cytometric analysis of nuclei isolated from gynogenic materials indicate that majority of the gynogenic Allium materials are haploid and DH plants. DH onion lines developed in our program are generally vigorous plants with high levels of fecundity. The seeds obtained from DH onions show high germination. Plants of DH onion lines grow uniformly and produce bulbs very uniform in size, shape, color and quality features. These DH lines are excellent inbreds to be used as male parents in the production of F1 hybrid onion lines. Success obtained in DH onion materials indicates that a similar approach can be applied in the breeding programs of other important Alliums.

  1. Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy due to HSPD1 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Maria Schioldan; Damgaard, Bodil; Risom, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    The hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HMLs) encompass the X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) caused by PLP1 mutations and known as the classical form of HML as well as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD) (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIM] 608804 and OMIM 260600) due to GJC2...... mutations. In addition, mutations in at least 10 other genes are known to cause HMLs. In 2008, an Israeli family with clinical and neuroimaging findings similar to those found in PMD was reported. The patients were found to have a homozygous missense mutation in HSPD1, encoding the mitochondrial heat......-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), and the disorder was defined as the autosomal recessive mitochondrial Hsp60 chaperonopathy (MitCHAP-60) disease. We here report the first case of this severe neurodegenerative disease since it was first described. Given the fact that the families carried the same mutation our patient...

  2. 'North Sea' progressive myoclonus epilepsy: phenotype of subjects with GOSR2 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boisse Lomax, L.; Bayly, M.A.; Hjalgrim, H.; Moller, R.S.; Vlaar, A.M.M.; Aaberg, K.M.; Marquardt, I.; Gandolfo, L.C.; Willemsen, M.A.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; O'Sullivan, J.D.; Korenke, G.C.; Bloem, B.R.; Coo, I.F. de; Verhagen, J.M.A.; Said, I.; Prescott, T.; Stray-Pedersen, A.; Rasmussen, M.; Vears, D.F.; Lehesjoki, A.E.; Corbett, M.A.; Bahlo, M.; Gecz, J.; Dibbens, L.M.; Berkovic, S.F.

    2013-01-01

    We previously identified a homozygous mutation in the Golgi SNAP receptor complex 2 gene (GOSR2) in six patients with progressive myoclonus epilepsy. To define the syndrome better we analysed the clinical and electrophysiological phenotype in 12 patients with GOSR2 mutations, including six new

  3. Novel mutation in CNTNAP1 results in congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Paulomi; Küspert, Melanie; Bale, Tejus; Brownstein, Catherine A; Towne, Meghan C; De Girolami, Umberto; Shi, Jiahai; Beggs, Alan H; Darras, Basil T; Wegner, Michael; Piao, Xianhua; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2017-05-01

    Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy (CHN) is a rare congenital neuropathy that presents in the neonatal period and has been linked previously to mutations in several genes associated with myelination. A recent study has linked 4 homozygous frameshift mutations in the contactin-associated protein 1 (CNTNAP1) gene with this condition. We report a neonate with CHN who was found to have absent sensory nerve and compound muscle action potentials and hypomyelination on nerve biopsy. On whole exome sequencing, we identified a novel CNTNAP1 homozygous missense mutation (p.Arg388Pro) in the proband, and both parents were carriers. Molecular modeling suggests that this variant disrupts a β-strand to cause an unstable structure and likely significant changes in protein function. This report links a missense CNTNAP1 variant to the disease phenotype previously associated only with frameshift mutations. Muscle Nerve 55: 761-765, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cell autonomy of the mouse claw paw mutation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Darbas (Aysel); M.M. Jaegle (Martine); E.T. Walbeehm (Erik); H. van den Burg (Hans); L.A.M. Broos (Ludo); M. Uyl (Matthijs); P. Visser (Pim); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); D.N. Meijer (Dies); M.J.F. Driegen (Siska)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractMice homozygous for the autosomal recessive mutation claw paw (clp) are characterized by limb posture abnormalities and congenital hypomyelination, with delayed onset of myelination of the peripheral nervous system but not the central nervous system. Although this combination of limb and

  5. A homozygous missense variant in VWA2, encoding an interactor of the Fraser-complex, in a patient with vesicoureteral reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ven, Amelie T.; Kobbe, Birgit; Kohl, Stefan; Shril, Shirlee; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Imhof, Thomas; Ityel, Hadas; Vivante, Asaf; Chen, Jing; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Connaughton, Dervla M.; Mann, Nina; Widmeier, Eugen; Taglienti, Mary; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Nakayama, Makiko; Senguttuvan, Prabha; Kumar, Selvin; Tasic, Velibor; Kehinde, Elijah O.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Lifton, Richard P.; Soliman, Neveen; Lu, Weining; Bauer, Stuart B.; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Wagener, Raimund

    2018-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the most common cause (40–50%) of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. About 40 monogenic causes of CAKUT have so far been discovered. To date less than 20% of CAKUT cases can be explained by mutations in these 40 genes. To identify additional monogenic causes of CAKUT, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES) and homozygosity mapping (HM) in a patient with CAKUT from Indian origin and consanguineous descent. We identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1336C>T, p.Arg446Cys) in the gene Von Willebrand factor A domain containing 2 (VWA2). With immunohistochemistry studies on kidneys of newborn (P1) mice, we show that Vwa2 and Fraser extracellular matrix complex subunit 1 (Fras1) co-localize in the nephrogenic zone of the renal cortex. We identified a pronounced expression of Vwa2 in the basement membrane of the ureteric bud (UB) and derivatives of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM). By applying in vitro assays, we demonstrate that the Arg446Cys mutation decreases translocation of monomeric VWA2 protein and increases translocation of aggregated VWA2 protein into the extracellular space. This is potentially due to the additional, unpaired cysteine residue in the mutated protein that is used for intermolecular disulfide bond formation. VWA2 is a known, direct interactor of FRAS1 of the Fraser-Complex (FC). FC-encoding genes and interacting proteins have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic and/or isolated CAKUT phenotypes in humans. VWA2 therefore constitutes a very strong candidate in the search for novel CAKUT-causing genes. Our results from in vitro experiments indicate a dose-dependent neomorphic effect of the Arg446Cys homozygous mutation in VWA2. PMID:29351342

  6. A homozygous missense variant in VWA2, encoding an interactor of the Fraser-complex, in a patient with vesicoureteral reflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie T van der Ven

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT are the most common cause (40-50% of chronic kidney disease (CKD in children. About 40 monogenic causes of CAKUT have so far been discovered. To date less than 20% of CAKUT cases can be explained by mutations in these 40 genes. To identify additional monogenic causes of CAKUT, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES and homozygosity mapping (HM in a patient with CAKUT from Indian origin and consanguineous descent. We identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1336C>T, p.Arg446Cys in the gene Von Willebrand factor A domain containing 2 (VWA2. With immunohistochemistry studies on kidneys of newborn (P1 mice, we show that Vwa2 and Fraser extracellular matrix complex subunit 1 (Fras1 co-localize in the nephrogenic zone of the renal cortex. We identified a pronounced expression of Vwa2 in the basement membrane of the ureteric bud (UB and derivatives of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM. By applying in vitro assays, we demonstrate that the Arg446Cys mutation decreases translocation of monomeric VWA2 protein and increases translocation of aggregated VWA2 protein into the extracellular space. This is potentially due to the additional, unpaired cysteine residue in the mutated protein that is used for intermolecular disulfide bond formation. VWA2 is a known, direct interactor of FRAS1 of the Fraser-Complex (FC. FC-encoding genes and interacting proteins have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic and/or isolated CAKUT phenotypes in humans. VWA2 therefore constitutes a very strong candidate in the search for novel CAKUT-causing genes. Our results from in vitro experiments indicate a dose-dependent neomorphic effect of the Arg446Cys homozygous mutation in VWA2.

  7. Congenital myopathy is caused by mutation of HACD1

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, Emad; Reish, Orit; Ohno, Yusuke; Scheetz, Todd; DeLuca, Adam; Searby, Charles; Regev, Miriam; Benyamini, Lilach; Fellig, Yakov; Kihara, Akio; Sheffield, Val C.; Parvari, Ruti

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are heterogeneous inherited diseases of muscle characterized by a range of distinctive histologic abnormalities. We have studied a consanguineous family with congenital myopathy. Genome-wide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous non-sense mutation in 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase 1 (HACD1) in affected individuals. The mutation results in non-sense mediated decay of the HACD1 mRNA to 31% of control levels in patient muscle and completely abro...

  8. FKRP mutations, including a founder mutation, cause phenotype variability in Chinese patients with dystroglycanopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaona; Yang, Haipo; Wei, Cuijie; Jiao, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Yanling; Han, Chunxi; Wu, Xiru; Xiong, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene have been associated with dystroglycanopathies, which are common in Europe but rare in Asia. Our study aimed to retrospectively analyze and characterize the clinical, myopathological and genetic features of 12 Chinese patients with FKRP mutations. Three patients were diagnosed with congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C (MDC1C) and nine patients were diagnosed with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I). Three muscle biopsy specimens had dystrophic changes and reduced glycosylated α-dystroglycan staining, and two showed reduced expression of laminin α2. Two known and 13 novel mutations were identified in our single center cohort. Interestingly, the c.545A>G mutation was found in eight of the nine LGMD2I patients as a founder mutation and this founder mutation in Chinese patients differs from the one seen in European patients. Moreover, patients homozygous for the c.545A>G mutation were clinically asymptomatic, a less severe phenotype than in compound heterozygous patients with the c.545A>G mutation. The 13 novel mutations of FKRP significantly expanded the mutation spectrum of MDC1C and LGMD2I, and the different founder mutations indicate the ethnic difference in FKRP mutations.

  9. Simplified methodology for large scale isolation of homozygous transgenic lines of lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia S. Darqui

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: This protocol allows a simplified scaling-up of the production of multiple homozygous transgenic progeny lines in the early generations avoiding expensive and time-consuming molecular assays.

  10. Functional characterization of a new p53 mutant generated by homozygous deletion in a neuroblastoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yohko; Ozaki, Toshinori; Niizuma, Hidetaka; Ohira, Miki; Kamijo, Takehiko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2007-01-01

    p53 is a key modulator of a variety of cellular stresses. In human neuroblastomas, p53 is rarely mutated and aberrantly expressed in cytoplasm. In this study, we have identified a novel p53 mutant lacking its COOH-terminal region in neuroblastoma SK-N-AS cells. p53 accumulated in response to cisplatin (CDDP) and thereby promoting apoptosis in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells bearing wild-type p53, whereas SK-N-AS cells did not undergo apoptosis. We found another p53 (p53ΔC) lacking a part of oligomerization domain and nuclear localization signals in SK-N-AS cells. p53ΔC was expressed largely in cytoplasm and lost the transactivation function. Furthermore, a 3'-part of the p53 locus was homozygously deleted in SK-N-AS cells. Thus, our present findings suggest that p53 plays an important role in the DNA-damage response in certain neuroblastoma cells and it seems to be important to search for p53 mutations outside DNA-binding domain

  11. Relevance of spontaneous fabT mutations to a streptococcal toxic shock syndrome to non-streptococcal toxic shock syndrome transition in the novel-type Streptococcus pyogenes isolates that lost a salRK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Matsumoto, Masakado; Hata, Nanako; Matsui, Hideyuki; Zhang, Yan; Isaka, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a causative agent of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). Mutations in covR/S or rgg, negative regulators, can reportedly modulate the severity of infection in this pathogen. Recently, we showed that the regions encoding the SalR-SalK, a two-component regulatory system, were deleted in some emm 1-type isolates (named as 'novel-type'). In this study, the two novel 'STSS' isolates 10-85stss and 11-171stss were more virulent than the two novel 'non-STSS' isolates 11O-2non and 11T-3non when examined using a mouse model of invasive infection. Genome-sequencing experiments using the three strains 10-85stss , 11-171stss , and 11O-2non detected only one single nucleotide polymorphism that causes a non-synonymous mutation in fabT encoding a transcriptional regulator in strain 11O-2non . Loss of fabT reduced the high level of virulence observed in the STSS isolates to that in the non-STSS isolates, and introduction of an intact fabT compensated the lower virulence of 11O-2non , suggesting that the mutation in fabT, but not in covR/S or rgg, is involved in the differential virulence among the novel-type clinical isolates. This type of non-synonymous fabT mutation was also identified in 12 non-STSS isolates (including 11O-2non and 11T-3non ), and most of those 12 isolates showed impaired FabT function. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cultivation of Staphylococcus epidermidis in the Human Spaceflight Environment Leads to Alterations in the Frequency and Spectrum of Spontaneous Rifampicin-Resistance Mutations in the rpoB Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are persistent inhabitants of human spaceflight habitats and represent potential opportunistic pathogens. The effect of the human spaceflight environment on the growth and the frequency of mutations to antibiotic resistance in the model organism Staphylococcus epidermidis strain ATCC12228 was investigated. Six cultures of the test organism were cultivated in biological research in canisters-Petri dish fixation units for 122 h on orbit in the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the SpaceX-3 resupply mission. Asynchronous ground controls (GCs) consisted of identical sets of cultures cultivated for 122 h in the ISS Environmental Simulator at Kennedy Space Center. S. epidermidis exhibited significantly lower viable counts but significantly higher frequencies of mutation to rifampicin (Rif) resistance in space vs. GC cultures. The spectrum of mutations in the rpoB gene leading to Rif(R) was altered in S. epidermidis isolates cultivated in the ISS compared to GCs. The results suggest that the human spaceflight environment induces unique physiologic stresses on growing bacterial cells leading to changes in mutagenic potential.

  13. Multiple Patterns of FHIT Gene Homozygous Deletion in Egyptian Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, H.M.S.; Zakhary, N.I.; Medhat, A.M.; Karim, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene encodes a putative tumour suppressor protein. Loss of Fhit protein in cancer is attributed to different genetic alterations that affect the FHIT gene structure. In this study, we investigated the pattern of homozygous deletion that target the FHIT gene exons 3 to 9 genomic structure in Egyptian breast cancer patients. We have found that 65% (40 out of 62) of the cases exhibited homozygous deletion in at least one FHIT exon. The incidence of homozygous deletion was not associated with patients clinico pathological parameters including patients age, tumour grade, tumour type, and lymph node involvement. Using correlation analysis, we have observed a strong correlation between homozygous deletions of exon 3 and exon 4 (P<0.0001). Deletions in exon 5 were positively correlated with deletions in exon 7 (P<0.0001), Exon 8 (P<0.027), and exon 9 (P=0.04). Additionally, a strong correlation was observed between exons 8 and exon 9 (P<0.0001).We conclude that FHIT gene exons are homozygously deleted at high frequency in Egyptian women population diagnosed with breast cancer. Three different patterns of homozygous deletion were observed in this population indicating different mechanisms of targeting FHIT gene genomic structure.

  14. Lethal factor VII deficiency due to novel mutations in the F7 promoter: functional analysis reveals disruption of HNF4 binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Lopez, Estelle; Viart, Victoria; Chafa, Ouerdia; Tapon-Bretaudière, Jacqueline; Claustres, Mireille; Taulan, Magali

    2012-08-01

    Hereditary factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Deleterious mutations that prevent the synthesis of any amount of functional FVII have been associated with life-threatening haemorrhage in neonates. Here we report two infants, of Maghrebian origin, who suffered a fatal spontaneous cerebral haemorrhage. Investigation of the molecular basis for their severe FVII deficiency revealed novel mutations in a homozygous state within the F7 gene promoter: a single nucleotide substitution (c.-65G>C) and a 2bp deletion (c.-60_-59delTT). To determine whether these promoter variants were responsible for the FVII deficiency, computer-assisted sequence analyses were performed. The data predicted a disrupted binding of both HNF4 and COUP-TF transcription factors with each variant. Concordantly, experimental results revealed an altered HNF4-induced transactivation in the promoter mutated variants. The execution of functional tests is critical to ensuring a complete understanding of the effect of any promoter mutant on FVII deficiency. Only then can an accurate molecular diagnosis be made and further genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis be offered.

  15. MTHFR variants reduce the risk of G:C->A:T transition mutations within the p53 tumor suppressor gene in colon tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, C M; Curtin, K; Samowitz, W; Bigler, J; Potter, J D; Caan, B; Slattery, M L

    2005-10-01

    5,10-Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme in folate-mediated 1-carbon metabolism. Reduced MTHFR activity has been associated with genomic DNA hypomethylation. Methylated cytosines at CpG sites are easily mutated and have been implicated in G:C-->A:T transitions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. We investigated 2 polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene (C677T and A1298C) and their associations with colon tumor characteristics, including acquired mutations in Ki-ras and p53 genes and microsatellite instability (MSI). The study population comprised 1248 colon cancer cases and 1972 controls, who participated in a population-based case-control study and had been analyzed previously for MSI, acquired mutations in Ki-ras, p53, and germline MTHFR polymorphisms. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios are presented. Overall, MTHFR genotypes were not associated with MSI status or the presence of any p53 or Ki-ras mutation. Individuals with homozygous variant MTHFR genotypes had a significantly reduced risk of G:C-->A:T transition mutations within the p53 gene, yet, as hypothesized, only at CpG-associated sites [677TT vs. 677CC (referent group) OR = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.1-0.8) for CpG-associated sites; OR = 1.5 (0.7-3.6) for non-CpG associated sites]. Genotypes conferring reduced MTHFR activity were associated with a decreased risk of acquired G:C-->A:T mutations within the p53 gene occurring at CpG sites. Consistent with evidence on the phenotypic effect of the MTHFR C677T variant, we hypothesize that this relation may be explained by modestly reduced genomic DNA methylation, resulting in a lower probability of spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine to thymidine. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which MTHFR polymorphisms can affect the risk of colon cancer.

  16. Spontaneous uterine rupture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Rupture of a gravid uterus is a surgical emergency. Predisposing factors include a scarred uterus. Spontaneous rupture of an unscarred uterus during pregnancy is a rare occurrence. We hereby present the case of a spontaneous complete uterine rupture at a gestational age of 34 weeks in a 35 year old patient ...

  17. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  18. Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli paradigm. R. Jayaraman*. R. H. 35, Palaami Enclave, New Natham Road, Madurai 625 014, India. Abstract. Mutators (also called hypermutators) are mutants which show higher than normal spontaneous mutation frequencies, ranging from 10–20 fold to ...

  19. A Homozygous TPO Gene Duplication (c.1184_1187dup4) Causes Congenital Hypothyroidism in Three Siblings Born to a Consanguineous Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangul, Hakan; Aydin, Banu K; Bas, Firdevs

    2015-12-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common neonatal endocrine disease, and germ-line mutations in the TPO gene cause the inherited form of the disease. Our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of congenital hypothyroidism in three affected children coming from a consanguineous Turkish family. Because CH is usually inherited in autosomal recessive manner in consanguineous/multicase families, we adopted a two-stage strategy of genetic linkage studies and targeted sequencing of the candidate genes. First, we investigated the potential genetic linkage of the family to any known CH locus, using microsatellite markers, and then screened for mutations in linked-gene by conventional sequencing. The family showed potential linkage to the TPO gene and we detected a homozygous duplication (c.1184_1187dup4) in all cases. The mutation segregated with disease status in the family. This study confirms the pathogenicity of the c.1184_1187dup4 mutation in the TPO gene and helps establish a genotype/phenotype correlation associated with this mutation. It also highlights the importance of molecular genetic studies in the definitive diagnosis and accurate classification of CH.

  20. A Novel Mutation in the Transglutaminase-1 Gene in an Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vaigundan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structure-function implication on a novel homozygous Trp250/Gly mutation of transglutaminase-1 (TGM1 observed in a patient of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis is invoked from a bioinformatics analysis. Structural consequences of this mutation are hypothesized in comparison to homologous enzyme human factor XIIIA accepted as valid in similar structural analysis and are projected as guidelines for future studies at an experimental level on TGM1 thus mutated.

  1. Simple and rapid determination of homozygous transgenic mice via in vivo fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaolin; Jia, Junshuang; Qin, Yujuan; Lin, Xia; Li, Wei; Xiao, Gaofang; Li, Yanqing; Xie, Raoying; Huang, Hailu; Zhong, Lin; Wu, Qinghong; Wang, Wanshan; Huang, Wenhua; Yao, Kaitai; Xiao, Dong; Sun, Yan

    2015-11-17

    Setting up breeding programs for transgenic mouse strains require to distinguish homozygous from the heterozygous transgenic animals. The combinational use of the fluorescence reporter transgene and small animal in-vivo imaging system might allow us to rapidly and visually determine the transgenic mice homozygous for transgene(s) by the in vivo fluorescence imaging. RLG, RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice ubiquitously express red fluorescent protein (RFP). To identify homozygous RLG transgenic mice, whole-body fluorescence imaging for all of newborn F2-generation littermates produced by mating of RFP-positive heterozygous transgenic mice (F1-generation) derived from the same transgenic founder was performed. Subsequently, the immediate data analysis of the in vivo fluorescence imaging was carried out, which greatly facilitated us to rapidly and readily distinguish RLG transgenic individual(s) with strong fluorescence from the rest of F2-generation littermates, followed by further determining this/these RLG individual(s) showing strong fluorescence to be homozygous, as strongly confirmed by mouse mating. Additionally, homozygous RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice were also rapidly and precisely distinguished by the above-mentioned optical approach. This approach allowed us within the shortest time period to obtain 10, 8 and 2 transgenic mice homozygous for RLG, RCLG and Rm17LG transgene, respectively, as verified by mouse mating, indicating the practicality and reliability of this optical method. Taken together, our findings fully demonstrate that the in vivo fluorescence imaging offers a visual, rapid and reliable alternative method to the traditional approaches (i.e., mouse mating and real-time quantitative PCR) in identifying homozygous transgenic mice harboring fluorescence reporter transgene under the control of a ubiquitous promoter in the situation mentioned in this study.

  2. Mutations in the gene for lipoprotein lipase. A cause for low HDL cholesterol levels in individuals heterozygous for familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pimstone, S. N.; Gagné, S. E.; Gagné, C.; Lupien, P. J.; Gaudet, D.; Williams, R. R.; Kotze, M.; Reymer, P. W.; Defesche, J. C.; Kastelein, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is characterized by elevated plasma concentrations of LDL cholesterol resulting from mutations in the gene for the LDL receptor. Low HDL cholesterol levels are seen frequently in patients both heterozygous and homozygous for mutations in this gene. Suggested

  3. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. PTEN and DMBT1 homozygous deletion and expression in medulloblastomas and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, María Mar; Mercapide, Javier; Muñoz, Jorge; Coullin, Philippe; Danglot, Giséle; Tuñon, Teresa; Martínez-Peñuela, José María; Rivera, José María; Burgos, Juan J; Bernheim, Alain; Castresana, Javier S

    2004-12-01

    Medulloblastoma, which accounts for 20-25% of all childhood brain tumors, is defined as a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) located in the cerebellum. Supratentorial PNET are less frequent than medulloblastoma. But their clinical outcome is worse than in medulloblastomas. Chromosome 10q contains at least 2 tumor suppressor genes that might play a role in brain tumor development: PTEN and DMBT1. The aim of this study was to compare the status of homozygous deletion and expression of PTEN and DMBT1 genes in PNET primary tumor samples and cell lines. Homozygous deletions of PTEN and DMBT1 were studied in 32 paraffin-embedded PNET samples (23 medulloblastomas and 9 supratentorial PNET) and in 7 PNET cell lines, by differential PCR and by FISH. PTEN homozygous losses were demonstrated in 7 medulloblastomas (32%) and in no supratentorial PNET, while homozygous deletions of DMBT1 appeared in 1 supratentorial PNET (20%) and in 7 medulloblastomas (33%). No homozygous deletion of PTEN or DMBT1 was detected in any of the PNET cell lines either by differential PCR or by FISH. Expression study of the 2 genes was performed in the 7 PNET cell lines by RT-PCR. One PNET cell line lacked PTEN and DMBT1 expression, while 2 medulloblastoma cell lines did not express DMBT1. Our results add some positive data to the hypothesis that supratentorial PNETs and medulloblastomas might be genetically different.

  6. Verbascoside is not genotoxic in the ST and HB crosses of the Drosophila wing spot test, and its constituent, caffeic acid, decreases the spontaneous mutation rate in the ST cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cruz, Luis Felipe; Ávila-Acevedo, José Guillermo; Ortega-Capitaine, Diego; Ojeda-Duplancher, Jesús Clemente; Perdigón-Moya, Juana Laura; Hernández-Portilla, Luis Barbo; López-Dionicio, Héctor; Durán-Díaz, Angel; Dueñas-García, Irma Elena; Castañeda-Partida, Laura; García-Bores, Ana María; Heres-Pulido, María Eugenia

    2012-03-01

    Verbascoside (VB) is a phenylpropanoid isolated from Buddleja species, some of which originate in Mexico, and was first described in the sixteenth century in the codices of Mexican traditional medicine. VB is present in alcohol extracts and is widely used in the north of Mexico as a sunscreen. VB absorbs UV-A and UV-B radiation and has high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities. VB and its constituent caffeic acid (CA) were screened to determine their genotoxic activity using the Drosophila wing spot test. Third instar larvae (72±4 h) of the standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses, with regulated and high levels of cytochrome P450s (Cyp450s), respectively, were exposed to VB or CA (0, 27, 57, 81, 135, and 173 mM). VB was not genotoxic at any of the concentrations tested in both crosses. The amount of VB residue as determined by HPLC in the adult flies that were fed with VB indicated a low metabolism of this compound, which explains the absence of genotoxicity. CA decreased the spontaneous frequencies of small and total spots and showed putative toxicity in the ST cross. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pregnancy in a Woman with Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Not on Low-Density Lipoprotein Apheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akl C. Fahed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in women with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH has been rarely reported and might pose risks on the mother and her fetus. Although most reported cases remained on low-density lipoprotein (LDL apheresis, there are no clear guidelines regarding the management of this entity. We report the first case of an uncomplicated pregnancy in a 24-year-old homozygous FH woman who was not maintained on LDL apheresis. FH expresses a wide variability in the phenotype, and management of homozygous FH cases who desire to become pregnant should be individualized based on preconceptional assessment with frequent antenatal follow-up. Decisions on management should be made after weighing the risks versus benefits of LDL apheresis.

  8. A single amino acid mutation in SNAP-25 induces anxiety-related behavior in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Kataoka

    Full Text Available Synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25 is a presynaptic protein essential for neurotransmitter release. Previously, we demonstrate that protein kinase C (PKC phosphorylates Ser(187 of SNAP-25, and enhances neurotransmitter release by recruiting secretory vesicles near to the plasma membrane. As PKC is abundant in the brain and SNAP-25 is essential for synaptic transmission, SNAP-25 phosphorylation is likely to play a crucial role in the central nervous system. We therefore generated a mutant mouse, substituting Ser(187 of SNAP-25 with Ala using "knock-in" technology. The most striking effect of the mutation was observed in their behavior. The homozygous mutant mice froze readily in response to environmental change, and showed strong anxiety-related behavior in general activity and light and dark preference tests. In addition, the mutant mice sometimes exhibited spontaneously occurring convulsive seizures. Microdialysis measurements revealed that serotonin and dopamine release were markedly reduced in amygdala. These results clearly indicate that PKC-dependent SNAP-25 phosphorylation plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional behavior as well as the suppression of epileptic seizures, and the lack of enhancement of monoamine release is one of the possible mechanisms underlying these defects.

  9. The spectrum of familial Mediterranean fever gene mutations in Arabs: report of a large series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Hasan A; El-Khateeb, Mohammed; El-Shanti, Hatem; Rabaiha, Zaid Abu; Tayeh, Marwan; Najib, Dana

    2005-06-01

    To identify the frequency and distribution of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) gene (MEFV) mutations in Arab patients. The study was performed in the pediatric FMF clinic of Jordan University Hospital over a period of 4 years. Patients were referred by their physicians for diagnosis, management, genetic study, and counseling. A diagnosis of FMF was made according to published criteria. Screening for 5 mutations, namely M694V, V726A, M694I, M680I, and E148Q, was performed by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) for the first 4 and by restriction endonuclease testing for E148Q. Of the 407 unrelated patients investigated, 239 (59%) had 1 or 2 mutations and 168 (41%) had none of the studied mutations detected. Of those with mutations, 92 were homozygous, 53 were compound heterozygotes, 3 had complex alleles, and 91 patients had only 1 identifiable mutation. Of the mutations, M694V, V726A, M694I, M680I, and E148Q accounted for 38, 26, 14, 10 and 13%, respectively. Twelve of our patients developed the protracted febrile myalgia syndrome (PFMS) of whom 5 (42%) were homozygous for M694V. Only 2 developed chronic renal failure, both of whom were homozygous for M694V and were not on colchicine prophylaxis. However, 43 patients had a family history of chronic renal failure, and 15 (35%) were homozygous for M694V. Our data indicate that the 5 MEFV mutations are well distributed in Arabs. They also show that M694V is the most common mutation in Arab patients with FMF and seems to have an association with the development of amyloidosis and the PFMS. The high frequency of V726A, and the unique high frequency of M694I in Arabs compared with 3 other ethnic groups, are confirmed.

  10. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome: three novel mutations in the LRP5 gene and response to bisphosphonate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, B; Bursalı, A; Alp, Z; Suyugül, N; Laine, C M; Mäkitie, O

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma (OPPG) syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by congenital or infancy-onset visual loss and severe juvenile osteoporosis. OPPG is caused by homozygous mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. We present three novel homozygous LRP5 mutations found in 3 unrelated Turkish children with consanguineous parents, along with clinical phenotypes and response to treatment with bisphosphonates (bisP). The LRP5 gene was analyzed by direct sequencing after PCR amplification. Mutation screening for LRP5 revealed homozygous nonsense R1002X mutation in the first patient and homozygous missense mutations V336M and G507S in the second and third patient, respectively. The parents were heterozygous for these mutations. The patients' eye symptoms began during the first months of life but the OPPG diagnoses were made based on skeletal deformities and osteopenia after 4 years of age. The patients' bone mineral density Z scores were very low and consistent with osteopenia. All patients were treated with bisP for 3.5-7 years. We report three novel LRP5 mutations in 3 Turkish patients with OPPG. We show that the response of bisP therapy has improved the lumbar spinal bone mineral density Z scores and the patients' quality of life as the bone pains decreased. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. INHIBITION OF SPONTANEOUS MUTAGENESIS BY VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE IN ESCHERICHIA COLI: DEPENDENCE ON RECOMBINATIONAL REPAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutagens that effectively inhibit both induced and spontaneous mutations. We have shown previously that VAN and CIN reduced the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella TA104 (hisG428, rfa, ¿uvrB, pKM101) by approximately...

  12. Presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome with a homozygous sequence variant in LAMA5 combines myopia, facial tics, and failure of neuromuscular transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Ricardo A; Arredondo, Juan; Vázquez, Jessica; Chong, Jessica X; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Lara, Marian; Ng, Fiona; Lo, Victoria L; Pytel, Peter; McDonald, Craig M

    2017-08-01

    Defects in genes encoding the isoforms of the laminin alpha subunit have been linked to various phenotypic manifestations, including brain malformations, muscular dystrophy, ocular defects, cardiomyopathy, and skin abnormalities. We report here a severe defect of neuromuscular transmission in a consanguineous patient with a homozygous variant in the laminin alpha-5 subunit gene (LAMA5). The variant c.8046C>T (p.Arg2659Trp) is rare and has a predicted deleterious effect. The affected individual, who also carries a rare homozygous sequence variant in LAMA1, had muscle weakness, myopia, and facial tics. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed mild volume loss and periventricular T2 prolongation. Repetitive nerve stimulation revealed 50% decrement of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and 250% facilitation immediately after exercise, Endplate studies identified a profound reduction of the endplate potential quantal content and endplates with normal postsynaptic folding that were denuded or partially occupied by small nerve terminals. Expression studies revealed that p.Arg2659Trp caused decreased binding of laminin alpha-5 to SV2A and impaired laminin-521 cell-adhesion and cell projection support in primary neuronal cultures. In summary, this report describing severe neuromuscular transmission failure in a patient with a LAMA5 mutation expands the list of phenotypes associated with defects in genes encoding alpha-laminins. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Pediatric experience with mipomersen as adjunctive therapy for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raal, Frederick J.; Braamskamp, Marjet J.; Selvey, Sheryl L.; Sensinger, Charlotte H.; Kastelein, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare, inherited condition resulting in severely elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (LDL-C) leading to premature cardiovascular disease and, often, death. Mipomersen is an antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits apolipoprotein B

  14. No postcopulatory selection against MHC-homozygous offspring: Evidence from a pedigreed captive rhesus macaque colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterck, E H M; Bontrop, R E; de Groot, N; de Vos-Rouweler, A J M; Doxiadis, G G M

    2017-07-01

    The heterozygosity status of polymorphic elements of the immune system, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), is known to increase the potential to cope with a wider variety of pathogens. Pre- and postcopulatory processes may regulate MHC heterozygosity. In a population where mating occurs among individuals that share identical MHC haplotypes, postcopulatory selection may disfavour homozygous offspring or ones with two MHC haplotypes identical to its mother. We tested these ideas by determining the incidence of MHC-heterozygous and MHC-homozygous individuals in a pedigreed, partially consanguineous captive rhesus monkey colony. Bayesian statistics showed that when parents share MHC haplotypes, the distribution of MHC-heterozygous and MHC-homozygous individuals significantly fitted the expected Mendelian distribution, both for the complete MHC haplotypes, and for MHC class I or II genes separately. Altogether, we found in this captive colony no evidence for postcopulatory selection against MHC-homozygous individuals. However, the distribution of paternally and maternally inherited MHC haplotypes tended to differ significantly from expected. Individuals with two MHC haplotypes identical to their mother were underrepresented and offspring with MHC haplotypes identical to their father tended to be overrepresented. This suggests that postcopulatory processes affect MHC haplotype combination in offspring, but do not prevent low MHC heterozygosity. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Spontaneous Atraumatic Mediastinal Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morkos Iskander BSc, BMBS, MRCS, PGCertMedEd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous atraumatic mediastinal hematomas are rare. We present a case of a previously fit and well middle-aged lady who presented with acute breathlessness and an increasing neck swelling and spontaneous neck bruising. On plain chest radiograph, widening of the mediastinum was noted. The bruising was later confirmed to be secondary to mediastinal hematoma. This life-threatening diagnostic conundrum was managed conservatively with a multidisciplinary team approach involving upper gastrointestinal and thoracic surgeons, gastroenterologists, radiologists, intensivists, and hematologists along with a variety of diagnostic modalities. A review of literature is also presented to help surgeons manage such challenging and complicated cases.

  16. [Common deafness gene mutations of non-syndromic hearing loss in Liaoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Wang, Zheng; Yang, Ning; Hui, Lian; Jiang, Xuejun

    2014-08-01

    Investigate common deafness gene mutations in patients with severe and profound non-syndromic hearing loss in Liaoning in order to understand their hereditary etiologies and characteristics at the molecular level. Peripheral blood samples were obtained and the DNA templates were extracted from 128 non-syndromic hearing loss patients who are sporadic in clinics. The deafness gene chip was applied to detect hot-spot deafness gene mutations including GJB2, GJB3, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA. Deafness etiology questionnaires, pure tone audiometry, auditory brainstem response, tympanometry and temporal bone CT were also applied. Various types of gene locus mutations were seen in 52 of the 128 patients (40.6%); (1) GJB2 gene mutations (n=22) included c. 235 del C homozygous mutation (n=10), c. 235 del C heterozygous mutation (n=5); c. 176_191 del 16 heterozygous mutation (n=l); c 35 del G heterozygous mutation (n=l); c. 235 del C/c. 299_300 del AT mutation (n=l), c. 235 del C/c. 176_191 del 16 mutation (n=l), c. 35 del G/c. 176_191 del 16 mutation (n=l); c. 299_300 del AT/c. 919-2 A>G mutation (n=l), c. 235 del C/c. 919-2 A>G mutation (n=l). (2) SLC26A4 gene mutations (n=30) included c. 919-2 A>G homozygous mutation (n=6), c. 919-2 A>G heterozygous mutation (n=17), c. 2168 A>G homozygous mutation (n=l), c. 2168 A>G heterozygous mutation (n=2), c. 2168 A>G/c. 919-2 A>G mutation (n=2), c. 919-2 A>G/GJB2 c. 235 del C mutation (n=2); (3) No GJB3 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. Genetic deafness was confirmed at the gene level in 24 cases (18.8%) and 28 patients (21.9%) were diagnosed as carriers of genetic deafness gene mutations. Genetic deafness occupies a large population in deaf community in Liaoning. Molecular genetic screening for these mutations and genetic counseling are effective methods to prevent the occurrence of hereditary hearing loss and provide theoretical guidance.

  17. Precise estimates of mutation rate and spectrum in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan O.; Siegal, Mark L.; Hall, David W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation. The most direct and unbiased method of studying spontaneous mutations is via mutation accumulation (MA) lines. Until recently, MA experiments were limited by the cost of sequencing and thus provided us with small numbers of mutational events and therefore imprecise estimates of rates and patterns of mutation. We used whole-genome sequencing to identify nearly 1,000 spontaneous mutation events accumulated over ∼311,000 generations in 145 diploid MA lines of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MA experiments are usually assumed to have negligible levels of selection, but even mild selection will remove strongly deleterious events. We take advantage of such patterns of selection and show that mutation classes such as indels and aneuploidies (especially monosomies) are proportionately much more likely to contribute mutations of large effect. We also provide conservative estimates of indel, aneuploidy, environment-dependent dominant lethal, and recessive lethal mutation rates. To our knowledge, for the first time in yeast MA data, we identified a sufficiently large number of single-nucleotide mutations to measure context-dependent mutation rates and were able to (i) confirm strong AT bias of mutation in yeast driven by high rate of mutations from C/G to T/A and (ii) detect a higher rate of mutation at C/G nucleotides in two specific contexts consistent with cytosine methylation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24847077

  18. Increased microerythrocyte count in homozygous alpha(+-thalassaemia contributes to protection against severe malarial anaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya J I Fowkes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The heritable haemoglobinopathy alpha(+-thalassaemia is caused by the reduced synthesis of alpha-globin chains that form part of normal adult haemoglobin (Hb. Individuals homozygous for alpha(+-thalassaemia have microcytosis and an increased erythrocyte count. Alpha(+-thalassaemia homozygosity confers considerable protection against severe malaria, including severe malarial anaemia (SMA (Hb concentration 1.1 x 10(12/l as a result of the reduced mean cell Hb in homozygous alpha(+-thalassaemia. In addition, children homozygous for alpha(+-thalassaemia require a 10% greater reduction in erythrocyte count than children of normal genotype (p = 0.02 for Hb concentration to fall to 50 g/l, the cutoff for SMA. We estimated that the haematological profile in children homozygous for alpha(+-thalassaemia reduces the risk of SMA during acute malaria compared to children of normal genotype (relative risk 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-1.12, p = 0.09.The increased erythrocyte count and microcytosis in children homozygous for alpha(+-thalassaemia may contribute substantially to their protection against SMA. A lower concentration of Hb per erythrocyte and a larger population of erythrocytes may be a biologically advantageous strategy against the significant reduction in erythrocyte count that occurs during acute infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. This haematological profile may reduce the risk of anaemia by other Plasmodium species, as well as other causes of anaemia. Other host polymorphisms that induce an increased erythrocyte count and microcytosis may confer a similar advantage.

  19. Haematological values in homozygous sickle cell disease in steady state and haemoglobin phenotypes AA controls in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinbami Akinsegun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickle cell disease is a genetic abnormality involving the haemoglobin. Although, it is primarily a red cell disorders, the white blood cells and platelets are also affected by the mutation. The consequent haemoglobin S causes polymerization of haemoglobin resulting in haemolysis and anaemia. This study aims to provide baseline haematological values in sickle cell disease patients in steady state and compare the deviation from haemoglobin phenotype AA control values. Methods A case–control study was conducted amongst homozygous sickle cell patients attending the sickle cell clinics of Lagos State University Teaching Hospital Ikeja and haemoglobin phenotype AA controls. About 4.5mls of blood sample was collected from each participant for full blood count analysis. All blood samples were screened for HIV and haemoglobin phenotypes confirmed using cellulose acetate haemoglobin electrophoresis at pH 8.6. Results A total of 103 cases and 98 controls were enrolled. The overall mean haemoglobin concentration for cases was 7.93 ± 1.47 g/dl, packed cell volume 24.44 ± 4.68%, mean cell volume 81.52 ± 7.89 fl, and mean cell haemoglobin 26.50 ± 3.20 pg. While for controls, mean haemoglobin concentration was 13.83 ± 1.32 g/dl, packed cell volume 43.07 ± 3.95%, mean cell volume 86.90 ± 4.69 fl, and mean cell haemoglobin 28.50 ± 1.34 pg. The overall mean white blood cell counts for the cases was 10.27 ± 3.94 *103/μl and platelet counts of 412.71 ± 145.09*103/μl. While white blood cell count for the controls was 5.67 ± 1.59*103/μl and platelet counts of 222.82 ± 57.62*103/μl. Conclusion Homozygous sickle cell disease patients have lower values of red cell parameters, but higher values of white cell and platelets counts compared to haemoglobin phenotype AA controls.

  20. Haematological values in homozygous sickle cell disease in steady state and haemoglobin phenotypes AA controls in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is a genetic abnormality involving the haemoglobin. Although, it is primarily a red cell disorders, the white blood cells and platelets are also affected by the mutation. The consequent haemoglobin S causes polymerization of haemoglobin resulting in haemolysis and anaemia. This study aims to provide baseline haematological values in sickle cell disease patients in steady state and compare the deviation from haemoglobin phenotype AA control values. Methods A case–control study was conducted amongst homozygous sickle cell patients attending the sickle cell clinics of Lagos State University Teaching Hospital Ikeja and haemoglobin phenotype AA controls. About 4.5mls of blood sample was collected from each participant for full blood count analysis. All blood samples were screened for HIV and haemoglobin phenotypes confirmed using cellulose acetate haemoglobin electrophoresis at pH 8.6. Results A total of 103 cases and 98 controls were enrolled. The overall mean haemoglobin concentration for cases was 7.93 ± 1.47 g/dl, packed cell volume 24.44 ± 4.68%, mean cell volume 81.52 ± 7.89 fl, and mean cell haemoglobin 26.50 ± 3.20 pg. While for controls, mean haemoglobin concentration was 13.83 ± 1.32 g/dl, packed cell volume 43.07 ± 3.95%, mean cell volume 86.90 ± 4.69 fl, and mean cell haemoglobin 28.50 ± 1.34 pg. The overall mean white blood cell counts for the cases was 10.27 ± 3.94 *103/μl and platelet counts of 412.71 ± 145.09*103/μl. While white blood cell count for the controls was 5.67 ± 1.59*103/μl and platelet counts of 222.82 ± 57.62*103/μl. Conclusion Homozygous sickle cell disease patients have lower values of red cell parameters, but higher values of white cell and platelets counts compared to haemoglobin phenotype AA controls. PMID:22849350

  1. Co-inheritance of α0 -thalassemia elevates Hb A2 level in homozygous Hb E: Diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, K; Srivorakun, H; Fucharoen, G; Fucharoen, S

    2017-10-01

    Differentiation of homozygous hemoglobin (Hb) E with and without α 0 -thalassemia is subtle on routine hematological ground. We examined in a large cohort of homozygous Hb E if the level of Hb A 2 is helpful. A total of 592 subjects with homozygous Hb E were recruited from ongoing thalassemia screening program. Additionally, five couples at risk of having fetuses with Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis who were homozygous Hb E were also investigated. Hb analysis was performed using capillary electrophoresis system. Globin genotypes were defined by DNA analysis. Subjects were classified into four groups including pure homozygous Hb E (n=532), homozygous Hb E/α 0 -thalassemia (n=48), Hb Constant Spring EE Bart's disease (n=8), and Hb EE Bart's disease (n=4). The levels of Hb A 2 were found, respectively, to be 4.97±0.69, 6.64±1.02, 4.86±0.87, and 7.60±1.04%. Among five couples at risk, α 0 -thalassemia was identified in three subjects with Hb A 2 >6.0%. Increased Hb A 2 level is a useful marker for differentiation of homozygous Hb E with and without α 0 -thalassemia. This should lead to a significant reduction in number of referral cases of homozygous Hb E for molecular testing of α 0 -thalassemia in routine practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Radiation-induced point mutations, deletions and micronuclei in lacI transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winegar, Richard A.; Hamer, Janice D.; O'Loughlin, Kathleen G.; Mirsalis, Jon C.; Lutze, Louise H.

    1994-01-01

    The development of transgenic mutagenesis systems has now made it possible to study the effects of ionizing radiation at both the molecular and chromosomal levels in the same animal. In this report we present preliminary data on the response of Big Blue TM lacI transgenic mice to ionizing radiation as measured by lacI mutations and micronuclei. C57Bl/6 transgenic mice were irradiated with 137 Cs γ-rays at doses ranging from 0.1 to 14 Gy, and expression times ranging from 2 to 14 days. Dose-related increases in the mutant frequency were observed after irradiations with longer expression times. Mutant plaques were analyzed by restriction enzyme digestion to detect large structural changes in the target sequence. Of 34 γ-ray- induced mutations analyzed, 4 were large-scale rearrangements. Three of these rearrangements were deletions within the lacI gene characterized by the presence of short regions of homology at the breakpoint junctions. The fourth rearrangement was a deletion that extended from within the αlacZ gene into downstream sequences and that had 43 bp of homology at the junction. These data indicate that the Big Blue TM lacI transgenic mouse system is sensitive to the types of mutations induced by ionizing radiation. To determine whether the presence of the transgene affects micronucleus induction we compared the response of nontransgenic to hemizygous transgenic B6C3F1 mice and the response of nontransgenic to hemizygous and homozygous transgenic C57Bl/6 mice. The presence or absence of the lacI transgene had no effect on spontaneous micronucleus frequencies for either strain. However, radiation-induced micronucleus frequencies were significantly higher in hemizygous lacI B6C3F1 mice than in nontransgenic litter mates; the converse was true in C57Bl/6 mice. These data suggest that the lacI transgene does not cause chromosome instability as measured by spontaneous micronucleus levels. However, the response of these transgenic mice to a variety of

  3. Spontaneous Appendicocutaneous Fistula I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M T0k0de* MB, BS and. Dr 0. A. AWOj0bi+ FMCS (Nig). ABSTRACT. Ruptured appendicitis is not a common cause of spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula. A case of ruptured retrocaecal appendicitis presenting as an enterocutaneous fistula in a Nigerian woman is presented. The literature on this disorder is also reviewed.

  4. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Edna; Caly, Wanda Regina

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs in 30% of patients with ascites due to cirrhosis leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. The pathogenesis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is related to altered host defenses observed in end-stage liver disease, overgrowth of microorganisms, and bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to mesenteric lymph nodes. Clinical manifestations vary from severe to slight or absent, demanding analysis of the ascitic fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by a number of neutrophils over 250/mm3 associated or not to bacterial growth in culture of an ascites sample. Enterobacteriae prevail and Escherichia coli has been the most frequent bacterium reported. Mortality rates decreased markedly in the last two decades due to early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment. Third generation intravenous cephalosporins are effective in 70% to 95% of the cases. Recurrence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is common and can be prevented by the continuous use of oral norfloxacin. The development of bacterial resistance demands the search for new options in the prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; probiotics are a promising new approach, but deserve further evaluation. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients with cirrhosis and ascites shortly after an acute episode of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  5. Spontaneous Grammar Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoo, Hong Sing; Lewis, Marilyn

    1998-01-01

    Describes one New Zealand university language teacher's reflection on her own grammar explanations to university-level students of Bahasa Indonesian. Examines form-focused instruction through the teacher's spontaneous answers to students' questions about the form of the language they are studying. The teacher's experiences show that it takes time…

  6. EDITORIAL SPONTANEOUS BACTERIAL PERITONITIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequent]y occurs in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites. It is defined as an infection of previously sterile ascitic fluid without any demonstrable intrabdominal source of infection. It is now internationally agreed that a polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell count in the ascitic fluid of over 250 ...

  7. Spontaneous dimensional reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlip, Steven

    2012-10-01

    Over the past few years, evidence has begun to accumulate suggesting that spacetime may undergo a "spontaneous dimensional reduction" to two dimensions near the Planck scale. I review some of this evidence, and discuss the (still very speculative) proposal that the underlying mechanism may be related to short-distance focusing of light rays by quantum fluctuations.

  8. Mutations in Recombination Activating Gene 1 and 2 in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disorders in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshaal, Safa; El Hawary, Rabab; Elsharkawy, Marwa; Mousa, Reem K; Farid, Reem J; Abd Elaziz, Dalia; Alkady, Radwa; Galal, Nermeen; Massaad, Michel J; Boutros, Jeannette; Elmarsafy, Aisha

    2015-06-01

    The Recombination Activating Genes (RAG) 1/2 are important for the development and function of T and B cells. Loss of RAG1/2 function results in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), which could lead to early death. We studied the prevalence of RAG1/2 mutations in ten SCID patients in Egypt. We identified two novel homozygous nonsense mutations in RAG1, a novel homozygous deletion, and a previously reported homozygous missense mutation from four patients, as well as two homozygous mutations in RAG2 from the same patient. Prenatal diagnosis performed in the mother of a patient with RAG1 deficiency determined that the fetus was heterozygous for the same mutation. This represents the first report on RAG1/2 mutations in SCID patients in Egypt. The early diagnosis dramatically affects the outcome of the disease by allowing bone marrow transplantation at an early age, and providing prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for families with a history of SCID. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Targeted Mouse Mutations Reveals the Topography of Local Changes in Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B West

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The unintended consequences of gene targeting in mouse models have not been thoroughly studied and a more systematic analysis is needed to understand the frequency and characteristics of off-target effects. Using RNA-seq, we evaluated targeted and neighboring gene expression in tissues from 44 homozygous mutants compared with C57BL/6N control mice. Two allele types were evaluated: 15 targeted trap mutations (TRAP; and 29 deletion alleles (DEL, usually a deletion between the translational start and the 3' UTR. Both targeting strategies insert a bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter (LacZ and a neomycin resistance selection cassette. Evaluating transcription of genes in +/- 500 kb of flanking DNA around the targeted gene, we found up-regulated genes more frequently around DEL compared with TRAP alleles, however the frequency of alleles with local down-regulated genes flanking DEL and TRAP targets was similar. Down-regulated genes around both DEL and TRAP targets were found at a higher frequency than expected from a genome-wide survey. However, only around DEL targets were up-regulated genes found with a significantly higher frequency compared with genome-wide sampling. Transcriptome analysis confirms targeting in 97% of DEL alleles, but in only 47% of TRAP alleles probably due to non-functional splice variants, and some splicing around the gene trap. Local effects on gene expression are likely due to a number of factors including compensatory regulation, loss or disruption of intragenic regulatory elements, the exogenous promoter in the neo selection cassette, removal of insulating DNA in the DEL mutants, and local silencing due to disruption of normal chromatin organization or presence of exogenous DNA. An understanding of local position effects is important for understanding and interpreting any phenotype attributed to targeted gene mutations, or to spontaneous indels.

  10. A mutation in Nischarin causes otitis media via LIMK1 and NF-κB pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Tom; Parker, Andrew; Ball, Greg; Gale, Richard; Williams, Debbie; Simon, Michelle M.; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; Burton, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media (OM), inflammation of the middle ear (ME), is a common cause of conductive hearing impairment. Despite the importance of the disease, the aetiology of chronic and recurrent forms of middle ear inflammatory disease remains poorly understood. Studies of the human population suggest that there is a significant genetic component predisposing to the development of chronic OM, although the underlying genes are largely unknown. Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis we identified a recessive mouse mutant, edison, that spontaneously develops a conductive hearing loss due to chronic OM. The causal mutation was identified as a missense change, L972P, in the Nischarin (NISCH) gene. edison mice develop a serous or granulocytic effusion, increasingly macrophage and neutrophil rich with age, along with a thickened, inflamed mucoperiosteum. We also identified a second hypomorphic allele, V33A, with only modest increases in auditory thresholds and reduced incidence of OM. NISCH interacts with several proteins, including ITGA5 that is thought to have a role in modulating VEGF-induced angiogenesis and vascularization. We identified a significant genetic interaction between Nisch and Itga5; mice heterozygous for Itga5-null and homozygous for edison mutations display a significantly increased penetrance and severity of chronic OM. In order to understand the pathological mechanisms underlying the OM phenotype, we studied interacting partners to NISCH along with downstream signalling molecules in the middle ear epithelia of edison mouse. Our analysis implicates PAK1 and RAC1, and downstream signalling in LIMK1 and NF-κB pathways in the development of chronic OM. PMID:28806779

  11. A mutation in Nischarin causes otitis media via LIMK1 and NF-κB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Crompton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM, inflammation of the middle ear (ME, is a common cause of conductive hearing impairment. Despite the importance of the disease, the aetiology of chronic and recurrent forms of middle ear inflammatory disease remains poorly understood. Studies of the human population suggest that there is a significant genetic component predisposing to the development of chronic OM, although the underlying genes are largely unknown. Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis we identified a recessive mouse mutant, edison, that spontaneously develops a conductive hearing loss due to chronic OM. The causal mutation was identified as a missense change, L972P, in the Nischarin (NISCH gene. edison mice develop a serous or granulocytic effusion, increasingly macrophage and neutrophil rich with age, along with a thickened, inflamed mucoperiosteum. We also identified a second hypomorphic allele, V33A, with only modest increases in auditory thresholds and reduced incidence of OM. NISCH interacts with several proteins, including ITGA5 that is thought to have a role in modulating VEGF-induced angiogenesis and vascularization. We identified a significant genetic interaction between Nisch and Itga5; mice heterozygous for Itga5-null and homozygous for edison mutations display a significantly increased penetrance and severity of chronic OM. In order to understand the pathological mechanisms underlying the OM phenotype, we studied interacting partners to NISCH along with downstream signalling molecules in the middle ear epithelia of edison mouse. Our analysis implicates PAK1 and RAC1, and downstream signalling in LIMK1 and NF-κB pathways in the development of chronic OM.

  12. Homozygosity for dominant mutations increases severity of muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzel-Hézode, Marianne; Sternberg, Damien; Tabti, Nacira; Vicart, Savine; Goizet, Cyril; Eymard, Bruno; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fournier, Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    Muscle channelopathies caused by mutations in the SCN4A gene that encodes the muscle sodium channel are transmitted by autosomal-dominant inheritance. We report herein the first cases of homozygous patients for sodium channel mutations responsible for paramyotonia congenita (I1393T) or hypokalemic periodic paralysis (R1132Q). A parallel was drawn between this unprecedented situation and that of myotonia congenita by including patients homozygous or heterozygous for the CLCN1 I556N channel mutation, which is known for incomplete dominance and penetrance. Standardized electromyographic (EMG) protocols combining exercise and cold served as provocative tests to compare homozygotes with heterozygotes for each of the three mutations. Surface-recorded compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were used to monitor muscle electrical activity, and myotonic discharges were evaluated by needle EMG. In heterozygous patients, exercise tests disclosed abnormal patterns of CMAP changes, which matched those previously described for similar dominant sodium and chloride channel mutations. Homozygotes showed much more severe clinical features and CMAP changes. We hypothesized that the presence of 100% defective ion channels in the homozygotes could account for the most severe phenotype. This suggests that the severity of muscle channelopathies depends both on the degree of channel impairment caused by the mutation and on the number of mutant channels engaged in the pathophysiological process. Overall, this study has practical consequences for the diagnosis of muscle channelopathies and raises new questions about their pathophysiology.

  13. Cell autonomy of the mouse claw paw mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Darbas, Aysel; Jaegle, Martine; Walbeehm, Erik; van den Burg, Hans; Driegen, Siska; Broos, Ludo; Uyl, Matthijs; Visser, Pim; Grosveld, Frank; Meijer, Dies

    2004-01-01

    textabstractMice homozygous for the autosomal recessive mutation claw paw (clp) are characterized by limb posture abnormalities and congenital hypomyelination, with delayed onset of myelination of the peripheral nervous system but not the central nervous system. Although this combination of limb and peripheral nerve abnormalities in clp/clp mice might suggest a common neurogenic origin of the syndrome, it is not clear whether the clp gene acts primarily in the neurone, the Schwann cell or bot...

  14. A mutation in the tuft mouse disrupts TET1 activity and alters the expression of genes that are crucial for neural tube closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith S. K. Fong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variations affecting neural tube closure along the head result in malformations of the face and brain. Neural tube defects (NTDs are among the most common birth defects in humans. We previously reported a mouse mutant called tuft that arose spontaneously in our wild-type 3H1 colony. Adult tuft mice present midline craniofacial malformations with or without an anterior cephalocele. In addition, affected embryos presented neural tube closure defects resulting in insufficient closure of the anterior neuropore or exencephaly. Here, through whole-genome sequencing, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Tet1 gene, which encodes a methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1, co-segregating with the tuft phenotype. This mutation resulted in premature termination that disrupts the catalytic domain that is involved in the demethylation of cytosine. We detected a significant loss of TET enzyme activity in the heads of tuft embryos that were homozygous for the mutation and had NTDs. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis indicated that multiple gene pathways associated with neural tube closure were dysregulated in tuft embryo heads. Among them, the expressions of Cecr2, Epha7 and Grhl2 were significantly reduced in some embryos presenting neural tube closure defects, whereas one or more components of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway mediating planar cell polarity and convergent extension were affected in others. We further show that the recombinant mutant TET1 protein was capable of entering the nucleus and affected the expression of endogenous Grhl2 in IMCD-3 (inner medullary collecting duct cells. These results indicate that TET1 is an epigenetic determinant for regulating genes that are crucial to closure of the anterior neural tube and its mutation has implications to craniofacial development, as presented by the tuft mouse.

  15. A novel FKRP-related muscular dystrophy founder mutation in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as well as 13 LGMD patients from Denmark,[13] and a novel homozygous missense mutation, c.1364C>A (p.Ala455Asp), in. Tunisian families.[14] A previously unreported ... Patients with a family history suggestive of an X-linked pattern of disease were excluded. The majority of referrals were from the state hospitals in ...

  16. MRPL44 mutations cause a slowly progressive multisystem disease with childhood-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Haack, T.B.; Catarino, C.B.; Gallenmuller, C.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Strom, T.M.; Baertling, F.; Meitinger, T.; Mayatepek, E.; Prokisch, H.; Klopstock, T.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial translation may lead to combined respiratory chain deficiency and typically cause childhood-onset multisystem disease. Only recently, a homozygous missense mutation (c.467T > G, p.Leu156Arg) in MRPL44, encoding a protein of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome,

  17. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in children : complement mutations and clinical characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, Lianne M.; Westra, Dineke; van Wijk, Joanna A. E.; Dorresteijn, Eiske M.; Lilien, Marc R.; Davin, Jean-Claude; Komhoff, Martin; Van Hoeck, Koen; van der Vlugt, Amerins; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; van de Kar, Nicole C. A. J.

    Mutations in complement factor H (CFH), factor I (CFI), factor B (CFB), thrombomodulin (THBD), C3 and membrane cofactor protein (MCP), and autoantibodies against factor H (alpha FH) with or without a homozygous deletion in CFH-related protein 1 and 3 (a dagger CFHR1/3) predispose development of

  18. Research note Identification of a novel GLB1 mutation in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bibi Zubaida

    Significantly low levels of beta-galactosidase enzyme confirmed the diagnosis of GM1 gangliosidosis. DNA sequencing of GLB1 identified a homozygous 2-bp deletion c.881-882delAT. (p.Tyr294Terfs) in exon 8. In silico analysis supported the deleterious effect of the variant. The study extends GLB1 mutation spectrum and ...

  19. A frequent tyrosinase gene mutation associated with type I-A (tyroinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism in Puerto Rico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oetting, W.S.; Witkop, C.J. Jr.; Brown, S.A.; Fryer, J.P.; Bloom, K.E.; King, R.A. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)); Colomer, R. (Servicio Medico de Empressa de la ONCE, Canary Islands (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    The authors have determined the mutations in the tyrosinase gene from 12 unrelated Puerto Rican individuals who have type I-A (tyrosinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). All but one individual are of Hispanic descent. Nine individuals were homozygous for a missense mutation (G47D) in exon I at codon 47. Two individuals were heterozygous for the G47D mutation, with one having a missense mutation at codon 373 (T373K) in the homologous allele and the other having an undetermined mutation in the homologous allele. One individual with negroid features was homozygous for a nonsense mutation (W236X). The population migration between Puerto Rico and the Canary Islands is well recognized. Analysis of three individuals with OCA from the Canary Islands showed that one was a compound heterozygote for the G47D mutation and for a novel missense mutation (L216M), one was homozygous for a missense mutation (P81L), and one was heterozygous for the missense mutation P81L. The G47D and P81L missense mutations have been previously described in extended families in the United States. Haplotypes were determined using four polymorphisms linked to the tyrosinase locus. Haplotype analysis showed that the G47D mutation occurred on a single haplotype, consistent with a common founder for all individuals having this mutation. Two different haplotypes were found associated with the P81L mutation, suggesting that this may be either a recurring mutation for the tyrosinase gene or a recombination between haplotypes. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Fitness is strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect in a microbial mutation accumulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, Karl; Toll-Riera, Macarena; Kojadinovic, Mila; MacLean, R Craig

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of the evolutionary consequences of mutation relies heavily on estimates of the rate and fitness effect of spontaneous mutations generated by mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. We performed a classic MA experiment in which frequent sampling of MA lines was combined with whole genome resequencing to develop a high-resolution picture of the effect of spontaneous mutations in a hypermutator (ΔmutS) strain of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After ∼644 generations of mutation accumulation, MA lines had accumulated an average of 118 mutations, and we found that average fitness across all lines decayed linearly over time. Detailed analyses of the dynamics of fitness change in individual lines revealed that a large fraction of the total decay in fitness (42.3%) was attributable to the fixation of rare, highly deleterious mutations (comprising only 0.5% of fixed mutations). Furthermore, we found that at least 0.64% of mutations were beneficial and probably fixed due to positive selection. The majority of mutations that fixed (82.4%) were base substitutions and we failed to find any signatures of selection on nonsynonymous or intergenic mutations. Short indels made up a much smaller fraction of the mutations that were fixed (17.4%), but we found evidence of strong selection against indels that caused frameshift mutations in coding regions. These results help to quantify the amount of natural selection present in microbial MA experiments and demonstrate that changes in fitness are strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Spontaneous healing of spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almafragi, Amar; Convens, Carl; Heuvel, Paul Van Den

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome and sudden cardiac death. It should be suspected in every healthy young woman without cardiac risk factors, especially during the peripartum or postpartum periods. It is important to check for a history of drug abuse, collagen vascular disease or blunt trauma of the chest. Coronary angiography is essential for diagnosis and early management. We wonder whether thrombolysis might aggravate coronary dissection. All types of treatment (medical therapy, percutaneous intervention or surgery) improve the prognosis without affecting survival times if used appropriately according to the clinical stability and the angiographic features of the involved coronary arteries. Prompt recognition and targeted treatment improve outcomes. We report a case of SCAD in a young female free of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, who presented six hours after thrombolysis for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed a dissection of the left anterior descending and immediate branch. She had successful coronary artery bypass grafting, with complete healing of left anterior descending dissection.

  2. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome: a case report and review of known mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Clare; Devaney, Deirdre; Fischer, Judith; Lenane, Patricia; Irvine, Alan D

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS; Mendelian Inheritance in Man 608649) is classified as a syndromic autosomal recessive ichthyosis. Here we describe two siblings with IPS and report a recurrent homozygous mutation (c.1430T>A) that is predicted to lead to a p.Val477Asp substitution in fatty acid transport protein 4. This mutation has arisen for the second time in an entirely distinct population from the Scandinavian population where it was first described. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. CDH3 gene related hypotrichosis and juvenile macular dystrophy – A case with a novel mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Karti

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions and importance: This case of HJMD was related to a novel homozygous mutation, termed c.447_467del (p.149_156del. These findings have significance for the future mutational analysis and genetic counseling of families with HJMD, particularly in our region. The presence of sparse hair in childhood, with or without limb anomalies, should alert clinicians to request an eye consultation. Pediatricians, dermatologists, and ophthalmologists should be aware of the rarely seen entity of juvenile macular dystrophy with hypotrichosis.

  4. A novel PCCB mutation in a Thai patient with propionic acidemia identified by exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2015-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an inborn error of metabolism, caused by mutations in either the PCCA or PCCB gene, leading to mitochondrial accumulation of propionyl-CoA and its by-products. Here we report a 6-year-old Thai boy with PA who was born to consanguineous parents. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous frameshift insertion (c.379_380insA; p.T127NfsX160) in the PCCB gene, expanding its mutational spectrum.

  5. Dietary Iron Intake and Serum Ferritin Concentration in 213 Patients Homozygous for the HFEC282Y Hemochromatosis Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor R Gordeuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HFEC282Y homozygotes have an increased risk for developing increased iron stores and related disorders. It is controversial whether dietary iron restrictions should be recommended to such individuals.

  6. Pediatric patient with hyperketotic hypoglycemia diagnosed with glycogen synthase deficiency due to the novel homozygous mutation in GYS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Szymańska

    2015-09-01

    A random, asymptomatic hypoglycemia with ketonuria was found in this patient at the age of 7. His developmental parameters were within normal ranges. Oral glucose tolerance test showed normal baseline blood levels of glucose, insulin and lactate, and their increase following glucose intake. Eight-hour fasting plasma glucose test, revealed glucose blood level of 34 mg/dl with no clinical symptoms. The results of these tests suggested GSD 0. Molecular analysis of the GYS2 gene was not feasible, but this particular gene was included in the panel of hypoglycemia of whole exome sequencing (WES which was at our disposal.

  7. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  8. Same β-globin gene mutation is present on nine different β-thalassemia chromosomes in a Sardinian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirastu, M.; Galanello, R.; Doherty, M.A.; Tuveri, T.; Cao, A.; Kan, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    The predominant β-thalassemia in Sardinia is the β 0 type in which no β-globin chains are synthesized in the homozygous state. The authors determined the β-thalassemia mutations in this population by the oligonucleotide-probe method and defined the chromosome haplotypes on which the mutation resides. The same β/sup 39(CAG→TAG)/ nonsense mutation was found on nine different chromosome haplotypes. Although this mutation may have arisen more than once, the multiple haplotypes could also be generated by crossing over and gene conversion events. These findings underscore the frequency of mutational events in the β-globin gene region

  9. Disease-causing mutations in exon 11 of the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Jensen, T G; Bross, P

    1994-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is the most commonly recognized defect of the mitochondrial beta-oxidation in humans. It is a potentially fatal, autosomal recessive inherited defect. Most patients with MCAD deficiency are homozygous for a single disease-causing mutation (G985......), causing a change from lysine to glutamate at position 304 (K304E) in the mature MCAD. Only seven non-G985 mutations, all of which are rare, have been reported. Because the G985 mutation and three of the non-G985 mutations are located in exon 11, it has been suggested that this exon may be a mutational hot...

  10. Acute splenic sequestration in a pregnant woman with homozygous sickle-cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bastos Maia

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Homozygous (SS sickle-cell anemia complicated by acute splenic sequestration in adults is a rare event, and it has never been reported during pregnancy. CASE REPORT A 25-year-old woman with homozygous (SS sickle-cell disease was hospitalized at 32 weeks' of gestation presenting weakness, abdominal pain, fever and hemoglobin of 2.4 g/dl. Abnormal fetal heart rate was detected by means of cardiotocography, and 5 units of packed red cells were transfused. Cesarean was performed at 37 weeks. Both mother and baby were discharged in a good general condition. CONCLUSION This case report demonstrates the importance of immediate blood transfusion for treatment of fetal distress in cases of splenic sequestration during pregnancy. This treatment is essential for avoiding maternal and fetal complications.

  11. A hypermorphic epithelial β-catenin mutation facilitates intestinal tumorigenesis in mice in response to compounding WNT-pathway mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Buchert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway occurs in the vast majority of colorectal cancers. However, the outcome of the disease varies markedly from individual to individual, even within the same tumor stage. This heterogeneity is governed to a great extent by the genetic make-up of individual tumors and the combination of oncogenic mutations. In order to express throughout the intestinal epithelium a degradation-resistant β-catenin (Ctnnb1, which lacks the first 131 amino acids, we inserted an epitope-tagged ΔN(1-131-β-catenin-encoding cDNA as a knock-in transgene into the endogenous gpA33 gene locus in mice. The resulting gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice showed an increase in the constitutive Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation that shifts the cell fate towards the Paneth cell lineage in pre-malignant intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, 19% of all heterozygous and 37% of all homozygous gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice spontaneously developed aberrant crypt foci and adenomatous polyps, at frequencies and latencies akin to those observed in sporadic colon cancer in humans. Consistent with this, the Wnt target genes, MMP7  and Tenascin-C, which are most highly expressed in benign human adenomas and early tumor stages, were upregulated in pre-malignant tissue of gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice, but those Wnt target genes associated with excessive proliferation (i.e. Cdnn1, myc were not. We also detected diminished expression of membrane-associated α-catenin and increased intestinal permeability in gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice in challenge conditions, providing a potential explanation for the observed mild chronic intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to azoxymethane and mutant Apc-dependent tumorigenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that epithelial expression of ΔN(1-131-β-catenin in the intestine creates an inflammatory microenvironment and co-operates with other mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to facilitate and promote tumorigenesis.

  12. Multiple genetic switches spontaneously modulating bacterial mutability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Randal N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All life forms need both high genetic stability to survive as species and a degree of mutability to evolve for adaptation, but little is known about how the organisms balance the two seemingly conflicting aspects of life: genetic stability and mutability. The DNA mismatch repair (MMR system is essential for maintaining genetic stability and defects in MMR lead to high mutability. Evolution is driven by genetic novelty, such as point mutation and lateral gene transfer, both of which require genetic mutability. However, normally a functional MMR system would strongly inhibit such genomic changes. Our previous work indicated that MMR gene allele conversion between functional and non-functional states through copy number changes of small tandem repeats could occur spontaneously via slipped-strand mis-pairing during DNA replication and therefore may play a role of genetic switches to modulate the bacterial mutability at the population level. The open question was: when the conversion from functional to defective MMR is prohibited, will bacteria still be able to evolve by accepting laterally transferred DNA or accumulating mutations? Results To prohibit allele conversion, we "locked" the MMR genes through nucleotide replacements. We then scored changes in bacterial mutability and found that Salmonella strains with MMR locked at the functional state had significantly decreased mutability. To determine the generalizability of this kind of mutability 'switching' among a wider range of bacteria, we examined the distribution of tandem repeats within MMR genes in over 100 bacterial species and found that multiple genetic switches might exist in these bacteria and may spontaneously modulate bacterial mutability during evolution. Conclusions MMR allele conversion through repeats-mediated slipped-strand mis-pairing may function as a spontaneous mechanism to switch between high genetic stability and mutability during bacterial evolution.

  13. Suppression of cholesterol synthesis in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by her own low density lipoprotein density fraction. A possible role of apolipoprotein E

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, L.; Vermeer, B.J.; Wit, E. de

    1980-01-01

    The suppression of cellular cholesterol synthesis by low density lipoprotein (LDL) from a normal and from a homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic subject was measured on normal fibroblasts and on fibroblasts derived from the same homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic patient. On normal

  14. Molecular mechanisms of induced-mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    The outcome of recent studies on mechanisms of induced-mutations is outlined with particular emphasis on the dependence of recA gene function in Escherichia coli. Genes involved in spontaneous mutation and x-ray- and chemical-induced mutation and genes involved in adaptive response are presented. As for SOS mutagenesis, SOS-induced regulation mechanisms and mutagenic routes are described. Furthermore, specificity of mutagens themselves are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base substitution, frameshift, and deletion mutagenesis. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Homozygous deletion and expression of PTEN and DMBT1 in human primary neuroblastoma and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Jorge; Lázcoz, Paula; Inda, María Mar; Nistal, Manuel; Pestaña, Angel; Encío, Ignacio J; Castresana, Javier S

    2004-05-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common pediatric solid tumor. Although many allelic imbalances have been described, a bona fide tumor suppressor gene for this disease has not been found yet. In our study, we analyzed 2 genes, PTEN and DMBT1, mapping 10q23.31 and 10q25.3-26.1, respectively, which have been found frequently altered in other kinds of neoplasms. We screened both genes for homozygous deletions in 45 primary neuroblastic tumors and 12 neuroblastoma cell lines. Expression of these genes in cell lines was assessed by RT-PCR analysis. We could detect 2 of 41 (5%) primary tumors harboring PTEN homozygous deletions. Three of 41 (7%) primary tumors and 2 of 12 cell lines presented homozygous losses at the g14 STS on the DMBT1 locus. All cell lines analyzed expressed PTEN, but lack of DMBT1 mRNA expression was detected in 2 of them. We tried to see whether epigenetic mechanisms, such as aberrant promoter hypermethylation, had any role in DMBT1 silencing. The 2 cell lines lacking DMBT1 expression were treated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine; DMBT1 expression was restored in only one of them (MC-IXC). From our work, we can conclude that PTEN and DMBT1 seem to contribute to the development of a small fraction of neuroblastomas, and that promoter hypermethylation might have a role in DMBT1 gene silencing. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Immunodeficiency associated with FCN3 mutation and ficolin-3 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe-Fog, Lea; Hummelshøj, Tina; Honoré, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Ficolin-3, encoded by the FCN3 gene and expressed in the lung and liver, is a recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system. Heterozygosity for an FCN3 frameshift mutation (rs28357092), leading to a distortion of the C-terminal end of the molecule, occurs in people without...... disease (allele frequency among whites, 0.01). We describe a patient with recurrent infections who was homozygous for this mutation, who had undetectable serum levels of ficolin-3, and who had a deficiency in ficolin-3-dependent complement activation....

  17. Collagen XVIII Mutation in Knobloch Syndrome with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vinit B.; Olney, Ann Haskins; Garrett, Penny; Chary, Ajit; Dragan, Ecaterina; Lerner, Gary; Murray, Jeffrey; Bassuk, Alexander G.

    2010-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KNO) is caused by mutations in the collagen XIII gene (COL18A1) and patients develop encephalocele and vitreoretinal degeneration. Here we report an El Salvadorian family where two sisters showed features of KNO. One of the siblings also developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. DNA sequencing of COL18A1revealed a homozygous, 2-base pair deletion (c3514-3515delCT) in exon 41, which leads to abnormal collagen XVIII and deficiency of its proteolytic cleavage product endostatin. KNO patients with mutations in COL18A1 may be at risk for endostatin-related conditions including malignancy. PMID:20799329

  18. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described......, and that spontaneous recovery may occur in cases harboring an exon 5b mutation Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  19. Mutation analysis of a Chinese family with oculocutaneous albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Yaowu; Shen, Na; Peng, Jing; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Haiyi; Lu, Yanjun

    2016-12-20

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by either complete lack of or a reduction in melanin biosynthesis in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA1, the most common and severe type, is caused by mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. In this study, we report a Chinese family with two members affected by OCA. Blood samples were collected from all family members. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes, and all coding exons and adjacent intronic sequences of the TYR gene were examined for mutation analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based sequencing. A pedigree chart was drawn, and clinical examinations and paraclinical tests were performed. Compound heterozygous mutations in TYR (c.832C>T and c.929_930insC, which resulted in p.Arg278* and p.Arg311Lysfs*7, respectively) were identified in the two patients with milky skin, white hair, photophobia, and reduced visual acuity, while other family members only carried one of two heterozygous mutations. In addition, a homozygous missense mutation c.814G>A (p.Glu272Lys) in the solute carrier family 45 member 2 (SLC45A2) gene was found in both patients and unaffected family members, suggesting that this may not be a causative mutation. The findings of this study expand the mutational spectrum of OCA. Compound heterozygous mutations (c.832C>T and c.929_930insC) in the TYR gene may be responsible for partial clinical manifestations of OCA, while the homozygous missense mutation c.814G>A (p.Glu272Lys) in the SLC45A2 gene may not be associated with OCA.

  20. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1 F22-24/F22-24 ) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1 BRCA1/BRCA1 ) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1 F22-24/5382insC ) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Mgbemena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1F22–24/F22–24 developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1BRCA1/BRCA1 were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1F22–24/5382insC had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction.

  2. A Founder Mutation in MYO7A Underlies a Significant Proportion of Usher Syndrome in Indigenous South Africans: Implications for the African Diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lisa; George, Siddiqah; Greenberg, Jacquie; Ramesar, Raj S

    2015-10-01

    Research over the past 25 years at the University of Cape Town has led to the identification of causative mutations in 17% of the 1416 families in the Retinal Degenerative Diseases (RDD) biorepository in South Africa. A low rate of mutation detection has been observed in patients of indigenous African origin, hinting at novel genes and mutations in this population. Recently, however, data from our translational research program showed two unrelated indigenous African families with Usher syndrome (USH), with the same homozygous MYO7A mutation. Therefore, the extent to which this mutation contributes toward the disease burden in South Africa was investigated. Cohorts of unrelated indigenous South African probands with different RDD diagnoses were tested for the MYO7A c.6377delC mutation. Familial cosegregation analysis was performed for homozygous probands, clinical data were evaluated, and SNP haplotypes were analyzed. This homozygous MYO7A mutation underlies a remarkable 43% of indigenous African USH cases investigated in this study, the majority of which (60%) were diagnosed clinically with Type 2 USH. All homozygotes shared a common haplotype. This mutation does not appear to cause nonsyndromic vision loss. Of interest is the origin of this common mutation relevant to the Bantu population migration into southern Africa. Further investigation of the phenotype may elucidate the disease biology, and perhaps reveal a larger cohort with the same mutation, with which to assess the impact of environmental and genetic modifiers and evaluate therapeutic trials.

  3. Efficacy and safety of lumacaftor and ivacaftor in patients aged 6-11 years with cystic fibrosis homozygous for F508del-CFTR: a randomised, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratjen, Felix; Hug, Christopher; Marigowda, Gautham; Tian, Simon; Huang, Xiaohong; Stanojevic, Sanja; Milla, Carlos E; Robinson, Paul D; Waltz, David; Davies, Jane C

    2017-07-01

    Lumacaftor and ivacaftor combination treatment showed efficacy in patients aged 12 years or older with cystic fibrosis homozygous for F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in placebo-controlled studies and patients aged 6-11 years with cystic fibrosis homozygous for F508del-CFTR in an open-label study. We report efficacy and safety of lumacaftor and ivacaftor in patients with cystic fibrosis aged 6-11 years homozygous for F508del-CFTR. In this phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study, patients were enrolled at 54 hospitals and medical centres in nine countries (the USA, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Sweden, and the UK). Eligible patients weighed at least 15 kg, with a confirmed diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) of 70 or more, and lung clearance index 2·5 (LCI 2·5 ) of 7·5 or more at screening (values less than these thresholds were permitted at day 1). All patients were tested for CFTR genotype at screening; eligible patients had to have the F508del-CFTR mutation on both alleles. Exclusion criteria included any comorbidity or laboratory abnormality that might confound the study results or pose additional risk to the patient. Patients were stratified by weight (cystic fibrosis homozygous for F508del-CFTR. The overall safety profile was consistent with previous phase 3 studies of lumacaftor and ivacaftor. Vertex Pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Wilson disease mutation pattern with genotype-phenotype correlations from Western India: confirmation of p.C271* as a common Indian mutation and identification of 14 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Annu; Chandhok, Gursimran; Todorov, Theodor; Parekh, Saloni; Tilve, Sharada; Zibert, Andree; Bhatt, Mohit; Schmidt, Hartmut H-J

    2013-07-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the ATP7B gene, with over 600 mutations described. Identification of mutations has made genetic diagnosis of WD feasible in many countries. The heterogeneity of ATP7B mutants is, however, yet to be identified in the Indian population. We analyzed the mutational pattern of WD in a large region of Western India. We studied patients (n = 52) for ATP7B gene mutations in a cohort of families with WD and also in first-degree relatives (n = 126). All 21 exon-intron boundaries of the WD gene were amplified and directly sequenced. We identified 36 different disease-causing mutations (31 exonic and five intronic splice site variants). Fourteen novel mutations were identified. Exons 2, 8, 13, 14, and 18 accounted for the majority of mutations (86.4%). A previously recognized mutation, p.C271*, and the novel mutation p.E122fs, were the most common mutations with allelic frequencies of 20.2% and 10.6%, respectively. Frequent homozygous mutations (58.9%) and disease severity assessments allowed analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations. Our study significantly adds to the emerging data from other parts of India suggesting that p.C271* may be the most frequent mutation across India, and may harbor a moderate to severely disabling phenotype with limited variability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  5. Spontaneous Thigh Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan, Sameer K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A young man presented with a painful and swollen thigh, without any history of trauma, illness, coagulopathic medication or recent exertional exercise. Preliminary imaging delineated a haematoma in the anterior thigh, without any fractures or muscle trauma. Emergent fasciotomies were performed. No pathology could be identified intra-operatively, or on follow-up imaging. A review of thigh compartment syndromes described in literature is presented in a table. Emergency physicians and traumatologists should be cognisant of spontaneous atraumatic presentations of thigh compartment syndrome, to ensure prompt referral and definitive management of this limb-threatening condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:134-138].

  6. Connexin 50 Mutation Lowers Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šeda, Ondřej; Liška, F.; Pravenec, Michal; Vernerová, Z.; Kazdová, L.; Křenová, D.; Zídek, Václav; Šedová, Lucie; Krupková, M.; Křen, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 1 (2017), s. 15-28 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/12/0696 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : Connexin * Hypertension * Transcriptome * Animal models * Insulin resistance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cardiac and Cardiovascular systems; Cardiac and Cardiovascular systems (FGU-C) Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  7. Common Variable Immunodeficiency Caused by FANC Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekinaka, Yujin; Mitsuiki, Noriko; Imai, Kohsuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Mitsui-Sekinaka, Kanako; Honma, Kenichi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Arai, Ayako; Yoshida, Kenichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Hira, Asuka; Takata, Minoru; Ohara, Osamu; Ogawa, Seishi; Morio, Tomohiro; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2017-07-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common adult-onset primary antibody deficiency disease due to various causative genes. Several genes, which are known to be the cause of different diseases, have recently been reported as the cause of CVID in patients by performing whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis. Here, we found FANC gene mutations as a cause of adult-onset CVID in two patients. B cells were absent and CD4 + T cells were skewed toward CD45RO + memory T cells. T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and signal joint kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (sjKRECs) were undetectable in both patients. Both patients had no anemia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia. Using WES, we identified compound heterozygous mutations of FANCE in one patient and homozygous mutation of FANCA in another patient. The impaired function of FANC protein complex was confirmed by a monoubiquitination assay and by chromosome fragility test. We then performed several immunological evaluations including quantitative lymphocyte analysis and TRECs/sjKRECs analysis for 32 individuals with Fanconi anemia (FA). In total, 22 FA patients (68.8%) were found to have immunological abnormalities, suggesting that such immunological findings may be common in FA patients. These data indicate that FANC mutations are involved in impaired lymphogenesis probably by the accumulation of DNA replication stress, leading to CVID. It is important to diagnose FA because it drastically changes clinical management. We propose that FANC mutations can cause isolated immunodeficiency in addition to bone marrow failure and malignancy.

  8. Protein expression studies of desmoplakin mutations in cardiomyopathy patients reveal different molecular disease mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, T. B.; Hansen, J.; Nissen, P. H.

    2013-01-01

    . This study aimed to investigate protein expression in myocardial and epidermal tissue of ARVC and CS patients carrying DSP mutations in order to elucidate potential molecular disease mechanisms. Genetic investigations identified three ARVC patients carrying different heterozygous DSP mutations in addition...... to a homozygous DSP mutation in a CS patient. The protein expression of DSP in mutation carriers was evaluated in biopsies from myocardial and epidermal tissue by immunohistochemistry. Keratinocyte cultures were established from skin biopsies of mutation carriers and characterized by reverse transcriptase...... polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and protein mass spectrometry. The results showed that the mutation carriers had abnormal DSP expression in both myocardial and epidermal tissue. The investigations revealed that the disease mechanisms varied accordingly to the specific types of DSP mutation...

  9. Compound heterozygous ASPM mutations in Pakistani MCPH families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammad, Farooq; Mahmood Baig, Shahid; Hansen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is characterized by reduced head circumference (50% of all reported families. In spite of the high frequency of MCPH in Pakistan only one case of compound heterozygosity for mutations in ASPM has been reported yet. In this large MCPH study we...... confirmed compound heterozygosity in two and homozygous mutations in 20 families, respectively, showing that up to 10% of families with MCPH caused by ASPM are compound heterozygous. In total we identified 16 different nonsense or frameshift mutations of which 12 were novel thereby increasing the number...... of mutations in ASPM significantly from 35 to 47. We found no correlation between the severity of the condition and the site of truncation. We suggest that the high frequency of compound heterozygosity observed in this study is taken into consideration as part of future genetic testing and counseling...

  10. Spontaneous Tumor Lysis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia C. Weeks MD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS is a known complication of malignancy and its treatment. The incidence varies on malignancy type, but is most common with hematologic neoplasms during cytotoxic treatment. Spontaneous TLS is thought to be rare. This case study is of a 62-year-old female admitted with multisystem organ failure, with subsequent diagnosis of aggressive B cell lymphoma. On admission, laboratory abnormalities included renal failure, elevated uric acid (20.7 mg/dL, and 3+ amorphous urates on urinalysis. Oliguric renal failure persisted despite aggressive hydration and diuretic use, requiring initiation of hemodialysis prior to chemotherapy. Antihyperuricemic therapy and hemodialysis were used to resolve hyperuricemia. However, due to multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome with extremely poor prognosis, the patient ultimately expired in the setting of a terminal ventilator wean. Although our patient did not meet current TLS criteria, she required hemodialysis due to uric acid nephropathy, a complication of TLS. This poses the clinical question of whether adequate diagnostic criteria exist for spontaneous TLS and if the lack of currently accepted guidelines has resulted in the underestimation of its incidence. Allopurinol and rasburicase are commonly used for prevention and treatment of TLS. Although both drugs decrease uric acid levels, allopurinol mechanistically prevents formation of the substrate rasburicase acts to solubilize. These drugs were administered together in our patient, although no established guidelines recommend combined use. This raises the clinical question of whether combined therapy is truly beneficial or, conversely, detrimental to patient outcomes.

  11. [Research progress of mutational spectrum and pathophysiology of WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome and nonsyndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S M; Han, Y H; Wang, H B

    2016-09-07

    Compound homozygous or heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome (WS), and heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal dominant non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). In addition, mutations in the WFS region has relationship with diabetes and psychiatric diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of genetic research with different phenotypes, including WS and LFSNHL.

  12. Molecular characterization of factor V leiden G1691A and prothrombin G20210A mutations in Saudi newborns with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawish, Gihan E-H

    2011-10-01

    This study examined a possible association between the mutations related to Factor V Leiden and Factor II (prothrombin) and stroke in Saudi neonates. A multiplex PCR was established to detect Factor V Leiden G1691A and prothrombin G20210A mutations in 72 neonatal stroke subjects and 70 healthy adult controls with no family history of thromboembolic diseases. The frequency of the homozygous normal genotype (GG) of both genes was found to be significantly lower in the stroke subjects than in the controls (P Factor II heterozygous mutant form (GA) and the homozygous normal Factor V (GG) (P Factor V and the homozygous normal Factor II genotypes (GG) (P = 0.0) than controls. The study concluded that prothrombin and Factor V Leiden may be important risk factors for neonatal stroke in Saudi children.

  13. Recent progress of national banking project on homozygous HLA-typed induced pluripotent stem cells in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Nam, Yoojun; Ham, Dong-Sik; Kim, Ji-Won; Ha, Hye-Yeong; Jung, Ji-Won; Jung, Seung Min; Baek, In Cheol; Kim, Su-Yeon; Kim, Tai-Gyu; Song, Jihwan; Lee, Jennifer; Park, Sung-Hwan; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2018-03-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated by introducing several factors into mature somatic cells. Banking of iPSCs can lead to wider application for treatment and research. In an economical view, it is important to store cells that can cover a high percentage of the population. Therefore, the use of homozygous human leukocyte antigen-iPSCs (HLA-iPSCs) is thought as a potential candidate for effective iPSC banking system for further clinical use. We screened the database stored in the Catholic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank of Korea and sorted the most frequent homozygous HLA types of the South Korean population. Blood cells with the selected homozygous HLA types were obtained and transferred to the GMP facility in the Catholic Institute of Cell Therapy. Cells were reprogrammed to iPSCs inside the facility and went through several quality controls. As a result, a total of 13 homozygous GMP-grade iPSC lines were obtained in the facility. The generated iPSCs showed high pluripotency and normal karyotype after reprogramming. Five HLA-homozygous iPSCs had the type that was included in the top five most frequent HLA types. Homozygous HLA-iPSCs can open a new opportunity for further application of iPSCs in clinical research and therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Physical mapping of chromosome 8p22 markers and their homozygous deletion in a metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bova, G.S.; Pin, S.S.; Isaacs, W.B. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the short arm of chromosome 8 as the site of one or more tumor suppressor genes inactivated in carcinogenesis of the prostate, colon, lung, and liver. Previously, we identified a homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22 in a metastatic prostate cancer. To map this homozygous deletion physically, long-range restriction mapping was performed using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of chromosome band 8p22. Subcloned genomic DNA and cDNA probes isolated by hybrid capture from these YACs were mapped in relation to one another, reinforcing map integrity. Mapped single-copy probes from the region were then applied to DNA isolated from a metastatic prostate cancer containing a chromosome 8p22 homozygous deletion and indicated that its deletion spans 730-970 kb. Candidate genes PRLTS (PDGF-receptor {beta}-like tumor suppressor) and CTSB (cathepsin B) are located outside the region of homozygous deletion. Genethon marker D8S549 is located approximately at the center of this region of homozygous deletion. Two new microsatellite polymorphisms, D8S1991 and D8S1992, also located within the region of homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22, are described. Physical mapping places cosmid CI8-2644 telomeric to MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor), the reverse of a previously published map, altering the interpretation of published deletion studies. This work should prove helpful in the identification of candidate tumor suppressor genes in this region. 47 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Confirmation that RIPK4 mutations cause not only Bartsocas-Papas syndrome but also CHAND syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, Tiffany; Jeraiby, Mohammed; Clémenson, Alix; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Granados, Viviana; Philip, Nicole; Touraine, Renaud

    2017-11-01

    CHAND syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by curly hair, ankyloblepharon, and nail dysplasia. Only few patients were reported to date. A homozygous RIPK4 mutation was recently identified by homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing in three patients from an expanded consanguineous kindred with a clinical diagnosis of CHAND syndrome. RIPK4 was previously known to be implicated in Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, the autosomal recessive form of popliteal pterygium syndrome. We report here two cases of RIPK4 homozygous mutations in a fetus with severe Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and a patient with CHAND syndrome. The patient with CHAND syndrome harbored the same mutation as the one identified in the family previously reported. We thus confirm the implication of RIPK4 gene in CHAND syndrome in addition to Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and discuss genotype/phenotype correlations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Hematological and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Hb A2 Variant with Homozygous α-Thalassemia-2 in a Southern Thai Individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuinoon, Manit; Jeenduang, Nutjaree; Kesornsit, Aumpika; Horpet, Dararat; Plyduang, Thunyaluk

    2017-05-01

    We report here the hematological and molecular features of a novel δ-globin chain variant found in a Southern Thai woman. Her complete blood count was as follows: red blood cell (RBC) count 5.90 × 10 12 /L, hemoglobin concentration (Hb) 12.6 g/dL, packed cell volume (PCV) 0.41 L/L, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) 69.5 fL, mean corpuscular Hb (MCH) 21.4 pg, mean corpuscular Hb concentration (MCHC) 30.7 g/dL and RBC distribution width (RDW) 13.1%. The blood smear demonstrated microcytic hypochromic RBCs suggestive of thalassemia trait. Hemoglobin analysis identified Hb A 2  + Hb A 2 -Kiriwong (2.4%) and Hb F (0.1%) on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To characterize the α-thalassemia (α-thal) genotype, common α-thal-1 and α-thal-2 alleles were characterized by multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR). The results revealed homozygous α-thal-2 (-α 3.7 /-α 3.7 ) in this case. DNA sequencing showed the presence of a novel δ-globin gene mutation [δ77(EF1)His→Arg; HBD: c.233A>G] that we named Hb A 2 -Kiriwong for the village from where the proband lived. In summary, the presence of microcytic hypochromic RBCs in this case was likely the result of the homozygous -α 3.7 (rightward) deletion and was not affected by this Hb A 2 variant.

  17. [Blood transfusion assessment to 112 homozygous sickle-cell disease patients in university hospital of Brazzaville].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokekias, A Elira; Ossini, L Ngolet; Tsiba, F O Atipo; Malanda, F; Koko, I; De Montalembert, M

    2009-01-01

    Homozygous, sickle-cell disease (SCD) is responsible for acute complication, especially anaemic crisis and special situation such as acute chest syndrome, stroke and acute priapism. Pregnancy sickle-cell disease presents high risk for the mother and the fetus. In these indications, blood transfusion is the main therapy aiming to reduce anaemia in order to restore hemoglobin's rate or to increase normal Hb proportion. This study aims to assess the short-term efficiency of the red cell transfusion in SCD homozygous form. One hundred and twelve homozygous sickle-cell patients were enrolled in this prospective study: 59 females and 53 males, median age is 21,8 years (extremes: 2 and 45 years). These patients are mostly with very low income. Two groups of patients are included in this study. In the first group, patients present acute anemia crisis caused by infections disease (malaria, bacterial infections). In the second group (20 cases), SCD patients have particularly situations: pregnancy (10 cases); stroke (six cases); cardiac failure (two cases) and priapism (two cases). Transfusion treatment in first group is simple regimen. Transfusion of EC increased median Hb level at 2,9 g/dl (extremes: 1,1 and 4,7). In the second group of patients, 16 cases were transfused by manual partial exchange (1-3) and four patients received simple regimen of transfusion. Median Hb level was 3,1g/dl (extremes: 2,4-4,9 g/dl). HbS percentage reduction was after PTE between -30 and -66,8% (median: -52,6%). According to our diagnostic possibilities (blood serologic test), we have not found any contamination by HIV, HBV and HCV (virus).

  18. GM2 Activator Deficiency Caused by a Homozygous Exon 2 Deletion in GM2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Patricia L; Laine, Regina; Alexander, John J; Ankala, Arunkanth; Teot, Lisa A; Lidov, Hart G W; Anselm, Irina

    2017-05-25

    GM2 activator (GM2A) deficiency (OMIM 613109) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder, with onset typically in infancy or early childhood. Clinically, it is almost indistinguishable from Tay-Sachs disease (OMIM 272800) or Sandhoff disease (OMIM 268800); however, traditionally available biochemical screening tests will most likely reveal normal results. We report a 2-year-old male with initially normal development until the age of 9 months, when he presented with developmental delay and regression. Workup at that time was unrevealing; at 15 months, he had abnormal brain MRI findings and a cherry red spot on ophthalmological examination. Family history and all laboratory studies were uninformative. The combination of a cherry red spot and developmental regression was strongly suggestive of a lysosomal storage disorder. Sequence analysis of GM2A did not reveal any pathogenic variants; however, exon 2 of GM2A could not be amplified by PCR, raising suspicion for a large, homozygous deletion. Subsequent copy number analysis confirmed a homozygous deletion of exon 2 in GM2A. This is the first reported case of GM2A deficiency being caused by a whole exon deletion. We describe previously unreported electron microscopy findings in this disease, thus expanding the clinical and variant spectrum for GM2 activator deficiency. These findings demonstrate the increased degree of suspicion required for diagnosis of this rare disorder. Brief Summary: This case of GM2 activator deficiency was caused by a homozygous deletion in GM2A, demonstrating the need to include exon level copy number analysis in any workup to fully exclude this disorder.

  19. Colloid clearance rate changes in children with homozygous-β-thalassemia in relation to blood transfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriou, P.A.; Karpathios, T.E.; Antipas, S.E.; Fretzayias, A.M.; Kasfiki, A.G.; Melissinos, K.G.; Matsaniotis, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The plasma clearance rate of heat denatured human serum albumin (DHAI-125, 5 mg/kg body weight) was studied in 20 children with homozygous-β-thalassemia before and 7-10 days after blood transfusion. A significant increase of the DHAI-125 clearance rate (P < 0.02) was found 7-10 days after blood transfusion while the spleen presented its minimum size. This finding may be relevant to the improved intrasplenic blood circulation after blood transfusion due to the release of the blood trapped within the spleen. (orig.)

  20. Corneal arcus and xanthomas in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: First report from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 12-year-old male who developed corneal arcus and multiple skin lesions with a 10-year history of xanthomas. The lesions appeared over his fingers, hands, elbows, knees, buttocks and feet. Laboratory studies showed a total serum cholesterol level of 752.1 mg/dL; a triglyceride level of 96.6 mg/dL; a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of 661.3 mg/dL. Findings were consistent with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. To our knowledge, this is the first such case to be reported from China.

  1. Mutation analysis of SLC26A4 for Pendred syndrome and nonsyndromic hearing loss by high-resolution melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Neng; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl

    2011-01-01

    Pendred syndrome and DFNB4 (autosomal recessive nonsyndromic congenital deafness, locus 4) are associated with autosomal recessive congenital sensorineural hearing loss and mutations in the SLC26A4 gene. Extensive allelic heterogeneity, however, necessitates analysis of all exons and splice sites...... to identify mutations for individual patients. Although Sanger sequencing is the gold standard for mutation detection, screening methods supplemented with targeted sequencing can provide a cost-effective alternative. One such method, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, was developed...... for clinical mutation detection in SLC26A4. However, this method inherently cannot distinguish homozygous changes from wild-type sequences. High-resolution melting (HRM), on the other hand, can detect heterozygous and homozygous changes cost-effectively, without any post-PCR modifications. We developed...

  2. A new mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase as a cause of HUPRA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Henry; Martín-Hernández, Elena; Delmiro, Aitor; García-Silva, María Teresa; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; Muley, Rafael; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2013-09-13

    HUPRA syndrome is a rare mitochondrial disease characterized by hyperuricemia, pulmonary hypertension, renal failure in infancy and alkalosis. This syndrome was previously described in three patients with a homozygous mutation c.1169A > G (p.D390G) in SARS2, encoding the mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase. Here we report the clinical and genetic findings in a girl and her brother. Both patients were clinically diagnosed with the HUPRA syndrome. Analysis of the pedigree identified a new homozygous mutation c.1205G > A (p.R402H) in SARS2 gene. This mutation is very rare in the population and it is located at the C-terminal globular domain of the homodimeric enzyme very close to p.D390G. Several data support that p.R402H mutation in SARS2 is a new cause of HUPRA syndrome.

  3. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  4. Spontaneous wave packet reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    There are taken into account the main conceptual difficulties met by standard quantum mechanics in dealing with physical processes involving macroscopic system. It is stressed how J.A.Wheeler's remarks and lucid analysis have been relevant to pinpoint and to bring to its extreme consequences the puzzling aspects of quantum phenomena. It is shown how the recently proposed models of spontaneous dynamical reduction represent a consistent way to overcome the conceptual difficulties of the standard theory. Obviously, many nontrivial problems remain open, the first and more relevant one being that of generalizing the model theories considered to the relativistic case. This is the challenge of the dynamical reduction program. 43 refs, 2 figs

  5. The relationship between thrombophilic mutations and preeclampsia: a prospective case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalinkaya, A.; Erdemoglu, M.; Akdeniz, N.; Kale, A.; Kale, E.

    2006-01-01

    Preeclampsia and its association with thrombophillia remain controversial, due to inconsistent results in different studies, which different ethnic groups, selection criteria, and patient numbers. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between thrombophillia and preeclamptic patients in our region. In a prospective case-control study, we compared 100 consecutive women with preeclampsia and eclampsia (group 1) with 100 normal pregnant women (group 2). All women were tested two months after delivery for mutations of factor V Leiden, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and prothrombin gene mutation mutataion as well as for deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrmbin III. A thrombophilic mutation was found in 42 (42%) and 28(28%) women in group I and group II, respectively (P+0.27, OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.2). The incidence of Factor V Leiden mutation (heterozygous), prothrombin mutation (heterozygous), prothrombin mutation (homozygous), MTHFR mutation (homozygous) was not statistically significant in group 1 compared with group 2 (P>0.05). Also, deficiencies of protein S, protein c and antithrombin III were not statistically significant in group I com pared with group II (P>0.05). There was no difference in thrombophilic mutations between preeclamptic patients and normal pregnant women in our region. Therefore, we suggest that preeclamptic patients should not be tested for thrombophilia. (author)

  6. Genetic contribution of SUN5 mutations to acephalic spermatozoa in Fujian China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yan-Wei; Xu, Xiaohui; Ji, Zhi-Yong; Lin, Shao-Bin; Wang, Xu; Qiu, Ping-Ping; Zhou, Yulin; Mei, Li-Bin; Su, Zhi-Ying; Li, Lin; Li, Ping

    2018-03-20

    Acephalic spermatozoa is an extremely rare disease associated with primary infertility. A recent study showed that genetic alterations in the SUN5 gene lead to this disease, and SUN5 mutations could explain the disease in about half of the patients. Therefore, in the present study, to re-visit the genetic contribution of SUN5 mutations to acephalic spermatozoa, we recruited 15 unrelated affected individuals and screened the SUN5 gene for mutations by whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing. Five of the 15 (33.33%) subjects were found to carry the same homozygous mutation in the SUN5 gene c.381delA (p.V128Sfs*7). Neither homozygous nor compound heterozygous mutations in SUN5 were found in the other 10 patients. The c.381delA mutation resulted in the truncation of the SUN5 protein and decreased the expression and altered the distribution of the outer dense fiber 1 (ODF1) protein. Thus, in our study SUN5 mutations accounted for only one-third of the patients in our cohort, which is lower than the percentage reported previously. Thus, our study suggests that the contribution of SUN5 mutations to acephalic spermatozoa might not be as high as described previously. These results will help in the genetic counseling of patients with acephalic spermatozoa. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A case of Donohue syndrome “Leprechaunism” with a novel mutation in the insulin receptor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Kirel, Birgül; Bozdağ, Özkan; Köşger, Pelin; Aydoğdu, Sultan Durmuş; Alıncak, Eylem; Tekin, Neslihan

    2017-01-01

    Donohue syndrome (Leprechaunism) is characterized by severe insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, postprandial hyperglycemia, preprandial hypoglycemia, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic findings, and clinical and laboratory findings of hyperandrogenemia due to homozygous or compound heterozygous inactivating mutations in the insulin receptor gene. A female newborn presented with lack of subcutaneous fat tissue, bilateral simian creases, hypertrichosis, especially on he...

  8. Short stature associated with a novel heterozygous mutation in the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyvenvoorde, H.A. van; Setten, P.A. van; Walenkamp, M.J.; Doorn, J. van; Koenig, J.; Gauguin, L.; Oostdijk, W.; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; Losekoot, M.; Wade, J.D.; Meyts, P. De; Karperien, M.; Noordam, C.; Wit, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Homozygous IGF1 deletions or mutations lead to severe short stature, deafness, microcephaly, and mental retardation. Heterozygosity for an IGF-I defect may modestly decrease height and head circumference. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to investigate the clinical features of

  9. The idic(X)(q13) in myeloid malignancies: breakpoint clustering in segmental duplications and association with TET2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Kajsa; Haferlach, Claudia; Fonatsch, Christa

    2010-01-01

    , is in the deleted region, suggesting that loss of this gene underlies the frequent presence of ringed sideroblasts. Additional genetic abnormalities were present in 12/14 (86%), including partial uniparental disomies for 9p (one case) and 4q (two cases) associated with homozygous mutations of JAK2 and TET2...

  10. Four Novel p.N385K, p.V36A, c.1033–1034insT and c.1417–1418delCT Mutations in the Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1 Gene in Patients with Types A and B Niemann-Pick Disease (NPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Dehghan Manshadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Types A and B Niemann-Pick disease (NPD are autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorders caused by the deficient activity of acid sphingomyelinase due to mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1 gene. Methods: In order to determine the prevalence and distribution of SMPD1 gene mutations, the genomic DNA of 15 unrelated Iranian patients with types A and B NPD was examined using PCR, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Results: Of 8 patients with the p.G508R mutation, 5 patients were homozygous, while the other 3 were heterozygous. One patient was heterozygous for both the p.N385K and p.G508R mutations. Another patient was heterozygous for both the p.A487V and p.G508R mutations. Two patients (one homozygous and one heterozygous showed the p.V36A mutation. One patient was homozygous for the c.1033–1034insT mutation. One patient was homozygous for the c.573delT mutation, and 1 patient was homozygous for the c.1417–1418delCT mutation. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis indicated that two new p.V36A and p.N385K mutations decreased the acid sphingomyelinase (ASM protein stability, which might be evidence to suggest the pathogenicity of these mutations. Conclusion: with detection of these new mutations, the genotypic spectrum of types A and B NPD is extended, facilitating the definition of disease-related mutations. However, more research is essential to confirm the pathogenic effect of these mutations.

  11. GNE missense mutation in recessive familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köroğlu, Çiğdem; Yılmaz, Rezzak; Sorgun, Mine Hayriye; Solakoğlu, Seyhun; Şener, Özden

    2017-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease eventually leading to death from respiratory failure. Recessive inheritance is very rare. Here, we describe the clinical findings in a consanguineous family with five men afflicted with recessive ALS and the identification of the homozygous mutation responsible for the disorder. The onset of the disease ranged from 12 to 35 years of age, with variable disease progressions. We performed clinical investigations including metabolic and paraneoplastic screening, cranial and cervical imaging, and electrophysiology. We mapped the disease gene to 9p21.1-p12 with a LOD score of 5.2 via linkage mapping using genotype data for single-nucleotide polymorphism markers and performed exome sequence analysis to identify the disease-causing gene variant. We also Sanger sequenced all coding sequences of SIGMAR1, a gene reported as responsible for juvenile ALS in a family. We did not find any mutation in SIGMAR1. Instead, we identified a novel homozygous missense mutation p.(His705Arg) in GNE which was predicted as damaging by online tools. GNE has been associated with inclusion body myopathy and is expressed in many tissues. We propose that the GNE mutation underlies the pathology in the family.

  12. Heart-specific expression of laminopathic mutations in transgenic zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay D; Parnaik, Veena K

    2017-07-01

    Lamins are key determinants of nuclear organization and function in the metazoan nucleus. Mutations in human lamin A cause a spectrum of genetic diseases that affect cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle as well as other tissues. A few laminopathies have been modeled using the mouse. As zebrafish is a well established model for the study of cardiac development and disease, we have investigated the effects of heart-specific lamin A mutations in transgenic zebrafish. We have developed transgenic lines of zebrafish expressing conserved lamin A mutations that cause cardiac dysfunction in humans. Expression of zlamin A mutations Q291P and M368K in the heart was driven by the zebrafish cardiac troponin T2 promoter. Homozygous mutant embryos displayed nuclear abnormalities in cardiomyocyte nuclei. Expression analysis showed the upregulation of genes involved in heart regeneration in transgenic mutant embryos and a cell proliferation marker was increased in adult heart tissue. At the physiological level, there was deviation of up to 20% from normal heart rate in transgenic embryos expressing mutant lamins. Adult homozygous zebrafish were fertile and did not show signs of early mortality. Our results suggest that transgenic zebrafish models of heart-specific laminopathies show cardiac regeneration and moderate deviations in heart rate during embryonic development. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  13. Spontaneous compactification to homogeneous spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous compactification of extra dimensions to compact homogeneous spaces is studied. The methods developed within the framework of coset space dimensional reduction scheme and the most general form of invariant metrics are used to find solutions of spontaneous compactification equations

  14. Screening for spontaneous preterm birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, M.A.; van Dam, A.J.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is the most important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this thesis studies on spontaneous preterm birth are presented. The main objective was to investigate the predictive capacity of mid-trimester cervical length measurement for spontaneous preterm birth in a

  15. Case report: a novel KERA mutation associated with cornea plana and its predicted effect on protein function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Laura; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Harris, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cornea plana (CNA) is a hereditary congenital abnormality of the cornea characterized by reduced corneal curvature, extreme hypermetropia, corneal clouding and hazy corneal limbus. The recessive form, CNA2, is associated with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations...... of the keratocan gene (KERA) on chromosome 12q22. To date, only nine different disease-associated KERA mutations, including four missense mutations, have been described. Case presentation: In this report, we present clinical data from a Turkish family with autosomal recessive cornea plana. In some of the affected......, and this knowledge will ease the interpretation of future findings of mutations in these areas in other families with cornea plana....

  16. Mitchell-Riley Syndrome: A Novel Mutation in RFX6 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Zegre Amorim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel RFX6 homozygous missense mutation was identified in an infant with Mitchell-Riley syndrome. The most common features of Mitchell-Riley syndrome were present, including severe neonatal diabetes associated with annular pancreas, intestinal malrotation, gallbladder agenesis, cholestatic disease, chronic diarrhea, and severe intrauterine growth restriction. Perijejunal tissue similar to pancreatic tissue was found in the submucosa, a finding that has not been previously reported in this syndrome. This case associating RFX6 mutation with structural and functional pancreatic abnormalities reinforces the RFX6 gene role in pancreas development and β-cell function, adding information to the existent mutation databases.

  17. A Novel Mutation in the EDAR Gene Causes Severe Autosomal Recessive Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Emil; Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Lildballe, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    nasal discharge. The girl was the second born child of first-cousin immigrants from Northern Iraq. A novel homozygous mutation (c.84delC) in the EDAR gene was identified. This mutation most likely causes a frameshift in the protein product (p.S29fs*74). This results in abolition of all ectodysplasin......-mediated NF-kB signalling. This complete loss-of-function mutation likely accounts for the severe clinical abnormalities in ectodermal structures in the described patient. (C) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  18. A novel mutation in LAMC3 associated with generalized polymicrogyria of the cortex and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambonin, J L; Dyment, D A; Xi, Y; Lamont, R E; Hartley, T; Miller, E; Kerr, M; Boycott, K M; Parboosingh, J S; Venkateswaran, S

    2018-01-01

    Occipital cortical malformation is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by pachygyria and polymicrogyria of the occipital lobes as well as global developmental delays and seizures. This condition is due to biallelic, loss-of-function mutations in LAMC3 and has been reported in four unrelated families to date. We report an individual with global delays, seizures, and polymicrogyria that extends beyond the occipital lobes and includes the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes. Next-generation sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in LAMC3: c.3190C>T (p.Gln1064*). This finding extends the cortical phenotype associated with LAMC3 mutations.

  19. Increased yield of heterologous viral glycoprotein in the seeds of homozygous transgenic tobacco plants cultivated underground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackaberry, Eilleen S; Prior, Fiona; Bell, Margaret; Tocchi, Monika; Porter, Suzanne; Mehic, Jelica; Ganz, Peter R; Sardana, Ravinder; Altosaar, Illimar; Dudani, Anil

    2003-06-01

    The use of transgenic plants in the production of recombinant proteins for human therapy, including subunit vaccines, is being investigated to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these emerging biopharmaceutical products. We have previously shown that synthesis of recombinant glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus can be targeted to seeds of transgenic tobacco when directed by the rice glutelin 3 promoter, with gB retaining critical features of immunological reactivity (E.S. Tackaberry et al. 1999. Vaccine, 17: 3020-3029). Here, we report development of second generation transgenic plant lines (T1) homozygous for the transgene. Twenty progeny plants from two lines (A23T(1)-2 and A24T(1)-3) were grown underground in an environmentally contained mine shaft. Based on yields of gB in their seeds, the A23T(1)-2 line was then selected for scale-up in the same facility. Analyses of mature seeds by ELISA showedthat gB specific activity in A23T(1)-2 seeds was over 30-fold greater than the best T0 plants from the same transformation series, representing 1.07% total seed protein. These data demonstrate stable inheritance, an absence of transgene inactivation, and enhanced levels of gB expression in a homozygous second generation plant line. They also provide evidence for the suitability of using this environmentally secure facility to grow transgenic plants producing therapeutic biopharmaceuticals.

  20. Heart valve surgery in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease: A management strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutaouekkil, El Mehdi; Najib, Abdelmalek; Ajaja, Rida; Arji, Moha; Slaoui, Anas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with the homozygous sickle cell disease have increased perioperative mortality. Some indications like heart valve surgery, may justify an exchange blood transfusion to reduce the proportion of hemoglobin S (HbS) and complications. Subjects and Methods: We report two female cases aged 20 and 27, of African origin with homozygous sickle cell anemia who underwent heart valve surgery to treat mitral valve regurgitation. This presentation describes the perioperative considerations including anesthesia and postoperative care. Results: A partial exchange blood transfusion decreased HbS levels from respectively, 90% and 84%, 9% to 27% and 34%, and simultaneously treated the anemia. Neither sickling crisis nor acidosis occurred in any patient, and no special postoperative complication occurred. Average hospital stay was 10 days. Currently, the two patients remain alive and free of cardiac symptoms. Discussion: Although the presence of sickle cell disorders is associated with increased risk of sickling and thus vaso-occlusive complications, they should not be taken as a contraindication for heart valve surgery. Nevertheless, monitoring of certain parameters such as venous, arterial oxygen content, pH, and body temperature is mandatory for a better outcome. Furthermore, preoperative exchange transfusion has a positive influence on the outcome of surgery and on the survival of patients undergoing heart valves surgery. Avoiding intraoperative hypoxia, hypothermia, and vaso-constrictive agents, minimizing HbS levels with preoperative exchange transfusion, and ensuring a stress-free environment with the judicious use of sedatives made surgery relatively safe in these cases. PMID:26139741

  1. Heart valve surgery in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease: A management strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mehdi Moutaouekkil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with the homozygous sickle cell disease have increased perioperative mortality. Some indications like heart valve surgery, may justify an exchange blood transfusion to reduce the proportion of hemoglobin S (HbS and complications. Subjects and Methods: We report two female cases aged 20 and 27, of African origin with homozygous sickle cell anemia who underwent heart valve surgery to treat mitral valve regurgitation. This presentation describes the perioperative considerations including anesthesia and postoperative care. Results: A partial exchange blood transfusion decreased HbS levels from respectively, 90% and 84%, 9% to 27% and 34%, and simultaneously treated the anemia. Neither sickling crisis nor acidosis occurred in any patient, and no special postoperative complication occurred. Average hospital stay was 10 days. Currently, the two patients remain alive and free of cardiac symptoms. Discussion: Although the presence of sickle cell disorders is associated with increased risk of sickling and thus vaso-occlusive complications, they should not be taken as a contraindication for heart valve surgery. Nevertheless, monitoring of certain parameters such as venous, arterial oxygen content, pH, and body temperature is mandatory for a better outcome. Furthermore, preoperative exchange transfusion has a positive influence on the outcome of surgery and on the survival of patients undergoing heart valves surgery. Avoiding intraoperative hypoxia, hypothermia, and vaso-constrictive agents, minimizing HbS levels with preoperative exchange transfusion, and ensuring a stress-free environment with the judicious use of sedatives made surgery relatively safe in these cases.

  2. Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: A Proposed New Treatment in Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatin, Laure; Rogier de Mare, Amélie; Mary, Pierre; Vialle, Raphaël; Damsin, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Possibilities for bone reconstruction in osteonecrosis of the femoral head in sickle cell hemoglobinopathies before the end of growth have not been assessed. The aim of our study was to evaluate the morphological and functional results in 11 osteonecrosis of the femoral head because of homozygous sickle cell disease. Surgical treatment consisted of a triple acetabular osteotomy in seven cases, femoral varus osteotomy in two cases and a combination of both in two cases. The severity of the osteonecrosis was evaluated on radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pre- and postoperative, and function of the hip joint was assessed by Harris and Postel Merle d'Aubigné scores. The anesthetic part (pre- and postoperative) and eventual complications were collected and analyzed. The maximum follow-up was between 1 to 9.6 years. All patients were considered to be satisfactory at maximum follow-up. The severity of the initial damage was not associated with any morphological or functional outcome at maximum follow-up. All patients had an objective functional gain. We found no general complications. We proposed a decision tree for the patient's management of avascular necrosis of the femoral head in sickle cell hemoglobinopathies before bone maturity, and with an Arlet and Ficat's stage of 3 or 4. The results of this study confirmed the interest of conservative surgical treatment in children with homozygous sickle cell anemia in case of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. IV (cases series of our department).

  3. Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly and symptomatic epilepsy caused by a homozygous 7-kilobase deletion in LYK5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffenberger, Erik G; Strauss, Kevin A; Ramsey, Keri E; Craig, David W; Stephan, Dietrich A; Robinson, Donna L; Hendrickson, Christine L; Gottlieb, Steven; Ramsay, David A; Siu, Victoria M; Heuer, Gregory G; Crino, Peter B; Morton, D Holmes

    2007-07-01

    We used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to investigate the cause of a symptomatic epilepsy syndrome in a group of seven distantly related Old Order Mennonite children. Autozygosity mapping was inconclusive, but closer inspection of the data followed by formal SNP copy number analyses showed that all affected patients had homozygous deletions of a single SNP (rs721575) and their parents were hemizygous for this marker. The deleted SNP marked a larger deletion encompassing exons 9-13 of LYK5, which encodes STE20-related adaptor protein, a pseudokinase necessary for proper localization and function of serine/threonine kinase 11 (a.k.a. LKB1). Homozygous LYK5 deletions were associated with polyhydramnios, preterm labour and distinctive craniofacial features. Affected children had large heads, infantile-onset intractable multifocal seizures and severe psychomotor retardation. We designated this condition PMSE syndrome (polyhydramnios, megalencephaly and symptomatic epilepsy). Thirty-eight percent (N = 16) of affected children died during childhood (ages 7 months to 6 years) from medical complications of the disorder, which included status epilepticus, congestive heart failure due to atrial septal defect and hypernatremic dehydration due to diabetes insipidus. A single post-mortem neuropathological study revealed megalencephaly, ventriculomegaly, cytomegaly and extensive vacuolization and astrocytosis of white matter. There was abundant anti-phospho-ribosomal S6 labelling of large cells within the frontal cortex, basal ganglia, hippocampus and spinal cord, consistent with constitutive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway in brain.

  4. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: Hamman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushank Chadha, BS

    2018-04-01

    significant fat stranding. The image also showed an intraluminal stent traversing the gastric antrum and gastric pylorus with no indication of obstruction. Circumferential mural thickening of the gastric antrum and body were consistent with the patient’s history of gastric adenocarcinoma. The shotty perigastric lymph nodes with associated fat stranding, along the greater curvature of the distal gastric body suggested local regional nodal metastases and possible peritoneal carcinomatosis. The thoracic CT scans showed extensive pneumomediastinum that tracked into the soft tissues of the neck, which given the history of vomiting also raised concern for esophageal perforation. There was still no evidence of mediastinal abscess or fat stranding. Additionally, a left subclavian vein port catheter, which terminates with tip at the cavoatrial junction of the superior vena cava can also be seen on the image. Discussion: Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum, also known as Hamman syndrome, is defined by the uncommon incidence of free air in the mediastinum due to the bursting of alveoli, as a result of extended spells of shouting, coughing, or vomiting.1,2 The condition is diagnosed when a clear cause (aerodigestive rupture, barotrauma, infection secondary to gas-forming organisms3 for pneumomediastinum cannot be clearly identified on diagnostic studies. Macklin and Macklin were the first to note the pathogenesis of the syndrome and explained that the common denominator to spontaneous pneumomediastinum was that increased alveolar pressure leads to alveolar rupture.3 Common clinical findings for spontaneous pneumomediastinum include: chest pain, dyspnea, cough, and emesis.4 The condition is not always readily recognized on initial presentation in part for its rare incidence, estimated to be approximately 1 in every 44,500 ED patients3and also because of the non-specific presenting symptoms. For this patient, there was no clear singular cause, and therefore she received care for spontaneous

  5. Two novel AIRE mutations in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) among Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, G; Sahu, R P; Zhang, L; George, G; Bhavani, N; Shah, N; Bhatia, V; Bhansali, A; Jevalikar, G; Jayakumar, R V; Eisenbarth, G S; Bhatia, E

    2009-11-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. There is no information on AIRE mutations in Indians. In a cross-sectional study, nine patients (eight families), from four referral hospitals in India, were studied for AIRE mutations by direct sequencing. We screened for new mutations in 150 controls by allele-specific PCR. The patients had 1-7 known components of APECED. Three patients had unusual manifestations: presentation with type 1 diabetes; chronic sinusitis and otitis media; and facial dysmorphism. All patients carried homozygous, probably recessive, AIRE mutations. Two unrelated patients from a small in-bred community (Vanika Vaisya) in south India carried an unreported missense mutation, p.V80G, in the N-terminal caspase recruitment domain. Another unique mutation, p.C302X, resulting in a truncated protein with deletion of both zinc-finger domains, was detected in a patient from Gujarat. Neither mutation was detected in controls. Other mutations, previously described in Caucasians, were: 13 base pair deletion (p.C322fsX372) in 4 (38%), and Finn-major (p.R257X) and p.R139X (Sardinian) mutation in one subject each. In conclusion, in this first series of APECED in Indians, we detected AIRE mutations previously reported in Caucasians, as well as unique mutations. Of these, p.V80G is possibly an ancestral mutation in an in-bred community.

  6. Spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumino, B.

    1981-12-01

    There has been recently a revival of interest in supersymmetric gauge theories, stimulated by the hope that supersymmetry might help in clarifying some of the questions which remain unanswered in the so called Grand Unified Theories and in particular the gauge hierarchy problem. In a Grand Unified Theory one has two widely different mass scales: the unification mass M approx. = 10/sup 15/GeV at which the unification group (e.g. SU(5)) breaks down to SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) and the mass ..mu.. approx. = 100 GeV at which SU(2) x U(1) is broken down to the U(1) of electromagnetism. There is at present no theoretical understanding of the extreme smallness of the ratio ..mu../M of these two numbers. This is the gauge hierarchy problem. This lecture attempts to review the various mechanisms for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in gauge theories. Most of the discussions are concerned with the tree approximation, but what is presently known about radiative correction is also reviewed.

  7. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  8. Spontaneous lateral temporal encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncbilek, Gokhan; Calis, Mert; Akalan, Nejat

    2013-01-01

    A spontaneous encephalocele is one that develops either because of embryological maldevelopment or from a poorly understood postnatal process that permits brain herniation to occur. We here report a rare case of lateral temporal encephalocele extending to the infratemporal fossa under the zygomatic arch. At birth, the infant was noted to have a large cystic mass in the right side of the face. After being operated on initially in another center in the newborn period, the patient was referred to our clinic with a diagnosis of temporal encephalocele. He was 6 months old at the time of admission. Computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed a 8 × 9 cm fluid-filled, multiloculated cystic mass at the right infratemporal fossa. No intracranial pathology or connection is seen. The patient was operated on to reduce the distortion effect of the growing mass. The histopathological examination of the sac revealed well-differentiated mature glial tissue stained with glial fibrillary acid protein. This rare clinical presentation of encephaloceles should be taken into consideration during the evaluation of the lateral facial masses in the infancy period, and possible intracranial connection should be ruled out before surgery to avoid complications.

  9. Exome sequencing identifies truncating mutations in human SERPINF1 in autosomal-recessive osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jutta; Semler, Oliver; Gilissen, Christian; Li, Yun; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Giunta, Cecilia; Bergmann, Carsten; Rohrbach, Marianne; Koerber, Friederike; Zimmermann, Katharina; de Vries, Petra; Wirth, Brunhilde; Schoenau, Eckhard; Wollnik, Bernd; Veltman, Joris A; Hoischen, Alexander; Netzer, Christian

    2011-03-11

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures after minimal trauma. After mutations in all known OI genes had been excluded by Sanger sequencing, we applied next-generation sequencing to analyze the exome of a single individual who has a severe form of the disease and whose parents are second cousins. A total of 26,922 variations from the human reference genome sequence were subjected to several filtering steps. In addition, we extracted the genotypes of all dbSNP130-annotated SNPs from the exome sequencing data and used these 299,494 genotypes as markers for the genome-wide identification of homozygous regions. A single homozygous truncating mutation, affecting SERPINF1 on chromosome 17p13.3, that was embedded into a homozygous stretch of 2.99 Mb remained. The mutation was also homozygous in the affected brother of the index patient. Subsequently, we identified homozygosity for two different truncating SERPINF1 mutations in two unrelated patients with OI and parental consanguinity. All four individuals with SERPINF1 mutations have severe OI. Fractures of long bones and severe vertebral compression fractures with resulting deformities were observed as early as the first year of life in these individuals. Collagen analyses with cultured dermal fibroblasts displayed no evidence for impaired collagen folding, posttranslational modification, or secretion. SERPINF1 encodes pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a secreted glycoprotein of the serpin superfamily. PEDF is a multifunctional protein and one of the strongest inhibitors of angiogenesis currently known in humans. Our data provide genetic evidence for PEDF involvement in human bone homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Evaluation of hemogram in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease: about 87 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmani, Fatima; Benkirane, Souad; Kouzih, Jaafar; Woumki, Aziz; Mamad, Hassan; Masrar, Azlarab

    2016-01-01

    Homozygous sickle cell disease is one of the most frequent haemoglobinopathies in Morocco. Sickle cell disease is characterized by a large clinical and biological expression variability which depends on modulating genetic and environmental factors. Clinical manifestation includes regenerative anemia whose severity may vary among individuals. In the absence of treatment, it results in premature death. Sickle cell disease is characterized by a large clinical and biological expression variability which depends on genetic and environmental factors. A severe clinical picture marked by high early transfusion frequency, severe infectious complications and early mortality. A constant inflammatory condition characterized by elevated inflammatory proteins and compromised nutritional status. The objective of this study is to determine the hematological parameters profile in moroccan patients with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease during stationary phases. We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study of 87 patients with sickle cell (SS) disease. We performed a biological study based on: Hemogram with morphological assessment of red blood cells stained with MGG and automated reticulocyte counting; Hemoglobin electrophoresis test performed on alkaline agarose gel (pH 8.8) and densitometric integration. The average age is 13.22 years ± 16.36, ranging betrween 0.6 and 36 years, with a sex ratio (M/F) of 1.175. Biological effects of anemia were intense in 88.5% of patients; 67.8% of patients had normocytic anemia compared with 29.9% with microcytosis, and 2.3% with macrocytosis. The degree of anisocytosis was related to the degree of anemia, very evocative in patients with homozygous S/S (95.4%). Reticulocytosis was observed in 81.6% of patients; 52.9% of patients had thrombocytosis. Leukocytosis was observed in 64.4% of patients; 80.5% of patients had neutropenia. The parameters of the hemogram will serve as a basis for comparison during crises and will make it possible to

  11. Primary ciliary dyskinesia-causing mutations in Amish and Mennonite communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkol, Thomas W; Puffenberger, Erik G; Lie, Hauw; Helms, Cynthia; Strauss, Kevin A; Bowcock, Anne; Carson, John L; Hazucha, Milan; Morton, D Holmes; Patel, Anand C; Leigh, Margaret W; Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether individuals with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) from unrelated Amish and Mennonite families harbor a single and unique founder mutation. Subjects from Amish and Mennonite communities in several states were enrolled in the study. All subjects were clinically characterized, and nasal nitric oxide levels were measured. Nasal epithelial scrapings were collected from several subjects for ciliary ultrastructural analyses. DNA was isolated from patients with PCD and their unaffected first- and second-degree relatives. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping, linkage analyses, targeted mutation analyses, and exome sequencing were performed. All subjects from Old-Order Amish communities from Pennsylvania were homozygous for a nonsense mutant DNAH5 allele, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X). Two affected siblings from an unrelated Mennonite family in Arkansas were homozygous for the same nonsense DNAH5 mutation. Children with PCD from an Amish family from Wisconsin had biallelic DNAH5 mutations, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X) and c.10815delT (p.P3606HfsX23), and mutations in other genes associated with PCD were also identified in this community. The Amish and Mennonite subjects from geographically dispersed and socially isolated communities had the same founder DNAH5 mutation, owing to the common heritage of these populations. However, disease-causing mutations in other PCD-associated genes were also found in affected individuals in these communities, illustrating the genetic heterogeneity in this consanguineous population. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene mutations in a cohort of Italian patients with autoimmune-polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal-dystrophy (APECED) and in their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervato, Sara; Mariniello, Barbara; Lazzarotto, Francesca; Morlin, Luca; Zanchetta, Renato; Radetti, Giorgio; De Luca, Filippo; Valenzise, Mariella; Giordano, Roberta; Rizzo, Daniela; Giordano, Carla; Betterle, Corrado

    2009-03-01

    Autoimmune-polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal-dystrophy (APECED) is a rare syndrome characterized by chronic candidiasis, chronic hypoparathyroidism and Addison's disease. APECED has been associated with mutations in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. Our aim is to perform a genetic analysis of the AIRE gene in Italian APECED patients and in their relatives. Design AIRE mutations were determined by DNA sequencing in all subjects. Patients were tested for clinical autoimmune or non-autoimmune diseases, or for organ and non-organ specific autoantibodies. A total of 24 Italian patients with APECED (15 from the Venetian region, 2 from Southern-Tyrol, 4 from Apulia, 3 from Sicily), 25 relatives and 116 controls were studied. Ten out of the 15 Venetian patients (66%) were homozygous for R257X or compound heterozygous with 1094-1106del13. One patient was homozygous for 1094-1106del13 and another for R139X. A novel mutation (1032-1033delGT) in combination with 1094-1106del13 was identified in one patient. No mutations were found in two cases. Two patients from Southern Tyrol were homozygous for R257X and for 1094-1106del13bp. All patients from Apulia were homozygous or heterozygous for W78R combined with Q358X. The patients from Sicily were homozygous for R203X or compound heterozygous with R257X. The analysis of the genotype-phenotype revealed that patients carrying 1094-1106del13 at the onset of Addison's disease were significantly older than those carrying other mutations. The genetic study of 25 relatives identified 20 heterozygous subjects. They suffered from various autoimmune and non-autoimmune diseases but no major disease of APECED was found. These data demonstrate the great genetic heterogeneity for the AIRE mutations in Italian APECED patients, and that the heterozygosity for AIRE mutations do not produce APECED.

  13. Bilateral spontaneous carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townend, Bradley Scott; Traves, Laura; Crimmins, Denis

    2005-06-01

    Bilateral internal carotid artery dissections have been reported, but spontaneous bilateral dissections are rare. Internal carotid artery dissection can present with a spectrum of symptoms ranging from headache to completed stroke. Two cases of spontaneous bilateral carotid artery dissection are presented, one with headache and minimal symptoms and the other with a stroke syndrome. No cause could be found in either case, making the dissections completely spontaneous. Bilateral internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) should be considered in young patients with unexplained head and neck pain with or without focal neurological symptoms and signs. The increasing availability of imaging would sustain the higher index of suspicion.

  14. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → There exists a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. → This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. → A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

  15. Stanol esters attenuate the aggravating effect of dietary cholesterol on atherosclerosis in homozygous Watanabe rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene; Husche, Constanze; Pilegaard, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Plant stanols are marketed as natural means to lower blood cholesterol in humans; hence the effect on combined familial hyperlipidemia is not known. The objective was to investigate the effect of stanol esters on blood lipids and aortic atherosclerosis in homozygous WHHL rabbits challenged...... with dietary cholesterol. A total of 36 rabbits, 6 weeks of age, with initial plasma cholesterol of 22.5 mmol/L were assigned to two treatment groups fed a standard rabbit chow with 1 g/kg cholesterol or this diet added 34 g/kg stanol ester, respectively, for 16 weeks. Plasma cholesterol was measured initially...... and at termination, also in lipoproteins. Aortic atherosclerosis was evaluated as cholesterol content and area covered by plaque. Plasma cholesterol was not significantly different between the groups at termination (35.7 mmol/L vs. 35.5 mmol/L). A significant increase in LDL was seen (13.1 mmol/L vs. 16.5 mmol...

  16. Limb defects in homozygous {alpha}-thalassemia: Report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitayat, D.; Thomas, M.; Silver, M.M. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    Homozygosity for the South-Asian {alpha}-thalassemia (--{sup SEA}/) deletion is a serious hematological condition that results, in most cases, in intrauterine or postnatal death due to anemia and severe hypoxia of prenatal onset. A relationship between congenital abnormalities and intrauterine hypoxia has been postulated. However, since homozygosity for the (--{sup SEA}/) deletion is most common in underdeveloped countries where detailed autopsies are lacking, the incidence of congenital abnormalities among these babies has not been well delineated. We report on three newborn infants, homozygous for the (--{sup SEA}/) deletion, who were born with limb defects. We postulate that this combination is the result of prenatal hypoxia which may affect other fetal body organs. This should be taken into consideration when prenatal treatment of affected fetuses, with intrauterine blood transfusion, is suggested. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  17. The Importance of Homozygous Polymorphisms of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Gene in Romanian Patients with Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Hotoleanu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms have recently raised the interest as a possible thrombophilic factors. Aims: We aimed to assess the frequency of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE in a Romanian population and the associated risk of VTE. Study Design: We performed a case-control transversal study including 90 patients diagnosed with VTE and 75 sex- and age-matched controls. Methods: MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were detected using PCR-RFLP method. Results: The homozygous MTHFR 677TT genotype, present in 18.8% of patients with VTE versus 6.6% of controls, was significantly associated with VTE (p= 0.021, OR= 3.26, 95%CI (1.141-9.313. The heterozygous MTHFR A1298C genotype, presenting the highest prevalence in the VTE group (34.4% as well as in controls (37.3%, was not associated with VTE (p=0.7. No associations were found for heterozygous MTHFR C677T (with a frequency of 32.2% in VTE and 37.3% in controls, p=0.492, respective homozygous MTHFR A1298C genotype (with a frequency of 1.1% in VTE and 2.6% in controls, p=0.456. Conclusion: Among MTHFR polymorphisms, only homozygosity for MTHFR 677TT may be considered a risk factor for VTE; the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism is not significantly associated with an increased risk of VTE.

  18. Homozygous Deletions and Recurrent Amplifications Implicate New Genes Involved in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennuan Liu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer cell lines provide ideal in vitro systems for the identification and analysis of prostate tumor suppressors and oncogenes. A detailed characterization of the architecture of prostate cancer cell line genomes would facilitate the study of precise roles of various genes in prostate tumorigenesis in general. To contribute to such a characterization, we used the GeneChip 500K single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP array for analysis of genotypes and relative DNA copy number changes across the genome of 11 cell lines derived from both normal and cancerous prostate tissues. For comparison purposes, we also examined the alterations observed in the cell lines in tumor/normal pairs of clinical samples from 72 patients. Along with genome-wide maps of DNA copy number changes and loss of heterozygosity for these cell lines, we report previously unreported homozygous deletions and recurrent amplifications in prostate cancers in this study. The homozygous deletions affected a number of biologically important genes, including PPP2R2A and BNIP3L identified in this study and CDKN2A/CDKN2B reported previously. Although most amplified genomic regions tended to be large, amplifications at 8q24.21 were of particular interest because the affected regions are relatively small, are found in multiple cell lines, are located near MYC, an oncogene strongly implicated in prostate tumorigenesis, and are known to harbor SNPs that are associated with inherited susceptibility for prostate cancer. The genomic alterations revealed in this study provide an important catalog of positional information relevant to efforts aimed at deciphering the molecular genetic basis of prostate cancer.

  19. Beta-thalassaemia mutations in northern India (Delhi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, N; Sharma, S; Rusia, U; Sen, S; Sood, S K

    1998-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to define beta-thalassaemia mutations prevalent in northern India (Delhi). Forty six children of beta-thalassaemia major and their families were investigated. DNA was extracted from leucocytes and screened for mutations prevalent in the Indian population. These mutations included 619bp deletion, IVS 1-1 (G-T), IVS 1-5 (G-C), frameshift mutations FS 8/9 (+G), FS 41/42 (-CTTT), Codon 16(-C), Codon 15 (G-A), codon 30 (G-C), IVS 1-110 (G-A) and -88 (C-T). 619 bp deletion mutation was detected directly by amplification of DNA by PCR followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Other mutations were studied by DNA amplification and dot blot hybridization using synthetic normal and mutant oligonucleotide probes labelled at 5' end with gamma-32 P-ATP. Five mutations accounted for all the chromosomes in 46 patients. 619 bp deletion mutation was found to be the commonest mutation (34.8%) followed by IVS 1-5 (G-C) in 22.8 per cent, IVS 1-1 (G-T) in 19.6 per cent, FS 8/9 (+G) in 13 per cent and FS 41/42 (-CTTT) in 9.8 per cent. Nineteen (41.3%) patients were homozygous and 27 (58.7%) double heterozygous for different beta-thalassaemia mutations. This observation of limited number of mutations is significant and will be useful in planning strategies for prenatal diagnosis of beta-thalassaemia in northern India.

  20. Hemochromatosis (HFE gene mutations in Brazilian chronic hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Perícole

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI have reduced hemoglobin levels, mostly as a result of decreased kidney production of erythropoietin, but the relation between renal insufficiency and the magnitude of hemoglobin reduction has not been well defined. Hereditary hemochromatosis is an inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The importance of the association of hemochromatosis with treatment for anemia among patients with CRI has not been well described. We analyzed the frequency of the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene in 201 Brazilian individuals with CRI undergoing hemodialysis. The analysis of the effects of HFE mutations on iron metabolism and anemia with biochemical parameters was possible in 118 patients of this study (hemoglobin, hematocrit, ferritin levels, transferrin saturation, and serum iron. A C282Y heterozygous mutation was found in 7/201 (3.4% and H63D homozygous and heterozygous mutation were found in 2/201 (1.0% and 46/201 (22.9%, respectively. The allelic frequencies of the HFE mutations (0.017 for C282Y mutation and 0.124 for H63D mutation did not differ between patients with CRI and healthy controls. Regarding the biochemical parameters, no differences were observed between HFE heterozygous and mutation-negative patients, although ferritin levels were not higher among patients with the H63D mutation (P = 0.08. From what we observed in our study, C282Y/H63D HFE gene mutations are not related to degrees of anemia or iron stores in CRI patients receiving intravenous iron supplementation (P > 0.10. Nevertheless, the present data suggest that the H63D mutation may have an important function as a modulating factor of iron overload in these patients.

  1. Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodan Paramanathan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Vinodan Paramanathan, Ardalan ZolnourianQueen's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Burton on Trent, Staffordshire DE13 0RB, UKAbstract: Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma is an uncommon clinical entity seen in ophthalmology practice. It is poorly represented in the literature. Current evidence attributes it to orbital trauma, neoplasm, vascular malformations, acute sinusitis, and systemic abnormalities. A 65-year-old female presented with spontaneous intraorbital hematoma manifesting as severe ocular pains, eyelid edema, proptosis, and diplopia, without a history of trauma. Computer tomography demonstrated a fairly well defined extraconal lesion with opacification of the paranasal sinuses. The principal differential based on all findings was that of a spreading sinus infection and an extraconal tumor. An unprecedented finding of a spontaneous orbital hematoma was discovered when the patient was taken to theater. We discuss the rarity of this condition and its management.Keywords: hemorrhage, ophthalmology, spontaneous, intra-orbital, hematoma

  2. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  3. Spontaneity and international marketing performance

    OpenAIRE

    Souchon, Anne L.; Hughes, Paul; Farrell, Andrew M.; Nemkova, Ekaterina; Oliveira, Joao S.

    2016-01-01

    The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to ascertain how today’s international marketers can perform better on the global scene by harnessing spontaneity. Design/methodology/approach – The authors draw on contingency theory to develop a model of the spontaneity – international marketing performance relationship, and identify three potential m...

  4. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Růžička

    Full Text Available Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs rarely associated with mutations (coldspots and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  5. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Michal; Kulhánek, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Čechová, Andrea; Špačková, Naďa; Fajkusová, Lenka; Réblová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs) rarely associated with mutations (coldspots) and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots) exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  6. Prevalence of mitochondrial DNA mutations in sporadic patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Chen, Jia; Li, Ying; Lin, Peng-Fang; He, Jian-Guo; Yang, Bei-Bei

    2016-01-01

    Several mitochondrial DNA mutations have been reported to be associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss in several families. However, little is known about the prevalence of these mutations in sporadic patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. The purpose of our study was to investigate the incidence of these mitochondrial DNA mutations in such population. A total of 178 sporadic patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss were enrolled in this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood sample. We employed the SNaPshot(®) sequencing method to detect five mitochondrial DNA mutations, including A1555G and A827G in 12S rRNA gene and A7445G, 7472insC, and T7511C in tRNA(Ser(UCN)) gene. Meanwhile, we used polymerase chain reaction and sequenced the products to screen GJB2 gene mutations in patients carrying mitochondrial DNA mutations. We failed to detect the presence of A1555G mutation in 12S rRNA gene, and of A7445G, 7472insC, T7511C mutations in tRNA(Ser(UCN)) gene in our population. However, we found that 6 patients (3.37%) were carriers of a homozygous A827G mutation and one of them also carried homozygous GJB2 235delC mutation. Our findings in the present study indicate that even in sporadic patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss, mitochondrial DNA mutations might also contribute to the clinical phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Homozygous deletion of TRMT10A as part of a contiguous gene deletion in a syndrome of failure to thrive, delayed puberty, intellectual disability and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zung, Amnon; Kori, Michal; Burundukov, Ella; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Tatoor, Yasmin; Granot, Esther

    2015-12-01

    Two recent reports describe a new syndrome of intellectual disability, short stature, microcephaly, and young onset diabetes or disturbed glucose metabolism in association with inactivating mutations in the TRMT10A gene. We investigated the clinical spectrum presented by a 17-year-old female with a homozygous contiguous gene deletion involving the TRMT10A gene. From infancy, she presented with failure to thrive and microcephaly. Puberty was characterized by a slow and an inconsistent course of progression. Concomitantly, gonadotropin levels fluctuated between low and high levels which were compatible with gonadal failure. Unlike the previous reports, the patient had ketoacidosis at onset of diabetes and islet cell autoantibodies. Nevertheless, glycemic control was excellent (HbA1C 5.0%-6.2%). RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated a complete abolishment of TRMT10A mRNA and its translated protein. In order to elucidate the nature of diabetes in this patient, endogenous insulin secretion and glycemic control were evaluated by a glucagon stimulation test and continuous glucose monitoring both during insulin treatment and off therapy. Endogenous insulin secretion still persisted 22 months after onset of diabetes and relatively normal glucose levels were kept over 3 days without insulin treatment. The fluctuating course of puberty and diabetes may reflect intermittent apoptotic damages due to sensitization of the relevant cells to various stress agents in the absence of functional TRMT10A. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Clinical variant of Tangier disease in Japan: mutation of the ABCA1 gene in hypoalphalipoproteinemia with corneal lipidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Jun; Nagano, Makoto; Kujiraoka, Takeshi; Ishihara, Mitsuaki; Egashira, Tohru; Takada, Daisuke; Tsuji, Masahiro; Hattori, Hiroaki; Emi, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    Despite progress in molecular characterization, specific diagnoses of disorders belonging to a group of inherited hypoalphalipoproteinemias, i.e., apolipoprotein AI deficiency, lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency, Tangier disease (TD), and familial high-density lipoprotein (HDL) deficiency, remain difficult on a purely clinical basis. Several TD patients were recently found to be homozygous for mutations in the ABCA1 gene. We have documented here a clinical variant of TD in a Japanese patient who manifested corneal lipidosis and premature coronary artery disease as well as an almost complete absence of HDL-cholesterol, by identifying a novel homozygous ABCA1 mutation (R1680W). We propose that patients with apparently isolated HDL deficiency who are found to carry ABCA1 mutations may in fact belong to a category of TD patients whose phenotypic features are only partially expressed, and that a number of hidden clinical variants of TD might exist among other HDL deficiency patients who have escaped correct clinical diagnosis.

  9. Induced mutations in connection with biotechnology for crop improvement in Latin America. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This publication results from the second Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Plant Breeding and Genetics organized on a regional basis in Latin America. The present CRP and the previous one were initiated and implemented in response to the pressing need to enhance the productivity of economic plants, viz. food crops, fruits and ornamentals. Improvement of crop production has become the highest priority in most countries of Latin America, as in other regions. Breeding superior varieties is often the only feasible solution where inputs are limited; well adapted varieties are required to meet specific agro-environmental conditions. Such varieties provide yield stability on an economically required level. The most important and common factors limiting crop production are abiotic, e.g. cold, salinity, soil aluminium toxicity and drought; as well as biotic, e.g. diseases and pests. Modern biotechnology and induced mutations offer new means and significant potential to breed desired varieties in a relatively short time. Additionally, both approaches facilitate the breeding of some vegetatively propagated crops which until now were improved mainly through selection of rare spontaneous mutants in natural or cultivated populations. Using some of these techniques it recently became possible to produce, in some crops, true-to-type mutated lines or clones within a few months. Biotechnology can also facilitate selection, description and molecular characterization of promising mutants. Currently used DNA markers, such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) as well as other polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques, were included in this CRP to benefit the important crops of this region. Also included in this CRP were doubled haploids (DH), which are obtained from anther or microspore cultures and are very suitable biotechnology methods. In connection with radiation-induced mutations, they can speed up conventional

  10. APOA5 Q97X Mutation Identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dussaillant Catalina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. Methods We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel. Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. Results A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. Conclusion The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family.

  11. Deficient plakophilin-1 expression due to a mutation in PKP1 causes ectodermal dysplasia-skin fragility syndrome in Chesapeake Bay retriever dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Olivry

    Full Text Available In humans, congenital and hereditary skin diseases associated with epidermal cell-cell separation (acantholysis are very rare, and spontaneous animal models of these diseases are exceptional. Our objectives are to report a novel congenital acantholytic dermatosis that developed in Chesapeake Bay retriever dogs. Nine affected puppies in four different litters were born to eight closely related clinically normal dogs. The disease transmission was consistent with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Clinical signs occurred immediately after birth with superficial epidermal layers sloughing upon pressure. At three month of age, dogs exhibited recurrent superficial skin sloughing and erosions at areas of friction and mucocutaneous junctions; their coat was also finer than normal and there were patches of partial hair loss. At birth, histopathology revealed severe suprabasal acantholysis, which became less severe with ageing. Electron microscopy demonstrated a reduced number of partially formed desmosomes with detached and aggregated keratin intermediate filaments. Immunostaining for desmosomal adhesion molecules revealed a complete lack of staining for plakophilin-1 and anomalies in the distribution of desmoplakin and keratins 10 and 14. Sequencing revealed a homozygous splice donor site mutation within the first intron of PKP1 resulting in a premature stop codon, thereby explaining the inability to detect plakophilin-1 in the skin. Altogether, the clinical and pathological findings, along with the PKP1 mutation, were consistent with the diagnosis of ectodermal dysplasia-skin fragility syndrome with plakophilin-1 deficiency. This is the first occurrence of ectodermal dysplasia-skin fragility syndrome in an animal species. Controlled mating of carrier dogs would yield puppies that could, in theory, be tested for gene therapy of this rare but severe skin disease of children.

  12. Mutations in the CEP290 (NPHP6) Gene Are a Frequent Cause of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Anneke I.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Yzer, Suzanne; Lopez, Irma; Arends, Maarten L.; Voesenek, Krysta E. J.; Zonneveld, Marijke N.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Brunner, Han G.; Hoyng, Carel B.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Cremers, Frans P. M.

    2006-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the main causes of childhood blindness. To date, mutations in eight genes have been described, which together account for ∼45% of LCA cases. We localized the genetic defect in a consanguineous LCA-affected family from Quebec and identified a splice defect in a gene encoding a centrosomal protein (CEP290). The defect is caused by an intronic mutation (c.2991+1655A→G) that creates a strong splice-donor site and inserts a cryptic exon in the CEP290 messenger RNA. This mutation was detected in 16 (21%) of 76 unrelated patients with LCA, either homozygously or in combination with a second deleterious mutation on the other allele. CEP290 mutations therefore represent one of the most frequent causes of LCA identified so far. PMID:16909394

  13. Autosomal recessive mutations in THOC6 cause intellectual disability: syndrome delineation requiring forward and reverse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, J S; Huang, L; Thevenon, J; Kariminedjad, A; Beaulieu, C L; Masurel-Paulet, A; Najmabadi, H; Fattahi, Z; Beheshtian, M; Tonekaboni, S H; Tang, S; Helbig, K L; Alcaraz, W; Rivière, J-B; Faivre, L; Innes, A M; Lebel, R R; Boycott, K M

    2017-01-01

    THOC6 is a part of the THO complex, which is involved in coordinating mRNA processing with export. The THO complex interacts with additional components to form the larger TREX complex (transcription export complex). Previously, a homozygous missense mutation in THOC6 in the Hutterite population was reported in association with syndromic intellectual disability. Using exome sequencing, we identified three unrelated patients with bi-allelic mutations in THOC6 associated with intellectual disability and additional clinical features. Two of the patients were compound heterozygous for a stop and a missense mutation, and the third was homozygous for a missense mutation; the missense mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by in silico analysis and modeling. Clinical features of the three newly identified patients and those previously reported are reviewed; intellectual disability is moderate to severe, and malformations are variable including renal and heart defects, cleft palate, microcephaly, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Facial features are variable and include tall forehead, short upslanting palpebral fissures +/- deep set eyes, and a long nose with overhanging columella. These subtle facial features render the diagnosis difficult to make in isolation with certainty. Our results expand the mutational and clinical spectrum of this rare disease, confirm that THOC6 is an intellectual disability causing gene, while providing insight into the importance of the THO complex in neurodevelopment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel homozygous PTH1R variant identified through whole-exome sequencing further expands the clinical spectrum of primary failure of tooth eruption in a consanguineous Saudi family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelani, Musharraf; Kang, Changsoo; Mohamoud, Hussein Sheikh Ali; Al-Rehaili, Rayan; Almramhi, Mona Mohammad; Serafi, Rehab; Yang, Huanming; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Naeem, Muhammad; Alkhiary, Yaser Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to identify the genetic cause of non-syndromic primary failure of tooth eruption in a five-generation consanguineous Saudi family using whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis. The family pedigree and phenotype were obtained from patient medical records. WES of all four affected family members was performed using the 51 Mb SureSelect V4 library kit and then sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing system. Sequence alignment, variant calling, and the annotation of single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels were performed using standard bioinformatics pipelines. The genotype of candidate variants was confirmed in all available family members by Sanger sequencing. Pedigree analysis suggested that the inheritance was autosomal recessive. WES of all affected individuals identified a novel homozygous variant in exon 8 of the parathyroid hormone 1 receptor gene (PTH1R) (NM_000316: c.611T>A: p.Val204Glu). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of primary failure of eruption caused by a homozygous mutation in PTH1R. Our findings prove the application of WES as an efficient molecular diagnostics tool for this rare phenotype and further broaden the clinical spectrum of PTH1R pathogenicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of Xmn I Polymorphism and Hemoglobin E Haplotypes on Postnatal Gamma Globin Gene Expression in Homozygous Hemoglobin E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supachai Ekwattanakit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. To explore the role of cis-regulatory sequences within the β globin gene cluster at chromosome 11 on human γ globin gene expression related to Hb E allele, we analyze baseline hematological data and Hb F values together with β globin haplotypes in homozygous Hb E. Patients and Methods. 80 individuals with molecularly confirmed homozygous Hb E were analyzed for the β globin haplotypes and Xmn I polymorphism using PCR-RFLPs. 74 individuals with complete laboratory data were further studied for association analyses. Results. Eight different β globin haplotypes were found linked to Hb E alleles; three major haplotypes were (a (III, (b (V, and (c (IV accounting for 94% of Hb E chromosomes. A new haplotype (Th-1 was identified and most likely converted from the major ones. The majority of individuals had Hb F < 5%; only 10.8% of homozygous Hb E had high Hb F (average 10.5%, range 5.8–14.3%. No association was found on a specific haplotype or Xmn I in these individuals with high Hb F, measured by alkaline denaturation. Conclusion. The cis-regulation of γ globin gene expression might not be apparent under a milder condition with lesser globin imbalance such as homozygous Hb E.

  17. Ethnicity of children with homozygous c.985A>G medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, J M; Oerton, J; Cortina-Borja, M

    2008-01-01

    newborn screening study. METHODS: Homozygous c.985A>G MCADD cases were ascertained in six English newborn screening centres between 1 March 2004 and 28 February 2007 by screening approximately 1.1 million newborns using tandem mass spectrometry analysis of underivatised blood spot samples to quantitate...

  18. Incidence of the endothelin receptor B mutation that causes lethal white foal syndrome in white-patterned horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santschi, E M; Vrotsos, P D; Purdy, A K; Mickelson, J R

    2001-01-01

    To determine incidence of the Ile118Lys endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) mutation responsible for overo lethal white syndrome (OLWS) and its association with specific types of white patterning. 945 horses of white-patterned bloodlines and 55 solid-colored horses of other breeds. Horses were genotyped by use of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction to determine incidence of the Ile118Lys EDNRB mutation. Genotypes detected were homozygous Ile118, homozygous Lys118, and heterozygous. All foals with OLWS were homozygous for the Ile118Lys EDNRB mutation, and adults that were homozygous were not found. White patterning was strongly associated with EDNRB genotype. Color patterns with highest incidence (> 94%) of heterozygotes were frame overo, highly white calico overo, and frame blend overo. White-patterned bloodlines with lowest incidence of heterozygotes (white calico overo, splashed white overo, nonframe blend overo, and breeding-stock solid. The mutation was not detected in solid-colored horses from breeds without white patterning. In homozygotes, the Ile118Lys EDNRB mutation causes OLWS. In heterozygotes, the mutation is usually responsible for a frame overo phenotype. The frame pattern can be combined with other white patterns, making accurate estimation of EDNRB genotype by visual inspection difficult. Wide range of incidence of heterozygotes in various subtypes of white-patterned horses indicates different genetic control of these color patterns. Determination of EDNRB genotype by use of a DNA-based test is the only way to determine with certainty whether white-patterned horses can produce a foal affected with OLWS.

  19. New ATP8A2 gene mutations associated with a novel syndrome: encephalopathy, intellectual disability, severe hypotonia, chorea and optic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Hernández, Elena; Rodríguez-García, María Elena; Camacho, Ana; Matilla-Dueñas, Antoni; García-Silva, María Teresa; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; Corral-Juan, Marc; Tejada-Palacios, Pilar; de Las Heras, Rogelio Simón; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    We report the clinical and biochemical findings from two unrelated patients who presented with a novel syndrome: encephalopathy, intellectual disability, severe hypotonia, chorea and optic atrophy. Whole exome sequencing (WES) uncovered a homozygous mutation in the ATP8A2 gene (NM_016529:c.1287G > T, p.K429N) in one patient and compound heterozygous mutations (c.1630G > C, p.A544P and c.1873C > T, p.R625W) in the other. Only one haploinsufficiency case and a family with a homozygous mutation in ATP8A2 gene (c.1128C > G, p.I376M) have been described so far, with phenotypes that differed slightly from the patients described herein. In conclusion, our data expand both the genetic and phenotypic spectrum associated with ATP8A2 gene mutations.

  20. Wolfram Syndrome: New Mutations, Different Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lugani, Francesca; Perri, Katia; Russo, Chiara; Tallone, Ramona; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Lorini, Renata; d'Annunzio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Background Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym “DIDMOAD”. The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. Methodology/Principal Findings We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females). Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V) was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. Conclusions/Significance Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10), deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA). PMID:22238590

  1. Wolfram syndrome: new mutations, different phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Aloi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolfram Syndrome (WS is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym "DIDMOAD". The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females. Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10, deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA.

  2. Spontaneous evolution of an unusual cortical malformation in SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Desai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain malformations such as agenesis and dysgenesis of corpus callosum, pituitary hypoplasia, hypothalamic hamartoma, mesial temporal periventricular heterotopia, and abnormally oriented and misshapen hippocampi have been described with SOX2 gene mutations. A neocortical malformation is presented here in association with SOX2 deletion that over time underwent spontaneous evolution and decrease in size.

  3. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: revival of Löwdin mutation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-06-10

    Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C→A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Löwdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Löwdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene expression in hypothalamus, liver and adipose tissues and feed intake response to melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) agonist in pigs expressing (MC4R) mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcriptional profiling was used to identify genes and pathways that responded to intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) agonist, NDP-MSH, in pigs homozygous for the missense mutation in the MC4R, D298 allele (n = 12), N298 allele (n = 12) or heterozygous (n = 12...

  5. Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome: two siblings with a new mutation and dramatic therapeutic effect of high-dose riboflavin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horoz, Ozden O.; Mungan, Neslihan O.; Yildizdas, Dincer; Hergüner, Özlem; Ceylaner, Serdar; Kör, Deniz; Waterham, Hans; Coskun, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome (BVVLS) is a rare and severe neurometabolic disease. We present two siblings with BVVLS with a novel homozygous mutation in SLC52A3 (formerly C20orf54) gene. The first sibling was admitted with respiratory insufficiency and required mechanical ventilation. After

  6. A novel mutation in the lysyl hydroxylase 1 gene causes decreased lysyl hydroxylase activity in an ehlers-danlos VIA patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, L.C.; Overstreet, M.A.; Siddiqui, A.; Paepe, A. de; Ceylaner, G.; Malfait, F.; Symoens, S.; Atsawasuwan, P.; Yamauchi, M.; Ceylaner, S.; Bank, R.A.; Yeowell, H.N.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of a patient with the phenotype of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI was confirmed biochemically by the severely diminished level of lysyl hydroxylase (LH) activity in the patient's skin fibroblasts. A novel homozygous mutation, a single base change of T1360 → G in exon 13 of the

  7. A case of spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Kanji; Yoshimoto, Hisanori; Harada, Kiyoshi; Uozumi, Tohru; Kuwabara, Satoshi.

    1983-01-01

    The authors experienced a case of spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy diagnosed by CT scan with metrizamide and Conray. Patient was 23-year-old male who had been in good health until one month before admission, when he began to have headache and tinnitus. He noticed bilateral visual acuity was decreased about one week before admission and vomiting appeared two days before admission. He was admitted to our hospital because of bilateral papilledema and remarkable hydrocephalus diagnosed by CT scan. On admission, no abnormal neurological signs except for bilateral papilledema were noted. Immediately, right ventricular drainage was performed. Pressure of the ventricle was over 300mmH 2 O and CSF was clear. PVG and PEG disclosed an another cavity behind the third ventricle, which was communicated with the third ventricle, and occlusion of aqueduct of Sylvius. Metrizamide CT scan and Conray CT scan showed a communication between this cavity and quadrigeminal and supracerebellar cisterns. On these neuroradiological findings, the diagnosis of obstructive hydrocephalus due to benign aqueduct stenosis accompanied with spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy was obtained. Spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy was noticed to produce arrest of hydrocephalus, but with our case, spontaneous regression of such symptoms did not appeared. By surgical ventriculocisternostomy (method by Torkildsen, Dandy, or Scarff), arrest of hydrocephalus was seen in about 50 to 70 per cent, which was the same results as those of spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy. It is concluded that VP shunt or VA shunt is thought to be better treatment of obstructive hydrocephalus than the various kinds of surgical ventriculocisternostomy. (J.P.N.)

  8. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency.

  9. MRI at 3 Tesla detects no evidence for ischemic brain damage in intensively treated patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Stephan A.; O' Regan, Declan P.; Fitzpatrick, Julie; Hajnal, Joseph V. [Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Neuwirth, Clare; Potter, Elizabeth; Tosi, Isabella; Naoumova, Rossi P. [MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Clinical Research Facility, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Lipid Clinic, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is considered a model disease for excessive plasma cholesterol levels. Patients with untreated homozygous FH have a markedly increased risk for premature atherosclerosis. The frequency and extent of ischemic brain damage detectable by high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after long-term intensive treatment are unknown. In a case control study, five patients with homozygous FH (one male and four females; mean age: 23.6 {+-} 9.2, range: 12-36 years; mean pre-treatment serum total cholesterol level: 26.9 {+-} 3.24 mmol/L; all patients with documented atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries) and five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. All patients had been on maximal lipid-lowering medication since early childhood, and four of them were also on treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis at bi-weekly intervals. Brain MRI was performed at 3 Tesla field strength with fluid-attenuated T2-weighted inversion recovery and T1-weighted spin-echo MR pulse sequences and subsequently evaluated by two independent readers. The maximal lipid-lowering treatment reduced the total serum cholesterol by more than 50% in the patients, but their serum concentrations were still 3.6-fold higher than those found in the controls (11.9 {+-} 4.2 vs. 4.5 {+-} 0.5 mmol/L; p < 0.0047). No brain abnormality was observed in any of the patients with homozygous FH. Homozygous FH patients on intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy have no evidence of ischemic brain damage at 3 Tesla MRI despite the remaining high cholesterol levels. (orig.)

  10. MRI at 3 Tesla detects no evidence for ischemic brain damage in intensively treated patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, Stephan A.; O'Regan, Declan P.; Fitzpatrick, Julie; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Neuwirth, Clare; Potter, Elizabeth; Tosi, Isabella; Naoumova, Rossi P.

    2007-01-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is considered a model disease for excessive plasma cholesterol levels. Patients with untreated homozygous FH have a markedly increased risk for premature atherosclerosis. The frequency and extent of ischemic brain damage detectable by high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after long-term intensive treatment are unknown. In a case control study, five patients with homozygous FH (one male and four females; mean age: 23.6 ± 9.2, range: 12-36 years; mean pre-treatment serum total cholesterol level: 26.9 ± 3.24 mmol/L; all patients with documented atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries) and five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. All patients had been on maximal lipid-lowering medication since early childhood, and four of them were also on treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis at bi-weekly intervals. Brain MRI was performed at 3 Tesla field strength with fluid-attenuated T2-weighted inversion recovery and T1-weighted spin-echo MR pulse sequences and subsequently evaluated by two independent readers. The maximal lipid-lowering treatment reduced the total serum cholesterol by more than 50% in the patients, but their serum concentrations were still 3.6-fold higher than those found in the controls (11.9 ± 4.2 vs. 4.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L; p < 0.0047). No brain abnormality was observed in any of the patients with homozygous FH. Homozygous FH patients on intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy have no evidence of ischemic brain damage at 3 Tesla MRI despite the remaining high cholesterol levels. (orig.)

  11. Association of dilated cardiomyopathy with the striatin mutation genotype in boxer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurs, K M; Stern, J A; Sisson, D D; Kittleson, M D; Cunningham, S M; Ames, M K; Atkins, C E; DeFrancesco, T; Hodge, T E; Keene, B W; Reina Doreste, Y; Leuthy, M; Motsinger-Reif, A A; Tou, S P

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial disease in the Boxer dog is characterized by 1 of 2 clinical presentations, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) characterized by ventricular systolic dysfunction, dilatation and tachyarrhythmias, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) characterized by ventricular tachyarrhythmias, syncope, and sudden death. Boxer ARVC has been associated with a deletion in the striatin gene in some families. We hypothesized that both presentations represent a single disease, and the development of DCM in the Boxer is associated with the striatin deletion. Thirty-three adult Boxer dogs with DCM, 29 adult Boxer dogs with the striatin deletion and ARVC, and 16 Boxers without cardiac disease. DNA samples were evaluated for the striatin deletion. Association of the deletion with the DCM phenotype was tested by a Fisher's exact test. T-tests were used to evaluate potential differences between the positive heterozygous and positive homozygous groups with DCM with regard to age, LVIDD, LVIDS, and FS%. Thirty of 33 dogs with DCM were positive for the striatin deletion. The striatin mutation and the homozygous genotype were strongly associated with the DCM phenotype (P Boxer dog and the striatin mutation, particularly with the homozygous genotype. The observation that 3/33 dogs developed DCM and lacked the striatin mutation suggests that there is at least 1 other cause of DCM in the Boxer dog. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Clinical characteristics and mutation analysis of propionic acidemia in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatanavicharn, Nithiwat; Liammongkolkul, Somporn; Sakamoto, Osamu; Kamolsilp, Mahattana; Sathienkijkanchai, Achara; Wasant, Pornswan

    2014-02-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is caused by a deficiency of propionyl CoA carboxylase. A characteristic urine organic acid profile includes 3-hydroxypropionate, methylcitrate, tiglylglycine, and propionylglycine. The diagnosis of PA is confirmed by detection of mutations in the PCCA or PCCB genes. We herein report the clinical and molecular findings of four Thai patients with PA. Clinical findings of four Thai patients with PA were retrospectively reviewed. Urine organic acids were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PCR-sequencing analyses of encoding exons and intron/exon boundaries of the PCCA and PCCB genes were performed. All patients had neonatal onset of PA. One patient died of cardiomyopathy, and another one of pneumonia and metabolic decompensation. The remainder experienced significant neurocognitive impairment. Mutation analysis of the PCCA gene identified homozygous c.1284+1G>A in patient 1, c.230G>A (p.R77Q) and c.1855C>T (p.R619X) in patient 2, homozygous c.2125T>C (p.S709P) in patient 3, and only one mutant allele, c.231+1G>T in patient 4. No PCCB mutation was identified. Four mutations including c.230G>A, c.231+1G>T, c.1855C>T, and c.2125T>C have not been reported previously. The clinical and molecular study of these Thai patients provided additional knowledge of the genotype and phenotype characteristics of PA. The results of the study suggested that PCCA mutations in Asian populations were distinct from those of other populations.

  13. A Turkish family with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome caused by a novel ALDH3A2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder caused by mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase family 3 member A2 (ALDH3A2 gene that encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Affected patients display ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia. More than 70 mutations in ALDH3A2 have been discovered in SLS patients. We diagnosed two brothers age of 12 and 20 years with characteristic features of this rare syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed demyelinating disease in both of them. We described a novel homozygous, c. 835 T > A (p.Y279N mutation in exon 6 in two patients.

  14. Case report: a novel KERA mutation associated with cornea plana and its predicted effect on protein function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Laura; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Harris, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    individuals, hypotrichosis was found. KERA was screened for mutations using Sanger sequencing. We detected a novel KERA variant, p.(Ile225Thr), that segregates with the disease in the homozygous form. The three-dimensional structure of keratocan protein was modelled, and we showed that this missense variation...... are predicted to result in destabilization of the protein. Conclusion: We present the 10th pathogenic KERA mutation identified so far. Protein modelling is a useful tool in predicting the effect of missense mutations. This case underline the importance of the leucin rich repeat domain for the protein function...

  15. Production of hemizygous and homozygous embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from the transgenic alszheimer göttingen minipis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Jacobsen, J.; Gunnarsson, A.

    2011-01-01

    Production of hemizygous and homozygous embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from the transgenic alszheimer göttingen minipis......Production of hemizygous and homozygous embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from the transgenic alszheimer göttingen minipis...

  16. Spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, M.J.; Saez, J.; Perez-Paya, F.J.; Fernandez, F.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of CT in the etiologic diagnosis of spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage. The CT findings are described in 13 patients presenting subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage. Those patients in whom the bleeding was not spontaneous were excluded. Surgical confirmation was obtained in nine cases. In 11 of the 13 cases (84.6%), involving five adenocarcinomas, five angiomyolipoma, two complicated cysts and one case of panarterities nodosa, CT disclosed the underlying pathology. In two cases (15.4%), it only revealed the extension of the hematoma, but gave no clue to its origin. CT is the technique of choice when spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage is suspected since, in most cases, it reveals the underlying pathology. (Author)

  17. DNA sequence analysis of X-ray induced Adh null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, J.; Fossett, N.G.; Arbour-Reily, P.; McDaniel, M.; Tucker, A.; Chang, S.H.; Lee, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The mutational spectrum for 28 X-ray induced mutations and 2 spontaneous mutations, previously determined by genetic and cytogenetic methods, consisted of 20 multilocus deficiencies (19 induced and 1 spontaneous) and 10 intragenic mutations (9 induced and 1 spontaneous). One of the X-ray induced intragenic mutations was lost, and another was determined to be a recombinant with the allele used in the recovery scheme. The DNA sequence of two X-ray induced intragenic mutations has been published. This paper reports the results of DNA sequence analysis of the remaining intragenic mutations and a summary of the X-ray induced mutational spectrum. The combination of DNA sequence analysis with genetic complementation analysis shows a continuous distribution in size of deletions rather than two different types of mutations consisting of deletions and 'point mutations'. Sequencing is shown to be essential for detecting intragenic deletions. Of particular importance for future studies is the observation that all of the intragenic deletions consist of a direct repeat adjacent to the breakpoint with one of the repeats deleted

  18. Pulmonary Embolism in a Sarcoidosis Patient Double Heterozygous for Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Gene Polymorphisms and Factor V Leiden and Homozygous for the D-Allele of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim El-Majzoub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis. It presents in patients younger than 40 years of age. The lungs are the most commonly affected organ. Till the present day, there is no single specific test that will accurately diagnose sarcoidosis; as a result, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis relies on a combination of clinical, radiologic, and histologic findings. Patients with sarcoidosis have been found to have an increased risk of pulmonary embolism compared to the normal population. MTHFR and factor V Leiden mutations have been reported to increase the risk of thrombosis in patients. We hereby present a case of a middle aged man with sarcoidosis who developed a right main pulmonary embolism and was found to be double heterozygous for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms and factor V Leiden and homozygous for the D-allele of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene.

  19. The Charles River "hairless" rat mutation is distinct from the hairless mouse alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleyev, A A; Christiano, A M

    2001-02-01

    The Charles River (CR) "hairless" rat is one of the autosomal recessive hypotrichotic animal models actively studied in pharmacologic and dermatologic research. Despite its widespread use, the molecular basis of this monogenic mutation remains unknown, and the skin histologic features of this phenotype have never been described. However, the designation "hairless" has been used as an extension of the hairless mouse (hr) nomenclature on the basis of the clinical absence of hairs in both phenotypes. We present a description of the histopathologic changes in heterozygous and homozygous CR hairless rat mutants during the first month of life. The postnatal homozygous rat skin was characterized by abnormal keratinization of the hair shaft and formation of a thick and dense layer of corneocytes in the lower portion of the epidermal stratum corneum. This layer prevented the improperly keratinized hair shaft from penetrating the skin surface. Starting from the latest stages of hair follicle (HF) development, obvious signs of HF degeneration were observed in homozygous skin. This process was extremely rapid, and by day 12, mainly atrophic HFs with abnormal or broken hairs were present in the skin. Therefore, the mutation in the CR rat abrogates cell proliferation in the hair matrix and affects keratinocyte differentiation in the HF and interfollicular epidermis, a phenotype that is completely distinct from hr/hr. To test whether the CR rat harbored a mutation in the hr gene, we analyzed the coding region of this gene and consensus intron splice site sequences in mutant rats and found no mutation, further supporting phenotypic evidence that the hairless phenotype in CR rats is not allelic with hairless. Finally, using intragenic polymorphisms, we were able to exclude homozygosity at the hairless locus by use of genotypic analysis. Thus, morphologic analysis of successive stages of phenotype development in the CR hairless rat, together with definitive molecular studies

  20. Penetrance of eye defects in mice heterozygous for mutation of Gli3 is enhanced by heterozygous mutation of Pax6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price David J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the consequences of heterozygous mutations of developmentally important genes is important for understanding human genetic disorders. The Gli3 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor and homozygous loss-of-function mutations of Gli3 are lethal. Humans heterozygous for mutations in this gene suffer Greig cephalopolysyndactyly or Pallister-Hall syndromes, in which limb defects are prominent, and mice heterozygous for similar mutations have extra digits. Here we examined whether eye development, which is abnormal in mice lacking functional Gli3, is defective in Gli3+/- mice. Results We showed that Gli3 is expressed in the developing eye but that Gli3+/- mice have only very subtle eye defects. We then generated mice compound heterozygous for mutations in both Gli3 and Pax6, which encodes another developmentally important transcription factor known to be crucial for eye development. Pax6+/-; Gli3+/- eyes were compared to the eyes of wild-type, Pax6+/- or Gli3+/- siblings. They exhibited a range of abnormalities of the retina, iris, lens and cornea that was more extensive than in single Gli3+/- or Pax6+/- mutants or than would be predicted by addition of their phenotypes. Conclusion These findings indicate that heterozygous mutations of Gli3 can impact on eye development. The importance of a normal Gli3 gene dosage becomes greater in the absence of a normal Pax6 gene dosage, suggesting that the two genes co-operate during eye morphogenesis.

  1. Spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Cimilli Ozturk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspepsia with mild, stabbing epigastric discomfort without history of trauma is a very common symptom that emergency physicians see in their daily practice. Vascular emergencies, mostly the aortic dissection and aneurysm, are always described in the differential diagnosis with persistent symptoms. Isolated celiac artery dissection occurring spontaneously is a very rare diagnosis. The involvement of branch vessels is generally observed and patients show various clinical signs and symptoms according to the involved branch vessel. Here we are presenting a case with spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection, without any branch vessel involvement or visceral damage, detected by computed tomography scans taken on admission.

  2. Spontaneous waves in muscle fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten [Department of Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Street 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Mechanical oscillations are important for many cellular processes, e.g. the beating of cilia and flagella or the sensation of sound by hair cells. These dynamic states originate from spontaneous oscillations of molecular motors. A particularly clear example of such oscillations has been observed in muscle fibers under non-physiological conditions. In that case, motor oscillations lead to contraction waves along the fiber. By a macroscopic analysis of muscle fiber dynamics we find that the spontaneous waves involve non-hydrodynamic modes. A simple microscopic model of sarcomere dynamics highlights mechanical aspects of the motor dynamics and fits with the experimental observations.

  3. Eculizumab in neonatal hemolytic uremic syndrome with homozygous factor H deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaux, Katell; Bacchetta, Justine; Javouhey, Etienne; Cochat, Pierre; Frémaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Sellier-Leclerc, Anne-Laure

    2014-12-01

    Neonatal atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare but severe disease that is mainly due to methylmalonic aciduria or genetic complement abnormalities. Traditional management of aHUS includes plasma infusion/exchange, but in small or unstable infants, plasma exchange can be challenging because of high extracorporeal volume and difficulty to obtain an adequate venous access. The C5 complement blocker eculizumab has become a cornerstone of first-line management of aHUS due to complement deregulation in older patients. However, little data are available on its use in neonatal aHUS. We report on an 11-day-old neonate with severe aHUS (myocardial impairment, respiratory failure, acute kidney disease requiring hemodiafiltration) due to homozygous factor-H deficiency. She received early treatment with eculizumab as first-line therapy and completely recovered within 5 days. A second dose of eculizumab was administered 7 days after the first infusion, followed by a dose every 2 weeks for 2 months and then every 3 weeks, at the same dosage (300 mg). With more than 24 months of follow-up, renal function remains normal. We report on the long-term efficacy and safety of eculizumab as first-line therapy in neonatal aHUS. However its use still requires optimization in terms of indications and administration (frequency, dosage).

  4. Homozygous sequence variants in the WNT10B gene underlie split hand/foot malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmat Ullah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM, also known as ectrodactyly is a rare genetic disorder. It is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of limb malformations characterized by absence/hypoplasia and/or median cleft of hands and/or feet. To date, seven genes underlying SHFM have been identified. This study described four consanguineous families (A-D segregating SHFM in an autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 12p11.1–q13.13 harboring WNT10B gene. Sequence analysis identified a novel homozygous nonsense variant (p.Gln154* in exon 4 of the WNT10B gene in two families (A and B. In the other two families (C and D, a previously reported variant (c.300_306dupAGGGCGG; p.Leu103Argfs*53 was detected. This study further expands the spectrum of the sequence variants reported in the WNT10B gene, which result in the split hand/foot malformation.

  5. Effects of chronic deoxynivalenol exposure on p53 heterozygous and p53 homozygous mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, G S; Coady, L; Curran, I; Caldwell, D; Armstrong, C; Aziz, S A; Nunnikhoven, A; Gannon, A M; Liston, V; Shenton, J; Mehta, R

    2016-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a secondary metabolite associated with Fusarium species pathogenic to important food crops. A two-year feeding study reported that DON was non-carcinogenic in B6C3F1 mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize the chronic effects of DON by exposing cancer-prone transgenic p53 heterozygous (p53+/-) male mice and p53 homozygous (p53+/+) male mice to 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg DON/kg in diet for 26 weeks. Gross and microscopic organ-specific neoplastic and non-neoplastic changes and expression profiles of key hepatic and renal genes were assessed. Few toxicologic differences between p53+/+ and p53+/- mice were observed, and no tumours were observed due to DON. The results indicated that DON was non-carcinogenic and that reduced expression of the p53 gene did not play a key role in responses to DON toxicity. The lack of inflammatory and proliferative lesions in mice may be attributed to the anorectic effects of DON, which resulted in dose-dependent reductions in body weight in p53+/+ and p53+/- mice. Hepatic and renal gene expression analyses confirmed that chronic exposure to DON was noninflammatory. The effects of 26-week DON exposure on p53+/+ and p53+/-mice were consistent with those previously seen in B6C3F1 mice exposed to DON for two years. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of a breast cancer family double heterozygote for RAD51C and BRCA2 gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has entered routine genetic testing of hereditary breast cancer. It has provided the opportunity to screen multiple genes simultaneously, and consequently has identified new complex genotypes. Here we report the first identification of a woman double heterozygote...... for mutations in the RAD51C and BRCA2 genes. The RAD51C missense mutation p.Arg258His has previously been identified in a homozygous state in a patient with Fanconi anemia. This mutation is known to affect the DNA repair function of the RAD51C protein. The BRCA2 p.Leu3216Leu synonymous mutation has not been...... described before and mini-gene splicing experiments revealed that the mutation results in skipping of exon 26 containing a part of the DNA-binding domain. We conclude that the woman has two potential disease-causing mutations and that predictive testing of family members should include both the RAD51C...

  7. Haldane and the first estimates of the human mutation rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the mouse and dog genomes shows that their selective con- straint is independent of their genic environment. Genome. Res. 14, 852–859. Drake J. W., Charlesworth B., Charlesworth D. and Crow J. F.. 1998 Rates of spontaneous mutation. Genetics 148, 1667–. 1686. Haldane J. B. S. 1927 A mathematical theory of natural ...

  8. Spontaneous pneumothorax as indicator for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesma, Paul C; van den Borne, Ben E E M; Gille, Johannes J P; Nagelkerke, Ad F; van Waesberghe, JanHein T M; Paul, Marinus A; van Moorselaar, R Jeroen A; Menko, Fred H; Postmus, Pieter E

    2014-07-03

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene. Clinical manifestations of BHD include skin fibrofolliculomas, renal cell cancer, lung cysts and (recurrent) spontaneous pneumothorax (SP). All clinical manifestations usually present in adults > 20 years of age. Two non-related patients with (recurrent) pneumothorax starting at age 14 accompanied by multiple basal lung cysts on thoracic CT underwent FLCN germline mutation analysis. A pathogenic FLCN mutation was found in both patients confirming suspected BHD. The family history was negative for spontaneous pneumothorax in both families. Although childhood occurrence of SP in BHD is rare, these two cases illustrate that BHD should be considered as cause of SP in children.

  9. IDH1/IDH2 but Not TP53 Mutations Predict Prognosis in Bulgarian Glioblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergana Stancheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase isoforms 1 (IDH1 and 2 (IDH2 have been associated with good prognosis for patients with brain neoplasias and have been commonly found together with mutated TP53 gene. To determine the prevalence of IDH1, IDH2, and TP53 mutations and their impact on overall survival 106 glioblastoma patients were analysed. IDH1 mutations were detected in 13 and IDH2 mutation in one patient. Two homozygous samples with R132H mutation in IDH1 gene and a novel aberration K129R in IDH2 gene were found. Sixty-four percent of IDH1/IDH2 mutated tumours harboured also a mutation in TP53 gene. Genetic aberrations in TP53 were present in 37 patients. Statistical analysis of the impact of the studied factors on the overall survival showed that the mutations in IDH1/IDH2, but not the ones in TP53, were associated with longer survival. Also, the impact of age on prognosis was confirmed. This is the first comprehensive study on glioblastomas in Bulgaria. Our results suggest that IDH1/IDH2 but not TP53 mutations together with other prognostic factors such as age might be applied in clinical practice for prediction of outcome in patients with glioblastomas.

  10. Autosomal recessive transmission of MYBPC3 mutation results in malignant phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins is most commonly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Since nearly 50% of HCM cases occur in the absence of a family history, a recessive inheritance pattern may be involved. METHODS: A pedigree was identified with suspected autosomal recessive transmission of HCM. Twenty-six HCM-related genes were comprehensively screened for mutations in the proband with targeted second generation sequencing, and the identified mutation was confirmed with bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 376 healthy controls. RESULTS: A novel missense mutation (c.1469G>T, p.Gly490Val in exon 17 of MYBPC3 was identified. Two siblings with HCM were homozygous for this mutation, whereas other family members were either heterozygous or wild type. Clinical evaluation showed that both homozygotes manifested a typical HCM presentation, but none of others, including 5 adult heterozygous mutation carriers up to 71 years of age, had any clinical evidence of HCM. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identified a MYBPC3 mutation in HCM, which appeared autosomal recessively inherited in this family. The absence of a family history of clinical HCM may be due to not only a de novo mutation, but also recessive mutations that failed to produce a clinical phenotype in heterozygous family members. Therefore, consideration of recessive mutations leading to HCM is essential for risk stratification and genetic counseling.

  11. Human Papillomavirus Infection as a Possible Cause of Spontaneous Abortion and Spontaneous Preterm Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambühl, Lea Maria Margareta; Baandrup, Ulrik; Dybkær, Karen

    2016-01-01

    , and 10.9% (95% CI; 10.1–11.7) for umbilical cord blood. Summary estimates for HPV prevalence of spontaneous abortions and spontaneous preterm deliveries, in cervix (spontaneous abortions: 24.5%, and pretermdeliveries: 47%, resp.) and placenta (spontaneous abortions: 24.9%, and preterm deliveries: 50......%, resp.), were identified to be higher compared to normal full-term pregnancies (푃 spontaneous abortion, spontaneous preterm...

  12. [Analysis of clinical characteristics and genetic mutation in a pedigree affected with Chediak-Higashi syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiangang; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Liyu; Sun, Hongli; Yang, Ying

    2018-04-10

    To explore the genetic basis for a pedigree affected with Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS). Clinical data of two CHS patients from the pedigree was collected and analyzed. Targeted next generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing were conducted to detect potential mutation of the LYST gene. Both patients presented immunodeficiency, oculocutaneous albinism, and acidophilic inclusion body on bone marrow and blood smears. A homozygous c.6077_6078insA (p.Tyr2026Terfs) mutation was detected in the LYST gene in both patients. Genetic testing can play an important role in the diagnosis of CHS.

  13. Aromatic L-Amino acid decarboxylase deficiency: A new case from Turkey with a novel mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivilcim Gucuyener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC, a vitamin B6-requiring enzyme that converts L-dopa to dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptophan to serotonin. Deficiency of this enzyme results in developmental delay, muscular hypotonia, dystonia, involuntary movements, autonomic dysfunction, and oculogyric crises. We now report a 2-year-old Turkish boy with AADC deficiency confirmed by greatly reduced AADC activity in the plasma and by genetic studies. Mutation analysis revealed a homozygous mutation c.208C > T (p. His70Tyr in exon 3 of the AADC gene which has not been described to date.

  14. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press

  15. Spontaneous emission by moving atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meystre, P.; Wilkens, M.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that spontaneous emission is not an intrinsic atomic property, but rather results from the coupling of the atom to the vacuum modes of the electromagnetic field. As such, it can be modified by tailoring the electromagnetic environment into which the atom can radiate. This was already realized by Purcell, who noted that the spontaneous emission rate can be enhanced if the atom placed inside a cavity is resonant with one of the cavity is resonant with one of the cavity modes, and by Kleppner, who discussed the opposite case of inhibited spontaneous emission. It has also been recognized that spontaneous emission need not be an irreversible process. Indeed, a system consisting of a single atom coupled to a single mode of the electromagnetic field undergoes a periodic exchange of excitation between the atom and the field. This periodic exchange remains dominant as long as the strength of the coupling between the atom and a cavity mode is itself dominant. 23 refs., 6 figs

  16. Spontaneous Development of Moral Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M.

    1975-01-01

    Moral competence is more difficult to attain than scientific competence. Since language comprehension plays a central role in conceptual development, and moral language is difficult to learn, there is a common deficiency in moral conceptual development. This suggests a theory of non-spontaneous solutions to moral problems. (Author/MS)

  17. Shell theorem for spontaneous emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mortensen, Jakob Egeberg; Lodahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    and therefore is given exactly by the dipole approximation theory. This surprising result is a spontaneous emission counterpart to the shell theorems of classical mechanics and electrostatics and provides insights into the physics of mesoscopic emitters as well as great simplifications in practical calculations....

  18. Prediction of Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Karolien

    2002-01-01

    Preterm birth is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. It is a major goal in obstetrics to lower the incidence of spontaneous preterm birth (SPB) and related neonatal morbidity and mortality. One of the principal objectives is to discover early markers that would allow us to identify

  19. EAMJ Dec. Spontaneous.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... surgical abortion at one month gestation without any complication. The second pregnancy which was a year prior resulted in a spontaneous miscarriage at two months followed by evacuation of retained products of conception with no post abortion complications. Antibiotics were taken following both.

  20. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential. The microscopic shell and pairing corrections are obtained using the Strutinsky and BCS approaches and the cranking formulae yield the inertia tensor. Finally, the WKB method is used to calculate penetrabilities and spontaneous fission half-lives. Calculations are performed for the ...

  1. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) mutations and osteoporosis, impaired glucose metabolism and hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Anne; Saukkonen, Tero; Kivelä, Tero; Lahtinen, Ulla; Laine, Christine; Somer, Mirja; Toiviainen-Salo, Sanna; Cole, William G; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Mäkitie, Outi

    2010-04-01

    Mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5) underlie osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. Animal models implicate a role for LRP5 in lipid and glucose homeostasis. The objective was to evaluate metabolic consequences of LRP5 mutations in humans. Thirteen Finnish individuals with homozygous or heterozygous LRP5 mutations were assessed for bone health, glucose and lipid metabolism, and for serum serotonin concentration. Results were compared with findings in family members without mutations. Bone mineral density (BMD), vertebral morphology, oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests, lipid profile and serum serotonin concentrations. Two individuals were homozygous for R570W, one compound heterozygous for R570W and R1036Q, and 10 were heterozygous (six for R570W, three for R1036Q and one for R925C). Subjects with two LRP5 mutations had multiple spinal fractures and low BMD. Subjects with one mutation had significantly lower median lumbar spine (P = 0.004) and femoral neck (P = 0.005) BMD Z-scores, and more often vertebral fractures than the 18 individuals without mutations. Of the 12 subjects with LRP5 mutation six had diabetes and one had impaired glucose tolerance. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests suggested impaired beta-cell function; no insulin resistance was observed. Prevalence of hypercholesterolaemia was similar in mutation positive and negative subjects. Serum serotonin concentrations showed a trend towards higher concentrations in subjects with LRP5 mutation. We found high prevalence of osteoporosis and abnormal glucose metabolism in subjects with LRP5 mutation(s). Further studies are needed to establish the role of LRP5 in glucose and lipid metabolism.

  2. Variation in RNA virus mutation rates across host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Combe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10(-6 to 10(-4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10(-5 s/n/r. Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1-21% did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature.

  3. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Saxer

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9, with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9 - 9.5×10(-9, per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11, with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13 to 1.6×10(-10, is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes.

  4. A report of fulminant malignant hyperthermia in a patient with a novel mutation of the CACNA1S gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppin, P Jason; Chandy, Tony T; Ghanekar, Anand; Kraeva, Natalia; Beattie, W Scott; Riazi, Sheila

    2010-07-01

    To report the identification of a novel mutation in the CACNA1S gene that encodes the alpha-1-subunit (Cav1.1) of the voltage-gated skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel in a patient with malignant hyperthermia. An otherwise healthy 34-yr-old female developed fulminant malignant hyperthermia (MH) under sevoflurane anesthesia during laparoscopic donor nephrectomy. The first sign was an increase in end-tidal CO(2). Malignant hyperthermia was suspected early, and resuscitative measures, including supportive and specific treatment, were successfully implemented. The patient rejected the open muscle biopsy for the Caffeine-Halothane Contracture Test (CHCT); therefore, only molecular genetic testing was performed. Sequencing of the entire ryanodine receptor type 1 transcript did not reveal any MH causative mutations. However, a novel homozygous mutation, p.Arg1086Ser, was identified in the CACNA1S gene that encoded for the alpha-1-subunit of the skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1). A CACNA1S mutation, p.Arg1086His, involving the same Arg1086 residue that is mutated in our patient has previously been reported in association with MH in three independent families. The homozygous p.Arg1086Ser mutation of CACNA1S, the gene that encodes the alpha-1-subunit of the voltage-gated skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel, is a novel mutation associated with malignant hyperthermia.

  5. Novel mutations in PRG4 gene in two Indian families with camptodactyly-arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashree S Nandagopalan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Camptodactyly - arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the PRG4 (proteoglycan 4 gene. Hallmarks of the syndrome include congenital or early-onset camptodactyly and arthropathy with synovial hyperplasia, progressive coxa vara deformity and non-inflammatory pericardial effusions. Till date only around 25 pathogenic mutations have been reported in this gene and none have been reported from India. We report here the mutations in the PRG4 gene in three patients of CACP from two unrelated families from India. Methods: Molecular genetic studies were done for the three patients with the CACP syndrome, from two unrelated Indian families, through sequence analysis of all coding exons and the exon-intron boundaries of the PRG4 gene. Results: Two novel frame-shift deletion mutations leading to premature protein termination were found. One patient was identified to be homozygous for a 2 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2645_2646delGA and the two affected siblings from the other family were found to be homozygous for a 4 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2883_2886delAAGA. Conclusions: This is perhaps the first report of PRG4 mutations from India. Further mutation studies in Indian CACP cases will help to determine the mutation spectrum of the PRG4 gene in the Indian population and also help to further elucidate the molecular pathology and the genotype-phenotype correlation of this rare disease.

  6. Mapping and exome sequencing identifies a mutation in the IARS gene as the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Watanabe, Daisaku; Watanabe, Toshio; Takasuga, Akiko; Sugimoto, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We identified an IARS (isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase) c.235G>C (p.Val79Leu) substitution as the causative mutation for neonatal weakness with intrauterine growth retardation (perinatal weak calf syndrome). In Japanese Black cattle, the syndrome was frequently found in calves sired by Bull A. Hence, we employed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis. In order to identify the perinatal weak calf syndrome locus in a 4.04-Mb region of BTA 8, we analysed a paternal half-sibling family with a BovineSNP50 BeadChip and microsatellites. In this critical region, we performed exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. Three variants were detected as possible candidates for causative mutations that were predicted to disrupt the protein function, including a G>C (p.Val79Leu) mutation in IARS c.235. The IARS c.235G>C mutation was not a homozygous risk allele in the 36 healthy offspring of Bull A. Moreover, the IARS Val79 residue and its flanking regions were evolutionarily and highly conserved. The IARS mutant (Leu79) had decreased aminoacylation activity. Additionally, the homozygous mutation was not found in any of 1526 healthy cattle. Therefore, we concluded that the IARS c.235G>C mutation was the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

  7. Recessive mutations of TMC1 associated with moderate to severe hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Ayesha; Maqsood, Azra; Rehman, Atteeq U; Morell, Robert J; Holt, Jeffrey R; Friedman, Thomas B; Naz, Sadaf

    2016-04-01

    TMC1 encodes a protein required for the normal function of mechanically activated channels that enable sensory transduction in auditory and vestibular hair cells. TMC1 protein is localized at the tips of the hair cell stereocilia, the site of conventional mechanotransduction. In many populations, loss-of-function recessive mutations of TMC1 are associated with profound deafness across all frequencies tested. In six families reported here, variable moderate-to-severe or moderate-to-profound hearing loss co-segregated with STR (short tandem repeats) markers at the TMC1 locus DFNB7/11. Massively parallel and Sanger sequencing of genomic DNA revealed each family co-segregating hearing loss with a homozygous TMC1 mutation: two reported mutations (p.R34X and p.R389Q) and three novel mutations (p.S596R, p.N199I, and c.1404 + 1G > T). TMC1 cDNA sequence from affected subjects homozygous for the donor splice site transversion c.1404 + 1G > T revealed skipping of exon 16, deleting 60 amino acids from the TMC1 protein. Since the mutations in our study cause less than profound hearing loss, we speculate that there is hypo-functional TMC1 mechanotransduction channel activity and that other even less damaging variants of TMC1 may be associated with more common mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss.

  8. Mutations in plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein cause severe syndromic protein-losing enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Ilse Julia; Becker, Kerstin; Gottschalk, Ingo; Körber, Friederike; Dötsch, Jörg; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Hünseler, Christoph; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2018-04-16

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is characterised by gastrointestinal protein leakage due to loss of mucosal integrity or lymphatic abnormalities. PLE can manifest as congenital diarrhoea and should be differentiated from other congenital diarrhoeal disorders. Primary PLEs are genetically heterogeneous and the underlying genetic defects are currently emerging. We report an infant with fatal PLE for whom we aimed to uncover the underlying pathogenic mutation. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the index patient. Variants were classified based on the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines. WES results and our detailed clinical description of the patient were compared with the literature. We discovered a novel homozygous stop mutation (c.988C>T, p.Q330*) in the Plasmalemma Vesicle-Associated Protein ( PLVAP ) gene in a newborn with fatal PLE, facial dysmorphism, and renal, ocular and cardiac anomalies. The Q330* mutation is predicted to result in complete loss of PLVAP protein expression leading to deletion of the diaphragms of endothelial fenestrae, resulting in plasma protein extravasation and PLE. Recently, another single homozygous stop mutation in PLVAP causing lethal PLE in an infant was reported. Our findings validate PLVAP mutations as a cause of syndromic PLE. Prenatal anomalies, severe PLE and syndromic features may guide the diagnosis of this rare disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Analysis of TPO gene in Turkish children with iodide organification defect: identification of a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkkahraman, Doga; Alper, Ozgul M; Pehlivanoglu, Suray; Aydin, Funda; Yildiz, Akin; Luleci, Guven; Akcurin, Sema; Bircan, Iffet

    2010-02-01

    The objective was to determine molecular genetic analysis of the TPO gene in Turkish children with iodide organification defect (IOD). Patients with a diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism were evaluated. Subjects having a definite diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis, thyroid gland dysplasia and, or iodine deficiency were excluded. A total of 10 patients from nine unrelated Turkish families, with an unknown etiology of hypothyroidism, and with a presumptive diagnosis of IOD were included in the study. A perchlorate discharge test (PDT) was performed to all subjects, and sequence analysis of TPO gene was applied in patients with a positive PDT. Five out of 10 patients have a total IOD, while the five remaining patients have a partial IOD according to PDT results. In two sisters, one has a partial and the other one has a total IOD a novel homozygous nonsense p.Q315X mutation was found in exon 8. Additionally, a previously known homozygous missense p.R314W mutation was detected in the same exon in another patient with a total IOD. No TPO gene mutation was detected in any of the seven remaining patients. Two different TPO gene mutations were found to be responsible for IOD in two unrelated Turkish families from the same ethnic background. More subjects should be screened for detecting the prevalence and spectrum profile of TPO mutations in our population that might be helpful for understanding the pathophysiology of congenital hypothyroidism.

  10. Is Increased Low-dose somatic Radiosensitivity Associated with Increased Transgenerational Germline Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2008-10-02

    Using single-molecule polymerase chain reaction, the frequency of spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation at an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus was studied in DNA samples extracted from sperm and bone marrow of Atm knockout (Atm+/–) heterozygous male mice. The frequency of spontaneous mutation in sperm and bone marrow in Atm+/– males did not significantly differ from that in wild-type BALB/c mice. Acute gamma-ray exposure did not affect ESTR mutation frequency in bone marrow and resulted in similar increases in sperm samples taken from Atm+/– and BALB/c males. Taken together, these results suggest that the Atm haploinsufficiency analyzed in our study does not affect spontaneous and radiation-induced ESTR mutation frequency in mice.

  11. Is Increased Low-dose somatic Radiosensitivity Associated with Increased Transgenerational Germline Mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Using single-molecule polymerase chain reaction, the frequency of spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation at an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus was studied in DNA samples extracted from sperm and bone marrow of Atm knockout (Atm+/-) heterozygous male mice. The frequency of spontaneous mutation in sperm and bone marrow in Atm+/- males did not significantly differ from that in wild-type BALB/c mice. Acute gamma-ray exposure did not affect ESTR mutation frequency in bone marrow and resulted in similar increases in sperm samples taken from Atm+/- and BALB/c males. Taken together, these results suggest that the Atm haploinsufficiency analyzed in our study does not affect spontaneous and radiation-induced ESTR mutation frequency in mice

  12. Folliculin mutations are not associated with severe COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litonjua Augusto A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rare loss-of-function folliculin (FLCN mutations are the genetic cause of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, a monogenic disorder characterized by spontaneous pneumothorax, fibrofolliculomas, and kidney tumors. Loss-of-function folliculin mutations have also been described in pedigrees with familial spontaneous pneumothorax. Because the majority of patients with folliculin mutations have radiographic evidence of pulmonary cysts, folliculin has been hypothesized to contribute to the development of emphysema. To determine whether folliculin sequence variants are risk factors for severe COPD, we genotyped seven previously reported Birt-Hogg-Dubé or familial spontaneous pneumothorax associated folliculin mutations in 152 severe COPD probands participating in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study. We performed bidirectional resequencing of all 14 folliculin exons in a subset of 41 probands and subsequently genotyped four identified variants in an independent sample of345 COPD subjects from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (cases and 420 male smokers with normal lung function from the Normative Aging Study (controls. Results None of the seven previously reported Birt-Hogg-Dubé or familial spontaneous pneumothorax mutations were observed in the 152 severe, early-onset COPD probands. Exon resequencing identified 31 variants, including two non-synonymous polymorphisms and two common non-coding polymorphisms. No significant association was observed for any of these four variants with presence of COPD or emphysema-related phenotypes. Conclusion Genetic variation in folliculin does not appear to be a major risk factor for severe COPD. These data suggest that familial spontaneous pneumothorax and COPD have distinct genetic causes, despite some overlap in radiographic characteristics.

  13. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Mutations Uncovered in Lebanese Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valencia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, short limbs, growth retardation, polydactyly, and ectodermal defects with cardiac anomalies occurring in around 60% of cases. EVC syndrome has been linked to mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes. Case Presentation. We report EvC syndrome in two unrelated Lebanese families both having homozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene, c.2653C>T (p.(Arg885* and c.2012_2015del (p.(Leu671* in exons 15 and 13, respectively, with the latter being reported for the first time. Conclusion. Although EvC has been largely described in the medical literature, clinical features of this syndrome vary. While more research is required to explore other genes involved in EvC, early diagnosis and therapeutic care are important to achieve a better quality of life.

  14. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Mutations Uncovered in Lebanese Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Maria; Tabet, Lara; Yazbeck, Nadine; Araj, Alia; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Charaffedine, Khalil; Fares, Farah; Badra, Rebecca; Farra, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, short limbs, growth retardation, polydactyly, and ectodermal defects with cardiac anomalies occurring in around 60% of cases. EVC syndrome has been linked to mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes. Case Presentation. We report EvC syndrome in two unrelated Lebanese families both having homozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene, c.2653C>T (p.(Arg885(*))) and c.2012_2015del (p.(Leu671(*))) in exons 15 and 13, respectively, with the latter being reported for the first time. Conclusion. Although EvC has been largely described in the medical literature, clinical features of this syndrome vary. While more research is required to explore other genes involved in EvC, early diagnosis and therapeutic care are important to achieve a better quality of life.

  15. Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Missense Mutations in SPARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Majewski, Jacek; Tétreault, Martine; Nadaf, Javad; Kannu, Peter; Sochett, Etienne; Howard, Andrew; Stimec, Jennifer; Dupuis, Lucie; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Palomo, Telma; Ouellet, Jean; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Mort, John S.; Moffatt, Pierre; Boudko, Sergei; Bächinger, Hans-Peter; Rauch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC) is a glycoprotein that binds to collagen type I and other proteins in the extracellular matrix. Using whole-exome sequencing to identify the molecular defect in two unrelated girls with severe bone fragility and a clinical diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type IV, we identified two homozygous variants in SPARC (GenBank: NM_003118.3; c.497G>A [p.Arg166His] in individual 1; c.787G>A [p.Glu263Lys] in individual 2). Published modeling and site-directed mutagenesis studies had previously shown that the residues substituted by these mutations form an intramolecular salt bridge in SPARC and are essential for the binding of SPARC to collagen type I. The amount of SPARC secreted by skin fibroblasts was reduced in individual 1 but appeared normal in individual 2. The migration of collagen type I alpha chains produced by these fibroblasts was mildly delayed on SDS-PAGE gel, suggesting some overmodification of collagen during triple helical formation. Pulse-chase experiments showed that collagen type I secretion was mildly delayed in skin fibroblasts from both individuals. Analysis of an iliac bone sample from individual 2 showed that trabecular bone was hypermineralized on the material level. In conclusion, these observations show that homozygous mutations in SPARC can give rise to severe bone fragility in humans. PMID:26027498

  16. Assessment of Iron Overload in Homozygous and Heterozygous Beta Thalassemic Children below 5 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj J. Trivedi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thalassemia is a genetic disease having 3-7% carrier rate in Indians. It is transfusion dependent anemia having high risk of iron overloading. A clinical symptom of iron overload becomes detectable in second decade causing progressive liver, heart and endocrine glands damage. There is a need to assess iron overload in thalassemics below 5 years of age to protect them from complications at later age of life. Aims and objectives: Present study was undertaken to estimate serum iron status and evaluate serum transferrin saturation in both homozygous & heterozygous form of thalassemia as an index of iron overload among children of one to five years of age. Materials and Methods: Clinically diagnosed thirty cases of β thalassemia major & thirty cases of β thalassemia minor having severe anemia, hepatospleenomegaly and between 1 year to 5 years of age were included in study group and same age matched healthy controls were included in the study. RBC indices and HbA, HbA2 and HbF were estimated along with serum iron & serum Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC and serum transferrin levels. Results: Significant difference was observed in hemoglobin levels between control and both beta thalassemia groups. Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV and Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH values were reduced. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed the elevated levels of HbF and HbA2 in both beta thalassemia groups. Among serum iron parameters, serum iron, TIBC and transferrin saturation were elevated whereas serum transferrin levels were low in thalassemia major in children below 5 years of age. Conclusion: Although clinical symptoms of iron overload have been absent in thalassemic children below five years of age, biochemical iron overloading has started at much lower age which is of great concern.

  17. Urinary iron excretion induced by intravenous infusion of deferoxamine in ß-thalassemia homozygous patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boturão-Neto E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to identify noninvasive methods to evaluate the severity of iron overload in transfusion-dependent ß-thalassemia and the efficiency of intensive intravenous therapy as an additional tool for the treatment of iron-overloaded patients. Iron overload was evaluated for 26 ß-thalassemia homozygous patients, and 14 of them were submitted to intensive chelation therapy with high doses of intravenous deferoxamine (DF. Patients were classified into six groups of increasing clinical severity and were divided into compliant and non-compliant patients depending on their adherence to chronic chelation treatment. Several methods were used as indicators of iron overload. Total gain of transfusion iron, plasma ferritin, and urinary iron excretion in response to 20 to 60 mg/day subcutaneous DF for 8 to 12 h daily are useful to identify iron overload; however, urinary iron excretion in response to 9 g intravenous DF over 24 h and the increase of urinary iron excretion induced by high doses of the chelator are more reliable to identify different degrees of iron overload because of their correlation with the clinical grades of secondary hemochromatosis and the significant differences observed between the groups of compliant and non-compliant patients. Finally, the use of 3-9 g intravenous DF for 6-12 days led to a urinary iron excretion corresponding to 4.1 to 22.4% of the annual transfusion iron gain. Therefore, continuous intravenous DF at high doses may be an additional treatment for these patients, as a complement to the regular subcutaneous infusion at home, but requires individual planning and close monitoring of adverse reactions.

  18. Molecular Clock of Neutral Mutations in a Fitness-Increasing Evolutionary Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Leo; Suzuki, Shingo; Hashimoto, Tomomi; Oyake, Ayana; Kobayashi, Hisaka; Someya, Yuki; Narisawa, Dai; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The molecular clock of neutral mutations, which represents linear mutation fixation over generations, is theoretically explained by genetic drift in fitness-steady evolution or hitchhiking in adaptive evolution. The present study is the first experimental demonstration for the molecular clock of neutral mutations in a fitness-increasing evolutionary process. The dynamics of genome mutation fixation in the thermal adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli were evaluated in a prolonged evolution experiment in duplicated line