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Sample records for spontaneous epileptic seizures

  1. Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronically epileptic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kun; Hu, Ming; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Neuroinflammatory processes are pathologic hallmarks of both experimental and human epilepsy, and could be implicated in the neuronal hyperexcitability. Aspirin represents one of the non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with fewer side effects in long-term application. This study was carried out to assess the anti-epileptic effects of aspirin when administered during the chronic stage of temporal lobe epilepsy [TLE] in mice. The alteration of hippocampal neurogenesis was also examined for raising a possible mechanism underlying the protective effect of anti-inflammatory treatment in the TLE. Two months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, the chronically epileptic mice were treated with aspirin (20 mg, 60 mg or 80 mg/kg) once a day for 10 weeks. Spontaneous recurrent seizures were monitored by video camera for 2 weeks. To evaluate the profile of hippocampal neurogenesis, the newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus were labeled by the proliferation marker BrdU. The newborn neurons that extended axons to CA3 area were visualized by cholera toxin B subunit retrograde tracing. Administration of aspirin with a dosage of 60 mg or 80 mg/kg initiated at 2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus significantly reduced the frequency and duration of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Aspirin treatment also increased the number of newborn neurons with anatomic integration through improving the survival of the newly generated cells. Aspirin treatment during the chronic stage of TLE could attenuate the spontaneous recurrent seizures in mice. Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition of COX-PGE2 pathway might partly contribute to this anti-epileptic effect. Highlights • Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures of chronically epileptic mice • Aspirin increases neurogenesis of chronically epileptic hippocampus by improving the survival of newly generated cells • Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition

  2. Patterns of epileptic seizure occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amengual-Gual, Marta; Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2018-02-23

    The occurrence of epileptic seizures in seemingly random patterns takes a great toll on persons with epilepsy and their families. Seizure prediction may markedly improve epilepsy management and, therefore, the quality of life of persons with epilepsy. Literature review. Seizures tend to occur following complex non-random patterns. Circadian oscillators may contribute to the rhythmic patterns of seizure occurrence. Complex mathematical models based on chaos theory try to explain and even predict seizure occurrence. There are several patterns of epileptic seizure occurrence based on seizure location, seizure semiology, and hormonal factors, among others. These patterns are most frequently described for large populations. Inter-individual variability and complex interactions between the rhythmic generators continue to make it more difficult to predict seizures in any individual person. The increasing use of large databases and machine learning techniques may help better define patterns of seizure occurrence in individual patients. Improvements in seizure detection -such as wearable seizure detectors- and in seizure prediction -such as machine learning techniques and artificial as well as biological intelligence- promise to provide further progress in the field of epilepsy and are being applied to closed-loop systems for the treatment of epilepsy. Seizures tend to occur following complex and patient-specific patterns despite their apparently random occurrence. A better understanding of these patterns and current technological advances may allow the implementation of closed-loop detection, prediction, and treatment systems in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  4. Automated differentiation between epileptic and non-epileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was the clinical validation of an automated algorithm based on surface electromyography (EMG) for differentiation between convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). Forty-four consecutive episodes with convulsive events were automatically analyzed with the a......%) and 18 PNESs (95%). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 95%. This algorithm is useful for distinguishing between epileptic and psychogenic convulsive seizures....

  5. Clinical features of poststroke epileptic seizures

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    T. V. Danilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poststroke epileptic seizures are detected in 30–40% of patients over 60 years of age. Objective: to explore the clinical features of epileptic seizures in stroke, risk factors for their development to form the bases for prediction and elaboration of optimal therapy. Patients and methods. 468 patients with ischemic stroke were examined. A study group included 265 patients (176 men and 89 women aged 31–89 years with epileptic seizures; a control group comprised 203 non-epileptic patients (126 men and 77 women aged 31–91 years. The patients of both groups were matched for age, clinical characteristics, and pathogenetic subtypes of stroke. Instrumental examinations were performed in the attack-free interval. Neurological status was evaluated using the conventional procedure (the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale; brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, magnetic resonance angiography, electroencephalography, extraand transcranial duplex sound of cerebral vessels, by estimating the level and degree of stenosis and cerebrovascular responsiveness. Results and discussion. Focal seizures were noted to more frequently develop with a preponderance of simple partial seizures within the first 7 days of stroke, with neurological worsening in the acute period of the disease. Stroke in the left carotid and vertebrobasilar beds may provoke the development of early seizures. The cortical localization of ischemic foci and pre-stroke chronic brain ischemia with the signs of circulatory comorbidity in the anterior and posterior circulatory systems may be a risk factor of epileptic seizures. There was an association of the type of an epileptic seizure and the size of an ischemic focus, as evidenced by MRI, with a tendency towards the generalization of seizures in the extensive ischemic foci. A tendency toward the generalization of epileptic seizures was established in the development of stroke in the left carotid bed, as well as in critical stenoses and

  6. [Semiology and propagation of epileptic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellner, A-K; Fritsch, B

    2013-06-01

    The evaluation of episodic seizure-like symptoms is a common challenge in the neurologist's daily routine. The clinical signs (semiology) are the most important puzzle pieces to distinguish epileptic seizures from other episodic entities. Due to the often far-reaching health and social consequences of the diagnosis of epilepsy, the early and rigorous assessment of episodic symptoms by means of the patient history is important. This assessment is based on knowledge of the association of certain semiologies with epileptic syndromes and brain regions; however, certain limitations and pitfalls have to be considered. Typical propagation pathways of seizure activity determine the serial occurrence of semiological features and provide supplementary information.

  7. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

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    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Eisenstadt, M.L. [Knoxville Neurology Clinic, St. Mary`s Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  8. Epileptic Seizures Prediction Using Machine Learning Methods

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    Syed Muhammad Usman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizures occur due to disorder in brain functionality which can affect patient’s health. Prediction of epileptic seizures before the beginning of the onset is quite useful for preventing the seizure by medication. Machine learning techniques and computational methods are used for predicting epileptic seizures from Electroencephalograms (EEG signals. However, preprocessing of EEG signals for noise removal and features extraction are two major issues that have an adverse effect on both anticipation time and true positive prediction rate. Therefore, we propose a model that provides reliable methods of both preprocessing and feature extraction. Our model predicts epileptic seizures’ sufficient time before the onset of seizure starts and provides a better true positive rate. We have applied empirical mode decomposition (EMD for preprocessing and have extracted time and frequency domain features for training a prediction model. The proposed model detects the start of the preictal state, which is the state that starts few minutes before the onset of the seizure, with a higher true positive rate compared to traditional methods, 92.23%, and maximum anticipation time of 33 minutes and average prediction time of 23.6 minutes on scalp EEG CHB-MIT dataset of 22 subjects.

  9. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: our video-EEG experience.

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    Nežádal, Tomáš; Hovorka, Jiří; Herman, Erik; Němcová, Iveta; Bajaček, Michal; Stichová, Eva

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the number of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in our patients with a refractory seizure disorder, to determine the 'typical' PNES semiology using video-EEG monitoring and describe other PNES parameters. We evaluated prospectively 596 patients with pharmacoresistant seizures. All these patients underwent continuous video-EEG monitoring. In consenting patients, we used suggestive seizure provocation. We assessed seizure semiology, interictal EEG, brain MRI, psychiatric co-morbidities, personality profiles, and seizure outcome. In the sample of 596 monitored patients, we detected 111 (19.3%) patients with PNES. Of the 111 patients with PNES, 86.5% had spontaneous and 76.5% had provoked seizures. The five most typical symptoms were: initially closed eyelids (67.6%), rapid tremor (47.7%), asynchronous limb movement (37.8%), preictal pseudosleep (33.3%), and side-to-side head movement (32.4%). Interictal EEG was rated as abnormal in 46.2% and with epileptiform abnormality in 9%. Brain MRI was abnormal in 32 (28.8%) patients. Personality disorders (46.8%), anxiety (39.6%), and depression (12.6%) were the most frequent additional psychiatric co-morbidities. PNES outcome after at least 2 years is reported; 22.5% patients was seizure-free; one-third had markedly reduced seizure frequency. We have not seen any negative impact of the provocative testing on the seizure outcome. Video-EEG monitoring with suggestive seizure provocation supported by clinical psychiatric and psychological evaluation significantly contributes to the correct PNES diagnosis, while interictal EEG and brain MRI are frequently abnormal. Symptoms typical for PNES, as opposed to epileptic seizures, could be distinguished.

  10. Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas

    detected without any false positive detections. This was obtained using a generic algorithm on the signals from only a single frontal channel. Applying the same algorithm architecture on EEG data from two outpatient children monitored for approximately three entire days each, the sensitivity was 90......Approximately 50 million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy. Although 70% can control their seizures by anti-epileptic drugs, it is still a cumbersome disease to live with for a large group of patients. The current PhD dissertation investigates how these people can be helped by continous...... monitoring of their brain waves. More specifically, three issues were investigated: The feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, optimization of automatic seizure detection algorithms, and the link between intra- and extracranial EEG. Regarding feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, neither...

  11. Video electroencephalography monitoring differentiates between epileptic and non-epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Mette Borch; Erdal, Jesper; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is often misdiagnosed and approximately one in every four patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy does not have epilepsy, but instead non-epileptic seizures. Video electroencephalography monitoring (VEM) is the gold standard for differentiation between epileptic and non...

  12. Autonomic epileptic seizures, autonomic effects of seizures, and SUDEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Brian; Bateman, Lisa; Millichap, John J; Wirrell, Elaine; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2013-03-01

    Many generalized tonic-clonic seizures are accompanied by profound autonomic changes. However, autonomic seizures and autonomic status epilepticus can also be seen with specific electroclinical syndromes (Panayiotopoulos syndrome), etiologies, and localizations. Such autonomic symptoms may impact cardiorespiratory function. While it is likely that several factors contribute to SUDEP, further study of both ictal respiratory and cardiac changes and underlying neuroanatomical mechanisms involved in autonomic seizure semiology are likely to provide important data to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of this devastating condition. This paper will review the association between autonomic symptoms and epileptic seizures and will highlight the work of three young investigators. Drs. Lisa Bateman and Brian Moseley will review their work on cardiorespiratory effects of recorded seizures and how this assists in our understanding of SUDEP. Dr. John Millichap will review autonomic seizures and autonomic dysfunctions related to childhood epilepsy and will discuss the importance of expanded research efforts in this field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Emergence of semiology in epileptic seizures.

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    Chauvel, Patrick; McGonigal, Aileen

    2014-09-01

    Semiology, the manifestation of epilepsy, is dependent upon electrical activity produced by epileptic seizures that are organized within existing neural pathways. Clinical signs evolve as the epileptic discharge spreads in both time and space. Studying the relation between these, of which the temporal component is at least as important as the spatial one, is possible using anatomo-electro-clinical correlations of stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) data. The period of semiology production occurs with variable time lag after seizure onset and signs then emerge more or less rapidly depending on seizure type (temporal seizures generally propagating more slowly and frontal seizures more quickly). The subset of structures involved in semiological production, the "early spread network", is tightly linked to those constituting the epileptogenic zone. The level of complexity of semiological features varies according to the degree of involvement of the primary or associative cortex, with the former having a direct relation to peripheral sensory and motor systems with production of hallucinations (visual and auditory) or elementary sensorimotor signs. Depending on propagation pattern, these signs can occur in a "march" fashion as described by Jackson. On the other hand, seizures involving the associative cortex, having a less direct relation with the peripheral nervous system, and necessarily involving more widely distributed networks manifest with altered cognitive and/or behavioral signs whose neural substrate involves a network of cortical structures, as has been observed for normal cognitive processes. Other than the anatomical localization of these structures, the frequency of the discharge is a crucial determinant of semiological effect since a fast (gamma) discharge will tend to deactivate normal function, whereas a slower theta discharge can mimic physiological function. In terms of interaction between structures, the degree of synchronization plays a key role in

  14. A computational study of stimulus driven epileptic seizure abatement.

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    Peter Neal Taylor

    Full Text Available Active brain stimulation to abate epileptic seizures has shown mixed success. In spike-wave (SW seizures, where the seizure and background state were proposed to coexist, single-pulse stimulations have been suggested to be able to terminate the seizure prematurely. However, several factors can impact success in such a bistable setting. The factors contributing to this have not been fully investigated on a theoretical and mechanistic basis. Our aim is to elucidate mechanisms that influence the success of single-pulse stimulation in noise-induced SW seizures. In this work, we study a neural population model of SW seizures that allows the reconstruction of the basin of attraction of the background activity as a four dimensional geometric object. For the deterministic (noise-free case, we show how the success of response to stimuli depends on the amplitude and phase of the SW cycle, in addition to the direction of the stimulus in state space. In the case of spontaneous noise-induced seizures, the basin becomes probabilistic introducing some degree of uncertainty to the stimulation outcome while maintaining qualitative features of the noise-free case. Additionally, due to the different time scales involved in SW generation, there is substantial variation between SW cycles, implying that there may not be a fixed set of optimal stimulation parameters for SW seizures. In contrast, the model suggests an adaptive approach to find optimal stimulation parameters patient-specifically, based on real-time estimation of the position in state space. We discuss how the modelling work can be exploited to rationally design a successful stimulation protocol for the abatement of SW seizures using real-time SW detection.

  15. Comparing maximum autonomic activity of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and epileptic seizures using heart rate variability.

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    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sándor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    The semiology of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) can resemble epileptic seizures, and differentiation between epileptic seizures with no EEG-correlate and PNES can be challenging even for trained experts. Therefore, there has been a search for a quantitative measure, other than EEG and semiology that could distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures. We used ECG to measure heart rate variability (HRV) in order to compare maximum autonomic activity of epileptic seizures and PNES. These comparisons could potentially serve as biomarkers for distinguishing these types of clinical episodes. Forty-nine epileptic seizures from 17 patients and 24 PNES from 7 patients with analyzable ECG were recorded during long-term video-EEG monitoring. Moving windows of 100 R-R intervals throughout each seizure were used to find maximum values of Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) (sympathetic tonus) and minimum values of Cardiac Vagal Index (CVI), Root-Mean-Square-of-Successive-Differences (RMSSD) and HF-power (parasympathetic tonus). In addition, non-seizure recordings of each patient were used to compare HRV-parameters between the groups. The maximum CSI for epilepsy seizures were higher than PNES (P=0.015). The minimum CVI, minimum RMSSD and HF-power did not show significant difference between epileptic seizures and PNES (P=0.762; P=0.152; P=0.818). There were no statistical difference of non-seizure HRV-parameters between the PNES and epilepsy patients. We found the maximum sympathetic activity accompanying the epileptic seizures to be higher, than that during the PNES. However, the great variation of autonomic response within both groups makes it difficult to use these HRV-measures as a sole measurement in distinguishing epileptic seizures from PNES. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spontaneous epileptic rats show changes in sleep architecture and hypothalamic pathology.

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    Bastlund, Jesper F; Jennum, Poul; Mohapel, Paul; Penschuck, Silke; Watson, William P

    2005-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the relationship between sleep, hypothalamic pathology, and seizures in spontaneous epileptic rats. Rats were implanted with radiotelemetry transmitters for measuring electrocorticogram (ECoG) and stimulation electrodes in the hippocampus. Epileptogenesis was triggered by 2 h of electical stimulation-induced self-sustained status epilepticus (SSSE). After SSSE, ECoGs were monitored over a 15-week period for the occurrence of interictal high-amplitude low-frequency (HALF) acitvity and spontaneous reoccurring seizures (SRSs). Spontaneous epileptic rats showed clinical features of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), such as spontaneous seizures, interictal activity and neuronal cell loss in the dorsomedial hypothalamus, a region important for normal sleep regulation. Interestingly, epileptic rats showed disturbances in sleep architecture, with a high percentage of the seizures occurring during sleep. Therefore we conclude that a close association exists between epileptiform activity and alterations in sleep architecture that may be related to hypothalamic pathology.

  17. Definition and classification of epilepsy. Classification of epileptic seizures 2016

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    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, especially in childhood and adolescence. The incidence varies from 15 to 113 cases per 100 000 population with the maximum among children under 1 year old. The prevalence of epilepsy is high, ranging from 5 to 8 cases (in some regions – 10 cases per 1000 children under 15 years old. Classification of the disease has great importance for diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. The article presents a novel strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, developed in 2016. It contains a number of brand new concepts, including a very important one, saying that some seizures, previously considered as generalized or focal only, can be, in fact, both focal and generalized. They include tonic, atonic, myoclonic seizures and epileptic spasms. The term “secondarily generalized seizure” is replace by the term “bilateral tonic-clonic seizure” (as soon as it is not a separate type of epileptic seizures, and the term reflects the spread of discharge from any area of cerebral cortex and evolution of any types of focal seizures. International League Against Epilepsy recommends to abandon the term “pseudo-epileptic seizures” and replace it by the term “psychogenic non-epileptic seizures”. If a doctor is not sure that seizures have epileptic nature, the term “paroxysmal event” should be used without specifying the disease. The conception of childhood epileptic encephalopathies, developed within this novel classification project, is one of the most significant achievements, since in this case not only the seizures, but even epileptiform activity can induce severe disorders of higher mental functions. In addition to detailed description of the new strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, the article contains a comprehensive review of the existing principles of epilepsy and epileptic seizures classification.

  18. The determinants of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics | Imam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This assesses generalisation of seizures, falls, injuries, urinary incontinence, warning interval before loss of consciousness, automatisms and time of recovery on a graded scale. Results: The most frequent indices of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics is the generalisation of seizures in 85.7% of subjects, incontinence of ...

  19. Epileptic seizures due to multiple cerebral cavernomatosis

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    Spasić Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cavernous angiomas are angiographically occult vascular malformations that are present in 0.4−0.9 % of people, and represent around 5% of all cerebrovascular malformations. They can be single or multiple, and sporadic or familial. The presence of multiple lesions is more frequent in familial cavernomatosis. Ten to 30 % are associated with familial clustering. Case report. We presented the case of a 43-year-old man, admitted to the Emergency Department due to unprovoked seizure during the wide awake and everyday activities. Neurological examination was with no focal signs. A 32-channel standard digital EEG was without any significant changes of normal baseline activity. After sleep deprivation EEG showed multifocal, bilateral and asymmetric polyspikes and sharpwaves activity. Hyperventilation induced generalized epileptiform discharges. MRI scan demonstrated multiple small cavernous angiomas. Neuropsychological testing demonstrated a delayed memory impairment. Neurosurgery treatment was not recommended, and the therapy with valproate 1 250 mg/day had an excellent efficacy with no singnificant adverse effects. Conclusion. This patient considered as a rare case with multiple cavernomatosis highlights the importance of neuroradiological examination in adult patients with the first epileptic seizure but with no focal neurological signs. .

  20. Temporal epileptic seizures and occupational exposure to solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M; Bælum, Jesper; Bonde, J P

    1994-01-01

    exposure to a mixture of organic solvents (mainly cyclohexanone, white spirit, and isopropanol). Epileptic seizures of temporal type were occurring in relation to solvent exposure. The seizures disappeared shortly after stopping exposure but returned just after a short term re-exposure to cyclohexanone...

  1. The Role of Emotions in Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mai Bjørnskov; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka

    Dysregulated emotions have been implied as factors contributing to psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES). The present study explored patients with PNES’ inclusion of emotions in their narratives of their seizures. Results revealed that patients focus more on their physical experience than...

  2. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    The main focus of this dissertation lies within the area of epileptic seizure detection. Medically refractory epileptic patients suffer from the unawareness of when the next seizure sets in, and what the consequences will be. A wearable device based on uni- or multi-modalities able to detect and ...... implemented in a wireless sEMG device. A double-blind test on patients in the clinic, showed 100 % reliability for three of four patients, whereas it failed for the last patient, who had atypical GTC seizures....... and alarm whenever a seizure starts is of great importance to these patients and their relatives, in the sense, that the alert of the seizure will make them feel more safe. Thus the objective of the project is to investigate the movements of convulsive epileptic seizures and design seizure detection...... methods have been applied in different studies in order to achieve the goal of reliable seizure detection. In the first study we present a method where the support vector machine classifier is applied on features based on wavelet bands. This was used on multi-modal data from control subjects...

  3. Epileptic seizures in patients with a posterior circulation infarct

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    Yüksel Kaplan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of seizures and the clinical features of patients with seizures related to a posterior circulation infarct (POCI. METHODS: We reviewed all ischemic stroke patients admitted to our clinic between January 2011 and January 2012. The patients’ database information was retrospectively analyzed. Fifty-five patients with a POCI were included in the study. We reviewed all patients with epileptic seizures related to a POCI. Age, gender, recurrent stroke, risk factors, etiology, radiographic localization, the seizure type and onset time, and the electroencephalographic findings of patients were evaluated. We excluded all patients who had precipitating conditions during seizures such as taking drugs, acid-base disturbances, electrolyte imbalance, and history of epilepsy. RESULTS: Seizures were observed in four patients (3 male, 1 female with a POCI related epileptic seizures (7.2%. The etiology of strokes was cardiac-embolic in 3 patients and vertebral artery dissection in 1 patient. Seizures occurred in 2 patients as presenting finding, in 1 patient within 7 days, and 1 patient within 28 days. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in 3 patients and simple partial seizures with secondary generalization in 1 patient. Three patients had cerebellum infarction at the left hemisphere. One patient had lateral medullary infarction at the right side. The electroencephalographic findings of patients were normal. CONCLUSION: Studies involving patients with seizures related to a POCI are novel and few in number. Three patients with seizure had cerebellum infarction. The cerebellum in these patients may contribute via different mechanisms over seizure activity.

  4. Time dependencies in the occurrences of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasemidis, L D; Olson, L D; Savit, R S; Sackellares, J C

    1994-01-01

    A new method of analysis, developed within the framework of nonlinear dynamics, is applied to patient recorded time series of the occurrence of epileptic seizures. These data exhibit broad band spectra and generally have no obvious structure. The goal is to detect hidden internal dependencies in the data without making any restrictive assumptions, such as linearity, about the structure of the underlying system. The basis of our approach is a conditional probabilistic analysis in a phase space reconstructed from the original data. The data, recorded from patients with intractable epilepsy over a period of 1-3 years, consist of the times of occurrences of hundreds of partial complex seizures. Although the epileptic events appear to occur independently, we show that the epileptic process is not consistent with the rules of a homogeneous Poisson process or generally with a random (IID) process. More specifically, our analysis reveals dependencies of the occurrence of seizures on the occurrence of preceding seizures. These dependencies can be detected in the interseizure interval data sets as well as in the rate of seizures per time period. We modeled patient's inaccuracy in recording seizure events by the addition of uniform white noise and found that the detected dependencies are persistent after addition of noise with standard deviation as great as 1/3 of the standard deviation of the original data set. A linear autoregressive analysis fails to capture these dependencies or produces spurious ones in most of the cases.

  5. Automatic Epileptic Seizure Onset Detection Using Matching Pursuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Thomas Lynggaard; Olsen, Ulrich L.; Conradsen, Isa

    2010-01-01

    An automatic alarm system for detecting epileptic seizure onsets could be of great assistance to patients and medical staff. A novel approach is proposed using the Matching Pursuit algorithm as a feature extractor combined with the Support Vector Machine (SVM) as a classifier for this purpose...

  6. Effects of kindling and epileptic seizures during pregnancy on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), which is highly expressed in the developing central nervous system, may play important roles in myelination, cell migration, neurogenesis and synaptogenesis. This study to determine the effect of kindling and epileptic seizures during pregnancy on the ...

  7. [Focal epileptic seizures ipsilateral to the tumor: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, Sebastião Silva; Mendes, Mirian Fabíola Studart; Silveira, Roberto Leal

    2002-06-01

    Focal somatosensory epileptic seizures ipsilateral to a brain tumor is reported and the literature reviewed. It is an exceptional occurrence, having been described only six cases, with several mechanisms being proposed. The proximity of the lesions with the low cerebral convexity (perisylvian) suggests the compromising of the secondary somatosensorial area, seeming to prove the experimental observation of somatosensorial crises originating in this area.

  8. Childhood masturbation simulating epileptic seizures: A report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Abstract Background: Childhood masturbation (self-gratification) may mimic epileptic seizures, ... cal presentation of two cases of child masturbation mimicking sei- zures. Conclusion: There is ... acterized by self-stimulation of the genitalia, associated with unusual postures and movements which could be.

  9. Recognition of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a curable neurophobia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2013-02-01

    Diagnosing psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) remains challenging. The majority of \\'PNES status\\' cases are likely to be seen in the emergency department or similar non-specialised units, where patients are initially assessed and managed by physicians of varying expertise in neurology.

  10. Preictal Dynamics of EEG Complexity in Intracranially Recorded Epileptic Seizure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bob, P.; Roman, R.; Světlák, M.; Kukleta, M.; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 23 (2014), el151:1-4 ISSN 0025-7974 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : EEG * epileptic Seizure Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 5.723, year: 2014

  11. Reappraisal of epileptic pain as a rare symptom of seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuloğlu Pazarcı, Nevin; Bebek, Nerses; Baykan, Betül; Gürses, Candan; Gökyiğit, Ayşen

    2016-02-01

    To draw attention to epileptic pain which is a rare seizure symptom mostly causing wrong diagnosis and delayed treatment. We present nine patients in whom pain was a prominent initial or early ictal symptom. We reviewed the records of 4736 patients, and found nine patients who had pain as an aura or an early prominent symptom of their seizures. Seizure semiology, EEG, and cranial imaging features were evaluated retrospectively. Age at seizure onset ranged from 6 months to 50 years, and the mean age during the study was 37.7±11.9 years. Pain was predominantly peripherally localized in four patients, whereas cephalic pain was detected in three patients, and abdominal pain was detected in two patients. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed epileptic abnormalities on the temporoparietal and frontotemporal regions in three patients each. Photosensitive generalized epileptic discharges were detected in one and diffuse background slowing in the remaining two other patients. Electroencephalography abnormalities were lateralized to the contralateral site of the pain in four patients with strictly localized pain. Three patients revealed no abnormality on the cranial MR imaging, whereas others showed different types of abnormality such as heterotopias (n:1), mesial temporal lobe atrophy (n:1), white and gray matter sequela lesions (n:1), diffuse white matter lesion (n:1), chronic encephalomalacia and gliosis (n:1), and perivascular space dilatation (n:1). Epileptic pain is a neglected, but important, semiologic symptom with localization and lateralization value in the patients with somatosensorial seizures of parietal as well as temporal lobe origin. It occurs mainly as peripherally localized, cephalic, or abdominal pain and is usually associated with a symptomatic etiology. Awareness of epileptic pain is important to avoid misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Serum Prolactin in Diagnosis of Epileptic Seizures

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies in databases and references concerning serum prolactin levels (PRL in patients with suspected seizures were rated for quality and analyzed by members of the Therapeutics Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Focal epileptic seizures mimicking sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Ossola, Maria; Colnaghi, Silvia; Arbasino, Carla

    2009-03-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a common parasomnia. The diagnostic criteria for SP, as reported in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, are essentially clinical, as electroencephalography (EEG)-polysomnography (PSG) is not mandatory. We describe a subject whose sleep-related events fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SP, even though her visual hallucinations were elementary, repetitive and stereotyped, thus differing from those usually reported by patients with SP. Video/EEG-PSG documented the focal epileptic nature of the SP-like episodes.

  14. The quantitative measurement of consciousness during epileptic seizures.

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    Nani, Andrea; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of consciousness is a fundamental element in the classification of epileptic seizures. It is, therefore, of great importance for clinical practice to develop instruments that enable an accurate and reliable measurement of the alteration of consciousness during seizures. Over the last few years, three psychometric scales have been specifically proposed to measure ictal consciousness: the Ictal Consciousness Inventory (ICI), the Consciousness Seizure Scale (CSS), and the Responsiveness in Epilepsy Scale--versions I and II (RES-I and RES-II). The ICI is a self-report psychometric instrument which retrospectively assesses ictal consciousness along the dimensions of the level/arousal and contents/awareness. The CSS has been used by clinicians to quantify the impairment of consciousness in order to establish correlations with the brain mechanisms underlying alterations of consciousness during temporal lobe seizures. The most recently developed observer-rated instrument is the RES-I, which has been used to assess responsiveness during epileptic seizures in patients undergoing video-EEG. The implementation of standardized psychometric tools for the assessment of ictal consciousness can complement clinical observations and contribute to improve accuracy in seizure classification. © 2013.

  15. Hyperspherical Manifold for EEG Signals of Epileptic Seizures

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    Tahir Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling of EEG signals of epileptic seizures presents a challenge as seizure data is erratic, often with no visible trend. Limitations in existing models indicate a need for a generalized model that can be used to analyze seizures without the need for apriori information, whilst minimizing the loss of signal data due to smoothing. This paper utilizes measure theory to design a discrete probability measure that reformats EEG data without altering its geometric structure. An analysis of EEG data from three patients experiencing epileptic seizures is made using the developed measure, resulting in successful identification of increased potential difference in portions of the brain that correspond to physical symptoms demonstrated by the patients. A mapping then is devised to transport the measure data onto the surface of a high-dimensional manifold, enabling the analysis of seizures using directional statistics and manifold theory. The subset of seizure signals on the manifold is shown to be a topological space, verifying Ahmad's approach to use topological modelling.

  16. First seizure: EEG and neuroimaging following an epileptic seizure.

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    Pohlmann-Eden, Bernd; Newton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    An early EEG (within 48 h) and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (hr_MRI) are the methods of choice for an accurate diagnosis after a first seizure presentation. Together with a careful history and examination, they will allow definition of the epilepsy syndrome in two-thirds of patients and help assess the individual risk for seizure recurrence, which is determined by the specific syndrome and is highest with focal epileptiform activity on EEG. Despite the heterogeneity of first seizure studies, EEG and etiology are consistently found to be the best predictors for seizure recurrence and prognosis. The additional yield of sleep-deprived EEG and sleep EEG is uncertain; yet MRI is essential for detecting brain tumors and other structural bases for new epilepsy. The rate occurrence of remote symptomatic seizures increases significantly with age and the most common etiology in the elderly with a first seizure is stroke; however, its exact relevance to epileptogenicity is yet to be defined. There is a striking lack of systematic studies using early EEG and hr_MRI in order to better characterize epileptogenic areas and elucidate the mechanisms of seizure provocation.

  17. Subjective and objective characteristics of altered consciousness during epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campora, Nuria; Kochen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Conscious states are inner states and processes of awareness. These states are by definition subjective. We analyzed subjective and objective characteristics of alteration of consciousness (AOC) during epileptic seizures, including its involvement in both the level of awareness and subjective content of consciousness. We evaluated AOC using the Consciousness Seizure Scale, the Ictal Consciousness Inventory, and a new structured survey developed by our group: the Seizure Perception Survey, which incorporates patients' subjective experiences before and after they watch a video-electroencephalographic recording of their own seizure. We included 35 patients (105 seizures) with drug-resistant epilepsy. Most seizures caused profound AOC. The content of consciousness was lower during temporal seizures with profound AOC. We uncovered a correlation between the subjective perception and objective duration of a seizure using the Seizure Perception Survey regarding memory; the patients had a better recall of ictal onset during wakefulness regardless of the epileptogenic zone, laterality, or magnitude of AOC. Nonetheless, the recovery of memory at the end of a seizure took more time in patients who showed greater AOC, less vivid content of consciousness, or a longer seizure. For 85% of the patients, this was the first time they were able to view their own seizures. The majority of the patients requested to view them again because this procedure allowed them to compare the recordings with their own memories and emotions during a seizure and to verify the real duration of the seizure. Alteration of consciousness is one of the most dramatic clinical manifestations of epilepsy. Usually, practitioners or relatives assume that the patients with AOC may not have any knowledge on their seizures. In this study, however, we found that most patients with AOC had a fairly accurate perception of the duration of a seizure and retained their memory of ictal onset. In contrast, for the

  18. Epileptic Seizures Versus Syncope: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

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    Marios Charalambous

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Generalised epileptic seizures and syncope are two syndromes with similar clinical manifestation and their differentiation can be quite challenging. The aim of this review is to use an evidence-based approach in differentiating these two syndromes through the comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved and their clinical signs. Both syndromes affect regions of the forebrain and consciousness level, although, different mechanisms are involved. Syncope is a paroxysmal event secondary to a short-term decrease in cerebral perfusion, oxygenation or essential nutrients delivery. Generalised epileptic seizure activity is defined as the clinical manifestation of transient paroxysmal disturbances in brain function secondary to an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. Clinical criteria, including precipitating events, clinical signs preceding, during and following the episodes and event duration, can be used to differentiate the two syndromes. Although these criteria might be useful for the practitioner, definite conclusions should be precluded due to the lack of original research articles and weak evidence on this specific field.Application: The review might be a useful tool for the general practitioner and clinical scientist as it will aid towards the differentiation of two syndromes, i.e. generalised epileptic seizures and syncope, with similar clinical presentation.

  19. Cardiac Troponin I elevation after epileptic seizure

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    Sieweke Nicole

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac troponin-I (cTNI is highly specific biomarker to prove myocardial damage, e.g. in acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, it occurs in other conditions as well. We therefore analysed cTNI increase in patients after generalized convulsive seizure. Methods Consecutive patients admitted with acute generalized convulsive seizure were included in case of cTNI measurement on admission. Among 898 selected cases, 53 patients were referred secondary to our department; in 845 cases cTNI measurements on admission were available. In case of multiple admissions (81 cases, only the first admission entered our analysis. In 17 patients elevated cTNI was determined due to ACS; in one patient a myocarditis was found. 5 patients suffered of relevant renal insufficiency. Finally 741 patients were included in the analysis. A cTNI cut-off level of ≥ 0.1 ng/ml was considered. Factors associated with a cTNI increase were analysed subsequently. Results The mean age of the study population (n = 741 was 47.8 years (SD ± 18.6, 40.9% were female. In 50 patients (6.7% a cTNI elevation of unknown origin was found; no obvious cardiac involvement could be detected in these patients who all remained asymptomatic. A vascular risk profile (including at least hypertension, hypercholesterolemia or diabetes (OR = 3.62; CI: 1.59 to 8.21; p = 0.001 and elevated creatine kinase on admission (OR = 2.36; CI: 1.26 to 4.39; p = 0.002 were independent factors associated with cTNI release. Conclusion cTNI release occurs in patients with generalized convulsive seizure with predominance in patients with vascular risk profile.

  20. Epileptic Seizure, Postictal Hemiparesis, and Hyperleukocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Martin; Kurnik, Karin; Heinen, Florian; Schmid, Irene; Hoffmann, Florian; Reiter, Karl; Gerstl, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a rare event in infancy. Besides vasculopathy, thrombophilia, or cardiac disorders, cancer and chemotherapy are known predisposing factors for AIS. Leukemia can be associated with different abnormal coagulation parameters, but severe bleeding or thrombosis occurs rarely. Clinical Course: We report the case of a 2-year-old boy who was presented to our emergency ward after a prolonged seizure with right sided postictal hemiparesis. Cranial computed tomography scan revealed a large infarction and edema due to thrombosis of the left carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery. Laboratory workup showed 196 g/L leukocytes with 75% myeloid blast cells. Immediate exchange transfusion, hydration, and chemotherapy with cytarabine were started. During the hospital course intracranial pressure increased and the patient developed a unilateral dilated pupil unresponsive to light. Cranial computed tomography scan revealed a new infarction in the right middle cerebral artery territory. Refractory increased intracranial pressure and brain stem herniation developed, and the child died 3 days after admission to hospital. Conclusion: Seizures with postictal hemiparesis due to cerebral infarction can be a rare manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Leukocytosis and cancer-induced coagulopathy are main reasons for thrombosis and/or hemorrhage. High leukocyte counts need immediate interventions with hydration, careful chemotherapy, and perhaps exchange transfusion or leukapharesis. In the presence of thrombosis, anticoagulation must be discussed despite the risk of bleeding due to hyperfibrinolysis and low platelet counts. Mortality may be reduced by awareness of this rare presentation of leukemia and prompt institution of leucoreductive treatment. PMID:28229095

  1. Epileptic Seizure, Postictal Hemiparesis, and Hyperleukocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Olivieri MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS is a rare event in infancy. Besides vasculopathy, thrombophilia, or cardiac disorders, cancer and chemotherapy are known predisposing factors for AIS. Leukemia can be associated with different abnormal coagulation parameters, but severe bleeding or thrombosis occurs rarely. Clinical Course: We report the case of a 2-year-old boy who was presented to our emergency ward after a prolonged seizure with right sided postictal hemiparesis. Cranial computed tomography scan revealed a large infarction and edema due to thrombosis of the left carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery. Laboratory workup showed 196 g/L leukocytes with 75% myeloid blast cells. Immediate exchange transfusion, hydration, and chemotherapy with cytarabine were started. During the hospital course intracranial pressure increased and the patient developed a unilateral dilated pupil unresponsive to light. Cranial computed tomography scan revealed a new infarction in the right middle cerebral artery territory. Refractory increased intracranial pressure and brain stem herniation developed, and the child died 3 days after admission to hospital. Conclusion: Seizures with postictal hemiparesis due to cerebral infarction can be a rare manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Leukocytosis and cancer-induced coagulopathy are main reasons for thrombosis and/or hemorrhage. High leukocyte counts need immediate interventions with hydration, careful chemotherapy, and perhaps exchange transfusion or leukapharesis. In the presence of thrombosis, anticoagulation must be discussed despite the risk of bleeding due to hyperfibrinolysis and low platelet counts. Mortality may be reduced by awareness of this rare presentation of leukemia and prompt institution of leucoreductive treatment.

  2. Epileptic Seizures from Abnormal Networks: Why Some Seizures Defy Predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    P. Kudela), gbergey@jhmi.edu (G.K. Bergey ), pfranasz@gmail.com (P.J. Franaszczuk). 1 Tel.: +1 443 287 4561; fax: +1 443 287 6423. 2 Tel.: +1 443 287...cle can be found, in the online version, at doi:10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2011.11.006. References Afra, P., Jouny, C.C., Bergey , G.K., 2008. Duration of...complex partial seizures: an intracranial EEG study. Epilepsia 49 (4), 677—684. Anderson, W.S., Kudela, P., Cho, R.J., Bergey , G.K., Franaszczuk, P., 2007

  3. Do video games evoke specific types of epileptic seizures?

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    Piccioli, Marta; Vigevano, Federico; Buttinelli, Carla; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A

    2005-11-01

    We determined whether epileptic clinical manifestations evoked by playing video games (VG) differ from those evoked by intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) or striped patterns (P). We exposed nine children who had TV- and VG-evoked seizures in daily life to 12 VG after standardized photic stimulation and pattern stimulation. Their EEGs were recorded continuously, analyzed, and then correlated with a video of their behavior. Similar types of clinical signs were seen during VG, P, and IPS, but the signs we observed were more subtle during the VG. Eight patients showed a clear lateralization. A new observation was the lowering of the eyelids to a state of half-closed. Our study suggests that the type of visual stimulus provoking a photoparoxysmal response or seizure is not particularly relevant. The children belonged to different epilepsy groups, and our findings add to the discussion on the boundaries of the epilepsy types.

  4. Vomiting as an ictal manifestation of epileptic seizures and syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotopoulos, C P

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four out of 900 adult and children patients with epilepsy, were found to have vomiting during an ictus. All the 24 patients were children before puberty with a similar clinical pattern consisting of partial seizures which were mainly nocturnal. Ictal vomiting was always concurrent with other epileptic manifestations, more often deviation of the eyes and impairment of consciousness. The initial part of the ictus was short or prolonged for hours with frequent "marching" to hemi-convulsions and generalised seizures. Seventeen of the 24 children suffered from benign childhood epilepsies (BCE) with complete remission in long follow-up. A significantly higher association was found between ictal vomiting and the syndrome of BCE with occipital spikes (p less than 0.001) but not with centro-temporal spikes (p less than 0.2). The recognition of this association may have important theoretical implications. On clinical grounds, it may prevent unnecessary investigations and undue concern. PMID:3148690

  5. Epileptic seizure as the first sign of hypoparathyroidism

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    Pešić Milica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypoparathyroidism refers to a group of disorders in which extracellular calcium levels cannot be maintained within the normal range due to relative or absolute deficiency of parathyroid hormone (PTH. The clinical features of hypoparathyroidism are consistent with hypocalcaemia and, predominantly, neuromuscular dysfunction. Although hypocalcaemia-induced seizures are well documented hypoparathyroidism-induced epilepsy is often misdiagnosed as idiopathic epilepsy. Case report. We reported a 57-year-old woman with new-onset seizure due to hypoparathyroidism. At first, diagnosis of epilepsy was established and the antiepileptic therapy was initiated with gradual increase of the dose. Computerized tomography scan of the head revealed bilateral basal ganglia and cerebellar calcification and many punctiform calcifications between cortical and subcortical parts. During hospitalization, laboratory tests showed hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia and low PTH level. Once the diagnosis of hypoparathyroidism was established, a proper treatment with calcium and vitamin D was started, and the patient was discharged from hospital with full seizure control. Conclusion. Standard evaluation of serum calcium levels in patients with new-onset epileptic seizures should be obligatory part of a diagnostic algoritam to avoid misdiagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy.

  6. Mental development of tuberous sclerosis with regard to epileptic seizures and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katafuchi, Yukihiko; Ishihara, Osamu; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Shiotsuki, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yoichiro; Imuta, Fusae

    1985-01-01

    The relation of mental development to epileptic seizures and CT findings was examined in 17 patients with tuberous sclerosis. Epileptic seizures occurred in 16 of the 17 patients. The earlier it occurred, the higher the incidence of mental retardation was. There was no constant correlation between mental development and the type of epileptic seizures or the attainment of inhibition of seizures. In two patients in whom calcification spreading to the cerebral cortex and subcortical region was detected on CT, in addition to calcified tubercles around the cerebral ventricle, an intelligence quotient was significantly lower than in the other patients. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Similar semiology of epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures recorded during stereo-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowsky-Coste, Karine; Montavont, Alexandra; Keo-Kosal, Pascale; Guenot, Marc; Chatillon, Claude-Edouard; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    We report two adolescents with refractory seizure disorders in whom both epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) were recorded with intracerebral EEG. The ictal phenomenology of epileptic seizures (ES) and PNES, consisting of hypermotor attacks in the first patient and left-sided painful episodes in the second patient, proved remarkably similar in both cases, highlighting the difficulties which can arise with the distinction of epileptic seizures and PNES based on ictal phenomenology alone. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An Automatic Prediction of Epileptic Seizures Using Cloud Computing and Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, Sanjay; Sood, Sandeep K; Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which is characterized by the spontaneous and unforeseeable occurrence of seizures. An automatic prediction of seizure can protect the patients from accidents and save their life. In this article, we proposed a mobile-based framework that automatically predict seizures using the information contained in electroencephalography (EEG) signals. The wireless sensor technology is used to capture the EEG signals of patients. The cloud-based services are used to collect and analyze the EEG data from the patient's mobile phone. The features from the EEG signal are extracted using the fast Walsh-Hadamard transform (FWHT). The Higher Order Spectral Analysis (HOSA) is applied to FWHT coefficients in order to select the features set relevant to normal, preictal and ictal states of seizure. We subsequently exploit the selected features as input to a k-means classifier to detect epileptic seizure states in a reasonable time. The performance of the proposed model is tested on Amazon EC2 cloud and compared in terms of execution time and accuracy. The findings show that with selected HOS based features, we were able to achieve a classification accuracy of 94.6 %.

  9. Reliable epileptic seizure detection using an improved wavelet neural network

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    Zarita Zainuddin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundElectroencephalogram (EEG signal analysis is indispensable in epilepsy diagnosis as it offers valuable insights for locating the abnormal distortions in the brain wave. However, visual interpretation of the massive amounts of EEG signals is time-consuming, and there is often inconsistent judgment between experts. AimsThis study proposes a novel and reliable seizure detection system, where the statistical features extracted from the discrete wavelet transform are used in conjunction with an improved wavelet neural network (WNN to identify the occurrence of seizures. Method Experimental simulations were carried out on a well-known publicly available dataset, which was kindly provided by the Epilepsy Center, University of Bonn, Germany. The normal and epileptic EEG signals were first pre-processed using the discrete wavelet transform. Subsequently, a set of statistical features was extracted to train a WNNs-based classifier. ResultsThe study has two key findings. First, simulation results showed that the proposed improved WNNs-based classifier gave excellent predictive ability, where an overall classification accuracy of 98.87% was obtained. Second, by using the 10th and 90th percentiles of the absolute values of the wavelet coefficients, a better set of EEG features can be identified from the data, as the outliers are removed before any further downstream analysis.ConclusionThe obtained high prediction accuracy demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed seizure detection scheme. It suggested the prospective implementation of the proposed method in developing a real time automated epileptic diagnostic system with fast and accurate response that could assist neurologists in the decision making process.

  10. Dentate gyrus mossy cells control spontaneous convulsive seizures and spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Anh D; Nguyen, Theresa M; Limouse, Charles; Kim, Hannah K; Szabo, Gergely G; Felong, Sylwia; Maroso, Mattia; Soltesz, Ivan

    2018-02-16

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is characterized by debilitating, recurring seizures and an increased risk for cognitive deficits. Mossy cells (MCs) are key neurons in the hippocampal excitatory circuit, and the partial loss of MCs is a major hallmark of TLE. We investigated how MCs contribute to spontaneous ictal activity and to spatial contextual memory in a mouse model of TLE with hippocampal sclerosis, using a combination of optogenetic, electrophysiological, and behavioral approaches. In chronically epileptic mice, real-time optogenetic modulation of MCs during spontaneous hippocampal seizures controlled the progression of activity from an electrographic to convulsive seizure. Decreased MC activity is sufficient to impede encoding of spatial context, recapitulating observed cognitive deficits in chronically epileptic mice. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  11. Seizure metaphors differ in patients' accounts of epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2009-05-01

    To increase understanding of the subjective symptomatology of seizure experiences and improve differential diagnosis by studying the seizure metaphors used by patients with (psychogenic) nonepileptic seizures (NES) and epilepsy. Twenty-one unselected patients taking part in this study were admitted for 48 h of video-EEG (electroenceophalography) observation because of uncertainty about the diagnosis. Eight were proven to have epilepsy, 13 to have psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). During their admission, patients were interviewed by a neurologist. A linguist blinded to the medical diagnosis identified and categorized all seizure metaphors in verbatim transcripts. Between-group comparisons and logistic regression analysis were carried out. Of 382 metaphors identified, 80.8% conceptualized seizures as an agent/force, event/situation, or space/place. Most patients used metaphors from all categories, but patients with epilepsy and PNES showed preferences for different metaphoric concepts (differences p = 0.009 to p = 0.039). Patients with epilepsy preferred metaphors depicting the seizure as an agent/force or event/situation. PNES patients more often used metaphors of space/place. Logistic regression analyses predicted the diagnosis of PNES or epilepsy correctly in 85.7% of cases (based on different metaphor types in the each category) or 81.0% (based on all metaphor tokens). Patients with epilepsy and PNES have different preferences in the metaphoric conceptualization of their seizures. Epileptic seizures are described as a more external, self-directed entity than PNES, which are depicted as a state or place patients go through. The differentiating value of metaphoric conceptualizations suggests that metaphor preference could form the basis of future diagnostic questionnaires or other diagnostic tools.

  12. Non Epileptic Seizures Among School Going Children And Adolescents

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    Dhanaraj M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Non epileptic seizures were diagnosed in 20 (F:15, M:5 school children and adolescents by a positive provocative test consisting of induction and termination of the attack with suggestions and saline injection and normal ictal EEG. Patients were followed up for a period of two years. The major provocating factors were (a family problems, mainly conflict between the parents in 25%, (b problems in schooling in 20%, (c combination of both in 30%, (d sexual and physical abuse in 10% and (e undetectable in 15%. The frequency of the attacks were > 1/day in 55%, 1 - 6 / week in 25%, 1 - 3 / month in 15% and occasional in 5%. During follow up, 55% were free from attacks, 10% had recurrence occasionally for one year and free from it during the second year, 10% continued to get attacks and 25% were lost to follow up. In those free from attacks, multiple somatic complaints were reported by 30% of patients.

  13. [Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukujima, M M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1996-06-01

    Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1) were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2). The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  14. Patterns of muscle activation during generalized tonic and tonic–clonic epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tonic seizures and the tonic phase of tonic–clonic epileptic seizures are defined as “sustained tonic” muscle contraction lasting a few seconds to minutes. Visual inspection of the surface electromyogram (EMG) during seizures contributed considerably to a better understanding and accurate...

  15. Combined Effects of Feedforward Inhibition and Excitation in Thalamocortical Circuit on the Transitions of Epileptic Seizures

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    Denggui Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying electrophysiologically observed two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in cerebral cortex remain unknown. The interplay within thalamocortical network is believed to give rise to these epileptic multiple modes of activity and transitions between them. In particular, it is thought that in some areas of cortex there exists feedforward inhibition from specific relay nucleus of thalamus (TC to inhibitory neuronal population (IN which has even more stronger functions on cortical activities than the known feedforward excitation from TC to excitatory neuronal population (EX. Inspired by this, we proposed a modified computational model by introducing feedforward inhibitory connectivity within thalamocortical circuit, to systematically investigate the combined effects of feedforward inhibition and excitation on transitions of epileptic seizures. We first found that the feedforward excitation can induce the transition from tonic oscillation to spike and wave discharges (SWD in cortex, i.e., the epileptic tonic-absence seizures, with the fixed weak feedforward inhibition. Thereinto, the phase of absence seizures corresponding to strong feedforward excitation can be further transformed into the clonic oscillations with the increasing of feedforward inhibition, representing the epileptic absence-clonic seizures. We also observed the other fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2/3/4-spike and wave discharges, reversed SWD and clonic oscillations, as well as saturated firings. More importantly, we can identify the stable parameter regions representing the tonic-clonic oscillations and SWD discharges of epileptic seizures on the 2-D plane composed of feedforward inhibition and excitation, where the physiologically plausible transition pathways between tonic-clonic and absence seizures can be figured out. These results indicate the functional role of feedforward pathways in controlling epileptic

  16. [THE PROPAGATION AND SEMIOLOGY OF FOCAL EPILEPTIC SEIZURES. CASES CONNECTED TO THE INSULA. THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Attila; Balogh, Attila

    2016-01-30

    The developing of diagnostical examinations in epileptology provides new challenges in seizure semiology. On the analysis of seizures it is important to examine the mechanisms of their propagation. The brain connectivity (based on the neuroimaging), the shadowing of the movement of excessive neuronal activity (based on computerized EEG and MEG methods), the cognition of the physiological and pathological brain networks are the footstone of the epileptic seizure propagation. The investigators prove, by means of case demonstrations of the role of the network nodes and the role of the epileptic hubs in the seizure symptomatology. The preoperative, intra and postoperative data are analised of three insular and one parietal epileptic patients in point of view of their seizure symptomes. Complex neuroimaging, noninvasive and invasive electrophysiology, intensive long-term video-EEG monitoring, computerized EEG analysis, fuctional mapping, intraoperative corticography were used. The etiology were confirmed with hystology. It is observed that on seizure semiology our patients plays the insula a double role. In some cases, it is the focus of insular seizures with their symptoms difficult to identify. However, in the majority of cases and as a consequence of its rich neural connections, the insula has a peculiar property in the evolution of the symptomatogenic features of seizures. This observations are developing new relationships between the mechanism of seizure propagation and its semiological consequences. On epileptological point of view there are brain structures which has peculiar role in the "designe" of propagation of the epileptic excitement. The numerous new methods in neuroimaging and neurophysiology allowed the connectomical examination of the epileptic networks. The role of the epileptic diathesis is approachable with the metholdology of the brain connectivity. Theoretically the node of the epileptic network consist of the potential pathes where the localised

  17. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography during epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of sustained muscle activation during convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), as compared to voluntary muscle activation. The main goal was to find surface electromyography (EMG) features that can distinguish between convuls...

  18. Epileptic seizures and headache/migraine: a review of types of association and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Carlo; Pruna, Dario; Ledda, Mariagiuseppina

    2013-11-01

    There are different possible temporal associations between epileptic seizures and headache attacks which have given rise to unclear or controversial terminologies. The classification of the International League Against Epilepsy does not refer to this type of disorder, while the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-2) defines three kinds of association: (1) migraine-triggered seizure ("migralepsy"), (2) hemicrania epileptica, and (3) post-ictal headache. We performed an extensive review of the literature, not including "post-ictal" and "inter-ictal" headaches. On the basis of well-documented reports, the following clinical entities may be identified: (A) "epileptic headache (EH)" or "ictal epileptic headache (IEH)": in this condition headache (with or without migrainous features) is an epileptic manifestation per se, with onset, and cessation if isolated, coinciding with the scalp or deep EEG pattern of an epileptic seizure. EH maybe followed by other epileptic manifestations (motor/sensory/autonomic); this condition should be differentiated from "pure" or "isolated" EH, in which headache/migraine is the sole epileptic manifestation (requiring differential diagnosis from other headache forms). "Hemicrania epileptica" (if confirmed) is a very rare variant of EH, characterized by ipsilateral location of headache and ictal EEG paroxysms. (B) "Pre-ictal migraine" and "pre-ictal headache": when a headache attack is followed during, or shortly after, by a typical epileptic seizure. The migraine attack may be with or without aura, and its seizure-triggering role ("migraine-triggered seizure") is still a subject of debate. A differentiation from occipital epilepsy is mandatory. The term "migralepsy" has not been used uniformly, and may therefore led to misinterpretation. On the basis of this review we suggest definitions and a terminology which may become the basis of a forthcoming classification of headaches associated with epileptic seizures. Copyright

  19. Prediction of Epileptic Seizure by Analysing Time Series EEG Signal Using k-NN Classifier

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    Md. Kamrul Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalographic signal is a representative signal that contains information about brain activity, which is used for the detection of epilepsy since epileptic seizures are caused by a disturbance in the electrophysiological activity of the brain. The prediction of epileptic seizure usually requires a detailed and experienced analysis of EEG. In this paper, we have introduced a statistical analysis of EEG signal that is capable of recognizing epileptic seizure with a high degree of accuracy and helps to provide automatic detection of epileptic seizure for different ages of epilepsy. To accomplish the target research, we extract various epileptic features namely approximate entropy (ApEn, standard deviation (SD, standard error (SE, modified mean absolute value (MMAV, roll-off (R, and zero crossing (ZC from the epileptic signal. The k-nearest neighbours (k-NN algorithm is used for the classification of epilepsy then regression analysis is used for the prediction of the epilepsy level at different ages of the patients. Using the statistical parameters and regression analysis, a prototype mathematical model is proposed which helps to find the epileptic randomness with respect to the age of different subjects. The accuracy of this prototype equation depends on proper analysis of the dynamic information from the epileptic EEG.

  20. [Effect of electroacupuncture of different regions of the auricle on epileptic seizures in epilepsy rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Yan-Hua; Rong, Pei-Jing; Li, Liang; Ben, Hui; Zhu, Bing

    2011-12-01

    To observe the anti-seizure effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at different sites regions of the auricle in awake rats. Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into model, ear-apex, ear-outer-margin, earlobe, cymba-concha, cavitas-conchae groups (n = 10 in each group). A metal microelectrode (diameter: 50 microm) was implanted into the somatosensary cortex for recording the field potentials (FPs). Epileptic seizure model was established by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 60 mg/kg). EA (20 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to ear-apex, ear-outer-margin, earlobe, cymaba-concha and cavitas-conchae for 30 min, respectively. The epileptic behavior changes (scores) were determined in the light of Racine's method, and the epileptic seizure was assessed according to the epileptic FPs (5-folds above the basic amplitude) of the cerebral cortex. In comparison with the model group, the latency of the first seizure of epilepsy in the ear-outer-margin, earlobe, cymba-concha, cavitas-conchae groups were increased significantly (P epilepsy, and reducing the scores of the epileptic behavior and seizure duration (P 0.05). EA of cymba-concha and cavitas-conchae has a good effect in suppressing epileptic seizures, which may be mediated via the auricular branch of the vagus nerve.

  1. Epileptic Seizure Classification of EEGs Using Time-Frequency Analysis Based Multiscale Radial Basis Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Xu-Dong; Luo, Mei-Lin; Li, Ke; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Qi

    2018-03-01

    The automatic detection of epileptic seizures from electroencephalography (EEG) signals is crucial for the localization and classification of epileptic seizure activity. However, seizure processes are typically dynamic and nonstationary, and thus, distinguishing rhythmic discharges from nonstationary processes is one of the challenging problems. In this paper, an adaptive and localized time-frequency representation in EEG signals is proposed by means of multiscale radial basis functions (MRBF) and a modified particle swarm optimization (MPSO) to improve both time and frequency resolution simultaneously, which is a novel MRBF-MPSO framework of the time-frequency feature extraction for epileptic EEG signals. The dimensionality of extracted features can be greatly reduced by the principle component analysis algorithm before the most discriminative features selected are fed into a support vector machine (SVM) classifier with the radial basis function (RBF) in order to separate epileptic seizure from seizure-free EEG signals. The classification performance of the proposed method has been evaluated by using several state-of-art feature extraction algorithms and other five different classifiers like linear discriminant analysis, and logistic regression. The experimental results indicate that the proposed MRBF-MPSO-SVM classification method outperforms competing techniques in terms of classification accuracy, and shows the effectiveness of the proposed method for classification of seizure epochs and seizure-free epochs.

  2. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions

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    Sarma AK

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anand K Sarma,1 Nabil Khandker,1 Lisa Kurczewski,2 Gretchen M Brophy2 1Department of Neurology, 2Departments of Pharmacotherapy & Outcomes Science and Neurosurgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical–psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and “pseudoseizure” patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who

  3. Classification of clinical semiology in epileptic seizures in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Lakshmi; Palumbo, Linda; Ghosh, Soumya

    2012-03-01

    The clinical semiology of 61 neonatal seizures with EEG correlates, in 24 babies was analysed. Most seizures (89%) had multiple features during the EEG discharge. The seizures were classified using the prominent clinical feature at onset, and all features seen during the seizure, using an extended classification scheme. Orolingual features occurred most frequently at onset (30%), whereas ocular phenomena occurred most often during the seizure (70%). Orolingual, ocular and autonomic features were seen at onset in 55% of the seizures. Seizure onsets with clonic, tonic and hypomotor features were seen in 20%, 8% and 18% respectively. Clinico-electrical correlations were as follows. The EEG discharge involved both hemispheres in 54% of all seizures, in clonic seizures this was 93%. Focal clonic seizures were associated with EEG seizure onset from the contralateral hemisphere. Majority of the clonic and hypomotor seizures had a left hemisphere ictal EEG onset. Orolingual seizures frequently started from the right hemisphere, whereas ocular and autonomic seizures arose from either hemisphere. There was no significant difference in mortality, morbidity, abnormal neuroimaging and EEG background abnormalities in babies with or without clonic seizures. This study provides insights into neuronal networks that underpin electroclinical seizures, by analysing and classifying the obvious initial clinical features and those during the seizure. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An efficient detection of epileptic seizure by differentiation and spectral analysis of electroencephalograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jae-Hwan; Chung, Yoon Gi; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2015-11-01

    Epilepsy is a critical neurological disorder resulting from abnormal hyper-excitability of neurons in the brain. Studies have shown that epilepsy can be detected in electroencephalography (EEG) recordings of patients suffering from seizures. The performance of EEG-based epileptic seizure detection relies largely on how well one can extract features from an EEG that characterize seizure activity. Conventional feature extraction methods using time-series analysis, spectral analysis and nonlinear dynamic analysis have advanced in recent years to improve detection. The computational complexity has also increased to obtain a higher detection rate. This study aimed to develop an efficient feature extraction method based on Hjorth's mobility to reduce computational complexity while maintaining high detection accuracy. A new feature extraction method was proposed by computing the spectral power of Hjorth's mobility components, which were effectively estimated by differentiating EEG signals in real-time. Using EEG data in five epileptic patients, this method resulted in a detection rate of 99.46% between interictal and epileptic EEG signals and 99.78% between normal and epileptic EEG signals, which is comparable to most advanced nonlinear methods. These results suggest that the spectral features of Hjorth's mobility components in EEG signals can represent seizure activity and may pave the way for developing a fast and reliable epileptic seizure detection method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Predictive value of EEG findings at control of epileptic spasms for seizure relapse in patients with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keitaro; Toribe, Yasuhisa; Kimizu, Tomokazu; Kimura, Sadami; Ikeda, Tae; Mogami, Yukiko; Yanagihara, Keiko; Mano, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the prognostic importance of electroencephalography (EEG) findings at cessation of epileptic spasms for seizure outcome. We reviewed 71 children with West syndrome (cryptogenic 14) who had obtained control of epileptic spasms with initial treatment (adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) 37, high-dose vitamin B6 2, and antiepileptic drugs 32). According to the EEG findings at control of epileptic spasms, the subjects were divided into three groups: normal group (no epileptic activity, n=12), abnormal group (residual epileptic activity without hypsarrhythmia, n=53), and hypsarrhythmic group (persisting hypsarrhythmia, n=6). Overall, 47 (66%) of the 71 patients (cryptogenic 4) had experienced relapses of seizures (epileptic spasms 23 and focal seizure 24) after initial control of epileptic spasms. Within symptomatic cases, seizure relapse rate varied widely from 0% (Down syndrome) to 100% (tuberous sclerosis), depending on underlying causes. Seizure relapse depended on the EEG findings at control of epileptic spasms. The normal group had a significantly lower seizure relapse rate (17%) in comparison with the abnormal group (75%), the hypsarrhythmic group (83%), and the epileptiform (abnormal plus hypsarrhythmic, 76%) group. No significant difference in seizure relapse rate was observed between non-hypsarrhythmic (normal plus abnormal, 65%) and hypsarrhythmic groups. At the last follow-up, normal group children also showed a favorable seizure prognosis (seizure control 100%). A favorable seizure prognosis is associated with the disappearance of epileptic activity, but not the resolution of hypsarrhythmic pattern on EEG at control of epileptic spasms. We suggest that effective treatment for West syndrome should produce both cessation of epileptic spasms and disappearance of epileptic activity on EEG. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of the family of feline leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) genes, and mutational analysis in familial spontaneous epileptic cats

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Hamamoto, Yuji; Mizoguchi, Shunta; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Fujita, Michio

    2017-01-01

    Background Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) proteins play a critical role in synaptic transmission. Dysfunction of these genes and encoded proteins is associated with neurological disorders such as genetic epilepsy or autoimmune limbic encephalitis in animals and human. Familial spontaneous epileptic cats (FSECs) are the only feline strain and animal model of familial temporal lobe epilepsy. The seizure semiology of FSECs comprises recurrent limbic seizures with or without evolution into...

  7. Epileptic seizure, as the first symptom of hypoparathyroidism in children, does not require antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Jia; Li, Jiu-Wei; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Hu, Lin-Yan; Zou, Li-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Patients with hypoparathyroidism exhibit metabolic disorders (hypocalcemia) and brain structural abnormalities (brain calcifications). Currently, studies have determined whether antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is required for epileptic seizures in children with hypoparathyroidism. This study aims to evaluate the data of two medical centers in Beijing based on the diagnosis of epileptic seizures as the first symptom of hypoparathyroidism in children. A total of 42 patients were included and assigned into AED and non-AED treatment groups in a 1:2 matched case-control study. Results show that the seizure outcome after 1 year of AED treatment is not significantly different from that of the control. In the subgroup analysis of patients with subcortical calcifications, the seizure outcome is still not significantly different from that of the control. Thus, AED treatment cannot improve the seizure outcomes in children with parathyroid disorder, even in such cases as suspected structural seizure caused by subcortical calcifications. Clinicians must take adequate considerations on the use of AEDs in these patients. Epileptic seizures, as the first symptom of hypoparathyroidism in children, do not require epilepsy drugs.

  8. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  9. The prevalence of orodental trauma during epileptic seizures in terms of dental treatment - Survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlak, Dominika; Łuniewska, Joanna; Stojak, Wiktoria; Hovhannisyan, Anahit; Stróżyńska, Anna; Mańka-Malara, Katarzyna; Adamiec, Marcin; Rysz, Andrzej

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Seizures that occur during attacks may lead to head injuries. It is crucial to establish proper prophylactic management against trauma occurrence, as nowadays prevention is not sufficient. Assessment of the frequency of head and intraoral trauma during epileptic seizures and to evaluate factors that may predispose to injuries. The questionnaire was carried out among 106 patients with epilepsy. Survey conducted questions regarding development of the disease and occurrence of orodental and head trauma. Results were statistically analyzed with the chi-square test (ptrauma during epileptic seizures. The most common were lips, tongue or cheeks injuries. 18% patients suffered from tooth crack and 17% from tooth fracture. 50% of respondents suffered from head trauma during seizures: 41% patients reported bruises, 39% burns, 37% wounds, 10% nose fractures, 7% eye socket trauma and 3% skull crack. 14.1% of respondents experienced dentist refusal to undertake treatment, while 4% of patients had epileptic attack during dental procedures. Dental trauma is common result of epileptic seizures. It is necessary to implement prophylactic management to prevent hard and soft tissues injuries, for example by using custom-made mouthguards. Moreover, specially designed dental programs for this group of patients should be provided. Copyright © 2017 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  10. Independent Neuronal Origin of Seizures and Behavioral Comorbidities in an Animal Model of a Severe Childhood Genetic Epileptic Encephalopathy.

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    Samuel K Asinof

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The childhood epileptic encephalopathies (EE's are seizure disorders that broadly impact development including cognitive, sensory and motor progress with severe consequences and comorbidities. Recently, mutations in DNM1 (dynamin 1 have been implicated in two EE syndromes, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome and Infantile Spasms. Dnm1 encodes dynamin 1, a large multimeric GTPase necessary for activity-dependent membrane recycling in neurons, including synaptic vesicle endocytosis. Dnm1Ftfl or "fitful" mice carry a spontaneous mutation in the mouse ortholog of DNM1 and recapitulate many of the disease features associated with human DNM1 patients, providing a relevant disease model of human EE's. In order to examine the cellular etiology of seizures and behavioral and neurological comorbidities, we engineered a conditional Dnm1Ftfl mouse model of DNM1 EE. Observations of Dnm1Ftfl/flox mice in combination with various neuronal subpopulation specific cre strains demonstrate unique seizure phenotypes and clear separation of major neurobehavioral comorbidities from severe seizures associated with the germline model. This demonstration of pleiotropy suggests that treating seizures per se may not prevent severe comorbidity observed in EE associated with dynamin-1 mutations, and is likely to have implications for other genetic forms of EE.

  11. Transient Gyral Enhancement After Epileptic Seizure in a Patient with CREST Syndrome

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    Mustafa Açıkgöz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Limited scleroderma, also termed CREST syndrome (calcinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia, is a form of scleroderma which is an autoimmune connective tissue disease. Neurological involvement is less common than other system involvements in scleroderma. Epileptic seizure is a rare neurological complication. Gyral enhancement is not an expected finding during disease. Gyral enhancement is contrast enhancement of superficial brain parenchyma and it usually occurs as a result of vascular, inflammatory, infectious and neoplastic processes. A-sixty-seven-year old female patient, who was diagnosed as CREST syndrome for three years was admitted to our hospital. She had an epileptic seizure three days ago and behavioral changes after the seizure. There was not epilepsy diagnosis in her medical history. In neurological examination; she was apathic and deep tendon reflexes were hyperactive, Hoffman’s and Babinski reflexes were positive on the right side of her body. In laboratory studies; anti-nuclear antibody was positive at 1/1000 and anti-centromere antibody was positive. On contrast-enhanced cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; gyral enhancement was observed in the left parieto-occipital region. Cerebrospinal fluid tests were within normal limits. Electroencephalography demonstrated diffuse cerebral dysfunction. We administrated antiepileptic drug to the patient during hospitalization. On the follow up, apathy and restriction of the cooperation were improved. Epileptic seizure did not recur. After ten days, in the control cranial MRI, gyral enhancement was reduced significantly. Neurological involvement in CREST syndrome is rare and epileptic seizures have been appeared in a limited number in the literature. Inflammatory and vascular processes can cause gyral enhancement, but also it must be kept in mind that gyral enhancement can be observed transiently after epileptic seizure

  12. Topographic movie of intracranial ictal high-frequency oscillations with seizure semiology: epileptic network in Jacksonian seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Chan, Derrick W; Go, Cristina Y; Ochi, Ayako; Elliott, Irene M; Donner, Elizabeth J; Weiss, Shelly K; Snead, O Carter; Rutka, James T; Drake, James M; Otsubo, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We developed a technique to produce images of dynamic changes in ictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) >40 Hz recorded on subdural electroencephalography (EEG) that are time-locked to the ictal EEG and ictal semiology video. We applied this technique to Jacksonian seizures to demonstrate ictal HFO propagation along the homunculus in the primary sensory-motor cortex to visualize the underlying epileptic network. We analyzed intracranial ictal EEGs from two patients with intractable Jacksonian seizures who underwent epilepsy surgery. We calculated the degrees of increase in amplitude within 40-80, 80-200, and 200-300 Hz frequency bands compared to the interictal period and converted them into topographic movies projected onto the brain surface picture. We combined these data with the ictal EEGs and video of the patient demonstrating ictal semiology. The ictal HFOs began in the sensory cortex and appeared concomitantly with the sensory aura. They then propagated to the motor cortex at the same time that focal motor symptoms evolved. As the seizure progressed, the ictal HFOs spread or reverberated in the rolandic region. However, even when the seizure became secondarily generalized, the ictal HFOs were confined to the rolandic region. In both cases, there was increased amplitude of higher frequency bands during seizure initiation compared to seizure progression. This combined movie showed the ictal HFO propagation corresponding to the ictal semiology in Jacksonian seizures and revealed the epileptic network involved in seizure initiation and progression. This method may advance understanding of neural network activities relating to clinical seizure generation and propagation. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa [Naperville, IL; Kulikov, Stanislav [Sarov, RU; Osorio, Ivan [Leawood, KS; Raptis, Apostolos C [Downers Grove, IL

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  14. [Epileptic seizures during childbirth in a patient with idiopathic generalised epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Zwarts, M.J.; Renier, W.O.; Bloem, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    During her first pregnancy, a 37-year-old woman with idiopathic generalised epilepsy that was adequately controlled with lamotrigine experienced a series of epileptic seizures following an elective caesarean section. The attacks were terminated with diazepam. The following day, she developed

  15. Possible reasons why certain epileptics commit unlawful acts during or directly after seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, P H; Gagiano, C A; Verschoor, T

    1994-01-01

    Courts have accepted that epileptics sometimes commit unlawful acts as a result of an epileptic seizure. Reasons for this unlawful behaviour may be found in the interictal, ictal and post-ictal phases of the seizure. Interictal aspects which are relevant to the form of epileptic automatism may be the person's natural tendencies, the same psychodynamic factors which determine the contents of dreams, the person's social background of violence and the contents of a person's thoughts immediately before a seizure. Ictal aspects include the specific part of the brain from which the seizure originates, the loss of integration of incoming sensorial stimuli with motor-emotional output, the loss of higher control associated with a reversion to primitive automatic behaviour and the emergence of repressed feelings and aggressive instincts. Post-ictal violent behaviour may stem from the epileptic's misinterpretation of well-meant attempts by bystanders to protect him or her against the consequences of his or her confused conduct--and is usually characterized by a clouded consciousness, paranoid ideas and hallucinations.

  16. Neuroethological approach to frontolimbic epileptic seizures and parasomnias: The same central pattern generators for the same behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassinari, C A; Cantalupo, G; Högl, B; Cortelli, P; Tassi, L; Francione, S; Nobili, L; Meletti, S; Rubboli, G; Gardella, E

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this report is not to make a differential diagnosis between epileptic nocturnal seizures and non-epileptic sleep-related movement disorders, or parasomnias. On the contrary, our goal is to emphasize the commonly shared semiological features of some epileptic seizures and parasomnias. Such similar features might be explained by the activation of the same neuronal networks (so-called 'central pattern generators' or CPG). These produce the stereotypical rhythmic motor sequences - in other words, behaviours - that are adaptive and species-specific (such as eating/alimentary, attractive/aversive, locomotor and nesting habits). CPG are located at the subcortical level (mainly in the brain stem and spinal cord) and, in humans, are under the control of the phylogenetically more recent neomammalian neocortical structures, according to a simplified Jacksonian model. Based on video-polygraphic recordings of sleep-related epileptic seizures and non-epileptic events (parasomnias), we have documented how a transient "neomammalian brain" dysfunction - whether epileptic or not - can 'release' (disinhibition?) the CPG responsible for involuntary motor behaviours. Thus, in both epileptic seizures and parasomnias, we can observe: (a) oroalimentary automatisms, bruxism and biting; (b) ambulatory behaviours, ranging from the classical bimanual-bipedal activity of 'frontal' hypermotor seizures, epileptic and non-epileptic wanderings, and somnambulism to periodic leg movements (PLM), alternating leg muscle activation (ALMA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS); and (c) various sleep-related events such as ictal fear, sleep terrors, nightmares and violent behaviour.

  17. Novel feature extraction method based on weight difference of weighted network for epileptic seizure detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenglin Wang; Qingfang Meng; Hong-Bo Xie; Yuehui Chen

    2014-01-01

    The extraction method of classification feature is primary and core problem in all epileptic EEG detection algorithms, since it can seriously affect the performance of the detection algorithm. In this paper, a novel epileptic EEG feature extraction method based on the statistical parameter of weighted complex network is proposed. The EEG signal is first transformed into weighted network and the weight differences of all the nodes in the network are analyzed. Then the sum of top quintile weight differences is extracted as the classification feature. At last, the extracted feature is applied to classify the epileptic EEG dataset. Experimental results show that the single feature classification based on the extracted feature obtains higher classification accuracy up to 94.75%, which indicates that the extracted feature can distinguish the ictal EEG from interictal EEG and has great potentiality of real-time epileptic seizures detection.

  18. Fast monitoring of epileptic seizures using recurrence time statistics of electroencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo eGao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common disorders of the brain. Currently, determination of epileptic seizures often involves tedious, time-consuming visual inspection of electroencephalography (EEG data by medical experts. To better monitor seizures and make medications more effective, we propose a recurrence time based approach to characterize brain electrical activity. Recurrence times have a number of distinguished properties that make it very effective for forwarning epileptic seizures as well as studying propagation of seizures: 1 recurrence times amount to periods of periodic signals, 2 recurrence times are closely related to information dimension, Lyapunov exponent, and Kolmogorov entropy of chaotic signals, 3 recurrence times embody Shannon and Renyi entropies of random fields, and 4 recurrence times can readily detect bifurcation-like transitions in dynamical systems. In particular, property 4 dictates that unlike many other nonlinear methods, recurrence time method does not require the EEG data be chaotic and/or stationary. Moreover, the method only contains a few parameters that are largely signal-independent, and hence, is very easy to use. The method is also very fast—it is fast enough to on-line process multi-channel EEG data with a typical PC. Therefore, it has the potential to be an excellent candidate for real-time monitoring of epileptic seizures in a clinical setting.

  19. Fast monitoring of epileptic seizures using recurrence time statistics of electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianbo; Hu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a relatively common brain disorder which may be very debilitating. Currently, determination of epileptic seizures often involves tedious, time-consuming visual inspection of electroencephalography (EEG) data by medical experts. To better monitor seizures and make medications more effective, we propose a recurrence time based approach to characterize brain electrical activity. Recurrence times have a number of distinguished properties that make it very effective for forewarning epileptic seizures as well as studying propagation of seizures: (1) recurrence times amount to periods of periodic signals, (2) recurrence times are closely related to information dimension, Lyapunov exponent, and Kolmogorov entropy of chaotic signals, (3) recurrence times embody Shannon and Renyi entropies of random fields, and (4) recurrence times can readily detect bifurcation-like transitions in dynamical systems. In particular, property (4) dictates that unlike many other non-linear methods, recurrence time method does not require the EEG data be chaotic and/or stationary. Moreover, the method only contains a few parameters that are largely signal-independent, and hence, is very easy to use. The method is also very fast-it is fast enough to on-line process multi-channel EEG data with a typical PC. Therefore, it has the potential to be an excellent candidate for real-time monitoring of epileptic seizures in a clinical setting.

  20. Do seizures and epileptic activity worsen epilepsy and deteriorate cognitive function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, Giuliano; Depaulis, Antoine; Tassinari, Alberto; de Curtis, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Relevant to the definition of epileptic encephalopathy (EE) is the concept that the epileptic activity itself may contribute to bad outcomes, both in terms of epilepsy and cognition, above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and that these can worsen over time. The review of the clinical and experimental evidence that seizures or interictal electroencephalography (EEG) discharges themselves can induce a progression toward more severe epilepsy and a regression of brain function leads to the following conclusions: The possibility of seizure-dependent worsening is by no means a general one but is limited to some types of epilepsy, namely mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and EEs. Clinical and experimental data concur in indicating that prolonged seizures/status epilepticus (SE) are a risky initial event that can set in motion an epileptogenic process leading to persistent, possibly drug-refractory epilepsies. The mechanisms for SE-related epileptogenic process are incompletely known; they seem to involve inflammation and/or glutamatergic transmission. The evidence of the role of recurrent individual seizures in sustaining epilepsy progression is ambiguous. The correlation between high seizure frequency and bad outcome does not necessarily demonstrate a cause-effect relationship, rather high seizure frequency and bad outcome can both depend on a particularly aggressive epileptogenic process. The results of EE studies challenge the idea of a common seizure-dependent mechanism for epilepsy progression/intellectual deterioration. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. The epileptic seizure and the mystery of death in Christian painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael W

    2010-02-01

    The epileptic seizure is in many cultures associated with death. Indo-European tradition perceives death not necessarily as the end but as a step, as a point the life cycle is passing through. The epileptic seizure may be seen as a transient form of death, which offers some symmetry with the biblical story of the death and resurrection of Christ. This article, originating from a case report, shows how some Christian painting alludes to renaissance after a seizure and to the parallelism between the patient with epilepsy and the destiny of Christ. Special attention is paid to Raphael's, in this respect particularly complex work, The Transfiguration. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Automated Algorithm for Generalized Tonic–Clonic Epileptic Seizure Onset Detection Based on sEMG Zero-Crossing Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Hoppe, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Patients are not able to call for help during a generalized tonic–clonic epileptic seizure. Our objective was to develop a robust generic algorithm for automatic detection of tonic–clonic seizures, based on surface electromyography (sEMG) signals suitable for a portable device. Twenty-two seizure...

  3. Impact of corticosterone treatment on spontaneous seizure frequency and epileptiform activity in mice with chronic epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olagide W Castro

    Full Text Available Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures in patients with epilepsy. Despite compelling anecdotal evidence for stress-induced seizures, animal models of the phenomena are sparse and possible mechanisms are unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that increased levels of the stress-associated hormone corticosterone (CORT would increase epileptiform activity and spontaneous seizure frequency in mice rendered epileptic following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. We monitored video-EEG activity in pilocarpine-treated mice 24/7 for a period of four or more weeks, during which animals were serially treated with CORT or vehicle. CORT increased the frequency and duration of epileptiform events within the first 24 hours of treatment, and this effect persisted for up to two weeks following termination of CORT injections. Interestingly, vehicle injection produced a transient spike in CORT levels - presumably due to the stress of injection - and a modest but significant increase in epileptiform activity. Neither CORT nor vehicle treatment significantly altered seizure frequency; although a small subset of animals did appear responsive. Taken together, our findings indicate that treatment of epileptic animals with exogenous CORT designed to mimic chronic stress can induce a persistent increase in interictal epileptiform activity.

  4. Detection of tonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sigge N.; Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    , median frequency, zero crossing rate and approximate entropy. These features were used as input in the random forest classifier to decide if a data segment was from a seizure or not. The goal was to develop a generic algorithm for all tonic seizures, but better results were achieved when certain...... parameters were adapted specifically for each patient. With patient specific parameters the algorithm obtained a sensitivity of 100% for four of six patients with false detection rates between 0.08 and 7.90 per hour....

  5. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  6. Epileptic seizure classifications of single-channel scalp EEG data using wavelet-based features and SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjarasjitt, Suparerk

    2017-10-01

    In this study, wavelet-based features of single-channel scalp EEGs recorded from subjects with intractable seizure are examined for epileptic seizure classification. The wavelet-based features extracted from scalp EEGs are simply based on detail and approximation coefficients obtained from the discrete wavelet transform. Support vector machine (SVM), one of the most commonly used classifiers, is applied to classify vectors of wavelet-based features of scalp EEGs into either seizure or non-seizure class. In patient-based epileptic seizure classification, a training data set used to train SVM classifiers is composed of wavelet-based features of scalp EEGs corresponding to the first epileptic seizure event. Overall, the excellent performance on patient-dependent epileptic seizure classification is obtained with the average accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of, respectively, 0.9687, 0.7299, and 0.9813. The vector composed of two wavelet-based features of scalp EEGs provide the best performance on patient-dependent epileptic seizure classification in most cases, i.e., 19 cases out of 24. The wavelet-based features corresponding to the 32-64, 8-16, and 4-8 Hz subbands of scalp EEGs are the mostly used features providing the best performance on patient-dependent classification. Furthermore, the performance on both patient-dependent and patient-independent epileptic seizure classifications are also validated using tenfold cross-validation. From the patient-independent epileptic seizure classification validated using tenfold cross-validation, it is shown that the best classification performance is achieved using the wavelet-based features corresponding to the 64-128 and 4-8 Hz subbands of scalp EEGs.

  7. Network dynamics of the brain and influence of the epileptic seizure onset zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Samuel P; Santaniello, Sabato; Yaffe, Robert B; Jouny, Christophe C; Crone, Nathan E; Bergey, Gregory K; Anderson, William S; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2014-12-09

    The human brain is a dynamic networked system. Patients with partial epileptic seizures have focal regions that periodically diverge from normal brain network dynamics during seizures. We studied the evolution of brain connectivity before, during, and after seizures with graph-theoretic techniques on continuous electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings (5.4 ± 1.7 d per patient, mean ± SD) from 12 patients with temporal, occipital, or frontal lobe partial onset seizures. Each electrode was considered a node in a graph, and edges between pairs of nodes were weighted by their coherence within a frequency band. The leading eigenvector of the connectivity matrix, which captures network structure, was tracked over time and clustered to uncover a finite set of brain network states. Across patients, we found that (i) the network connectivity is structured and defines a finite set of brain states, (ii) seizures are characterized by a consistent sequence of states, (iii) a subset of nodes is isolated from the network at seizure onset and becomes more connected with the network toward seizure termination, and (iv) the isolated nodes may identify the seizure onset zone with high specificity and sensitivity. To localize a seizure, clinicians visually inspect seizures recorded from multiple intracranial electrode contacts, a time-consuming process that may not always result in definitive localization. We show that network metrics computed from all ECoG channels capture the dynamics of the seizure onset zone as it diverges from normal overall network structure. This suggests that a state space model can be used to help localize the seizure onset zone in ECoG recordings.

  8. RESISTANT EPILEPSY FORMS, ASSOCIATED WITH FEVER-PROVOKED (FEBRILE EPILEPTIC SEIZURES (DRAVET SYNDROME, DESC, HHE (A LECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Bobylova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important characteristics of resistant epilepsy forms, associated with fever-provoked (febrile epileptic seizures (Dravet syndrome, DESC — Devastating epileptic encephalopathy in school-aged children, HHE — hemiconvul- sion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome are proposed. For every syndrome all the main aspects of disease are considered in detail: aetiology and pathogenesis, clinical picture, including of characteristics of seizures, EEG, neuroimaging, therapeu­tic approachers and prognosis.  

  9. Epileptic seizures induce structural and functional alterations on brain tissue membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Sevgi; Severcan, Mete; Ilbay, Gul; Severcan, Feride

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by disruption of balance between cerebral excitation and inhibition, leading to recurrent and unprovoked convulsions. Studies are still underway to understand mechanisms lying epileptic seizures with the aim of improving treatment strategies. In this context, the research on brain tissue membranes gains importance for generation of epileptic activities. In order to provide additional information for this field, we have investigated the effects of pentylenetetrazol-induced and audiogenetically susceptible epileptic seizures on structure, content and function of rat brain membrane components using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The findings have shown that both two types of epileptic seizures stimulate the variations in the molecular organization of membrane lipids, which have potential to influence the structures in connection with functions of membrane proteins. Moreover, less fluid lipid structure and a decline in content of lipids obtained from the ratio of CH3 asym/lipid, CH2 asym/lipid, CO/lipid, and olefinicCH/lipid and the areas of the PO2 symmetric and asymmetric modes were observed. Moreover, based on IR data the changes in the conformation of proteins were predicted by neural network (NN) analysis, and displayed as an increase in random coil despite a decrease in beta sheet. Depending on spectral parameters, we have successfully differentiated treated samples from the control by principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis. In summary, FT-IR spectroscopy may offer promising attempt to identify compositional, structural and functional alterations in brain tissue membranes resulting from epileptic activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Advantages of respiratory monitoring during video-EEG evaluation to differentiate epileptic seizures from other events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Milena; Abdennadher, Myriam; Singh, Kanwaljit; Katz, Eliot; Llewellyn, Nichelle; Zarowsly, Marcin; White, David P.; Dworetzky, Barbara A.; Kothare, Sanjeev V.

    2014-01-01

    Distinction between epileptic (ES) and seizure-like events of non-epileptic nature(SLNE) is often difficult using descriptions of seizure semiology. Cardiopulmonary dysfunction is frequent in ES but has not been objectively examined in relationship to SLNE. Our purpose was to compare cardiopulmonary dysfunction between ES and SLNE. We prospectively recorded cardio-pulmonary function using pulse-oximetry, EKG and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) in 52 ES and 22 SLNE. Comparison of cardiopulmonary complications between ES and SLNE was done using two-sample t-tests and logistic regression. Ictal bradypnea and pre-ictal bradycardia were more frequent in ES than SLNE (p1.0). Cardio-respiratory dysfunction, specifically bradypnea, apnea, pre-ictal bradycardia, and oxygen desaturation, is more frequently seen in ES than in SLNE. Tachycardia was not discriminant between ES and SLNE. PMID:24561659

  11. Brain Inflammation in an Infant With Hemimegalencephaly, Escalating Seizures, and Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Hee Kim MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemimegalencephaly, a congenital brain malformation typically characterized by enlargement of one hemisphere, is frequently associated with intractable epilepsy. The authors report a case of a 12-month-old girl with hemimegalencephaly who underwent semiurgent hemispherectomy because of rapidly escalating seizures, arrested development, and associated encephalopathy. The brain tissue was examined and evaluated for neuroinflammation. Immunohistochemical analysis of the brain tissue revealed the presence of abundant activated CD68-positive microglia and reactive astrogliosis. Detection of active inflammatory changes in the brain of a patient with hemimegalencephaly complicated by intractable epilepsy suggests a potential role of ongoing brain inflammation in seizure exacerbation and epileptic encephalopathy.

  12. Is there a Relation between Food Intake and Epileptic Seizures in Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Fallah

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Seizure is one of the most common pediatric neurology problems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of different kinds of food on seizures of epileptic children based on their mothers attitude and experience. Methods: In a descriptive- analytic study done at the pediatric neurology clinic of Shahid Sadoughi University, attitude and experience of mothers regarding the effect of different kinds of foods on children seizures was evaluated via a questionnaire. Results: A total of 148 mothers with ages ranging between 17-52 years (mean± SD:31.6± 6.6 years were evaluated. Their children were 58.5% boys and 41.5% girls with age range of 1-19 years (mean± SD: 6.2±3.8 years. Eighty percent of mothers believed that different kinds of food affected the seizures and this belief was not related to their educational level, gender of child or state of seizure control. The most common kinds of food which triggered seizures based on mothers attitude were salty food and pickled vegetables and based on experience, they were cucumber and milk and . The most common kinds of food that caused decreasing in seizures frequency based on mothers attitude were coffee and cattle oil and based on experience, they were honey and sugar. Conclusion: In this study, majority of mothers believe that different kinds of food have an effect on the seizures in their children and it is necessary to educate epileptic patients about their diet after extraction and testing of effective materials of different kinds of food in animals and human models via further researches.

  13. Cardiac arrest associated with epileptic seizures: A case report with simultaneous EEG and ECG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Mehvari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ictal asystole is a rare, probably underestimated manifestation of epileptic seizures whose pathophysiology is still debated. This report describes two patients who had cardiac asystole at the end of their seizure. The first patient was a 13-year-old boy with complex partial seizures.. His MRI showed symmetrical signal abnormality in the bilateral parietooccipital lobe accompanied by mild gliosis and volume loss. During a 3-day long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had cardiac arrest at the end of one of his seizures that was secondarily generalized. The second one was a 42-year-old veteran with penetrating head trauma in the left frontal lobe due to shell injury. During long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had one generalized tonic–clonic seizure accompanied by bradycardia and cardiac asystole. Asystoles could have a role in the incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP, meaning that the presence of ictal bradycardia is a risk factor for SUDEP. In cases of epileptic cardiac dysrhythmia, prolonged simultaneous EEG/ECG monitoring may be required. Cardiological investigation should be included in epilepsy management.

  14. EPILAB: a software package for studies on the prediction of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, C A; Direito, B; Feldwisch-Drentrup, H; Valderrama, M; Costa, R P; Alvarado-Rojas, C; Nikolopoulos, S; Le Van Quyen, M; Timmer, J; Schelter, B; Dourado, A

    2011-09-15

    A Matlab®-based software package, EPILAB, was developed for supporting researchers in performing studies on the prediction of epileptic seizures. It provides an intuitive and convenient graphical user interface. Fundamental concepts that are crucial for epileptic seizure prediction studies were implemented. This includes, for example, the development and statistical validation of prediction methodologies in long-term continuous recordings. Seizure prediction is usually based on electroencephalography (EEG) and electrocardiography (ECG) signals. EPILAB is able to process both EEG and ECG data stored in different formats. More than 35 time and frequency domain measures (features) can be extracted based on univariate and multivariate data analysis. These features can be post-processed and used for prediction purposes. The predictions may be conducted based on optimized thresholds or by applying classifications methods such as artificial neural networks, cellular neuronal networks, and support vector machines. EPILAB proved to be an efficient tool for seizure prediction, and aims to be a way to communicate, evaluate, and compare results and data among the seizure prediction community. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Anticonvulsant Effects of Ketogenic Diet on Epileptic Seizures and Potential Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Jingwei; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Wei; Li, Bingjin

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is a syndrome of brain dysfunction induced by the aberrant excitability of certain neurons. Despite advances in surgical technique and anti-epileptic drug in recent years, recurrent epileptic seizures remain intractable and lead to a serious morbidity in the world. The ketogenic diet refers to a high-fat, low-carbohydrate and adequate-protein diet. Currently, its beneficial effects on epileptic seizure reduction have been well established. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying the anti-epileptic effects of ketogenic diet are still poorly understood. In this article, the possible roles of ketogenic diet on epilepsy were discussed. Data was obtained from the websites including Web of Science, Medline, Pubmed, Scopus, based on these keywords: "Ketogenic diet" and "epilepsy". As shown in both clinical and basic studies, the therapeutic effects of ketogenic diet might involve neuronal metabolism, neurotransmitter function, neuronal membrane potential and neuron protection against ROS. In this review, we systematically reviewed the effects and possible mechanisms of ketogenic diet on epilepsy, which may optimize the therapeutic strategies against epilepsy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Regularity and Matching Pursuit feature extraction for the detection of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Z-Flores, Emigdio; Trujillo, Leonardo; Sotelo, Arturo; Legrand, Pierrick; Coria, Luis N

    2016-06-15

    The neurological disorder known as epilepsy is characterized by involuntary recurrent seizures that diminish a patient's quality of life. Automatic seizure detection can help improve a patient's interaction with her/his environment, and while many approaches have been proposed the problem is still not trivially solved. In this work, we present a novel methodology for feature extraction on EEG signals that allows us to perform a highly accurate classification of epileptic states. Specifically, Hölderian regularity and the Matching Pursuit algorithm are used as the main feature extraction techniques, and are combined with basic statistical features to construct the final feature sets. These sets are then delivered to a Random Forests classification algorithm to differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic readings. Several versions of the basic problem are tested and statistically validated producing perfect accuracy in most problems and 97.6% accuracy on the most difficult case. A comparison with recent literature, using a well known database, reveals that our proposal achieves state-of-the-art performance. The experimental results show that epileptic states can be accurately detected by combining features extracted through regularity analysis, the Matching Pursuit algorithm and simple time-domain statistical analysis. Therefore, the proposed method should be considered as a promising approach for automatic EEG analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimized feature subsets for epileptic seizure prediction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Ventura, Francisco; Teixeira, César; Dourado, António

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of the number of EEG features to give as inputs to epilepsy seizure predictors is a needed step towards the development of a transportable device for real-time warning. This paper presents a comparative study of three feature selection methods, based on Support Vector Machines. Minimum-Redundancy Maximum-Relevance, Recursive Feature Elimination, Genetic Algorithms, show that, for three patients of the European Database on Epilepsy, the most important univariate features are related to spectral information and statistical moments.

  18. FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION FOR CONTROL OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Jianhang

    parameters regarding their ability to inhibit seizures. The present thesis hypothesized that the antiepileptic effects of vagus nerve stimulation and spinal cord stimulation could be improved by using higher stimulation frequencies than those that are currently used in clinic or proposed in the literature.......Nearly 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy and one-third of them do not respond well to any antiepileptic drugs. Given the large population of patients experiencing drug resistant epilepsy, increased attention has been paid over the last two decades to the development of electrical...

  19. Epileptic seizure prediction based on a bivariate spectral power methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandarabadi, Mojtaba; Teixeira, Cesar A; Direito, Bruno; Dourado, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The spectral power of 5 frequently considered frequency bands (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Theta and Delta) for 6 EEG channels is computed and then all the possible pairwise combinations among the 30 features set, are used to create a 435 dimensional feature space. Two new feature selection methods are introduced to choose the best candidate features among those and to reduce the dimensionality of this feature space. The selected features are then fed to Support Vector Machines (SVMs) that classify the cerebral state in preictal and non-preictal classes. The outputs of the SVM are regularized using a method that accounts for the classification dynamics of the preictal class, also known as "Firing Power" method. The results obtained using our feature selection approaches are compared with the ones obtained using minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance (mRMR) feature selection method. The results in a group of 12 patients of the EPILEPSIAE database, containing 46 seizures and 787 hours multichannel recording for out-of-sample data, indicate the efficiency of the bivariate approach as well as the two new feature selection methods. The best results presented sensitivity of 76.09% (35 of 46 seizures predicted) and a false prediction rate of 0.15(-1).

  20. Increased hair cortisol and antecedent somatic complaints in children with a first epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Ioannis; Pervanidou, Panagiota; Gnardellis, Charalampos; Loli, Nomiki; Theodorou, Virginia; Mantzou, Aimilia; Soukou, Faye; Sinani, Olga; Chrousos, George P

    2017-03-01

    Stress is the most frequent seizure-precipitating factor reported by patients with epilepsy, while stressful life events may increase seizure susceptibility in humans. In this study, we investigated the relations between both biological and behavioral measures of stress in children with a first epileptic seizure (hereafter called seizure). We hypothesized that hair cortisol, a biomarker of chronic stress reflecting approximately 3months of preceding exposure, might be increased in children with a first seizure. We also employed standardized questionnaires to examine presence of stress-related behavioral markers. This was a cross-sectional clinical study investigating stress-related parameters in children with a first seizure (First Epileptic Seizure Group (FESG), n=22) in comparison to healthy children without seizures (Control Group, n=29). Within 24h after a first seizure, hair samples were collected from children for the determination of cortisol. In parallel, perceived stress and anxiety and depressive symptoms were examined with appropriate self- and parent-completed questionnaires, and history of stressful life events during the past year was recorded. Emotional and behavioral problems were also assessed by parent-reported validated and widely-used questionnaires. Higher hair cortisol measurements were observed in the FESG than control children (7.5 versus 5.0pg/mg respectively, p=0.001). The former were more likely to complain of somatic problems than the latter (59.8 vs. 55.4 according to DSM-oriented Scale, p=0.021); however, there were no differences in perceived stress and anxiety or depressive symptoms between the two groups. Using ROC analysis of hair cortisol measurements for predicting disease status, the maximum sensitivity and specificity were observed for a cut-off point of 5.25pg/mg. Increased hair cortisol indicates chronic hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis prior to the first seizure. This might have contributed to

  1. Epileptic seizure predictors based on computational intelligence techniques: a comparative study with 278 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre Teixeira, César; Direito, Bruno; Bandarabadi, Mojtaba; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Valderrama, Mario; Schelter, Bjoern; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Navarro, Vincent; Sales, Francisco; Dourado, António

    2014-05-01

    The ability of computational intelligence methods to predict epileptic seizures is evaluated in long-term EEG recordings of 278 patients suffering from pharmaco-resistant partial epilepsy, also known as refractory epilepsy. This extensive study in seizure prediction considers the 278 patients from the European Epilepsy Database, collected in three epilepsy centres: Hôpital Pitié-là-Salpêtrière, Paris, France; Universitätsklinikum Freiburg, Germany; Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Portugal. For a considerable number of patients it was possible to find a patient specific predictor with an acceptable performance, as for example predictors that anticipate at least half of the seizures with a rate of false alarms of no more than 1 in 6 h (0.15 h⁻¹). We observed that the epileptic focus localization, data sampling frequency, testing duration, number of seizures in testing, type of machine learning, and preictal time influence significantly the prediction performance. The results allow to face optimistically the feasibility of a patient specific prospective alarming system, based on machine learning techniques by considering the combination of several univariate (single-channel) electroencephalogram features. We envisage that this work will serve as benchmark data that will be of valuable importance for future studies based on the European Epilepsy Database. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Seizure-specific wavelet (Seizlet) design for epileptic seizure detection using CorrEntropy ellipse features based on seizure modulus maximas patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnam, Morteza; Pourghassem, Hossein

    2017-01-30

    EEG signal analysis of pediatric patients plays vital role for making a decision to intervene in presurgical stages. In this paper, an offline seizure detection algorithm based on definition of a seizure-specific wavelet (Seizlet) is presented. After designing the Seizlet, by forming cone of influence map of the EEG signal, four types of layouts are analytically designed that are called Seizure Modulus Maximas Patterns (SMMP). By mapping CorrEntropy Induced Metric (CIM) series, four structural features based on least square estimation of fitted non-tilt conic ellipse are extracted that are called CorrEntropy Ellipse Features (CEF). The parameters of the SMMP and CEF are tuned by employing a hybrid optimization algorithm based on honeybee hive optimization in combination with Las Vegas randomized algorithm and Elman recurrent classifier. Eventually, the optimal features by AdaBoost classifiers in a cascade structure are classified into the seizure and non-seizure signals. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on 844h signals with 163 seizure events recorded from 23 patients with intractable seizure disorder and accuracy rate of 91.44% and false detection rate of 0.014 per hour are obtained by 7-channel EEG signals. To overcome the restrictions of general kernels and wavelet coefficient-based features, we designed the Seizlet as an exclusive kernel of seizure signal for first time. Also, the Seizlet-based patterns of EEG signals have been modeled to extract the seizure. The reported results demonstrate that our proposed Seizlet is effectiveness to extract the patterns of the epileptic seizure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Budget impact analysis of adjunctive therapy with lacosamide for partial-onset epileptic seizures in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to compute the budget impact of lacosamide, a new adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures in epilepsy patients from 16 years of age who are uncontrolled and having previously used at least three anti-epileptic drugs from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective. The budget impact analysis compared the 'world with lacosamide' to the 'world without lacosamide' and calculated how a change in the mix of anti-epileptic drugs used to treat uncontrolled epilepsy would impact drug spending from 2008 to 2013. Data on the number of patients and on the market shares of anti-epileptic drugs were taken from Belgian sources and from the literature. Unit costs of anti-epileptic drugs originated from Belgian sources. The budget impact was calculated from two scenarios about the market uptake of lacosamide. The Belgian target population is expected to increase from 5333 patients in 2008 to 5522 patients in 2013. Assuming that the market share of lacosamide increases linearly over time and is taken evenly from all other anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide increases from €5249 (0.1% of reference drug budget) in 2008 to €242,700 (4.7% of reference drug budget) in 2013. Assuming that 10% of patients use standard AED therapy plus lacosamide, the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide is around €800,000-900,000 per year (or 16.7% of the reference drug budget). Adjunctive therapy with lacosamide would raise drug spending for this patient population by as much as 16.7% per year. However, this budget impact analysis did not consider the fact that lacosamide reduces costs of seizure management and withdrawal. The literature suggests that, if savings in other healthcare costs are taken into account, adjunctive therapy with lacosamide may be cost saving.

  4. Advantages of respiratory monitoring during video-EEG evaluation to differentiate epileptic seizures from other events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Milena; Abdennadher, Myriam; Singh, Kanwaljit; Katz, Eliot; Llewellyn, Nichelle; Zarowsky, Marcin; White, David P; Dworetzky, Barbara A; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2014-03-01

    Differentiating between epileptic seizures (ES) and seizure-like nonepileptic events (SLNE) is often difficult using descriptions of seizure semiology. Cardiopulmonary dysfunction is frequent in ES but has not been objectively examined in relation to SLNE. Our purpose was to compare cardiopulmonary dysfunction between ES and SLNE. We prospectively recorded cardiopulmonary function using pulse oximetry, EKG, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) in 52 ES and 22 SLNE. Comparison of cardiopulmonary complications between ES and SLNE was done using two-sample T-tests and logistic regression. Ictal bradypnea and preictal bradycardia were more frequent in ES than SLNE (p1.0). Cardiorespiratory dysfunction, specifically bradypnea, apnea, preictal bradycardia, and oxygen desaturation, is more frequently seen in ES than in SLNE. Tachycardia was not discriminant between ES and SLNE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Auricular Acupuncture May Suppress Epileptic Seizures via Activating the Parasympathetic Nervous System: A Hypothesis Based on Innovative Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular acupuncture is a diagnostic and treatment system based on normalizing the body's dysfunction. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that auricular acupuncture has a significant effect on inducing parasympathetic tone. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder consisting of recurrent seizures resulting from excessive, uncontrolled electrical activity in the brain. Autonomic imbalance demonstrating an increased sympathetic activity and a reduced parasympathetic activation is involved in the development and progress of epileptic seizures. Activation of the parasympathetic nervous system such as vagus nerve stimulation has been used for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Here, we propose that auricular acupuncture may suppress epileptic seizures via activating the parasympathetic nervous system.

  6. Auricular Acupuncture May Suppress Epileptic Seizures via Activating the Parasympathetic Nervous System: A Hypothesis Based on Innovative Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Rong, Pei-Jing; Li, Liang; Ben, Hui; Zhu, Bing; Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a diagnostic and treatment system based on normalizing the body's dysfunction. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that auricular acupuncture has a significant effect on inducing parasympathetic tone. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder consisting of recurrent seizures resulting from excessive, uncontrolled electrical activity in the brain. Autonomic imbalance demonstrating an increased sympathetic activity and a reduced parasympathetic activation is involved in the development and progress of epileptic seizures. Activation of the parasympathetic nervous system such as vagus nerve stimulation has been used for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Here, we propose that auricular acupuncture may suppress epileptic seizures via activating the parasympathetic nervous system.

  7. [Characteristics and management of epileptic seizures in emergency department and diagnostic correlation at discharge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñol-Ripoll, G; Gómez Bitrian, J; Puerta González-Miró, I de la; Royo Hernández, R; Mauri-Llerda, J A

    2008-04-01

    Patients with seizures are common in the emergency department (ED), yet little is known regarding the management of these patients. This study was performed to define the demographic characteristics of patients with seizure disorders in the ED patient population and to determine final disposition, diagnostic and therapeutic activities, and to evaluate the concordance between provisional and definitive diagnosis. We recorded prospectively all patients which were diagnosed of seizure in ED of Hospital Clínico of Zaragoza between November 1th and April 30th. Chart review was used to gather definitive diagnosis regarding these patients. Of the 54,022 patients who presented to the ED during the study period, 137 (0.36%) had complains related to seizures. Sixty one (44%) of these patients were admitted to the hospital. New-onset seizures were thought to be present in 60% of patients. Blood work was abnormal in 12% of patients and 48% of patients had pathological findings in neuroimaging study. False positive diagnosis was present in 33% of patients. The most important trigger of seizures in epileptic patients was tapped suddenly the antiepileptic drug treatment. We found a false positive diagnosis in 33% of patients, and the most important confounding pathology was sincope and stroke. High percentaje of pathological findings in neuroimaging studies were found. Electroencefalographic and toxicological studies were performed less than is recommended.

  8. Ecstatic epileptic seizures: a glimpse into the multiple roles of the insula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eGschwind

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecstatic epileptic seizures are a rare but compelling epileptic entity. During the first seconds of these seizures, ecstatic auras provoke feelings of well-being, intense serenity, bliss, and enhanced self-awareness. They are associated with the impression of time dilation, and can be described as a mystic experience by some patients. The functional neuroanatomy of ecstatic seizures is still debated. During recent years several patients presenting with ecstatic auras have been reported by others and us (in total n=49; a few of them in the setting of presurgical evaluation including electrical brain stimulation. According to the recently recognized functions of the insula, and the results of nuclear brain imaging and electrical stimulation, the ecstatic symptoms in these patients seem to localize to a functional network centered around the anterior insular cortex, where we thus propose to locate this rare ictal phenomenon. Here we summarize the role of the multiple sensory, autonomic, affective and cognitive functions of the insular cortex, which are integrated into the creation of self-awareness, and we suggest how this system may become dysfunctional on several levels during ecstatic aura.

  9. EPILEPTIC SPASMS

    OpenAIRE

    K. Yu. Mukhin; M. B. Mironov

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic spasms are epileptic seizures with sudden flexion/extension or of the mixed flexion and extension type, mainly involving the proximal and truncal muscles, that are normally longer than myoclonic seizures but shorter than tonic seizures, and last for about 1 second. For diagnostics of epileptic spasms, it is necessary that they are combined with ictal and interictal epileptiform patterns on electroencephalography (EEG). The first detailed clinical description of seizures of the infan...

  10. Brain network dynamics characterization in epileptic seizures. Joint directed graph and pairwise synchronization measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A. C.; Machado, B. S.; Florence, G.; Hamad, A. P.; Sakamoto, A. C.; Fujita, A.; Baccalá, L. A.; Amaro, E.; Sameshima, K.

    2014-12-01

    Here we propose and evaluate a new approach to analyse multichannel mesial temporal lobe epilepsy EEG data from eight patients through complex network and synchronization theories. The method employs a Granger causality test to infer the directed connectivity graphs and a wavelet transform based phase synchronization measure whose characteristics allow studying dynamical transitions during epileptic seizures. We present a new combined graph measure that quantifies the level of network hub formation, called network hub out-degree, which closely reflects the level of synchronization observed during the ictus.

  11. Improved seizure control by alternating therapy of levetiracetam and valproate in epileptic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, E.A.; Edelbroek, P.M.; Gorter, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Tolerance to drug treatment is a serious problem in the treatment of epilepsy. We previously showed that tolerance to levetiracetam (LEV) developed within 4 days after the start of the treatment in a rat model for spontaneous seizures after electrically induced status epilepticus. In the

  12. Frontal lobe epileptic seizures are accompanied by elevated pitch during verbal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Iva; Echternach, Matthias; Sammler, Daniela; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2018-01-31

    The objective of our study was to assess alterations in speech as a possible localizing sign in frontal lobe epilepsy. Ictal speech was analyzed in 18 patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) during seizures and in the interictal period. Matched identical words were analyzed regarding alterations in fundamental frequency (ƒo) as an approximation of pitch. In patients with FLE, ƒo of ictal utterances was significantly higher than ƒo in interictal recordings (p = 0.016). Ictal ƒo increases occurred in both FLE of right and left seizure origin. In contrast, a matched temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) group showed less pronounced increases in ƒo, and only in patients with right-sided seizure foci. This study for the first time shows significant voice alterations in ictal speech in a cohort of patients with FLE. This may contribute to the localization of the epileptic focus. Increases in ƒo were interestingly found in frontal lobe seizures with origin in either hemisphere, suggesting a bilateral involvement to the planning of speech production, in contrast to a more right-sided lateralization of pitch perception in prosodic processing. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. SozRank: A new approach for localizing the epileptic seizure onset zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murin, Yonathan; Kim, Jeremy; Parvizi, Josef; Goldsmith, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting about 1% of the world population. For patients with focal seizures that cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs, the common treatment is a surgical procedure for removal of the seizure onset zone (SOZ). In this work we introduce an algorithm for automatic localization of the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in epileptic patients based on electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings. The proposed algorithm builds upon the hypothesis that the abnormal excessive (or synchronous) neuronal activity in the brain leading to seizures starts in the SOZ and then spreads to other areas in the brain. Thus, when this abnormal activity starts, signals recorded at electrodes close to the SOZ should have a relatively large causal influence on the rest of the recorded signals. The SOZ localization is executed in two steps. First, the algorithm represents the set of electrodes using a directed graph in which nodes correspond to recording electrodes and the edges' weights quantify the pair-wise causal influence between the recorded signals. Then, the algorithm infers the SOZ from the estimated graph using a variant of the PageRank algorithm followed by a novel post-processing phase. Inference results for 19 patients show a close match between the SOZ inferred by the proposed approach and the SOZ estimated by expert neurologists (success rate of 17 out of 19).

  14. SozRank: A new approach for localizing the epileptic seizure onset zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonathan Murin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting about 1% of the world population. For patients with focal seizures that cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs, the common treatment is a surgical procedure for removal of the seizure onset zone (SOZ. In this work we introduce an algorithm for automatic localization of the seizure onset zone (SOZ in epileptic patients based on electrocorticography (ECoG recordings. The proposed algorithm builds upon the hypothesis that the abnormal excessive (or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain leading to seizures starts in the SOZ and then spreads to other areas in the brain. Thus, when this abnormal activity starts, signals recorded at electrodes close to the SOZ should have a relatively large causal influence on the rest of the recorded signals. The SOZ localization is executed in two steps. First, the algorithm represents the set of electrodes using a directed graph in which nodes correspond to recording electrodes and the edges' weights quantify the pair-wise causal influence between the recorded signals. Then, the algorithm infers the SOZ from the estimated graph using a variant of the PageRank algorithm followed by a novel post-processing phase. Inference results for 19 patients show a close match between the SOZ inferred by the proposed approach and the SOZ estimated by expert neurologists (success rate of 17 out of 19.

  15. SCN8A Epileptic Encephalopathy: Detection of Fetal Seizures Guides Multidisciplinary Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Melanie A; Johnson, Julia; Huisman, Thierry A; Poretti, Andrea; Baranano, Kristin W; Baschat, Ahmet A; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2016-11-01

    SCN8A mutations are rare and cause a phenotypically heterogeneous early onset epilepsy known as early infantile epileptic encephalopathy type 13 (EIEE13, OMIM #614558). There are currently no clear genotype-phenotype correlations to help guide patient counseling and management. We describe a patient with EIEE13 (de novo heterozygous pathogenic mutation in SCN8A - p.Ile240Val (ATT>GTT)) who presented prenatally with maternally reported intermittent, rhythmic movements that, when observed on ultrasound, were concerning for fetal seizures. Ultrasound also revealed abnormal developmental states. With maternal administration of levetiracetam, the rhythmic fetal movements stopped. After birth, the patient developed treatment-refractory multi-focal epilepsy confirmed by electroencephalogram. Neuroimaging revealed restricted diffusion in the superior cerebellar peduncles, a finding not reported previously in EIEE13. This is the first report of EIEE13 associated with clinical prenatal-onset seizures. Ultrasonography can be useful for identifying fetal seizures, which may be treatable in utero. Ideally, the clinical approach to fetal seizures should involve a multidisciplinary team spanning the pre- and postnatal course to expedite early diagnosis and optimize management, as illustrated by this patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anion gap can differentiate between psychogenic and epileptic seizures in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Matzka, Liesl; Maranda, Louise; Weber, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Differentiation between psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and generalized convulsive epileptic seizures (ES) is important for appropriate triaging in the emergency department (ED). This can be difficult in the ED, as the event is often not witnessed by a medical professional. In the current study, we investigated whether anion gap (AG), bicarbonate, and the Denver Seizure Score (DSS) could differentiate between PNES and ES. Of a total of 1,354 subjects reviewed from a tertiary care medical center, 27 PNES and 27 ES patients were identified based on clinical description and subsequent electroencephalogram. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine whether there was an association between seizure type and AG, bicarbonate, or DSS (24-bicarbonate + 2 × [AG-12]) when samples were drawn within 24 h of the concerning event. The result showed that sensitivity and negative predictive value dropped markedly for all measures if samples were drawn >2 h after the event; the sensitivity was similar for AG and DSS and higher than for bicarbonate. We propose that AG > 10 (sensitivity of 81.8%, specificity of 100%) in the first 2 h after the event could be used as a potential tool in the ED to help differentiate between PNES and ES. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Electro-acupuncture improves epileptic seizures induced by kainic acid in taurine-depletion rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hong-Bing; Li, Bing; Gu, Jing; Cheng, Jie-Shi; Yang, Ru

    2005-01-01

    Electro-acupuncture (EA) partially inhibited epilepsy with great success. The biological basis underlying EA anti-convulsion remained uncertain, which resulted in limited application and slow improvement of acupuncture. Our previous study indicated that taurine may play an inhibitory role against epilepsy as an inhibitory amino acid in the central nervous system and EA may inhibit epilepsy via up-regulating the expression of taurine transporter to increase the release of taurine. Involvement of taurine in kainic acid (KA)-induced epilepsy and anti-convulsion of EA was further addressed on taurine deficiency animal in the present work. We instituted endogenous taurine-deficiency model by supplementation of beta-alanine (3%) in drinking water for continuous 10 days initially, injected KA into lateral cerebral ventricle to induce epileptic seizure, and performed EA treatment on DU26 "RenZhong" and K "YongQuan" acupoints by an EA apparatus (Model G6805-2) using successive waves with the frequency 64Hz and the current intensity 0.8-1.0 mA for 30 minutes in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Taurine levels markedly decreased in cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum of rats after beta-alanine administration by fluore-HPLC measurement. EA alleviated epileptic activity in rats at 3.5 h time point after KA injection, whereas beta-alanine-induced taurine depletion rendered rats more susceptible to KA-induced epilepsy. Taurine transporter level increased after EA treatment. These results suggested that taurine participated in epileptogenesis and EA may be related to taurine in controlling epileptic seizure.

  18. MICROARRAY PROFILE OF SEIZURE DAMAGE-REFRACTORY HIPPOCAMPAL CA3 IN A MOUSE MODEL OF EPILEPTIC PRECONDITIONING

    OpenAIRE

    HATAZAKI, S.; BELLVER-ESTELLES, C.; JIMENEZ-MATEOS, E. M.; MELLER, R.; BONNER, C.; MURPHY, N.; MATSUSHIMA, S.; TAKI, W.; PREHN, J. H. M.; SIMON, R. P.; HENSHALL, D. C.

    2007-01-01

    A neuroprotected state can be acquired by preconditioning brain with a stimulus that is subthreshold for damage (tolerance). Acquisition of tolerance involves coordinate, bi-directional changes to gene expression levels and the re-programmed phenotype is determined by the preconditioning stimulus. While best studied in ischemic brain there is evidence brief seizures can confer tolerance against prolonged seizures (status epilepticus). Presently, we developed a model of epileptic preconditioni...

  19. Automatic detection of epileptic seizures on the intra-cranial electroencephalogram of rats using reservoir computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteneers, Pieter; Verstraeten, David; van Mierlo, Pieter; Wyckhuys, Tine; Stroobandt, Dirk; Raedt, Robrecht; Hallez, Hans; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we propose a technique based on reservoir computing (RC) to mark epileptic seizures on the intra-cranial electroencephalogram (EEG) of rats. RC is a recurrent neural networks training technique which has been shown to possess good generalization properties with limited training. The system is evaluated on data containing two different seizure types: absence seizures from genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) and tonic-clonic seizures from kainate-induced temporal-lobe epilepsy rats. The dataset consists of 452hours from 23 GAERS and 982hours from 15 kainate-induced temporal-lobe epilepsy rats. During the preprocessing stage, several features are extracted from the EEG. A feature selection algorithm selects the best features, which are then presented as input to the RC-based classification algorithm. To classify the output of this algorithm a two-threshold technique is used. This technique is compared with other state-of-the-art techniques. A balanced error rate (BER) of 3.7% and 3.5% was achieved on the data from GAERS and kainate rats, respectively. This resulted in a sensitivity of 96% and 94% and a specificity of 96% and 99% respectively. The state-of-the-art technique for GAERS achieved a BER of 4%, whereas the best technique to detect tonic-clonic seizures achieved a BER of 16%. Our method outperforms up-to-date techniques and only a few parameters need to be optimized on a limited training set. It is therefore suited as an automatic aid for epilepsy researchers and is able to eliminate the tedious manual review and annotation of EEG. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Metallothionein reduces central nervous system inflammation, neurodegeneration, and cell death following kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Florit, Sergi; Giralt, Mercedes

    2005-01-01

    We examined metallothionein (MT)-induced neuroprotection during kainic acid (KA)-induced excitotoxicity by studying transgenic mice with MT-I overexpression (TgMT mice). KA induces epileptic seizures and hippocampal excitotoxicity, followed by inflammation and delayed brain damage. We show for th...

  1. Epileptic seizure detection from EEG signals with phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling and support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiang; Cai, Lihui; Chen, Yingyuan; Qin, Yingmei

    2018-03-01

    As a pattern of cross-frequency coupling (CFC), phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) depicts the interaction between the phase and amplitude of distinct frequency bands from the same signal, and has been proved to be closely related to the brain’s cognitive and memory activities. This work utilized PAC and support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify the epileptic seizures from electroencephalogram (EEG) data. The entropy-based modulation index (MI) matrixes are used to express the strength of PAC, from which we extracted features as the input for classifier. Based on the Bonn database, which contains five datasets of EEG segments obtained from healthy volunteers and epileptic subjects, a 100% classification accuracy is achieved for identifying seizure ictal from healthy data, and an accuracy of 97.67% is reached in the classification of ictal EEG signals from inter-ictal EEGs. Based on the CHB-MIT database which is a group of continuously recorded epileptic EEGs by scalp electrodes, a 97.50% classification accuracy is obtained and a raising sign of MI value is found at 6s before seizure onset. The classification performance in this work is effective, and PAC can be considered as a useful tool for detecting and predicting the epileptic seizures and providing reference for clinical diagnosis.

  2. Acute Renal Failure with Severe Loin Pain and Patchy Renal Vasoconstriction in a Patient without Hypouricemia, Provoked by Epileptic Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Michitaka; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Yamakawa, Taishi; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2017-01-01

    A 26-year-old Japanese man without hypouricemia and with 3 previous episodes of seizures concurrent with acute kidney injury (AKI) was admitted due to an epileptic seizure, lower back pain and AKI. His creatinine kinase levels were slightly elevated. Patchy renal ischemia on contrast-enhanced computed tomography and persistent residual contrast medium was observed, consistent with acute renal failure with severe loin pain and patchy renal ischemia after anaerobic exercise (ALPE). Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) demonstrated signal changes in the corresponding area. ALPE should be considered a cause of AKI following seizures. We recommend DWI as an alternative diagnostic modality.

  3. People with Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: A South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisma Pretorius

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES is a disabling disorder which has a negative effect on the quality of life of individuals with PNES. A clear understanding of the disorder is necessary, however, to date, research about PNES in South Africa is limited.Objectives: The aims of this study were to explore the demographic variables of individuals with PNES in South Africa, to review the available body of research on PNES, and to compare it with our results.Method: Twenty-two people with PNES, with confirmed video EEG, were recruited by means of convenience sampling from two hospitals. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the demographic variables of the participants.Results: Internationally comparable results revealed misdiagnoses and low treatment delivery amongst a primarily female population.Conclusion: This study provided greater insight into individuals with PNES in South Africa, highlighting the need for more information, support, effective treatment and accurate diagnosis of PNES.

  4. Trichotillomania and non-epileptic seizures as sleep-related dissociative phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Franco, Melina; Bush-Martínez, Alejandra; Nenclares-Portocarrero, Alejandro; Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro

    2015-03-15

    The occurrence of non-epileptic seizures (NES) and trichotillomania during sleep is rare. We describe the case of an adult woman with a personal history of childhood maltreatment and psychiatric morbidity (major depression, trichotillomania, and conversion disorder), who was referred to the sleep unit because of nocturnal hair-pulling and psychomotor agitation during sleep. An all-night PSG recording with audiovisual monitoring documented seven episodes of trichotillomania and one NES, all of which arose from unequivocal wakefulness. Improvement of nocturnal behaviors was observed after long-term psychotherapy. This case illustrates that nocturnal trichotillomania and NES may be symptoms of a sleep-related dissociative disorder. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  5. Are psychogenic non-epileptic seizures just another symptom of conversion disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Richard A A; Duncan, Roderick; Goldstein, Laura H; Jankovic, Joseph; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2017-05-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are classified with other functional neurological symptoms as 'Conversion Disorder', but there are reasons to wonder whether this symptomatology constitutes a distinct entity. We reviewed the literature comparing PNES with other functional neurological symptoms. We find eight studies that directly examined this question. Though all but one found significant differences-notably in presenting age, trauma history, and dissociation-they were divided on whether these differences represented an important distinction. We argue that the aetiological and mechanistic distinctions they support, particularly when bolstered by additional data, give reason to sustain a separation between these conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Vulnerability to psychogenic non-epileptic seizures is linked to low neuropeptide Y levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterdahl, Michael; Miani, Alessandro; Vercoe, Moana

    2017-01-01

    ) and PNES symptoms in women with a history of sexual abuse. NPY has been associated with resilience to stress and we hypothesized that low levels would increase the extent and severity of PNES symptoms in this patient population. Serum levels of NPY, and related hormones were measured in fifteen female PNES......Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is a conversion disorder that reflects underlying psychological distress. Female patients with PNES often present with a history of prolonged stressors, especially sexual abuse. In the current study, we studied the relationship between neuropeptide Y (NPY...... patients and sixty female controls. PNES patients reported more severe abuse histories, feeling of abandonment, and decreased perception of quality of life than controls. Importantly, they also had lower NPY levels. Our analysis indicates that low levels of NPY in PNES may confer greater vulnerability...

  7. An integrative view of mechanisms underlying generalized spike-and-wave epileptic seizures and its implication on optimal therapeutic treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyuan Yan

    Full Text Available Many types of epileptic seizures are characterized by generalized spike-and-wave discharges. In the past, notable effort has been devoted to understanding seizure dynamics and various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, by taking an integrative view of the underlying mechanisms, we demonstrate that epileptic seizures can be generated by many different combinations of synaptic strengths and intrinsic membrane properties. This integrative view has important medical implications: the specific state of a patient characterized by a set of biophysical characteristics ultimately determines the optimal therapeutic treatment. Through the same view, we further demonstrate the potentiation effect of rational polypharmacy in the treatment of epilepsy and provide a new angle to resolve the debate on polypharmacy. Our results underscore the need for personalized medicine and demonstrate that computer modeling and simulation may play an important role in assisting the clinicians in selecting the optimal treatment on an individual basis.

  8. A Case of Habitual Neck Compression Induced Electroencephalogram Abnormalities: Differentiating from Epileptic Seizures Using a Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hongyoon; Seo, Minseok; Lee, Hoyoung; Kim, Youngsoo; Yun, Changho; Kim, Sangeun; Park, Sungho

    2014-01-01

    Self-induced hypoxia has been reported particularly in adolescents, and it can result in neurological injury. Here, we present a case of electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities induced by habitual neck compression differentiated from epileptic seizures by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. A 19-year-old male was admitted for evaluation of recurrent generalized tonic-clonic seizures. No interictal EEG abnormality was detected; however, abnormal slow delta waves were found immediately after habitual right neck compression. To differentiate EEG abnormalities due to a hemodynamic deficit induced by habitual neck compression from an epileptic seizure, Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT was performed immediately after right carotid artery compression. Abnormal delta waves were triggered, and cerebral hypoperfusion in the right internal carotid artery territory was detected on Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. The slow delta wave detected on the EEG resulted from the cerebral hypoperfusion because of the habitual neck compression

  9. Mice with conditional NeuroD1 knockout display reduced aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis but no change in epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulet, Rebecca; Zhu, Jingfei; Aktar, Mahafuza; Hsieh, Jenny; Cho, Kyung-Ok

    2017-07-01

    Adult neurogenesis is significantly increased in the hippocampus of rodent models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). These adult-generated neurons have recently been shown to play a contributing role in the development of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). In order to eventually target pro-epileptic adult neurogenesis in the clinical setting, it will be important to identify molecular players involved in the control of aberrant neurogenesis after seizures. Here, we focused on NeuroD1 (ND1), a member of the bHLH family of transcription factors previously shown to play an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of adult-generated neurons in the hippocampus. Wild-type mice treated with pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus (SE) showed a significant up-regulation of NeuroD1+ immature neuroblasts located in both the granule cell layer (GCL), and ectopically localized to the hilar region of the hippocampus. As expected, conditional knockout (cKO) of NeuroD1 in Nestin-expressing stem/progenitors and their progeny led to a reduction in the number of NeuroD1+ adult-generated neurons after pilocarpine treatment compared to WT littermates. Surprisingly, there was no change in SRS in NeuroD1 cKO mice, suggesting that NeuroD1 cKO fails to reduce aberrant neurogenesis below the threshold needed to impact SRS. Consistent with this conclusion, the total number of adult-generated neurons in the pilocarpine model, especially the total number of Prox1+ hilar ectopic granule cells were unchanged after NeuroD1 cKO, suggesting strategies to reduce SRS will need to achieve a greater removal of aberrant adult-generated neurons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A systematic review of epileptic seizures in adults with subdural haematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Sae-Yeon; Konczalla, Juergen; Dubinski, Daniel; Cattani, Adriano; Cuca, Colleen; Seifert, Volker; Rosenow, Felix; Strzelczyk, Adam; Freiman, Thomas M

    2017-02-01

    Posttraumatic epileptic seizures (PTS) are a serious complication in patients with subdural haematoma (SDH). However, to date, several studies have shown discordances about SDH-associated seizures in terms of incidence, risk factors and prophylactic antiepileptic treatment. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence, risk factors of PTS and the role of prophylactic antiepileptic treatment in patients with SDH. A systematic literature review examining PTS in patients with SDH was performed using PubMed gateway, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Excerpta Medica dataBASE between September 1961 and February 2016. Search terms included subdural haematoma, seizure, epilepsy, prophylactic antiepileptic drugs, anticonvulsive medication, and risk factors. Human-based clinical studies focusing on epileptic seizures in patients with SDH. PRISMA statements were used for assessing data quality. Two independent reviewers extracted data from included studies and disagreement was solved by consensus. Twenty-four studies were identified for inclusion into the study. Overall incidence of early PTS (ePTS) and late PTS (lPTS)/2 years was 28% and 43% in acute SDH (aSDH) whereas the incidence of e- and lPTS was lower in chronic SDH (cSDH; 5.3% vs. 10%). Overall risk factors for PTS in patients with aSDH were: 24h postoperative Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) score below 9 (OR 10.5), craniotomy (OR 3.9), preoperative GCS below 8 (OR 3.1). In patients with cSDH the risk factors were alcohol abuse (OR 14.3), change of mental status (OR 7.2), previous stroke (OR 5.3) and density of haematoma in computer tomography (OR 3.8). Age, sex, haematoma size/side and midline shifts were not significant risk factors for PTS in both types of SDH. In prevention of PTS phenytoin and levetiracetam showed similar efficacy (OR 1.3), whereas levetiracetam was associated with significantly lower adverse effects (OR 0.1). Most of the studies were of retrospective nature with a small sample

  11. Ngram-derived pattern recognition for the detection and prediction of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Eftekhar

    Full Text Available This work presents a new method that combines symbol dynamics methodologies with an Ngram algorithm for the detection and prediction of epileptic seizures. The presented approach specifically applies Ngram-based pattern recognition, after data pre-processing, with similarity metrics, including the Hamming distance and Needlman-Wunsch algorithm, for identifying unique patterns within epochs of time. Pattern counts within each epoch are used as measures to determine seizure detection and prediction markers. Using 623 hours of intracranial electrocorticogram recordings from 21 patients containing a total of 87 seizures, the sensitivity and false prediction/detection rates of this method are quantified. Results are quantified using individual seizures within each case for training of thresholds and prediction time windows. The statistical significance of the predictive power is further investigated. We show that the method presented herein, has significant predictive power in up to 100% of temporal lobe cases, with sensitivities of up to 70-100% and low false predictions (dependant on training procedure. The cases of highest false predictions are found in the frontal origin with 0.31-0.61 false predictions per hour and with significance in 18 out of 21 cases. On average, a prediction sensitivity of 93.81% and false prediction rate of approximately 0.06 false predictions per hour are achieved in the best case scenario. This compares to previous work utilising the same data set that has shown sensitivities of up to 40-50% for a false prediction rate of less than 0.15/hour.

  12. Controlled test for predictive power of Lyapunov exponents: their inability to predict epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Cheng; Harrison, Mary Ann F; Frei, Mark G; Osorio, Ivan

    2004-09-01

    Lyapunov exponents are a set of fundamental dynamical invariants characterizing a system's sensitive dependence on initial conditions. For more than a decade, it has been claimed that the exponents computed from electroencephalogram (EEG) or electrocorticogram (ECoG) signals can be used for prediction of epileptic seizures minutes or even tens of minutes in advance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictive power of Lyapunov exponents. Three approaches are employed. (1) We present qualitative arguments suggesting that the Lyapunov exponents generally are not useful for seizure prediction. (2) We construct a two-dimensional, nonstationary chaotic map with a parameter slowly varying in a range containing a crisis, and test whether this critical event can be predicted by monitoring the evolution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents. This can thus be regarded as a "control test" for the claimed predictive power of the exponents for seizure. We find that two major obstacles arise in this application: statistical fluctuations of the Lyapunov exponents due to finite time computation and noise from the time series. We show that increasing the amount of data in a moving window will not improve the exponents' detective power for characteristic system changes, and that the presence of small noise can ruin completely the predictive power of the exponents. (3) We report negative results obtained from ECoG signals recorded from patients with epilepsy. All these indicate firmly that, the use of Lyapunov exponents for seizure prediction is practically impossible as the brain dynamical system generating the ECoG signals is more complicated than low-dimensional chaotic systems, and is noisy. Copyright 2004 American Institute of Physics

  13. Efficient feature selection using a hybrid algorithm for the task of epileptic seizure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kee Huong; Zainuddin, Zarita; Ong, Pauline

    2014-07-01

    Feature selection is a very important aspect in the field of machine learning. It entails the search of an optimal subset from a very large data set with high dimensional feature space. Apart from eliminating redundant features and reducing computational cost, a good selection of feature also leads to higher prediction and classification accuracy. In this paper, an efficient feature selection technique is introduced in the task of epileptic seizure detection. The raw data are electroencephalography (EEG) signals. Using discrete wavelet transform, the biomedical signals were decomposed into several sets of wavelet coefficients. To reduce the dimension of these wavelet coefficients, a feature selection method that combines the strength of both filter and wrapper methods is proposed. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as part of the filter method. As for wrapper method, the evolutionary harmony search (HS) algorithm is employed. This metaheuristic method aims at finding the best discriminating set of features from the original data. The obtained features were then used as input for an automated classifier, namely wavelet neural networks (WNNs). The WNNs model was trained to perform a binary classification task, that is, to determine whether a given EEG signal was normal or epileptic. For comparison purposes, different sets of features were also used as input. Simulation results showed that the WNNs that used the features chosen by the hybrid algorithm achieved the highest overall classification accuracy.

  14. Early childhood trauma and hippocampal volumes in patients with epileptic and psychogenic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Benjamin; Velakoulis, Dennis; Yuan, Cheng Yi; Ang, Anthony; Steward, Chris; Desmond, Patricia; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to early life childhood trauma has been implicated as resulting in a vulnerability to epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), hippocampal atrophy, and psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to explore the relationships between childhood trauma, epilepsy, PNES, and hippocampal volume in patients admitted to a video-electroencephalogram monitoring (VEM) unit. One hundred thirty-one patients were recruited from the Royal Melbourne Hospital VEM unit. The diagnostic breakdown of this group was: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (32), other epilepsy syndromes (35), PNES (47), other nonepileptic syndromes (5), both epilepsy and PNES (6), and uncertain diagnosis (6). All patients completed a questionnaire assessing exposure to childhood trauma, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), as well as questionnaires assessing psychiatric symptomatology (SCL-90-R), Anxiety and Depression (HADS), quality of life (QOLIE-98) and cognition (NUCOG). Volumetric coronal T1 MRI scans were available for 84 patients. Hippocampal volumes were manually traced by a blinded operator. The prevalence of childhood trauma in patients with PNES was higher than in patients with other diagnoses (p=0.005), and the group with PNES overall scored significantly higher on the CTQ (p=0.002). No association was found between CTQ scores and hippocampal volumes; however, patients with a history of sexual abuse were found to have smaller left hippocampal volumes than patients who had not (p=0.043). Patients reporting having experienced childhood trauma scored lower on measures of quality of life and higher on measures of psychiatric symptomatology. Patients with PNES report having experienced significantly more childhood trauma than those with epileptic seizures, and in both groups there was a relationship between a history of having experienced sexual abuse and reduced left hippocampal volume. Patients with PNES and those with epilepsy who have a history of childhood trauma have overall

  15. Automatic epileptic seizure detection in EEGs using MF-DFA, SVM based on cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongnan; Wen, Tingxi; Huang, Wei; Wang, Meihong; Li, Chunfeng

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease with transient brain dysfunction that results from the sudden abnormal discharge of neurons in the brain. Since electroencephalogram (EEG) is a harmless and noninvasive detection method, it plays an important role in the detection of neurological diseases. However, the process of analyzing EEG to detect neurological diseases is often difficult because the brain electrical signals are random, non-stationary and nonlinear. In order to overcome such difficulty, this study aims to develop a new computer-aided scheme for automatic epileptic seizure detection in EEGs based on multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) and support vector machine (SVM). New scheme first extracts features from EEG by MF-DFA during the first stage. Then, the scheme applies a genetic algorithm (GA) to calculate parameters used in SVM and classify the training data according to the selected features using SVM. Finally, the trained SVM classifier is exploited to detect neurological diseases. The algorithm utilizes MLlib from library of SPARK and runs on cloud platform. Applying to a public dataset for experiment, the study results show that the new feature extraction method and scheme can detect signals with less features and the accuracy of the classification reached up to 99%. MF-DFA is a promising approach to extract features for analyzing EEG, because of its simple algorithm procedure and less parameters. The features obtained by MF-DFA can represent samples as well as traditional wavelet transform and Lyapunov exponents. GA can always find useful parameters for SVM with enough execution time. The results illustrate that the classification model can achieve comparable accuracy, which means that it is effective in epileptic seizure detection.

  16. The effect of electroacupuncture on spontaneous recurrent seizure and expression of GAD(67) mRNA in dentate gyrus in a rat model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianjun; Liu, Jianhua; Fu, Wenbin; Ma, Wentao; Xu, Zhenhua; Yuan, Mingquan; Song, Jian; Hu, Jiming

    2008-01-10

    Concerns regarding the side effects of pharmacological approaches have recently increased interest in the use of acupuncture for treatment of epilepsy. Although clinical evidence for the acupunctural anti-epileptic effect has been demonstrated, the precise mechanism still remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on spontaneous recurrent seizure (SRS) and expression of GAD(67) mRNA in dentate gyrus (DG) in epileptic rats. EA at bilateral acupoints of Zusanli (St36) was administered. Two sham EA controls were set: sham EA at bilateral nearby nonacupoints in the hamstring muscles, and sham EA at bilateral St36 without electrical stimulation. Lithium-pilocarpine injection was performed to establish the rat model of epilepsy at the 1st day. Three time points were set according to the day when the rats were killed (30th, 45th, 60th day). The results showed that EA at St36 significantly reduced the times of spontaneous recurrent seizure, neither of the two sham EA controls displayed significant effect on spontaneous recurrent seizure. Moreover, EA at St36 significantly elevated the expression of GAD(67) mRNA in DG granule cell layer (GCL), but not in the hilus; neither of the two sham controls showed significant effect on the expression of GAD(67) mRNA in granule cell layer or hilus. The findings suggest that EA at St36 possess some curative effect on epileptic rats, related with change of GAD(67) mRNA level in DG region.

  17. Repeat interruptions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 expansions are strongly associated with epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Karen N.; Liu, Jilin; Landrian, Ivette; Zeng, Desmond; Raskin, Salmo; Moscovich, Mariana; Gatto, Emilia M.; Ochoa, Adriana; Teive, Hélio A. G.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is the result of a non-coding, pentanucleotide repeat expansion within intron 9 of the Ataxin 10 gene. SCA10 patients present with pure cerebellar ataxia; yet, some families also have a high incidence of epilepsy. SCA10 expansions containing penta- and heptanucleotide interruption motifs, termed “ATCCT interruptions,” experience large contractions during germline transmission, particularly in paternal lineages. At the same time, these alleles confer an earlier age at onset which contradicts traditional rules of genetic anticipation in repeat expansions. Previously, ATCCT interruptions have been associated with a higher prevalence of epileptic seizures in one Mexican-American SCA10 family. In a large cohort of SCA10 families, we analyzed whether ATCCT interruptions confers a greater risk for developing seizures in these families. Notably, we find that the presence of repeat interruptions within the SCA10 expansion confers a 6.3-fold increase in the risk of an SCA10 patient developing epilepsy (6.2-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only) and a 13.7-fold increase in having a positive family history of epilepsy (10.5-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only). We conclude that the presence of repeat interruptions in SCA10 repeat expansion indicates a significant risk for the epilepsy phenotype and should be considered during genetic counseling. PMID:24318420

  18. Slow moving neural source in the epileptic hippocampus can mimic progression of human seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia-Chu; Wei, Xile; Ananthakrishnan, Arvind Keshav; Shivacharan, Rajat S; Gonzalez-Reyes, Luis E; Zhang, Mingming; Durand, Dominique M

    2018-01-24

    Fast and slow neural waves have been observed to propagate in the human brain during seizures. Yet the nature of these waves is difficult to study in a surgical setting. Here, we report an observation of two different traveling waves propagating in the in-vitro epileptic hippocampus at speeds similar to those in the human brain. A fast traveling spike and a slow moving wave were recorded simultaneously with a genetically encoded voltage sensitive fluorescent protein (VSFP Butterfly 1.2) and a high speed camera. The results of this study indicate that the fast traveling spike is NMDA-sensitive but the slow moving wave is not. Image analysis and model simulation demonstrate that the slow moving wave is moving slowly, generating the fast traveling spike and is, therefore, a moving source of the epileptiform activity. This slow moving wave is associated with a propagating neural calcium wave detected with calcium dye (OGB-1) but is independent of NMDA receptors, not related to ATP release, and much faster than those previously recorded potassium waves. Computer modeling suggests that the slow moving wave can propagate by the ephaptic effect like epileptiform activity. These findings provide an alternative explanation for slow propagation seizure wavefronts associated with fast propagating spikes.

  19. Failure of Adaptive Self-Organized Criticality during Epileptic Seizure Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Christian; Storch, Alexander; Hallmeyer-Elgner, Susanne; Bullmore, Ed; Gross, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Critical dynamics are assumed to be an attractive mode for normal brain functioning as information processing and computational capabilities are found to be optimal in the critical state. Recent experimental observations of neuronal activity patterns following power-law distributions, a hallmark of systems at a critical state, have led to the hypothesis that human brain dynamics could be poised at a phase transition between ordered and disordered activity. A so far unresolved question concerns the medical significance of critical brain activity and how it relates to pathological conditions. Using data from invasive electroencephalogram recordings from humans we show that during epileptic seizure attacks neuronal activity patterns deviate from the normally observed power-law distribution characterizing critical dynamics. The comparison of these observations to results from a computational model exhibiting self-organized criticality (SOC) based on adaptive networks allows further insights into the underlying dynamics. Together these results suggest that brain dynamics deviates from criticality during seizures caused by the failure of adaptive SOC. PMID:22241971

  20. [A modified approach to the diagnosis and therapy of epileptic seizures in the third stage of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavranović, Muhamed; Delilović, Jasminka; Kurtović, Azra; Alibegović, Sakib; Rajić, Zeljka; Ajanović, Zakira

    2003-01-01

    Incidence of seizures in the elderly is nowadays greater than the one characteristic for children up to 10 years of age. Epileptic seizures are the third most common serious neurological disorder in this age group, after stroke and dementia. Optimal care for those patients, regarding to the seizures, demands some modification in diagnostic and treatment approach. Aim of this report was to point out problems in diagnostics, treatment and most common mistakes in practice. Fifty one patients were assessed, aged 65-83 years, (30 female and 21 male), with diagnosis of epilepsy and established antiepileptic treatment. All patients were re-examined, and following procedures were utilised: auto and heteroanamnesis (especially data provided by eyewitnesses), clinical examination, biochemical status, complete cardiological examination, EEG registration, serum concentrations of antiepileptic drugs, CT and MRI scan. Out of 51 patients 11 were misdiagnosed (syncope, provoked seizures, TIA). The most common form of seizures were partial seizures with or without secondary generalization (31 cases). Etiologic factors: stroke (25 cases), arteriosclerosis (7 cases), tumours (3 cases), trauma (2 cases), unknown (3 cases) cardiovascular diseases (29 casec) diabetes mellitus (20 cases), respiratory disturbance (12 cases) renal disturbances (8 cases). Only 30 patients had monotherapy from the beginning, with either carbamazepine or valproate. Rest were treated from the beginning with 2 antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital + carbamazepine or pheytoin + phenobarbital). Adverse effects were recorded in 21 patients. I. It is crucial to distingiush unprovoked and provoked seizures during diagnostic procedures, as well as epileptic and non-epileptic attacks; 2. Principle of monotherapy is conditio sine qua non, and in treatment attention should be paid to co-morbidity, multitherapy, drug interactions, intoxication, diminished detoxication and elimination of drugs, as well as increased

  1. SCN8A mutations in Chinese patients with early onset epileptic encephalopathy and benign infantile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaping; Gao, Hua; Bao, Xinhua; Zhang, Qingping; Li, Jiarui; Wei, Liping; Wu, Xiru; Chen, Yan; Yu, Shujie

    2017-09-18

    SCN8A mutations have recently been associated with epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders. This study aimed to broaden the phenotypic-spectrum of disease related with SCN8A mutations. To identify the pathogenic gene of a Chinese family, in which six members suffered from epilepsy, whole-exome sequencing was performed. In addition, target next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed on 178 sporadic patients, who had epilepsy of unknown etiology within 6 months after birth. A detailed clinical history was obtained. A heterozygous missense mutation of SCN8A was identified in the Chinese family. Six de novo mutations of SCN8A were detected in 6 sporadic patients with epilepsy. In the family, six members developed seizures within a few years after birth. Five of them had milder clinical performance, that they had normal cognition and developmental milestones, and seizure-free was achieved by mono-therapy. The other one affected member presented with refractory epilepsy and developmental regression. She died from sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) at 17-year-old. Clinical features of six sporadic patients with SCN8A mutations were diverse, ranging from severe epileptic encephalopathy to benign epilepsy with normal cognition. Seizures started at the mean age of 3.9 months (from 2 months to 6 months). Seizure-free was achieved in four of them by mono- or multi-antiepileptic drugs. Five of them demonstrated mild or severe psychomotor retardation, whereas the other one was normal in development and intelligence. Our findings extend the spectrum of SCN8A mutations and the clinical features of patients with SCN8A mutations. The majority of SCN8A mutations were de novo, inherited mutations from the heterozygous parents can also occur. The phenotypic spectrum of SCN8A mutation varied largely. Most affected patients manifested as refractory epilepsy and severe intellectual disability, only a small number of patients presented with milder clinical patterns

  2. Preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate gyrus principal neurons in the dorsal hippocampus before spontaneous seizures in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Satoshi; Toyoda, Izumi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2014-12-10

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy might be preceded by increased action potential firing of hippocampal neurons. Preictal activity is potentially important because it might provide new opportunities for predicting when a seizure is about to occur and insight into how spontaneous seizures are generated. We evaluated local field potentials and unit activity of single, putative excitatory neurons in the subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Average action potential firing rates of neurons in the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, increased significantly and progressively beginning 2-4 min before locally recorded spontaneous seizures. In the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, 41-57% of neurons displayed increased preictal activity with significant consistency across multiple seizures. Much of the increased preictal firing of neurons in the subiculum and CA1 correlated with preictal theta activity, whereas preictal firing of neurons in the dentate gyrus was independent of theta. In addition, some CA1 and dentate gyrus neurons displayed reduced firing rates preictally. These results reveal that different hippocampal subregions exhibit differences in the extent and potential underlying mechanisms of preictal activity. The finding of robust and significantly consistent preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate neurons in the dorsal hippocampus, despite the likelihood that many seizures initiated in other brain regions, suggests the existence of a broader neuronal network whose activity changes minutes before spontaneous seizures initiate. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416671-17$15.00/0.

  3. Microarray profile of seizure damage-refractory hippocampal CA3 in a mouse model of epileptic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatazaki, S; Bellver-Estelles, C; Jimenez-Mateos, E M; Meller, R; Bonner, C; Murphy, N; Matsushima, S; Taki, W; Prehn, J H M; Simon, R P; Henshall, D C

    2007-12-05

    A neuroprotected state can be acquired by preconditioning brain with a stimulus that is subthreshold for damage (tolerance). Acquisition of tolerance involves coordinate, bi-directional changes to gene expression levels and the re-programmed phenotype is determined by the preconditioning stimulus. While best studied in ischemic brain there is evidence brief seizures can confer tolerance against prolonged seizures (status epilepticus). Presently, we developed a model of epileptic preconditioning in mice and used microarrays to gain insight into the transcriptional phenotype within the target hippocampus at the time tolerance had been acquired. Epileptic tolerance was induced by an episode of non-damaging seizures in adult C57Bl/6 mice using a systemic injection of kainic acid. Neuron and DNA damage-positive cell counts 24 h after status epilepticus induced by intraamygdala microinjection of kainic acid revealed preconditioning given 24 h prior reduced CA3 neuronal death by approximately 45% compared with non-tolerant seizure mice. Microarray analysis of over 39,000 transcripts (Affymetrix 430 2.0 chip) from microdissected CA3 subfields was undertaken at the point at which tolerance was acquired. Results revealed a unique profile of small numbers of equivalently up- and down-regulated genes with biological functions that included transport and localization, ubiquitin metabolism, apoptosis and cell cycle control. Select microarray findings were validated post hoc by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The present study defines a paradigm for inducing epileptic preconditioning in mice and first insight into the global transcriptome of the seizure-damage refractory brain.

  4. The role of driver nodes in managing epileptic seizures: Application of Kuramoto model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Ali; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Bakouie, Fatemeh

    2017-04-21

    Synchronization is an important global phenomenon which could be found in a wide range of complex systems such as brain or electronic devices. However, in some circumstances the synchronized states are not desirable for the system and should be suppressed. For example, excessively synchronized activities in the brain network could be the root of neuronal disorders like epileptic seizures. According to the controllability theory of the complex networks, a minimum set of driver nodes has the ability to control the entire system. In this study, we examine the role of driver nodes in suppressing the excessive synchronization in a generalized Kuramoto model, which consists of two types of oscillators: contrarian and regular ones. We used two different structural topologies: Barabási-Albert scale-free (BASF) network and Caenorhabditis elegans (C.elegans) neuronal network. Our results show that contrarian driver nodes have the sufficient ability to break the synchronized level of the systems. In this case, the system coherency level is not fully suppressed that is avoiding dysfunctions of normal brain functions which require the neuronal synchronized activities. Moreover, in this case, the oscillators grouped in two distinct synchronized clusters that could be an indication of chaotic behavior of the system known as resting-state activity of the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Large-Scale Modeling of Epileptic Seizures: Scaling Properties of Two Parallel Neuronal Network Simulation Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo L. Pesce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our limited understanding of the relationship between the behavior of individual neurons and large neuronal networks is an important limitation in current epilepsy research and may be one of the main causes of our inadequate ability to treat it. Addressing this problem directly via experiments is impossibly complex; thus, we have been developing and studying medium-large-scale simulations of detailed neuronal networks to guide us. Flexibility in the connection schemas and a complete description of the cortical tissue seem necessary for this purpose. In this paper we examine some of the basic issues encountered in these multiscale simulations. We have determined the detailed behavior of two such simulators on parallel computer systems. The observed memory and computation-time scaling behavior for a distributed memory implementation were very good over the range studied, both in terms of network sizes (2,000 to 400,000 neurons and processor pool sizes (1 to 256 processors. Our simulations required between a few megabytes and about 150 gigabytes of RAM and lasted between a few minutes and about a week, well within the capability of most multinode clusters. Therefore, simulations of epileptic seizures on networks with millions of cells should be feasible on current supercomputers.

  6. Fuzzy topological digital space and digital fuzzy spline of electroencephalography during epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mazlina Muzafar; Wahab, Abdul Fatah

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy disease occurs because of there is a temporary electrical disturbance in a group of brain cells (nurons). The recording of electrical signals come from the human brain which can be collected from the scalp of the head is called Electroencephalography (EEG). EEG then considered in digital format and in fuzzy form makes it a fuzzy digital space data form. The purpose of research is to identify the area (curve and surface) in fuzzy digital space affected by inside epilepsy seizure in epileptic patient's brain. The main focus for this research is to generalize fuzzy topological digital space, definition and basic operation also the properties by using digital fuzzy set and the operations. By using fuzzy digital space, the theory of digital fuzzy spline can be introduced to replace grid data that has been use previously to get better result. As a result, the flat of EEG can be fuzzy topological digital space and this type of data can be use to interpolate the digital fuzzy spline.

  7. Risk factors for learning problems in youth with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Julia; Caplan, Rochelle; Siddarth, Prabha; Bursch, Brenda; Falcone, Tatiana; Forgey, Marcy; Hinman, Kyle; Curt LaFrance, W; Laptook, Rebecca; Shaw, Richard; Weisbrot, Deborah; Willis, Matthew; Plioplys, Sigita

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the risk factors for learning problems (LP) in pediatric psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and their specificity by comparing psychopathology, medical, cognitive/linguistic/achievement, bullying history, and parent education variables between subjects with PNES with and without LP and between subjects with PNES and siblings with LP. 55 subjects with PNES and 35 siblings, aged 8-18years, underwent cognitive, linguistic, and achievement testing, and completed somatization and anxiety sensitivity questionnaires. A semi-structured psychiatric interview about the child was administered to each subject and parent. Child self-report and/or parent report provided information on the presence/absence of LP. Parents also provided each subject's medical, psychiatric, family, and bullying history information. Sixty percent (33/55) of the PNES and 49% (17/35) of the sibling subjects had LP. A multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that bullying and impaired formulation of a sentence using a stimulus picture and stimulus word were significantly associated with increased likelihood of LP in the PNES youth. In terms of the specificity of the LP risk factors, a similar analysis comparing LP in the youth with PNES and sibling groups identified anxiety disorder diagnoses and bullying as the significant risk factors associated with LP in the PNES youth. These findings emphasize the need to assess youth with PNES for LP, particularly if they have experienced bullying, have linguistic deficits, and meet criteria for anxiety disorder diagnoses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: so-called psychiatric comorbidity and underlying defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghi, Massimiliano; Negrini, Paola Beffa; Perin, Cecilia; Peroni, Federica; Magaudda, Adriana; Cerri, Cesare; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria

    2015-01-01

    In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) do not have a unique classification as they can be found within different categories: conversion, dissociative, and somatization disorders. The ICD-10, instead, considers PNES within dissociative disorders, merging the dissociative disorders and conversion disorders, although the underlying defense mechanisms are different. The literature data show that PNES are associated with cluster B (mainly borderline) personality disorders and/or to people with depressive or anxiety disorders. Defense mechanisms in patients with PNES with a prevalence of anxious/depressive symptoms are of "neurotic" type; their goal is to lead to a "split", either vertical (dissociation) or horizontal (repression). The majority of patients with this type of PNES have alexithymia traits, meaning that they had difficulties in feeling or perceiving emotions. In subjects where PNES are associated with a borderline personality, in which the symbolic function is lost, the defense mechanisms are of a more archaic nature (denial). PNES with different underlying defense mechanisms have different prognoses (despite similar severity of PNES) and need usually a different treatment (pharmacological or psychological). Thus, it appears superfluous to talk about psychiatric comorbidity, since PNES are a different symptomatic expression of specific psychiatric disorders.

  9. Large-scale modeling of epileptic seizures: scaling properties of two parallel neuronal network simulation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Lorenzo L; Lee, Hyong C; Hereld, Mark; Visser, Sid; Stevens, Rick L; Wildeman, Albert; van Drongelen, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Our limited understanding of the relationship between the behavior of individual neurons and large neuronal networks is an important limitation in current epilepsy research and may be one of the main causes of our inadequate ability to treat it. Addressing this problem directly via experiments is impossibly complex; thus, we have been developing and studying medium-large-scale simulations of detailed neuronal networks to guide us. Flexibility in the connection schemas and a complete description of the cortical tissue seem necessary for this purpose. In this paper we examine some of the basic issues encountered in these multiscale simulations. We have determined the detailed behavior of two such simulators on parallel computer systems. The observed memory and computation-time scaling behavior for a distributed memory implementation were very good over the range studied, both in terms of network sizes (2,000 to 400,000 neurons) and processor pool sizes (1 to 256 processors). Our simulations required between a few megabytes and about 150 gigabytes of RAM and lasted between a few minutes and about a week, well within the capability of most multinode clusters. Therefore, simulations of epileptic seizures on networks with millions of cells should be feasible on current supercomputers.

  10. METALS IN THE METABOLISM OF HIPPOCAMPUS AND ROLE OF ZINC IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Kuchkovsky

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Physiological mechanisms of convulsions status during epilepsy or episindrom significantly different from the mechanisms, which were describe for other disorders associated with glutamatergic system, such as schizophrenia (a decrease of glutamate in neurons and increased dopaminergic load, drug addiction and alcoholism (the formation of endogenous opioids and dopamine, strengthening the role of GABA-ergic system. With glutamatergic transmission are сconnect not only convulsive state, but also the realization of higher integrative functions. Therefore, the development of epilepsy, particularly  which caused glutamate, implemented by activating Zn-ergic hippocampal neurons, associate with complex changes in human mental functions. Based on a scientific literature about  of the role of chelating zinc in the mechanisms of glutamatergic transmission, we can  suggest it participation in the mechanisms of formation of epilepsy  convulsions. In experience on animals, was show that in the animal organism of stressing correlative changes observe zinc content and secretory material in the hippocampus, Paneth cells  and B cells of pancreas. The nature of the changes depend on the stressor. When this change of zinc content in the hippocampus and hypothalamus (as the main regulator of stress reaction were multidirectional that this can be explained by the release of metal together with secretory material in the hypothalamus into the bloodstream. Research epileptic activity  of hippocampus by administering to the animal chelate 8 BSQ allowed to establish the dependence between convulsant action  and first  stress condition of the animal. Evocation of stress by 8-BSQ and physical activity, immobilization and alcohol abuse found that the convulsive effect of this reagent during intravitreal research increased in the case of prior exposure by specified kinds of stressors. In this pre-convulsive effect on exertion increased by 266% and the zinc content

  11. Electric Stimulation of Ear Reduces the Effect of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathway on Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures in Rats

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    En-Tzu Liao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common clinical syndrome with recurrent neuronal discharges in the temporal lobe, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus. Clinical antiepileptic medicines are often ineffective or of little benefit in 30% of epileptic patients and usually cause severe side effects. Emerging evidence indicates the crucial role of inflammatory mediators in epilepsy. The current study investigates the role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and its underlying mechanisms in kainic acid- (KA- induced epileptic seizures in rats. Experimental KA injection successfully initiated an epileptic seizure accompanied by increased expression of TLR4 in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and somatosensory cortex. In addition, calcium-sensitive phosphorylated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα increased after the initiation of the epileptic seizure. Furthermore, downstream-phosphorylated signal-regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK, and p38 kinase simultaneously increased in these brain areas. Moreover, the transcriptional factor phosphorylated nuclear factor-κB (pNF-κB increased, suggesting that nucleus transcription was affected. Furthermore, the aforementioned molecules decreased by an electric stimulation (ES of either 2 Hz or 15 Hz of the ear in the three brain areas. Accordingly, we suggest that ES of the ear can successfully control epileptic seizures by regulating the TLR4 signaling pathway and has a therapeutic benefit in reducing epileptic seizures.

  12. Selecting Statistical Characteristics of Brain Signals to Detect Epileptic Seizures using Discrete Wavelet Transform and Perceptron Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Abbasi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram signals (EEG have always been used in medical diagnosis. Evaluation of the statistical characteristics of EEG signals is actually the foundation of all brain signal processing methods. Since the correct prediction of disease status is of utmost importance, the goal is to use those models that have minimum error and maximum reliability. In anautomatic epileptic seizure detection system, we should be able to distinguish between EEG signals before, during and after seizure. Extracting useful characteristics from EEG data can greatly increase the classification accuracy. In this new approach, we first parse EEG signals to sub-bands in different categories with the help of discrete wavelet transform(DWT and then we derive statistical characteristics such as maximum, minimum, average and standard deviation for each sub-band. A multilayer perceptron (MLPneural network was used to assess the different scenarios of healthy and seizure among the collected signal sets. In order to assess the success and effectiveness of the proposed method, the confusion matrix was used and its accuracy was achieved98.33 percent. Due to the limitations and obstacles in analyzing EEG signals, the proposed method can greatly help professionals experimentally and visually in the classification and diagnosis of epileptic seizures.

  13. Classification of epileptic seizures using wavelet packet log energy and norm entropies with recurrent Elman neural network classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, S; Sriraam, N; Kumar, G Pradeep

    2017-02-01

    Electroencephalogram shortly termed as EEG is considered as the fundamental segment for the assessment of the neural activities in the brain. In cognitive neuroscience domain, EEG-based assessment method is found to be superior due to its non-invasive ability to detect deep brain structure while exhibiting superior spatial resolutions. Especially for studying the neurodynamic behavior of epileptic seizures, EEG recordings reflect the neuronal activity of the brain and thus provide required clinical diagnostic information for the neurologist. This specific proposed study makes use of wavelet packet based log and norm entropies with a recurrent Elman neural network (REN) for the automated detection of epileptic seizures. Three conditions, normal, pre-ictal and epileptic EEG recordings were considered for the proposed study. An adaptive Weiner filter was initially applied to remove the power line noise of 50 Hz from raw EEG recordings. Raw EEGs were segmented into 1 s patterns to ensure stationarity of the signal. Then wavelet packet using Haar wavelet with a five level decomposition was introduced and two entropies, log and norm were estimated and were applied to REN classifier to perform binary classification. The non-linear Wilcoxon statistical test was applied to observe the variation in the features under these conditions. The effect of log energy entropy (without wavelets) was also studied. It was found from the simulation results that the wavelet packet log entropy with REN classifier yielded a classification accuracy of 99.70 % for normal-pre-ictal, 99.70 % for normal-epileptic and 99.85 % for pre-ictal-epileptic.

  14. Dentate gyrus progenitor cell proliferation after the onset of spontaneous seizures in the tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiruska, Premysl; Shtaya, Anan B Y; Bodansky, David M S; Chang, Wei-Chih; Gray, William P; Jefferys, John G R

    2013-06-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy alters adult neurogenesis. Existing experimental evidence is mainly from chronic models induced by an initial prolonged status epilepticus associated with substantial cell death. In these models, neurogenesis increases after status epilepticus. To test whether status epilepticus is necessary for this increase, we examined precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis after the onset of spontaneous seizures in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy induced by unilateral intrahippocampal injection of tetanus toxin, which does not cause status or, in most cases, detectable neuronal loss. We found a 4.5 times increase in BrdU labeling (estimating precursor cells proliferating during the 2nd week after injection of toxin and surviving at least up to 7days) in dentate gyri of both injected and contralateral hippocampi of epileptic rats. Radiotelemetry revealed that the rats experienced 112±24 seizures, lasting 88±11s each, over a period of 8.6±1.3days from the first electrographic seizure. On the first day of seizures, their duration was a median of 103s, and the median interictal period was 23min, confirming the absence of experimentally defined status epilepticus. The total increase in cell proliferation/survival was due to significant population expansions of: radial glial-like precursor cells (type I; 7.2×), non-radial type II/III neural precursors in the dentate gyrus stem cell niche (5.6×), and doublecortin-expressing neuroblasts (5.1×). We conclude that repeated spontaneous brief temporal lobe seizures are sufficient to promote increased hippocampal neurogenesis in the absence of status epilepticus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rare GABRA3 variants are associated with epileptic seizures, encephalopathy and dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niturad, Cristina Elena; Lev, Dorit; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Schubert, Julian; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Kroes, Hester Y; Oegema, Renske; Traverso, Monica; Specchio, Nicola; Lassota, Maria; Chelly, Jamel; Bennett-Back, Odeya; Carmi, Nirit; Koffler-Brill, Tal; Iacomino, Michele; Trivisano, Marina; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Striano, Pasquale; Nawara, Magdalena; Rzonca, Sylwia; Fischer, Ute; Bienek, Melanie; Jensen, Corinna; Hu, Hao; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Krause, Roland; May, Patrick; Becker, Felicitas; Balling, Rudi; Biskup, Saskia; Haas, Stefan A; Nürnberg, Peter; van Gassen, Koen L I; Lerche, Holger; Zara, Federico; Maljevic, Snezana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2017-11-01

    Genetic epilepsies are caused by mutations in a range of different genes, many of them encoding ion channels, receptors or transporters. While the number of detected variants and genes increased dramatically in the recent years, pleiotropic effects have also been recognized, revealing that clinical syndromes with various degrees of severity arise from a single gene, a single mutation, or from different mutations showing similar functional defects. Accordingly, several genes coding for GABAA receptor subunits have been linked to a spectrum of benign to severe epileptic disorders and it was shown that a loss of function presents the major correlated pathomechanism. Here, we identified six variants in GABRA3 encoding the α3-subunit of the GABAA receptor. This gene is located on chromosome Xq28 and has not been previously associated with human disease. Five missense variants and one microduplication were detected in four families and two sporadic cases presenting with a range of epileptic seizure types, a varying degree of intellectual disability and developmental delay, sometimes with dysmorphic features or nystagmus. The variants co-segregated mostly but not completely with the phenotype in the families, indicating in some cases incomplete penetrance, involvement of other genes, or presence of phenocopies. Overall, males were more severely affected and there were three asymptomatic female mutation carriers compared to only one male without a clinical phenotype. X-chromosome inactivation studies could not explain the phenotypic variability in females. Three detected missense variants are localized in the extracellular GABA-binding NH2-terminus, one in the M2-M3 linker and one in the M4 transmembrane segment of the α3-subunit. Functional studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a variable but significant reduction of GABA-evoked anion currents for all mutants compared to wild-type receptors. The degree of current reduction correlated partially with the phenotype

  16. Towards prognostic biomarkers from BOLD fluctuations to differentiate a first epileptic seizure from new-onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalit; Janssens, Rick; Vlooswijk, Mariëlle C G; Rouhl, Rob P W; de Louw, Anton; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Ulman, Shrutin; Besseling, René M H; Hofman, Paul A M; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne H; Hilkman, Danny M; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Backes, Walter H

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of epilepsy cannot be reliably made prior to a patient's second seizure in most cases. Therefore, adequate diagnostic tools are needed to differentiate subjects with a first seizure from those with a seizure preceding the onset of epilepsy. The objective was to explore spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in subjects with a first-ever seizure and patients with new-onset epilepsy (NOE), and to find characteristic biomarkers for seizure recurrence after the first seizure. We examined 17 first-seizure subjects, 19 patients with new-onset epilepsy (NOE), and 18 healthy controls. All subjects underwent clinical investigation and received electroencephalography and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The BOLD time series were analyzed in terms of regional homogeneity (ReHo) and fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFFs). We found significantly stronger amplitudes (higher fALFFs) in patients with NOE relative to first-seizure subjects and healthy controls. The frequency range of 73-198 mHz (slow-3 subband) appeared most useful for discriminating patients with NOE from first-seizure subjects. The ReHo measure did not show any significant differences. The fALFF appears to be a noninvasive measure that characterizes spontaneous BOLD fluctuations and shows stronger amplitudes in the slow-3 subband of patients with NOE relative first-seizure subjects and healthy controls. A larger study population with follow-up is required to determine whether fALFF holds promise as a potential biomarker for identifying subjects at increased risk to develop epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of the family of feline leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) genes, and mutational analysis in familial spontaneous epileptic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Hamamoto, Yuji; Mizoguchi, Shunta; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Fujita, Michio

    2017-12-13

    Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) proteins play a critical role in synaptic transmission. Dysfunction of these genes and encoded proteins is associated with neurological disorders such as genetic epilepsy or autoimmune limbic encephalitis in animals and human. Familial spontaneous epileptic cats (FSECs) are the only feline strain and animal model of familial temporal lobe epilepsy. The seizure semiology of FSECs comprises recurrent limbic seizures with or without evolution into generalized epileptic seizures, while cats with antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channel complexed/LGI1 show limbic encephalitis and recurrent limbic seizures. However, it remains unclear whether the genetics underlying FSECs are associated with LGI family genes. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the feline LGI1-4 genes and examined their association with FSECs. Conventional PCR techniques were performed for cloning and mutational analysis. Characterization was predicted using bioinformatics software. The cDNAs of feline LGI1-4 contained 1674-bp, 1650-bp, 1647-bp, and 1617-bp open reading frames, respectively, and encoded proteins comprising 557, 549, 548, and 538 amino acid residues, respectively. The feline LGI1-4 putative protein sequences showed high homology with Homo sapiens, Canis familiaris, Bos taurus, Sus scrofa, and Equus caballus (92%-100%). Mutational analysis in 8 FSECs and 8 controls for LGI family genes revealed 3 non-synonymous and 14 synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region. Only one non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in LGI4 was found in 3 out of 8 FSECs. Using three separate computational tools, this mutation was not predicted to be disease causing. No co-segregation of the disease was found with any variant. We cloned the cDNAs of the four feline LGI genes, analyzed the amino acid sequences, and revealed that epilepsy in FSEC is not a monogenic disorder associated with LGI genes.

  18. Total corpus callosotomy for epileptic spasms after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) in a case with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanishi, Tohru; Fujimoto, Ayataka; Motoi, Hirotaka; Kanai, Sotaro; Nishimura, Mitsuyo; Yamazoe, Tomohiro; Takagi, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takamichi; Enoki, Hideo

    2017-05-01

    Corpus callosotomy is a palliative therapy for refractory epilepsy, including West syndrome, without a resectable epileptic focus. The surgical outcome of corpus callosotomy is relatively favorable in cryptogenic (non-lesional) West syndrome. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a disorder that frequently leads to the development of refractory seizures by multiple cortical tubers. The multiple cortical tubers cause multiple or wide epileptic networks in these cases. Most of West syndrome cases in TSC with multiple tubers need additional resective surgery after corpus callosotomy. We describe a case of TSC in a boy aged 4years and 8months. He had multiple cortical tubers on his brain and developed epileptic spasms. The seizures were controlled with valproate. At the age of 1year and 4months, he presented with acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), and had relapsed epileptic spasms one month after the onset of the encephalopathy. The seizures were refractory to multiple antiepileptic drugs. A total corpus callosotomy was performed at the age of 3years and 8months. The patient did not show any seizures after the surgery. During 12months of the follow-up, the patient was free from any seizures. Even in cases of symptomatic WS with multiple lesions, total corpus callosotomy may be a good strategy if the patients have secondary diffuse brain insults. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The epileptic human hippocampal cornu ammonis 2 region generates spontaneous interictal-like activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittner, Lucia; Huberfeld, Gilles; Clémenceau, Stéphane; Eross, Loránd; Dezamis, Edouard; Entz, László; Ulbert, István; Baulac, Michel; Freund, Tamás F; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Miles, Richard

    2009-11-01

    The dentate gyrus, the cornu ammonis 2 region and the subiculum of the human hippocampal formation are resistant to the cell loss associated with temporal lobe epilepsy. The subiculum, but not the dentate gyrus, generates interictal-like activity in tissue slices from epileptic patients. In this study, we asked whether a similar population activity is generated in the cornu ammonis 2 region and examined the electrophysiological and neuroanatomical characteristics of human epileptic cornu ammonis 2 neurons that may be involved. Hippocampal slices were prepared from postoperative temporal lobe tissue derived from epileptic patients. Field potentials and multi-unit activity were recorded in vitro using multiple extracellular microelectrodes. Pyramidal cells were characterized in intra-cellular records and were filled with biocytin for subsequent anatomy. Fluorescent immunostaining was made on fixed tissue against the chloride-cation cotransporters sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter-1 and potassium-chloride cotransporter-2. Light and electron microscopy were used to examine the parvalbumin-positive perisomatic inhibitory network. In 15 of 20 slices, the hippocampal cornu ammonis 2 region generated a spontaneous interictal-like activity, independently of population events in the subiculum. Most cornu ammonis 2 pyramidal cells fired spontaneously. All cells fired single action potentials and burst firing was evoked in three cells. Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic potentials were recorded in all cells, but hyperpolarizing inhibitory postsynaptic potentials were detected in only 27% of the cells. Two-thirds of cornu ammonis 2 neurons showed depolarizing responses during interictal-like events, while the others were inhibited, according to the current sink in the cell body layer. Two biocytin-filled cells both showed a pyramidal-like morphology with axons projecting to the cornu ammonis 2 and cornu ammonis 3 regions. Expression of sodium

  20. Epileptic Angina

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    Sachin Sureshbabu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Pain is a rare manifestation of epilepsy observed in less than 1% of patients. When present, it is usually accompanied by other focal features. This rare occurrence of epileptic seizures masquerading as angina is a novel observation.

  1. The similarities between the hallucinations associated with the partial epileptic seizures of the occipital lobe and ball lightning observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, G. K.; Cooray, V.

    2007-12-01

    Ball Lightning was seen and described since antiquity and recorded in many places. Ball lightning is usually observed during thunderstorms but large number of ball lightning observations is also reported during fine weather without any connection to thunderstorms or lightning. However, so far no one has managed to generate them in the laboratory. It is photographed very rarely and in many cases the authenticity of them is questionable. It is possible that many different phenomena are grouped together and categorized simply as ball lightning. Indeed, the visual hallucinations associated with simple partial epileptic seizures, during which the patient remains conscious, may also be categorized by a patient unaware of his or her condition as ball lightning observation. Such visual hallucinations may occur as a result of an epileptic seizure in the occipital, temporo-occipital or temporal lobes of the cerebrum [1,2,3]. In some cases the hallucination is perceived as a coloured ball moving horizontally from the periphery to the centre of the vision. The ball may appear to be rotating or spinning. The colour of the ball can be red, yellow, blue or green. Sometimes, the ball may appear to have a solid structure surrounded by a thin glow or in other cases the ball appears to generate spark like phenomena. When the ball is moving towards the centre of the vision it may increase its intensity and when it reaches the centre it can 'explode' illuminating the whole field of vision. During the hallucinations the vision is obscured only in the area occupied by the apparent object. The hallucinations may last for 5 to 30 seconds and rarely up to a minute. Occipital seizures may spread into other regions of the brain giving auditory, olfactory and sensory sensations. These sensations could be buzzing sounds, the smell of burning rubber, pain with thermal perception especially in the arms and the face, and numbness and tingling sensation. In some cases a person may experience only

  2. The impact of self-efficacy, alexithymia and multiple traumas on posttraumatic stress disorder and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizures: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man Cheung; Allen, Rachel D; Dennis, Ian

    2013-12-30

    This study investigated the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizure, whether alexithymia mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and psychiatric outcomes, and whether the mediational effect was moderated by the severity of PTSD from other traumas. Seventy-one (M=31, F=40) people with a diagnosis of epilepsy recruited from support groups in the United Kingdom completed the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 and the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. They were compared with 71 people (M=29, F=42) without epilepsy. For people with epilepsy, 51% and 22% met the diagnostic criteria for post-epileptic seizure PTSD and for PTSD following one other traumatic life event respectively. For the control group, 24% met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD following other traumatic life events. The epilepsy group reported significantly more anxiety and depression than the control. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis showed that self-efficacy was significantly correlated with alexithymia, post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Alexithymia was also significantly correlated with post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Mediation analyses confirmed that alexithymia mediated the path between self-efficacy and post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Moderated mediation also confirmed that self-efficacy and PTSD from one other trauma moderated the effect of alexithymia on outcomes. To conclude, people can develop posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizure. These psychiatric outcomes are closely linked with their belief in personal competence to deal with stressful situations and regulate their own functioning, to process rather than defend against distressing emotions, and with the degree of PTSD from other traumas. © 2013 Elsevier

  3. Positron emission tomography in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGonigal A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aileen McGonigal,1–3 Marie Arthuis,3 Jean-Arthur Micoulaud-Franchi,4,5 Fabrice Bartolomei,1–3 Eric Guedj6–8 1Institut de Neurosciences des Systèmes, INSERM UMR 1106, Marseille, France; 2Aix Marseille University, Faculty of Medicine, Marseille, France; 3Clinical Neurophysiology Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Department of Functional Investigation of the Nervous System, Sleep Clinic, Bordeaux University Hospital, Bordeaux, France; 5USR CNRS 3413, University of Bordeaux, France; 6Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 7Aix-Marseille University, CERIMED, Marseille, France; 8Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, UMR7289, INT, Marseille, FranceWe have read with interest the recent review entitled “Uncovering the etiology of conversion disorder: insights from functional neuroimaging” by Maryam Ejareh dar and Richard AA Kanaan,1 published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. Our paper on resting state brain metabolism measured by positron emission tomography (PET was included and discussed.2 We were most surprised to see that the authors of the review seem to have misunderstood the findings of our study, which concerned patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES. The authors state that the 16 patients included in our study “were later found to have PNES with comorbid epilepsy”. This is incorrect, since our study included only patients with PNES in whom comorbid epilepsy was excluded. This crucial point is indeed detailed in the Methods section of our article and clearly stated in the abstract: “in all patients, the diagnosis was subsequently confirmed to be PNES with no coexisting epilepsy.” It is thus on the basis of incorrect understanding of our results that Drs Ejareh dar and Kanaan discuss the possible significance of hypometabolism in the anterior cingulate region described in our paper, and erroneously suggest that interpretation of PET findings is

  4. Epileptic seizure propagation from the second somatic sensory area to the fronto-medial region, by insular redistribution. A case report and a connectome description

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    Balogh Attila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The seizure propagation phenomenon by inducing remote symptoms brings several difficulties in finding the seizure onset and delineating the epileptic network which should be taken into consideration in epilepsy surgery. By demonstrating a difficult (MRI negative epilepsy surgery case explored with invasive presurgical evaluation we highlight the importance to recognise the secondary sensory area and to explore the the parieto-opercular-insular-medial frontal network in certain cases. A further conclusion is the consideration of the redistributory role of the insula as a special structure in the cerebral connectome, having a role in epileptic network organisation.

  5. A model based approach in observing the activity of neuronal populations for the prediction of epileptic seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, M.S.; Nesic, D.; Kuhlmann, L.; Postoyan, R.; Varsavsky, A.; Cook, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Epilepsy is a common neurological disease that affects 0.5-1 % of the world's population. In cases where known treatments cannot achieve complete recovery, seizure prediction is essential so that preventive measures can be undertaken to prevent resultant injury. The elcctroencephalogram (EEG) is a widely used diagnostic tool for epilepsy. However, the EEG does not provide a detailed view of the underlying seizure causing neuronal mechanisms. Knowing the dynamics of the neuronal population is useful because tracking the evolution of the neuronal mechanisms will allow us to track the brain's progression from interictal to ictal state. Wendling and colleagues proposed a parameterised mathematical model that represents the activity of interconnected neuronal populations. By modifying the parameters, this model is able to reproduce signals that are very similar to the real EEG depicting commonly observed patterns during interictal and ictal periods. The transition from non-seizure to seizure activity, as seen in the EEG. is hypothesised to be due to the impairment of inhibition. Using Wendling's model, we designed a deterministic nonlinear estimator to recover the average membrane potential of the neuronal populations from a single channel EEG signal. for any fixed and known parameter values. Our nonlinear estimator is analytically proven to asymptotically converge to the true state of the model and illustrated in simulations. We were able to computationally observe the dynamics of the three neuronal populations described in the model: excitatory, fast and slow inhibitory populations. This forms a first step towards the prediction of epileptic seiwres. (author)

  6. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

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    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  7. EPILEPTIC SPASMS

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    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic spasms are epileptic seizures with sudden flexion/extension or of the mixed flexion and extension type, mainly involving the proximal and truncal muscles, that are normally longer than myoclonic seizures but shorter than tonic seizures, and last for about 1 second. For diagnostics of epileptic spasms, it is necessary that they are combined with ictal and interictal epileptiform patterns on electroencephalography (EEG. The first detailed clinical description of seizures of the infantile spasms type was provided by English pediatrician W.J. West in 1841. The term of infantile spasms is limited with age and means epileptic spasms that occur to children in early infancy, usually up to 1 y.o. Infantile spasms cannot be synonymous to the West syndrome. Infantile spasms are a type of epileptic seizures and West syndrome is a form of epilepsy that is usually manifested through hypsarrhythmia on the EEG and mental retardation, apart from infantile spasms. Epileptic spasms is the term broader than infantile spasms. Committee of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE recommends exactly the “epileptic spasms” term, as this type of seizures is not a prerogative of the West syndrome and can be observed in children older than 1 y.o. and even in adults. The authors provided a detailed review of modern references devoted to epileptic spasms including the history of the issue, determination of the term, and position of epileptic spasms in modern classification systems, approaches to diagnostics including differential diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  8. Emotional stimuli-provoked seizures potentially misdiagnosed as psychogenic non-epileptic attacks: A case of temporal lobe epilepsy with amygdala enlargement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Tamune

    Full Text Available The association between emotional stimuli and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is largely unknown. Here, we report the case of a depressed, 50-year-old female complaining of episodes of a “spaced out” experience precipitated by emotional stimuli. Psychogenic non-epileptic attacks were suspected. However, video-EEG coupled with emotional stimuli-provoked procedures and MRI findings of amygdala enlargement, led to the diagnosis of left TLE. Accurate diagnosis and explanation improved her subjective depression and seizure frequency. This case demonstrated that emotional stimuli can provoke seizures in TLE and suggested the involvement of the enlarged amygdala and the modulation of emotion-related neural circuits. Keywords: Video-EEG, Psychogenic non-epileptic attacks, Temporal lobe epilepsy, Amygdala enlargement, Reflex seizure, Provoked seizure

  9. Nonseizure SUDEP: Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy without preceding epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhatoo, Samden D; Nei, Maromi; Raghavan, Manoj; Sperling, Michael; Zonjy, Bilal; Lacuey, Nuria; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-07-01

    To describe the phenomenology of monitored sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) occurring in the interictal period where death occurs without a seizure preceding it. We report a case series of monitored definite and probable SUDEP where no electroclinical evidence of underlying seizures was found preceding death. Three patients (two definite and one probable) had SUDEP. They had a typical high SUDEP risk profile with longstanding intractable epilepsy and frequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). All patients had varying patterns of respiratory and bradyarrhythmic cardiac dysfunction with profound electroencephalography (EEG) suppression. In two patients, patterns of cardiorespiratory failure were similar to those seen in some patients in the Mortality in Epilepsy Monitoring Units Study (MORTEMUS). SUDEP almost always occur postictally, after GTCS and less commonly after a partial seizure. Monitored SUDEP or near-SUDEP cases without a seizure have not yet been reported in literature. When nonmonitored SUDEP occurs in an ambulatory setting without an overt seizure, the absence of EEG information prevents the exclusion of a subtle seizure. These cases confirm the existence of nonseizure SUDEP; such deaths may not be prevented by seizure detection-based devices. SUDEP risk in patients with epilepsy may constitute a spectrum of susceptibility wherein some are relatively immune, death occurs in others with frequent GTCS with one episode of seizure ultimately proving fatal, while in others still, death may occur even in the absence of a seizure. We emphasize the heterogeneity of SUDEP phenomena. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Methylated flavonoids as anti-seizure agents: Naringenin 4',7-dimethyl ether attenuates epileptic seizures in zebrafish and mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copmans, Daniëlle; Orellana-Paucar, Adriana M; Steurs, Gert; Zhang, Yifan; Ny, Annelii; Foubert, Kenn; Exarchou, Vasiliki; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Kim, Youngju; De Borggraeve, Wim; Dehaen, Wim; Pieters, Luc; de Witte, Peter A M

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disease that affects more than 70 million people worldwide and is characterized by the presence of spontaneous unprovoked recurrent seizures. Existing anti-seizure drugs (ASDs) have side effects and fail to control seizures in 30% of patients due to drug resistance. Hence, safer and more efficacious drugs are sorely needed. Flavonoids are polyphenolic structures naturally present in most plants and consumed daily with no adverse effects reported. These structures have shown activity in several seizure and epilepsy animal models through allosteric modulation of GABA A receptors, but also via potent anti-inflammatory action in the brain. As such, dietary flavonoids offer an interesting source for ASD and anti-epileptogenic drug (AED) discovery, but their pharmaceutical potential is often hampered by metabolic instability and low oral bioavailability. It has been argued that their drug-likeness can be improved via methylation of the free hydroxyl groups, thereby dramatically enhancing metabolic stability and membrane transport, facilitating absorption and highly increasing bioavailability. Since no scientific data is available regarding the use of methylated flavonoids in the fight against epilepsy, we studied naringenin (NRG), kaempferol (KFL), and three methylated derivatives, i.e., naringenin 7-O-methyl ether (NRG-M), naringenin 4',7-dimethyl ether (NRG-DM), and kaempferide (4'-O-methyl kaempferol) (KFD) in the zebrafish pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure model. We demonstrate that the methylated flavanones NRG-DM and NRG-M are highly effective against PTZ-induced seizures in larval zebrafish, whereas NRG and the flavonols KFL and KFD possess only a limited activity. Moreover, we show that NRG-DM is active in two standard acute mouse seizure models, i.e., the timed i.v. PTZ seizure model and the 6-Hz psychomotor seizure model. Based on these results, NRG-DM is proposed as a lead compound that is worth further investigation for the treatment

  11. NeuroKinect: A Novel Low-Cost 3Dvideo-EEG System for Epileptic Seizure Motion Quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Silva Cunha

    motion trajectories when compared to a 2D frame by frame tracking procedure. We conclude that this new approach provides a more comfortable (both for patients and clinical professionals, simpler, faster and lower-cost procedure than previous approaches, therefore providing a reliable tool to quantitatively analyze MOI patterns of epileptic seizures in the routine of EMUs around the world. We hope this study encourages other EMUs to adopt similar approaches so that more quantitative information is used to improve epilepsy diagnosis.

  12. NeuroKinect: A Novel Low-Cost 3Dvideo-EEG System for Epileptic Seizure Motion Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, João Paulo Silva; Choupina, Hugo Miguel Pereira; Rocha, Ana Patrícia; Fernandes, José Maria; Achilles, Felix; Loesch, Anna Mira; Vollmar, Christian; Hartl, Elisabeth; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-01-01

    motion trajectories when compared to a 2D frame by frame tracking procedure. We conclude that this new approach provides a more comfortable (both for patients and clinical professionals), simpler, faster and lower-cost procedure than previous approaches, therefore providing a reliable tool to quantitatively analyze MOI patterns of epileptic seizures in the routine of EMUs around the world. We hope this study encourages other EMUs to adopt similar approaches so that more quantitative information is used to improve epilepsy diagnosis.

  13. Ictal brain SPET during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol: a new diagnostic procedure in drug-resistant epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Giordano, Alessandro; Bruno, Isabella; Di Giuda, Daniela; De Rossi, Giuseppe; Troncone, Luigi; Parbonetti, Giovanni; Colicchio, Gabriella

    2002-01-01

    Functional brain imaging plays an important role in seizure focus localisation. However, truly ictal single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies are not routinely performed owing to technical problems associated with the use of tracers and methodological and logistical difficulties. In this study we tried to resolve both of these issues by means of a new procedure: technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain SPET performed during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol, a well-known central and respiratory stimulant. We studied 33 drug-resistant epileptic patients. All patients underwent anamnestic evaluation, neuropsychological and psychodynamic assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, interictal and ictal video-EEG monitoring, and interictal and ictal SPET with 99m Tc-ECD. In order to obtain truly ictal SPET, 65 mg of pentylenetetrazol was injected every 2 minutes and, immediately the seizure began, 740 MBq of 99m Tc-ECD was injected. The scintigraphic findings were considered abnormal if a single area of hyperperfusion was present and corresponded to the site of a single area of hypoperfusion at interictal SPET: the ''hypo-hyperperfusion'' SPET pattern. In 27 of the 33 patients (82%), interictal-ictal SPET showed the hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern. Video-EEG showed a single epileptogenic zone in 21/33 patients (64%), and MRI showed anatomical lesions in 19/33 patients (57%). Twenty-two of the 27 patients with hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern underwent ablative or palliative surgery and were seizure-free at 3 years of follow-up. No adverse effects were noted during pharmacologically provoked seizure. It is concluded that ictal brain SPET performed during pharmacologically provoked seizure provides truly ictal images because 99m Tc-ECD is injected immediately upon seizure onset. Using this feasible procedure it is possible to localise the focus, to avoid the limitations due to the unpredictability of seizures, to avoid pitfalls due

  14. Ictal brain SPET during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol: a new diagnostic procedure in drug-resistant epileptic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Giordano, Alessandro; Bruno, Isabella; Di Giuda, Daniela; De Rossi, Giuseppe; Troncone, Luigi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, 00168 Roma (Italy); Parbonetti, Giovanni; Colicchio, Gabriella [Department of Neurosurgery, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    Functional brain imaging plays an important role in seizure focus localisation. However, truly ictal single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies are not routinely performed owing to technical problems associated with the use of tracers and methodological and logistical difficulties. In this study we tried to resolve both of these issues by means of a new procedure: technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain SPET performed during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol, a well-known central and respiratory stimulant. We studied 33 drug-resistant epileptic patients. All patients underwent anamnestic evaluation, neuropsychological and psychodynamic assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, interictal and ictal video-EEG monitoring, and interictal and ictal SPET with {sup 99m}Tc-ECD. In order to obtain truly ictal SPET, 65 mg of pentylenetetrazol was injected every 2 minutes and, immediately the seizure began, 740 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD was injected. The scintigraphic findings were considered abnormal if a single area of hyperperfusion was present and corresponded to the site of a single area of hypoperfusion at interictal SPET: the ''hypo-hyperperfusion'' SPET pattern. In 27 of the 33 patients (82%), interictal-ictal SPET showed the hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern. Video-EEG showed a single epileptogenic zone in 21/33 patients (64%), and MRI showed anatomical lesions in 19/33 patients (57%). Twenty-two of the 27 patients with hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern underwent ablative or palliative surgery and were seizure-free at 3 years of follow-up. No adverse effects were noted during pharmacologically provoked seizure. It is concluded that ictal brain SPET performed during pharmacologically provoked seizure provides truly ictal images because {sup 99m}Tc-ECD is injected immediately upon seizure onset. Using this feasible procedure it is possible to localise the focus, to avoid the limitations due to the unpredictability

  15. Cardiac troponin I (CTnI level among children with epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Anwer Attia Khattab

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Cardiac troponin I is a perfect tool for early detection of cases with myocardial dysfunction in epileptic patients – cardiac troponin I is significantly increased in children with epilepsy especially the complicated epilepsy. Cardiac injury in epileptic children is more common in patients with early onset epilepsy, positive prenatal problem, idiopathic epilepsy, abnormal imaging and EEG – elevated TnI levels may be of value in assessing the severity and eventual outcome and mortality risk of the disease in children with epilepsy.

  16. Mouse epileptic seizure detection with multiple EEG features and simple thresholding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieng, Quang M.; Anbazhagan, Ashwin; Chen, Min; Reutens, David C.

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent, unprovoked seizures. The search for new treatments for seizures and epilepsy relies upon studies in animal models of epilepsy. To capture data on seizures, many applications require prolonged electroencephalography (EEG) with recordings that generate voluminous data. The desire for efficient evaluation of these recordings motivates the development of automated seizure detection algorithms. Approach. A new seizure detection method is proposed, based on multiple features and a simple thresholding technique. The features are derived from chaos theory, information theory and the power spectrum of EEG recordings and optimally exploit both linear and nonlinear characteristics of EEG data. Main result. The proposed method was tested with real EEG data from an experimental mouse model of epilepsy and distinguished seizures from other patterns with high sensitivity and specificity. Significance. The proposed approach introduces two new features: negative logarithm of adaptive correlation integral and power spectral coherence ratio. The combination of these new features with two previously described features, entropy and phase coherence, improved seizure detection accuracy significantly. Negative logarithm of adaptive correlation integral can also be used to compute the duration of automatically detected seizures.

  17. Epileptic Seizure Detection and Prediction Based on Continuous Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring – a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senay Tewolde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the third most common neurological illness, affecting 1% of the world’s population. Despite advances in medicine, about 25 to 30% of the patients do not respond to or cannot tolerate the severe side effects of medical treatment, and surgery is not an option for the majority of patients with epilepsy. The objective of this article is to review the current state of research on seizure detection based on cerebral blood flow (CBF data acquired by thermal diffusion flowmetry (TDF, and CBF-based seizure prediction. A discussion is provided on the applications, advantages, and disadvantages of TDF in detecting and localizing seizure foci, as well as its role in seizure prediction. Also presented are an overview of the present challenges and possible future research directions (along with methodological guidelines of the CBF-based seizure detection and prediction methods.

  18. [Effect of electroacupuncture on cholecystokinin gene expression in rat hippocampus during penicillin-induced epileptic seizure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Wang, B; Cheng, J

    1996-01-01

    Northern Blot and hybrization in situ techniques were used to investigate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on the changes of cholecystokinin (CCK) mRAN levels of the hippocampus in rat penicillin-induced epilepsy model. Epilepsy can significantly increase CCK mRNA levels in dentate gyrus and CA3 areas of hippocampus in diencephalic sections after penicillin-induced seizure, whereas EA not only can attenuate the seizure behaviors and EEG changes, but also can decrease the increase of CCK mRNA contents induced by the seizure. However, in the subiculum, dentate gyrus and CA3 areas of mesencephalic sections of rat hippocampus, EA can further increase the enhancement of CCK mRNA concentration induced by penicillin-induced seizure. The results suggest that EA inhibitory effects on the seizure's behaviors and epileptiform activities may be related to the alteration of CCK gene expression in the different area of hippocampus.

  19. NeuroKinect: A Novel Low-Cost 3Dvideo-EEG System for Epileptic Seizure Motion Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, João Paulo Silva; Choupina, Hugo Miguel Pereira; Rocha, Ana Patrícia; Fernandes, José Maria; Achilles, Felix; Loesch, Anna Mira; Vollmar, Christian; Hartl, Elisabeth; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-01-01

    body motion trajectories when compared to a 2D frame by frame tracking procedure. We conclude that this new approach provides a more comfortable (both for patients and clinical professionals), simpler, faster and lower-cost procedure than previous approaches, therefore providing a reliable tool to quantitatively analyze MOI patterns of epileptic seizures in the routine of EMUs around the world. We hope this study encourages other EMUs to adopt similar approaches so that more quantitative information is used to improve epilepsy diagnosis. PMID:26799795

  20. Symbolic time series analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptic seizure and brain dynamics with eye-open and eye-closed subjects during resting states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Lal; Aziz, Wajid; Alowibdi, Jalal S; Habib, Nazneen; Rafique, Muhammad; Saeed, Sharjil; Kazmi, Syed Zaki Hassan

    2017-03-23

    Epilepsy is a neuronal disorder for which the electrical discharge in the brain is synchronized, abnormal and excessive. To detect the epileptic seizures and to analyse brain activities during different mental states, various methods in non-linear dynamics have been proposed. This study is an attempt to quantify the complexity of control and epileptic subject with and without seizure as well as to distinguish eye-open (EO) and eye-closed (EC) conditions using threshold-based symbolic entropy. The threshold-dependent symbolic entropy was applied to distinguish the healthy and epileptic subjects with seizure and seizure-free intervals (i.e. interictal and ictal) as well as to distinguish EO and EC conditions. The original time series data was converted into symbol sequences using quantization level, and word series of symbol sequences was generated using a word length of three or more. Then, normalized corrected Shannon entropy (NCSE) was computed to quantify the complexity. The NCSE values were not following the normal distribution, and the non-parametric Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon (MWW) test was used to find significant differences among various groups at 0.05 significance level. The values of NCSE were presented in a form of topographic maps to show significant brain regions during EC and EO conditions. The results of the study were compared to those of the multiscale entropy (MSE). The results indicated that the dynamics of healthy subjects are more complex compared to epileptic subjects (during seizure and seizure-free intervals) in both EO and EC conditions. The comparison of the dynamics of epileptic subjects revealed that seizure-free intervals are more complex than seizure intervals. The dynamics of healthy subjects during EO conditions are more complex compared to those during EC conditions. Further, the results clearly demonstrated that threshold-dependent symbolic entropy outperform MSE in distinguishing different physiological and pathological conditions. The

  1. Cannabidiol Post-Treatment Alleviates Rat Epileptic-Related Behaviors and Activates Hippocampal Cell Autophagy Pathway Along with Antioxidant Defense in Chronic Phase of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Mahshid; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Naderi, Nima; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal and sometimes severe behavioral and molecular symptoms are usually observed in epileptic humans and animals. To address this issue, we examined the behavioral and molecular aspects of seizure evoked by pilocarpine. Autophagy can promote both cell survival and death, but there are controversial reports about the neuroprotective or neurodegenerative effects of autophagy in seizure. Cannabidiol has anticonvulsant properties in some animal models when used as a pretreatment. In this study, we investigated alteration of seizure scores, autophagy pathway proteins, and antioxidant status in hippocampal cells during the chronic phase of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy after treatment with cannabidiol. Cannabidiol (100 ng, intracerebroventricular injection) delayed the chronic phase of epilepsy. Single administration of cannabidiol during the chronic phase of seizure significantly diminished seizure scores such as mouth clonus, head nodding, monolateral and bilateral forelimb clonus and increased the activity of catalase enzyme and reduced glutathione content. Such a protective effect in the behavioral scores of epileptic rats was also observed after repeated administrations of cannabidiol at the onset of the silent phase. Moreover, the amount of Atg7, conjugation of Atg5/12, Atg12, and LC3II/LC3I ratio increased significantly in epileptic rats treated with repeated injections of cannabidiol. In short, our results suggest that post-treatment of Cannabidiol could enhance the induction of autophagy pathway and antioxidant defense in the chronic phase of epilepsy, which could be considered as the protective mechanisms of cannabidiol in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

  2. A fuzzy rule-based system for epileptic seizure detection in intracranial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarabi, A; Fazel-Rezai, R; Aghakhani, Y

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for automatic detection of seizures in intracranial EEG recordings from patients suffering from medically intractable focal epilepsy. We designed a fuzzy rule-based seizure detection system based on knowledge obtained from experts' reasoning. Temporal, spectral, and complexity features were extracted from IEEG segments, and spatio-temporally integrated using the fuzzy rule-based system for seizure detection. A total of 302.7h of intracranial EEG recordings from 21 patients having 78 seizures was used for evaluation of the system. The system yielded a sensitivity of 98.7%, a false detection rate of 0.27/h, and an average detection latency of 11s. There was only one missed seizure. Most of false detections were caused by high-amplitude rhythmic activities. The results from the system correlate well with those from expert visual analysis. The fuzzy rule-based seizure detection system enabled us to deal with imprecise boundaries between interictal and ictal IEEG patterns. This system may serve as a good seizure detection tool with high sensitivity and low false detection rate for monitoring long-term IEEG.

  3. Clinical and neuropsychological changes after the disappearance of seizures in a case of transient epileptic amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Sekimoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We encountered a female patient with late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy who presented with transient amnesia as the sole ictal manifestation, an accelerated rate of forgetting daily life events, and a retrograde memory deficit. We describe the memory function of the patient both before and after the administration of antiseizure medication. After the patient's seizures were controlled with antiseizure drugs, her neuropsychological memory performance scores showed improvement. We presumed that the disappearance of seizures was associated with a decrease in the accelerated rate of forgetting medication. However, her lost memories were not recovered after the seizures were controlled by antiseizure medication.

  4. Effects of cell phone radiation on lipid peroxidation, glutathione and nitric oxide levels in mouse brain during epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Tomruk, Arın; Canseven, Ayse G; Yücel, Engin; Aktuna, Zuhal; Keskil, Semih; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the this study was to evaluate the effects of cellular phone radiation on oxidative stress parameters and oxide levels in mouse brain during pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced epileptic seizure. Eight weeks old mice were used in the study. Animals were distributed in the following groups: Group I: Control group treated with PTZ, Group II: 15min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation, Group III: 30min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation. The RF radiation was produced by a 900MHz cellular phone. Lipid peroxidation, which is the indicator of oxidative stress was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The glutathione (GSH) levels were determined by the Ellman method. Tissue total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were obtained using the Griess assay. Lipid peroxidation and NOx levels of brain tissue increased significantly in group II and III compared to group I. On the contrary, GSH levels were significantly lower in group II and III than group I. However, no statistically significant alterations in any of the endpoints were noted between group II and Group III. Overall, the experimental findings demonstrated that cellular phone radiation may increase the oxidative damage and NOx level during epileptic activity in mouse brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Proposal for best practice in the use of video-EEG when psychogenic non-epileptic seizures are a possible diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley Whitehead

    Full Text Available The gold-standard for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES is capturing an attack with typical semiology and lack of epileptic ictal discharges on video-EEG. Despite the importance of this diagnostic test, lack of standardisation has resulted in a wide variety of protocols and reporting practices. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of research findings on the diagnostic video-EEG procedure, in both the adult and paediatric literature. We discuss how uncertainties about the ethical use of suggestion can be resolved, and consider what constitutes best clinical practice. We stress the importance of ictal observation and assessment and consider how diagnostically useful information is best obtained. We also discuss the optimal format of video-EEG reports; and of highlighting features with high sensitivity and specificity to reduce the risk of miscommunication. We suggest that over-interpretation of the interictal EEG, and the failure to recognise differences between typical epileptic and nonepileptic seizure manifestations are the greatest pitfalls in neurophysiological assessment of patients with PNES. Meanwhile, under-recognition of semiological pointers towards frontal lobe seizures and of the absence of epileptiform ictal EEG patterns during some epileptic seizure types (especially some seizures not associated with loss of awareness, may lead to erroneous PNES diagnoses. We propose that a standardised approach to the video-EEG examination and the subsequent written report will facilitate a clear communication of its import, improving diagnostic certainty and thereby promoting appropriate patient management. Keywords: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, Nonepileptic attack disorder, Suggestion, EEG

  6. Oxidative Stress Induced by Epileptic Seizure and Its Attenuation by Melatonin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, J.; Stopka, Pavel; Nohejlová, K.; Rokyta, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, Suppl.1 (2013), S67-S74 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : free radicals * seizure * melatonin * EPR Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  7. Transplants of cells engineered to produce GABA suppress spontaneous seizures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thompson, K. W.; Suchomelová, Lucie

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2004), s. 4-12 ISSN 0013-9580 Grant - others:VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System Research Service(US) MREP Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cell transplantation * epilepsy * seizures Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.329, year: 2004

  8. [Impairments of gray matter in MRI-negative epileptic patients with different seizure types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, W; Xu, Q; Yang, F; Chen, G H; Lin, Z X; Zhang, Q R; Xiao, J H; Lu, G M; Zhang, Z Q

    2017-12-05

    Objective: To investigate the damage of gray matter structure in MRI-negative epilepsy patients with different symptoms by voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Methods: From June, 2009 to October, 2016, ninety MRI-negative epilepsy patients and thirty-five healthy volunteers underwent the 3T magnetic resonance imaging scan in Nanjing General Hospital. The patients were divided into three groups, including idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizure (I-GTCS), secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizure (S-GTCS), and partial seizure (PS) according to different symptoms. The three-dimensional high-resolution T1 structural MRI data was obtained for the voxel-based morphometry. Data of gray matter structure from four groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). An independent-sample t test was performed in order to compare gray matter volume of the three patient groups with controls respectively. According the results of ANOVA, impaired brain regions were selected as regions of interest in order to carry out correlation analysis between gray matter volume and disease duration. Results: ANOVA showed significant differences in gray matter structure of bilateral thalamus and frontal lobe between four groups (alphasim correction, P structure, especially in thalamus and frontal lobe. The impairments of thalamus and frontal lobe in patients with different seizure types are different with the progression of disease, which suggests that influences of different epilepsy seizures on the thalamo-cortical network are different.

  9. Epileptic fast intracerebral EEG activity: evidence for spatial decorrelation at seizure onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Fabrice; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Bourien, Jérôme; Chauvel, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Low-voltage rapid discharges (or fast EEG ictal activity) constitute a characteristic electrophysiological pattern in focal seizures of human epilepsy. They are characterized by a decrease of signal voltage with a marked increase of signal frequency (typically beyond 25 Hz). They have long been observed in stereoelectroencephalographic (SEEG) signals recorded with intra-cerebral electrodes, generally occurring at seizure onset and simultaneously involving distinct brain regions. Spectral properties of rapid ictal discharges as well as spatial correlations measured between SEEG signals generated from distant sites before, during and after these discharges were studied. Cross-correlation estimates within typical EEG sub-bands and statistical tests performed in ten patients suffering from partial epilepsy (frontal, temporal or fronto-temporal) reveal that SEEG signals are significantly de-correlated during the discharge period compared to periods that precede and follow this discharge. These results can be interpreted as a functional decoupling of distant brain sites at seizure onset followed by an abnormally high re-coupling when the seizure develops. They lead to the concept of “disruption” that is complementary of that of “activation” (revealed by significantly high correlations between signals recorded during seizures), both giving insights into our understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in human partial epilepsies as well as in the interpretation of clinical semiology. PMID:12764064

  10. The appropriacy of fluency tests in assessing epileptic seizure lateralization in children with partial epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Jasmina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluency tests are frequently used in clinical practice to asses executive functions. The literature data are not unequivocal although in a great number of papers is pointed out the importance of the left hemisphere, specially of the left frontal lobes in the mediation of phonological fluency and the right hemisphere in the mediation of nonverbal fluency. This paper considers the suitability of fluency tests for the detection of left versus right seizure laterality. The sample consisted of thirty-two epilepsy patients divided into two groups: LHF-participants with the seizure focus in the left hemisphere (n=16, and DHF-participants with the seizure focus in the right hemisphere (n=16, and K-the control group of t age-matched healthy children (n=50 aged 7-11 years. The qualitative and quantitative comparison of the phonological and nonverbal fluency performance was carried out in consideration of the seizure laterality as well as compared to the healthy controls. The results of phonological fluency performance revealed that the performance of the LHF group was significantly reduced as compared to both DHF and K group. The analysis of nonverbal fluency performance revealed that the performance of the DHF group was significantly reduced as compared to both LHF and K group The qualitative analysis obtained valuable data, which could additionally contribute to the neuropsychological evaluation of the left versus right seizure laterality.

  11. Low-Power Implantable Device for Onset Detection and Subsequent Treatment of Epileptic Seizures: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariqus Salam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, there has been growing interest in neuro-responsive intracerebral local treatments of seizures, such as focal drug delivery, focal cooling, or electrical stimulation. This mode of treatment requires an effective intracerebral electroencephalographic acquisition system, seizure detector, brain stimulator, and wireless system that consume ultra-low power. This review focuses on alternative brain stimulation treatments for medically intractable epilepsy patients. We mainly discuss clinical studies of long-term responsive stimulation and suggest safer optimized therapeutic options for epilepsy. Finally, we conclude our study with the proposed low-power, implantable fully integrated device that automatically detects low-voltage fast activity ictal onsets and triggers focal treatment to disrupt seizure progression. The detection performance was verified using intracerebral electroencephalographic recordings from two patients with epilepsy. Further experimental validation of this prototype is underway.

  12. Critical dynamics of Hopf bifurcations in the corticothalamic system: Transitions from normal arousal states to epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong-Ping; Robinson, P A

    2017-04-01

    A physiologically based corticothalamic model of large-scale brain activity is used to analyze critical dynamics of transitions from normal arousal states to epileptic seizures, which correspond to Hopf bifurcations. This relates an abstract normal form quantitatively to underlying physiology that includes neural dynamics, axonal propagation, and time delays. Thus, a bridge is constructed that enables normal forms to be used to interpret quantitative data. The normal form of the Hopf bifurcations with delays is derived using Hale's theory, the center manifold theorem, and normal form analysis, and it is found to be explicitly expressed in terms of transfer functions and the sensitivity matrix of a reduced open-loop system. It can be applied to understand the effect of each physiological parameter on the critical dynamics and determine whether the Hopf bifurcation is supercritical or subcritical in instabilities that lead to absence and tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, the effects of thalamic and cortical nonlinearities on the bifurcation type are investigated, with implications for the roles of underlying physiology. The theoretical predictions about the bifurcation type and the onset dynamics are confirmed by numerical simulations and provide physiologically based criteria for determining bifurcation types from first principles. The results are consistent with experimental data from previous studies, imply that new regimes of seizure transitions may exist in clinical settings, and provide a simplified basis for control-systems interventions. Using the normal form, and the full equations from which it is derived, more complex dynamics, such as quasiperiodic cycles and saddle cycles, are discovered near the critical points of the subcritical Hopf bifurcations.

  13. Physiological reactivity to spontaneously occurring seizure activity in dogs with epilepsy and their carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, R M A; Volk, H A; Fowkes, R C

    2017-08-01

    There is a complex bidirectional relationship between stress and epilepsy. Stressful stimuli and subsequent cortisol release act as a trigger for seizure activity in some individuals with epilepsy, and seizure activity itself may act as a stressor to the affected individual. Epilepsy is the most common chronic neurological condition in domestic dogs and requires chronic management by their human carers, impacting upon the quality of life of both dog and carer. Seizures occur unpredictably and may be stressful for carers to witness and manage. In the present study we investigated the role of seizure activity as a stressor, measuring the effect of spontaneously occurring seizure activity in dogs with epilepsy upon their own cortisol levels and that of their carers. Furthermore, we tested whether individual differences in HPA reactivity were associated with owner personality characteristics and the quality of the dog-carer relationship. Saliva samples were obtained from sixteen dog-carer dyads in the home setting 20 and 40minute post-seizure, and at time-matched points on the following (non-seizure) day. Significant differences in cortisol levels were found in dogs at 40minute post-seizure (265.1% increase), and at 20minute post-seizure in their carers (40.5% increase). No associations were found between cortisol reactivity and the strength of the dog-carer bond. Carers with higher neuroticism scores exhibited higher cortisol levels at both post-seizure sampling points. As there was a gender bias in the carer sample (15/16 were female), and there are known sex differences in cortisol reactivity in response to psychological stress, the conclusions of this study may be limited to female carers. These findings are the first to objectively demonstrate the acutely stressful effects of seizures in dogs with epilepsy and their carers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of the classic ketogenic diet on the treatment of refractory epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Duarte Martins

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:The ketogenic diet is used as a therapeutic alternative for the treatment of epilepsy in patients with refractory epilepsy. It simulates biochemical changes typical of fasting. The present study verified the nutritional impact of the ketogenic diet on children with refractory epilepsy. METHODS: Nutritional status data (dietary, biochemical and anthropometric measurements, seizure frequency, and adverse events were collected from the medical records and during outpatient clinic visits of children over a period of 36 months. RESULTS: Of the 29 children who initiated the ketogenic diet, 75.8% presented fewer seizures after one month of treatment. After six months, 48.3% of the patients had at least a 90.0% decrease in seizure frequency, and 50.0% of these patients presented total seizure remission. At 12 months, eight patients continued to show positive results, and seven of these children remained on the ketogenic diet for 24 months. There was an improvement of the nutritional status at 24 months, especially in terms of weight, which culminated with the recovery of proper weightforheight. There were no significant changes in biochemical indices (total cholesterol and components, triglycerides, albumin, total protein, creatinine, glycemia, serum aspartate transaminase and serum alanine transaminase. Serum cholesterol levels increased significantly in the first month, fell in the following six months, and remained within the normal limits thereafter. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, patients on the classic ketogenic diet for at least 24 months gained weight. Moreover, approximately one third of the patients achieved significant reduction in seizure frequency, and some patients achieved total remission.

  15. Physics of the Brain. Prevention of the Epileptic Seizures by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS Team

    The novel study of the epileptogenesis mechanisms is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated (amplitude modulation) multi-photon (frequency modulation) fiber-laser interaction with the brain epilepsy-topion (the epilepsy onset area), so as to prevent the excessive electrical discharge (epileptic seizure) in the brain. The repetition frequency, Ω, matches the low frequency (epileptic) phonon waves in the brain. The laser repetition frequency (5-100 pulses per second) enables the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the phonon (possible epileptic-to-be) activity in the brain. The tunable fiber laser frequencies, Δω (multi photon operation), are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling monitoring of the electrical charge imbalance (within the 10s of milliseconds), and the DNA-corruption in the epilepsy-topion, as the possible cause of the disease. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  16. Ictal technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission tomographic findings and propagation of epileptic seizure activity in patients with extratemporal epilepsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noachtar, S.; Arnold, S.; Werhahn, K.J.; Yousry, T.A.; Tatsch, K.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the propagation of extratemporal epileptic seizure activity on the regional increase in cerebral blood flow, which is usually associated with epileptic seizure activity. Forty-two consecutive patients with extratemporal epilepsies were prospectively evaluated. All patients underwent ictal SPET studies with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and video recordings of habitual seizures and imaging studies including cranial magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography with 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2 deoxy-d-glucose. Propagation of epilptic seizure activity (PESA) was defined as the absence of hyperperfusion on ictal ECD SPET in the lobe of seizure onset, but its presence in another ipsilateral or contralateral lobe. Observers analysing the SPET images were not informed of the other results. PESA was observed in 8 of the 42 patients (19%) and was ipsilateral to the seizure onset in five (63%) of these eight patients. The time between clinical seizure onset and injection of the ECD tracer ranged from 14 to 61 s (mean 34 s). Seven patients (88%) with PESA had parieto-occipital epilepsy and one patient had a frontal epilepsy. PESA was statistically more frequent in patients with parieto-occipital lobe epilepsies (58%) than in the remaining extratemporal epilepsy syndromes (3%) (P<0.0002). These findings indicate that ictal SPET studies require simultaneous EEG-video recordings in patients with extratemporal epilepsies. PESA should be considered when interpreting ictal SPET studies in these patients. Patients with PESA are more likely to have parieto-occipital lobe epilepsy than seizure onset in other extratemporal regions. (orig./MG) (orig.)

  17. Update on the mechanisms and roles of high-frequency oscillations in seizures and epileptic disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Alvarado-Rojas, C.; Schevon, C.A.; Staba, R.; Stacey, W.; Wendling, F.; Avoli, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 8 (2017), s. 1330-1339 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * epilepsy * ripples * fast ripples * ictogenesis * epileptogenesis * seizures * interneurons * computer models Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  18. MDR-1 and MRP2 gene polymorphisms in Mexican epileptic pediatric patients with complex partial seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eEscalante-Santiago

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the Pgp efflux transport protein is overexpressed in resected tissue of patients with epilepsy, the presence of polymorphisms in MDR1 / ABCB1 and MRP2 / ABCC2 in patients with antiepileptic-drugs resistant epilepsy is controversial. The aim of this study was to perform an exploratory study to identify nucleotide changes and search new and reported mutations in patients with antiepileptic-drugs resistant epilepsy (ADR and patients with good response to anti-epileptic drugs (CTR in a rigorously selected population. We analyzed 22 samples from drug-resistant patients with epilepsy and 7 samples from patients with good response to anti-epileptic drugs. Genomic DNA was obtained from leukocytes. Eleven exons in both genes were genotyped. The concentration of drugs in saliva and plasma was determined. The concentration of valproic acid in saliva was lower in ADR than in CRT. In ABCB1, five reported SNPs and five unreported nucleotide changes were identified; rs2229109 (GA and rs2032582 (AT and AG were found only in the ADR. Of six SNPs associated with the ABCC2 that were found in the study population, rs3740066 (TT and 66744T>A (TG were found only in the ADR. The strongest risk factor in the ABCB1 gene was identified as the TA genotype of rs2032582, whereas for the ABCC2 gene the strongest risk factor was the T allele of rs3740066. The screening of SNPs in ACBC1 and ABCC2 indicates that the Mexican patients with epilepsy in this study display frequently reported ABCC1 polymorphisms; however, in the study subjects with a higher risk factor for drug resistance, new nucleotide changes were found in the ABCC2 gene. Thus, the population of Mexican patients with AED-resistant epilepsy used in this study exhibits genetic variability with respect to those reported in other study populations; however, it is necessary to explore this polymorphism in a larger population of patients with AED-resistant epilepsy.

  19. Absence-like and tonic seizures in aspartoacylase/attractin double-mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohma, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Matalon, Reuben; Surendran, Sankar; Tyring, Stephen; Kitada, Kazuhiro; Sasa, Masashi; Serikawa, Tadao

    2007-04-01

    The Spontaneously Epileptic Rat (SER), a double-mutant for tremor and zitter mutations, shows spontaneous occurrences of absence-like and tonic seizures. Several lines of evidence suggest that the combined effect of Aspa and Atrn mutations is the most likely cause of the epileptic phenotype of the SER. To address this issue, we produced a new double-mutant mouse line carrying both homozygous Aspa-knockout and Atrn(mg-3J) mutant alleles. The Aspa/Atrn double-mutant mice exhibited absence-like and tonic seizures that were characterized by the appearance of 5-7 Hz spike-wave-like complexes and low voltage fast waves on EEGs. These results demonstrate directly that the simultaneous loss of the Aspa and Atrn gene functions causes epileptic seizures in the mouse and suggest that both Aspa and Atrn deficiencies might be responsible for epileptic seizures in the SER.

  20. Epileptic seizures as the first symptom of Wernicke's encephalopathy with cerebral cortical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kailei; Tian, Li; Xue, Weishuang; Teng, Weiyu

    2017-06-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is acute metabolic disease of the central nervous system caused by deficiency of thiamine. Typical imaging findings are bilateral and symmetric signal in mammillary bodies, medial thalamus and periaqueductal gray. We present a 45-year-old man diagnosed for WE with two seizures and unconsciousness. The magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral and symmetrical signal hyper-intensities in the frontal and parietal cortex, in addition to the classical MRI findings of WE. Cortical damage in WE is rare. The patient was improved significantly from unconsciousness to obeying commands and answering questions after 3days by thiamine supplementation. But the muscle strength and conscious state did not improve after 1year. This case report reminds us that we should take into account the possibility of WE when imaging shows cortical damage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of patients diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Lorna; Vaidya-Mathur, Urmi; Lancman, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are treated with psychotherapy, the effectiveness of most psychotherapeutic modalities remains understudied. In this treatment series of 16 patients dually diagnosed with PNES and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we evaluated the effect of prolonged exposure therapy (PE) on reduction of PNES. Secondary measures included Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Post-Traumatic Disorder Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Subjects diagnosed with video EEG-confirmed PNES and PTSD confirmed through neuropsychological testing and clinical interview were treated with traditional PE psychotherapy with certain modifications for the PNES. Treatment was conducted over the course of 12-15 weekly sessions. Seizure frequency was noted in each session by examining the patients' seizure logs, and mood and PTSD symptomatology was assessed at baseline and on the final session. Eighteen subjects enrolled, and 16 (88.8%) completed the course of treatment. Thirteen of the 16 (81.25%) therapy completers reported no seizures by their final PE session, and the other three reported a decline in seizure frequency (Z=-3.233, p=0.001). Mean scores on scales of depression (M=-13.56, SD=12.27; t (15)=-4.420, ptraumatic symptomatology. Follow-up revealed that gains made in seizure control on the last day of treatment were maintained over time. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizure in patients with intellectual disability with special focus on choice of therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemoto, Kousuke; Goji, Hiroko; Tadokoro, Yukari; Kato, Etsushi; Oshima, Tomohiro

    2017-02-01

    There have been a number of studies exploring treatments for psychogenic non-epileptic seizure (PNES) but largely neglecting the sizable subgroup of patients with intellectual disability (ID). In the present study, we attempted to demonstrate effects and preferred modes of therapeutic intervention in PNES patients with ID being treated at a Japanese municipal center with a short referral chain. We examined 46 PNES patients with ID (ID group) and 106 PNES patients without ID (non-ID group) retrospectively in case charts. In addition to examining basic demographic and clinical data, effects of different therapeutic intervention were examined as a function of decrease or disappearance of PNES attacks in the ID group. Age at the first visit as well as PNES onset was younger in the ID than in the non-ID group (t=2.651, p=0.009; t=3.528, p=0.001, respectively). PNES-free ratio at the last visit tended to be higher in the non-ID group (chi square=3.455; p=0.063). Psychosis was more often encountered in the ID group (chi square=13.443; p=0.001). Although cognitive therapy and pharmaco-therapeutic approaches were quite similarly distributed in both groups, environmental adjustment was often introduced in the ID group (44%) as compared to the non-ID group (15%) (chi square=14.299; p=0.001). Brief weekly visit service is also more often utilized by the patients with ID (54%) than by those without ID (35%) (chi square=5.021, p=0.025). Optimal treatment approaches in this sizable patient subgroup should be the subject of future prospective studies. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Semiologic classification of psychogenic non epileptic seizures (PNES) based on video EEG analysis: do we need new classification systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadwekar, Vaibhav; Nair, Pradeep Pankajakshan; Murgai, Aditya; Thirunavukkarasu, Sibi; Thazhath, Harichandrakumar Kottyen

    2014-03-01

    Different studies have described useful signs to diagnose psychogenic non-epileptic seizure (PNES). A few authors have tried to describe the semiologic groups among PNES patients; each group consisting of combination of features. But there is no uniformity of nomenclature among these studies. Our aim was to find out whether the objective classification system proposed by Hubsch et al. was useful and adequate to classify PNES patient population from South India. We retrospectively analyzed medical records and video EEG monitoring data of patients, recorded during 3 year period from June 2010 to July 2013. We observed the semiologic features of each PNES episode and tried to group them strictly adhering to Hubsch et al. classification. Minor modifications were made to include patients who were left unclassified. A total of 65 patients were diagnosed to have PNES during this period, out of which 11 patients were excluded due to inadequate data. We could classify 42(77.77%) patients without modifying the defining criteria of the Hubsch et al. groups. With minor modification we could classify 94.96% patients. The modified groups with patient distribution are as follows: Class 1--dystonic attacks with primitive gestural activities [3(5.6%)]. Class 2 – paucikinetic attacks with or without preserved responsiveness [5(9.3%)]. Class 3--pseudosyncope with or without hyperventilation [21(38.9%)]. Class 4--hyperkinetic prolonged attacks with hyperventilation, involvement of limbs and/or trunk [14(25.9%)]. Class 5--axial dystonic attacks [8(14.8%)]. Class 6--unclassified type [3(5.6%)]. This study demonstrates that the Hubsch's classification with minor modifications is useful and adequate to classify PNES patients from South India. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimized Seizure Detection Algorithm: A Fast Approach for Onset of Epileptic in EEG Signals Using GT Discriminant Analysis and K-NN Classifier

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    Azizi E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is a severe disorder of the central nervous system that predisposes the person to recurrent seizures. Fifty million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy; after Alzheimer’s and stroke, it is the third widespread nervous disorder. Objective: In this paper, an algorithm to detect the onset of epileptic seizures based on the analysis of brain electrical signals (EEG has been proposed. 844 hours of EEG were recorded form 23 pediatric patients consecutively with 163 occurrences of seizures. Signals had been collected from Children’s Hospital Boston with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz through 18 channels in order to assess epilepsy surgery. By selecting effective features from seizure and non-seizure signals of each individual and putting them into two categories, the proposed algorithm detects the onset of seizures quickly and with high sensitivity. Method: In this algorithm, L-sec epochs of signals are displayed in form of a thirdorder tensor in spatial, spectral and temporal spaces by applying wavelet transform. Then, after applying general tensor discriminant analysis (GTDA on tensors and calculating mapping matrix, feature vectors are extracted. GTDA increases the sensitivity of the algorithm by storing data without deleting them. Finally, K-Nearest neighbors (KNN is used to classify the selected features. Results: The results of simulating algorithm on algorithm standard dataset shows that the algorithm is capable of detecting 98 percent of seizures with an average delay of 4.7 seconds and the average error rate detection of three errors in 24 hours. Conclusion: Today, the lack of an automated system to detect or predict the seizure onset is strongly felt.

  5. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

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    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA- induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus

  6. Dynamics of evoked local field potentials in the hippocampus of epileptic rats with spontaneous seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Queiroz, C.M.; Gorter, J.A.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Wadman, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    A change in neuronal network excitability within the hippocampus is one of the hallmarks of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the dentate gyrus (DG), however, neuronal loss and mossy fiber sprouting are associated with enhanced inhibition rather than progressive hyperexcitability. The aim of this

  7. High expression of cystine-glutamate antiporter xCT (SLC7A11) is an independent biomarker for epileptic seizures at diagnosis in glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mai Froberg; Heimisdóttir, Sólborg Berglind; Sørensen, Mia Dahl

    2018-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are an important cause of morbidity in glioma patients. Substantial lines of evidence support the concept of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate being a crucial mediator of glioma-associated seizures. In gliomas, non-vesicular secretion of glutamate via the cystine-glutamate...... exchanger (SLC7A11, xCT) constitutes the main mechanism contributing to high extracellular glutamate concentrations. However, a convincing "proof-of-relevance" of this mechanism in patient material is lacking. A cohort of 229 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed glioma was analyzed with respect...... tumor using tissue microarrays. In addition to histological grading of the tumors, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) R132H mutational status was determined by immunohistochemistry. 215 consecutive glioma patients were included in the study (7.4% grade II, 7.0% grade III, 85.6% grade IV). High x...

  8. Ginkgo biloba L. attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures and associated neurological conditions in lithium-pilocarpine rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy through inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway hyperactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Arindam Ghosh; Sharma, Pallavi; Patial, Vikram; Singh, Damanpreet

    2017-05-23

    Ginkgo biloba L. (Ginkgoaceae) has been widely used in traditional medicine for variety of neurological conditions particularly behavioral and memory impairments. The present study was envisaged to explore the effect of a standardized fraction of Ginkgo biloba leaves (GBbf) in rat model of lithium-pilocarpine induced spontaneous recurrent seizures, and associated behavioral impairments and cognitive deficit. Rats showing appearance of spontaneous recurrent seizures following lithium pilocarpine (LiPc)-induced status epilepticus (SE) were treated with different doses of GBbf or vehicle for subsequent 4 weeks. The severity of seizures and aggression in rats were scored following treatment with GBbf. Further, open field, forced swim, novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests were conducted. Histopathological, protein levels and gene expression studies were performed in the isolated brains. Treatment with GBbf reduced seizure severity score and aggression in epileptic animals. Improved spatial cognitive functions and recognition memory, along with reduction in anxiety-like behavior were also observed in the treated animals. Histopathological examination by Nissl staining showed reduction in neuronal damage in the hippocampal pyramidal layer. The dentate gyrus and Cornu Ammonis 3 regions of the hippocampus showed reduction in mossy fiber sprouting. GBbf treatment attenuated ribosomal S6 and pS6 proteins, and hippocampal mTOR, Rps6 and Rps6kb1 mRNA levels. The results of present study concluded that GBbf treatment suppressed lithium-pilocarpine induced spontaneous recurrent seizures severity and incidence with improved cognitive functions, reduced anxiety-like behavior and aggression. The effect was found to be due to inhibition of mTOR pathway hyperactivation linked with recurrent seizures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Video-ambulatory EEG in a secondary care center: A retrospective evaluation of utility in the diagnosis of epileptic and nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Andrew; Manfredonia, Francesco; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-04-01

    The development and optimization of protocols using simultaneous video recording alongside long-term electroencephalography (EEG), such as ambulatory EEG (AEEG), expanded the range of available techniques for the investigation of paroxysmal clinical events. In particular, video-AEEG has received increasing attention over the last few years because of its potential to further improve diagnostic utility in the differential diagnosis between epileptic and nonepileptic seizures. We retrospectively evaluated 88 video-AEEG studies in order to assess the diagnostic utility of video-AEEG in 87 patients consecutively referred to a neurophysiology department. Typical clinical events occurred during 55 studies (62.5%). In 26 of these, at least one event was also clearly seen on video recording, contributing to a confident diagnosis. Clinical events were classified according to three diagnostic categories: epileptic seizures (6 studies, 6.8%), physiologic nonepileptic events (13 studies, 14.8%), or psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (36 studies, 40.9%). Of the studies with an event not recorded on video, a confident diagnosis could be reached in 55.2% of cases. The main reason for unsuccessful video recording was failure to activate the camcorder by the patient or carer. We found an overall diagnostic utility of 67.0%, which confirms the findings of previous reports evaluating the diagnostic yield of AEEG. Implementation of video-AEEG protocols in a secondary care center appears to have high diagnostic utility, particularly for patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. Our findings prompt further research into the potential applications of video-AEEG, in consideration of important implications for successful patient management and healthcare resource allocation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diurnal patterns and relationships between physiological and self-reported stress in patients with epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Barbora; Harris, Peter R; Reuber, Markus

    2017-05-01

    Patients with epilepsy and those with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) experience high levels of stress and stress is one of the most frequently self-identified seizure precipitants. Although stress is a multifaceted phenomenon, few studies have systematically examined its different components in patients with seizures. The aim of this study was therefore to describe diurnal patterns of psychological and physiological measures of stress in patients with epilepsy and patients with PNES, and explore their relationships to each other in order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying stress and seizure occurrence in these patients. A range of stress markers including self-reported stress, salivary cortisol, and heart rate variability (HRV) were explored in adult patients with refractory epilepsy (N=22) and those with PNES (N=23) undergoing three- to five-day video-telemetry. A diurnal pattern was observed in the physiological measures, characterized by higher levels of physiological arousal in the mornings and lower levels at night in both patients with epilepsy and PNES. The physiological measures (cortisol and HRV) were associated with each other in patients with epilepsy; no close relationship was found with self-reported stress in either of the two patient groups. The findings contribute to and expand on previous studies of the patterns of stress in patients with seizures. The results also indicate a discrepancy between patients' physiological responses and their subjective stress perceptions, suggesting that simple self-reports cannot be used as a proxy of physiological arousal in patients with seizures and stress. Stress in these patient groups should be studied using a combination of complementary measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Electroacupuncture at ST36-ST37 and at Ear Ameliorates Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizure Rats

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    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that mossy fiber sprouting can occur in the hippocampus region in rats 6 wk after kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure, and this mossy fiber sprouting can facilitate epileptogenesis. Transcutaneous auricular vagal nerve stimulation (VNS, which is similar to cervical VNS, can reduce the occurrence of epileptic seizure in intractable epilepsy patients. Greater parasympathetic nerve activity can be caused by 2 Hz electroacupuncture (EA. Therefore, we investigated the effect of 2 Hz EA at ST-36-ST37 and at the ear on mossy fiber sprouting in kainic-treated Sprague-Dawley rats. The results indicated that applying 2 Hz EA at ST36-ST37 and at the ear for 3 d per week over 6 consecutive weeks can ameliorate mossy fiber sprouting in the hippocampus region of rats. These results indicated that applying 2 Hz EA at ST36-ST37 and at the ear might be beneficial for the treatment and prevention of epilepsy in humans.

  12. The effect of PTZ-induced epileptic seizures on hippocampal expression of PSA-NCAM in offspring born to kindled rats

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    Rajabzadeh Aliakbar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal epileptic seizures during pregnancy can affect the hippocampal neurons in the offspring. The polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM, which is expressed in the developing central nervous system, may play important roles in neuronal migration, synaptogenesis, and axonal outgrowth. This study was designed to assess the effects of kindling either with or without maternal seizures on hippocampal PSA-NCAM expression in rat offspring. Methods Forty timed-pregnant Wistar rats were divided into four groups: A Kind+/Seiz+, pregnant kindled (induced two weeks prior to pregnancy rats that received repeated intraperitoneal (i.p. pentylenetetrazol, PTZ injections on gestational days (GD 14-19; B Kind-/Seiz+, pregnant non-kindled rats that received PTZ injections on GD14-GD19; C Kind+/Seiz-, pregnant kindled rats that did not receive any PTZ injections; and D Kind-/Seiz-, the sham controls. Following birth, the pups were sacrificed on PD1 and PD14, and PSA-NCAM expression and localization in neonates’ hippocampi were analyzed by Western blots and immunohistochemistry. Results Our data show a significant down regulation of hippocampal PSA-NCAM expression in the offspring of Kind+/Seiz+ (p = 0.001 and Kind-/Seiz+ (p = 0.001 groups compared to the sham control group. The PSA-NCAM immunoreactivity was markedly decreased in all parts of the hippocampus, especially in the CA3 region, in Kind+/Seiz+ (p = 0.007 and Kind-/Seiz+ (p = 0.007 group’s newborns on both PD1 and 14. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that maternal seizures but not kindling influence the expression of PSA-NCAM in the offspring’s hippocampi, which may be considered as a factor for learning/memory and cognitive impairments reported in children born to epileptic mothers.

  13. Epileptic Seizures are Reduced by Autonomic Biofeedback Therapy Through Enhancement of Fronto-limbic Connectivity: A Controlled Trial and Neuroimaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko; Aram, Julia; Koepp, Matthias; Lemieux, Louis; Mula, Marco; Critchley, Hugo; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Cercignani, Mara

    2018-01-01

    Thirty-percent of patients with epilepsy are drug-resistant, and might benefit from effective noninvasive therapeutic interventions. Evidence is accumulating on the efficacy of autonomic biofeedback therapy using galvanic skin response (GSR; an index of sympathetic arousal) in treating epileptic seizures. This study aimed to extend previous controlled clinical trials of autonomic biofeedback therapy with a larger homogeneous sample of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. In addition, we used neuroimaging to characterize neural mechanisms of change in seizure frequency following the therapy. Forty patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (age: 18 to 70years old), on stable doses of anti-epileptic medication, were recruited into a controlled and parallel-group trial from three screening centers in the UK. Patients were allocated to either an active intervention group, who received therapy with GSR biofeedback, or a control group, who received treatment as usual. Allocation to the group was informed, in part, by whether patients could travel to attend repeated therapy sessions (non-randomized). Measurement of outcomes was undertaken by an assessor blinded to the patients' group membership. Resting-state functional and structural MRI data were acquired before and after one month of therapy in the therapy group, and before and after a one-month interval in the control group. The percentage change of seizure frequency was the primary outcome measure. The analysis employed an intention-to-treat principle. The secondary outcome was the change in default mode network (DMN) and limbic network functional connectivity tested for effects of therapy. The trial was registered with the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) portfolio (ID 15967). Data were acquired between May 2014 and October 2016. Twenty participants were assigned to each group. Two patients in the control group dropped out before the second scan, leaving 18 control participants. There

  14. [PI 3 K/Akt signaling pathway contributed to the protective effect of acupuncture intervention on epileptic seizure-induced injury of hippocampal pyramidal cells in epilepsy rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Ang, Wen-Ping; Shen, De-Kai; Liu, Xiang-Guo; Yang, Yong-Qing; Ma, Yun

    2013-02-01

    To observe the protective effect of acupuncture stimulation on pyramidal cells in hippocampal CA 1 and CA 3 regions and to analyze the involvement of phosphatidy linositol-3-kinase (PI 3 K)/protein kinase B(PKB or Akt) signaling pathway in the acupuncture effect in epilepsy rats. A total of 120 SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group, model group, LY 294002 (a specific antagonist for PI 3 K/Akt signaling) group, acupuncture+ LY 294002 group and acupuncture group (n = 24 in each group, 12 for H. E. staining, and 12 for electron microscope observation). Epilepsy model was established by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 5 microL). Manual acupuncture stimulation was applied to "Baihui" (GV 20) and "Dazhui" (GV 14) once daily for 5 days. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO, 5 microL, a control solvent) was given to rats of the normal, model and acupuncture groups, and LY294002 (5 microL, dissolved in DMSO) given to rats of the LY 294002 and acupuncture+ LY 294002 groups by lateral ventricular injection. Four hours and 24 h after modeling, the hippocampus tissues were sampled for observing pathological changes of CA 1 and CA 3 regions after H. E. staining under light microscope and for checkin ultrastructural changes of the pyramidal cells under transmission electron microscope. In comparison with the normal control group, the numbers of pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 3 region in the model group were decreased significantly 4 h and 24 h after epileptic seizure (P acupuncture group were increased considerably in the number at both 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P acupuncture+ LY 294002 and model groups in the numbers of pyramidal cells at 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P > 0.05). Findings of the light microscope and electron microscope showed that the injury severity of pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 1 and CA 3 regions was moderate 4 h after epileptic seizure and even worse 24 h after seizure in the model group, LY 294002 group and acupuncture+ LY

  15. Epilepsy in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures Epilepsia em pacientes com crises não epilépticas psicogênicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Luiz Marchetti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of epilepsy in patients who presented psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES. The evaluation was carried out during intensive VEEG monitoring in a diagnostic center for epilepsy in a university hospital. The difficulties involved in reaching this diagnosis are discussed. Ninety-eight patients underwent intensive and prolonged video-electroencephalographic (VEEG monitoring; out of these, a total of 28 patients presented PNES during monitoring. Epilepsy was defined as present when the patient presented epileptic seizures during VEEG monitoring or when, although not presenting epileptic seizures during monitoring, the patient presented unequivocal interictal epileptiform discharges. The frequency of epilepsy in patients with PNES was 50% (14 patients. Our findings suggest that the frequency of epilepsy in patients with PNES is much higher than that of previous studies, and point out the need, at least in some cases, for prolonging the evaluation of patients with PNES who have clinical histories indicating epilepsy.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a frequência de epilepsia em pacientes que apresentaram crises não epilépticas psicogênicas (CNEP. Isto foi realizado durante monitoração intensiva por video-EEG num centro diagnóstico de epilepsia em um hospital universitário. As dificuldades envolvidas para se chegar a este diagnóstico são discutidas. Noventa e oito pacientes foram submetidos a monitoração intensiva por video-EEG; 28 destes pacientes apresentaram CNEP durante a monitoração. Epilepsia foi considerada presente quando o paciente apresentou crises epilépticas durante a avaliação pelo video-EEG ou quando, apesar da não ocorrência de crises epilépticas durante a avaliação, descargas epilépticas interictais inequívocas estavam presentes. A frequência de epilepsia em pacientes com CNEP foi 50% (14 pacientes. Nossos achados sugerem que a frequência de epilepsia em

  16. Crise epiléptica focal ipsilateral a tumor cerebral: relato de caso Focal epileptic seizures ipsilateral to the tumor: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Silva Gusmão

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se um caso de crise focal somatosensorial ipsilateral a tumor cerebral e revê-se a literatura. Trata-se de ocorrência excepcional, tendo sido descritos apenas seis casos. Vários mecanismos fisiopatológicos foram propostos para explicar a crise focal somatosensorial ipsilateral. A proximidade das lesões da convexidade cerebral baixa (perisilviana sugere o comprometimento da área somatosensorial secundária e parece comprovar os achados experimentais de crises somatosensoriais originadas desta área.Focal somatosensory epileptic seizures ipsilateral to a brain tumor is reported and the literature reviewed. It is an exceptional occurrence, having been described only six cases, with several mechanisms being proposed. The proximity of the lesions with the low cerebral convexity (perisylvian suggests the compromising of the secondary somatosensorial area, seeming to prove the experimental observation of somatosensorial crises originating in this area.

  17. Epileptic Angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshbabu, Sachin; Nayak, Dinesh; Peter, Sudhir; Sobhana, Chindripu; Mittal, Gaurav

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the probable ictal origin of unexplained episodic chest pain and if possible to lateralize and localize the epileptic focus. A 14 year old boy presented with episodic short lasting localized chest pain. His cardiac and other systemic work-up were normal. MRI brain did not reveal any structural pathology. Video telemetry was done for characterization of the paroxysms. Interictal record showed left fronto-central epileptiform discharges. A left hemispheric, predominantly centroparietal ictal rhythm was identified. The possible localizations of this unusual semiology are somatosensory areas I and II, supplementary sensorimotor area, posterior insula and cingulate cortex. Patient responded remarkably to antiseizure drugs. Pain is a rare manifestation of epilepsy observed in less than 1% of patients. When present, it is usually accompanied by other focal features. This rare occurrence of epileptic seizures masquerading as angina is a novel observation.

  18. Dentate gyrus progenitor cell proliferation after the onset of spontaneous seizures in the tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Shtaya, A.B.Y.; Bodansky, D.M.S.; Chang, W.C.; Gray, W.P.; Jefferys, J. G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, Jun 2013 (2013), s. 492-498 ISSN 0969-9961 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : spontaneous seizures * temporal lobe epilepsy * neurogenesis * tetanus toxin * apoptosis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.202, year: 2013

  19. High-frequency network activity, global increase in neuronal activity, and synchrony expansion precede epileptic seizures in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiruska, Premysl; Csicsvari, Jozsef; Powell, Andrew D; Fox, John E; Chang, Wei-Chih; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Li, Xiaoli; Palus, Milan; Bujan, Alejandro F; Dearden, Richard W; Jefferys, John G R

    2010-04-21

    How seizures start is a major question in epilepsy research. Preictal EEG changes occur in both human patients and animal models, but their underlying mechanisms and relationship with seizure initiation remain unknown. Here we demonstrate the existence, in the hippocampal CA1 region, of a preictal state characterized by the progressive and global increase in neuronal activity associated with a widespread buildup of low-amplitude high-frequency activity (HFA) (>100 Hz) and reduction in system complexity. HFA is generated by the firing of neurons, mainly pyramidal cells, at much lower frequencies. Individual cycles of HFA are generated by the near-synchronous (within approximately 5 ms) firing of small numbers of pyramidal cells. The presence of HFA in the low-calcium model implicates nonsynaptic synchronization; the presence of very similar HFA in the high-potassium model shows that it does not depend on an absence of synaptic transmission. Immediately before seizure onset, CA1 is in a state of high sensitivity in which weak depolarizing or synchronizing perturbations can trigger seizures. Transition to seizure is characterized by a rapid expansion and fusion of the neuronal populations responsible for HFA, associated with a progressive slowing of HFA, leading to a single, massive, hypersynchronous cluster generating the high-amplitude low-frequency activity of the seizure.

  20. Antimuscarinic-induced convulsions in fasted mice after food intake: No evidence of spontaneous seizures, behavioral changes or neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enginar, Nurhan; Nurten, Asiye; Türkmen, Aslı Zengin; Gündoğan, Gül İpek; Özünal, Zeynep Güneş

    2017-01-01

    Prolonged or repeated seizures have been shown to cause spontaneous recurrent seizures, increased anxiety‑related behavior, locomotor hyperactivity, impaired functions of learning and memory, and neuronal damage in the hippocampus and other brain regions in animals. Mice and rats treated with antimuscarinic drugs after fasting for two days or less develop convulsions after being allowed to eat ad libitum. To address whether such behavioral and neuroanatomic changes occur following these convulsions, mice treated i.p. with saline (control) or 2.4 mg/kg atropine and given food after 24 h of fasting were grouped according to seizure scores for behavioral and histological analysis. Following convulsions, the occurrence of spontaneous recurrent seizures was observed for 30 days. Motor activity and grooming behavior were assessed in the open field, and memory was assessed using the novel object recognition test 4 and 7 days after onset of convulsions, respectively. Animals allocated for the histological analysis were decapitated 7 days after onset of convulsions and hippocampal slices were evaluated for the percentage of degenerating neurons stained with Fluoro‑Jade C. Spontaneous recurrent seizures, locomotor alterations, anxiety‑related behavior, memory impairment, and neuronal loss in the granular layer of the dentate gyrus were not detected in the animals with seizure score 1-2 or 3-5. These results are in accordance with those related to the absence of behavioral changes, cognitive deficits, and hippocampal neuronal damage after single brief seizures in animals and patients with epilepsy.

  1. Effects of single-dose neuropeptide Y on levels of hippocampal BDNF, MDA, GSH, and NO in a rat model of pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Maral Kir

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, characterized by recurrent seizures, which may increase the content of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Th e objective of this study was to investigate the eff ects of Neuropeptide Y on oxidative and nitrosative balance and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by pentylenetetrazole (a standard convulsant drug in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. Th ree groups of seven rats were treated intraperitoneally as follows: group  (saline + saline  ml saline, group  (salin + Pentylenetetrazole  ml saline  min before Pentylenetetrazole; and group  (Neuropeptide Y + Pentylenetetrazole  μg/kg Neuropeptide Y  min before  mg/kg Pentylenetetrazole. After  h, the animals were euthanized by decapitation. Hippocampus were isolated to evaluate the malondialdehyde, glutathione, nitric oxide, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in three rat groups. Th e results of this study demonstrated that while intraperitoneally administered neuropeptide Y did not result in a statistically signifi cant diff erence in BDNF levels, its administration caused a statistically signifi cant decrease in malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels and an increase in glutathione levels in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure. Neuropeptide Y were able to reduce nitroxidative damage induced by pentylenetetrazole in the hippocampus of Wistar rats.

  2. Validity of the clinical and content scales of the Multiphasic Personality Inventory Minnesota 2 for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio, A; Jiménez-Huete, A; Toledano, R; García-Morales, I; Gil-Nagel, A

    2016-03-01

    The use of the Multiphasic Personality Inventory Minnesota 2 (MMPI-2) for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is controversial. This study examines the validity of the clinical scales and, unlike previous works, the content scales. Cross-sectional study of 209 patients treated in the epilepsy unit. We performed a logistic regression analysis, taking video-electroencephalography as the reference test, and as predictor variables age, sex, IQ and clinical (model A) or content scales (model B) of the MMPI-2. The models were selected according to the Aikake index and compared using the DeLong test. We analyzed 37 patients with PNES alone, or combined with seizures, and 172 patients with seizures only. The model consisting of sex, Hs (hypochondriasis) and Pa (paranoia) showed a sensitivity of 77.1%, a specificity of 76.8%, a percentage of correct classification of 76.8%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.836 for diagnosing CNEP. Model B, consisting of sex, HEA (health concerns) and FRS (fears), showed a sensitivity of 65.7%, a specificity of 78.0%, a percentage of correct classification of 75.9% and an AUC of 0.840. DeLong's test did not detect significant differences. The MMPI-2 has a moderate validity for the diagnosis of PNES in patients referred to an epilepsy unit. Using content scales does not significantly improve results from the clinical scales. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. COgnitive behavioural therapy vs standardised medical care for adults with Dissociative non-Epileptic Seizures (CODES): a multicentre randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Laura H; Mellers, John D C; Landau, Sabine; Stone, Jon; Carson, Alan; Medford, Nick; Reuber, Markus; Richardson, Mark; McCrone, Paul; Murray, Joanna; Chalder, Trudie

    2015-06-27

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of psychological interventions for patients with dissociative non-epileptic seizures (DS) is currently extremely limited, although data from two small pilot randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including from our group, suggest that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) may be effective in reducing DS occurrence and may improve aspects of psychological status and psychosocial functioning. The study is a multicentre, pragmatic parallel group RCT to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of specifically-tailored CBT plus standardised medical care (SMC) vs SMC alone in reducing DS frequency and improving psychological and health-related outcomes. In the initial screening phase, patients with DS will receive their diagnosis from a neurologist/epilepsy specialist. If patients are eligible and interested following the provision of study information and a booklet about DS, they will consent to provide demographic information and fortnightly data about their seizures, and agree to see a psychiatrist three months later. We aim to recruit ~500 patients to this screening stage. After a review three months later by a psychiatrist, those patients who have continued to have DS in the previous eight weeks and who meet further eligibility criteria will be told about the trial comparing CBT + SMC vs SMC alone. If they are interested in participating, they will be given a further booklet on DS and study information. A research worker will see them to obtain their informed consent to take part in the RCT. We aim to randomise 298 people (149 to each arm). In addition to a baseline assessment, data will be collected at 6 and 12 months post randomisation. Our primary outcome is monthly seizure frequency in the preceding month. Secondary outcomes include seizure severity, measures of seizure freedom and reduction, psychological distress and psychosocial functioning, quality of life, health service use, cost effectiveness and adverse

  4. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  5. Auricular Acupuncture May Suppress Epileptic Seizures via Activating the Parasympathetic Nervous System: A Hypothesis Based on Innovative Methods

    OpenAIRE

    He, Wei; Rong, Pei-Jing; Li, Liang; Ben, Hui; Zhu, Bing; Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a diagnostic and treatment system based on normalizing the body's dysfunction. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that auricular acupuncture has a significant effect on inducing parasympathetic tone. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder consisting of recurrent seizures resulting from excessive, uncontrolled electrical activity in the brain. Autonomic imbalance demonstrating an increased sympathetic activity and a reduced parasympathetic activation is inv...

  6. Epileptic seizure detection using DWT-based approximate entropy, Shannon entropy and support vector machine: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmila, A; Aman Raj, Suman; Shashank, Pandey; Mahalakshmi, P

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we have used a time-frequency domain analysis method called discrete wavelet transform (DWT) technique. This method stand out compared to other proposed methods because of its algorithmic elegance and accuracy. A wavelet is a mathematical function based on time-frequency analysis in signal processing. It is useful particularly because it allows a weak signal to be recovered from a noisy signal without much distortion. A wavelet analysis works by analysing the image and converting it to mathematical function which is decoded by the receiver. Furthermore, we have used Shannon entropy and approximate entropy (ApEn) for extracting the complexities associated with electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. The ApEn is a suitable feature to characterise the EEGs because its value drops suddenly due to excessive synchronous discharge of neurons in the brain during epileptic activity in this study. EEG signals are decomposed into six EEG sub-bands namely D1-D5 and A5 using DWT technique. Non-linear features such as ApEn and Shannon entropy are calculated from these sub-bands and support vector machine classifiers are used for classification purpose. This scheme is tested using EEG data recorded from five healthy subjects and five epileptic patients during the inter-ictal and ictal periods. The data are acquired from University of Bonn, Germany. The proposed method is evaluated through 15 classification problems, and obtained high classification accuracy of 100% for two cases and it indicates the good classifying performance of the proposed method.

  7. Health related quality of life of people with non-epileptic seizures: The role of socio-demographic characteristics and stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Catherine; Myers, Lorna; Pretorius, Chrisma; Lian, Olaug S; Reuber, Markus

    2018-02-01

    People with non-epileptic seizures (NES) consistently report poorer Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) than people with epilepsy. Yet, unlike in epilepsy, knowledge of how social factors influence the HRQoL of adults with NES is limited. To add to the evidence base, this study explores the relationship between HRQoL and perceived stigma among adults with NES, and the role of socio-demographic characteristics. Data was gathered from a survey of 115 people living with the condition, recruited from online support groups. Participants provided socio-demographic and health-related data and completed a series of questions investigating their HRQoL (QOLIE-31) and stigma perceptions (10-item Epilepsy Stigma Scale). Participants were found to experience high levels of perceived stigma (median 5.2, mean 4.9). A significant and moderate inverse correlation was observed between HRQoL and stigma (r s  - 0.474, p = stigma contribute to poorer HRQoL among adults with NES. Stigma perceptions were found to be most strongly associated with the seizure worry (r s  = - 0.479), emotional wellbeing (r s  = - 0.421), and social functioning (r s  = 0.407) HRQoL domains. Participants who reported being in employment or education were found to have significantly better HRQoL than those who were not (p = < 0.001). More (qualitative and quantitative) research is justified to understand how - and why - those with the condition experience stigmatisation, and the factors that impede and help facilitate the participation of people with NES in education and employment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Terminology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Ausserer, Harald; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Michele; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-03-01

    Several different terms have been used to describe "psychogenic nonepileptic seizures" (PNES) in the literature. In this study, we evaluated the most common English terms used to describe PNES on Google and in PubMed using multiple search terms (https://www.google.com and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). The information prevalence of the five terms most frequently used to refer to PNES in PubMed were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by pseudo(-)seizure(s), non(-)epileptic seizure(s), psychogenic seizure(s), and non(-)epileptic event(s). The five most frequently adopted terms to describe PNES in Google were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by non(-)epileptic event(s), psychogenic attack(s), non(-)epileptic attack(s), and psychogenic non(-)epileptic attack(s). The broad spectrum of synonyms used to refer to PNES in the medical literature reflects a lack of internationally accepted, uniform terminology for PNES. In addition to "seizure(s)," lay people use the word "attack(s)" to describe PNES. Although considered obsolete, some terms, e.g., pseudoseizure(s), are still used in the recent medical literature. Adopting a uniform terminology to describe PNES could facilitate communication between epileptologists, physicians without specific expertise in epilepsy, and patients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Joe Yuezhou; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if u...

  10. Designing Patient-Specific Optimal Neurostimulation Patterns for Seizure Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Roman A; Geng, Kunling; Song, Dong; Hampson, Robert E; Witcher, Mark R; Deadwyler, Sam A; Berger, Theodore W; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z

    2018-03-22

    Neurostimulation is a promising therapy for abating epileptic seizures. However, it is extremely difficult to identify optimal stimulation patterns experimentally. In this study, human recordings are used to develop a functional 24 neuron network statistical model of hippocampal connectivity and dynamics. Spontaneous seizure-like activity is induced in silico in this reconstructed neuronal network. The network is then used as a testbed to design and validate a wide range of neurostimulation patterns. Commonly used periodic trains were not able to permanently abate seizures at any frequency. A simulated annealing global optimization algorithm was then used to identify an optimal stimulation pattern, which successfully abated 92% of seizures. Finally, in a fully responsive, or closed-loop, neurostimulation paradigm, the optimal stimulation successfully prevented the network from entering the seizure state. We propose that the framework presented here for algorithmically identifying patient-specific neurostimulation patterns can greatly increase the efficacy of neurostimulation devices for seizures.

  11. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eGreyson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. 55% of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients’ reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  12. Seizure semiology: value in identifying seizure origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Mohammed M S; Girvin, John P

    2008-03-01

    The diagnosis of epilepsy depends upon a number of factors, particularly detailed and accurate seizure history, or semiology. Other diagnostic data, consisting of electroencephalography, video-monitoring of the seizures, and magnetic resonance imaging, are important in any comprehensive epilepsy program, particularly with respect to lateralizing and localizing the seizure focus, if such a focus exists, and with respect to determining the type of seizure or seizure syndrome. The aim of this review is to present a survey of important semiologic characteristics of various seizures that provide the historian with observations, which help to lateralize and localize epileptic zones. Clinical semiology is the starting point of understanding a seizure disorder and making the diagnosis of epilepsy. While it may not provide unequivocal evidence of localization of the epileptic focus, nevertheless it usually directs subsequent investigations, whose concordance is necessary for the ultimate localization.

  13. Assessing quantitative EEG spectrograms to identify non-epileptic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Ajay; Boro, Alexis; Yozawitz, Elissa

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative EEG (QEEG) spectrograms in order to distinguish epileptic from non-epileptic events. Seventeen patients with paroxysmal non-epileptic events, captured during EEG monitoring, were retrospectively assessed using QEEG spectrograms. These patients were compared to a control group of 13 consecutive patients (ages 25-60 years) with epileptic seizures of similar semiology. Assessment of raw EEG was employed as the gold standard against which epileptic and non-epileptic events were validated. QEEG spectrograms, available using Persyst 12 EEG system integration software, were each assessed with respect to their usefulness to distinguish epileptic from non-epileptic seizures. The given spectrogram was interpreted as indicating a seizure if, at the time of the clinically identified event, it showed a visually significant change from baseline. Eighty-two clinically identified paroxysmal events were analysed (46 non-epileptic and 36 epileptic). The "seizure detector trend analysis" spectrogram correctly classified 33/46 (71%) non-epileptic events (no seizure indicated during a clinically identified event) vs. 29/36 (81%) epileptic seizures (seizure indicated during a clinically identified event) (p=0.013). Similarly, "rhythmicity spectrogram", FFT spectrogram, "asymmetry relative spectrogram", and integrated-amplitude EEG spectrogram detected 28/46 (61%), 30/46 (65%), 22/46 (48%) and 27/46 (59%) non-epileptic events vs. 27/36 (75%), 25/36 (69%), 25/36 (69%) and 27/36 (75%) epileptic events, respectively. High sensitivities and specificities for QEEG seizure detection analyses suggest that QEEG may have a role at the bedside to facilitate early differentiation between epileptic seizures and non-epileptic events in order to avoid unnecessary administration of antiepileptic drugs and possible iatrogenic consequences.

  14. A 1.83 μJ/Classification, 8-Channel, Patient-Specific Epileptic Seizure Classification SoC Using a Non-Linear Support Vector Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Altaf, Muhammad Awais; Yoo, Jerald

    2016-02-01

    A non-linear support vector machine (NLSVM) seizure classification SoC with 8-channel EEG data acquisition and storage for epileptic patients is presented. The proposed SoC is the first work in literature that integrates a feature extraction (FE) engine, patient specific hardware-efficient NLSVM classification engine, 96 KB SRAM for EEG data storage and low-noise, high dynamic range readout circuits. To achieve on-chip integration of the NLSVM classification engine with minimum area and energy consumption, the FE engine utilizes time division multiplexing (TDM)-BPF architecture. The implemented log-linear Gaussian basis function (LL-GBF) NLSVM classifier exploits the linearization to achieve energy consumption of 0.39 μ J/operation and reduces the area by 28.2% compared to conventional GBF implementation. The readout circuits incorporate a chopper-stabilized DC servo loop to minimize the noise level elevation and achieve noise RTI of 0.81 μ Vrms for 0.5-100 Hz bandwidth with an NEF of 4.0. The 5 × 5 mm (2) SoC is implemented in a 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process consuming 1.83 μ J/classification for 8-channel operation. SoC verification has been done with the Children's Hospital Boston-MIT EEG database, as well as with a specific rapid eye-blink pattern detection test, which results in an average detection rate, average false alarm rate and latency of 95.1%, 0.94% (0.27 false alarms/hour) and 2 s, respectively.

  15. Self-esteem and psychiatric features of Turkish adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a comparative study with epilepsy and healthy control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Say, Gokçe N; Tasdemir, Haydar A; Akbas, Seher; Yüce, Murat; Karabekiroglu, Koray

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and epilepsy are known to have psychosocial problems. The aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial difficulties, history of stressful life events/abuse, psychiatric diagnosis, and self-esteem of adolescents with PNES to the ones with epilepsy and healthy controls at a tertiary care center in Turkey. Thirty-four adolescents with PNES diagnosed by video-EEG were compared with 23 adolescents that have epilepsy and 35 healthy volunteers. Comorbid psychiatric diagnoses of participants were examined by semi-structured interviews using Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (KSADS-PL). Self-esteem of adolescents was evaluated by Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). No differences in sociodemographic features were observed between the groups. The PNES group showed significantly higher rates of parental conflicts, difficulties in relationship with siblings/peers, school under-achievement, and history of stressful events/abuse. The rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders were 64.7% in PNES and 47.8% in epilepsy group. The most common disorders in both groups were attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depressive disorder. The rate of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was significantly increased in the PNES group. Additionally, adolescents with PNES displayed significantly lower levels of self-esteem than the other groups. It could be concluded that both disorders involved a high risk for developing psychiatric disorders; additionally, adolescents with PNES have higher rates of stressors and lower levels of self-esteem. Findings from this investigation point to the importance of psychiatric interventions in pediatric PNES and also epilepsy.

  16. Comparisons of childhood trauma, alexithymia, and defensive styles in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures vs. epilepsy: Implications for the etiology of conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Marcia J; Dwivedi, Alok K; Privitera, Michael D; Isaacs, Kelly; Hughes, Cynthia; Bowman, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    It has been theorized that conversion disorder is the result of emotion that cannot be experienced consciously as feeling states or put into words (i.e., alexithymia), but there is little confirming empirical evidence. We sought to characterize subjects with conversion disorder compared to subjects with a distinct medical illness, using the model of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) vs. epilepsy (ES), on measures of childhood traumatic experience, alexithymia and maturity of psychological defensive strategies. All subjects admitted to the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center were offered self-report questionnaires (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 and Response Evaluation Measure-71) at the outset of evaluation. Diagnosis of each subject was confirmed by video-EEG and we compared subjects with PNES to those with ES on these measures. 82 subjects had ES AND 96 had PNES. Those with PNES were significantly more likely to have experienced childhood trauma in all domains (p=.005 to p=.05), and were significantly more likely to have alexithymia (p=.0267). There was a significant difference in the capacity to identify feelings, and a trend towards significance in capacity to describe feelings. There were no differences in defensive styles between the two groups. PNES diagnosis was associated with female sex, higher alexithymia scores and higher rates of childhood trauma, but not with differences in defensive styles compared to ES. These findings add empirical evidence for theories regarding the cause of conversion disorder and may aid in the design of prospective treatment trials in patients with conversion disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mozart K.448 attenuates spontaneous absence seizure and related high-voltage rhythmic spike discharges in Long Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Juan, Chun-Ting; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Chiang, Ching-Tai; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has revealed more evidence supporting the positive effects of music on humans and animals. However, evidence of music's effects on improving epilepsy in animals is sparse. This study aimed to clarify the influence of Mozart's music in Long Evans rats, which are characterized by spontaneous absence epilepsy (SAE) and high-voltage rhythmic spike (HVRS) discharges. Continuous electroencephalograms comprised of HVRS discharges, and behavioral performance were recorded in Long Evans rats (n=5) before, during, and after exposure to the Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major, K.448 (Mozart K.448). The same evaluation was repeated after they had been subjected to daily exposure of the music for 20 days. Seizure frequencies and spontaneous HVRS discharges were reduced in all of the SAE rats during and after music exposure compared with the pre-music stage. The average seizure frequencies were 79.8±24.6, 48±15.2, and 33±12.1/h before, during, and after music exposure, respectively. The average run of spike episodes were 84.6±18.4, 52±17.8, and 36.8±16.9/h before, during, and after music exposure, respectively. The seizure frequencies and related run of spike episodes decreased by 39.8% and 38.5% during, and 58.6% and 56.6% post music exposure, respectively. The average run of spike durations and spike numbers also showed significant decreases (reduction by 47.1%, 47.8% during music and 60.8%, 61.3% post music). After daily music exposure for 20 days, the number of HVRS discharges and seizure frequencies during and after music exposure, however, showed no further accumulative reduction or adaptation effect. These results suggest that Mozart K.448 had a positive short-term effect in attenuating the spontaneous HVRS discharges in Long Evans rats. However, the mechanism needs further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy.

  19. Treatment of Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent the most severe epilepsies, with onset in infancy and childhood and seizures continuing in adulthood in most cases. New genetic causes are being identified at a rapid rate. Treatment is challenging and the overall outcome remains poor. Available targeted treatments, based on the precision medicine approach, are currently few. To provide an overview of the treatment of epileptic encephalopathies with known genetic determinants, including established treatment, anecdotal reports of specific treatment, and potential tailored precision medicine strategies. Genes known to be associated to epileptic encephalopathy were selected. Genes where the association was uncertain or with no reports of details on treatment, were not included. Although some of the genes included are associated with multiple epilepsy phenotypes or other organ involvement, we have mainly focused on the epileptic encephalopathies and their antiepileptic treatments. Most epileptic encephalopathies show genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. The treatment of seizures is difficult in most cases. The available evidence may provide some guidance for treatment: for example, ACTH seems to be effective in controlling infantile spams in a number of genetic epileptic encephalopathies. There are potentially effective tailored precision medicine strategies available for some of the encephalopathies, and therapies with currently unexplained effectiveness in others. Understanding the effect of the mutation is crucial for targeted treatment. There is a broad range of disease mechanisms underlying epileptic encephalopathies, and this makes the application of targeted treatments challenging. However, there is evidence that tailored treatment could significantly improve epilepsy treatment and prognosis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Functional imaging of epileptic activity in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Vulliemoz, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Around 20% of patients suffering from epilepsy have medically refractory seizures and epilepsy surgery can offer a cure or at least a significant improvement of their seizures. in well selected patients. A comprehensive work-up combining different imaging techniques is necessary to localise brain regions involved in the epileptic network. Simultaneous ElectroEncephaloGraphy and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (EEG-fMRI) is a new technique that allows mapping epileptic networks at a whol...

  1. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvasini Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  2. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Suvasini; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  3. Inflammatory changes during epileptogenesis and spontaneous seizures in a mouse model of mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernot, Fabien; Heinrich, Christophe; Barbier, Laure; Peinnequin, André; Carpentier, Pierre; Dhote, Franck; Baille, Valérie; Beaup, Claire; Depaulis, Antoine; Dorandeu, Frédéric

    2011-12-01

    Neuroinflammation appears as a prominent feature of the mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy syndrome (MTLE) that is observed in human patients and animal models. However, the precise temporal relationship of its development during epileptogenesis remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate (1) the time course and spatial distribution of neuronal death associated with seizure development, (2) the time course of microglia and astrocyte activation, and (3) the kinetics of induction of mRNAs from neuroinflammatory-related proteins during the emergence of recurrent seizures. Experimental MTLE was induced by the unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainate in C57BL/6 adult mice. Microglial and astrocytic changes in both ipsilateral and contralateral hippocampi were examined by respectively analyzing griffonia simplicifolia (GSA) lectin staining and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity. Changes in mRNA levels of selected genes of cytokine and cytokine regulatory proteins (interleukin-1β, IL-1β; interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, IL-1Ra; suppressor of cytokine signaling 3, SOCS3) and enzymes of the eicosanoid pathway (group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2, cPLA(2)-α; cycloxygenase-2, COX-2) were studied by reverse transcription-quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Our data show an immediate cell death occurring in the kainate-injected hippocampus during the initial status epilepticus (SE). A rapid increase of activated lectin-positive cells and GFAP-immunoreactivity was subsequently detected in the ipsilateral hippocampus. In the same structure, Il-1β, IL-1Ra, and COX-2 mRNA were specifically increased during SE and epileptogenesis with a different time course. Conversely, the expression of SOCS3 mRNA, a surrogate marker of interleukin signaling, was mainly increased in the contralateral hippocampus after SE. Our data show that specific neuroinflammatory pathways are activated in a time- and structure

  4. Herbal treatment following post-seizure induction in rat by lithium pilocarpine: Scutellaria lateriflora (Skullcap), Gelsemium sempervirens (Gelsemium) and Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) may prevent development of spontaneous seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peredery, Oksana; Persinger, Michael A

    2004-09-01

    About 1 week after the induction of status epilepticus in male rats by a single systemic injection of lithium (3 mEq/kg) and pilocarpine (30 g/kg), rats were continuously administered one of three herbal treatments through the water supply for 30 days. A fourth group received colloidal minerals and diluted food grade hydrogen peroxide in tap water, while a fifth group of rats received only tap water (control). Herbal treatments were selected for their historical antiseizure activities and sedative actions on the nervous system. The numbers of spontaneous seizures per day during a 15 min observation interval were recorded for each rat during the treatment period and during an additional 30 days when only tap water was given. Rats that received a weak solution of the three herbal fluid extracts of Scutellaria lateri flora (Skullcap), Gelsemium sempervirens (Gelsemium) and Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) displayed no seizures during treatment while all the other groups were not seizure-free. However, when this treatment was removed, the rats in this group displayed numbers of spontaneous seizures comparable to the controls. Although there is no proof that herbal remedies can control limbic or temporal lobe epilepsy, the results of this experiment strongly suggest that the appropriate combination of herbal compounds may be helpful as adjunctive interventions. Copyright (c) 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Pathophysiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lado, Fred A; Rubboli, Guido; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Capovilla, Pippo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Moshé, Solomon L

    2013-11-01

    The application of metabolic imaging and genetic analysis, and now the development of appropriate animal models, has generated critical insights into the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathies. In this article we present ideas intended to move from the lesions associated with epileptic encephalopathies toward understanding the effects of these lesions on the functioning of the brain, specifically of the cortex. We argue that the effects of focal lesions may be magnified through the interaction between cortical and subcortical structures, and that disruption of subcortical arousal centers that regulate cortex early in life may lead to alterations of intracortical synapses that affect a critical period of cognitive development. Impairment of interneuronal function globally through the action of a genetic lesion similarly causes widespread cortical dysfunction manifesting as increased delta slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and as developmental delay or arrest clinically. Finally, prolonged focal epileptic activity during sleep (as occurring in the syndrome of continuous spike-wave in slow sleep, or CSWSS) might interfere with local slow wave activity at the site of the epileptic focus, thereby impairing the neural processes and, possibly, the local plastic changes associated with learning and other cognitive functions. Seizures may certainly add to these pathologic processes, but they are likely not necessary for the development of the cognitive pathology. Nevertheless, although seizures may be either a consequence or symptom of the underlying lesion, their effective treatment can improve outcomes as both clinical and experimental studies may suggest. Understanding their substrates may lead to novel, effective treatments for all aspects of the epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. l-Carnitine Modulates Epileptic Seizures in Pentylenetetrazole-Kindled Rats via Suppression of Apoptosis and Autophagy and Upregulation of Hsp70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz M. Hussein

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available l-Carnitine is a unique nutritional supplement for athletes that has been recently studied as a potential treatment for certain neuropsychiatric disorders. However, its efficacy in seizure control has not been investigated. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive either saline (Sal (negative control or pentylenetetrazole (PTZ 40 mg/kg i.p. × 3 times/week × 3 weeks. The PTZ group was further subdivided into two groups, the first received oral l-carnitine (l-Car (100 mg/kg/day × 4 weeks (PTZ + l-Car, while the second group received saline (PTZ + Sal. Daily identification and quantification of seizure scores, time to the first seizure and the duration of seizures were performed in each animal. Molecular oxidative markers were examined in the animal brains. l-Car treatment was associated with marked reduction in seizure score (p = 0.0002 that was indicated as early as Day 2 of treatment and continued throughout treatment duration. Furthermore, l-Car significantly prolonged the time to the first seizure (p < 0.0001 and shortened seizure duration (p = 0.028. In addition, l-Car administration for four weeks attenuated PTZ-induced increase in the level of oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde (MDA (p < 0.0001 and reduced the activity of catalase enzyme (p = 0.0006 and increased antioxidant GSH activity (p < 0.0001. Moreover, l-Car significantly reduced PTZ-induced elevation in protein expression of caspase-3 (p < 0.0001 and β-catenin (p < 0.0001. Overall, our results suggest a potential therapeutic role of l-Car in seizure control and call for testing these preclinical results in a proof of concept pilot clinical study.

  7. Crises epilépticas no período neonatal: análise descritiva de uma população hospitalar Neonatal epileptic seizures: descriptive analysis in a hospital population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soniza Vieira Alves-Leon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar a incidência e a letalidade de crises epilépticas neonatais e as condições associadas à sua presença. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo observacional de base hospitalar com crianças nascidas de janeiro de 1995 a dezembro de 2004 acompanhadas por quatro semanas após o parto. Analisaram-se os dados referentes aos períodos pré-natal, intraparto e neonatal. RESULTADOS: Foram identificados 6.600 nascidos vivos de 6.483 partos, encontrando-se 61 casos incidentes de crises epilépticas neonatais (0,9%. A primeira crise ocorreu até 12 horas após o parto em 45,3% dos neonatos. Das mães analisadas, 32,8% apresentaram síndromes hipertensivas. Entre os 61 pacientes, 91,8% eram conceptos únicos e 4,9% eram primeiro e segundo gemelares. O peso foi menor que 2500g em 50,8% e a restri��ão do crescimento intrauterino ocorreu em 25,9% das gestações analisadas. Obervaram-se: hipoglicemia neonatal (56,5%, icterícia neonatal (52,1% e asfixia perinatal (70,7%. Desenvolveram sepse bacteriana 32 crianças e 17 apresentaram síndrome de aspiração meconial ao nascer. O desequilíbrio ácido-básico ocorreu em 68,1% ao longo de 28 dias pós-parto. A letalidade foi de 47,4%, sendo mais frequente no sexo masculino (65,6% e em filhos de mães afro-descendentes (67,2%. CONCLUSÕES: A incidência de crises epilépticas no período neonatal identificada neste estudo foi três a quatro vezes superior à incidência relatada em hospitais de países desenvolvidos, embora as características dos casos fossem semelhantes. A letalidade foi de 47,4% e a asfixia grave foi a condição patológica intraparto mais frequente.OBJECTIVE:To investigate their incidence and lethality of neonatal epileptic seizures and their associated conditions. METHODS: A retrospective observational hospital-based study was carried out in infants born between January 1995 and December 2004. The infants were followed up for four weeks after birth. Data on the

  8. Current understanding and neurobiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvin, Stéphane; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2016-08-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a group of diseases in which epileptic activity itself contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone. These impairments can worsen over time. This concept has been continually redefined since its introduction. A few syndromes are considered epileptic encephalopathies: early myoclonic encephalopathy and Ohtahara syndrome in the neonatal period, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome or infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome during infancy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-and-waves during sleep, and Landau-Kleffner syndrome during childhood. The inappropriate use of this term to refer to all severe epilepsy syndromes with intractable seizures and severe cognitive dysfunction has led to confusion regarding the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. Here, we review our current understanding of those epilepsy syndromes considered to be epileptic encephalopathies. Genetic studies have provided a better knowledge of neonatal and infantile epilepsy syndromes, while neuroimaging studies have shed light on the underlying causes of childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Apart from infantile spasm models, we lack animal models to explain the neurobiological mechanisms at work in these conditions. Experimental studies suggest that neuroinflammation may be a common neurobiological pathway that contributes to seizure refractoriness and cognitive involvement in the developing brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Positive allosteric modulator of mGluR4 PHCCC exhibits proconvulsant action in three models of epileptic seizures in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szczurowska, Ewa; Mareš, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2012), s. 619-628 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/1188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : convulsions * absence seizures * immature rat * metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  10. Early Seizure Detection by Applying Frequency-Based Algorithm Derived from the Principal Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiseon; Park, Junhee; Yang, Sejung; Kim, Hani; Choi, Yun Seo; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Lee, Hyang Woon; Lee, Byung-Uk

    2017-01-01

    The use of automatic electrical stimulation in response to early seizure detection has been introduced as a new treatment for intractable epilepsy. For the effective application of this method as a successful treatment, improving the accuracy of the early seizure detection is crucial. In this paper, we proposed the application of a frequency-based algorithm derived from principal component analysis (PCA), and demonstrated improved efficacy for early seizure detection in a pilocarpine-induced epilepsy rat model. A total of 100 ictal electroencephalographs (EEG) during spontaneous recurrent seizures from 11 epileptic rats were finally included for the analysis. PCA was applied to the covariance matrix of a conventional EEG frequency band signal. Two PCA results were compared: one from the initial segment of seizures (5 sec of seizure onset) and the other from the whole segment of seizures. In order to compare the accuracy, we obtained the specific threshold satisfying the target performance from the training set, and compared the False Positive (FP), False Negative (FN), and Latency (Lat) of the PCA based feature derived from the initial segment of seizures to the other six features in the testing set. The PCA based feature derived from the initial segment of seizures performed significantly better than other features with a 1.40% FP, zero FN, and 0.14 s Lat. These results demonstrated that the proposed frequency-based feature from PCA that captures the characteristics of the initial phase of seizure was effective for early detection of seizures. Experiments with rat ictal EEGs showed an improved early seizure detection rate with PCA applied to the covariance of the initial 5 s segment of visual seizure onset instead of using the whole seizure segment or other conventional frequency bands.

  11. Crise não epiléptica psicogênica: história e crítica de um conceito Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: history and critique of a concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Kurcgant

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Discute o desenvolvimento do conhecimento psiquiátrico sobre a crise não epiléptica psicogênica (CNEP, buscando iluminar os pressupostos epistemológicos do conceito e suas implicações práticas. Em sua definição atual, crises ou ataques recorrentes são manifestações comportamentais semelhantes às da epilepsia, mas que dela diferem por não serem consequentes de descargas elétricas cerebrais anormais, podendo ter origem psicogênica. Em direção inversa da metafísica, investiga-se a emergência histórica do conceito de CNEP nos últimos quarenta anos. Conceitos de comorbidade psiquiátrica, abuso e dissociação foram discutidos devido a sua participação na trajetória conceitual de CNEP.This discussion of the evolution of psychiatric knowledge concerning psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES sheds light on the epistemological assumptions underlying the concept and on its practical implications as well. PNES are defined as repeated seizures or attacks which can be mistaken for epilepsy because of the similar behavioral changes displayed, but which differ in that they are not the result of abnormal electrical activity in the brain and may be psychogenic in origin. The article investigates the historical development of the concept of PNES over the past forty years. The concepts of psychiatric comorbidity, abuse, and dissociation enter the discussion owing to their roles in the checkered development of the concept of PNES.

  12. Dynamin 1 isoform roles in a mouse model of severe childhood epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asinof, Samuel; Mahaffey, Connie; Beyer, Barbara; Frankel, Wayne N; Boumil, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Dynamin 1 is a large neuron-specific GTPase involved in the endocytosis and recycling of pre-synaptic membranes and synaptic vesicles. Mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 1 (DNM1) underlie two epileptic encephalopathy syndromes, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome and Infantile Spasms. Mice homozygous for the Dnm1 "fitful" mutation, a non-synonymous coding variant in an alternatively spliced exon of Dnm1 (exon 10a; isoform designation: Dnm1a(Ftfl)) have an epileptic encephalopathy-like disorder including lethal early onset seizures, locomotor and neurosensory deficits. Although fitful heterozygotes have milder recurrent seizures later in life, suggesting an additive or semi-dominant mechanism, the molecular etiology must also consider the fact that Dnm1a(Ftfl) exerts a dominant negative effect on endocytosis in vitro. Another complication is that the fitful mutation induces alterations in the relative abundance of Dnm1 splice variants; mutants have a downregulation of Dnm1a and an upregulation of Dnm1b, changes which may contribute to the epileptic pathology. To examine whether Dnm1a loss of function, Dnm1a(Ftfl) dominance or compensation by Dnm1b is the most critical for severe seizures, we studied alternate isoform-specific mutant mice. Mice lacking Dnm1 exon 10a or Dnm1 exon 10b have neither spontaneous seizures nor other overt abnormalities, suggesting that in normal conditions the major role of each isoform is redundant. However, in the presence of Dnm1a(Ftfl) only exon 10a deleted mice experience severe seizures. These results reveal functional differences between Dnm1a and Dnm1b isoforms in the presence of a challenge, i.e. toxic Dnm1(Ftfl), while reinforcing its effect explicitly in this model of severe pediatric epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Methodological standards for in vitro models of epilepsy and epileptic seizures. A TASK1-WG4 report of the AES/ILAE Translational Task Force of the ILAE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raimondo, J. V.; Heinemann, U.; de Curtis, M.; Goodkin, H. P.; Dulla, Ch. G.; Janigro, D.; Ikeda, A.; Lin, Ch.-Ch. K.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Galanopoulou, A. S.; Bernard, Ch.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, Suppl.4 (2017), s. 40-52 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-33115A; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08565S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : brain slice preparation * electrophysiological recording methods * recording solution composition * in vitro models of seizures * animal selection and killing Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  14. A prospective observational longitudinal study of new-onset seizures and newly diagnosed epilepsy in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsø, N; Toft, Nils; Sabers, A.

    2017-01-01

    Seizures are common in dogs and can be caused by non-epileptic conditions or epilepsy. The clinical course of newly diagnosed epilepsy is sparsely documented. The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate causes for seizures (epileptic and non-epileptic) in a cohort of dogs with ne...

  15. Localization of focal epileptic discharges using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stufflebeam, Steven M; Liu, Hesheng; Sepulcre, Jorge; Tanaka, Naoaki; Buckner, Randy L; Madsen, Joseph R

    2011-06-01

    In patients with medically refractory epilepsy the accurate localization of the seizure onset zone is critical for successful surgical treatment. The object of this study was to investigate whether the degree of coupling of spontaneous brain activity as measured with functional connectivity MR imaging (fcMR imaging) can accurately identify and localize epileptic discharges. The authors studied 6 patients who underwent fcMR imaging presurgical mapping and subsequently underwent invasive electroencephalography. Focal regions of statistically significant increases in connectivity were identified in 5 patients when compared with an ad hoc normative sample of 300 controls. The foci identified by fcMR imaging overlapped the epileptogenic areas identified by invasive encephalography in all 5 patients. These results suggest that fcMR imaging may provide an effective high-spatial resolution and noninvasive method of localizing epileptic discharges in patients with refractory epilepsy.

  16. Menstrual cycle worsening of epileptic seizures in women with symptomatic focal epilepsy Piora de crises epilépticas durante o período menstrual em mulheres com epilepsia focal sintomática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Belini Bazán

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hormonal fluctuation is responsible for worsening of epileptic seizures during the menstrual cycle. OBJETIVE: To identify irregularities in the menstrual cycles of women with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE and extratemporal focal epilepsy (ETFE and correlate the frequency of seizures during the menstrual cycles. METHOD: We evaluated prospectively women in the menacme with MTLE and ETFE. Calendars were provided for these patients, and they were asked to mark their seizure frequency according to the menses. Calendars were reviewed in each routine medical appointment. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients with MTLE and 14 with ETFE were evaluated. We registered 211 cycles in the patients with MTLE and 49 in those with ETFE. Irregular menstrual cycles were found in 28 (28/39, 71.7% patients with MTLE and 6 (6/14, 42.8% with ETFE (p=0.052. Premenstrual seizure worsening was observed in 46 (21.8% patients with MTLE and 9 (18.3% with ETFE (p=0.596. Menstrual worsening was observed in 47 (22.2% patients with MTLE and 15 (30.6% with ETFE (p=0. 217. Ovulatory worsening was observed in 36 (17% patients with MTLE and 13 (26.5% with ETFE (p=0,126. Catamenial worsening was observed in 58 (27.4% of the patients with MTLE and in 17 (34.7% of the patients with ETFE (p=0.315. CONCLUSION: There was no difference between the group of patients with MTLE and ETFE regarding the frequency of irregular cycles and seizure worsening during the premenstrual, menstrual, catamenial or ovulatory periods.INTRODUÇÃO: Admite-se que a flutuação hormonal seja a responsável para a piora de crises epilépticas no período catamenial. OBJETIVO: Identificar irregularidades nos ciclos menstruais de mulheres com epilepsia de lobo temporal mesial (ELTM e epilepsia focal extratemporal (EFET; e relacionar a frequencia de crises durante o ciclo menstrual. MÉTODO: Avaliamos mulheres na menacme, que apresentem quadro clínico laboratorial compatível com ELTM e EFET. Foram

  17. Seizure variables and cognitive performance in patients with epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are scanty reports on the contributions of seizure variables like seizure types, frequency of seizures, duration of epilepsy, age at onset and anti-epileptic drugs to cognitive disturbances in Nigerian Africans. This study assessed the effects of seizure variables on the cognitive performances of patients with epilepsy.

  18. Fractal Dimension in Epileptic EEG Signal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthayakumar, R.

    Fractal Analysis is the well developed theory in the data analysis of non-linear time series. Especially Fractal Dimension is a powerful mathematical tool for modeling many physical and biological time signals with high complexity and irregularity. Fractal dimension is a suitable tool for analyzing the nonlinear behaviour and state of the many chaotic systems. Particularly in analysis of chaotic time series such as electroencephalograms (EEG), this feature has been used to identify and distinguish specific states of physiological function.Epilepsy is the main fatal neurological disorder in our brain, which is analyzed by the biomedical signal called Electroencephalogram (EEG). The detection of Epileptic seizures in the EEG Signals is an important tool in the diagnosis of epilepsy. So we made an attempt to analyze the EEG in depth for knowing the mystery of human consciousness. EEG has more fluctuations recorded from the human brain due to the spontaneous electrical activity. Hence EEG Signals are represented as Fractal Time Series.The algorithms of fractal dimension methods have weak ability to the estimation of complexity in the irregular graphs. Divider method is widely used to obtain the fractal dimension of curves embedded into a 2-dimensional space. The major problem is choosing initial and final step length of dividers. We propose a new algorithm based on the size measure relationship (SMR) method, quantifying the dimensional behaviour of irregular rectifiable graphs with minimum time complexity. The evidence for the suitability (equality with the nature of dimension) of the algorithm is illustrated graphically.We would like to demonstrate the criterion for the selection of dividers (minimum and maximum value) in the calculation of fractal dimension of the irregular curves with minimum time complexity. For that we design a new method of computing fractal dimension (FD) of biomedical waveforms. Compared to Higuchi's algorithm, advantages of this method include

  19. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

    OpenAIRE

    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave) activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clini...

  20. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  1. Persistent genital arousal disorder associated with functional hyperconnectivity of an epileptic focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzellotti, F; Franciotti, R; Bonanni, L; Tamburro, G; Perrucci, M G; Thomas, A; Pizzella, V; Romani, G L; Onofrj, M

    2010-04-28

    Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder (PGAD) refers to the experience of persistent sensations of genital arousal that are felt to be unprovoked, intrusive and unrelieved by one or several orgasms. It is often mistaken for hypersexuality since PGAD often results in a high frequency of sexual behaviour. At present little is known with certainty about the etiology of this condition. We described a woman with typical PGAD symptoms and orgasmic seizures that we found to be related to a specific epileptic focus. We performed a EEG/MEG and fMRI spontaneous activity study during genital arousal symptoms and after the chronic administration of 300 mg/day of topiramate. From MEG data an epileptic focus was localized in the left posterior insular gyrus (LPIG). FMRI data evidenced that sexual excitation symptoms with PGAD could be correlated with an increased functional connectivity (FC) between different brain areas: LPIG (epileptic focus), left middle frontal gyrus, left inferior and superior temporal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobe. The reduction of the FC observed after antiepileptic therapy was more marked in the left than in the right hemisphere in agreement with the lateralization identified by MEG results. Treatment completely abolished PGAD symptoms and functional hyperconnectivity. The functional hyperconnectivity found in the neuronal network including the epileptic focus could suggest a possible central mechanism for PGAD. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estudo de fatores clínicos preditivos para crises epilépticas após acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Maiumi Fukujima

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos aspectos clínicos de 35 pacientes com acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico que evoluíram com crises epilépticas (Grupo 1, comparando-os a 35 pacientes com AVCI sem crises epilépticas (Grupo 2. A comparação das idades entre os grupos não mostrou diferença significante. O sexo masculino e a raça branca predominaram em ambos os grupos. Diabetes melito, hipertensão arterial, ataque isquêmico transitório, acidente vascular cerebral pregresso, enxaqueca, doença de Chagas, embolia cerebral cardiogênica e uso de anticoncepcional oral não diferiram significantemente entre os grupos. Tabagismo e etilismo foram significantemente mais freqüentes no Grupo 1 (pPreditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1 were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2. The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p<0,05. Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  3. Epileptic Angina ?

    OpenAIRE

    Sureshbabu, Sachin; Nayak, Dinesh; Peter, Sudhir; Sobhana, Chindripu; Mittal, Gaurav

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the probable ictal origin of unexplained episodic chest pain and if possible to lateralize and localize the epileptic focus. Methods: A 14 year old boy presented with episodic short lasting localized chest pain. His cardiac and other systemic work-up were normal. MRI brain did not reveal any structural pathology. Video telemetry was done for characterization of the paroxysms. Results: Interictal record showed left fronto-central epileptiform discharges. A left he...

  4. Channel selection for automatic seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of epileptic seizure detection using only a few of the recorded EEG channels and the ability of software to select these channels compared with a neurophysiologist. Methods: Fifty-nine seizures and 1419 h of interictal EEG are used for training and testing...

  5. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  6. Frequency interactions in human epileptic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotic, Marija; Zalay, Osbert; Valiante, Taufik; Carlen, Peter L; Bardakjian, Berj L

    2011-01-01

    We have used two algorithms, wavelet phase coherence (WPC) and modulation index (MI) analysis to study frequency interactions in the human epileptic brain. Quantitative analyses were performed on intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) segments from three patients with neocortical epilepsy. Interelectrode coherence was measured using WPC and intraelectrode frequency interactions were analyzed using MI. WPC was performed on electrode pairings and the temporal evolution of phase couplings in the following frequency ranges: 1-4 Hz, 4-8 Hz, 8-13 Hz, 13-30 Hz and 30-100 Hz was studied. WPC was strongest in the 1-4 Hz frequency range during both seizure and non-seizure activities; however, WPC values varied minimally between electrode pairings. The 13-30 Hz band showed the lowest WPC values during seizure activity. MI analysis yielded two prominent patterns of frequency-specific activity, during seizure and non-seizure activities, which were present across all patients.

  7. Impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reserve in seizure patients with brain arteriovenous malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fierstra, Jorn; Conklin, John; Krings, Timo; Slessarev, Marat; Han, Jay S.; Fisher, Joseph A.; terBrugge, Karel; Wallace, M. Christopher; Tymianski, Michael; Mikulis, David J.

    Epileptic seizures are a common presentation in patients with newly diagnosed brain arteriovenous malformations, but the pathophysiological mechanisms causing the seizures remain poorly understood. We used magnetic resonance imaging-based quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity mapping and

  8. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  9. Complex partial seizure, disruptive behaviours and the Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Complex partial seizure is an epileptic seizure which results in impairment of responsiveness or awareness such as altered level of consciousness. Complex partial seizures are often preceded by an aura such as depersonalization, feelings of de javu, jamais vu and fear. The ictal phase of complex partial ...

  10. Migrating Partial Seizures of Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A national surveillance study in conjunction with the British Paediatric Neurology Unit was undertaken to further define the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic features of migrating partial seizures of infancy (MPSI, a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with poor prognosis.

  11. Eight to Twelve Hertz Occipital EEG Training with Moderate and Severely Retarded Epileptic Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrud, Eric; Striefel, Sebastian

    1981-01-01

    Three retarded epileptic individuals (17 to 22 years old) with a variety of seizure disorders were provided with 8 to 12 Hz occipital EEG biofeedback training. While seizures were not totally eliminated in any of the Ss, the results of the study indicated that all Ss exhibited decreases in some aspect of their seizure activity. (Author)

  12. Oxidant-Antioxidant Balance In Epileptic Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moawad, A.T.; Mohammed, A.A.; El-Maghraby, D.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which are characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is usually controlled, but cannot be cured with medications, although surgery may be considered in difficult cases. Over 30% of people with epilepsy don't have seizure control even with the best available medications. In epileptic children, oxidant-antioxidant balance is disturbed. Glutathione homeostasis may be altered as a consequence of reactive metabolites and/or reactive oxygen species produced during treatment with antiepileptic drugs. Per-oxidation of membrane lipid caused by an increase in generation of free radical or decrease in the activities of antioxidant defense systems have been suggested to be critically involved in seizure control. The effect of antiepileptic monotherapy as valproic acid (VPA) or carbamazepine (CBZ) or both on level of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as an index of antioxidant and the plasma of malondialdehyde (MDA) as an index of oxidative stress were studied in this study. Forty children (18 males and 22 females) with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, diagnosed in the Pediatric Neurology Unit, Children Hospital, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, were selected to represent group (1) with mean age of 5.13 ± 4.36 years. Thirty healthy children (14 males and 16 females) matched in age, sex and social life status served as normal control group (2). The results revealed that there was high significant increase in the plasma level of MDA in patients with idiopathic epilepsy as compared to the control while the serum level of GST was significantly decreased in epileptic children as compared to the control group. Non-significant difference in plasma level of MDA and serum level of GST among the epileptic subgroups was observed. In uncontrolled epileptic patients (seizures more than 4/month), the plasma level of MDA displayed higher significant increase than in controlled epileptic patients. On the other hand, serum GST

  13. Pharmacoepidemiology and prevalence of epileptic seizures in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish an estimated number of people living with epilepsy in southeastern Nigeria, to determine the prevalence and the utilization pattern of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). A cross sectional, observational survey was used in the study. Multi-stage random sampling technique was used to select ...

  14. Epileptic encephalopathies (including severe epilepsy syndromes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covanis, Athanasios

    2012-09-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a group of devastating epileptic disorders that appear early in life and are characterized by pharmacoresistant generalized or focal seizures, persistent severe electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction or decline. The ictal and interictal epileptic discharges are age-specific and are the main etiologic factors causing cognitive deterioration. This is most obvious in the idiopathic group. In the symptomatic group, the most common causes are structural, congenital, or acquired and rarely some metabolic disorders. In certain cases, clinical and EEG abnormalities persist and may evolve from one type to another as the child grows older. Various factors trigger and sustain the underlying pathophysiologic process and the ongoing epileptic and epileptiform activity during the most critical periods of brain maturation, perpetuating their deleterious effect on the brain. Immune-mediated mechanisms may have a role, suggested by certain encephalopathies responding to immune-modulating treatments and by the finding of various autoimmune antibodies. The chance of a better cognitive outcome improves with early diagnosis and treatment that is appropriate and effective. Current antiepileptic drugs are, in general, not effective: we urgently need new trials in this very special epileptic category. This article briefly reviews the most common epileptic encephalopathies and analyzes the most important clinical issues. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Inflammation in Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy that manifests with infantile spasms (IS), hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants), and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12%-15%), or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment (adrenocorticotropic hormone and high-dose steroids) and the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate proinflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review, we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of WS? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inflammation in epileptic encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EE) that manifests with infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants) and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12–15%) or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment [adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and high dose steroids], the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate pro-inflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of West syndrome? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? PMID:28427564

  17. The electroencephalogram during spontaneous night sleep in epileptic patients O eletrencefalograma durante o sono noturno espontâneo em pacientes epilépticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Moura Ribeiro

    1967-12-01

    Full Text Available The sleep sistem results of the activity of two components: a descending component originated in the limbic structures, and an ascending system involving the bulbopontine structures which receives projections from the spinal cord components. Although the neocortex is not necessary for sleep mechanisms, it plays a very important role in sleep. Therefore, during the sleep state there is no significant quantitative difference in brain activity, but qualitative changes are recorded in EEG of epileptics patients during all night sleep.Foram estudados os traçados eletrencefalográficos obtidos durante o sono noturno de 5 pacientes epilépticos. Os resultados demonstram que a atividade paroxística focal evidencia modificações tanto qualitativas como quantitativas quando registrada no l.° e 2.° estágios do sono. Por outro lado, o EEG com descargas difusas e bilaterais intensas na fase inicial do sono, apresenta ausência de paroxismo na fase paradoxal. Assim, a análise dos diversos estágios do sono evidencia diferenças qualitativas e quantitativas na atividade elétrica cerebral de pacientes epilépticos durante o sono noturno.

  18. Epileptic Seizures in Patients Following Surgical Treatment of Acute Subdural Hematoma-Incidence, Risk Factors, Patient Outcome, and Development of New Scoring System for Prophylactic Antiepileptic Treatment (GATE-24 score).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Sae-Yeon; Dubinski, Daniel; Herrmann, Eva; Cuca, Colleen; Strzelczyk, Adam; Seifert, Volker; Konczalla, Juergen; Freiman, Thomas M

    2017-05-01

    Clinically evident or subclinical seizures are common manifestations in acute subdural hematoma (aSDH); however, there is a paucity of research investigating the relationship between seizures and aSDH. The purpose of this study is 2-fold: determine incidence and predictors of seizures and then establish a guideline in patients with aSDH to standardize the decision for prophylactic antiepileptic treatment. The author analyzed 139 patients with aSDH treated from 2007 until 2015. Baseline characteristics and clinical findings including Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at admission, 24 hours after operation, timing of operation, anticoagulation, and Glasgow Outcome Scale at hospital discharge and after 3 months were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to detect independent predictors of seizures, and a scoring system was developed. Of 139 patients, overall incidence of seizures was 38%, preoperatively 16% and postoperatively 24%. Ninety percent of patients with preoperative seizures were seizure free after operation for 3 months. Independent predictors of seizures were GCS <9 (odds ratio [OR] 3.3), operation after 24 hours (OR 2.0), and anticoagulation (OR 2.2). Patients with seizures had a significantly higher rate of unfavorable outcome at hospital discharge (P = 0.001) and in 3-month follow-up (P = 0.002). Furthermore, a score system (GATE-24) was developed. In patients with GCS <14, anticoagulation, or surgical treatment 24 hours after onset, a prophylactic antiepileptic treatment is recommended. Occurrence of seizures affected severity and outcomes after surgical treatment of aSDH. Therefore seizure prophylaxis should be considered in high-risk patients on the basis of the GATE-24 score to promote better clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epileptic encephalopathy as models of system epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capovilla, Giuseppe; Moshé, Solomon L; Wolf, Peter; Avanzini, Giuliano

    2013-11-01

    The pathophysiology of epileptic encephalopathies has long been debated. Recently, some authors proposed the new concept of so-called system epilepsies. This hypothesis postulates that system epilepsies are produced by the enduring propensity to generate seizures in different cerebral areas that, alone, are unable to create a specific electroclinical phenotype. This goes beyond the classical dichotomy between focal and generalized epilepsy. Epileptic encephalopathies, in general, have the ideal profile to be considered as system epilepsies, and West syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome are two of the best examples. Apart from the conventional neurophysiologic methods for studying brain activities and the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying epileptic syndromes, other new methods of neuroimaging support this hypothesis. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS: clinical characteristics of seizures according to age at first seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miziara Carmen Silvia M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BECTS is characterized by the presence of simple partial motor seizures in the face and/or oropharynx, with or without sensory symptoms and often with secondary generalization. These seizures tend to occur more often during sleep or drowsiness. According to some authors, generalized seizures prevail over other types particularly among children aged five or less. The purpose of this study is to determine the characteristics of the first epileptic episode among children with BECTS, grouped by age as of their first epileptic seizure, as well as to analyze how such seizures change over the course of clinical evolution. A total of 61 children were examined, 16 of whom below the age of 5 and 45 above. With regard to the first and recurrent epileptic episodes, our final assessment showed that partial seizures occurred more frequently than generalized tonic-clonic seizures in both groups. Although no conclusive relation could be established between the type of partial seizure (i.e. simple versus complex and the children's age as of their first epileptic episode, it was possible to correlate the type of epileptic seizure with their clinical evolution, in which case simple partial seizures proved to be more frequent than complex partial seizures. It should be noted that the number of children under the age of five was relatively small, which evinces the need for further studies. It should also be borne in mind that the reported frequency of generalized seizures in these children's first epileptic episode may be due to their parents' lack of attention and familiarity with this pathology and their attendant difficulty in characterizing its clinical symptoms.

  1. Genetic epileptic encephalopathies: is all written into the DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; de Jonghe, Peter; Zara, Federico

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy is a condition in which epileptic activity, clinical or subclinical, is thought to be responsible for any disturbance of cognition, behavior, or motor control. However, experimental evidence supporting this clinical observation are still poor and the causal relationship between pharmacoresistant seizures and cognitive outcome is controversial. In the past two decades, genetic studies shed new light onto complex mechanisms underlying different severe epileptic conditions associated with intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities, thereby providing important clues on the relationship between seizures and cognitive outcome. Dravet syndrome is a childhood disorder associated with loss-of-function mutations in SCN1A and is characterized by frequent seizures and severe cognitive impairment, thus well illustrating the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. However, it is difficult to determine the causative role of the underlying sodium channel dysfunction and that of the consequent seizures in influencing cognitive outcome in these children. It is also difficult to demonstrate whether a recognizable profile of cognitive impairment or a definite behavioral phenotype exists. Data from the laboratory and the clinics may provide greater insight into the degree to which epileptic activity may contribute to cognitive impairment in individual syndromes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Epileptic Encephalopathies: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Sonia; Al Baradie, Raidah

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are an epileptic condition characterized by epileptiform abnormalities associated with progressive cerebral dysfunction. In the classification of the International League Against Epilepsy eight age-related epileptic encephalopathy syndromes are recognized. These syndromes include early myoclonic encephalopathy and Ohtahara syndrome in the neonatal period, West syndrome and Dravet syndrome in infancy, myoclonic status in nonprogressive encephalopathies, and Lennox-Ga...

  3. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent neonatal epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Bagci, S; Zschocke, J; Hoffmann, G F; Bast, T; Klepper, J; Müller, A; Heep, A; Bartmann, P; Franz, A R

    2009-01-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase converts pyridoxine phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate to pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor in many metabolic reactions, including neurotransmitter synthesis. A family with a mutation in the pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase gene presenting with neonatal seizures unresponsive to pyridoxine and anticonvulsant treatment but responsive to pyridoxal phosphate is described. Pyridoxal phosphate should be considered in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy unrespons...

  4. Deep Recurrent Neural Networks for seizure detection and early seizure detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talathi, S. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Epilepsy is common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.6-0.8 % of world population. Epileptic patients suffer from chronic unprovoked seizures, which can result in broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Since seizures, in general, occur infrequently and are unpredictable, automated seizure detection systems are recommended to screen for seizures during long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. In addition, systems for early seizure detection can lead to the development of new types of intervention systems that are designed to control or shorten the duration of seizure events. In this article, we investigate the utility of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in designing seizure detection and early seizure detection systems. We propose a deep learning framework via the use of Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) RNNs for seizure detection. We use publicly available data in order to evaluate our method and demonstrate very promising evaluation results with overall accuracy close to 100 %. We also systematically investigate the application of our method for early seizure warning systems. Our method can detect about 98% of seizure events within the first 5 seconds of the overall epileptic seizure duration.

  5. Autism spectrum disorder and epileptic encephalopathy: common causes, many questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Siddharth; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a particularly severe form of epilepsy, associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, including impaired social-communication and restricted, repetitive behaviors that are the hallmarks of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the genetic landscape of epileptic encephalopathies is growing and demonstrates overlap with genes separately implicated in ASD. However, many questions remain about this connection, including whether epileptiform activity itself contributes to the development of ASD symptomatology. In this review, we compiled a database of genes associated with both epileptic encephalopathy and ASD, limiting our purview to Mendelian disorders not including inborn errors of metabolism, and we focused on the connection between ASD and epileptic encephalopathy rather than epilepsy broadly. Our review has four goals: to (1) discuss the overlapping presentations of ASD and monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (2) examine the impact of the epilepsy itself on neurocognitive features, including ASD, in monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (3) outline many of the genetic causes responsible for both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy; (4) provide an illustrative example of a final common pathway that may be implicated in both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy. We demonstrate that autistic features are a common association with monogenic epileptic encephalopathies. Certain epileptic encephalopathy syndromes, like infantile spasms, are especially linked to the development of ASD. The connection between seizures themselves and neurobehavioral deficits in these monogenic encephalopathies remains open to debate. Finally, advances in genetics have revealed many genes that overlap in ties to both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy and that play a role in diverse central nervous system processes. Increased attention to the autistic features of monogenic epileptic encephalopathies is warranted for

  6. The role of epilepsy surgery in the treatment of childhood epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayyali, Husam R; Abdelmoity, Ahmed; Baeesa, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    Children with epileptic encephalopathy often have global impairment of brain function and frequent intractable seizures, which contribute further to their developmental disability. Many of these children have identifiable brain lesion on neurological imaging. In such cases, epilepsy surgery may be considered as a treatment option despite the lack of localized epileptic pattern on electroencephalogram (EEG). In this paper, we summarize the clinical features of epileptic encephalopathy syndromes and review the reported literature on the surgical approach to some of these disorders.

  7. The Role of Epilepsy Surgery in the Treatment of Childhood Epileptic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kayyali, Husam R.; Abdelmoity, Ahmed; Baeesa, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    Children with epileptic encephalopathy often have global impairment of brain function and frequent intractable seizures, which contribute further to their developmental disability. Many of these children have identifiable brain lesion on neurological imaging. In such cases, epilepsy surgery may be considered as a treatment option despite the lack of localized epileptic pattern on electroencephalogram (EEG). In this paper, we summarize the clinical features of epileptic encephalopathy syndrome...

  8. Epileptic Negative Myoclonus as the First and Only Symptom in a Challenging Diagnosis of Benign Epilepsy With Centrotemporal Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen MD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of epileptic negative myoclonus as the first and only ictal symptom of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. Methods: Electrophysiological evaluations included polygraphic recordings with simultaneous video electroencephalogram monitoring and tests performed with patient’s upper limb outstretched in standing posture. Epileptic negative myoclonus manifestations, electrophysiological features, and responses to antiepileptic drugs were analyzed. Results: The authors report 2 patients with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, who had epileptic negative myoclonus as the first and only seizure type. Video electroencephalogram monitoring results showed that their negative myoclonus seizures were emanating from the contralateral central and the parietal regions. Epileptic negative myoclonus was controlled by administration of valproate and levetiracetam. Conclusion: Epileptic negative myoclonus can be the first and only seizure type of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, and long-term follow-up monitoring should be the care for the recurrence and/or presence of other types of seizures.

  9. Prevalence of Migraine Headache in Epileptic Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayena Jabbehdari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which a physician might come across in his career life. On the other hand, migraine is common disorders in society chronic headache such as migraine in epileptic patients give ride to difficulties in seizure treatment due to altering the sleeping pattern and calmness disarrangement. Therefore, early diagnosis and suitable treatment in epileptic patients is definitely inevitable, and it will help in a more desirable patients' treatment. So we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of migraine in epileptic patients and relation between these two disorders. Number of 150 epileptic patients attended to neurology clinic of Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital and Iranian Epilepsy Association between June 2010 to May 2011 were fulfilled the questionnaire, and the data has been assessed by SPSS software. In this study, we used MS-Q (migraine screening -questionnaire designed for early diagnosis of migraine in the general population. From all patients filling the questionnaire, the prevalence of migraine (with or without aura was as follows: 23 persons had criteria compatible with migraine with aura; 26 patients had migraine without aura. Migraine was more common in these patients: persons with academic degrees, women, patients who were used 2 antiepileptic drugs, and patients with high BMI. In this study, we showed that migraine in epileptic patients is more prevalent than the general population. Thus, early diagnosis and efficient treatment of migraine headache in these patients is mandatory. More studies are needed for evaluation of this issue.

  10. Prenuptial seizures: a report of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, H; Valeriano, J; Brillman, J

    1995-01-01

    The cases of 5 patients with seizures occurring the day of or shortly before their weddings are presented. Major life events may precipitate or exacerbate epileptic or nonepileptic seizures as a result of 1) missed medications, 2) sleep deprivation, 3) alcohol or concomitant medications, 4) hyperventilation, or 5) the emotional state directly or stress indirectly. Seizures occurring at times of psychological stress may be either neurological or psychiatric in origin. The physician treating patients with a new onset or exacerbation of seizures around a major life event must consider all of these factors in the evaluation.

  11. Epilepsy surgery for early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (ohtahara syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Saleem I; Galliani, Carlos A; Hernandez, Angel W; Donahue, David J

    2013-12-01

    Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy or Ohtahara syndrome is the earliest form of the age-dependent epileptic encephalopathies. Its manifestations include tonic spasms, focal motor seizures, suppression burst pattern, pharmaco-resistance, and dismal prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of epilepsy surgery in selected infants. We identified 11 patients, 9 from the literature and 2 from our institution that fulfilled diagnostic criteria of Ohtahara syndrome and had undergone epilepsy surgery in infancy. Seven of the 11 infants have remained seizure free (Engel class IA) and four are reportedly having rare to infrequent seizures (Engel class IIB). All patients experienced "catch up" development. In contrast to Ohtahara's15 pharmacotherapy managed patients, who had a mortality rate of approximately fifty percent, and those that survived continued to have seizures and were severely impaired, the outcome of selected surgically managed patients is much more favorable.

  12. Therapeutic approach to epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigevano, Federico; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Plouin, Perrine; Specchio, Nicola

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies (EEs) are electroclinical entities with a peculiar course of disease; seizures and electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptiform abnormalities, ictal and interictal, contribute to progressive disturbance of cerebral functions. Frequently EEs are drug resistant, and consequences may be catastrophic. The main goal of treatment is to stop the peculiar course of epilepsy, operating on three parameters: seizure control, reduction of EEG abnormalities, and developmental outcome. For a correct therapeutic approach it is mandatory to have an as accurate as possible syndromic and etiologic diagnosis. Given the poor efficacy of conventional antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the use of specific drugs for EEs, such as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosteroids or stiripentol is suggested. In some cases the choice of treatment is strictly related to the etiology: vigabatrin in tuberous sclerosis, ketogenic diet in glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency, and pyridoxine in pyridoxine deficiency. Some AEDs combinations, such as sodium valproate with lamotrigine, have also provided interesting results, for example, in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, although controlled studies are lacking. Finally, early surgery can be an option in children with focal structural abnormalities responsible for EEs preferably before irreversible damage on developmental outcome. Multispecialist support is recommended in EE. Management should be global from the onset, integrating not only seizure control but also all issues related to comorbidities, particularly neuropsychological and psychiatric. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. INHIBITORY MOTOR SEIZURES: SEMIOLOGY AND THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Мukhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to rare and unique type of epileptic seizures – inhibitory motor seizures, characterized by the inability to execute a voluntary movement with preserved consciousness. The exact prevalence of this type of seizures is not known, but many cases are unrecognized or non-correctly diagnosed as Todd's paralysis. Therefore practical doctors should know the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of this type of seizures andtake them into account in the differential diagnoses . The authors presented a detailed review of the literature, including the historical data, etiology, pathogenesis and proposed mechanisms of formation of inhibitory motor seizures, clinical and EEG characteristics, therapeutic approaches. Antiepileptic drugs of choice used in the treatment of inhibitory motor seizures are valproic acid (preferably depakine chronosphere – original prolonged form of valproate. The authors also presented their observations of patients with inhibitory motor seizures.

  14. Grey matter volume in healthy and epileptic beagles using voxel-based morphometry – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Frank

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most common chronic neurological disorders in dogs is idiopathic epilepsy (IE diagnosed as epilepsy without structural changes in the brain. In the current study the hypothesis should be proven that subtle grey matter changes occur in epileptic dogs. Therefore, magnetic resonance (MR images of one dog breed (Beagles were used to obtain an approximately uniform brain shape. Local differences in grey matter volume (GMV were compared between 5 healthy Beagles and 10 Beagles with spontaneously recurrent seizures (5 dogs with IE and 5 dogs with structural epilepsy (SE, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM. T1W images of all dogs were prepared using Amira 6.3.0 for brain extraction, FSL 4.1.8 for registration and SPM12 for realignment. After creation of tissue probability maps of cerebrospinal fluid, grey and white matter from control images to segment all extracted brains, GM templates for each group were constructed to normalize brain images for parametric statistical analysis, which was achieved using SPM12. Results Epileptic Beagles (IE and SE Beagles displayed statistically significant reduced GMV in olfactory bulb, cingulate gyrus, hippocampus and cortex, especially in temporal and occipital lobes. Beagles with IE showed statistically significant decreased GMV in olfactory bulb, cortex of parietal and temporal lobe, hippocampus and cingulate gyrus, Beagles with SE mild statistically significant GMV reduction in temporal lobe (p < 0.05; family- wise error correction. Conclusion These results suggest that, as reported in epileptic humans, focal reduction in GMV also occurs in epileptic dogs. Furthermore, the current study shows that VBM analysis represents an excellent method to detect GMV differences of the brain between a healthy dog group and dogs with epileptic syndrome, when MR images of one breed are used.

  15. Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy Associated With SCN2A Mutation Responsive to Oral Mexiletine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Laura A; Johnson, Maria R; MacDonald, John T; Karachunski, Peter I; Henry, Thomas R; Nascene, David R; Moran, Brian P; Raymond, Gerald V

    2017-01-01

    Genetic alterations are significant causes of epilepsy syndromes; especially early-onset epileptic encephalopathies and voltage-gated sodium channelopathies are among the best described. Mutations in the SCN2A subunit of voltage-gated sodium channels have been associated with benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures, generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus, and an early-onset infantile epileptic encephalopathy. We describe two infants with medically refractory seizures due to a de novo SCN2A mutation. The first child responded to intravenous lidocaine with significant reduction in seizure frequency and was successfully transitioned to enteral mexiletine. Mexiletine was subsequently used in a second infant with reduction in seizure frequency. Class 1b antiarrhythmic agents, lidocaine and mexiletine, may be useful in infants with medically refractory early infantile epileptic encephalopathy secondary to mutations in SCN2A. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Loss-of-function mutations of STXBP1 in patients with epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Yano, Tamami; Ueda, Yuki; Takayama, Rumiko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi

    2016-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy, which commences during early infancy, is a severe epileptic syndrome that manifests as age-dependent seizures and severe developmental delay. The syntaxin-binding protein 1 gene (STXBP1) is one of the genes responsible for epileptic encephalopathy. We conducted a cohort study to analyze STXBP1 in 42 patients with epileptic encephalopathy. We identified four novel mutations: two splicing mutations, a frameshift mutation, and a nonsense mutation. All of these mutations were predicted to cause loss-of-function. This result suggests loss-of-function is a common mechanism underlying STXBP1-related epileptic encephalopathy. The four patients showed epileptic features consistent with STXBP1-related epileptic encephalopathy, but showed variable radiological findings, including brain volume loss and myelination delay. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analyzing reliability of seizure diagnosis based on semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Wu, Han; Xu, Jiahui; Yan, Jianwei; Ding, Yao; Wang, Z Irene; Guo, Yi; Wang, Zhongjin; Shen, Chunhong; Chen, Zhong; Ding, Meiping; Wang, Shuang

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the accuracy of seizure diagnosis by semiological analysis and to assess the factors that affect diagnostic reliability. A total of 150 video clips of seizures from 50 patients (each with three seizures of the same type) were observed by eight epileptologists, 12 neurologists, and 20 physicians (internists). The videos included 37 series of epileptic seizures, eight series of physiologic nonepileptic events (PNEEs), and five series of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). After observing each video, the doctors chose the diagnosis of epileptic seizures or nonepileptic events for the patient; if the latter was chosen, they further chose the diagnosis of PNESs or PNEEs. The overall diagnostic accuracy rate for epileptic seizures and nonepileptic events increased from 0.614 to 0.660 after observations of all three seizures (p semiological diagnosis of seizures is greatly affected by the seizure type as well as the doctor's experience. Although the overall reliability is limited, it can be improved by observing more seizures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Partial Seizures Are Associated with Early Increases in Signal Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouny, Christophe C; Bergey, Gregory K; Franaszczuk, Piotr J

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Partial seizures are often believed to be associated with EEG signals of low complexity because seizures are associated with increased neural network synchrony. The investigations reported here provide an assessment of the signal complexity of epileptic seizure onsets using newly developed quantitative measures. Methods Using the Gabor atom density (GAD) measure of signal complexity, 339 partial seizures in 45 patients with intracranial electrode arrays were analyzed. Segmentation procedures were applied to determine the timing and amplitude of GAD changes relative to the electrographic onset of the seizure. Results 330 out of 339 seizures have significant complexity level changes, with 319 (97%) having an increase in complexity. GAD increases occur within seconds of the onset of the partial seizure but are not observed in channels remote from the focus. The complexity increase is similar for seizures from mesial temporal origin, neocortical temporal and extra-temporal origin. Conclusions Partial onset seizures are associated with early increases in signal complexity as measured by GAD. This increase is independent of the location of the seizure focus. Significance Despite the often predominant rhythmic activity that characterizes onset and early evolution of epileptic seizures, partial seizure onset is associated with an early increase in complexity. These changes are common to partial seizures originating from different brain regions, indicating a similar seizure dynamic. PMID:19910249

  19. Enriched environment attenuates behavioral seizures and depression in chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrinda, Marigowda; Sasidharan, Arun; Aparna, Sahajan; Srikumar, Bettadapura N; Kutty, Bindu M; Shankaranarayana Rao, Byrathnahalli S

    2017-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is commonly associated with depression, anxiety, and cognitive impairment. Despite significant progress in our understanding of the pathophysiology of TLE, it remains the most common form of refractory epilepsy. Enriched environment (EE) has a beneficial effect in many neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the effect of EE on cognitive changes in chronic TLE has not been evaluated. Accordingly, the present study evaluated the effects of EE on chronic epilepsy-induced alterations in cognitive functions, electrophysiology, and cellular changes in the hippocampus. Status epilepticus (SE) was induced in 2-month-old male Wistar rats with lithium and pilocarpine. Six weeks' post SE, epileptic rats were either housed in their respective home cages or in an enrichment cage (6 h/day) for 14 days. Seizure behavior was video-monitored 2 weeks before and during exposure to EE. Depression-like behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and spatial learning and memory were assessed using the sucrose preference test (SPT), elevated plus maze (EPM), and Morris water maze (MWM), respectively. Delta and theta power in the CA1 region of hippocampus was assessed from recordings of local field potentials (LFPs). Cellular changes in hippocampus were assessed by histochemistry followed by unbiased stereologic analysis. EE significantly reduced seizure episodes and seizure duration in epileptic rats. In addition, EE alleviated depression and hyperactivity, and restored delta and theta power of LFP in the hippocampal CA1 region. However, EE neither ameliorated epilepsy-induced spatial learning and memory deficits nor restored cell density in hippocampus. This is the first study that evaluates the role of EE in a chronic TLE model, where rats were exposed to EE after occurrence of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Given that 30% of TLE patients are refractory to drug treatment, therapeutic strategies that utilize components of EE could be designed to alleviate

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in an epileptic boxer dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lass, P.; Teodorczyk, J.

    2006-01-01

    A 6-year-old boxer dog was presented for rCBF SPECT scanning due to epileptic seizures. The epilepsy was presented as frequent convulsions with a total loss of concisenesses. rCBF SPECT scanning was performed using a triple-head gamma-camera 60 min, after i.v. application of 99m Tc-ECD of activity 370 MBq shortly after an epileptic seizure. Veterinary nuclear medicine is growing in its role, but neurological applications are rare. This paper reported a case of ischaemia in a demented dachshund dog. One may expect that in the future rCBF scanning may have a growing role in epileptic or demented small animals. (author)

  1. Imaging DC MEG Fields Associated with Epileptic Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, B. J.; Bowyer, S. M.; Moran, J. E.; Jenrow, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive brain imaging modality, with high spatial and temporal resolution, used to evaluate and quantify the magnetic fields associated with neuronal activity. Complex partial epileptic seizures are characterized by hypersynchronous neuronal activity believed to arise from a zone of epileptogenesis. This study investigated the characteristics of direct current (DC) MEG shifts arising at epileptic onset. MEG data were acquired with rats using a six-channel first order gradiometer system. Limbic status epilepticus was induced by IA (femoral) administration of kainic acid. DC-MEG shifts were observed at the onset of epileptic spike train activity and status epilepticus. Epilepsy is also being studied in patients undergoing presurgical mapping from the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Henry Ford Hospital using a whole head Neuromagnetometer. Preliminary data analysis shows that DC-MEG waveforms, qualitatively similar to those seen in the animal model, are evident prior to seizure activity in human subjects.

  2. Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Computed Tomography (CT) is an important tool for neuroimaging, it offers an opportunity to investigate structural lesions as a cause of seizures with little morbidity. This study is designed to evaluate it's applicability in children with epileptic seizures. Method: It is a descriptive study of the CT scans of the 103 ...

  3. Predictive factors for relapse of epileptic spasms after adrenocorticotropic hormone therapy in West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumiko; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Endoh, Fumika; Ohtsuka, Yoko; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether serial electroencephalographic (EEG) findings can predict relapse of epileptic spasms after synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy in patients with West syndrome (WS). Thirty-nine WS patients (8 cryptogenic and 31 symptomatic) were included in this study. These patients received ACTH therapy for the first time and were regularly followed up for more than three years at our hospital. Sixteen patients (41.0%) showed seizure relapse (relapse group) and 23 patients (59.0%) did not show relapse (non-relapse group). We used survival analysis to investigate the influence of etiology and presence of epileptic discharges after the ACTH therapy on seizure outcome. Immediately after the ACTH therapy, etiology was associated with seizure outcome (p=0.003). In the early stage (1 month after the ACTH therapy), only the presence of epileptic discharges (p=0.001) had a significant association with seizure outcome, regardless of etiology. Because all relapsed patients were in the symptomatic group, we performed the same statistical analysis on symptomatic WS patient data only. We found that the group with no epileptic discharges on EEG showed a significantly higher seizure-free rate than those with epileptic discharges in the early stage (p=0.0091). This study demonstrated that serial EEG findings after ACTH therapy are significantly related to relapse of epileptic spasms. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Three patients manifesting early infantile epileptic spasms associated with 2q24.3 microduplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Ishizuka, Mamiko; Yamaguchi, Tokito; Watanabe, Akito; Nasu, Hirosato; Ueda, Yuki; Ohtani, Hideyuki; Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi; Shigematsu, Hideo; Inoue, Yushi; Tanahashi, Yoshihiro; Aiba, Kaori; Ohta, Hodaka; Shimada, Shino; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    Recent development of genetic analyses enabled us to reveal underlying genetic causes of the patients with epileptic encephalopathy in infancy. Mutations of voltage-gated sodium channel type I alpha subunit gene (SCN1A) are to be causally related with several phenotypes of epilepsy, generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFS+), Dravet syndrome, and other infantile epileptic encephalopathies. In addition to SCN1A, contiguous genes such as SCN2A and SCN3A in 2q24.3 are also reported to have contribution to epileptic seizures. Therefore, gene abnormality involving this region is reasonable to contribute to epilepsy manifestation. We encountered three patients with 2q24.3 microduplication diagnosed by Array comparative genomic hybridization array (aCGH). They developed partial seizures and epileptic spasms in their early infantile periods and showed remarkable developmental delay, although their seizures disappeared from 11 to 14 months of age. One of three patients had 2q24.3 microduplication which excludes SCN1A. Therefore, characteristics of epilepsy with 2q24.3 microduplication do not necessarily need duplication of SCN1A. This study suggested that 2q24.3 microduplication is one of the causes for early infantile epileptic spasms. Epileptic spasms associated with 2q24.3 microduplications may have better seizure outcome comparing with other etiologies. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Consciousness in non-epileptic attack disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Markus; Kurthen, M

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consciousness should not only distinguish between the 'level' and `content' of consciousness but also between 'phenomenal consciousness' (consciousness of states it somehow "feels to be like") and 'access consciousness' (having certain 'higher' cognitive processes at one's disposal). The existing evidence shows that there is a great intra- and interindividual variability of NEA experience. However, in most NEAs phenomenal experience - and, as a precondition for that experience, vigilance or wakefulness - is reduced to a lesser degree than in those epileptic seizures involving impairment of consciousness. In fact, complete loss of "consciousness" is the exception rather than the rule in NEAs. Patients, as well as external observers, may have a tendency to overestimate impairments of consciousness during the seizures.

  6. The quality of life of epileptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsono Harsono

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy has historically been surrounded by prejudice and myth, and associated with many misconceptions. Even today, people with epilepsy experience psychosocial problems, especially in their relationships and employment. Age, seizure severity and frequency, stigma of epilepsy, social deprivation, fear and anxiety, factors responsible for inadequate treatment, treatment gap, and healthcare needs may affect the quality of life of epileptic patients. Improving the diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and social acceptability are important factors in achieving the objective of the management of epilepsy. Treatment of epilepsy refers to any intervention that is intended to restore health status including quality of life. Quality of life is recognized as an important outcome in epilepsy treatment. Quality of life has been reported to vary across epileptic patients with different clinical, demographic, and socio-economic variables. Seizure type and frequency have been found to be significant predictors of quality of life scores. For measuring quality of life in clinical practice, such as in epileptic patients, a wider range of properties is required to ensure that a measure can be used routinely. These include validity, appropriateness and acceptability, reliability, responsiveness to change, and interpretability.

  7. Consciousness in Non-Epileptic Attack Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, M.; Kurthen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consciousness should not only distinguish between the ‘level’ and ‘content’ of consciousness but also between ‘phenomenal consciousness’ (consciousness of states it somehow “feels to be like”) and ‘access consciousness’ (having certain ‘higher’ cognitive processes at one’s disposal). The existing evidence shows that there is a great intra- and interindividual variability of NEA experience. However, in most NEAs phenomenal experience – and, as a precondition for that experience, vigilance or wakefulness – is reduced to a lesser degree than in those epileptic seizures involving impairment of consciousness. In fact, complete loss of “consciousness” is the exception rather than the rule in NEAs. Patients, as well as external observers, may have a tendency to overestimate impairments of consciousness during the seizures. PMID:21447903

  8. Automatic multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (MISA) system for detection of motor seizures from electromyographic data and motion data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The objective is to develop a non-invasive automatic method for detection of epileptic seizures with motor manifestations. Ten healthy subjects who simulated seizures and one patient participated in the study. Surface electromyography (sEMG) and motion sensor features were extracted as energy...

  9. Seizure Onset Detection based on a Uni- or Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (UISA/MISA) System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An automatic Uni- or Multi-modal Inteligent Seizure Acquisition (UISA/MISA) system is highly applicable for onset detection of epileptic seizures based on motion data. The modalities used are surface electromyography (sEMG), acceleration (ACC) and angular velocity (ANG). The new proposed automatic...

  10. The role of antiepileptic drugs in free radicals generation and antioxidant levels in epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldin, Essam Eldin Mohamed Nour; Elshebiny, Hosam Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Tarek Mostafa; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed Abdel-Azim; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2016-01-01

    Many risk factors are encountered during the pathogenesis of epilepsy. In this study, the effect of seizure frequency on free radical generation and antioxidants levels in epileptic patients was evaluated. This study was carried out on 15 healthy controls (GI) and 60 epileptic patients treated with mono- or poly-therapy of carbamazepine, valproic acid, or phenytoin. The treated epileptic patients were divided into 2 main groups according to the seizure frequency: controlled seizure patients GII (n = 30) and uncontrolled seizure patients GIII (n = 30). GII included the GIIA subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for more than 12 months and the GIIB subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for a period from 6 to12 months. GIII included GIIIA (n = 15) and GIIIB (n = 15) for patients which had a seizure frequency of less than and more than four times/month, respectively. In comparison to the control group (GI), the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde/creatinine ratio were significantly increased in GIIB, GIIIA, and GIIIB, while vitamins A and E levels were significantly decreased in GIIIB. Serum NO levels had significant negative correlations with serum vitamin E in the GIIA and GIIB groups, and with vitamin A in the GIIIA and GIIIB groups. However, serum NO had positive correlation with urinary MDA/Cr ratio. The imbalance between free radical generation and antioxidant system in epileptic patients may be a factor in seizure frequency.

  11. Epileptic Encephalopathies and Their Relationship to Developmental Disorders: Do Spikes Cause Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Barry R.

    2004-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are progressive clinical and electroencephalographic syndromes where deterioration is thought to be caused by frequent seizures and abundant EEG epileptiform activity. Seizures occur in approximately 10-15% of children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) and 8-10% have epileptiform EEG abnormalities without…

  12. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clinical picture and diagnostics of this disorder, including the peculiar anomalies on EEG. The especial attention is given to approaches to the treatment of epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikeswaves activity during sleep. Efficacy of valproates, corticosteroid hormones and antiepileptic drugs of other groups is considered. The author represents own experience of treatment this disorder with corticosteroids, scheme of therapy and assessment of efficacy.

  13. Response of human epileptic temporal lobe cortical blood flow to hyperventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinand, M E; Carter, L P; Oommen, K J; Hutzler, R; Labiner, D M; Talwar, D; el-Saadany, W; Ahern, G L

    1995-07-01

    Bilateral long-term surface cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) and electrocorticographic (ECoG) monitoring were performed in eight patients with complex partial seizures. In each patient, the epileptic temporal lobe was localized using ictal ECoG. Mean seizure interval (frequency-1) off anticonvulsant medication, a clinical measure of epileptogenicity, was 1.0 +/- 0.3 h (range: 0.4 to 2.5 h). During 13 interictal hyperventilation periods, 3.6 +/- 0.6 min in duration, the mean decrease in epileptic and nonepileptic temporal cortical CBF was 13.7 +/- 2.3 versus 6.4 +/- 1.9 ml/(100 g min) (t = 2.230, d.f. = 16, P e. frequency increased) with increasing magnitude of seizure focus CBF reduction during hyperventilation. Seizure interval was significantly correlated with epileptic temporal lobe CBF decrease during hyperventilation (R = 0.763, d.f. = 5, P < 0.05). The data suggest that, compared to nonepileptic brain, epileptic temporal lobe is particularly prone to hypoperfusion during hyperventilation. Epileptogenicity is a function of this seizure focus susceptibility to ischemia. The finding of abnormal seizure focus autoregulation during hyperventilation has implication for epileptic focus localization with cerebral blood flow analysis.

  14. Low doses of ethanol markedly potentiate the anti-seizure effect of diazepam in a mouse model of difficult-to-treat focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sabine; Bankstahl, Marion; Gramer, Martina; Hausknecht, Maria; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol is commonly used as a solvent in injectable formulations of poorly water-soluble drugs. The concentrations of ethanol in such formulations are generally considered reasonably safe. It is long known that ethanol can potentiate central effects of sedatives and tranquillizers, particularly the benzodiazepines, most likely as a result of a synergistic interaction at the GABAA receptor. However, whether this occurs at the low systemic doses of ethanol resulting from its use as solvent in parenteral formulations of benzodiazepines is not known. In the present study we evaluated whether a commercial ethanol-containing aqueous solution of diazepam exerts more potent anti-seizure effects than an aqueous solution of diazepam hydrochloride or an aqueous emulsion of this drug in the intrahippocampal kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice. Spontaneous epileptic seizures in this model are known to be resistant to major antiepileptic drugs. Administration of the ethanol-containing formulation of diazepam caused an almost complete suppression of seizures. This was not seen when the same dose (5 mg/kg) of diazepam was administered as aqueous solution or emulsion, although all three diazepam formulations resulted in similar drug and metabolite concentrations in plasma. Our data demonstrate that ethanol-containing solutions of diazepam are superior to block difficult-to-treat seizures to other formulations of diazepam. To our knowledge, this has not been demonstrated before and, if this finding can be translated to humans, may have important consequences for emergency treatment of acute seizures, series of seizures, and initial treatment of status epilepticus in patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Cell Volume in the Dynamics of Seizure, Spreading Depression, and Anoxic Depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell volume changes are ubiquitous in normal and pathological activity of the brain. Nevertheless, we know little of how cell volume affects neuronal dynamics. We here performed the first detailed study of the effects of cell volume on neuronal dynamics. By incorporating cell swelling together with dynamic ion concentrations and oxygen supply into Hodgkin-Huxley type spiking dynamics, we demonstrate the spontaneous transition between epileptic seizure and spreading depression states as the cell swells and contracts in response to changes in osmotic pressure. Our use of volume as an order parameter further revealed a dynamical definition for the experimentally described physiological ceiling that separates seizure from spreading depression, as well as predicted a second ceiling that demarcates spreading depression from anoxic depolarization. Our model highlights the neuroprotective role of glial K buffering against seizures and spreading depression, and provides novel insights into anoxic depolarization and the relevant cell swelling during ischemia. We argue that the dynamics of seizures, spreading depression, and anoxic depolarization lie along a continuum of the repertoire of the neuron membrane that can be understood only when the dynamic ion concentrations, oxygen homeostasis,and cell swelling in response to osmotic pressure are taken into consideration. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a unified framework for a wide range of neuronal behaviors that may be of substantial importance in the understanding of and potentially developing universal intervention strategies for these pathological states.

  16. Mental Development of Children with Non-epileptic Paroxysmal States in Medical History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turovskaya N.G.,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The author studied mental functions disorders in children with a history of paroxysmal states of various etiologies and compared mental development disorder patterns in patients with epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysms. Study sample were 107 children, aged 6 to 10 years. The study used experimental psychological and neuropsychological techniques. According to the empirical study results, non-epileptic paroxysms unlike epileptic much less combined with a number of mental functions disorders and intelligence in general. However, non-epileptic paroxysmal states as well as epileptic seizure associated with increasing activity exhaustion and abnormal function of the motor analyzer (dynamic and kinesthetic dyspraxia. Visual memory disorders and modal-nonspecific memory disorders have more pronounced importance in the mental ontogenesis structure in children with convulsive paroxysms compared to children with cerebral pathology without paroxysms history

  17. Cytokine-dependent bidirectional connection between impaired social behavior and susceptibility to seizures associated with maternal immune activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, James; Kumar, Udaya; Medel-Matus, Jesus-Servando; Shin, Don; Sankar, Raman; Mazarati, Andrey

    2015-09-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) results in the development of autism in the offspring via hyperactivation of IL-6 signaling. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that the MIA-associated activation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concurrently with IL-6 increases the rate and the severity of hippocampal kindling in mice, thus, offering an explanation for autism-epilepsy comorbidity. We examined whether epileptic phenotype triggered by prenatal exposure to IL-6 and IL-1β combination is restricted to kindling or whether it is reproducible in another model of epilepsy, whereby spontaneous seizures develop following kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus. We also examined whether in mice prenatally exposed to IL-6 and IL-6+IL-1β, the presence of spontaneous seizures would exacerbate autism-like features. Between days 12 and 16 of pregnancy, C57BL/6J mice received daily injections of IL-6, IL-1β, or IL-6+IL-1β combination. At postnatal day 40, male offspring were examined for the presence of social behavioral deficit, and status epilepticus was induced by intrahippocampal KA injection. After 6weeks of monitoring for spontaneous seizures, sociability was tested again. Both IL-6 and IL-6+IL-1β offspring presented with social behavioral deficit. Prenatal exposure to IL-6 alleviated, while such exposure to IL-6+IL-1β exacerbated, the severity of KA-induced epilepsy. Increased severity of epilepsy in the IL-6+IL-1β mice correlated with the improvement of autism-like behavior. We conclude that complex and not necessarily agonistic relationships exist between epileptic and autism-like phenotypes in an animal model of MIA coupled with KA-induced epilepsy and that the nature of these relationships depends on components of MIA involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective......: to show whether medical signal processing of EMG data is feasible for detection of epileptic seizures. Methods: EMG signals during generalised seizures were recorded from 3 patients (with 20 seizures in total). Two possible medical signal processing algorithms were tested. The first algorithm was based...... the frequency-based algorithm was efficient for detecting the seizures in the third patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that EMG signals could be used to develop an automatic seizuredetection system. However, different patients might require different types of algorithms /approaches....

  19. Relation of local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose to endocrine fluctuation around seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingfang; Sun Qiyin; Sun Aijun

    1999-01-01

    Objection: To probe into the relation of local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMRglc) to endocrine fluctuation around seizures. Methods: Serum prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol levels in 76 epileptic patients with unilobar epileptic focus were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) before and after seizures. Moreover, the patients were examined by 18 F-FDG PET imaging and the LCMRglc of epileptic foci was measured. Results: FDG metabolic level of epileptic foci right at the attack was relatively higher than that at interictal phase, and the serum PRL, GH and cortisol levels were significant higher after seizures. The serum PRL levels in 80.3% patients and the serum cortisol levels in 68.4% patients reached their peaks 15 min after seizure. The serum GH levels in 65.8% patients reached peaks at 30 min after seizure. The changes of hormone levels correlated significantly with the lengths of seizure free intervals (SFI) and with the types of seizures, but the changes of hormone levels were of no relation with the site and LCMRglc of epileptic foci. In 6 patients with absentia seizures, no significant increase was observed in LCMRglc (P > 0.05), nor in serum PRL and cortisol; the changes of GH were not related with the types of seizures. Also, the shorter the SFI was, and the lower the basal hormone levels were, and the less the postictal hormone levels increased especially the levels of GH and cortisol. conclusions: the serum PRL, GH, cortisol levels are significantly different before and after seizures, the hormone levels reached their peaks from 15 min to 30 min after seizures. The changes of postictal hormone levels are correlated significantly with the types of seizures and length of SFI, but the changes of hormone levels are not related with the site and FDG metabolism of epileptic foci

  20. EEG analysis of seizure patterns using visibility graphs for detection of generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B A M; Aarts, Ronald M

    2017-10-01

    The traditional EEG features in the time and frequency domain show limited seizure detection performance in the epileptic population with intellectual disability (ID). In addition, the influence of EEG seizure patterns on detection performance was less studied. A single-channel EEG signal can be mapped into visibility graphs (VGS), including basic visibility graph (VG), horizontal VG (HVG), and difference VG (DVG). These graphs were used to characterize different EEG seizure patterns. To demonstrate its effectiveness in identifying EEG seizure patterns and detecting generalized seizures, EEG recordings of 615h on one EEG channel from 29 epileptic patients with ID were analyzed. A novel feature set with discriminative power for seizure detection was obtained by using the VGS method. The degree distributions (DDs) of DVG can clearly distinguish EEG of each seizure pattern. The degree entropy and power-law degree power in DVG were proposed here for the first time, and they show significant difference between seizure and non-seizure EEG. The connecting structure measured by HVG can better distinguish seizure EEG from background than those by VG and DVG. A traditional EEG feature set based on frequency analysis was used here as a benchmark feature set. With a support vector machine (SVM) classifier, the seizure detection performance of the benchmark feature set (sensitivity of 24%, FD t /h of 1.8s) can be improved by combining our proposed VGS features extracted from one EEG channel (sensitivity of 38%, FD t /h of 1.4s). The proposed VGS-based features can help improve seizure detection for ID patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Brain lateralization and seizure semiology: ictal clinical lateralizing signs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Réka; Kalmár, Zsuzsanna; Fehér, Nóra; Fogarasi, András; Gyimesi, Csilla; Janszky, József

    2008-07-30

    Clinical lateralizing signs are the phenomena which can unequivocally refer to the hemispheric onset of epileptic seizures. They can improve the localization of epileptogenic zone during presurgical evaluation, moreover, their presence can predict a success of surgical treatment. Primary sensory phenomena such as visual aura in one half of the field of vision or unilateral ictal somatosensory sensation always appear on the contralateral to the focus. Periictal unilateral headache, although it is an infrequent symptom, is usually an ipsilateral sign. Primary motor phenomena like epileptic clonic, tonic movements, the version of head ubiquitously appear contralateral to the epileptogenic zone. Very useful lateralization sign is the ictal hand-dystonia which lateralizes to the contralateral hemisphere in nearly 100%. The last clonus of the secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizure lateralizes to the ipsilateral hemisphere in 85%. The fast component of ictal nystagmus appears in nearly 100% on the contralateral side of the epileptic focus. Vegetative symptoms during seizures arising from temporal lobe such as spitting, nausea, vomiting, urinary urge are typical for seizures originating from non-dominant (right) hemisphere. Ictal pallor and cold shivers are dominant hemispheric lateralization signs. Postictal unilateral nose wiping refers to the ipsilateral hemispheric focus compared to the wiping hand. Ictal or postictal aphasia refers to seizure arising from dominant hemisphere. Intelligable speech during complex partial seizures appears in non-dominant seizures. Automatism with preserved consciousness refers to the seizures of non-dominant temporal lobe.

  2. Post-stroke seizures are clinically underestimated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentes, Carla; Martins, Hugo; Peralta, Ana Rita; Casimiro, Carlos; Morgado, Carlos; Franco, Ana Catarina; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Geraldes, Ruth; Canhão, Patrícia; Pinho E Melo, Teresa; Paiva, Teresa; Ferro, José M

    2017-09-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is the leading cause of epilepsy in adults, although post-stroke seizures reported frequency is variable and few studies used EEG in their identification. To describe and compare EEG and clinical epileptic manifestations frequency in patients with an anterior circulation ischaemic stroke. Prospective study of acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients, consecutively admitted to a Stroke Unit over 24 months and followed-up for 1 year. All patients underwent standardized clinical and diagnostic assessment. Seizure occurrence was clinically evaluated during hospitalization and by a telephone interview at 6 months and a clinical appointment at 12 months after stroke. Video-EEG was performed in the first 72 h (1st EEG), daily after the 1st EEG for the first 7 days after the stroke, or later if neurological worsening, at discharge, and at 12 months. 151 patients were included (112 men) with a mean age of 67.4 (11.9) years. In the 1st year after stroke, 38 patients (25.2%) had an epileptic seizure. During hospitalization, 27 patients (17.9%) had epileptiform activity (interictal or ictal) in the EEG, 7 (25.9%) of them electrographic seizures. During the first week after stroke, 22 (14.6%) patients had a seizure and 4 (2.6%) non-convulsive status epilepticus criteria. Five (22.7%) acute symptomatic seizures were exclusively electrographic. At least one remote symptomatic seizure occurred in 23 (16%) patients. In the first 7 days after stroke, more than one-fifth of patients with seizures had exclusively electrographic seizures. Without a systematic neurophysiological evaluation the frequency of post-stroke seizures are clinically underestimated.

  3. Generalized seizures in the right hippocampus sclerosis combined with hypoplasia of the right vertebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchev, L.; Toneva, J.; Manolova, T.; Manchev, I.; Valcheva, V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a clinical case of generalized epileptic seizures, occurring suddenly. The common finding from MRI of the brain is sclerosis of the right hippocampus, while MR angiography shows hypoplasia of the right vertebral artery. There are EEG signs for single foci of abnormal activity more on the right side. An anticonvulsant and symptomatic treatment demonstrate a favorable result. Under discussion is the question of surgery treatment. Key words: Hippocampal Sclerosis. MRI. Epileptic Seizures

  4. Dextromethorphan in the treatment of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizures in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yin-Hsuan Chien; Ming-I. Lin; Wen-Chin Weng; Jung-Chieh Du; Wang-Tso Lee

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-burst in electroencephalography (EEG) can evolve into a few types of epileptic syndromes. We present here an unusual case of early myoclonic encephalopathy that evolved into migrating partial seizures in infancy. A female neonate initially had erratic myoclonus movements, hiccups, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG that was compatible with early myoclonic encephalopathy. The seizures were controlled with dextromethorphan (20 mg/kg), and a suppress...

  5. Dose-Dependent Effect of Curcumin on Learning and Memory Deficit in Kainate-Epileptic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kiasalari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : Epileptic seizures accompany disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills. With regard to antiepileptic potential of curcumin and its beneficial effect on memory, the effect of its administration on learning and memory in kainate-epileptic rats was investigated.   Methods: Forty male rats were divided into sham, positive control ( valproate-treated epileptic, epileptic, and two curcumin-treated epileptic groups. Rat model of epilepsy was induced by unilateral intrahippocampal administration of 4 μg of kainate per rat. Rats received intraperitoneal injection of curcumin (50 and 100 mg/kg daily for 1 week before surgery. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial (IL and step-through latencies (STL were determined using passive avoidance test and alternation behavior percentage was obtained according to Y maze test.   Results: Regarding IL, there was no significant difference between the groups. In contrast, STL significantly decreased in curcumin-50-treated epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 263.1 to 184.5 s. However, this parameter significantly increased in curcumin-100-treated epileptic group as compared to epileptic group (p<0.01 (a change from 263.1 to 220.3 s. In addition, STL was also significantly higher in valproic acid-treated epileptic group versus epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 145.7 to 210.3 s. Alternation percentage was also significantly higher in curcumin-50- and curcumin-100-treated epileptic groups relative to epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 60.5 to 77.6 and 80.3%.   Conclusion: Curcumin could dose-dependently enhance the consolidation and recall in epileptic animals and could improve spatial memory in such animals.

  6. Cognitive functions, epileptic syndromes and antiepileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo R. M. Bittencourt

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive function of patients on monotherapy specific for their epileptic syndrome has been studied infrequently. We evaluated 7 patients with symptomatic localised epilepsies (SEL on phenytoin aged 30±12 (mean±standard deviation years, 8 with idiopathic generalised epilepsies on sodium valproate aged 18±4 years, 16 with SEL on carbamazepine aged 28±11 years, and 35 healthy controls aged 27±11 years. All subjects were of normal intelligence, educated appropriately to age, and led productive lives in the community. Two of the patients on carbamazepine and one on valproate had less than five partial, absence or myoclonic seizures monthly, the remaining were controlled. Carbamazepine serum concentrations were 12±5 ug/ml, phenytoin were 23±7, and valproate were 62±23 (mean±sd. Tests included immediate recall and recognition for pictures, Stroop test, delayed recall and recognition of pictures. Patients on phenytoin and valproate performed significantly worse than controls on immediate recall, and patients on carbamazepine performed significantly worse than controls in Stroop test (p<0,01. The results indicate relatively minor effects of the epileptic syndromes and of phenytoin, carbamazepine and valproate on cognition of patients with controlled epilepsy leading productive lives in the community. We conclude that the cognitive deficit found in chronic epileptic patients on polytherapeutic drug regimen must be multifactorial, and that future studies need to control for all possible variables in order to achieve meaningul results.

  7. Behavior and learning problems in epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, D

    In this modern age of rapidly advancing medical knowledge and technology there are few conditions as wrapped up in ignorance and prejudice as that known as epilepsy. A large part of the reason for this lies in the concept of the "epileptic person," by which is really meant the epileptic personality. In an attempt to assess behavior and learning in children with seizures, behavior and learning being regarded as opposite sides of the same coin, a study was designed in which totally objective neurological and psychological data was obtained from such a group of children. The evaluation was carried out without any prior knowledge of the nature of the presenting clinical picture, so as to prevent bias from pre-conceived notions. The results show that 70% of the first 200 children showed significant learning defects sufficient to make special educational placement mandatory. Of the remaining 30% some still showed minor learning problems enough to give rise to difficulties in regular classroom situations. Associated with these learning problems were varying behavioral reaction types, varying from the classical hyperactive child with minimal cerebral dysfunction to many environmentally-produced behavior difficulties resulting from faulty school placement due to failure to recognize learning problems. Faculty parental handling due to similar failure to realize the child's limitations also contributed to this. The significance of these findings with respect to the behavior disturbances of the so-called epileptic child will be discussed.

  8. Sobressalto patológico: aspectos clínicos e eletrencefalográficos Startle seizures: clinical and electroencephalographic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Dahne Kliemann

    1967-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de um paciente apresentando crises de sobressalto provocadas por estímulos auditivos, sensitivos e visuais, sem crises epilépticas espontâneas nem retardo psicomotor. Estudam os aspectos clínicos e eletrencefalográficos e revisam a situação da entidade entre as assim chamadas epilepsias reflexas.The case of a patient presenting startle seizures provoked by acoustic, sensitive and visual stimuli who did not present spontaneous epileptic seizures and had no psychomotor retard is reported. The clinical and electroencephalographic aspects with special mention to the finding of exaggerated evoked potentials in the vertex are discussed. The situation of the disease among reflex epilepsies is revised.

  9. Epilepsy, viewed metaphysically: an interpretation of the biblical story of the epileptic boy and of Raphael's transfiguration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, D

    1986-01-01

    Raphael's last painting reveals, in the upper half of the picture, Christ's transfiguration on Mount Tabor and, in the lower half, the young boy's epileptic seizure at the foot of the mountain in the presence of the other disciples. Raphael depicts both events, which are told in succession in the Gospels, as if they took place at the same time. By synchronizing both scenes Raphael demonstrated a significant correspondence between Christ and the epileptic boy, which reveals the epileptic seizure as a symbolic representation of a transcendent event. This metaphysical aspect of epilepsy depicted by Raphael can also be found in the corresponding biblical passages. In the Gospels, the metamorphosis caused by the epileptic seizure is used as a simile for Christ's transfiguration through suffering, death, and resurrection.

  10. [Epilepsy from a metaphysical perspective: an interpretation of the biblical story of the epileptic boy and Raphael's Transfiguration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, D

    1994-01-01

    Raphael's last painting reveals, in the upper half of the picture, Christ's transfiguration on Mount Tabor and, in the lower half, the young boy's epileptic seizure at the foot of the mountain in the presence of the other disciples. Raphael depicts both events, which are told in succession in the Gospels, as if they took place at the same time. By synchronizing both scenes, Raphael demonstrated a significant correspondence between Christ and the epileptic boy which reveals the epileptic seizure as a symbolic representation of a transcendental event. This metaphysical aspect of epilepsy depicted by Raphael can also be found in the corresponding biblical passages. In the Gospels, the metamorphosis caused by the epileptic seizure is used as a simile for Christ's transfiguration through suffering, death and resurrection.

  11. Febrile Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chance that the child may be injured by falling or may choke on food or saliva in the mouth. Using proper first aid for seizures can help avoid these hazards. There is no evidence that short febrile seizures cause brain damage. Large studies have found that even children ...

  12. Distribution entropy analysis of epileptic EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Yan, Chang; Karmakar, Chandan; Liu, Changchun

    2015-01-01

    It is an open-ended challenge to accurately detect the epileptic seizures through electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Recently published studies have made elaborate attempts to distinguish between the normal and epileptic EEG signals by advanced nonlinear entropy methods, such as the approximate entropy, sample entropy, fuzzy entropy, and permutation entropy, etc. Most recently, a novel distribution entropy (DistEn) has been reported to have superior performance compared with the conventional entropy methods for especially short length data. We thus aimed, in the present study, to show the potential of DistEn in the analysis of epileptic EEG signals. The publicly-accessible Bonn database which consisted of normal, interictal, and ictal EEG signals was used in this study. Three different measurement protocols were set for better understanding the performance of DistEn, which are: i) calculate the DistEn of a specific EEG signal using the full recording; ii) calculate the DistEn by averaging the results for all its possible non-overlapped 5 second segments; and iii) calculate it by averaging the DistEn values for all the possible non-overlapped segments of 1 second length, respectively. Results for all three protocols indicated a statistically significantly increased DistEn for the ictal class compared with both the normal and interictal classes. Besides, the results obtained under the third protocol, which only used very short segments (1 s) of EEG recordings showed a significantly (p entropy algorithm. The capability of discriminating between the normal and interictal EEG signals is of great clinical relevance since it may provide helpful tools for the detection of a seizure onset. Therefore, our study suggests that the DistEn analysis of EEG signals is very promising for clinical and even portable EEG monitoring.

  13. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Eleven children with epileptic encephalopathy were administered one cycle of intravenous methylprednisolone (15-30 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days, once a month for four months) in addition to constant dosages of their regular antiepileptic drugs. The treatment resulted in statistically significant reductions of generalized slow spike-and-wave discharges (ptreatment regimen did not cause significant or persistent adverse effects. We suggest that children with epileptic encephalopathy without an underlying structural lesion could be the best candidates for intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  14. Complete remission of epileptic psychosis after temporal lobectomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Renato Luiz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a female patient with refractory complex partial seizures since 15 years of age, recurrent postictal psychotic episodes since 35 which evolved to a chronic refractory interictal psychosis and MRI with right mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS. After a comprehensive investigation (video-EEG intensive monitoring, interictal and ictal SPECT, and a neuropsychological evaluation including WADA test she was submitted to a right temporal lobectomy. Since then, she has been seizure-free with remission of psychosis, although with some persistence of personality traits (hiperreligiosity, viscosity which had been present before surgery. This case supports the idea that temporal lobectomy can be a safe and effective therapeutic measure for patients with MTS, refractory epilepsy and recurrent postictal epileptic psychosis or interictal epileptic psychosis with postictal exacerbation.

  15. From the Behavioral Pharmacology of Beta-Carbolines to Seizures, Anxiety, and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Venault

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of beta-carbolines are inverse agonists of the GABA-A receptor complex, acting on the benzodiazepine site. They show convulsive properties when administered at high doses, anxiogenic properties at moderate doses, and learning-enhancing effects at low doses. These data suggest a possible physiological relationship, through the GABA-A receptor channel, between memory processes, anxiety, and ultimately, in pathological states, epileptic seizures. This relationship seems to be confirmed partially by experiments on mouse strains selected for their resistance (BR and sensitivity (BS to a single convulsive dose of a beta-carboline. These two strains also show differences in anxiety and learning abilities. However, some opposite results found while observing the behavior of the two strains suggest that in addition to pharmacologically induced anxiety, there is spontaneous anxiety, no doubt involving other brain mechanisms.

  16. Mutations in the GABA Transporter SLC6A1 Cause Epilepsy with Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvill, Gemma L.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Schneider, Amy; Zemel, Matthew; Myers, Candace T.; Saykally, Julia; Nguyen, John; Robbiano, Angela; Zara, Federico; Specchio, Nicola; Mecarelli, Oriano; Smith, Robert L.; Leventer, Richard J.; Møller, Rikke S.; Nikanorova, Marina; Dimova, Petia; Jordanova, Albena; Petrou, Steven; Helbig, Ingo; Striano, Pasquale; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Mefford, Heather C.

    2015-01-01

    GAT-1, encoded by SLC6A1, is one of the major gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters in the brain and is responsible for re-uptake of GABA from the synapse. In this study, targeted resequencing of 644 individuals with epileptic encephalopathies led to the identification of six SLC6A1 mutations in seven individuals, all of whom have epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (MAE). We describe two truncations and four missense alterations, all of which most likely lead to loss of function of GAT-1 and thus reduced GABA re-uptake from the synapse. These individuals share many of the electrophysiological properties of Gat1-deficient mice, including spontaneous spike-wave discharges. Overall, pathogenic mutations occurred in 6/160 individuals with MAE, accounting for ∼4% of unsolved MAE cases. PMID:25865495

  17. Deletion of mTOR in Reactive Astrocytes Suppresses Chronic Seizures in a Mouse Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueqin; Sha, Longze; Sun, Nannan; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Germline and somatic mutations in key genes of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway have been identified in seizure-associated disorders. mTOR mutations lead to aberrant activation of mTOR signaling, and, although affected neurons are critical for epileptogenesis, the role of mTOR activation in glial cells remains poorly understood. We previously reported a consistent activation of the mTOR pathway in astrocytes in the epileptic foci of temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study, it was demonstrated that mTOR deletion from reactive astrocytes prevents increases in seizure frequency over the disease course. By using a tamoxifen-inducible mTOR conditional knockout system and kainic acid, a model was developed that allowed astrocyte-specific mTOR gene deletion in mice with chronic epilepsy. Animals in which mTOR was deleted from 44 % of the astrocyte population exhibited a lower seizure frequency compared with controls. Down-regulation of mTOR significantly ameliorated astrogliosis in the sclerotic hippocampus but did not rescue mossy fiber sprouting. In cultured astrocytes, the mTOR pathway modulated the stability of the astroglial glutamate transporter 1 (Glt1) and influenced the ability of astrocytes to remove extracellular glutamate. Taken together, these data indicate that astrocytes with activated mTOR signaling may provide conditions that are favorable for spontaneous recurrent seizures.

  18. Seizure semiology reflects spread from frontal to temporal lobe: evolution of hyperkinetic to automotor seizures as documented by invasive EEG video recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezer, Fadime Irsel; Agan, Kadriye; Borggraefe, Ingo; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2013-09-01

    This patient report demonstrates the importance of seizure evolution in the localising value of seizure semiology. Spread of epileptic activity from frontal to temporal lobe, as demonstrated by invasive recordings, was reflected by change from hyperkinetic movements to arrest of activity with mild oral and manual automatisms. [Published with video sequences].

  19. Differential DNA methylation patterns define status epilepticus and epileptic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F C; Das, Sudipto; Sano, Takanori; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Bryan, Kenneth; Buckley, Patrick G; Stallings, Raymond L; Henshall, David C

    2012-02-01

    Prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) produce pathophysiological changes in the hippocampus that are associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression. Epileptic tolerance is an endogenous program of cell protection that can be activated in the brain by previous exposure to a non-harmful seizure episode before status epilepticus. A major transcriptional feature of tolerance is gene downregulation. Here, through methylation analysis of 34,143 discrete loci representing all annotated CpG islands and promoter regions in the mouse genome, we report the genome-wide DNA methylation changes in the hippocampus after status epilepticus and epileptic tolerance in adult mice. A total of 321 genes showed altered DNA methylation after status epilepticus alone or status epilepticus that followed seizure preconditioning, with >90% of the promoters of these genes undergoing hypomethylation. These profiles included genes not previously associated with epilepsy, such as the polycomb gene Phc2. Differential methylation events generally occurred throughout the genome without bias for a particular chromosomal region, with the exception of a small region of chromosome 4, which was significantly overrepresented with genes hypomethylated after status epilepticus. Surprisingly, only few genes displayed differential hypermethylation in epileptic tolerance. Nevertheless, gene ontology analysis emphasized the majority of differential methylation events between the groups occurred in genes associated with nuclear functions, such as DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. The present study reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes after status epilepticus and in epileptic tolerance, which may contribute to regulating the gene expression environment of the seizure-damaged hippocampus.

  20. Atonic elements combined or uncombined with epileptic spasms in infantile spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jiao; Qian, Ping; Li, Hui; Yang, Haipo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yuehua; Yang, Zhixian

    2017-01-01

    To study the atonic elements combined or uncombined with epileptic spasms in infantile spasms. The demographic data, clinical characteristics, electroencephalogram (EEG), and polyelectromyography (PEMG) features were analyzed in 12 infantile spasm patients with atonic elements. A total of 29 EEGs were recorded. Hypsarrhythmia or hypsarrhythmia variants were identified during interictal EEG. Insular or clustered epileptic spasms occurred in all. Three subtypes of atonic elements combined or uncombined with epileptic spasms (spasm-atonic, pure atonic, and atonic-spasm seizures) were observed electroclinically, which could present insularly or in cluster or altered with epileptic spasms in the same cluster. The ictal EEG showed generalized high-amplitude slow waves presenting alone or combined with other patterns. The corresponding PEMG showed an obvious electrical silence alone or preceding or following a crescendo-decrescendo pattern generated from myoelectric burst. Atonic elements combined or uncombined with epileptic spasms was a newly noticed phenomenon in infantile spasms, which was artificially divided into three subtypes here. It might be a variant of epileptic spasms or a unique seizure type. Atonic elements combined or uncombined with epileptic spasms was a previously ignored phenomenon in infantile spasms, which should be seriously considered in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Febrile seizures - semiology in humans and animal models: evidence of focality and heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Brian G R; Gindner, Diane

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between febrile seizures and hippocampal sclerosis has been the subject of longstanding discussion. Animal models for prolonged seizures have shown a clear causal relationship with focal limbic features at low dose and hippocampal damage at high dose. Careful history taking of febrile seizure semiology has shown focal early features often with clear temporal lobe elements. This would suggest that many febrile seizures are secondarily generalised hippocampal seizures. There is evidence of varying levels of epileptogenicity in specific infective causes of febrile seizures. Seizure semiology also suggests that a proportion of such seizures may be non-epileptic reflex asystolic attacks. Seizure semiology in febrile seizures deserves closer scrutiny. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Can developmental venous anomalies cause seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussaule, Claire; Masnou, Pascal; Nasser, Ghaïdaa; Archambaud, Frédérique; Cauquil-Michon, Cécile; Gagnepain, Jean-Paul; Bouilleret, Viviane; Denier, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are congenital anatomical variants of normal venous drainage of normal brain. Although DVAs are often discovered on the occasion of a seizure, their involvement in epilepsy is poorly studied. Our objective was to determine whether DVA can cause seizures, in the cases where there is no associated lesion, including no cavernoma or dysplasia. Based on clinical history, cerebral MRI, EEG recording, and 18 F-FDG PET, we report 4 patients with DVA revealed by seizures. The first patient had a convulsive seizure caused by a hemorrhagic infarction due to thrombosis of her DVA. The second patient had a left temporo-parietal DVA next to a nonspecific lesion, possibly a sequelae of a venous infarction. The last two patients disclosed an isolated and uncomplicated DVA with a concordant epileptic focus confirmed on ictal video EEG recording. We reviewed literature and identified 21 other published cases of seizures caused by complications of a DVA and 9 patients that may have a direct link between epilepsy and an isolated and uncomplicated DVA. Seizures are linked to a DVA in two main situations: presence of an associated epileptogenic lesion, such as cavernoma or dysplasia, and occurrence of a complication of the DVA. Before concluding that a seizure is caused by a DVA, it is essential to perform full MRI protocols to search them. It remains rare and uncertain that isolated and uncomplicated DVA can cause seizures. In this last situation, physiopathological processes are probably different in each patient.

  3. Febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cry or moan. If standing, the child will fall. The child may vomit or bite their tongue. Sometimes, children ... of febrile seizures is not related to future risk of epilepsy. Children who would develop epilepsy anyway will sometimes have ...

  4. FOCAL EPILEPTIC MYOCLONUS IN KOZHEVNIKOV–RASMUSSEN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Kvaskova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the clinical, electroencephalographic (EEG and neuroimaging features, as well as the results of treatment of patients with focal epileptic myoclonus (FEM with the Kozhevnikov–Rasmussen syndrome (KRS. FEM in KRS-patients was identified in 11 cases, accounting for 0.9 % of all the cases of epilepsy with the onset of seizures up to 18 years (n = 1261. The age at onset of KRS ranged from 3 to 21 years (average – 9.2 ± 5.7 years. In the active period of the disease of all patients in the clinical picture the active FEM appeared and increasing frequency of the secondary generalized seizures (SGS. In addition SGS and FEM, the clinical picture of the disease in most patients (91 % the focal motor (clonic and the somatosensory focal seizures were observed. As the disease progressed, the FEM became more pronounced in frequency and intensity, seized more muscle groups, localizing mainly in the muscles of the trunk and limbs. The typical EEG pattern of FEM patients with KRS was regional epileptiform activity that occurs in the structure of the continued regional slowing localizing maximum of the fronto-central-temporal region. During the magnetic resonance tomography of the brain in dynamics all the patients observed the increase in total cortical hemiatrophy. In all the cases, the appointment of antiepileptic therapy resulted in a slowing of the FEM, however, a complete remission was reached at none of the patients. Two patients were made surgical treatment of epilepsy. In one case remission of epileptic seizures was observed after right-side hemispherotomy. Our study showed that FEM is very resistant type of epileptic seizures. This fact calls for the identification of the FEM at the early stages of the disease with the purpose to improve the prognosis, as well as for an earlier surgical treatment.

  5. Dopey's seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Copyright 1999 BEA Trading Ltd.

  6. Envenomation Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharal, Ghulam Abbas; Darby, Richard Ryan; Cohen, Adam B

    2018-01-01

    Insect sting-related envenomation rarely produces seizures. We present a patient with confusion and seizures that began 24 hours after a yellow jacket (wasp) sting. Given the rapid onset and resolution of symptoms, as well as accompanying dermatological and orbital features, and the lack of any infectious or structural abnormalities identified, the toxic effect of the wasp venom (and related anaphylaxis reaction) was believed to be the cause of his presentation.

  7. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  8. Atypical presentation in Rasmussen encephalitis: delayed late-onset periodic epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Taíssa P F; Hamad, Ana P A; Caboclo, Luís Otávio S F; Centeno, Ricardo S; Zaninotto, Ana Luiza; Scattolin, Monica; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Lancellotti, Carmem L P; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T

    2011-09-01

    A five-and-a-half-year-old girl started experiencing progressive left hemiparesis at age two and a half years. At age five years and four months she started presenting clusters of asymmetric periodic epileptic spasms with no hypsarrhythmia. The ictal EEG showed periodic, constant and stereotyped complexes. Serial brain imaging revealed progressive atrophy of the right hemisphere with increased T2 signal on MRI. She underwent a right hemispherotomy, and histological examination showed signs of inflammation and features of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). She has been seizure-free for 16 months. This case is unique in the following aspects: the presence of typical Rasmussen encephalitis features of progressive unilateral brain involvement without seizures, a delay of almost three years prior to seizure onset; an atypical seizure type presentation with periodic epileptic spasms and the presence of FCD associated with inflammatory changes. [Published with video sequences].

  9. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thyrion, L.; Raedt, R.; Portelli, J.; van Loo, P.; Wadman, W.J.; Glorieux, G.; Lambrecht, B.N.; Janssens, S.; Vonck, K.; Boon, P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in

  10. The Presence of Consciousness in Absence Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines three respects in which the study of epileptic absence seizures promises to inform our understanding of consciousness. Firstly, it has the potential to bear on debates concerning the behavioural and cognitive functions associated with consciousness. Secondly, it has the potential to illuminate the relationship between background states (or ‘levels’) of consciousness and the contents of consciousness. Thirdly, it has the potential to bear on our understanding of the unity of consciousness. PMID:21447898

  11. Seizure Following Topical Gammabenzene Hexachloride Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas Animesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of short-lived, self-limiting major epileptic seizures following an improper application of gammabenzene hexachloride (GBHC lotion in a 15 month old boy suffering from scabies with secondary bacterial infection is reported here due to its rarity in clinical practice and, more particularly, to stress the need of correct instructions on the use of GBHC application for the prevention of iatrogenic neurotoxicity.

  12. Ketogenic diet efficacy in the treatment of intractable epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayyali, Husam R; Gustafson, Megan; Myers, Tara; Thompson, Lindsey; Williams, Michelle; Abdelmoity, Ahmad

    2014-03-01

    To determine the efficacy of the ketogenic diet in controlling epileptic spasms after failing traditional antiepileptic medication therapy. This is a prospective, case-based study of all infants with epileptic spasms who were referred for treatment with the ketogenic diet at our hospital between 2009 and 2012. All subjects continued to have epileptic spasms with evidence of hypsarrhythmia or severe epileptic encephalopathy on electroencephalography despite appropriate medication treatments. The diet efficacy was assessed through clinic visits, phone communications, and electroencephalography. Quality of life improvement was charted based on the caregiver's perspective. Twenty infants (15 males) were included in the study. The mean age at seizure onset was 4.5 months. Age at ketogenic diet initiation was 0.3 to 2.9 years (mean 1.20, standard deviation 0.78). Fifteen patients had epileptic spasms of unknown etiology; three had perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, one had lissencephaly, and one had STXBP1 mutation. Fifteen infants failed to respond to adrenocorticotropin hormone and/or vigabatrin before going on the ketogenic diet. Three months after starting the diet, >50% seizure reduction was achieved in 70% of patients (95% CI 48-86). These results were maintained at 6- and 12-month intervals. All eight of the patients followed for 24 months had >50% seizure reduction (95% CI 63-100). At least 90% seizure reduction was reported in 20% of patients at 3 months (95% CI 7-42), 22% (95% CI 8-46) at 6 months, and 35% (95% CI 17-59) at 12 months. The majority of patients (63%) achieved improvement of their spasms within 1 month after starting the diet. Sixty percent of patients had electroencephalographic improvement. All caregivers reported improvement of the quality of life at the 3-month visit (95% confidence interval 81-100). This ratio was 94% at 6 months (95% CI 72-99) and 82% at 12 months (95% CI 58-95). The ketogenic diet is a safe and potentially

  13. The delta between postoperative seizure freedom and persistence: Automatically detected focal slow waves after epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Schönherr

    2017-01-01

    Significance: The quantity of delta activity could be used as a diagnostic marker for recurrent seizures. The close relation to epileptic spike localizations and the resection volume of patients with successful second surgery imply involvement in seizure recurrence. This initial evidence suggests a potential application in the planning of second epilepsy surgery.

  14. Endogenous sulfur dioxide regulates hippocampal neuron apoptosis in developing epileptic rats and is associated with the PERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Manman; Han, Ying; Li, Qinrui; Zhang, Jing

    2018-02-05

    Epilepsy is among the most common neurological diseases in children. Recurrent seizures can result in hippocampal damage and seriously impair learning and memory functions in children. However, the mechanisms underlying epilepsy-related brain injury are unclear. Neuronal apoptosis is among the most common neuropathological manifestations of brain injury. Endogenous sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) has been shown to be involved in seizures and related neuron apoptosis. However, the role of endogenous SO 2 in epilepsy remains unclear. This study assessed whether endogenous SO 2 is involved in epilepsy and its underlying mechanisms. Using a rat epilepsy model induced by an intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA), we found that hippocampal neuron apoptosis was induced in epileptic rats, and the SO 2 content and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) activity in the plasma were increased compared to those in the control group. However, the inhibition of SO 2 production by l-aspartate-β-hydroxamate (HDX) can subvert this response 72h after an epileptic seizure. No difference in apoptosis was observed 7 d after the epileptic seizure in the KA and KA+HDX groups. The protein expression levels of AAT2, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), pancreatic eIF2 kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) and phospho-PERK (p-PERK) were remarkably elevated in the hippocampi of the epileptic rats, while the HDX treatment was capable of reversing this process 7 d after the epileptic seizure. These results indicate that the inhibition of endogenous SO 2 production can alleviate neuronal apoptosis and is associated with the PERK signaling pathway during the initial stages after epileptic seizure, but inhibiting SO 2 production only delayed the occurrence of apoptosis and did not prevent neuronal apoptosis in the epileptic rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dextromethorphan in the treatment of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizures in infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hsuan Chien

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-burst in electroencephalography (EEG can evolve into a few types of epileptic syndromes. We present here an unusual case of early myoclonic encephalopathy that evolved into migrating partial seizures in infancy. A female neonate initially had erratic myoclonus movements, hiccups, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG that was compatible with early myoclonic encephalopathy. The seizures were controlled with dextromethorphan (20 mg/kg, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG was reverted to relatively normal background activity. However, at 72 days of age, alternating focal tonic seizures, compatible with migrating partial seizures in infancy, were demonstrated by the 24-hour EEG recording. The seizures responded poorly to dextromethorphan. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizure in infancy. Whether it represents another age-dependent epilepsy evolution needs more clinical observation.

  16. High-Definition transcranial direct current stimulation in early onset epileptic encephalopathy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiron, Oded; Gale, Rena; Namestnic, Julia; Bennet-Back, Odeya; David, Jonathan; Gebodh, Nigel; Adair, Devin; Esmaeilpour, Zeinab; Bikson, Marom

    2018-01-01

    Early onset epileptic encephalopathy is characterized by high daily seizure-frequency, multifocal epileptic discharges, severe psychomotor retardation, and death at infancy. Currently, there are no effective treatments to alleviate seizure frequency and high-voltage epileptic discharges in these catastrophic epilepsy cases. The current study examined the safety and feasibility of High-Definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) in reducing epileptiform activity in a 30-month-old child suffering from early onset epileptic encephalopathy. HD-tDCS was administered over 10 intervention days spanning two weeks including pre- and post-intervention video-EEG monitoring. There were no serious adverse events or side effects related to the HD-tDCS intervention. Frequency of clinical seizures was not significantly reduced. However, interictal sharp wave amplitudes were significantly lower during the post-intervention period versus baseline. Vital signs and blood biochemistry remained stable throughout the entire study. These exploratory findings support the safety and feasibility of 4 × 1 HD-tDCS in early onset epileptic encephalopathy and provide the first evidence of HD-tDCS effects on paroxysmal EEG features in electroclinical cases under the age of 36 months. Extending HD-tDCS treatment may enhance electrographic findings and clinical effects.

  17. Focal seizure-induced premature myelination: speculation from serial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duprez, T.; Grandin, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Ghariani, S.; Gadisseux, J.F.; Evrard, P. [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Smith, A.M. [MRI Laboratory, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    1998-09-01

    Local changes in the white matter underlying a focus of cortical thickening were monitored using MRI in an epileptic 2-month-old boy. We hypothesise that these changes reflected seizure-induced premature myelination. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 10 refs.

  18. Anticonvulsant action of topiramate against motor seizures in developing rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haugvicová, Renata; Kubová, Hana; Škutová, Markéta; Mareš, Pavel

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2000), s. 1235-1240 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd NL5745 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : topiramate * pentylenetetrazol * epileptic seizures Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.787, year: 2000

  19. Mechanism of RDX-Induced Seizures in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Barsotti, M. and Crofti, G. 1949. Epileptic attacks as manifestations of inducstrial intoxification caused by trimethylenetrinitroamine (T4). Med. Lav...883. Katel, W. B. and Hughes, J. R. 1972. Toxic encephalopathy with seizures secondary to ingestion of composition of C-4: a clinical and

  20. Diagnostic Approach to Genetic Causes of Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Semra; Erçal, Derya

    2016-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are characterized by recurrent clinical seizures and prominent interictal epileptiform discharges seen during the early infantile period. Although epileptic encephalopathies are mostly associated with structural brain defects and inherited metabolic disorders, pathogenic gene mutations may also be involved in the development of epileptic encephalopathies even when no clear genetic inheritance patterns or consanguinity exist. The most common epileptic encephalopathies are Ohtahara syndrome, early myoclonic encephalopathy, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome and Dravet syndrome, which are usually unresponsive to traditional antiepileptic medication. Many of the diagnoses describe the phenotype of these electroclinical syndromes, but not the underlying causes. To date, approximately 265 genes have been defined in epilepsy and several genes including STXBP1, ARX, SLC25A22, KCNQ2, CDKL5, SCN1A, and PCDH19 have been found to be associated with early-onset epileptic encephalopathies. In this review, we aimed to present a diagnostic approach to primary genetic causes of early-onset epileptic encephalopathies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Epilepsy surgery in pediatric epileptic encephalopathy: when interictal EEG counts the most.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahwan, Amre; O'Halloran, Philip J; Madigan, Cathy; King, Mary D; O'Brien, Donncha

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, seizure onset localization in ictal electro-encephalography (EEG) is the main factor guiding resective epilepsy surgery. The situation is often different in infantile epileptic encephalopathy. We demonstrate the importance of the underrated interictal (rather than ictal) surface EEG in informing decision-making in epilepsy surgery for children with epileptic encephalopathy caused by subtle focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). We present a small case series of three children who had an epileptic encephalopathy with either epileptic spasms or tonic seizures. All three were thought initially to have normal neuroimaging. Ictal EEG localizing features were seen in none and lateralizing features were seen only clinically in one of the three. However, the interictal EEG showed persistent and consistent focal irregular slowing in all, particularly after medically resolving the diffuse encephalopathy. Subtle FCDs were uncovered in all. Surgery was performed in all with excellent outcome. In infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by subtle FCD, the often underrated interictal surface EEG (particularly persistent foal irregular slowing) informs the most; not only to the target area for surgical resection but also to its extent. This may negate the need for unnecessary and sometimes non-informative invasive monitoring in these cases. A matter of "zooming out" to define the extent of a resectable abnormality rather than "zooming in" to define a seemingly localized epileptic focus that may change with time.

  2. Seizure semiology of lesional frontal lobe epilepsies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, D; Lettori, D; Contaldo, I; Veredice, C; Sacco, A; Vasco, J; Martinelli, D; Chieffo, D; Tartaglione, T; Colosimo, C; Di Rocco, C; Guzzetta, F

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the semiology of seizures in children with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and to compare them with other paediatric cohorts described in the literature as well as with adult counterparts. We analysed 174 registered seizures of 18 cases under 12 years with lesional epilepsy whose frontal origin was defined by the concordance of neuroimaging and ictal electrographic findings, and confirmed by surgery in the six cases operated on. Seizures were generally short, with a high daily frequency and usually related to sleep. The most characteristic semiological pattern consisted of complex motor seizures, particularly hypermotor. Often seizures corresponded to a mixture of different semiological patterns (tonic, gelastic, automotor, hypermotor, versive) presenting in the same seizure, often as a unique type in the same patient. With regard to several aspects the semiology of FLE in our cohort looks like that reported in adult series, in particular as to the frequency of complex motor seizures. However, our cohort was also characterised by a more protean array of seizure semiology, stressing the occurrence of seizures typically present in adults (versive and complex motor) and of some seizure patterns more characteristic in children such as epileptic spasms; moreover, the rare occurrence of secondarily generalised tonic clonic seizures (SGTCS) was confirmed.

  3. Potent Anti-seizure Effects of Locked Nucleic Acid Antagomirs Targeting miR-134 in Multiple Mouse and Rat Models of Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina R. Reschke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Current anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs act on a limited set of neuronal targets, are ineffective in a third of patients with epilepsy, and do not show disease-modifying properties. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that regulate levels of proteins by post-transcriptional control of mRNA stability and translation. MicroRNA-134 is involved in controlling neuronal microstructure and brain excitability and previous studies showed that intracerebroventricular injections of locked nucleic acid (LNA, cholesterol-tagged antagomirs targeting microRNA-134 (Ant-134 reduced evoked and spontaneous seizures in mouse models of status epilepticus. Translation of these findings would benefit from evidence of efficacy in non-status epilepticus models and validation in another species. Here, we report that electrographic seizures and convulsive behavior are strongly reduced in adult mice pre-treated with Ant-134 in the pentylenetetrazol model. Pre-treatment with Ant-134 did not affect the severity of status epilepticus induced by perforant pathway stimulation in adult rats, a toxin-free model of acquired epilepsy. Nevertheless, Ant-134 post-treatment reduced the number of rats developing spontaneous seizures by 86% in the perforant pathway stimulation model and Ant-134 delayed epileptiform activity in a rat ex vivo hippocampal slice model. The potent anticonvulsant effects of Ant-134 in multiple models may encourage pre-clinical development of this approach to epilepsy therapy.

  4. Biphasic action of vigabatrin on cortical epileptic after-discharges in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Šlamberová, Romana

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 369, č. 3 (2004), s. 305-311 ISSN 0028-1298 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1643 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : epileptic seizures * electrical stimulation * sensorimotor cortex Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.963, year: 2004

  5. Application of rare variant transmission disequilibrium tests to epileptic encephalopathy trio sequence data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bridgers, Joshua; Cossette, Patrick; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Jiang, Yu; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; O'Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrou, Steven; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ren, Zhong; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott; Wang, Quanli; Balling, Rudi; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Craiu, Dana; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jähn, Johanna A.; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby; Komarek, Vladimir; Krause, Roland; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lerche, Holger; Linnankivi, Tarja; Marini, Carla; May, Patrick; Møller, Rikke S.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Pal, Deb; Palotie, Aarno; Rosenow, Felix; Selmer, Kaja; Serratosa, Jose M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Stephani, Ulrich; Sterbova, Katalin; Striano, Pasquale; Suls, Arvid; Talvik, Tiina; von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne G.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Zara, Federico; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Bluvstein, Judith; Cascino, Gregory D.; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Fiol, Miguel E.; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Haas, Kevin; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Kuperman, Rachel; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack; Park, Kristen; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joseph; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.

    2017-01-01

    The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly encoding ion channel and synaptic proteins have been found to account for over 15% of patients

  6. The Persistence of Erroneous Familiarity in an Epileptic Male: Challenging Perceptual Theories of Deja Vu Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Akira R.; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old, temporal lobe epileptic male, MH. Prior to complex partial seizure, experienced up to three times a day, MH often experiences an aura experienced as a persistent sensation of deja vu. Data-driven theories of deja vu formation suggest that partial familiarity for the perceived stimulus is responsible for the…

  7. Homocysteine, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels in serum of epileptic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osama Nour Eldeen

    2012-07-04

    (11):5923–8. [10] Kubova´ H, Folbergrova´ J, Mares P. Seizures induced by homocysteine in rats during ontogenesis. Epilepsia 1995;36(8):. 750–6. Homocysteine, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels in serum of epileptic children.

  8. Synaptic and extrasynaptic GABA transporters as targets for anti-epileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karsten K; Clausen, Rasmus P; Larsson, Orla M

    2009-01-01

    Inhibition of the GABA transporter subtype GAT1 by the clinically available anti-epileptic drug tiagabine has proven to be an effective strategy for the treatment of some patients with partial seizures. In 2005, the investigational drug EF1502 was described as possessing activity at both GAT1...

  9. Application of rare variant transmission disequilibrium tests to epileptic encephalopathy trio sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly encoding ion channel and synaptic proteins have been found to account for over 15% of patients...

  10. Downregulated GABA and BDNF-TrkB Pathway in Chronic Cyclothiazide Seizure Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhen Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclothiazide (CTZ has been reported to simultaneously enhance glutamate receptor excitation and inhibit GABAA receptor inhibition, and in turn it evokes epileptiform activities in hippocampal neurons. It has also been shown to acutely induce epileptic seizure behavior in freely moving rats. However, whether CTZ induced seizure rats could develop to have recurrent seizure still remains unknown. In the current study, we demonstrated that 46% of the CTZ induced seizure rats developed to have recurrent seizure behavior as well as epileptic EEG with a starting latency between 2 weeks and several months. In those chronic seizure rats 6 months after the seizure induction by the CTZ, our immunohistochemistry results showed that both GAD and GAT-1 were significantly decreased across CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus area of the hippocampus studied. In addition, both BDNF and its receptor TrkB were also decreased in hippocampus of the chronic CTZ seizure rats. Our results indicate that CTZ induced seizure is capable of developing to have recurrent seizure, and the decreased GABA synthesis and transport as well as the impaired BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway may contribute to the development of the recurrent seizure. Thus, CTZ seizure rats may provide a novel animal model for epilepsy study and anticonvulsant drug testing in the future.

  11. De novo GABRG2 mutations associated with epileptic encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dingding; Hernandez, Ciria C; Shen, Wangzhen; Hu, Ningning; Poduri, Annapurna; Shiedley, Beth; Rotenberg, Alex; Datta, Alexandre N; Leiz, Steffen; Patzer, Steffi; Boor, Rainer; Ramsey, Kerri; Goldberg, Ethan; Helbig, Ingo; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R; Lemke, Johannes R; Marsh, Eric D; Macdonald, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood onset epilepsies with medication-resistant seizures and poor developmental outcomes. Many epileptic encephalopathies have a genetic aetiology and are often associated with de novo mutations in genes mediating synaptic transmission, including GABAA receptor subunit genes. Recently, we performed next generation sequencing on patients with a spectrum of epileptic encephalopathy phenotypes, and we identified five novel (A106T, I107T, P282S, R323W and F343L) and one known (R323Q) de novo GABRG2 pathogenic variants (mutations) in eight patients. To gain insight into the molecular basis for how these mutations contribute to epileptic encephalopathies, we compared the effects of the mutations on the properties of recombinant α1β2γ2L GABAA receptors transiently expressed in HEK293T cells. Using a combination of patch clamp recording, immunoblotting, confocal imaging and structural modelling, we characterized the effects of these GABRG2 mutations on GABAA receptor biogenesis and channel function. Compared with wild-type α1β2γ2L receptors, GABAA receptors containing a mutant γ2 subunit had reduced cell surface expression with altered subunit stoichiometry or decreased GABA-evoked whole-cell current amplitudes, but with different levels of reduction. While a causal role of these mutations cannot be established directly from these results, the functional analysis together with the genetic information suggests that these GABRG2 variants may be major contributors to the epileptic encephalopathy phenotypes. Our study further expands the GABRG2 phenotypic spectrum and supports growing evidence that defects in GABAergic neurotransmission participate in the pathogenesis of genetic epilepsies including epileptic encephalopathies. PMID:27864268

  12. Connectivity of epileptic brain regions in wake and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimes, Petr; Duque, Juliano J; Jurak, Pavel; Halamek, Josef; Worrell, Gregory A

    2015-08-01

    Focal epileptic brain is characterized by a region of pathological tissue seizure onset zone (SOZ) - the pathologic tissue generating seizures. During the interictal period (nonseizure) the SOZ is characterized by epileptiform activity - interictal spikes & high-frequency oscillations (HFO). The SOZ also exhibits hyper-synchrony and functional disconnection from the surrounding areas. Recent studies have described the synchrony inside the SOZ and surrounding tissue for just small sets of patients (2-4) and without any distinction in behavioral states. Wake and sleep cycles can, however, have a significant influence on SOZ activity. Here we show the results of connectivity analysis in three fundamental areas of the epileptic brain - inside SOZ, outside SOZ and bridging areas in 7 patients during wake and sleep. We observed increased synchrony inside SOZ and decreased synchrony on its edges (bridging areas) in specific frequency bands. We also detected significant differences of synchrony levels between wake and sleep periods in HFO frequencies. Our results provide additional insight into the properties of SOZ connectivity. Knowledge of these principles may prove useful for SOZ localization and understanding epileptic brain function in general.

  13. De novo loss-of-function mutations in CHD2 cause a fever-sensitive myoclonic epileptic encephalopathy sharing features with Dravet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suls, Arvid; Jaehn, Johanna A; Kecskés, Angela

    2013-01-01

    CHD2 mutation was identified in an epileptic proband of a second (stage 2) cohort. All three individuals with a CHD2 mutation had intellectual disability and fever-sensitive generalized seizures, as well as prominent myoclonic seizures starting in the second year of life or later. To explore...

  14. Electrographic Changes Accompanying Recurrent Seizures under Ketogenic Diet Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Lucchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet (KD is increasingly used to treat epilepsy refractory to antiepileptic drugs and other neurological disorders. In animal models, the KD was found to increase the threshold to seizures induced by different convulsive stimulations. However, in models in which suprathreshold stimuli were used, a paradoxical seizure worsening was consistently observed in KD-fed animals. To better define this phenomenon, we characterized the electrographic response to seizures induced in mice which were treated with the KD, and then corneally stimulated at 6-Hz in four different sessions. We also evaluated the electroencephalogram (EEG in three patients in which the KD was associated with a paradoxical worsening of epileptic seizures. Although seizures were initially less severe, a remarkable prolongation of the electrographic response was observed in mice receiving the KD from the second session of 6-Hz corneal stimulation and onwards. The EEG was also markedly altered in the presence of progressive seizure aggravation observed in children treated with the KD, specifically one affected by Lennox–Gastaut syndrome and two by type I lissencephaly. These results suggest that when seizures are induced or recur because of resistance to therapeutic interventions, the KD may change the EEG by potentiating the electrographic epileptic activity.

  15. Preventing and treating posttraumatic seizures: the human experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Nancy R

    2009-02-01

    Posttraumatic epilepsy presents an ideal target for prevention efforts. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common, characteristics that put people at high risk such as penetrating injury or subdural hematoma or provoked seizures are easily identified, and the latency between the injury and the onset of epileptic seizures is frequently short. Several drugs have been tested for their ability to prevent provoked seizures and epilepsy after TBI. We describe the design of those studies and their results. Phenytoin and carbamazepine significantly reduce the incidence of provoked seizures. Phenobarbital and the combination of phenobarbital and phenytoin also look promising for reducing provoked seizures, but small sample sizes in the studies evaluating these drugs do not allow definitive conclusions. None of the drugs studied (phenytoin, phenobarbital, their combination, carbamazepine, valproate, or magnesium) have shown reliable evidence that they prevent, or even suppress, epileptic seizures after TBI. For most of the regimens tested (the phenytoin/phenobarbital combination being the exception), the best estimate of effect is under a 25% reduction in posttraumatic seizures, well less than the 50% reduction most studies were designed to detect. The evaluation of the tested drugs has serious limitations, however, and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) developed since 1980 and other compounds have barely been tested at all. Better understanding the process of epileptogenesis, testing treatments that demonstrate antiepileptogenic effects in the laboratory, and performing thorough preclinical and phase II evaluations before attempting definitive trials should greatly improve the chance of identifying ways to prevent posttraumatic epilepsy, providing the ultimate cure for this condition.

  16. Models for discovery of targeted therapy in genetic epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maljevic, Snezana; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are severe disorders emerging in the first days to years of life that commonly include refractory seizures, various types of movement disorders, and different levels of developmental delay. In recent years, many de novo occurring variants have been identified in individuals with these devastating disorders. To unravel disease mechanisms, the functional impact of detected variants associated with epileptic encephalopathies is investigated in a range of cellular and animal models. This review addresses efforts to advance and use such models to identify specific molecular and cellular targets for the development of novel therapies. We focus on ion channels as the best-studied group of epilepsy genes. Given the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of epileptic encephalopathy disorders, experimental models that can reflect this complexity are critical for the development of disease mechanisms-based targeted therapy. The convergence of technological advances in gene sequencing, stem cell biology, genome editing, and high throughput functional screening together with massive unmet clinical needs provides unprecedented opportunities and imperatives for precision medicine in epileptic encephalopathies. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Impaired action potential initiation in GABAergic interneurons causes hyperexcitable networks in an epileptic mouse model carrying a human Na(V)1.1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz; Mantegazza, Massimo; Lerche, Holger

    2014-11-05

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na(+) channels in interneurons and persistent Na(+) currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca(2+) imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414874-16$15.00/0.

  18. Vaccination, seizures and 'vaccine damage'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Natasha J; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2007-04-01

    Concerns about the safety of vaccination have plagued the community, with reduction in vaccine uptake resulting in increased risk of epidemics. Vaccination has been implicated in the cause of febrile seizures, 'vaccine encephalopathy' and autistic spectrum disorders. Evaluation of alleged associations is complicated by evolution in the vaccination field. This review focuses on the risk of seizures following vaccination and the alleged associations of vaccination with vaccine encephalopathy and also with autism spectrum disorders. Over the last decade the introduction of new vaccines such as the acellular pertussis vaccine has produced a reduction in seizures following vaccination, the outcome of which was benign even with older vaccines. New evidence emerged in 2006 showing that cases of alleged 'vaccine encephalopathy' are due to mutations within a sodium channel gene. The weight of epidemiological evidence does not support a relationship between vaccination and childhood epileptic encephalopathies or autism spectrum disorders. Vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society in such a way that produces change in attitudes to vaccination and subsequent increase in vaccine coverage.

  19. The ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ville, Dorothée; Chiron, Catherine; Laschet, Jacques; Dulac, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Hormonal therapy or ketogenic diet often permits overcoming the challenging periods of many epileptic encephalopathies (West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes and encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep), but relapse affects over 20% of patients. We report here a monocenter pilot series of 42 consecutive patients in whom we combined oral steroids with the ketogenic diet for corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent epileptic encephalopathy. We retrospectively evaluated the effect on seizure frequency, interictal spike activity, neuropsychological course, and steroid treatment course. Twenty-three patients had West syndrome (WS), 13 had encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep (CSWS), and six others had miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. All patients succeeded to reach 0.8 to 1.6g/l ketone bodies in the urine following the usual KD regimen. For at least 6 months, 14/42 responded to the addition of the ketogenic diet: 4/23 with WS, 8/13 with CSWS, and 2/6 with miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. The addition of the KD allowed withdrawing steroids in all responders. Among them, 10/15 had been patients with steroid-dependent epileptic encephalopathy and 4/27 patients with steroid-resistant epileptic encephalopathy. Therefore, the ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies. Patients presenting with steroid-dependent CSWS seem to be the best candidates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Anoxic seizures: self-terminating syncopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J B

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on anoxic seizures induced by self terminating syncopes in the young. Anoxic seizures are nonepileptic events consequent upon abrupt interruption of the energy supply to metabolically active cerebral neurones. Anoxic seizures are the most common paroxysmal events misdiagnosed as epilepsy. Neurally mediated syncopes have numerous appellations, especially in the young. This proliferation of terminology likely results from uncertainty regarding pathophysiology. The most important type of self-limiting syncope from the point of view of diagnostic difficulty has been called neurocardiogenic or vasovagal syncope and reflex anoxic seizure, amongst other names: this review includes a video clip of such a child with prolonged asystole. It also includes a detailed case history emphasising the feelings of a patient with this type of syncope who was misdiagnosed as having epilepsy for many years. The second class of self-terminating syncope discussed and illustrated on video is the so-called breath-holding spell of young children. The third example illustrated is the compulsive Valsalva manoeuvre of individuals with autistic spectrum disorder, in which anoxic seizures - as shown on the video clips - are easily misdiagnosed as epileptic seizures, with unfortunate consequences.

  1. Functional neuroimaging in epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Capovilla, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies (EEs) represent a group of severe epileptic disorders associated with cognitive and behavioral disturbances. The mechanisms of cognitive disability in EEs remain unclear. This review summarized neuroimaging studies that have tried to describe specific fingerprints of brain activation in EE. Although the epileptic activity can be generated individually in different brain regions, it seems likely that the activity propagates in a syndrome-specific way. In some EEs, the epileptiform discharges were associated with an interruption of activity in the default mode network. In another EE, other mechanisms seem to underlie cognitive disability associated with epileptic activity, for example, abnormal connectivity pattern or interfering activity in the thalamocortical network. Further neuroimaging studies are needed to investigate the short-term and long-term impact of epileptic activity on cognition and development. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Partial seizures during ACTH therapy in a cryptogenic West syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Miho; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Tanabe, Takuya; Nomura, Shohei; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Azumakawa, Kohji; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Partial seizures often develop during the clinical course of infantile spasms. Herein, we report a boy with cryptogenic West syndrome, who developed partial seizures that we suspected were induced by the ACTH therapy. The patient developed cryptogenic West syndrome at six months of age and ACTH therapy was started. On the tenth day of treatment, he developed frequent partial seizures, characterized by being motionless during the seizure with eye deviation to the right. The partial seizures stopped after the ACTH was discontinued, although oral carbamazepine was commenced at the same time. Thus, a definitive role for carbamazepine in the treatment of the partial seizures was unclear as the timing of the seizure cessation also corresponded to the discontinuation of the ACTH therapy. We suspected that the partial seizures were induced by the ACTH therapy for the following reasons: (1) seizures appeared only during ACTH therapy, (2) no new epileptic focus was revealed by EEG, MRI, or (99m)TcECD SPECT, and (3) the seizures were different from the epileptic spasms. Our results suggest that ACTH might induce partial seizures in West syndrome. Further studies are required to confirm this phenomenon. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Early onset epileptic encephalopathy with a novel GABRB3 mutation treated effectively with clonazepam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Lian, Yajun; Xie, Nanchang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Early onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE) is one of the most serious early onset epilepsies. The etiopathology of this condition remains unclear, and recent evidence indicated that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor, subunit beta 3 (GABRB3) gene mutations might be associated with EOEE. Furthermore, the therapeutic regimen for EOEE has yet to be well elucidated. Herein, we reported the clinical and genetic features of a case with GABRB3-related EOEE. Patient concerns: A 6-year-old girl developed epileptic seizures 3 days after birth. She presented with multiple seizure types including myoclonic seizures, spasms, and absence seizures. Serial electroencephalographic examinations showed variable abnormalities, and intellectual evaluation revealed significant development retardation. Conventional antiepileptic drugs were ineffective for the seizure controlling. Genetic screening identified a novel nonsense mutation (C.5G > A, p.W2X) in the GABRB3 gene. Diagnoses: Early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Interventions: We changed the antiepileptic strategy to oral clonazepam (0.5mg twice daily). The patient was followed up once a week and significant declining in the attack frequency was noted 1 week later (2–3 times daily). Subsequently, the dosage was doubled (1mg twice daily), and complete cessation of seizures was achieved 20 days later. Outcomes: Through a 9-month follow up,the girl remained seizure-free. Lessons: This study identified a novel nonsensemutation (C.5G>A) in the exon 1 of GABRB3 Gene, which may be associated with EOEE. To our knowledge, this is the first report to use clonazepam in the patient with GABRB3-related EOEE with favorable outcome. Our finding suggested that clonazepam might be a choice for patient with GABRB3-related EOEE. The remarkable efficacy of clonazepam in the control of seizures indicated a potential GABRB3- or GABA-related mechanism involved in the development of EOEE. PMID:29390378

  4. Excitatory aminoacids and epileptic seizures in immature brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Kubová, Hana

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, Suppl.1 (2004), s. S115-S124 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/1238; GA MŠk LN00B122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : NMDA receptors * nonNMDA receptors * glutamate metabotropic receptors Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  5. Focal epileptic seizures ipsilateral to the tumor: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Gusmão, Sebastião Silva; Mendes, Mirian Fabíola Studart; Silveira, Roberto Leal

    2002-01-01

    Descreve-se um caso de crise focal somatosensorial ipsilateral a tumor cerebral e revê-se a literatura. Trata-se de ocorrência excepcional, tendo sido descritos apenas seis casos. Vários mecanismos fisiopatológicos foram propostos para explicar a crise focal somatosensorial ipsilateral. A proximidade das lesões da convexidade cerebral baixa (perisilviana) sugere o comprometimento da área somatosensorial secundária e parece comprovar os achados experimentais de crises somatosensoriais originad...

  6. Epileptic seizures in patients with glioma: A single centre- based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Department of Radiology, Yichang Central People's Hospital, Yichang, Hubei 443003, China ... INTRODUCTION. Epilepsy is typical in brain tumour patients, and its control plays imperative part in clinical management. Convulsions add up considerable morbidity in brain tumour ..... influence the action of that enzyme.

  7. The Significance of Epileptic Seizures in Infancy and Childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-13

    Apr 13, 1974 ... disorder in function. This can be expressed by abnormal activity at all levels: motor, sensory, sensorial, behavioural, ... of the same motor, sensory or psychological pattern which,. Department of Neuromuscular and .... dency to call it West's Syndrome, in the memory of Dr. West, an English paediatrician who ...

  8. Aliocha Dostoevski’s death during an epileptic seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson José Amâncio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mortality due to epilepsy is of great concern worldwide. Individuals with epilepsy have a two- or three-fold risk of death when compared to the general population. Based on biographical data and Anna Grigoriévna Dostoevskaia’s memories, the authors concluded that a prolonged episode of status epilepticus was the culprit in the death of young Aliocha, youngest son of Fyodor Mikhailovich and Anna Dostoevski. At the time of Aliocha’s death, very limited knowledge about epilepsy or therapeutic resources was available. Despite all the progress, epilepsies remain potentially fatal conditions. The suffering generated by Aliocha’s death and other similar cases remains as a challenge for epileptologists who assemble efforts to fight against such conditions.

  9. Epileptic seizures in patients with glioma: A single centrebased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To elucidate the outcomes of treatment and epidemiology of epilepsy related to glioma in a single center in Chinese patients. Methods: Prescription medicines usage and clinical data were collected from medical records of 119 patients with gliomas between August 2009 and September 2015. Fisher's exact and ...

  10. Role of biomarkers in differentiating new-onset seizures from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Javali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Review of literature revealed very limited studies considering a combination of serum prolactin (PRL and serum creatine kinase (CK as markers for differentiating epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the role of serum PRL and serum CK, individually and in combination. Methodology: This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary care medical teaching hospital over a period of 18 months. Patients aged over 15 years suspected to have new-onset seizures presenting within 5 h of ictus were included in this study. CK, serum PRL was measured at 0–1, 1–3, and 3–5 h after seizures. Results: Hundred subjects were studied for the role of serum PRL and serum CK in differentiating epileptic and PNES. The mean age was 42.24 years with a male:female ratio of 1.27:1. All patients of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS, who presented within 1 h, had elevated PRL, whereas 75% of patients with partial seizures had elevated PRL within 1 h of presentation. Nearly 91.66% of patients with GTCS who presented within 1 h had elevated CPK, whereas 70% of patients with partial seizures had elevated CPK. None of the patients diagnosed with PNES showed rise in either of the markers. Conclusion: In the present study, none of the patients with PNES showed raise in either serum PRL or CK. However, there was no correlation between the types of seizure and PRL or serum CK levels.

  11. How large must an epileptic focus be to cause an electrographic status epilepticus--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, Susanne; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    Based on experimental data from animal studies different theories regarding the size of an epileptic focus have been postulated which range from single pacemaker cells to extended neuronal networks. We report a case which gives further information about the size of a human epileptic focus which can trigger manifest epileptic seizures. We report a 22-year-old man with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. This patient suffered from brief complex partial seizures and frequent epigastric auras. To differentiate a mesiotemporal from a temporolateral seizure origin the patient was implanted with a 10 contact depth electrode from a posterior approach into the right hippocampus, and additional temporobasal/temporolateral subdural strip electrodes. Depth recordings revealed an electrographic status with continuous rhythmic sharp wave activity (1 Hz), the field of which was confined to a diameter of less than 1 cm in the anterior hippocampus, whereas temporobasal subdural strip electrodes did not display this activity. Periodically, spread of this activity occurred to the amygdala, to the posterior part of the hippocampus, and less often to the temporobasal cortex. Most seizure patterns remained subclinical, few of them became symptomatic as partial seizures. This case demonstrates that a hippocampal epileptic focus causing electrographic focal status epilepticus may be limited to a volume of less than 1 cm in diameter. This observation is discussed with regard to implantation strategies and to possible superselective resective or modulatory approaches in the treatment of such limited epileptogenic areas.

  12. A brief history of typical absence seizures - Petit mal revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen; Lattanzi, Simona; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Nardone, Raffaele; Martini, Mariano

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we have traced back the history of typical absence seizures, from their initial clinical description to the more recent nosological position. The first description of absence seizures was made by Poupart in 1705 and Tissot in 1770. In 1824, Calmeil introduced the term "absences", and in 1838, Esquirol for the first time used the term petit mal. Reynolds instead used the term "epilepsia mitior" (milder epilepsy) and provided a comprehensive description of absence seizures (1861). In 1854, Delasiauve ranked absences as the seizure type with lower severity and introduced the concept of idiopathic epilepsy. Otto Binswanger (1899) discussed the role of cortex in the pathophysiology of "abortive seizures", whereas William Gowers (1901) emphasized the importance of a detailed clinical history to identify nonmotor seizures or very mild motor phenomena which otherwise may go unnoticed or considered not epileptic. At the beginning of the 20th Century, the term pyknolepsy was introduced, but initially was not universally considered as a type of epilepsy; it was definitely recognized as an epileptic entity only in 1945, based on electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. Hans Berger, the inventor of the EEG, made also the first EEG recording of an atypical absence (his results were published only in 1933), whereas the characteristic EEG pattern was reported by neurophysiologists of the Harvard Medical School in 1935. The discovery of EEG made it also possible to differentiate absence seizures from so called "psychomotor" seizures occurring in temporal lobe epilepsy. Penfield and Jasper (1938) considered absences as expression of "centrencephalic epilepsy". Typical absences seizures are now classified by the International League Against Epilepsy among generalized nonmotor (absence) seizures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Surgical versus medical treatment for children with epileptic encephalopathy in infancy and early childhood: Results of an international multicenter cohort study in Far-East Asia (the FACE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Taisuke; Kim, Heung-Dong; Luan, Guoming; Inoue, Yushi; Baba, Hiroshi; Oguni, Hirokazu; Hong, Seung-Chyul; Kameyama, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Hirose, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Sugai, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    To compare the seizure and developmental outcomes in infants and young children with epileptic encephalopathy who have undergone surgical and medical treatments. An international, multicenter, observational cohort study was undertaken. A total of 317 children aged epileptic encephalopathy who could benefit from surgery. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to forecasting the occurrence of epileptic seizures, is one of the most important but challenging problems in biomedical sciences, across the world. In this research we propose a new methodology which is based on studying the EEG signals using two measures, the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension. In order to validate the proposed method, it is applied to epileptic EEG signals of patients by computing the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension, and then the results are validated versus the reference data. The results of these analyses show that we are able to forecast the onset of a seizure on average of 25.76 seconds before the time of occurrence. PMID:26586477

  15. Epileptic spasms: Nosological characteristics and approaches to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mironov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence, anamnestic, clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuroimaging features of epileptic syndromes associated with epileptic spasms (ES and the efficiency of antiepileptic therapy in patients with these conditions. Patients and methods. The study covered 1261 patients with epileptic seizures in the history with their onset from the first day of life to 18 years.Results. A history of ES was recorded in 112 patients, which accounted for 8.9% of cases among all the forms of epilepsy with its onset less than 18 years of age. ES was detected in 47.1% of the patients with seizure onset in the first year of life. There was a slight male preponderance: 59 (52.7% versus 53 (47.3%. Epilepsy with ES onset occurred in the first 6 months of life in 57.9% of cases. The West syndrome was found in 58.9% of the patients with ES-associated epilepsy, which amounted to 5.2% of all forms of epilepsy developing at the age of less than 18 years; Ohtahara syndrome in 32.1% (2.9% of all forms of epilepsy, early myoclonic encephalopathy in 0.9% (0.08% and symptomatic focal epilepsy with periodic spasms in 8.1% (0.7% of all forms of epilepsy. Antiepileptic therapy led to complete remission in 45.5% of ES-associated epilepsy cases. There was a 50% or more reduction in the rate of seizures in 35.7% of the patients treated with antiepileptic drugs. No effect was seen in 18.8% of cases.

  16. Modeling epileptic brain states using EEG spectral analysis and topographic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Teixeira, César; Ribeiro, Bernardete; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Sales, Francisco; Dourado, António

    2012-09-30

    Changes in the spatio-temporal behavior of the brain electrical activity are believed to be associated to epileptic brain states. We propose a novel methodology to identify the different states of the epileptic brain, based on the topographic mapping of the time varying relative power of delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency sub-bands, estimated from EEG. Using normalized-cuts segmentation algorithm, points of interest are identified in the topographic mappings and their trajectories over time are used for finding out relations with epileptogenic propagations in the brain. These trajectories are used to train a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which models the different epileptic brain states and the transition among them. Applied to 10 patients suffering from focal seizures, with a total of 30 seizures over 497.3h of data, the methodology shows good results (an average point-by-point accuracy of 89.31%) for the identification of the four brain states--interictal, preictal, ictal and postictal. The results suggest that the spatio-temporal dynamics captured by the proposed methodology are related to the epileptic brain states and transitions involved in focal seizures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Seizure semiology in males with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures is associated with somatic complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Shawn D; Hill, Stacy W; Pearson, Caleb

    2015-09-01

    Psychopathology has been studied in patients with epileptic or psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in the context of diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, most PNES studies include few males and do not consider possible gender differences, making findings less generalizable to males with PNES. In this study we specifically compare males with PNES to females with PNES and to males with epilepsy. Males with PNES (n=58), males with epilepsy (n=86), females with PNES (n=147), and females with ES (n=142) were evaluated on an inpatient epilepsy monitoring unit. Self-reported objective measures of psychopathology, demographics, and PNES seizure semiology were compared. Personality Assessment Inventory profiles revealed marked differences, particularly in somatic symptoms, between PNES and epilepsy. Females with PNES had higher levels of physiological depressive symptoms but lower antisocial features. Males with PNES who had clinically significant elevations on the somatic complaints scale were much more likely to have motor seizures while females with PNES classified similarly were equally likely to have either motor or non-motor events. Gender difference in PNES seizure semiology was associated with whether or not clinically significant somatic symptoms were present; males with elevated somatic symptoms were much more likely to have motor PNES. However, we did not find evidence of greater psychopathology in males with PNES compared to females with PNES. Gender differences in the behavioral manifestation of PNES in the context of presence or absence of somatization may have implications for diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The seizure semiology consistent with frontal lobe symptomatogenic zone in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztoprak, Ülkühan; Yalnızoğlu, Dilek; Oğuz, Kader Karlı; Ergun, Eser Lay; Söylemezoğlu, Figen; Bilginer, Burçak; Akalan, Nejat; Topçu, Meral; Turanlı, Güzide

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the seizure semiology consistent with frontal lobe symptomatogenic zone in childhood. We analyzed 549 videotaped seizures from 79 patients (mean age 9.9 ± 3.8 years). Magnetic resonance imaging was normal in 30 patients. The seizures in the time interval of 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. were considered as nocturnal. The mean number of seizures per patient was 6.8 ± 7.3. The mean seizure duration was 25.7 ± 26.9 sec; postictal confusion was 27 ± 16.1 sec (7-92 seconds). The seizures were observed in sleep with a rate of 56.8%; 43.1% of them were during wakefulness. Overall 50.4% of the seizures occured during night-time sleep. Tonic seizure (77.2%) was the most frequent simple motor seizure. Versive seizures were the second most frequent type of simple motor seizure (26.7%). Clonic seizures were 17.7%, complex motor seizures were 20.5%, and dialeptic seizures were 3% of all the seizures. Epileptic spasm, myoclonic seizures, aphasia, and akinetic semiologies were not observed. Vocalization was observed in 16% of the seizures. Frontal lobe seizures in childhood have a short duration, occur frequently, especially during night time sleep, and have a brief postictal period. Tonic semiology, versive semiology are the most frequent seizure semiologies; hypermotor and secondary generalized tonic clonic seizures and vocalizations are observed less in children compared to adults.

  19. Differential suppression of seizures via Y2 and Y5 neuropeptide Y receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, David P D; Nanobashvili, Avtandil; Sørensen, Andreas Vehus

    2005-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) prominently inhibits epileptic seizures in different animal models. The NPY receptors mediating this effect remain controversial partially due to lack of highly selective agonists and antagonists. To circumvent this problem, we used various NPY receptor knockout mice with the......, while activation of Y5 receptors in extra-hippocampal regions reduces generalized seizures in vivo.......Neuropeptide Y (NPY) prominently inhibits epileptic seizures in different animal models. The NPY receptors mediating this effect remain controversial partially due to lack of highly selective agonists and antagonists. To circumvent this problem, we used various NPY receptor knockout mice...... with the same genetic background and explored anti-epileptic action of NPY in vitro and in vivo. In Y2 (Y2-/-) and Y5 (Y5-/-) receptor knockouts, NPY partially inhibited 0 Mg2+-induced epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. In contrast, in double knockouts (Y2Y5-/-), NPY had no effect, suggesting...

  20. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000128.htm Epilepsy or seizures - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have epilepsy . People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  1. Ketogenic diet - A novel treatment for early epileptic encephalopathy due to PIGA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Charuta; Kolbe, Diana L; Mansilla, M Adela; Mason, Sara; Smith, Richard J H; Campbell, Colleen A

    2016-10-01

    We describe the presentation and workup of two brothers with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy who became seizure-free on a ketogenic diet. Extensive testing culminated in whole exome sequencing, which led to the diagnosis of phosphatidyl inositol glycan biosynthesis class A protein (PIGA) deficiency. This familial case highlights the importance of genetic testing for early-onset epileptic encephalopathies and underscores the potential value of a ketogenic diet in the treatment of this condition. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (MISA) system - A new approach towards seizure detection based on full body motion measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Many epilepsy patients cannot call for help during a seizure, because they are unconscious or because of the affection of their motor system or speech function. This can lead to injuries, medical complications and at worst death. An alarm system setting off at seizure onset could help to avoid ha...... is individualized (subject specific) it is able to detect all simulated seizures with a maximum of 1 false positive. Based on the results from the simulated seizures and normal movements the MISA system seems to be a promising approach to seizure detection....... hazards. Today no reliable alarm systems are available. A Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (MISA) system based on full body motion data seems as a good approach towards detection of epileptic seizures. The system is the first to provide a full body description for epilepsy applications. Three......) and audio and video recording. The results showed that a non-subject specific MISA system developed on data from the modalities: accelerometer (ACM), gyroscope and EMG is able to detect 98% of the simulated seizures and at the same time mistakes only 4 of the normal movements for seizures. If the system...

  3. Treatable newborn and infant seizures due to inborn errors of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campistol, Jaume; Plecko, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    About 25% of seizures in the neonatal period have causes other than asphyxia, ischaemia or intracranial bleeding. Among these are primary genetic epileptic encephalopathies with sometimes poor prognosis and high mortality. In addition, some forms of neonatal infant seizures are due to inborn errors of metabolism that do not respond to common AEDs, but are amenable to specific treatment. In this situation, early recognition can allow seizure control and will prevent neurological deterioration and long-term sequelae. We review the group of inborn errors of metabolism that lead to newborn/infant seizures and epilepsy, of which the treatment with cofactors is very different to that used in typical epilepsy management.

  4. Monitoring of regional cerebral blood flow by single photon emission tomography of I123-N-isopropyl-iodoamphetamine in epileptics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magistretti, P.L.; Uren, R.F.; Parker, J.A.; Royal, H.D.; Front, D.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    In some patients with epileptic disorders it is difficult to accurately localize the seizure focus especially in the case of deep lesions. In an attempt to provide better localization of such foci we have used single photon emission tomography (SPECT) of a new radiopharmaceutical I 123 -N-isopropyl-iodoamphetamine (IMP) to measure regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF) in the ictal and interictal phases. Eight patients were studied. The location of the seizure focus was determined by intraoperative corticography operative findings and pathology in 5 patients and by neuropsychological testing and long-term EEG monitoring in the other three. The SPECT scan accurately localized the seizure focus in all patients. This modality also allowed the functional state of the seizure focus to be assessed. In five of the thirteen studies there was increased RCBF at the seizure focus. On four of these occasions the patients reported symptoms typical of their seizures. In the asymptomatic patient the focally increased RCBF corresponded with a very active superficial epileptic focus on EEG. These preliminary results suggest that SPECT scans of RCBF, will have considerable utility in the management of epileptics. This is particularly the case as the necessary instrumentation is already available in many hospitals, thus minimizing the cost of widespread application

  5. Pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage: acute symptomatic seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beslow, Lauren A; Abend, Nicholas S; Gindville, Melissa C; Bastian, Rachel A; Licht, Daniel J; Smith, Sabrina E; Hillis, Argye E; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2013-04-01

    Seizures are believed to be common presenting symptoms in neonates and children with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, few data are available on the epidemiology of acute symptomatic seizures or the risk for later epilepsy. To define the incidence of and explore risk factors for seizures and epilepsy in children with spontaneous ICH. Our a priori hypotheses were that younger age at presentation, cortical involvement of ICH, acute symptomatic seizures after presentation, ICH due to vascular malformation, and elevated intracranial pressure requiring urgent intervention would predict remote symptomatic seizures and epilepsy. Prospective cohort study conducted between March 1, 2007, and January 1, 2012. Three tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Seventy-three pediatric subjects with spontaneous ICH including 20 perinatal (≥37 weeks' gestation to 28 days) and 53 childhood subjects (>28 days to Acute symptomatic seizures (clinically evident and electrographic-only seizures within 7 days), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy. Acute symptomatic seizures occurred in 35 subjects (48%). Acute symptomatic seizures as a presenting symptom of ICH occurred in 12 perinatal (60%) and 19 childhood (36%) subjects (P = .07). Acute symptomatic seizures after presentation occurred in 7 children. Electrographic-only seizures were present in 9 of 32 subjects (28%) with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring. One-year and 2-year remote symptomatic seizure-free survival rates were 82% (95% CI, 68-90) and 67% (95% CI, 46-82), respectively. One-year and 2-year epilepsy-free survival rates were 96% (95% CI, 83-99) and 87% (95% CI, 65-95), respectively. Elevated intracranial pressure requiring acute intervention was a risk factor for seizures after presentation (P = .01; Fisher exact test), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy (P = .03, and P = .04, respectively; log-rank test). Presenting seizures are common in perinatal and childhood ICH. Continuous

  6. Epileptic Encephalopathy in Childhood: A Stepwise Approach for Identification of Underlying Genetic Causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaina; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in childhood. Epilepsy associated with global developmental delay and cognitive dysfunction is defined as epileptic encephalopathy. Certain inherited metabolic disorders presenting with epileptic encephalopathy can be treated with disease specific diet, vitamin, amino acid or cofactor supplementations. In those disorders, disease specific therapy is successful to achieve good seizure control and improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. For this reason, intractable epilepsy with global developmental delay or history of developmental regression warrants detailed metabolic investigations for the possibility of an underlying treatable inherited metabolic disorder, which should be undertaken as first line investigations. An underlying genetic etiology in epileptic encephalopathy has been supported by recent studies such as array comparative genomic hybridization, targeted next generation sequencing panels, whole exome and whole genome sequencing. These studies report a diagnostic yield up to 70%, depending on the applied genetic testing as well as number of patients enrolled. In patients with epileptic encephalopathy, a stepwise approach for diagnostic work-up will help to diagnose treatable inherited metabolic disorders quickly. Application of detailed genetic investigations such as targeted next generation sequencing as second line and whole exome sequencing as third line testing will diagnose underlying genetic disease which will help for genetic counseling as well as guide for prenatal diagnosis. Knowledge of underlying genetic cause will provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathy and pave the ground towards the development of targeted neuroprotective treatment strategies to improve the health outcome of children with epileptic encephalopathy.

  7. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  8. Consciousness and epilepsy: why are complex-partial seizures complex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2009-01-01

    changes depend on seizure spread to subcortical structures including the lateral septum. Understanding the contributions of network inhibition to impaired consciousness in TLE is an important goal, as recurrent limbic seizures often result in cortical dysfunction during and between epileptic events that adversely affects patients' quality of life.

  9. International veterinary epilepsy task force recommendations for systematic sampling and processing of brains from epileptic dogs and cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matiasek, Kaspar; Pumarola I Batlle, Martí; Rosati, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, histological investigations of the epileptic brain are required to identify epileptogenic brain lesions, to evaluate the impact of seizure activity, to search for mechanisms of drug-resistance and to look for comorbidities. For many instances, however, neuropathological studies fai...

  10. [Epileptic encephalopathy associated with forced normalization after administration of levetiracetam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takahiro; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Nobuya; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Here we report a case of a 10-year-old female with unclassified epileptic encephalopathy who showed forced normalization after administration of levetiracetam (LEV). She initially presented with intractable tonic and myoclonic seizures that were observed about 10 times a day along with frequent multifocal sharp and slow wave complexes on electroencephalography (EEG). We were forced to decrease the topiramate dose because of the appearance of nystagmus, and her myoclonic seizures became worse. We added LEV (250 mg/day) and her tonic and myoclonic seizures disappeared one day after initiation of LEV administration. However, she showed hyporesponsiveness and akinesia. The disappearance of paroxysmal discharges on EEG confirmed the diagnosis of forced normalization. Despite continuous administration of LEV, tonic and myoclonic seizures relapsed within a month but her psychotic symptoms resolved simultaneously. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of forced normalization after LEV administration. It should be noted that LEV may cause forced normalization although it can be started at an adequate dosage.

  11. The role of astroglia in the epileptic brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eLosi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsies comprise a family of multifactorial neurological disorders that affect at least 50 million people worldwide. Despite a long history of neurobiological and clinical studies the mechanisms that lead the brain network to a hyperexcitable state and to the intense, massive neuronal discharges reflecting a seizure episode are only partially defined. Most epilepsies of genetic origin are related to mutations in ionic channels that cause neuronal hyperexcitability. However, idiopathic epilepsies of unclear origin represent the majority of these brain disorders. A large body of evidence suggests that in the epileptic brain neurons are not the only players. Indeed, the glial cell astrocyte is known to be morphologically and functionally altered in different types of epilepsy. Although it is unclear whether these astrocyte dysfunctions can have a causative role in epileptogenesis, the hypothesis that astrocytes contribute to epileptiform activities recently received a considerable experimental support. Notably, currently used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, that act mainly on neuronal ion channels, are ineffective in a large group of patients. Clarifying astrocyte functions in the epileptic brain tissue could unveil astrocytes as novel therapeutic targets. In this review we present first a short overview on the role of astrocytes in the epileptic brain starting from the historical observations on their fundamental modulation of brain homeostasis, such as the control of water content, ionic equilibrium and neurotransmitters concentrations. We then focus our review on most recent studies that hint at a distinct contribution of these cells in the generation of focal epileptiform activities.

  12. The effects of a history of seizures during pregnancy on umbilical arterial blood gas values in pregnant women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ozhan; Sarı, Mustafa Erkan; Ertuğrul, Funda Arpacı; Kurt, Aslıhan; Selimova, Vefa; Atalay, Cemal Reşat

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate if the number of seizures that occur during pregnancy has any effect on umbilical arterial blood gas values at delivery. In total, 55 women who were 37 to 41 weeks pregnant and diagnosed with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and 50 pregnant women with similar characteristics but not diagnosed as epileptic were included in this study. The patients diagnosed with epilepsy were divided into two groups: 27 patients with a history of at least 5 epileptic seizures during pregnancy and 28 who had no seizures during pregnancy. All patients diagnosed with epilepsy had a history of caesarean delivery or a caesarean section under general anesthesia on the advice of neurology. Pregnant women in the control group were also chosen from among patients who had a caesarean on account of a previous caesarean delivery. In the cases included in the study, umbilical arterial blood gas sampling was performed immediately after delivery. When the control group without epilepsy was compared with pregnant women who had no history of epileptic seizures during pregnancy, no difference was found in umbilical arterial blood gas values (p>0.05). When patients with a history of 5 or more epileptic seizures during pregnancy were compared with the control group without epilepsy and the patients with epilepsy who had no history of seizures during pregnancy, there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05), although their umbilical arterial blood pH values were found to be lower, while partial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2), values were higher and partial oxygen pressure (pO2) values were lower. Taking potential fetal risks into consideration, maternal generalized tonic-clonic epileptic seizures might be worrying. Tonic-clonic seizures that occur during pregnancy appear to be associated with temporary hypoxia. Therefore, monotherapy for seizures and treatment at the lowest effective dose should be administered to women with epilepsy in the

  13. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Mark H; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L; Blaha, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a "closed-loop" system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the "CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database" which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events.

  14. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H Myers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a ‘closed-loop’ system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998, Ben-Menachem, 2001, while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between EEG electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the ‘CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database’ which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events.

  15. Age-dependent seizure semiology in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarasi, András; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Janszky, József; Janszky, Imre; Rásonyi, György; Kelemen, Anna; Halász, Péter

    2007-09-01

    To examine the effects of age on different aspects of temporal lobe seizure semiology. We performed a video analysis of 605 archived seizures from 155 consecutive patients (age 10 months to 49 years) selected by seizure freedom after temporal lobectomy. Eighty patients had hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Beside semiological seizure classification, we assessed age dependency of several axes of seizure semiology: (1) aura, (2) number of different lateralizing signs, occurrence of ictal (3) emotional signs, (4) autonomic symptoms, (5) automatisms, and (6) secondary generalization as well as (7) the ratio of motor seizure components. From the 155 patients, 117 reported aura, 39 had ictal emotional signs, 51 had autonomic symptoms, 130 presented automatisms, while 18 patients showed secondary generalization at least once during their seizures. Altogether 369 (median: 2/patient) different lateralizing signs were recorded. Frequency of HS (p semiology. Conversely, other aspects (aura, emotional, and autonomic signs) are independent of the maturation process. This is the first report investigating age dependency of epileptic seizure semiology comparing all age groups.

  16. Predictors and incidence of posttraumatic seizures in children and adolescents after brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios K. Petridis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the incidence of early and late seizures after head injury in patients under 18 years old. Factors correlating with a high risk of developing posttraumatic seizures were identified. Such risk factors were the severity of the head trauma and a Glasgow Coma Scale of 3-8. In contrast to many studies, we observed that the incidence of posttraumatic seizures was significantly higher in patients older than 12 years old (12-16 and 12-18. Most of the late seizures were paroxysmal electroencephalography (EEG discharges diagnosed on a snapshot-EEG during the follow-up examination of the patients without clinical symptoms. We suppose that EEG-examination in head injured children is important to identify patients with epileptic potentials without clinical symptoms. Epileptic patterns of the EEG could worsen the diagnosis and clinical outcome of the children in accordance to studies performed in the adult population.

  17. Epileptic spasms in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, David T; Jennesson, Melanie M; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2013-09-01

    To characterize epileptic spasms (ES) occurring after the age of two years in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), particularly treatment response to vigabatrin (VGB), which is extremely effective for infantile spasms (IS) in TSC. The authors retrospectively reviewed 19 patients with TSC and ES. Medical records were assessed for clinical and treatment data, neurocognitive, EEG, MRI data, and genetic analyses. Of 391 patients with TSC, 19 (4.8%) had ES. Of those with detailed clinical data, six had infantile spasms that persisted after 2 years old, six recurred after an initial remission of infantile spasms (range 2-24 years old), and four occurred de novo over the age of two (range 2-20 years old). All concurrently had other seizure types. One had hypsarrhythmia on EEG. All had brain MRI stigmata typical of TSC. Thirteen had a mutation in TSC2, and one in TSC1. Six patients became spasm-free with medication treatment, including four with VGB, one with VGB in combination with the low glycemic index dietary treatment, and one with felbamate. Five became spasm-free after epilepsy surgery. VGB was not effective for seven patients. The majority continued to have refractory epilepsy. ES are not uncommon in patients with TSC, especially those with TSC2 mutations. ES in TSC occur in the setting of other seizure types and refractory epilepsy. Hypsarrhythmia is rare. VGB can be effective, but the success of VGB for ES in TSC is not equivalent to that of IS in TSC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Paroxysmal belching: Epileptic or nonepileptic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyan Popkirov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and localizing value of ictal belching are yet unknown. We present the case of a patient with medically refractory focal epilepsy with simple and complex partial seizures, as well as generalized seizures. One presumed seizure type comprised frequent episodes of repetitive belching. Video-EEG monitoring during these attacks showed no ictal changes. The belching episodes were inducible and terminable through suggestion. The diagnosis of excessive supragastric belching, a previously described psychogenic condition, was made.

  19. Paroxysmal belching: Epileptic or nonepileptic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and localizing value of ictal belching are yet unknown. We present the case of a patient with medically refractory focal epilepsy with simple and complex partial seizures, as well as generalized seizures. One presumed seizure type comprised frequent episodes of repetitive belching. Video-EEG monitoring during these attacks showed no ictal changes. The belching episodes were inducible and terminable through suggestion. The diagnosis of excessive supragastric belching, a previously described psychogenic condition, was made.

  20. Analysis of Mutations in 7 Genes Associated with Neuronal Excitability and Synaptic Transmission in a Cohort of Children with Non-Syndromic Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kwong, Anna Ka-Yee; Ho, Alvin Chi-Chung; Fung, Cheuk-Wing; Wong, Virginia Chun-Nei

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic Encephalopathy (EE) is a heterogeneous condition in which cognitive, sensory and/or motor functions deteriorate as a consequence of epileptic activity, which consists of frequent seizures and/or major interictal paroxysmal activity. There are various causes of EE and they may occur at any age in early childhood. Genetic mutations have been identified to contribute to an increasing number of children with early onset EE which had been previously considered as cryptogenic. We identifi...

  1. Automatic ictal HFO detection for determination of initial seizure spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graef, Andreas; Flamm, Christoph; Pirker, Susanne; Baumgartner, Christoph; Deistler, Manfred; Matz, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) are a reliable indicator for the epileptic seizure onset zone (SOZ) in ECoG recordings. We propose a novel method for the automatic detection of ictal HFOs in the ripple band (80-250 Hz) based on CFAR matched sub-space filtering. This allows to track the early propagation of ictal HFOs, revealing initial and follow-up epileptic activity on the electrodes. We apply this methodology to two seizures from one patient suffering from focal epilepsy. The electrodes identified are in very good accordance with the visual HFO analysis by clinicians. Furthermore the electrodes with initial HFO activity are correlated well with the SOZ (conventional v-activity).

  2. Space time frequency (STF) code tensor for the characterization of the epileptic preictal stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Teixeira, César; Ribeiro, Bernardete; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Dourado, António

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the ability of multiway models to characterize the epileptic preictal period. The understanding of the characteristics of the period prior to the seizure onset is a decisive step towards the development of seizure prediction frameworks. Multiway models of EEG segments already demonstrated that hidden structures may be unveiled using tensor decomposition techniques. We propose a novel approach using a multiway model, Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC), to identify spatial, temporal and spectral signatures of the preictal period. The results obtained, from a dataset of 4 patients, with a total of 30 seizures, suggest that a common structure may be involved in seizure generation. Furthermore, the spatial signature may be related to the ictal onset region and that determined frequency sub-bands may be more relevant in preictal stages.

  3. CDKL5 variant in a boy with infantile epileptic encephalopathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Virginia Chun-Nei; Kwong, Anna Ka-Yee

    2015-04-01

    A Chinese boy presented at 18 months with intractable epilepsy, developmental delay and autistic features. He had multiple seizure types, including absence, myoclonic seizures, limb spasm and tonic seizures. His seizures were finally controlled at 3 years of age with clonazepam and a short course of chloral hydrate incidentally given for his insomnia. Subsequently, he had improvement in his communication skills. A novel hemizygous missense variant (c.1649G>A; p.R550Q) in exon 12 of CDKL5 gene was detected for him, his asymptomatic mother and elder sister. His phenotype is less severe than other male cases. We recommend screening CDKL5 for boys with pharmarco-resistant epilepsy and a trial of benzodiazepines for Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy (IEE). Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Immune-mediated steroid-responsive epileptic spasms and epileptic encephalopathy associated with VGKC-complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Jehan; Brenner, Tanja; Gill, Deepak; Troedson, Christopher; Sinclair, Adriane J; Brilot, Fabienne; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Dale, Russell C

    2011-11-01

    Autoantibodies that bind to voltage-gated potassium-channel complex proteins (VGKC-complex antibodies) occur frequently in adults with limbic encephalitis presenting with cognitive impairment and seizures. Recently, VGKC-complex antibodies have been described in a few children with limbic encephalitis, and children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus. We report a case of infantile-onset epileptic spasms and developmental delay compatible with epileptic encephalopathy. Our patient was a female infant, aged 4 months at presentation. She had evidence of immune activation in the central nervous system with elevated cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and mirrored oligoclonal bands, which prompted testing for autoantibodies. VGKC-complex antibodies were elevated (201 pmol/L, normaltreatment, which was started late in the disease course. On review at 13 months of age, her development was consistent with an age of 5 to 6 months. These results suggest that VGKC-complex antibodies might represent a marker of immune therapy responsiveness in a subgroup of patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  5. Characteristics of seizure-induced signal changes on MRI in patients with first seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Eun; Lee, Byung In; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Park, Kang Min; Kim, Hyung Chan; Lee, Joonwon; Bae, Soo-Young; Lee, Dongah; Kim, Sung Eun

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive factors and identify the characteristics of the seizure-induced signal changes on MRI (SCM) in patients with first seizures. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with first seizures from March 2010 to August 2014. The inclusion criteria for this study were patients with 1) first seizures, and 2) MRI and EEG performed within 24h of the first seizures. The definition of SCM was hyper-intensities in the brain not applying to cerebral arterial territories. Multivariate logistic regression was performed with or without SCM as a dependent variable. Of 431 patients with seizures visiting the ER, 69 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of 69 patients, 11 patients (15.9%) had SCM. Epileptiform discharge on EEG (OR 29.7, 95% CI 1.79-493.37, p=0.018) was an independently significant variable predicting the presence of SCM in patients with first seizures. In addition, the topography of SCM was as follows; i) ipsilateral hippocampus, thalamus and cerebral cortex (5/11), ii) unilateral cortex (4/11), iii) ipsilateral thalamus and cerebral cortex (1/11), iv) bilateral hippocampus (1/11). Moreover, 6 out of 7 patients who underwent both perfusion CT and MRI exhibited unilateral cortical hyperperfusion with ipsilateral thalamic involvement reflecting unrestricted vascular territories. There is an association between epileptiform discharges and SCM. Additionally, the involvement of the unilateral cortex and ipsilateral thalamus in SCM and its hyperperfusion state could be helpful in differentiating the consequences of epileptic seizures from other pathologies. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Elimination of medically intractable epileptic drop attacks following endoscopic total corpus callosotomy in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Keisuke; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi; Kumar, Ajay; Luat, Aimee F

    2017-11-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder, characterized by developmental delay, hand stereotypies, abnormal gait, and acquired microcephaly. Epilepsy is very common in Rett syndrome and can be medically intractable. It remains uncertain if a patient with epileptic drop attacks associated with this genetic disease can benefit from corpus callosotomy. We report an 8-year-old girl with Rett syndrome and medically intractable epileptic drop attacks who underwent endoscopic total corpus callosotomy without any complications that led to the successful elimination of her seizures. Total corpus callosotomy is a feasible treatment option for medically intractable epileptic drop attacks in Rett syndrome and should not be considered as a contraindication in this condition. This is the first reported case of corpus callosotomy in Rett syndrome.

  7. Limited efficacy of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of highly refractory epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shaun A; Shin, Ji Hyun; Shih, Evan J; Murata, Kristina K; Sewak, Sarika; Kezele, Michele E; Sankar, Raman; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that the ketogenic diet is effective in the treatment of epileptic spasms, even in refractory cases. However, there has been very limited demonstration of prompt and complete (video-EEG confirmed) response. We set out to describe our center's experience with the ketogenic diet in the treatment of children with highly refractory epileptic spasms, with rigorous seizure outcome assessment. Children treated with the ketogenic diet for epileptic spasms between April, 2010 and June, 2014 were retrospectively identified. Seizure burden was tabulated at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, and 12-months of ketogenic diet exposure. Adverse events were similarly ascertained. We identified a cohort of 22 consecutive patients who received ketogenic diet therapy, with median age of onset of epileptic spasms of 5.2 (IQR 2.0-9.0) months, with diet initiation beginning a median of 26.4 (12.5-38.7) months after onset, and following a median of 7 (IQR 5-7) treatment failures. Only 2 patients exhibited a complete response during ketogenic diet exposure, and response was more reasonably attributed to alternative therapies in both cases. A modest early reduction in seizure frequency was not sustained beyond 1 month of diet exposure. The diet was well tolerated, and continued in 6 patients with subjective and/or partial response. In contrast to prior studies reporting substantial efficacy of the ketogenic diet, our findings suggest limited efficacy, albeit in a highly refractory cohort. Prospective studies in both refractory and new-onset populations, with both video-EEG confirmation of response and rigorous cognitive outcome assessment, would be of great value to more clearly define the utility of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of epileptic spasms. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Confusing Coincidence: Neonatal Hypoglycemic Seizures and Hyperekplexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Demir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperekplexia is a rare, nonepileptic, genetic, or sporadic neurologic disorder characterized by startle responses to acoustic, optic, or tactile stimuli. Genetic defects in glycine receptors as well as encephalitis, tumors, inflammation, and disgenesis are among the etiologic causes of the disease. The main problem in hyperekplexia is the incomplete development of inhibitory mechanisms or exaggerated stimulation of excitatory mediators. Hyperekplexia is often confused with epileptic seizures. Here we present a case with hypoglycemic convulsions coexisting with hyperekplexia, causing diagnostic difficulty.

  9. Localization value of seizure semiology analyzed by the conditional inference tree method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Park, So-Hee; Lee, Seo-Young; Lee, Sang Kun

    2015-09-01

    Although accurate interpretation of seizures is important for the management of patients with epilepsy, studies on the localizing value of seizure semiology and the reliability of the semiology descriptions are scarce. The objective of our study is to investigate the accuracy of video-recorded seizure semiology in the classification and localization of epileptic seizures. We also evaluated the reliability of the semiology descriptions provided by the patients or their caregivers. Video-recorded clinical seizures from 831 consecutive patients (391 females; 31.7 ± 11.6 years) were analyzed retrospectively. Epileptic seizures were classified as generalized and partial seizures, and patients with partial seizures were further divided into five ictal onset areas. In order to analyze the diagnostic value of individual semiologic features for clinical diagnosis, we used the conditional inference tree method. Generalized and partial seizures were differentiated with high accuracy (97.1%), but the accuracy of localization among the five ictal onset areas was relatively low (56.1%), which was largely attributed to the difficulty in the discrimination between mesial and lateral temporal onset seizures. Lateralization of the ictal onset area in partial seizures was possible in 427 (55.1%) patients based on video analysis, nevertheless it was possible in only 158 (20.4%) patients based on historical semiology descriptions. The results of our study suggest that careful observation of seizure semiology may be useful for the differentiation of ictal onset areas. However, the semiologic differentiation between mesial and lateral temporal onset seizures is difficult, and historical semiologic descriptions should be interpreted carefully because of their low reliability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mozart's music in children with drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathies: Comparison of two protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Caprio, Francesca; Ferraioli, Giuseppe; Pisano, Simone; Viggiano, Andrea; Verrotti, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    In this prospective, randomized, open label study, we compared the effect on seizure recurrence and quality-of-life parameters, of two different protocols of music therapy in children and adolescents with refractory epileptic encephalopathies. Nine out of 19 patients (13 males and 6 females, aged between 1 and 24years) were randomized to listen to Mozart's sonata in D major for two pianos K448 for 2h/day for 2weeks; other 10 children were randomized on a set of Mozart's compositions. In group 1 (K448), 2/9 children (22.2%) had a ≥75% seizure decrease; two patients had less than 50% seizure reduction, and the other five were unchanged. In group 2 (set Mozart), 7/10 patients (70%) had a significant seizure reduction (specifically, ≥50% in 1/10; ≥75% in 4/10; 100% in 2/10). An overall more significant behavioral improvement including less irritability and tearfulness, reduced self-/heteroaggression, a better daytime vigilance, and nighttime sleep quality, was also reported in children from group 2. In conclusion, the present study seems to confirm that music therapy may be an additional, nonpharmacological, effective treatment for patients with refractory epileptic seizures in childhood. The Mozart's set of different compositions can be better accepted and effective than the K448. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Clinical and Neurophysiological Features of Epileptic Syndromes Associated with Benign Focal Epileptiform Discharges of Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Ermolaenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign focal epileptiform discharge of childhood (BFEDC is an age-dependent pattern determined in electroencephalograms (EEGs, which is associated with idiopathic benign focal epilepsy (BFE. Studies of BFE revealed symptomatic phenocopies in patients with cerebral struc- tural abnormalities in such conditions as infantile cerebral palsy and malformations. Some arguments against the «benign» nature of BFEDC are presented, since BFEDC may impair various cognitive functions and behavior (e.g., cause epileptic encephalophathies. Objective. To determine the clinical and neurophysiological features of epileptic syndromes associated with prolonged epileptiform activity during sleep in children and adolescents, as well as approaches to rational therapy. Patients and Methods. A total of 1862 children aged 2–18 admitted to the specialized Department of Psychoneurology of the Voronezh Regional Children Clinical Hospital No 1 in 2004–2007, who had epileptic seizures and non-epileptic neurological disorders, were exam- ined. The children underwent assessment of the neurological status, neuropsychological assessment, and video-EEG monitoring. The spike- wave index (SWI was calculated and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain was performed to register the epileptiform activity during sleep. Results and Discussion. It was demonstrated that when ISW of BFEDC patterns is >30%, evolution into epileptic encephalopathy was observed in 66% of patients (including epilepsy with electrical status epilepticus in sleep in 49% of patients and cognitive epileptiform disinte- gration in 17% of patients. The results prove the justification of prescribing antiepileptic drugs to patients with SWI ≥30% even if they have no epileptic seizures. Duo-therapy with valproate and ethosuximide or levetiracetam is most the effective therapy. Further prospective studies for children with BFEDC will give new insight into this area. 

  12. Comparative evaluation of oral hygiene status and gingival enlargement among epileptic and healthy children as related to various antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Neelam Hasmukhbhai; Deshpande, Anshula Neeraj; Deshpande, Neeraj Chandrahas; Rathore, Ashutosh Singh

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a gathering of neurological disorders characterized by epileptic seizures. Epileptic children, who are on active treatment with antiepileptic drugs, have a well-recognized side effect of gingival enlargement. Therefore, all efforts should be made, particularly for the population who are diagnosed or affected by the systemic disease. This study was conducted with an aim to determine oral hygiene status and gingival enlargement among epileptic and healthy children as related to various antiepileptic drugs. The cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the department of pedodontics and attached general hospital. A sample size of 120 participants with 60 healthy and 60 epileptic children between age 2 and 14 years were included. Oral health status of participants was examined using oral hygiene simplified index and plaque index. Gingival enlargement was assessed using Miranda-Brunet index. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA test, independent t -test, and Pearson's Chi-square test were used. From the total participants included in the study, 49% of participants had good oral hygiene from healthy group, and 28% participants had poor oral hygiene from the epileptic group. Sodium valproate was the most common drug used and was associated with increased gingival enlargement. Conclusion can be drawn that epileptic children under medication had poor oral hygiene and an increased risk for gingival enlargement as compared to their healthy counterparts. It must be stressed that the epileptic patients should be given dental care without conditions and provided with best possible care to restore esthetics and functions.

  13. Dissociation in patients with dissociative seizures: relationships with trauma and seizure symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, S; Mellers, J D C; Goldstein, L H

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to extend the current understanding of dissociative symptoms experienced by patients with dissociative (psychogenic, non-epileptic) seizures (DS), including psychological and somatoform types of symptomatology. An additional aim was to assess possible relationships between dissociation, traumatic experiences, post-traumatic symptoms and seizure manifestations in this group. A total of 40 patients with DS were compared with a healthy control group (n = 43), matched on relevant demographic characteristics. Participants completed several self-report questionnaires, including the Multiscale Dissociation Inventory (MDI), Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire-20, Traumatic Experiences Checklist and the Post-Traumatic Diagnostic Scale. Measures of seizure symptoms and current emotional distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were also administered. The clinical group reported significantly more psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, trauma, perceived impact of trauma, and post-traumatic symptoms than controls. Some dissociative symptoms (i.e. MDI disengagement, MDI depersonalization, MDI derealization, MDI memory disturbance, and somatoform dissociation scores) were elevated even after controlling for emotional distress; MDI depersonalization scores correlated positively with trauma scores while seizure symptoms correlated with MDI depersonalization, derealization and identity dissociation scores. Exploratory analyses indicated that somatoform dissociation specifically mediated the relationship between reported sexual abuse and DS diagnosis, along with depressive symptoms. A range of psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, traumatic experiences and post-traumatic symptoms are elevated in patients with DS relative to healthy controls, and seem related to seizure manifestations. Further studies are needed to explore peri-ictal dissociative experiences in more detail.

  14. Ictal speech and language dysfunction in adult epilepsy: Clinical study of 95 seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussaule, C; Cauquil, C; Flamand-Roze, C; Gagnepain, J-P; Bouilleret, V; Denier, C; Masnou, P

    2017-04-01

    To analyze the semiological characteristics of the language and speech disorders arising during epileptic seizures, and to describe the patterns of language and speech disorders that can predict laterality of the epileptic focus. This study retrospectively analyzed 95 consecutive videos of seizures with language and/or speech disorders in 44 patients admitted for diagnostic video-EEG monitoring. Laterality of the epileptic focus was defined according to electro-clinical correlation studies and structural and functional neuroimaging findings. Language and speech disorders were analyzed by a neurologist and a speech therapist blinded to these data. Language and/or speech disorders were subdivided into eight dynamic patterns: pure anterior aphasia; anterior aphasia and vocal; anterior aphasia and "arthria"; pure posterior aphasia; posterior aphasia and vocal; pure vocal; vocal and arthria; and pure arthria. The epileptic focus was in the left hemisphere in more than 4/5 of seizures presenting with pure anterior aphasia or pure posterior aphasia patterns, while discharges originated in the right hemisphere in almost 2/3 of seizures presenting with a pure vocal pattern. No laterality value was found for the other patterns. Classification of the language and speech disorders arising during epileptic seizures into dynamic patterns may be useful for the optimal analysis of anatomo-electro-clinical correlations. In addition, our research has led to the development of standardized tests for analyses of language and speech disorders arising during seizures that can be conducted during video-EEG sessions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Synergistic protection against acute flurothyl-induced seizures by adjuvant treatment of the ketogenic diet with the type 2 diabetes drug pioglitazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Timothy A; Matthews, Stephanie A; Simeone, Kristina A

    2017-08-01

    We have previously found that the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) contributes to the mechanism of action of the ketogenic diet (KD), an established treatment for pediatric refractory epilepsy. We have found that the KD increases brain PPARγ and that inhibition or genetic loss of PPARγ prevents the antiseizure effects of the KD on (1) acutely induced seizures in nonepileptic mice and (2) spontaneous recurrent seizures in epileptic mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that adjuvant treatment of KD-treated mice with a PPARγ agonist, pioglitazone, would result in an additive effect. Acute seizures were induced in three groups of C57Bl/6 mice by inhalation exposure to flurothyl gas. In Group 1, mice were weaned onto either a standard diet or KD comprised of a fat:carbohydrate/protein ratio of either 6:1, 3:1, or 1:1 for 2 weeks. In Group 2, vehicle or pioglitazone (0.1, 1, 10, 80 mg/kg) was administered 4 h prior to flurothyl exposure. In Group 3, vehicle or increasing doses of pioglitazone were administered to KD-treated mice 4 h prior to flurothyl exposure. Latency times to clonic seizures and generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures were recorded, and isobolographic analysis was used to determine combinatorial interactions. Neither KD treatment nor pioglitazone alone or in combination affected clonic seizures. However, the latency to GTC seizures was dose-dependently and significantly increased by both KD (~57%, p < 0.05) and pioglitazone (~28%, p < 0.05). Coadministration of an ineffective 1:1 KD and pioglitazone resulted in ~47-55% (p < 0.05) increase in latency to GTC. Isobolographic analysis indicated a synergistic interaction of the KD and pioglitazone. These results suggest coadministration may enable reduction of the KD ratio without loss of seizure protection. Such adjuvant treatment could improve quality of life and limit adverse effects of a classic KD or high-dose pioglitazone. Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  16. Early onset epileptic encephalopathy with a novel GABRB3 mutation treated effectively with clonazepam: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Lian, Yajun; Xie, Nanchang

    2017-12-01

    Early onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE) is one of the most serious early onset epilepsies. The etiopathology of this condition remains unclear, and recent evidence indicated that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor, subunit beta 3 (GABRB3) gene mutations might be associated with EOEE. Furthermore, the therapeutic regimen for EOEE has yet to be well elucidated. Herein, we reported the clinical and genetic features of a case with GABRB3-related EOEE. A 6-year-old girl developed epileptic seizures 3 days after birth. She presented with multiple seizure types including myoclonic seizures, spasms, and absence seizures. Serial electroencephalographic examinations showed variable abnormalities, and intellectual evaluation revealed significant development retardation. Conventional antiepileptic drugs were ineffective for the seizure controlling. Genetic screening identified a novel nonsense mutation (C.5G > A, p.W2X) in the GABRB3 gene. Early onset epileptic encephalopathy. We changed the antiepileptic strategy to oral clonazepam (0.5mg twice daily). The patient was followed up once a week and significant declining in the attack frequency was noted 1 week later (2-3 times daily). Subsequently, the dosage was doubled (1mg twice daily), and complete cessation of seizures was achieved 20 days later. Through a 9-month follow up,the girl remained seizure-free. This study identified a novel nonsensemutation (C.5G>A) in the exon 1 of GABRB3 Gene, which may be associated with EOEE. To our knowledge, this is the first report to use clonazepam in the patient with GABRB3-related EOEE with favorable outcome. Our finding suggested that clonazepam might be a choice for patient with GABRB3-related EOEE. The remarkable efficacy of clonazepam in the control of seizures indicated a potential GABRB3- or GABA-related mechanism involved in the development of EOEE. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A case for cannabidiol in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome seizure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Karen S; Wassman, E Robert

    2017-02-01

    Complex, and sometimes intractable, seizures affect the quality of life and cognitive development of over 90% of individuals with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). Fine resolution genotype-phenotype mapping of the WHS locus recently identified a candidate gene whose probable function has led to insights into a mechanism connecting WHS seizures with those of Dravet syndrome, a distinct condition caused by mutations in SCN1A and SCN1B. In addition to this possible molecular mechanistic connection, these disorders' seizures share a strikingly similar constellation of features, including clinical presentation, seizure types, early age of onset, EEG pattern, and responses to specific anti-epileptic drugs. Based in part on these similarities, we suggest that a highly successful Phase III clinical trial of a formulation of cannabidiol for Dravet syndrome seizures may be directly translatable into possible benefits for WHS individuals with challenging seizure patterns. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Efficacy of sodium channel blockers in SCN2A early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilena, Robertino; Striano, Pasquale; Gennaro, Elena; Bassi, Laura; Olivotto, Sara; Tadini, Laura; Mosca, Fabio; Barbieri, Sergio; Zara, Federico; Fumagalli, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Recent clinical evidence supports a targeted therapeutic approach for genetic epileptic encephalopathies based on the molecular dysfunction. A 2-day-old male infant presented with epileptic encephalopathy characterized by burst-suppression EEG background and tonic-clonic migrating partial seizures. The condition was refractory to phenobarbital, pyridoxine, pyridoxal phosphate and levetiracetam, but a dramatic response to an intravenous loading dose of phenytoin was documented by video-EEG monitoring. Over weeks phenytoin was successfully switched to carbamazepine to prevent seizure relapses associated with difficulty in maintaining proper blood levels of phenytoin. Genetic analysis identified a novel de novo heterozygous mutation (c.[4633A>G]p.[Met1545Val]) in SCN2A. At two years and three months of age the patient is still seizure-free on carbamazepine, although a developmental delay is evident. Sodium channel blockers represent the first-line treatment for confirmed or suspected SCN2A-related epileptic encephalopathies. In severe cases with compatible electro-clinical features we propose a treatment algorithm based on a test trial with high dose intravenous phenytoin followed in case of a positive response by carbamazepine, more suitable for long-term maintenance treatment. Because of their rarity, collaborative studies are needed to delineate shared therapeutic protocols for EIEE based on the electro-clinical features and the presumed underlying genetic substrate. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Febrile Seizure Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Cisneros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This simulation session is appropriate for medical students, community physicians, or residents in emergency medicine, neurology, pediatrics, or family medicine. Introduction: Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures in childhood; they are thought to occur in 2-5% of all children.1-3 Febrile seizures are defined as a seizure in association with a febrile illness in children without a central nervous system infection, previous afebrile seizure, known brain disorder, or electrolyte abnormalities. 1,2 They typically occur between 6 months and 18 months of age though they can occur up to 5 years of age.3 Febrile seizures are categorized as: simple (generalized seizure lasting less than 15 minutes in a child aged 6 months to 5 years, and less than 1 in a 24 hour period or complex (a focal seizure or generalized seizure lasting greater than 15 minutes, or multiple seizures in a 24 hour period. 1,3 Treatment for febrile seizures is based on treating the underlying cause of the fever and giving reassurance and education to the parents.2 Mortality is extremely rare, and there is no difference in the patient’s cognitive abilities after a febrile seizure, even when the seizure is prolonged.1 Objectives: At the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 discuss the management of febrile seizures 2 discuss when placement of an advanced airway is indicated in the management of a febrile seizure 3 list the risk factors for febrile seizures 4 prepare a differential diagnosis for the causes of febrile seizures 5 educate family members on febrile seizures. Methods: This educational session is a high-fidelity simulation.

  20. Automatic seizure detection in SEEG using high frequency activities in wavelet domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoubian, L; Lacoma, H; Gotman, J

    2013-03-01

    Existing automatic detection techniques show high sensitivity and moderate specificity, and detect seizures a relatively long time after onset. High frequency (80-500 Hz) activity has recently been shown to be prominent in the intracranial EEG of epileptic patients but has not been used in seizure detection. The purpose of this study is to investigate if these frequencies can contribute to seizure detection. The system was designed using 30 h of intracranial EEG, including 15 seizures in 15 patients. Wavelet decomposition, feature extraction, adaptive thresholding and artifact removal were employed in training data. An EMG removal algorithm was developed based on two features: Lack of correlation between frequency bands and energy-spread in frequency. Results based on the analysis of testing data (36 h of intracranial EEG, including 18 seizures) show a sensitivity of 72%, a false detection of 0.7/h and a median delay of 5.7 s. Missed seizures originated mainly from seizures with subtle or absent high frequencies or from EMG removal procedures. False detections were mainly due to weak EMG or interictal high frequency activities. The system performed sufficiently well to be considered for clinical use, despite the exclusive use of frequencies not usually considered in clinical interpretation. High frequencies have the potential to contribute significantly to the detection of epileptic seizures. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The paradox of the paroxysm: can seizure precipitants help explain human ictogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberfeld, Gilles; Le Duigou, Caroline; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Navarro, Vincent; Baulac, Michel; Miles, Richard

    2013-10-01

    An epileptic brain is permanently in a diseased state, but seizures occur rarely and without warning. Here we examine this paradox, common to paroxysmal diseases. We review the problem in the context of the prototypic acquired epilepsies of the medial temporal lobe. We ask how an epileptic temporal lobe differs from a healthy one and examine biological mechanisms that may explain the transition to seizure. Attempts to predict seizure timing from analyses of brain electrical activity suggest that the neurological processes involved may be initiated significantly before a seizure. Furthermore, whereas seizures are said to occur without warning, some patients say they know when a seizure is imminent. Several factors, including sleep deprivation, oscillations in hormonal levels, or withdrawal from drugs, increase the probability of a seizure. We ask whether these seizure precipitants might act through common neuronal mechanisms. Several precipitating factors seem to involve relief from a neurosteroid modulation of gamma-amino butyric acid receptor type A (GABAA) receptors. We propose tests of this hypothesis.

  2. Using wearable sensors for semiology-independent seizure detection - towards ambulatory monitoring of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldberg, Beeke E; Kautz, Thomas; Leutheuser, Heike; Hopfengartner, Rudiger; Kasper, Burkhard S; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of the central nervous system. Nearly 70% of people with epilepsy respond to a proper treatment, but for a successful therapy of epilepsy, physicians need to know if and when seizures occur. The gold standard diagnosis tool video-electroencephalography (vEEG) requires patients to stay at hospital for several days. A wearable sensor system, e.g. a wristband, serving as diagnostic tool or event monitor, would allow unobtrusive ambulatory long-term monitoring while reducing costs. Previous studies showed that seizures with motor symptoms such as generalized tonic-clonic seizures can be detected by measuring the electrodermal activity (EDA) and motion measuring acceleration (ACC). In this study, EDA and ACC from 8 patients were analyzed. In extension to previous studies, different types of seizures, including seizures without motor activity, were taken into account. A hierarchical classification approach was implemented in order to detect different types of epileptic seizures using data from wearable sensors. Using a k-nearest neighbor (kNN) classifier an overall sensitivity of 89.1% and an overall specificity of 93.1% were achieved, for seizures without motor activity the sensitivity was 97.1% and the specificity was 92.9%. The presented method is a first step towards a reliable ambulatory monitoring system for epileptic seizures with and without motor activity.

  3. Predicting seizure by modeling synaptic plasticity based on EEG signals - a case study of inherited epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghui; Su, Jianzhong; Wang, Qingyun; Liu, Yueming; Good, Levi; Pascual, Juan M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper explores the internal dynamical mechanisms of epileptic seizures through quantitative modeling based on full brain electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Our goal is to provide seizure prediction and facilitate treatment for epileptic patients. Motivated by an earlier mathematical model with incorporated synaptic plasticity, we studied the nonlinear dynamics of inherited seizures through a differential equation model. First, driven by a set of clinical inherited electroencephalogram data recorded from a patient with diagnosed Glucose Transporter Deficiency, we developed a dynamic seizure model on a system of ordinary differential equations. The model was reduced in complexity after considering and removing redundancy of each EEG channel. Then we verified that the proposed model produces qualitatively relevant behavior which matches the basic experimental observations of inherited seizure, including synchronization index and frequency. Meanwhile, the rationality of the connectivity structure hypothesis in the modeling process was verified. Further, through varying the threshold condition and excitation strength of synaptic plasticity, we elucidated the effect of synaptic plasticity to our seizure model. Results suggest that synaptic plasticity has great effect on the duration of seizure activities, which support the plausibility of therapeutic interventions for seizure control.

  4. Predicting seizure by modeling synaptic plasticity based on EEG signals - a case study of inherited epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghui; Su, Jianzhong; Wang, Qingyun; Liu, Yueming; Good, Levi; Pascual, Juan

    2018-03-01

    This paper explores the internal dynamical mechanisms of epileptic seizures through quantitative modeling based on full brain electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Our goal is to provide seizure prediction and facilitate treatment for epileptic patients. Motivated by an earlier mathematical model with incorporated synaptic plasticity, we studied the nonlinear dynamics of inherited seizures through a differential equation model. First, driven by a set of clinical inherited electroencephalogram data recorded from a patient with diagnosed Glucose Transporter Deficiency, we developed a dynamic seizure model on a system of ordinary differential equations. The model was reduced in complexity after considering and removing redundancy of each EEG channel. Then we verified that the proposed model produces qualitatively relevant behavior which matches the basic experimental observations of inherited seizure, including synchronization index and frequency. Meanwhile, the rationality of the connectivity structure hypothesis in the modeling process was verified. Further, through varying the threshold condition and excitation strength of synaptic plasticity, we elucidated the effect of synaptic plasticity to our seizure model. Results suggest that synaptic plasticity has great effect on the duration of seizure activities, which support the plausibility of therapeutic interventions for seizure control.

  5. Physics of the Brain: Interaction of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams with the Epilepsy Topion, (the Seizure Onset Area)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    A novel method for the possible prevention of epileptic seizures is proposed, based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy topion, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure--excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas. The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  6. Research of the serum level of neuron-specific enolase in children with various types of seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relevance between the level changes of serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE and neuronal damage in various seizure types of children with epilepsy. Methods According to the classification criteria of seizure types formulated by International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE in 1981, 190 children with epilepsy were enrolled including tonic-clonic seizure group (41 cases, tonic seizure group (34 cases, clonic seizure group (22 cases, myoclonic seizure group (12 cases, atonic seizure group (17 cases, absence seizure group (22 cases, simple partial seizure group (21 cases and complex partial seizure group (21 cases, and 64 healthy children were enrolled as control group. The long-range vedio-electroencephalogram (VEEG was operated and the blood samples were collected from these cases within 72 h after their seizures. Results The serum NSE levels of epileptic children were significantly higher than control group (P = 0.000. Among these seizure groups, serum NSE in myoclonic seizure group [(32.42 ± 6.62 ng/ml] was significantly higher than the other types, except for tonic-clonic seizure group (P = 0.062. There was no significant difference among the other types (P > 0.05, for all. According to rank correlation analysis, there was positive corrlation between serum NSE levels and VEEG abnormal intensity (rs = 0.613, P = 0.000. Conclusion The serum NSE were markedly increased in children with epilepsy after seizures, suggesting that a certain degree of neuronal damage may result from seizures; the higher NSE levels were, the more serious neuronal damage caused by epileptiform discharges was. The serum NSE levels in myoclonic seizure group and tonic-clonic seizure group were significantly higher than other seizure types, indicating the two kinds of seizures may result in greater neuronal damage.

  7. Seizure disorders and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, J

    2000-01-01

    Seizures are uncontrolled hypersynchronous electrical discharges of neurons in the brain that interfere with normal function. They are a symptom of an underlying disorder. Epilepsy is a condition of recurring seizures that do not have a reversible metabolic cause. Seizures can be confused with a variety of other conditions, so an understanding of seizure manifestations is crucial in making an accurate diagnosis. Drug therapy is the mainstay of epilepsy treatment, but surgery and vagal nerve stimulation are options for selected refractory cases. Psychosocial consequences of recurring seizures are often more significant to patients than the seizures themselves.

  8. Clinical characteristics of patients seizure following the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inatomi, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Makoto; Yonehara, Toshiro; Ando, Yukio

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with seizure following the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake. We retrospectively studied patients with seizure admitted to our hospital for 12weeks following the earthquake. We compared the clinical backgrounds and characteristics of the patients: before (the same period from the previous 3years) and after the earthquake; and the early (first 2weeks) and late (subsequent 10weeks) phases. A total of 60 patients with seizure were admitted to the emergency room after the earthquake, and 175 (58.3/year) patients were admitted before the earthquake. Of them, 35 patients with seizure were hospitalized in the Department of Neurology after the earthquake, and 96 (32/year) patients were hospitalized before the earthquake. In patients after the earthquake, males and non-cerebrovascular diseases as an epileptogenic disease were seen more frequently than before the earthquake. During the early phase after the earthquake, female, first-attack, and non-focal-type patients were seen more frequently than during the late phase after the earthquake. These characteristics of patients with seizure during the early phase after the earthquake suggest that many patients had non-epileptic seizures. To prevent seizures following earthquakes, mental stress and physical status of evacuees must be assessed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. How Sleep Activates Epileptic Networks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Halász

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The relationship between sleep and epilepsy has been long ago studied, and several excellent reviews are available. However, recent development in sleep research, the network concept in epilepsy, and the recognition of high frequency oscillations in epilepsy and more new results may put this matter in a new light. Aim. The review address the multifold interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy networks and with networks of cognitive functions. Material and Methods. The work is a conceptual update of the available clinical data and relevant studies. Results and Conclusions. Studies exploring dynamic microstructure of sleep have found important gating mechanisms for epileptic activation. As a general rule interictal epileptic manifestations seem to be linked to the slow oscillations of sleep and especially to the reactive delta bouts characterized by A1 subtype in the CAP system. Important link between epilepsy and sleep is the interference of epileptiform discharges with the plastic functions in NREM sleep. This is the main reason of cognitive impairment in different forms of early epileptic encephalopathies affecting the brain in a special developmental window. The impairment of cognitive functions via sleep is present especially in epileptic networks involving the thalamocortical system and the hippocampocortical memory encoding system.

  10. Postnatal caffeine treatment affects differently two pentylenetetrazol seizure models in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 7 (2009), s. 463-469 ISSN 1059-1311 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR9184 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epileptic seizures * caffeine * development Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.233, year: 2009

  11. Risk of Seizures in First Degree Relatives of Probands with Epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the risk of seizures in first degree relatives of epileptic patients. To relate the risk to several clinical characteristics in the probands. Such information is useful for genetic counselling. Methods: A prospective case-control study of 648 FDR of 88 probands attending the neurology out-patient clinic of a ...

  12. Orthosiphon stamineus Leaf Extract Affects TNF-α and Seizures in a Zebrafish Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Kar Meng Choo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizures result from abnormal brain activity and can affect motor, autonomic and sensory function; as well as, memory, cognition, behavior, or emotional state. Effective anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are available but have tolerability issues due to their side effects. The Malaysian herb Orthosiphon stamineus, is a traditional epilepsy remedy and possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and free-radical scavenging abilities, all of which are known to protect against seizures. This experiment thus aimed to explore if an ethanolic leaf extract of O. stamineus has the potential to be a novel symptomatic treatment for epileptic seizures in a zebrafish model; and the effects of the extract on the expression levels of several genes in the zebrafish brain which are associated with seizures. The results of this study indicate that O. stamineus has the potential to be a novel symptomatic treatment for epileptic seizures as it is pharmacologically active against seizures in a zebrafish model. The anti-convulsive effect of this extract is also comparable to that of diazepam at higher doses and can surpass diazepam in certain cases. Treatment with the extract also counteracts the upregulation of NF-κB, NPY and TNF-α as a result of a Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ treated seizure. The anti-convulsive action for this extract could be at least partially due to its downregulation of TNF-α. Future work could include the discovery of the active anti-convulsive compound, as well as determine if the extract does not cause cognitive impairment in zebrafish.

  13. Clobazam-Treated Patients with Lennox Gastaut Syndrome Experienced Fewer Seizure-Related Injuries than Placebo Patients During Trail OV-1012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    seizure, Injury. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a severe childhood- onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by electroen- cephalography (EEG...differences in the rates of seizure-related injuries were observed for the medium- and high-dosage clobazam treatment groups (4.8% and 10.2...U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with LGS in patients 2 years and older based on

  14. Etiology, characteristics and outcome of seizures after pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordelli, Duccio Maria; Masetti, Riccardo; Zama, Daniele; Gueraldi, Daniela; Rondelli, Roberto; Cottone, Carlo; Prete, Arcangelo; Pession, Andrea; Franzoni, Emilio

    2014-02-01

    Epileptic seizures are frequent manifestations after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In this retrospective single-center study we evaluated electroclinical features and analyzed etiologies and outcome of seizures after pediatric HSCT. Of 261 children transplanted between 2000 and 2010, we identified and analyzed data of 28 patients with seizures within a year from HSCT. Most frequent etiologies were posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES, 14 patients) and central nervous system (CNS) infections (4 patients). Seizures were the presentation of the underlying complications in 22 patients. Sixteen episodes of status epilepticus were identified. Seizures secondary to PRES were usually longer and associated with non-convulsive signs. Early neuroimaging and EEG monitoring proved to be crucial to diagnose and treat seizures and their causes. No patients developed epilepsy suggesting that chronic antiepileptic therapy is not necessary in these patients. Overall survival was 32.3% over 5 years in patients with seizures and 45.8% in patients without seizures (poncological disease and cord blood stem cell transplantation. Seizures in transplanted children are a severe event and are associated with high morbidity and poor outcome. In particular, patients with non-oncological diseases and cord blood stem cell transplantation have to be considered at high risk of seizures. Moreover, this study underlines the importance of early recognition of non-convulsive clinical signs and of EEG monitoring for a prompt diagnosis and an appropriate management of seizures and their causes. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel mutation in STXBP1 gene in a child with epileptic encephalopathy and an atypical electroclinical pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Romina; Zucca, Claudio; Tenderini, Erika; Arrigoni, Filippo; Ragona, Francesca; Zorzi, Giovanna; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Borgatti, Renato

    2014-02-01

    Mutations in STXBP1 gene, encoding the syntaxin binding protein 1, have been recently described in Ohtahara syndrome, or early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-burst pattern, and in other early-onset epileptic encephalopathies. A 3-year-old boy affected by epileptic encephalopathy started at 8 months of age is described. Focal epilepsy was characterized by drug resistance seizures with multifocal interictal and ictal electroencephalographic (EEG) features and variable EEG focus. Direct sequencing of the STXBP1 gene showed a novel de novo mutation (c.751G>A), leading to a p.Ala251Thr substitution. Based on reported data, treatment with vigabatrin was attempted and patient became immediately seizure free for 4 months. The present case further expands the clinical spectrum of "STXBP1-related encephalopathy" suggesting molecular analysis of STXBP1 in early onset epileptic encephalopathies of unknown etiology (with onset within the first year of life). In addition, the case provides valuable suggestions on seizures treatment in STXBP1 mutated subjects.

  16. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Faraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient′s history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control.

  17. Fuzzy rule-based seizure prediction based on correlation dimension changes in intracranial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbi, Ahmed F; Aarabi, Ardalan; Fazel-Rezai, Reza

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for epileptic seizure prediction from intracranial EEG recordings. We applied correlation dimension, a nonlinear dynamics based univariate characteristic measure for extracting features from EEG segments. Finally, we designed a fuzzy rule-based system for seizure prediction. The system is primarily designed based on expert's knowledge and reasoning. A spatial-temporal filtering method was used in accordance with the fuzzy rule-based inference system for issuing forecasting alarms. The system was evaluated on EEG data from 10 patients having 15 seizures.

  18. Nonepileptic Seizures: An Updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L.; LaFrance, W. Curt

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are a Functional Neurological Disorder/ Conversion Disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of Neurology and Psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions and outcome studies. Epidemiology and health care utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES and should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations, and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders. PMID:26996600

  19. The study of ictal brain SPECT during seizures induced by clonidine and sleep-deprivation in patients with epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaohui; Chen Xuehong; Wang Zhengjiang; Liu Jiangyan; Feng Jianzhong; Ye Jiang; Zhao Li

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and clinical value of combined clonidine and sleep-deprivation induced seizures for ictal brain SPECT imaging in patients with epilepsy. Methods: Fifty-two epilepsy patients were given oral clonidine plus sleep-deprivation to induce seizures with video-electroencephalogram (VEEG) monitoring. Forty-seven patients were selected as control group, whose seizures were induced by sleep-deprivation only. 99 Tc m -ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) was injected within 30 s since a clinical sign and/or a typical EEG discharge of epilepsy was recognized. Brain SPECT was performed 30 min after 99 Tc m -ECD injection. χ 2 -test was performed by using software SPSS 10.0. Results: One to two hr after oral intake of clonidine plus sleep-deprivation, 75% (39/52) patients were induced seizures, including 92.3% (36/39) with subclinical seizures and 7.7% (3/39) with clinical seizures. Ictal brain SPECT localized the lesions with high uptake of 99 Tc m -ECD in 37 (94.9%) patients. In control group, 38.3% (18/47) were induced epileptic seizures, including 77.8% (14/18) with subclinical seizures and 22.2% (4/18) with clinical seizures. The induction rate of epileptic seizures in clonidine plus sleep-deprivation group was significantly higher than that of control group (χ 2 = 13.614, P 2 = 1.253, P>0.05). Conclusions: The combination of oral intake of clonidine and sleep-deprivation could increase the induction rate of epileptic seizures and it is effective for epilepsy SPECT imaging. (authors)

  20. Origin and Propagation of Epileptic Spasms Delineated on Electrocorticography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Eishi; Juhász, Csaba; Shah, Aashit; Muzik, Otto; Chugani, Diane C.; Shah, Jagdish; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Purpose Ictal electrographic changes were analyzed on intracranial electrocorticography (ECoG) in children with medically refractory epileptic spasms to assess the dynamic changes of ictal discharges associated with spasms and their relation to interictal epileptiform activity and neuroimaging findings. Methods We studied a consecutive series of 15 children (age 0.4 to 13 years; nine girls) with clusters of epileptic spasms recorded on prolonged intracranial subdural ECoG recordings, which were being performed for subsequent cortical resection, and in total, 62 spasms were analyzed by using quantitative methods. Results Spasms were associated with either a “leading” spike followed by fast-wave bursts (type I: 42 events analyzed quantitatively) or fast-wave bursts without a “leading” spike (type II: 20 events analyzed quantitatively). Twenty-three of the 42 type I spasms but none of the 20 type II spasms were preceded by a focal seizure. A “leading” spike had a focal origin in all 42 type I spasms and involved the pre- or postcentral gyrus within 0.1 s in 37 of these spasms. A leading spike was associated with interictal spike activity >1/min in 40 of 42 type I spasms and originated within 2 cm from a positron emission tomography glucose hypometabolic region in all but two type I spasms. Failure to resect the cortex showing a leading spike was associated with poor surgical outcome (p = 0.01; Fisher’s exact probability test). Fast-wave bursts associated with spasms involved neocortical regions extensively at least in two lobes within 1.28 s in all 62 spasms and involved the pre- or postcentral gyrus in 53 of 62 spasms. Conclusions Epileptic spasms may be triggered by a focal neocortical impulse in a subset of patients, and a leading spike, if present, might be used as a marker of the trigger zone for epileptic spasms. Rapidly emerging widespread fast-wave bursts might explain the clinical semiology of epileptic spasms. PMID:16026561

  1. Multiple causes of apnea in 1p36 deletion syndrome include seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanabar, Gorande; Boyd, Stewart; Schugal, Anna; Bhate, Sanjay

    2012-06-01

    Apneic episodes have not previously been described in children with 1p36 deletion syndrome with seizures. Having encountered one such patient, we reviewed our experience of breathing difficulties in this syndrome, with particular attention to evidence of ictal apnea. We describe four children with 1p36 deletion syndrome, seizures and apneic episodes. Retrospective analysis of clinical features, seizure semiology and video-EEG data. All patients showed characteristic craniofacial features, mental retardation, and diffuse hypotonia and apnea. Seizure semiology included focal motor, ± secondary generalized tonic clonic and tonic events. All had histories of status epilepticus; three showed clustering of their habitual seizures. Assessment of apnea was complicated by the presence of multiple other potential causes including obesity, reflux, respiratory, and cardiac problems Epileptic apneas were confirmed in one child by video-telemetry. In three other children, an epileptic basis for apneas was inferred from their clinical histories and treatment response supported by EEG findings. In three children, epileptiform discharges occurred over fronto-centro-temporal regions. Epileptic apnea is a feature of 1p36 deletion syndrome, though episodic apnea is multifactorial in these children, and may need repeated re-appraisal. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. On the nature of seizure dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Viktor K; Stacey, William C; Quilichini, Pascale P; Ivanov, Anton I; Bernard, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between 'normal' and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  3. LANDAU–KLEFFNER SYNDROME (ACQUIRED EPILEPTIC APHASIA WITH A FOCUS ON ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Landau–Kleffner syndrome (LKS is a disease from the group of age-dependent epileptic encephalopathies with the phenomenon of prolonged spike–wave activity in slow-wave sleep, which is manifested by acquired sensorimotor aphasia, impaired higher mental functions concurrent with various epileptic seizures and diffuse electroencephalographic (EEG epileptiform changes in the absence of cerebral structural changes. In 1957, W. M. Landau, a pediatric neurologist, and F. R. Kleffner, a logopedist, first described the clinical presentation of the disease in 6 patients. The author associated the occurrence of aphasia with epileptiform EEG activity rather than with epileptic seizures, i. e. they per se formulated the modern concept of epileptic encephalopathy. There has been currently evidence that prolonged diffuse epileptiform activity has a damaging effect on a child’s developing brain, which is seen in impairments of speech and other higher mental functions. The age of patients with manifestations of LKS (3–5 years is a critical period for the development of speech function. According to the concept of H. Doose (2003, congenital brain maturation disorder underlies LKS. The paper considers ideas on the origin of the LKS, including the possible genetic bases of diseases, epidemiological aspects, clinical and EEG manifestations with a detailed description ictal and interictal EEG changes, and treatment approaches, including the author’s data. The disease is characterized by an electroclinical triad: seizures (may be absent or may be single in a history, impaired higher mental functions (with a predominance of aphasic disorders, epileptiform EEG activity (a combination of regional and diffuse patterns with an increase during sleep.

  4. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Latka, M; Kozik, A; West, B J; Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-01-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous, pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  5. Study on protective effect of ketogenic diet against hippocampal neurons of kainic acid-induced epileptic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-nan ZHANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the protective effects of ketogenic diet on hippocampal neurons of kainic acid (KA-induced epileptic rats.  Methods A total of 40 healthy male specific pathogen free (SPF Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into 4 groups, with each group containing 10 rats. Epileptic rat models were formed by injection of KA through lateral ventricle with brain stereotactic instrument. According to Racine classification, epileptic seizures in rats above grade Ⅳ were defined successful. Then the rats were given different dietary treatment: Group C with normal saline and normal diet, Group K with normal saline and ketogenic diet, Group E with KA and normal diet, Group EK with KA and ketogenic diet. All rats were observed for 21 d, and were recorded each body weight. The epileptic seizure frequency and duration were observed at 12:00-15:00 daily. At the 21st day, all rats were put to death, and the brain hippocampus tissues were separated. Neuron injury of rat hippocampal CA3 region in Group E and EK was observed by HE staining. Normal neuron number of rat hippocampal CA3 region in Group E and EK was counted by Nissl staining. Results Group C and K had no epileptic seizures, and the neuron number in hippocampal CA3 region was normal. Rats in both Group E and EK had grade Ⅳ or Ⅴ seizures. The number of seizures in Group EK [(17.90 ± 4.12 times] after 21-day ketogenic diet was decreased significantly compared to Group E [(30.50 ± 4.40 times] after 21-day normal diet (t = 6.606, P = 0.000. The seizure duration in Group EK [(212.70 ± 17.75 s] after 21-day ketogenic diet was shortened compared to Group E [(335.00 ± 14.21 s] after 21-day normal diet (t = 17.011, P = 0.000. The normal neuron number in hippocampal CA3 region in Group EK (117.67 ± 7.51 was more than those in Group E (71.33 ± 6.11, with statistically significant difference (t = 9.614, P = 0.000.  Conclusions Ketogenic diet has protective effect on hippocampal

  6. Seizure Prediction: Science Fiction or Soon to Become Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freestone, Dean R; Karoly, Philippa J; Peterson, Andre D H; Kuhlmann, Levin; Lai, Alan; Goodarzy, Farhad; Cook, Mark J

    2015-11-01

    This review highlights recent developments in the field of epileptic seizure prediction. We argue that seizure prediction is possible; however, most previous attempts have used data with an insufficient amount of information to solve the problem. The review discusses four methods for gaining more information above standard clinical electrophysiological recordings. We first discuss developments in obtaining long-term data that enables better characterisation of signal features and trends. Then, we discuss the usage of electrical stimulation to probe neural circuits to obtain robust information regarding excitability. Following this, we present a review of developments in high-resolution micro-electrode technologies that enable neuroimaging across spatial scales. Finally, we present recent results from data-driven model-based analyses, which enable imaging of seizure generating mechanisms from clinical electrophysiological measurements. It is foreseeable that the field of seizure prediction will shift focus to a more probabilistic forecasting approach leading to improvements in the quality of life for the millions of people who suffer uncontrolled seizures. However, a missing piece of the puzzle is devices to acquire long-term high-quality data. When this void is filled, seizure prediction will become a reality.

  7. The best time for EEG recording in febrile seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Rezayi, Alireza; Togha, Mansoureh; Ahmadabadi, Farzad; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Azargashb, Eznollah; Khodaei, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Some studies suggest that detection of epileptic discharge is unusual during the first postictal week of febrile seizure and others believe that EEGs carried out on the day of the seizure are abnormal in as many as 88% of the patients. In this study, we intend to compare early and late EEG abnormalities in febrile seizure. EEG was recorded during daytime sleep, 24-48 hours (early EEG) and 2 weeks (late EEG) after the seizure in 36 children with febrile seizure (FS), aged between 3 months and 6 years. EEGs that showed generalized or focal spikes, sharp, spike wave complex, and slowing were considered as abnormal EEG. Abnormalities of the first EEG were compared with those of second EEG. The most common abnormal epileptiform discharges recorded in the early EEG were slow waves (27.6%) and sharp waves in late EEG (36%). Distribution of abnormalities in early and late EEG showed no significant statistical difference. The early and late EEG recording had the same results in patient with febrile seizure.

  8. Delayed Effect of Craniotomy on Experimental Seizures in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcelli, Patrick A.; Kalikhman, David; Gale, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Neurosurgical therapeutic interventions include components that are presumed to be therapeutically inert, such as craniotomy and electrode implantation. Because these procedures may themselves exert neuroactive actions, with anecdotal evidence suggesting that craniotomy and electrode placement may have a particularly significant impact on epileptic seizures, the importance of their inclusion in sham control groups has become more compelling. Here we set out to test the hypothesis that craniotomy alone is sufficient to alter experimental seizures in rats. We tested adult male rats for seizures evoked by pentylenetetrazole (70 mg/kg) between 3 and 20 days following placement of bilateral craniotomies (either 2.5 or 3.5 mm in diameter) in the parietal bone of the skull, without penetrating the dura. Control (sham-operated) animals underwent anesthesia and surgery without craniotomy. We found that craniotomy significantly decreased the severity of experimental seizures on postoperative days 3, 6, and 10; this effect was dependent on the size of craniotomy. Animals with craniotomies returned to control seizure severity by 20 days post-craniotomy. These data support the hypothesis that damage to the skull is sufficient to cause a significant alteration in seizure susceptibility over an extended postoperative period, and indicate that this damage should not be considered neurologically inert. PMID:24324691

  9. A physiology-based seizure detection system for multichannel EEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ping Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Electroencephalogram (EEG signals play a critical role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Multichannel EEGs contain more information than do single-channel EEGs. Automatic detection algorithms for spikes or seizures have traditionally been implemented on single-channel EEG, and algorithms for multichannel EEG are unavailable. METHODOLOGY: This study proposes a physiology-based detection system for epileptic seizures that uses multichannel EEG signals. The proposed technique was tested on two EEG data sets acquired from 18 patients. Both unipolar and bipolar EEG signals were analyzed. We employed sample entropy (SampEn, statistical values, and concepts used in clinical neurophysiology (e.g., phase reversals and potential fields of a bipolar EEG to extract the features. We further tested the performance of a genetic algorithm cascaded with a support vector machine and post-classification spike matching. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained 86.69% spike detection and 99.77% seizure detection for Data Set I. The detection system was further validated using the model trained by Data Set I on Data Set II. The system again showed high performance, with 91.18% detection of spikes and 99.22% seizure detection. CONCLUSION: We report a de novo EEG classification system for seizure and spike detection on multichannel EEG that includes physiology-based knowledge to enhance the performance of this type of system.

  10. Phenomenology of hallucinations, illusions, and delusions as part of seizure semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, B S; Kasper, E M; Pauli, E; Stefan, H

    2010-05-01

    In partial epilepsy, a localized hypersynchronous neuronal discharge evolving into a partial seizure affecting a particular cortical region or cerebral subsystem can give rise to subjective symptoms, which are perceived by the affected person only, that is, ictal hallucinations, illusions, or delusions. When forming the beginning of a symptom sequence leading to impairment of consciousness and/or a classic generalized seizure, these phenomena are referred to as an epileptic aura, but they also occur in isolation. They often manifest in the fully awake state, as part of simple partial seizures, but they also can be associated to different degrees of disturbed consciousness. Initial ictal symptoms often are closely related to the physiological functions of the cortical circuit involved and, therefore, can provide localizing information. When brain regions related to sensory integration are involved, the seizure discharge can cause specific kinds of hallucinations, for example, visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, and cutaneous sensory sensations. In addition to these elementary sensory perceptions, quite complex hallucinations related to a partial seizure can arise, for example, perception of visual scenes or hearing music. By involving psychic and emotional spheres of human perception, many seizures also give rise to hallucinatory emotional states (e.g., fear or happiness) or even more complex hallucinations (e.g., visuospatial phenomena), illusions (e.g., déjà vu, out-of-body experience), or delusional beliefs (e.g., identity change) that often are not easily recognized as epileptic. Here we suggest a classification into elementary sensory, complex sensory, and complex integratory seizure symptoms. Epileptic hallucinations, illusions, and delusions shine interesting light on the physiology and functional anatomy of brain regions involved and their functions in the human being. This article, in which 10 cases are described, introduces the fascinating

  11. A gliotoxin model of occipital seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsattari, Seyed M; Shen, Bixia; Leung, L Stan; Rajakumar, Nagalingam

    2008-09-01

    Intracortical microinjection of fluorocitrate, a reversible inhibitor of glial tricarboxylic acid (TCA), results in impaired glial metabolism and epileptic seizures. To determine the potential contribution of epileptic activities to the metabolic properties of fluorocitrate, we investigated the seizure-inducing property of fluorocitrate at different doses. Twenty-seven male Sprague Dawley rats (250-400g) were studied with chronically implanted electrodes and cannulae in the occipital cortices. A week after surgery, awake behaving rats were injected with 0.2microl solution containing various concentrations of fluorocitrate or saline in the right occipital cortex; two sham-treated animals did not receive an injection. EEG was recorded with implanted electrodes. Thionin staining was used to verify injection sites. Twenty rats underwent immunohistochemistry for glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP) and neuronal nuclear-specific antigen (NeuN) 48h after the injections. Seizures developed within an hour of injection in all the rats that received > or =0.8nmol fluorocitrate and 2 of 4 rats that received 0.4nmol fluorocitrate. Five of 12 animals that received > or =1.2nmol fluorocitrate experienced status epilepticus. There was a significant increase in GFAP staining at the injection site in doses > or =0.8nmol fluorocitrate. There was only mild neuronal loss revealed by NeuN staining at the injection site in the animals that had received 1.6nmol flourocitrate. This study shows that fluorocitrate results in focal epileptic seizures with secondary generalization in a dose-dependent manner, including low doses of this agent previously used for studies of brain metabolism.

  12. Epileptic aura and perception of self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Allan; Kjaer, Troels W; Sabers, Anne; Wolf, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The health locus of control is the subjective perception of control over one's health. It has been studied for years as one of several factors that determine patient health-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to investigate how the epileptic aura is associated with the health locus of control, anxiety, and depression. Patients were included retrospectively, based on patient records from the epilepsy monitoring unit of the Rigshospitalet University Hospital. Participants were asked about the presence and nature of auras in a semistructured interview. The Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, Form C was used to evaluate the health locus of control. Three domains were evaluated: internal, where health is controlled by personal action; chance, where health is controlled by fate or luck; and powerful others, where health is controlled by the actions of others (e.g., doctors and parents). The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to evaluate levels of anxiety and depression. Forty-nine patients, with mean age of 38years, participated in the study. Of these, 67% reported experiencing one or more auras; i.e., subjective warning signs prior to a generalized or focal seizure with an impairment in consciousness. Patients that could react to their aura prior to a seizure scored higher on the internal subscale of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control questionnaire compared to participants that could not react to their aura. The ability to react to an aura prior to a seizure correlated positively with the internal subscale of the health locus of control. However, it did not significantly correlate with the external subscales of chance and powerful others in the health locus of control. Moreover, there was no significant relation between the ability to react to an aura prior to a seizure and the levels of anxiety or depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mozart's music in children with drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Toro, Annacarmela; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Ferrarioli, Giuseppe; Pisano, Simone; Viggiano, Andrea; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Mozart's sonata for two pianos in D major, K448, has been shown to decrease interictal EEG discharges and recurrence of clinical seizures in both adults and young patients. In this prospective, open-label study, we evaluated the effect of listening to a set of Mozart's compositions, according to the Tomatis method, on sleep quality and behavioral disorders, including auto-/hetero-aggression, irritability, and hyperactivity, in a group of children and adolescents with drug-resistant epilepsy. The study group was composed of 11 outpatients (7 males and 4 females), between 1.5years and 21years of age (mean age: 11.9years), all suffering from drug-resistant epileptic encephalopathy (n=11). All of them had a severe/profound intellectual disability associated with cerebral palsy. During the study period, each patient had to listen to a set of Mozart's compositions 2h per day for fifteen days for a total of 30h, which could be distributed over the day depending on the habits and compliance of each patient. The music was filtered by a device preferably delivering higher sound frequencies (>3000Hz) according to the Tomatis principles. The antiepileptic drug therapy remained unchanged throughout the study period. During the 15-day music therapy, 2 out of 11 patients had a reduction of 50-75% in seizure recurrence, and 3 out of 12 patients had a reduction of 75-89%. Overall, 5 (45.4%) out of 11 patients had a ≥50% reduction in the total number of seizures, while the percentage decrease of the total seizure number (11/11) compared with baseline was -51.5% during the 15-day music therapy and -20.7% in the two weeks after the end of treatment. All responders also had an improvement in nighttime sleep and daytime behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J; Anderson, William S

    2015-08-01

    The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone (SOZ) localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the [Formula: see text] Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. We showed that a directed transfer function (DTF) can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. We used seven complex partial seizures recorded from four patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a DTF measure. We showed that a DTF can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with a known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical SOZ and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2-10 s time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately [Formula: see text]. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined SOZ than inside. This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices.

  15. Epileptic nystagmus: A case report and systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Uk Lee

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Even though the localizing value of epileptic nystagmus seems limited in previous reports, the fast phase of epileptic nystagmus was almost always directed away from the epileptic focus that mostly arose from the posterior part of the cerebral hemisphere.

  16. Action of GABA-B antagonist on cortical epileptic afterdischarges in rats is similar to that of GABA-A antagonist

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Živanovič, D.; Bernášková, Klára; Kaminskij, Julij; Mareš, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2003), s. 651-655 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1643; GA ČR GA309/03/0770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : epileptic seizures * cerebral cortex * rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  17. Pure cannabidiol in the treatment of malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade, Dimah; Joshi, Charuta

    2015-05-01

    Malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy is a devastating pharmacoresistent epileptic encephalopathy of unknown etiology characterized by onset in the first 6 months of life, continuous migrating focal seizures with corresponding multifocal electroencephalographic discharges, developmental deterioration, and early mortality. Recent widespread interest in the nonpsychoactive component of the cannabis plant, cannabidiol, as a potential treatment for refractory devastating epilepsies has led to individual trials initiated by families or physicians in states that have legalized medical marijuana with anecdotal success. We describe a now 10-month-old boy with malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy who made developmental gains and demonstrated sustained seizure reduction with the addition of cannabidiol to his antiepileptic regimen. This report supports a role for cannabidiol in the treatment of malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Seizures and movement disorders induced by hyperglycemia without ketosis in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Samia; Cherif, Yousra; Aissi, Mouna; Alaya, Wafa; Berriche, Olfa; Boughammoura, Amel; Frih-Ayed, Mahbouba; Zantour, Baha; Habib Sfar, Mohamed

    2014-07-04

    Non-ketotic hyperglycemia (NKHG) may increase the probability of seizures and movement disorders. We describe a series of 14 elders admitted for seizures and movement disorders linked to NKHG. Twelve patients developed motor seizures and two others movement disorders. Glucose levels varied 9.28 to 32 mmol/l, while osmolarity values varied from 302.28 to 328 mosmol/l. All patients responded well to insulin therapy and four of them needed anti-epileptic drugs. Seizures or movement disorders in elderly with NKHG could be misdiagnosed as neurological diseases. Blood glucose must be audited whenever patients with seizures or movement disorders are encountered, as the condition may quickly resolve when NKHG is controlled.

  19. Magnetoencephalography in pediatric neurology and in epileptic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Pizzella, Vittorio; Trotta, Daniela; Madonna, Laura; Chiarelli, Francesco; Romani, Gian Luca

    2003-04-01

    In recent years, great advances in the knowledge of neuromagnetism have permitted the application of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices to the pathophysiologic study of the human brain. In particular, in pediatric neurology, the integration of biomagnetism with magnetic resonance imaging and other techniques for medical imaging have allowed for precise neuromagnetic measurements of the human brain. The more frequently used technique is magnetoencephalography. Recent data have illustrated the usefulness of magnetoencephalography in mapping activity of sensory and motor areas and in studying the spatiotemporal pattern of brain activation specific to somatosensory function. Moreover, magnetoencephalography is an important tool to localize epileptic activity; magnetic source imaging superimposes magnetoencephalographic localizations on the magnetic resonance imaging and yields improved spatial resolution as compared with surface electroencephalography. The role of magnetoencephalography in evaluating patients with epilepsy continues to evolve; in fact, it seems to be very useful in the localization of the epileptogenic zone in patients with partial epilepsy. This application of magnetoencephalography is essential in the selection of epileptic children candidates to surgical treatment of seizures.

  20. Epileptic neuronal networks: methods of identification and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Hermann; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to examine evidence for the concept that epileptic activity should be envisaged in terms of functional connectivity and dynamics of neuronal networks. Basic concepts regarding structure and dynamics of neuronal networks are briefly described. Particular attention is given to approaches that are derived, or related, to the concept of causality, as formulated by Granger. Linear and non-linear methodologies aiming at characterizing the dynamics of neur