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Sample records for spongy gold nanotubes

  1. Gold(I)-Alkanethiolate Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu Xin

    2009-12-28

    (Figure Presented) A solution approach to assembling Au(I) - alkanethiolates into nanotube structures at room temperature is presented, in which Au(I) cations and alkanethiolate ligands are coordinated into thin platelet forms that then evolve into an open tubular configuration (see figure). The organic-inorganic hybrid nature of the nanotubes, their ability to be modified, and their high stability make them of interest for practical applications. © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. Phonon assisted thermophoretic motion of gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, Philipp A.E.; Walther, Jens Honore; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigate the thermally driven mass transport of gold nanoparticles confined inside carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The observed thermophoretic motion of the gold nanoparticles correlates with the phonon dispersion exhibited by a standard carbon nanotube and......, in particular, with the breathing mode of the tube. Additionally, the results show an increased static friction for gold nanoparticles confines inside a zig-zag carbon nanotube when increasing the size length of the nanoparticles. However, an unexpected, opposite trend is observed for the same nanoparticles...

  3. Temperature driven transport of gold nanoparticles physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, P.A.E.; Poulikakos, D.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2006-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate the temperature driven mass transport of solid gold nanoparticles, physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Our results indicate that the nanoparticle experiences a guided motion, in the direction opposite to the direction of the temperature...... affects the nanoparticle motion along the carbon lattice....

  4. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, Luisa; Marsili, Paolo; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Margheri, Giancarlo; Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto; Giorgetti, Emilia; Cicchi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids

  5. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, Luisa [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Marsili, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Margheri, Giancarlo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Cicchi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cicchi@unifi.it [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy)

    2014-10-31

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids.

  6. Study of the Reaction Rate of Gold Nanotube Synthesis from Sacrificial Silver Nanorods through the Galvanic Replacement Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil Kwon; Hyunbae Dong; Sang-Yup Lee

    2010-01-01

    An investigation was carried out about the gold nanotube synthesis via a galvanic replacement reaction. The progress of the gold nanotube synthesis was investigated using electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. In addition, the reaction rates of gold nanotube formation in the early stage of the reaction were studied. The chlorine ion concentration linearly increased with the gold precursor concentration but deviated from the stoichiometric amounts. This deviation was probably due to AgCl...

  7. Synthesis of gold nanoclusters: a fluorescent marker for water-soluble TiO{sub 2} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratanatawanate, Chalita; Yu Jing; Zhou Chen; Zheng Jie; Balkus, Kenneth J Jr, E-mail: balkus@utdallas.edu [Department of Chemistry and the Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021 (United States)

    2011-02-11

    The first example of a water-soluble wrapped titania nanotube (TNT) decorated with fluorescent gold nanoparticles has been prepared. Gold nanoparticles {approx} 1.6 nm in diameter were grown on the TiO{sub 2} nanotubes using a thiolactic acid linker to control the size. The gold clusters emit at 660 nm in water and were imaged using confocal microscopy. The gold decorated TNTs were suspended in water by wrapping the nanotubes with poly-L-arginine.

  8. Nanoscale Soldering of Positioned Carbon Nanotubes using Highly Conductive Electron Beam Induced Gold Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for controlled positioning of carbon nanotubes followed by highly conductive contacting of the nanotubes, using electron beam assisted deposition of gold. The positioning and soldering process takes place inside an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (E......-SEM) in the presence of a source of gold-organic precursor gas. Bridges deposited between suspended microelectrodes show resistivities down to 10-4 Ωcm and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the deposits reveals a dense core of gold particles surrounded by a crust of small gold nanoparticles embedded...

  9. PEG-nanotube liquid crystals as templates for construction of surfactant-free gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameta, Naohiro; Shiroishi, Hidenobu

    2018-04-23

    Lyotropic liquid crystals, in which nanotubes coated with polyethylene glycol were aligned side-by-side in aqueous dispersions, acted as templates for the construction of surfactant-free gold nanorods with controllable diameters, functionalizable surfaces, and tunable optical properties.

  10. Gold supported on ceria nanotubes for CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongbin; Lu, Kun; Zong, Lijuan; Tong, Sai; Wang, Xuewen; Feng, Gang

    2017-09-01

    CeO2 is a typical of fluorite structure, semiconductor material, has high oxygen storage capability as well as unique redox property, which is widely used as catalysts supports in catalysis. Ceria nanotubes and nanocubes are prepared via hydrothermal method in the present work, and Au/CeO2 catalysts are prepared using deposition-precipitation technique with HAuCl4 as gold precursor. The prepared samples were used as catalysts for the CO oxidation reaction using a fix-bed reactor at 50-130 °C and characterized by XRD, BET, SEM, TEM, XPS, TPR and ICP. It is found that CeO2-NT and CeO2-NC expose different surface planes. The XPS and H2-TPR results illustrates that the {110} surface exposed by CeO2-NT has stronger interaction with gold particles, which benefits the electron and oxygen transfer between Au and ceria. All these characters of the Au/CeO2-NT(3%) result in the better activity and stability than the Au/CeO2-NC(3%).

  11. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when entering clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes: rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  12. Retracted-Enhanced X-Ray Absorption Property of Gold-Doped Single Wall Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimin Alimin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced X-ray absorption property of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT through gold (Au doping (Au@SWCNT has been studied. Mass attenuation coefficient of SWCNT increased 5.2-fold after Au doping treatment. The use of ethanol in the liquid phase adsorption could produce Au nanoparticles as confirmed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD patterns. The possibility of gold nanoparticles encapsulated in the internal tube space of SWCNT was observed by transmission electron microscope technique. A significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes and upshifts of Radial Breathing Mode (RBM of Au@SWCNT specimen suggest that the nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. In addition, a decrease intensity of XRD pattern of Au@SWCNT at around 2θ ≈ 2.6° supports the suggestion that Au nanoparticles are really encapsulated into SWCNT.

  13. Carbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano2hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, J-C; Zanolli, Z; Arnaud, L; Avilov, I V; Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J; Delgado, M; Demoisson, F; Reniers, F; Espinosa, E H; Ionescu, R; Leghrib, R; Llobet, E; Ewels, C P; Suarez-Martinez, I; Guillot, J; Mansour, A; Migeon, H-N; Watson, G E

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold-nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano 2 hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO 2 , CO, C 2 H 5 OH and C 2 H 4 .

  14. Carbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano{sup 2}hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlier, J-C; Zanolli, Z [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux (PCPM), European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Arnaud, L; Avilov, I V; Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J [Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matiere et du Rayonnement (PMR-LISE), Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Delgado, M [Sensotran, s.l., Avenida Remolar 31, E-08820 El Prat de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Demoisson, F; Reniers, F [Service de Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces (CHANI), Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, CP255, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Espinosa, E H; Ionescu, R; Leghrib, R; Llobet, E [Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avenida Paisos Catalans 26, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ewels, C P; Suarez-Martinez, I [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniere-BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Guillot, J; Mansour, A; Migeon, H-N [Departement Science et Analyse des Materiaux, Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, rue du Brill 41, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Watson, G E, E-mail: jean-jacques.pireaux@fundp.ac.b [Vega Science Trust, Unit 118, Science Park SQ, Brighton, BN1 9SB (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-16

    Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold-nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano{sup 2}hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  15. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes with Gold Nanoparticles to Fabricate a Sensor for Hydrogen Peroxide Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halimeh Rajabzade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive electrode was prepared based on gold nanoparticles/nanotubes/ionic liquid for measurement of Hydrogen peroxide. Gold nanoparticles of 20–25 nm were synthesized on a nanotube carbon paste electrode by cyclic voltammetry technique while the coverage was controlled by applied potential and time. The gold nanoparticles were modified to form a monolayer on CNT, followed by decoration with ionic liquid for determination of hydrogen peroxide. The experimental conditions, applied potential and pH, for hydrogen peroxide monitoring were optimized, and hydrogen peroxide was determined amperometrically at 0.3 V vs. SCE at pH 7.0. Electrocatalytic effects of gold deposited CNT were observed with respect to unmodified one. The sensitivity obtained was 5 times higher for modified one. The presence of Au particles in the matrix of CNTs provides an environment for the enhanced electrocatalytic activities. The sensor has a high sensitivity, quickly response to H2O2 and good stability. The synergistic influence of MWNT, Au particles and IL contributes to the excellent performance for the sensor. The sensor responds to H2O2 in the linear range from 0.02 µM to 0.3 mM. The detection limit was down to 0.4 µM when the signal to noise ratio is 3.

  16. Plasmonic gold nanoparticles modified titania nanotubes for antibacterial application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhou, Huaijuan; Qian, Shi; Liu, Ziwei; Feng, Jingwei; Jin, Ping; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-01-01

    Close-packed TiO 2 nanotube arrays are prepared on metallic Ti surface by electrochemical anodization. Subsequently, by magnetron sputtering, Au nanoparticles are coated onto the top sidewall and tube inwall. The Au@TiO 2 systems can effectively kill Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in darkness due to the existence of Au nanoparticles. On the basis of classical optical theories, the antibacterial mechanism is proposed from the perspective of localized surface plasmon resonance. Respiratory electrons of bacterial membrane transfer to Au nanoparticles and then to TiO 2 , which makes bacteria steadily lose electrons until death. This work provides insights for the better understanding and designing of noble metal nanoparticles-based plasmonic heterostructures for antibacterial application.

  17. Tuning of colossal dielectric constant in gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes using in-situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisakh Sarma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In-situ x-ray diffraction technique has been used to study the growth process of gold incorporated polypyrrole nanotubes that exhibit colossal dielectric constant due to existence of quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave state. These composite nanotubes were formed within nanopores of a polycarbonate membrane by flowing pyrrole monomer from one side and mixture of ferric chloride and chloroauric acid from other side in a sample cell that allows collection of x-ray data during the reaction. The size of the gold nanoparticle embedded in the walls of the nanotubes was found to be dependent on chloroauric acid concentration for nanowires having diameter more than 100 nm. For lower diameter nanotubes the nanoparticle size become independent of chloroauric acid concentration and depends on the diameter of nanotubes only. The result of this study also shows that for 50 nm gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes obtained with 5.3 mM chloroauric acid gives colossal dielectric constant of about 107. This value remain almost constant over a frequency range from 1Hz to 106 Hz even at 80 K temperature.

  18. Electrodeposited gold nanoparticles on carbon nanotube-textile: Anode material for glucose alkaline fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Pasta, Mauro

    2012-06-01

    In the present paper we propose a new anode material for glucose-gluconate direct oxidation fuel cells prepared by electrodepositing gold nanoparticles onto a conductive textile made by conformally coating single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) on a polyester textile substrate. The electrodeposition conditions were optimized in order to achieve a uniform distribution of gold nanoparticles in the 3D porous structure of the textile. On the basis of previously reported studies, the reaction conditions (pH, electrolyte composition and glucose concentration) were tuned in order to achieve the highest oxidation rate, selectively oxidizing glucose to gluconate. The electrochemical characterization was carried out by means of cyclic voltammetry. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Do seed VLCFAs trigger spongy tissue formation in Alphonso ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-17

    Apr 17, 2015 ... growth is a major contributing factor for the disorder which leads to reduced fat content in spongy tissue affected fruits. ... significant reduction in the biosynthesis of VLCFAs in seeds during fruit growth might trigger pre-germination events .... Intensity of spongy tissue was quantified as a percentage of.

  20. Do seed VLCFAs trigger spongy tissue formation in Alphonso ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 2. Do seed VLCFAs trigger spongy tissue ... Concurrently, a significant reduction in the ratio of linolenic acid/linoleic acid in pulp led to the loss of membrane integrity, cell death and the eventual formation of spongy tissue. Based on the above, it is ...

  1. The Effect of Local Electric Field in the Middle Dielectric Wall on the Infrared Plasmonic Shift of the Concentric Gold Double Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenji, Li; Shaoyan, Gao

    2015-02-01

    The effect of inserted gold nanotube on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) shifting and local electric field enhancement of concentric gold double nanotubes has been studied by using the quasi-static electricity. Because of the combined effect from inter-surface and inter-tube plasmon coupling, the LSPR in gold double nanotubes could be easily tuned into the infrared wavelength region. The calculation results indicate the plasmon peak shifting is quite sensitive to the thickness of the inner gold tube and the gap between the inner and outer gold tubes. The physical mechanism has been attributed to the local field effect of the separate dielectric layer. Because of the additional attraction from the inner gold tube to the free electrons at outer gold tube, the decreasing electric field in the middle dielectric spacer layer reduces the restoring force and lead to intense red shift of LSPR.

  2. Mechanical properties of nickel-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes and their embedded gold matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haiyang; Zha Xinwei

    2010-01-01

    The effects of nickel coating on the mechanical behaviors of armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and their embedded gold matrix composites under axial tension are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The results show that the Young's moduli and tensile strength of SWCNTs obviously decrease after nickel coating. For armchair SWCNTs, the decreased ratio of the Young's moduli of SWCNTs with smaller radius is larger than that of SWCNTs with larger radius. A comparison is made between the response to Young's modulus of a composite with parallel embedded nanotube and the response of a composite with vertically embedded nanotube. The results show that the uncoated SWCNT can enhance the Young's modulus of composite under the condition of parallel embedment, but such improvement disappears under the condition of vertical embedment because the interaction between SWCNT and gold matrix is too weak for effective load transfer. However, the nickel-coated SWCNT can indeed significantly improve the composite behavior.

  3. Determination of Patulin Using Amperometric Tyrosinase Biosensors Based on Electrodes Modified with Carbon Nanotubes and Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Varlamova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available New amperometric biosensors based on platinum screen printed electrodes modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles, and immobilized enzyme – tyrosinase have been developed for determination of patulin in the concentrations of 1·10–6 – 8·10–12 mol/L with an error of no more than 0.063. The best conditions for obtaining gold nanoparticles have been chosen. The conditions for immobilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles on the surface of the planar electrode have been revealed. The conditions for functioning of the proposed biosensors have been identified. The results have been used to control the content of patulin in food products within and lower than the maximum allowable levels.

  4. Preparation and electrochemical properties of gold nanoparticles containing carbon nanotubes-polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Aimin; Zhang Xing; Zhang Haili; Han, Deyan; Knight, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Gold nanoparticles containing carbon nanotubes-polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films were prepared via layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. → The electron transfer behaviour of the hybrid thin films were investigated using an electrochemical probe. → The resulting thin films exhibited an electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of nitric oxide. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/polyelectrolyte (PE) hybrid thin films were fabricated by alternatively depositing negatively charged MWCNT and positively charged (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. The stepwise growth of the multilayer films of MWCNT and PDDA was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that the MWCNT were uniformly embedded in the film to form a network and the coverage density of MWCNT increased with layer number. Au nanoparticles (NPs) could be further adsorbed onto the film to form PE/MWCNT/Au NPs composite films. The electron transfer behaviour of multilayer films with different compositions were studied by cyclic voltammetry using [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3-/4- as an electrochemical probe. The results indicated that the incorporation of MWCNT and Au NPs not only greatly improved the electronic conductivity of pure polyelectrolyte films, but also provided excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of nitric oxide (NO).

  5. Chemically bonded carbon nanotubes on modified gold substrate as novel unbreakable solid phase microextraction fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, H.; Ayazi, Z.; Sistani, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is introduced for preparation of an unbreakable fiber using gold wire as a substrate for solid phase microextraction (SPME). A gold wire is used as a solid support, onto which a first film is deposited that consists of a two-dimensional polymer obtained by hydrolysis of a self-assembled monolayer of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-1-propanthiol. This first film is covered with a layer of 3-(triethoxysilyl)-propylamine. Next, a stationary phase of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes was chemically bound to the surface. The synthetic strategy was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thermal stability of new fiber was examined by thermogravimetric analysis. The applicability of the novel coating was verified by its employment as a SPME fiber for isolation of diazinon and fenthion, as model compounds. Parameters influencing the extraction process were optimized to result in limits of detection as low as 0.2 ng mL -1 for diazinon, and 0.3 ng mL -1 for fenthion using the time-scheduled selected ion monitoring mode. The method was successfully applied to real water, and the recoveries for spiked samples were 104% for diazinon and 97% for fenthion. (author)

  6. Comparing the photothermal effects of gold nanorods and single-walled carbon nanotubes in cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Connor L.; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Young, Blake; Wolf, Roman; Silk, Kegan; Ingalls, Rianna; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.

    2017-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy (LIT) is an innovative cancer treatment modality that is specifically targeted towards treating late-stage, metastatic cancer. This treatment modality utilizes laser irradiation in combination with active immune system stimulation to induce a systemic anti-tumor immune response against metastatic cancer. Nanoparticles have recently been utilized to support and increase the photothermal effect of the laser irradiation by absorbing the light energy produced from the laser and converting that energy into thermal energy. In the past, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been the main choice in nanotechnology, however, recent studies have shown that gold nanorods (AuNRs) are a prospective alternative that may produce photothermal effects similar to SWNTs. Due to the precedence of gold biomaterials currently having approval for use in various treatments for humans, AuNRs are regarded to be a safer option than SWNTs. The goal of this study is to precisely compare any differences in photothermal effects between AuNRs and SWNTs. Both types of nanoparticles were irradiated with the same wavelength of near-infrared light to ascertain the photothermal effects in gel phantom tumor models, aqueous solutions, and metastatic cancer cell cultures. We discerned from the results that the AuNRs could be equally or more effective than SWNTs in absorbing the light energy from the laser and converting it into thermal energy. In both solution and gel studies, AuNRs were shown to be more efficient than SWNTs in creating thermal energy, while in cell studies, no definitive differences between AuNRs and SWNTs were observed. The cytotoxicity of both nanoparticles needs further assessment in future studies. Given these results, AuNRs are comparable to SWNTs, even superior in certain aspects. This advances the opportunity to use AuNRs as replacements for SWNTs in LIT treatments. The results from this study will contribute to any subsequent studies in the development

  7. Titania nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles for electrochemiluminescent biosensing of glycosylated hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qun [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, Industrial Park, Suzhou, 215123 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nantong University, Nantong, 226019 (China); Tang, Shan [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, Industrial Park, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Fang, Chen [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, Industrial Park, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Second Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Tu, Yi-Feng, E-mail: tuyf@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, Industrial Park, Suzhou, 215123 (China)

    2016-09-14

    A glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) biosensor with high performance has been constructed in this work. Here the fructosyl amino acid oxidase was immobilized onto a pre-functionalized indium tin oxide glass with titania nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles. The property of nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electromicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrochemistry and spectroscopy. Under the optimum conditions, fructosyl valine was detected by this biosensor. It exhibited a linear detection range from 4.0 × 10{sup −9} M to 7.2 × 10{sup −7} M, and a limit of detection for 3.8 × 10{sup −9} M at the signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Thus the HbA1c level in whole blood samples of healthy individuals or diabetic patients were evaluated with designed biosensor after pre-treatment of hydrolysis. The results of our detection were closely consistent with that of the standard method. At the same time, our biosensor has some advantages including high sensitivity, disposable usage and low cost, which implies its great promising application in point-of-care testing of HbA1c. - Highlights: • The enhanced electrochemiluminescence of luminol by AuNPs/TiNTs. • An ECL biosensor for HbA1c assay with ultra-high sensitivity. • A promising disposable device for diabetic diagnosis and treatment even for POCT. • The excellent regression of detected results with gold-standard method.

  8. Alignment of Gold Nanoparticle-Decorated DNA Origami Nanotubes: Substrate Prepatterning versus Molecular Combing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschome, Bezu; Facsko, Stefan; Gothelf, Kurt V; Keller, Adrian

    2015-11-24

    DNA origami has become an established technique for designing well-defined nanostructures with any desired shape and for the controlled arrangement of functional nanostructures with few nanometer resolution. These unique features make DNA origami nanostructures promising candidates for use as scaffolds in nanoelectronics and nanophotonics device fabrication. Consequently, a number of studies have shown the precise organization of metallic nanoparticles on various DNA origami shapes. In this work, we fabricated large arrays of aligned DNA origami decorated with a high density of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). To this end, we first demonstrate the high-yield assembly of high-density AuNP arrangements on DNA origami adsorbed to Si surfaces with few unbound background nanoparticles by carefully controlling the concentrations of MgCl2 and AuNPs in the hybridization buffer and the hybridization time. Then, we evaluate two methods, i.e., hybridization to prealigned DNA origami and molecular combing in a receding meniscus, with respect to their potential to yield large arrays of aligned AuNP-decorated DNA origami nanotubes. Because of the comparatively low MgCl2 concentration required for the efficient immobilization of the AuNPs, the prealigned DNA origami become mobile and displaced from their original positions, thereby decreasing the alignment yield. This increased mobility, on the other hand, makes the adsorbed origami susceptible to molecular combing, and a total alignment yield of 86% is obtained in this way.

  9. Interfacial shear stress between single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold surfaces with and without an alkanethiol monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huiyan; Wu, Yu-Chiao; Adams, George G; Miller, Glen P; McGruer, Nicol E

    2013-10-01

    A novel and effective technique is developed to make the first determination of shear stress between dielectrophoretically assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and surfaces. The results demonstrate that we can vary the shear stress by a factor of 20 by functionalizing a gold surface with different alkanethiols. The interfacial shear stress between a small bundle of SWNTs and a gold surface with and without self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiol (2-phenylethanethiol or 2-aminoethanethiol) is determined. The measurements are based on simple NEMS cantilever beams, a nanomanipulator, and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is emphasized that the measured quantity is the slack in the nanotube (not the shear stress) induced by the nanomanipulation. The shear stress is determined from the slack through a mechanics model. An average shear stress of 87 MPa between SWNTs and gold surfaces is obtained. For the tests on the self-assembled 2-aminoethanethiol surface, an average shear stress of 142 MPa is obtained. For the self-assembled 2-phenylethanethiol surface, the shear stress is determined to be around 7.2 MPa with an estimated work of adhesion of 0.5 J/m(2). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Do seed VLCFAs trigger spongy tissue formation in Alphonso ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-17

    Apr 17, 2015 ... Spongy tissue is a physiological disorder in Alphonso mango caused by the inception of germination-associated events during fruit ...... sion culture of Glycine max (L.) Merr. Plant Physiol. 60 554–. 562. Girotti AW 1990 Photodynamic lipid peroxidation in biological systems. Photochem. Photobiol. 51 497– ...

  11. Nanotubes oxidation temperature controls the height of single-walled carbon nanotube forests on gold micropatterned thin layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Francesco; Agnoli, Stefano; Meneghetti, Moreno; Elvassore, Nicola

    2010-07-06

    We developed a simple methodology for a direct control of the height of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) forests. We found that the important step is a good control of the oxidation temperature of the nanotubes. SWNTs oxidation at different temperature was followed by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Atomic force microscopy images showed that micropatterned self-assembled monolayers forests have average height from 20 to 80 nm using SWNTs oxidized in the temperature ranging from 323 to 303 K, respectively.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of gold nanotube/nanowire–polyurethane composite based on castor oil and polyethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, Yasaman, E-mail: y.ganji@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, 424 Hafez Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kasra, Mehran, E-mail: mkasra@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, 424 Hafez Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salahshour Kordestani, Soheila, E-mail: s.kordestani@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, 424 Hafez Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri Hariri, Mohiedin, E-mail: mohibagheri@gmail.com [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanotubes/nanowires (GNT/NW) were synthesized by using the template-assisted electrodeposition technique and mixed with castor oil–polyethylene glycol based polyurethane (PU) to fabricate porous composite scaffolds for biomedical application. 100 and 50 ppm of GNT/NW were used to synthesize composites. The composite scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. Cell attachment on polyurethane–GNT/NW composites was investigated using fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Addition of 50 or 100 ppm GNT/NW had significant effects on thermal, mechanical, and cell attachment of polyurethane. Higher crosslink density and better cell attachment and proliferation were observed in polyurethane containing 50 ppm GNT/NW. The results revealed that GNT/NW formed hydrogen bonding with the polyurethane matrix and improved the thermomechanical properties of nanocomposites. Compared with pure PU, better cellular attachment on polyurethane–GNT/NW composites was observed resulting from the improved surface properties of composites. - Highlights: • Polyurethane–gold nanotubes/nanowires (GNT/NWs) composites were synthesized. • Tan δ, E′ and E″ were increased upon addition of 50 ppm of GNT/NW. • Better cell attachment was observed in composites containing 50 ppm of GNT/NW. • GNT/NWs can make a bridge between the pores of the porous polymeric scaffolds. • GNT/NWs increased the crosslink density of the polymeric matrix.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of gold nanotube/nanowire–polyurethane composite based on castor oil and polyethylene glycol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganji, Yasaman; Kasra, Mehran; Salahshour Kordestani, Soheila; Bagheri Hariri, Mohiedin

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanotubes/nanowires (GNT/NW) were synthesized by using the template-assisted electrodeposition technique and mixed with castor oil–polyethylene glycol based polyurethane (PU) to fabricate porous composite scaffolds for biomedical application. 100 and 50 ppm of GNT/NW were used to synthesize composites. The composite scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. Cell attachment on polyurethane–GNT/NW composites was investigated using fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Addition of 50 or 100 ppm GNT/NW had significant effects on thermal, mechanical, and cell attachment of polyurethane. Higher crosslink density and better cell attachment and proliferation were observed in polyurethane containing 50 ppm GNT/NW. The results revealed that GNT/NW formed hydrogen bonding with the polyurethane matrix and improved the thermomechanical properties of nanocomposites. Compared with pure PU, better cellular attachment on polyurethane–GNT/NW composites was observed resulting from the improved surface properties of composites. - Highlights: • Polyurethane–gold nanotubes/nanowires (GNT/NWs) composites were synthesized. • Tan δ, E′ and E″ were increased upon addition of 50 ppm of GNT/NW. • Better cell attachment was observed in composites containing 50 ppm of GNT/NW. • GNT/NWs can make a bridge between the pores of the porous polymeric scaffolds. • GNT/NWs increased the crosslink density of the polymeric matrix

  14. Electrochemical deposition of gold nanoparticles on carbon nanotube coated glassy carbon electrode for the improved sensing of tinidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrokhian, Saeed; Rastgar, Shokoufeh

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of tinidazole (TNZ) is studied on gold-nanoparticle/carbon-nanotubes (AuNP/CNT) modified glassy carbon electrodes using the linear sweep voltammetry. An electrochemical procedure was used for the deposition of gold nanoparticles onto the carbon nanotube film pre-cast on a glassy carbon electrode surface. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The effect of the electrodeposition conditions, e.g., salt concentration and deposition time on the response of the electrode was studied. Also, the effect of experimental parameters, e.g., potential and time of accumulation, pH of the buffered solutions and the potential sweep rate on the response is examined. Under the optimal conditions, the modified electrode showed a wide linear response toward the concentration of TNZ in the range of 0.1–50 μM with a detection limit of 10 nM. The prepared electrode was successfully applied for the determination of TNZ in pharmaceutical and clinical samples.

  15. Kingfisher feathers - colouration by pigments, spongy nanostructures and thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Tinbergen, Jan; Leertouwer, Hein L.; Wilts, Bodo D.

    2011-01-01

    The colours of the common kingfisher, Alcedo atthis, reside in the barbs of the three main types of feather: the orange breast feathers, the cyan back feathers and the blue tail feathers. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the orange barbs contain small pigment granules. The cyan and blue barbs contain spongy nanostructures with slightly different dimensions, causing different reflectance spectra. Imaging scatterometry showed that the pigmented barbs create a diffuse orange scattering a...

  16. A ternary hybrid of carbon nanotubes/graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets/gold nanoparticles used as robust substrate electrodes in enzyme biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Panpan; Song, Rongbin; Zhu, Cheng; Ji, Yusheng; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-10-11

    A novel ternary hybrid of carbon nanotubes/graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets/gold nanoparticles was prepared and used as robust substrate electrodes for fabricating membrane-less glucose/O2 enzyme biofuel cells (EBFCs), and a remarkably improved power output was observed for the prepared EBFC.

  17. Development of an amperometric sulfite biosensor based on a gold nanoparticles/chitosan/multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polyaniline-modified gold electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Rachna; Chawla, Sheetal; Dahiya, Tulika; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2011-11-01

    A sulfite oxidase (SOx) purified from leaves of Syzygium cumini (Jamun) was immobilized covalently onto a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)/chitosan (CHIT)/carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (cMWCNTs)/polyaniline (PANI) composite that was electrodeposited onto the surface of a gold (Au) electrode. A novel and highly sensitive sulfite biosensor was developed that used this enzyme electrode (SOx/AuNPs/CHIT/cMWCNT/PANI/Au) as the working electrode, Ag/AgCl as the standard electrode, and Pt wire as the auxiliary electrode. The modified electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) before and after the immobilization of the SOx. The sensor produced its optimum response within 3 s when operated at 50 mVs(-1) in 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, and at 35 °C. The linear range and detection limit of the sensor were 0.75-400 μM and 0.5 μM (S/N = 3), respectively. The biosensor was employed to determine sulfite levels in fruit juices and alcoholic beverages. The enzyme electrode was used 300 times over a period of three months when stored at 4 °C.

  18. A molecular dynamics study on the thermal conductivity of endohedrally functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes with gold nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajori, Shahram; Haghighi, Samieh; Ansari, Reza

    2018-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of endohedrally functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with gold nanowires (GNWs) is studied by using a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effect of geometrical parameters, i.e. length and radius of pure SWCNTs/GNWs/SWCNTs filled with GNWs on the thermal conductivity are investigated. Also, the influence of various structures of GNWs such as pentagonal and multishell-GNWs on the thermal conductivity of the system is explored. The results indicate that as the length of the system rises, the thermal conductivity increases. It is also found that the thermal conductivity of GNWs is considerably lower than that of pure SWCNTs and GNWs@SWCNTs at a constant length of SWCNT or GNWs. For long pure SWCNTs, by increasing the radii of nanotubes, the thermal conductivity increases. Moreover, the thermal conductivity of the multishell-GNWs@SWCNTs is obtained higher than that of pentagonal configurations for the same lengths of SWCNTs. Through inserting the GNWs inside the SWCNTs, by maintaining the natural properties of NWs due to endohedral functionalization, the thermal conductivity is increased. This finding can be used as a benchmark for more efficient design of NEMS based on metallic NWs.

  19. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Pei-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. ► Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. ► Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. ► Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m −2 over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures (∼100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300–700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  20. Controlled self-decoration of Mo6SyIz (8.2 ≤ y + z ≤ 10) nanowires and their transformation to MoS2 nanotubes with gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovič, Andrej; Vengust, Damjan; Vilfan, Mojca; Mrzel, Aleš

    2013-01-01

    Nanowires and nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles are known for their excellent sensing and catalytic properties. However, the decoration of transition–metal dichalcogenide nanotubes can be very complex. Here we report on a simple procedure that enables efficient production and purification of thin bundles of Mo 6 S y I z (8.2 ≤ y + z ≤ 10) nanowires decorated with gold nanoparticles and their transformation to gold-decorated MoS 2 nanotubes. We isolated several hundred milligrams of nanowire bundles that were several microns long with average diameters of around 40 nm, and formed a stable dispersion in water without added surfactants. Gold nanoparticles were directly deposited on the nanowire bundles either in a solution or on a substrate at room temperature in a single-step reaction without any additional reducing reagents. The number of gold nanoparticles on a nanowire bundle is controlled by changing the concentration of chloroauric acid HAuCl 4 ·3H 2 O in the solution. Since the nanowires can serve as precursor crystals for fabrication of nanotubes, we were able to transform gold-decorated nanowires and produce gold-decorated MoS 2 nanotubes

  1. Ligand-optimized electroless synthesis of silver nanotubes and their activity in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muench, Falk; Rauber, Markus; Stegmann, Christian; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kunz, Ulrike; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    A facile electroless plating procedure for the controlled synthesis of nanoscale silver thin films and derived structures such as silver nanotubes was developed and the products were characterized by SEM, TEM and EDS. The highly stable plating baths consist of AgNO 3 as the metal source, a suitable ligand and tartrate as an environmentally benign reducing agent. Next to the variation of the coordinative environment of the oxidizing component, the influence of the pH value was evaluated. These two governing factors strongly affect the plating rate and the morphology of the developing silver nanoparticle films and can be used to adapt the reaction to synthetic demands. The refined electroless deposition allows the fabrication of homogeneous high aspect-ratio nanotubes in ion track etched polycarbonate. Template-embedded metal nanotubes can be interpreted as parallelled microreactors. Following this concept, both the silver nanotubes and spongy gold nanotubes obtained by the use of the silver structures as sacrificial templates were applied in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride, proving to be extraordinarily effective catalysts.

  2. Gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Bahiraei, Atousa; Madrakian, Tayyebeh

    2016-01-01

    A simple and highly sensitive sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium based on gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode is reported. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry was used to characterize the nanostructure and performance of the sensor and the results were compared with those obtained at the multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode and bare glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions diclofenac sodium gave linear response over the range of 0.03–200 μmol L −1 . The lower detection limits were found to be 0.02 μmol L −1 . The effect of common interferences on the current response of DS was investigated. The practical application of the modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of diclofenac sodium in urine and pharmaceutical samples. This revealed that the gold nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode shows excellent analytical performance for the determination of diclofenac sodium in terms of a very low detection limit, high sensitivity, very good accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. - Highlights: • GCE was modified with multiwalled carbon nanotube and gold nanoparticles. • AuNP/MWCNT/GCE was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium. • Modified electrode was characterized by SEM, EDS and EIS. • The proposed method showed excellent analytical figures of merit. • This sensor was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium in real samples.

  3. Gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afkhami, Abbas, E-mail: afkhami@basu.ac.ir; Bahiraei, Atousa; Madrakian, Tayyebeh

    2016-02-01

    A simple and highly sensitive sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium based on gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode is reported. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry was used to characterize the nanostructure and performance of the sensor and the results were compared with those obtained at the multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode and bare glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions diclofenac sodium gave linear response over the range of 0.03–200 μmol L{sup −1}. The lower detection limits were found to be 0.02 μmol L{sup −1}. The effect of common interferences on the current response of DS was investigated. The practical application of the modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of diclofenac sodium in urine and pharmaceutical samples. This revealed that the gold nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode shows excellent analytical performance for the determination of diclofenac sodium in terms of a very low detection limit, high sensitivity, very good accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. - Highlights: • GCE was modified with multiwalled carbon nanotube and gold nanoparticles. • AuNP/MWCNT/GCE was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium. • Modified electrode was characterized by SEM, EDS and EIS. • The proposed method showed excellent analytical figures of merit. • This sensor was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium in real samples.

  4. A novel voltammetric sensor based on gold nanoparticles involved in p-aminothiophenol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Application to the simultaneous determination of quercetin and rutin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Atar, Necip

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The p-MWCNs and AuNPs/p-MWCNs nanocomposites were synthesized. • The prepared nanocomposites were characterized. • The nanocomposites were applied to simultaneous determination of flavanoids. • The developed electrodes showed long-term stability and reproducibility. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes are expected to play a significant role in the design and manufacture of many nano-material devices in the future. Carbon nanotubes exhibit many unique properties which generate strong interests in studying their applications. In addition, certain properties of gold nanoparticles (e.g., conductivity, catalytic and photocatalytic activity) suggest that gold-nanoparticle-functionalized carbon nanotubes may prove applicable in future fabrication of nanodevices. In this study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the mean diameters of 20-25 nm were self-assembled onto the surfaces of p-aminothiophenol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNs) sheets. The p-MWCNs and AuNPs/p-MWCNs nanocomposites were characterized by reflection–absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The simultaneous determination of quercetin (QR) and rutin (RT) was performed by square wave voltammetry (SWV) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with AuNPs/p-MWCNs nanocomposite (AuNPs/p-MWCNs-GCE). QR presented two oxidation steps at E a1 of 270 mV and E a2 of 450 mV and RT presented only one oxidation step at E a of 360 mV at AuNPs/p-MWCNs-GCE. The linearity ranges and the detection limits of QR and RT were 1.0 × 10 −9 - 5.0 × 10 −8 M and 3.3 × 10 −10 . The application of the prepared nanocomposite to the analysis of real sample was also investigated

  5. Sensitive and selective electrochemical detection of chromium(VI) based on gold nanoparticle-decorated titania nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wei; Wu, Guosheng; Chen, Aicheng

    2014-01-07

    Owing to the severe toxicity and mobility of Cr(VI) in biological and environmental systems, it is of great importance to develop convenient and reliable methods for its detection. Here we report on a facile and effective electrochemical technique for monitoring Cr(VI) concentrations based on the utilization of Au nanoparticle-decorated titania nanotubes (TiO2NTs) grown on a titanium substrate. It was found that the electrochemical reduction of Cr(VI) at the Ti/TiO2NT/Au electrode exhibited an almost 23 fold improvement in activity as compared to a polycrystalline gold electrode, due to its nanoparticle/nanotubular heterojunction infrastructure. As a result, the Ti/TiO2NT/Au electrode demonstrated a wide linear concentration range from 0.10 μM to 105 μM, a low detection limit of 0.03 μM, and a high sensitivity of 6.91 μA μM(-1) Cr(VI) via amperometry, satisfying the detection requirements of the World Health Organization (WHO). Moreover, the Ti/TiO2NT/Au electrode exhibited good resistance against interference from coexisting Cr(III) and other metal ions, and excellent recovery for Cr(VI) detection in both tap and lake water samples. These attributes suggest that this hybrid sensor has strong potential in applications for the selective detection of Cr(VI).

  6. A sensitive DNA biosensor fabricated from gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and zinc oxide nanowires on a glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Li Shuping; Zhang Yuzhong

    2010-01-01

    We outline here the fabrication of a sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of sequence-specific target DNA. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnONWs) were first immobilized on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl groups were then dropped onto the surface of the ZnONWs. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were subsequently introduced to the surface of the MWNTs/ZnONWs by electrochemical deposition. A single-stranded DNA probe with a thiol group at the end (HS-ssDNA) was covalently immobilized on the surface of the AuNPs by forming an Au-S bond. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to investigate the film assembly process. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to monitor DNA hybridization by measuring the electrochemical signals of [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ bounding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The incorporation of ZnONWs and MWCNTs in this sensor design significantly enhances the sensitivity and the selectivity. This DNA biosensor can detect the target DNA quantitatively in the range of 1.0 x 10 -13 to 1.0 x 10 -7 M, with a detection limit of 3.5 x 10 -14 M (S/N = 3). In addition, the DNA biosensor exhibits excellent selectivity, even for single-mismatched DNA detection.

  7. Construction of an Electrochemical Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotubes/Gold Nanoparticles for Trace Determination of Amoxicillin in Bovine Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated for determination of amoxicillin in bovine milk samples by decoration of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs using ethylenediamine (en as a cross linker (AuNPs/en-MWCNTs. The constructed nanocomposite was homogenized in dimethylformamide and drop casted on screen printed electrode. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, energy dispersive X-Ray (EDX, X-Ray diffraction (XRD and cyclic voltammetry were used to characterize the synthesized nanocomposites. The results show that the synthesized nanocomposites induced a remarkable synergetic effect for the oxidation of amoxicillin. Effect of some parameters, including pH, buffer, scan rate, accumulation potential, accumulation time and amount of casted nanocomposites, on the sensitivity of fabricated sensor were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, there was two linear calibration ranges from 0.2–10 µM and 10–30 µM with equations of Ipa (µA = 2.88C (µM + 1.2017; r = 0.9939 and Ipa (µA = 0.88C (µM + 22.97; r = 0.9973, respectively. The limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantitation (LOQ were calculated as 0.015 µM and 0.149 µM, respectively. The fabricated electrochemical sensor was successfully applied for determination of Amoxicillin in bovine milk samples and all results compared with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC standard method.

  8. Construction of an Electrochemical Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotubes/Gold Nanoparticles for Trace Determination of Amoxicillin in Bovine Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Aliyu; Yusof, Nor Azah; Hajian, Reza; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2016-01-20

    In this work, a novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated for determination of amoxicillin in bovine milk samples by decoration of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using ethylenediamine (en) as a cross linker (AuNPs/en-MWCNTs). The constructed nanocomposite was homogenized in dimethylformamide and drop casted on screen printed electrode. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-Ray (EDX), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and cyclic voltammetry were used to characterize the synthesized nanocomposites. The results show that the synthesized nanocomposites induced a remarkable synergetic effect for the oxidation of amoxicillin. Effect of some parameters, including pH, buffer, scan rate, accumulation potential, accumulation time and amount of casted nanocomposites, on the sensitivity of fabricated sensor were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, there was two linear calibration ranges from 0.2-10 µM and 10-30 µM with equations of Ipa (µA) = 2.88C (µM) + 1.2017; r = 0.9939 and Ipa (µA) = 0.88C (µM) + 22.97; r = 0.9973, respectively. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were calculated as 0.015 µM and 0.149 µM, respectively. The fabricated electrochemical sensor was successfully applied for determination of Amoxicillin in bovine milk samples and all results compared with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) standard method.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of gold nanotube/nanowire-polyurethane composite based on castor oil and polyethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Yasaman; Kasra, Mehran; Salahshour Kordestani, Soheila; Bagheri Hariri, Mohiedin

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanotubes/nanowires (GNT/NW) were synthesized by using the template-assisted electrodeposition technique and mixed with castor oil-polyethylene glycol based polyurethane (PU) to fabricate porous composite scaffolds for biomedical application. 100 and 50 ppm of GNT/NW were used to synthesize composites. The composite scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. Cell attachment on polyurethane-GNT/NW composites was investigated using fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Addition of 50 or 100 ppm GNT/NW had significant effects on thermal, mechanical, and cell attachment of polyurethane. Higher crosslink density and better cell attachment and proliferation were observed in polyurethane containing 50 ppm GNT/NW. The results revealed that GNT/NW formed hydrogen bonding with the polyurethane matrix and improved the thermomechanical properties of nanocomposites. Compared with pure PU, better cellular attachment on polyurethane-GNT/NW composites was observed resulting from the improved surface properties of composites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Bahiraei, Atousa; Madrakian, Tayyebeh

    2016-02-01

    A simple and highly sensitive sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium based on gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode is reported. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry was used to characterize the nanostructure and performance of the sensor and the results were compared with those obtained at the multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode and bare glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions diclofenac sodium gave linear response over the range of 0.03-200μmolL(-1). The lower detection limits were found to be 0.02μmolL(-1). The effect of common interferences on the current response of DS was investigated. The practical application of the modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of diclofenac sodium in urine and pharmaceutical samples. This revealed that the gold nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode shows excellent analytical performance for the determination of diclofenac sodium in terms of a very low detection limit, high sensitivity, very good accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Modified carbon nanotubes as a sorbent for solid-phase extraction of gold, and its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam, Firouzeh Hassani; Behzadi, Mansoureh; Naghizadeh, Matin; Taher, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and accurate method was developed for solid-phase extraction and preconcentration of trace levels of gold in various samples. It is based on the adsorption of gold on modified oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes prior to its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The type and volume of eluent solution, sample pH value, flow rates of sample and eluent, sorption capacity and breakthrough volume were optimized. Under these conditions, the method showed linearity in the range of 0.2–6.0 ng L −1 with coefficients of determination of >0.99 in the sample. The relative standard deviation for seven replicate determinations of gold (at a level of 0.6 ng L −1 ) is ±3.8 %, the detection limit is 31 pg L −1 (in the initial solution and at an S/N ratio of 3; for n = 8), and the enrichment factor is 200. The sorption capacity of the modified MWCNTs for gold(III) is 4.15 mg g −1 . The procedure was successfully applied to the determination of gold in (spiked) water samples, human hair, human urine and standard reference material with recoveries ranging from 97.0 to 104.2 %. (author)

  12. Transient heat conduction through a substrate of brine-spongy ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, S. R.; Naterer, G. F.; Muzychka, Y. S.

    2017-08-01

    An analytical model for heat conduction through brine-spongy ice is developed. This model fills a gap in knowledge related to transient heat conduction to a two-phase substrate which is crucial for modeling transient icing and deicing of cold surfaces in contact with salt water. The core of the model is based on the phase change of pure ice and brine pockets trapped in the structure of spongy ice. Freezing of brine pockets causes the release of the latent heat of fusion that is considered as the source of heat generation distributed throughout the brine-spongy ice. A nonlinear partial differential equation and a number of equations of state for ice, brine, and brine-spongy ice create governing equations of heat transfer through brine-spongy ice. A standard numerical scheme solves the set of equations in various initial conditions. The variation of temperature, volume fraction of brine and salinity of brine pockets are calculated numerically. Experimental samples of brine-spongy ice are examined under transient conditions and their surface temperatures are captured using an infrared thermal camera. The numerical results, which are for various overall salinities, are closely aligned with the measured surface temperatures.

  13. Simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid and tryptophan with Azure A-interlinked multi-walled carbon nanotube/gold nanoparticles composite modified electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayati Filik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotube/Azure A/gold nanoparticle composites (Nafion/AuNPs/AzA/MWCNTs were prepared by binding gold nanoparticles to the surfaces of Azure A-coated carbon nanotubes. Nafion/AuNPs/AzA/MWCNTs based electrochemical sensor was fabricated for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid, and tryptophan. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize the electrochemical properties of the modified electrodes. The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid, and tryptophan (pH 7.0. The experiment results showed that the linear response range for simultaneous detection of AA, DA, UA and Trp were 300–10,000 μM, 0.5–50 μM, 0.5–50 μM and 1.0–100 μM, respectively, and the detection limits were 16 μM, 0.014 μM, 0.028 μM and 0.56 μM (S/N = 3. The proposed method offers promise for simple, rapid, selective and cost-effective analysis of small biomolecules. The procedure was also applied to the determination of tryptophan in spiked milk samples.

  14. Effect of gold nanoparticle attached multi-walled carbon nanotube-layered indium tin oxide in monitoring the effect of paracetamol on the release of epinephrine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Rajendra N., E-mail: rngcyfcy@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Rana, Anoop Raj Singh [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Aziz, Md. Abdul; Oyama, Munetaka [Department of Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

    2011-05-05

    A gold nanoparticle attached multi-walled carbon nanotube-layered indium tin oxide (AuNP/MWNT/ITO) electrode has been used for monitoring the effect of paracetamol (PAR) on the release of epinephrine (EPI) in human urine. The modified electrode shows an excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of EPI and PAR with acceleration of electron transfer rate as compared to MWNT/ITO and AuNP/ITO. An apparent shift of the oxidative potential towards less positive potential with a marked increase in peak currents is observed in square wave voltammetry at AuNP/MWNT/ITO electrode. The calibration curves for the simultaneous determination of PAR and EPI showed an excellent linear response, ranging from 5.0 x 10{sup -9} mol L{sup -1} to 80.0 x 10{sup -9} mol L{sup -1} for both the compounds. The detection limits for the simultaneous determination of PAR and EPI were found to be 46 x 10{sup -10} mol L{sup -1} and 42 x 10{sup -10} mol L{sup -1} respectively. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and EPI in human urine. It is observed that gold nanoparticles attached with multi-wall carbon nanotube catalyze the oxidation of EPI and PAR.

  15. Electrochemical detection of Hg(II in water using self-assembled single walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-amino benzene sulfonic acid on gold electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauta Gold Matlou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work reports on the detection of mercury using single walled carbon nanotube-poly (m-amino benzene sulfonic acid (SWCNT-PABS modified gold electrode by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs technique. A thiol containing moiety (dimethyl amino ethane thiol (DMAET was used to facilitate the assembly of the SWCNT-PABS molecules onto the Au electrode surface. The successfully assembled monolayers were characterised using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Cyclic voltammetric and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic studies of the modified electrode (Au-DMAET-(SWCNT-PABS showed improved electron transfer over the bare Au electrode and the Au-DMAET in [Fe (CN6]3−/4− solution. The Au-DMAET-(SWCNT-PABS was used for the detection of Hg in water by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV analysis at the following optimized conditions: deposition potential of −0.1 V, deposition time of 30 s, 0.1 M HCl electrolyte and pH 3. The sensor showed a good sensitivity and a limit of detection of 0.06 μM with a linear concentration range of 20 ppb to 250 ppb under the optimum conditions. The analytical applicability of the proposed method with the sensor electrode was tested with real water sample and the method was validated with inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectroscopy. Keywords: Self-assembly, Gold electrode, Carbon nanotubes, Electrochemical detection, Mercury

  16. Spectral tuning of Amazon parrot feather coloration by psittacofulvin pigments and spongy structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinbergen, Jan; Wilts, Bodo D; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2013-12-01

    The feathers of Amazon parrots are brightly coloured. They contain a unique class of pigments, the psittacofulvins, deposited in both barbs and barbules, causing yellow or red coloured feathers. In specific feather areas, spongy nanostructured barb cells exist, reflecting either in the blue or blue-green wavelength range. The blue-green spongy structures are partly enveloped by a blue-absorbing, yellow-colouring pigment acting as a spectral filter, thus yielding a green coloured barb. Applying reflection and transmission spectroscopy, we characterized the Amazons' pigments and spongy structures, and investigated how they contribute to the feather coloration. The reflectance spectra of Amazon feathers are presumably tuned to the sensitivity spectra of the visual photoreceptors.

  17. A sensitive electrochemical sensor for paracetamole based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and dopamine nanospheres functionalized with gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xue; Wang, Ling-Ling; Wang, Ya-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2014-01-01

    We describe an electrochemical sensor for paracetamole that is based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and dopamine nanospheres functionalized with gold nanoparticles. The functionalized nanospheres were prepared by a chemical route and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The well-dispersed gold nanoparticles were anchored on the dopamine nanosphere via a chemical reduction of the gold precursor. The stepwise fabrication of the modified electrode and its electrochemical response to paracetamole were evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The modified electrode displayed improved electrocatalytic activity towards paracetamole, a lower oxidation potential (371 mV), and a larger peak current when compared to a bare electrode or other modified electrodes. The kinetic parameters governing the electro-oxidation of paracetamole were studied, and the analytical conditions were optimized. The peak current was linearly related to the concentration of paracetamole in 0.8–400 μM range, and the detection limit was 50 nM (at an SNR of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of paracetamole in spiked human urine samples and gave recoveries between 95.3 and 105.2 %. (author)

  18. An electrochemical ELISA-like immunosensor for miRNAs detection based on screen-printed gold electrodes modified with reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H V; Piro, B; Reisberg, S; Huy Nguyen, L; Dung Nguyen, T; Duc, H T; Pham, M C

    2014-12-15

    We design an electrochemical immunosensor for miRNA detection, based on screen-printed gold electrodes modified with reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes. An original immunological approach is followed, using antibodies directed to DNA.RNA hybrids. An electrochemical ELISA-like amplification strategy was set up using a secondary antibody conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Hydroquinone is oxidized into benzoquinone by the HRP/H2O2 catalytic system. In turn, benzoquinone is electroreduced into hydroquinone at the electrode. The catalytic reduction current is related to HRP amount immobilized on the surface, which itself is related to miRNA.DNA surface density on the electrode. This architecture, compared to classical optical detection, lowers the detection limit down to 10 fM. Two miRNAs were studied: miR-141 (a prostate biomarker) and miR-29b-1 (a lung cancer biomarker). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectral tuning of Amazon parrot feather coloration by psittacofulvin pigments and spongy structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinbergen, Jan; Wilts, Bodo D.; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2013-01-01

    The feathers of Amazon parrots are brightly coloured. They contain a unique class of pigments, the psittacofulvins, deposited in both barbs and barbules, causing yellow or red coloured feathers. In specific feather areas, spongy nanostructured barb cells exist, reflecting either in the blue or

  20. The inhibition of the spongy electrocrystallization of zinc from doped flowing alkaline zincate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yue-hua; Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Li; Yan, Xu; Yang, Yu-sheng

    The effects of the presence of additives like lead and tungstate ions in flowing alkaline zincate solutions on suppressing spongy zinc electrogrowth are examined. The results show that the two additives with optimal concentrations in flowing electrolytes can suppress spongy zinc initiation and propagation. And, the two additives can bring about more uniform and compact deposits and, thereby, reduce spongy zinc growth. The influence of lead and tungstate ions on the zinc deposition/dissolution is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. It also shows that the addition of the two additives is largely a blocking action, and the co-deposition of lead and zinc ions may occur. The performance of the zinc-air flow battery with zinc regeneration electrolysis is determined. It shows that by the addition of 0.6 M Na 2WO 4 or 10 -4 M to 10 -3 M lead, compact or mixed compact-spongy zinc deposits are created and the favorable charge/discharge performance of the battery is achieved with an energy efficiency of approximately 60%.

  1. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    nanotubes are likely to be useful as nanochips since they exhibit diode properties at the junction. By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal oxides and GaN have been obtained. Both the oxide and GaN nanowires are single crystalline. Gold nanowires exhibit plasmon bands varying markedly with.

  2. A novel amperometric immunosensor based on layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles-multi-walled carbon nanotubes-thionine multilayer films on polyelectrolyte surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou Chaofeng [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yuan Ruo [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)], E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn; Chai Yaqin; Tang Mingyu; Chai Rong; He Xiulan [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2007-11-12

    A highly sensitive and label-free amperometric immunosensor has been developed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes-thionine (MWNTs-THI) and chitosan (CHIT) on 3-mercaptopropanesulfonic, sodium salt (MPS)-modified gold electrode surface by electrostatic adsorption. The stepwise LBL assembly process of electroactive species on electrode surface was characterized by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) in PBS. The factors influencing the performance of the resulting immunosensor were studied in detail. The morphologies of MWNTs, MWNTs-THI and GNPs-MWNTs-THI-CHIT were further characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The immunosensor was highly sensitive to CEA with a detection limit of 0.01 ng mL{sup -1} (signal/noise ratio of 3) and the linear range with two concentration intermittences was from 0.5 to 15.0 ng mL{sup -1} and from 15.0 to 200.0 ng mL{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, the prepared immunosensor could be regenerated 10 times with 5 M urea solution. When the immunosensor was stored at 4 deg. C and measured intermittently (every 4-6 days), no apparent change was found over 3 months. The immunosensor system showed an excellent reproducibility and stability.

  3. Immobilized organoruthenium(II) complexes onto polyethyleneimine-wrapped carbon nanotubes/in situ formed gold nanoparticles as a novel electrochemical sensing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadbakht, Azadeh, E-mail: Azadbakht.a@gmail.com; Abbasi, Amir Reza; Derikvand, Zohreh; Amraei, Shiba

    2015-03-01

    The polyethyleneimine (PEI) wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with a carboxylic acid group (CNTs–COOH) gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-modified gold (Au) electrode has been utilized as a platform to immobilize organoruthenium(II) complexes (ORC). The surface structure and composition of the sensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrocatalytic reduction of iodate and nitrite on the surface of modified electrode was investigated with cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and hydrodynamic voltammetry methods. The cyclic voltammetric results indicated the ability of AuNPs/PEI/CNT–COOH/ORC modified Au electrode to catalyze the reduction of this compound. AuNPs/PEI/CNTs–COOH nanocomposite combined the advantages of PEI-well dispersed CNTs–COOH and in situ formed AuNPs. - Highlights: • We prepared composite containing polyethyleneimine (PEI), CNTs and AuNPs. • AuNPs were in situ formed on the surface of CNTs–PEI. • When the AuNPs were in situ formed the stability would be improved. • Nanocomposite combined the advantages of PEI–CNTs and in situ formed AuNPs. • Modified nanocomposite Au electrode catalyzes the reduction of iodate and nitrite.

  4. Investigation of composition and structure of spongy and hard bone tissue using FTIR spectroscopy, XRD and SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Akhras, M.-Ali H.; Hasan Qaseer, M. K.; Albiss, B. A.; Alebrhim, M. Anwar; Gezawa, Umar S.

    2018-02-01

    Valuable structural and chemical features can be obtained for spongy and hard bone by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A better understanding of chemical and structural differences between spongy and hard bone is a very important contributor to bone quality. Our data according to IR data showed that the collagen cross-links occurred to be higher in spongy bone, and crystallinity was lower in spongy bone. Deconvolution of the infrared band near 870 cm-1 reveals evidence for A2-type carbonate substitution on hydroxyapatite of spongy bone in addition to the A and B type carbonate substitution that are also found in hard bone. IR and XRD data confirmed the results of each other since full width at half maximum of 002-apatite pattern of XRD showed that the crystallinity was lower in spongy bone. The microstructure was examined by using scanning electron microscope and the result showed that the lattice of thin threads in spongy bone and is less dense than hard bone.

  5. Gold nanoparticles/water-soluble carbon nanotubes/aromatic diamine polymer composite films for highly sensitive detection of cellobiose dehydrogenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Guangming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li Zhen, E-mail: happylizhen@yeah.ne [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Tang Lin; Wu Mengshi; Lei Xiaoxia; Liu Yuanyuan; Liu Can; Pang Ya; Zhang Yi [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-05-01

    Highlights: > Gold nanoparticles/multiwalled carbon nanotubes/poly (1,5-naphthalenediamine) modified electrode was fabricated. > The sensor was applied for the detection of cellobiose dehydrogenase genes. > An effective method to distribute MWCNTs and attach to the electrode was proposed. > The composite films greatly improved the sensitivity and enhanced the DNA immobilization. > The DNA biosensor exhibited fairly high sensitivity and quite low detection limit. - Abstract: An electrochemical sensor based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/poly (1,5-naphthalenediamine) films modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was fabricated. The effectiveness of the sensor was confirmed by sensitive detection of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) gene which was extracted from Phanerochaete chrysosporium using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The monomer of 1,5-naphthalenediamine was electropolymerized on the GCE surface with abundant free amino groups which enhanced the stability of MWCNTs modified electrode. Congo red (CR)-functionalized MWCNTs possess excellent conductivity as well as high solubility in water which enabled to form the uniform and stable network nanostructures easily and created a large number of binding sites for electrodeposition of GNPs. The continuous GNPs together with MWCNTs greatly increased the surface area, conductivity and electrocatalytic activity. This electrode structure significantly improved the sensitivity of sensor and enhanced the DNA immobilization and hybridization. The thiol modified capture probes were immobilized onto the composite films-modified GCE by a direct formation of thiol-Au bond and horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin (HRP-SA) conjugates were labeled to the biotinylated detection probes through biotin-streptavidin bond. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to investigate the film assembly and DNA hybridization processes

  6. Two-dimensional Fourier analysis of the spongy medullary keratin of structurally coloured feather barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, R. O.; Torres, R.; Williamson, S.; Dyck, J.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted two-dimensional (2D) discrete Fourier analyses of the spatial variation in refractive index of the spongy medullary keratin from four different colours of structurally coloured feather barbs from three species of bird: the rose-faced lovebird, Agapornis roseicollis (Psittacidae), the budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulatus (Psittacidae), and the Gouldian finch, Poephila guttata (Estrildidae). These results indicate that the spongy medullary keratin is a nanostructured tissue that functions as an array of coherent scatterers. The nanostructure of the medullary keratin is nearly uniform in all directions. The largest Fourier components of spatial variation in refractive index in the tissue are of the appropriate size to produce the observed colours by constructive interference alone. The peaks of the predicted reflectance spectra calculated from the 2D Fourier power spectra are congruent with the reflectance spectra measured by using microspectrophotometry. The alternative physical models for the production of these colours, the Rayleigh and Mie theories, hypothesize that medullary keratin is an incoherent array and that scattered waves are independent in phase. This assumption is falsified by the ring-like Fourier power spectra of these feathers, and the spacing of the scattering air vacuoles in the medullary keratin. Structural colours of avian feather barbs are produced by constructive interference of coherently scattered light waves from the optically heterogeneous matrix of keratin and air in the spongy medullary layer.

  7. A DNA biosensor based on gold nanoparticle decorated on carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for gender determination of Arowana fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedfar, Kasra; Heng, Lee Yook; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2017-12-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified to design a new DNA biosensor. Functionalized MWCNTs were equipped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) (~15nm) (GNP-MWCNTCOOH) to construct DNA biosensors based on carbon-paste screen-printed (SPE) electrodes. GNP attachment onto functionalized MWCNTs was carried out by microwave irradiation and was confirmed by spectroscopic studies and surface analysis. DNA biosensors based on differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were constructed by immobilizing thiolated single-stranded DNA probes onto GNP-MWCNTCOOH. Ruthenium (III) chloride hexaammoniate [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ,2Cl - ] (RuHex) was used as hybridization redox indicator. RuHex and MWCNT interaction was low in compared to other organic redox hybridization indicators. The linear response range for DNA determination was 1×10 -21 to 1×10 -9 M with a lower detection limit of 1.55×10 -21 M. Thus, the attachment of GNPs onto functionalized MWCNTs yielded sensitive DNA biosensor with low detection limit and stability more than 30days. Constructed electrode was used to determine gender of arowana fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimization of modified carbon paste electrode with multiwalled carbon nanotube/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like gold nanostructures for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraz, Ahmadreza; Rafati, Amir Abbas; Najafi, Mojgan

    2014-11-01

    We describe the modification of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an ionic liquid (IL). Electrochemical studies by using a D-optimal mixture design in Design-Expert software revealed an optimized composition of 60% graphite, 14.2% paraffin, 10.8% MWCNT and 15% IL. The optimal modified CPE shows good electrochemical properties that are well matched with model prediction parameters. In the next step, the optimized CPE was modified with gold nanostructures by applying a double-pulse electrochemical technique. The resulting electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It gives three sharp and well-separated oxidation peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The sensor enables simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA with linear responses from 0.3 to 285, 0.08 to 200, and 0.1 to 450 μM, respectively, and with 120, 30 and 30 nM detection limits (at an S/N of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of AA, DA, and UA in spiked samples of human serum and urine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembling Gold Nanorods and Glucose Oxidase onto Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized Sol-Gel Matrix for an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyan Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of gold nanorods (AuNRs and glucose oxidase (GOD onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-functionalized three-dimensional sol-gel matrix. A thiolated aqueous silica sol containing SWCNTs was first assembled on the surface of a cleaned Au electrode, and then the alternate self-assembly of AuNRs and GOD were repeated to assemble multilayer films of AuNRs-GOD onto SWCNTs-functionalized silica gel for optimizing the biosensor. Among the resulting glucose biosensors, the four layers of AuNRs-GOD-modified electrode showed the best performance. The sol-SWCNTs-(AuNRs- GOD4/Au biosensor exhibited a good linear range of 0.01–8 mM glucose, high sensitivity of 1.08 μA/mM, and fast amperometric response within 4 s. The good performance of the proposed glucose biosensor could be mainly attributed to the advantages of the three-dimensional sol-gel matrix and stereo self-assembly films, and the natural features of one-dimensional nanostructure SWCNTs and AuNRs. This study may provide a new facile way to fabricate the enzyme-based biosensor with high performance.

  10. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembling Gold Nanorods and Glucose Oxidase onto Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized Sol-Gel Matrix for an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoyan; Hou, Shihua; Miao, Zhiying; Zhang, Cong; Ji, Yanhong

    2015-09-18

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of gold nanorods (AuNRs) and glucose oxidase (GOD) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-functionalized three-dimensional sol-gel matrix. A thiolated aqueous silica sol containing SWCNTs was first assembled on the surface of a cleaned Au electrode, and then the alternate self-assembly of AuNRs and GOD were repeated to assemble multilayer films of AuNRs-GOD onto SWCNTs-functionalized silica gel for optimizing the biosensor. Among the resulting glucose biosensors, the four layers of AuNRs-GOD-modified electrode showed the best performance. The sol-SWCNTs-(AuNRs- GOD)₄/Au biosensor exhibited a good linear range of 0.01-8 mM glucose, high sensitivity of 1.08 μA/mM, and fast amperometric response within 4 s. The good performance of the proposed glucose biosensor could be mainly attributed to the advantages of the three-dimensional sol-gel matrix and stereo self-assembly films, and the natural features of one-dimensional nanostructure SWCNTs and AuNRs. This study may provide a new facile way to fabricate the enzyme-based biosensor with high performance.

  11. Multiplexed determination of human growth hormone and prolactin at a label free electrochemical immunosensor using dual carbon nanotube-screen printed electrodes modified with gold and PEDOT nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafín, V; Martínez-García, G; Agüí, L; Yáñez-Sedeño, P; Pingarrón, J M

    2014-09-21

    A label-free dual electrochemical immunosensor was constructed for the multiplexed determination of human growth (hGH) and prolactin (PRL) hormones. The immunosensor used an electrochemical platform composed of carbon nanotube-screen printed carbon electrodes (CNT/SPCEs) modified with poly(ethylene-dioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and gold nanoparticles, on which the corresponding hGH and PRL antibodies were immobilized. The affinity reactions were monitored by measuring the decrease in the differential pulse voltammetric oxidation response of the redox probe dopamine. The experimental variables involved in the preparation of both AuNP/PEDOT/CNT/SPC modified electrodes and the dual immunosensor were optimized. The immunosensor exhibited an improved analytical performance for hGH and PRL with respect to other electrochemical immunosensor designs, showing wide ranges of linearity and low detection limits of 4.4 and 0.22 pg mL(-1), respectively. An excellent selectivity against other hormones and in the presence of ascorbic and uric acids was found. The usefulness of the dual immunosensor for the simultaneous analysis of hGH and PRL was demonstrated by analyzing human serum and saliva samples spiked with the hormones at different concentration levels.

  12. Label-free impedimetric aptasensor for detection of femtomole level acetamiprid using gold nanoparticles decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanoribbon composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Airong; Liu, Qian; Huan, Juan; Qian, Jing; Dong, Xiaoya; Qiu, Baijing; Mao, Hanping; Wang, Kun

    2015-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanoribbon (Au/MWCNT-rGONR) composites were synthesized by a one-pot reaction. By employing the resulting Au/MWCNT-rGONR composites as the support for aptamer immobilization, we developed an ultrasensitive label-free electrochemical impedimetric aptasensor for acetamiprid detection, which was based on that the variation of electron transfer resistance was relevant to the formation of acetamiprid-aptamer complex at the modified electrode surface. Compared with pure Au NPs and MWCNT-rGONR, the Au/MWCNT-rGONR composites modified electrode was the most sensitive aptasensing platform for the determination of acetamiprid. The proposed aptasensor displayed a linear response for acetamiprid in the range from 5×10(-14) M to 1×10(-5) M with an extremely low detection limit of 1.7×10(-14) M (S/N=3). In addition, this impedimetric aptasensor possessed great advantages including the simple operation process, low-cost, selectivity and sensitivity, which provided a promising model for the aptamer-based detection with a direct impedimetric method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A very low potential electrochemical detection of L-cysteine based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes/gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Francisco de Assis dos Santos; da Silva, Monique Gabriella Angelo; Lima, Phabyanno Rodrigues; Meneghetti, Mario Roberto; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Goulart, Marilia Oliveira Fonseca

    2013-12-15

    A nanohybrid platform built with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods, prepared via a cationic surfactant-containing seed-mediated sequential growth process, in aqueous solution, on a glassy carbon substrate has been successfully developed to be used in the electrocatalytic oxidation of L-cysteine (Cys). The nanohybrid was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements. Cyclic voltammetry results had shown that the modified electrode allows the oxidation of Cys at a very low anodic potential (0.00 V vs. Ag/AgCl). The kinetic constant kcat for the catalytic oxidation of Cys was evaluated by chronoamperometry and provided a value of 5.6×10(4) L mol(-1) s(-1). The sensor presents a linear response range from 5.0 up to 200.0 µmol L(-1), detection limit of 8.25 nmol L(-1) and a sensitivity of 120 nA L µmol(-1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Simple flow injection for determination of sulfite by amperometric detection using glassy carbon electrode modified with carbon nanotubes-PDDA-gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Sroysee, Wongduan; Chairam, Sanoe; Nacapricha, Duangjai

    2015-02-01

    A new approach is presented for sensitive and selective measurement of sulfite (SO3(2-)) in beverages based on a simple flow injection system with amperometric detection. In this work, the sulfite sensor was a glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes-poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)-gold nanoparticles composites (CNTs-PDDA-AuNPs/GC). Electrochemical oxidation of sulfite with this electrode was first studied in 0.1M phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) using cyclic voltammetry. The results indicated that the CNTs-PDDA-AuNPs/GC electrode possesses electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of sulfite with high sensitivity and selectivity. Sulfite was quantified using amperometric measurement with the new sensor at +0.4V vs Ag/AgCl in conjunction with flow injection. The linear working range for the quantitation of sulfite was 2-200 mg L(-1) (r(2)=0.998) with a detection limit of 0.03 mg L(-1) (3σ of blank) and an estimated precision of 1.5%.The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of sulfite in fruit juices and wines with a sample throughput of 23 samples per hour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Gold Nanoparticles on Polymer-Wrapped Carbon Nanotubes: An Efficient and Selective Catalyst for the Electroreduction of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhong, Huei-Ru Molly; Tornow, Claire E; Kim, Chaerin; Verma, Sumit; Oberst, Justin L; Anderson, Paul S; Gewirth, Andrew A; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi; Kenis, Paul J A

    2017-11-17

    Multiple approaches will be needed to reduce the atmospheric CO 2 levels, which have been linked to the undesirable effects of global climate change. The electroreduction of CO 2 driven by renewable energy is one approach to reduce CO 2 emissions while producing chemical building blocks, but current electrocatalysts exhibit low activity and selectivity. Here, we report the structural and electrochemical characterization of a promising catalyst for the electroreduction of CO 2 to CO: Au nanoparticles supported on polymer-wrapped multiwall carbon nanotubes. This catalyst exhibits high selectivity for CO over H 2 : 80-92 % CO, as well as high activity: partial current density for CO as high as 160 mA cm -2 . The observed high activity, originating from a high electrochemically active surface area (23 m 2  g -1 Au), in combination with the low loading (0.17 mg cm -2 ) of the highly dispersed Au nanoparticles underscores the promise of this catalyst for efficient electroreduction of CO 2 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Current-transport studies and trap extraction of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanotubes using gold Schottky diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, G.; Hussain, I.; Zaman, S.; Bano, N.; Nur, O.; Willander, M. [Department of Science and Technology, Campus Norrkoeping, Linkoeping University, 60174 Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-03-15

    High-quality zinc oxide (ZnO) nanotubes (NTs) were grown by the hydrothermal technique on n-Si substrate. The room temperature (RT) current-transport mechanisms of Au Schottky diodes fabricated from ZnO NTs and nanorods (NRs) reference samples have been studied and compared. The tunneling mechanisms via deep-level states was found to be the main conduction process at low applied voltage but at the trap-filled limit voltage (V{sub TFL}) all traps were filled and the space-charge-limited current conduction was the dominating current-transport mechanism. The deep-level trap energy and the trap concentration for the NTs were obtained as {proportional_to}0.27 eV and 2.1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The same parameters were also extracted for the ZnO NRs. The deep-level states observed crossponds to zinc interstitials (Zn{sub i}), which are responsible for the violet emission. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Electrochemical Deposition of Platinum and Palladium on Gold Nanoparticles Loaded Carbon Nanotube Support for Oxidation Reactions in Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surin Saipanya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pt and Pd sequentially electrodeposited Au nanoparticles loaded carbon nanotube (Au-CNT was prepared for the electrocatalytic study of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid oxidations. All electrochemical measurements were carried out in a three-electrode cell. A platinum wire and Ag/AgCl were used as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. Suspension of the Au-CNT, phosphate buffer, isopropanol, and Nafion was mixed and dropped on glassy carbon as a working electrode. By sequential deposition method, PdPtPt/Au-CNT, PtPdPd/Au-CNT, and PtPdPt/Au-CNT catalysts were prepared. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs of those catalysts in 1 M H2SO4 solution showed hydrogen adsorption and hydrogen desorption reactions. CV responses for those three catalysts in methanol, ethanol, and formic acid electrooxidations studied in 2 M CH3OH, CH3CH2OH, and HCOOH in 1 M H2SO4 show characteristic oxidation peaks. The oxidation peaks at anodic scan contribute to those organic substance oxidations while the peaks at cathodic scan are related with the reoxidation of the adsorbed carbonaceous species. Comparing all those three catalysts, it can be found that the PdPtPt/Au-CNT catalyst is good at methanol oxidation; the PtPdPt/Au-CNT effectively enhances ethanol oxidation while the PtPdPd/Au-CNT exceptionally catalyzes formic acid oxidation. Therefore, a different stoichiometry affects the electrochemical active surface area of the catalysts to achieve the catalytic oxidation reactions.

  18. Optimization of modified carbon paste electrode with multiwalled carbon nanotube/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like gold nanostructures for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afraz, Ahmadreza [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, P.O. Box 65174, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafati, Amir Abbas, E-mail: aa_rafati@basu.ac.ir [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, P.O. Box 65174, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi, Mojgan [Department of Materials Engineering, Hamedan University of Technology (HUT), 65169 Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    We describe the modification of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an ionic liquid (IL). Electrochemical studies by using a D-optimal mixture design in Design-Expert software revealed an optimized composition of 60% graphite, 14.2% paraffin, 10.8% MWCNT and 15% IL. The optimal modified CPE shows good electrochemical properties that are well matched with model prediction parameters. In the next step, the optimized CPE was modified with gold nanostructures by applying a double-pulse electrochemical technique. The resulting electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It gives three sharp and well-separated oxidation peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The sensor enables simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA with linear responses from 0.3 to 285, 0.08 to 200, and 0.1 to 450 μM, respectively, and with 120, 30 and 30 nM detection limits (at an S/N of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of AA, DA, and UA in spiked samples of human serum and urine. - Highlights: • New method for simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA was developed. • MWCNT/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like Au nanostructure was used for CPE modification. • Optimization of electrode composition was done by Design-Expert software. • The pH effect, peak separation mechanism and real samples was thoroughly studied.

  19. Optimization of modified carbon paste electrode with multiwalled carbon nanotube/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like gold nanostructures for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afraz, Ahmadreza; Rafati, Amir Abbas; Najafi, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    We describe the modification of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an ionic liquid (IL). Electrochemical studies by using a D-optimal mixture design in Design-Expert software revealed an optimized composition of 60% graphite, 14.2% paraffin, 10.8% MWCNT and 15% IL. The optimal modified CPE shows good electrochemical properties that are well matched with model prediction parameters. In the next step, the optimized CPE was modified with gold nanostructures by applying a double-pulse electrochemical technique. The resulting electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It gives three sharp and well-separated oxidation peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The sensor enables simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA with linear responses from 0.3 to 285, 0.08 to 200, and 0.1 to 450 μM, respectively, and with 120, 30 and 30 nM detection limits (at an S/N of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of AA, DA, and UA in spiked samples of human serum and urine. - Highlights: • New method for simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA was developed. • MWCNT/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like Au nanostructure was used for CPE modification. • Optimization of electrode composition was done by Design-Expert software. • The pH effect, peak separation mechanism and real samples was thoroughly studied

  20. On-chip highly sensitive saliva glucose sensing using multilayer films composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles, and glucose oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is very important for human health to rapidly and accurately detect glucose levels in biological environments, especially for diabetes mellitus. We proposed a simple, highly sensitive, accurate, convenient, low-cost, and disposable glucose biosensor on a single chip. A working (sensor electrode, a counter electrode, and a reference electrode are integrated on a single chip through micro-fabrication. The working electrode is functionalized through a layer-by-layer (LBL assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and multilayer films composed of chitosan (CS, gold nanoparticles (GNp, and glucose oxidase (GOx to obtain high sensitivity and accuracy. The glucose sensor has following features: (1 direct electron transfer between GOx and the electrode surface; (2 on-a-chip; (3 glucose detection down to 0.1 mg/dL (5.6 μM; (4 good sensing linearity over 0.017–0.81 mM; (5 high sensitivity (61.4 μA/mM-cm2 with a small reactive area (8 mm2; (6 fast response; (7 high reproducibility and repeatability; (8 reliable and accurate saliva glucose detection. Thus, this disposable biosensor will be an alternative for real time tracking of glucose levels from body fluids, e.g. saliva, in a noninvasive, pain-free, accurate, and continuous way. In addition to being used as a disposable glucose biosensor, it also provides a suitable platform for on-chip electrochemical sensing for other chemical agents and biomolecules.

  1. Optimized dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoparticles and enhanced carbon nanotube nanoprobes for amplified electrochemical immunoassay of E. coli in dairy product based on enzymatically induced deposition of polyaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinai; Shen, Jianzhong; Ma, Haile; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Chenyong; Han, En; Yao, Boshui; He, Yunyao

    2016-06-15

    A highly sensitive immunosensor was reported for Escherichia coli assay in dairy product based on electrochemical measurement of polyaniline (PAn) that was catalytically deposited by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labels. Herein, the immunosensor was developed by using poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (PAMAM(Au)) as sensing platform. Importantly, the optimal HAuCl4/PAMAM ratio was investigated to design the efficient PAMAM(Au) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites were proven to not only increase the amount of immobilized capture antibody (cAb), but also accelerate the electron transfer process. Moreover, the {dAb-CNT-HRP} nanoprobes were prepared by exploiting the amplification effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for loading detection antibody (dAb) and enormous HRP labels. After a sandwich immunoreaction, the quantitatively captured nanoprobes could catalyze oxidation aniline to produce electroactive PAn for electrochemical measurement. On the basis of signal amplification of the PAMAM(Au)-based immunosensor and the {dAb-CNT-HRP} nanoprobes, the proposed strategy exhibited a linear relationship between the peak current of PAn and the logarithmic value of E. coli concentration ranging from 1.0 × 10(2) to 1.0 × 10(6) cfu mL(-1) with a detection limit of 50 cfu mL(-1) (S/N=3), and the electrochemical detection of E. coli could be achieved in 3h. The electrochemical immunosensor was also used to determine E. coli in dairy product (pure fresh milk, infant milk powder, yogurt in shelf-life and expired yogurt), and the recoveries of standard additions were in the range of 96.8-108.7%. Overall, this method gave a useful protocol for E. coli assay with high sensitivity, acceptable accuracy and satisfying stability, and thus provided a powerful tool to estimate the quality of dairy product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of long-term hypodynamy on spongy bone tissue in Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Tarabová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Weightlessness can cause various damages especially on the musculoskeletal system both in animals and humans. The aim of our study was to observe the influence of simulated, long-term microgravity on the spongy bone tissue of the femur in Japanese quails. A total of 80 cockerels at the age of 2 days were exposed to simulated microgravity – hypodynamy. After days 56, 63, 90 and 180, six birds from the experimental group and six birds from the control group were euthanised. Samples for histological examination were collected from femur epiphysis. The whole femur of the other limb was used for the analysis of the calcium content. Microscopic examination showed differences between experimental and control animals in the spongy bone tissue after every day of the experiment. In the experimental animals, there were numerous, big, multinucleated cells osteoclasts, lying on the bone trabeculae surface, which were damaged. The highest difference in the calcium content in femurs between the control and experimental animals was found after 90 days of hypodynamy. This study builds on short-term hypodynamy experiments; such long periods had never been studied before in birds. Because our findings are similar to those found in osteoporotic bone tissue, it could by useful in the development of countermeasures against the negative influence of microgravity and immobilization.

  3. Kingfisher feathers--colouration by pigments, spongy nanostructures and thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Tinbergen, Jan; Leertouwer, Hein L; Wilts, Bodo D

    2011-12-01

    The colours of the common kingfisher, Alcedo atthis, reside in the barbs of the three main types of feather: the orange breast feathers, the cyan back feathers and the blue tail feathers. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the orange barbs contain small pigment granules. The cyan and blue barbs contain spongy nanostructures with slightly different dimensions, causing different reflectance spectra. Imaging scatterometry showed that the pigmented barbs create a diffuse orange scattering and the spongy barb structures create iridescence. The extent of the angle-dependent light scattering increases with decreasing wavelength. All barbs have a cortical envelope with a thickness of a few micrometres. The reflectance spectra of the cortex of the barbs show oscillations when measured from small areas, but when measured from larger areas the spectra become wavelength independent. This can be directly understood with thin film modelling, assuming a somewhat variable cortex thickness. The cortex reflectance appears to be small but not negligible with respect to the pigmentary and structural barb reflectance.

  4. Spongy film of cellulosic polysaccharide as a dressing for aphthous stomatitis treatment in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Teixeira, Fernanda Mossumez; Figueiredo Pereira, Márcia de; Gomes Ferreira, Nara Lins; Miranda, Guilherme Marcelino de; Andrade Aguiar, José Lamartine de

    2014-04-01

    To develop an experimental model of acute inflammation, like aphthous ulcers, in oral cavity of rabbits, and also, to evaluate the results of the application of a polysaccharide spongy film of molasses from sugar cane as assist treatment in the healing process. Twenty adult rabbits weighting between 2.5 kg and 3.9 kg were divided into two groups: experimental and control infected ulcers were induced on the jugal mucosa by surgical excision. They were treated at the experimental group by curettage and dressing with spongy film of cellulosic polysaccharide film, whereas saline solution was used in the control group. Temporal evolution of the healing area, histopathology and bacteriological analysis were used to evaluate the healing process on the 3rd (D3), 7th (D7) and 11th days (D11). The healing time and bacteriological study showed no statistical differences on the group means. Analyzing the histopathology of the experimental group we verified epithelial hyperplasia from D3 to D11, instead in the control group there was a greater clutter of the epithelial cells from the D3 to D11. The experimental model used caused aphthous ulcers and the polysaccharide sponge film can be used as an aid in the symptomatic treatment and healing of the ulcerative lesions of the oral mucosa.

  5. Neutral red interlinked gold nanoparticles/multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrid nanomaterial and its application for the detection of NADH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Ida; Gupta, Mandakini

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fabricated a nanostructured hybrid material of GNPs/neutral red/MWCNTs. • GNPs decorated on MWCNT template by using neutral red as interlinker for first time. • Nanocomposite modified electrode employed successfully as sensor for NADH. • The electrode has high stability as it does not involve any biological entity. - Abstract: A novel nanocomposite of gold nanoparticles/neutral red/MWCNTs was prepared which was used to modify glassy carbon electrode. The prepared nanocomposite was physically characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential measurement, energy dispersive X-ray, FTIR spectroscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy. Electrochemical characterization was done using cyclic voltammetry technique. The modified glassy carbon electrode showed electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of NADH in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution, pH 5.0. The modified electrode has better adhesion over the electrode surface, good stability as no leaching of neutral red based nanocomposite was observed. The oxidation of NADH started at 0.37 V and reached maxima at 0.52 V at the modified electrode surface. So the prepared composite modified electrode can be applied as electrochemical sensor for NADH. The sensitivity and detection limits of the modified glassy carbon electrode were found to be 0.588 μA/mM and 5 × 10 −7 at signal to noise ratio 3

  6. Soldering of Nanotubes onto Microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2003-01-01

    Suspended bridges of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes were fabricated inside a scanning electron microscope by soldering the nanotube onto microelectrodes with highly conducting gold-carbon material. By the decomposition of organometallic vapor with the electron beam, metal-containing solder...... bonds were formed at the intersection of the nanotube and the electrodes. Current-voltage curves indicated metallic conduction of the nanotubes, with resistances in the range of 9-29 kOmega. Bridges made entirely of the soldering material exhibited resistances on the order of 100 Omega, and the solder...

  7. A spongy graphene based bimorph actuator with ultra-large displacement towards biomimetic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; Lan, Tian; Wu, Guan; Zhu, Zicai; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-07

    Bimorph actuators, consisting of two layers with asymmetric expansion and generating bending displacement, have been widely researched. Their actuation performances greatly rely on the difference of coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the two material layers. Here, by introducing a spongy graphene (sG) paper with a large negative CTE as well as high electrical-to-thermal properties, an electromechanical sG/PDMS bimorph actuator is designed and fabricated, showing an ultra-large bending displacement output under low voltage stimulation (curvature of about 1.2 cm(-1) at 10 V for 3 s), a high displacement-to-length ratio (∼0.79), and vibration motion at AC voltage (up to 10 Hz), which is much larger and faster than that of the other electromechanical bimorph actuators. Based on the sG/PDMS bimorph serving as the "finger", a mechanical gripper is constructed to realize the fast manipulation of the objects under 0.1 Hz square wave voltage stimulation (0-8 V). The designed bimorph actuator coupled with ultra-large bending displacement, low driven voltage, and the ease of fabrication may open up substantial possibilities for the utilization of electromechanical actuators in practical biomimetic device applications.

  8. A novel antibody–antigen based impedimetric immunosensor for low level detection of HER2 in serum samples of breast cancer patients via modification of a gold nanoparticles decorated multiwall carbon nanotube-ionic liquid electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkan, Elham [Nano Drug Delivery Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saber, Reza [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi, Ziba [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University, P.O. Box 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-18

    Highlights: • Design of a novel impedimetric immunosensor for detection of HER2 in serum samples. • Use of a multiwall carbon nanotube-ionic liquid electrode modified with AuNPs as a base. • Immobilization of monoclonal HER2 antibody on AuNPs/MWCILE using 1,6-hexanedithiol as a cross linker. • Achieving linear dynamic range and limit of detection of 10–110 ng mL{sup −1} and 7.4 ng mL{sup −1}, respectively. • Method development and validation and application to assay of HER2 in biological fluids. - Abstract: A highly sensitive impedimetric immunosensor based on a gold nanoparticles/multiwall carbon nanotube-ionic liquid electrode (AuNPs/MW-CILE) was developed for the determination of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Gold nanoparticles were used to enhance the extent of immobilization and to retain the immunoactivity of the antibody Herceptin on the electrode. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed for characterization of various layers coated onto the AuNPs/MW-CILE. The impedance measurements at different steps were based on the charge transfer kinetics of the [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−/4−} redox pair. The immobilization of antibody and the corresponding antigen–antibody interaction at the electrode surface altered the interfacial electron transfer. The interactions of antibody with various concentrations of antigen were also monitored via the change of impedance response. The results showed that the charge transfer resistance increases linearly with increasing concentrations of HER2 antigen. The linear range and limit of detection were found as 10–110 ng mL{sup −1} and 7.4 ng mL{sup −1}, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the immunosensor were validated. The results showed that the prepared immunosensor is a useful tool for screening of trace amounts of HER2 in serum samples of breast cancer patients.

  9. In situ synthesis of cylindrical spongy polypyrrole doped protonated graphitic carbon nitride for cholesterol sensing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bishnu Kumar; Ahmad, Rafiq; Shrestha, Sita; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2017-08-15

    Herein, we demonstrate the exfoliation of bulk graphitic carbon nitrides (g-C 3 N 4 ) into ultra-thin (~3.4nm) two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets and their functionalization with proton (g-C 3 N 4 H + ). The layered semiconductor g-C 3 N 4 H + nanosheets were doped with cylindrical spongy shaped polypyrrole (CSPPy-g-C 3 N 4 H + ) using chemical polymerization method. The as-prepared nanohybrid composite was utilized to fabricate cholesterol biosensors after immobilization of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) at physiological pH. Large specific surface area and positive charge nature of CSPPy-g-C 3 N 4 H + composite has tendency to generate strong electrostatic attraction with negatively charged ChOx, and as a result they formed stable bionanohybrid composite with high enzyme loading. A detailed electrochemical characterization of as-fabricated biosensor electrode (ChOx-CSPPy-g-C 3 N 4 H + /GCE) exhibited high-sensitivity (645.7 µAmM -1 cm -2 ) in wide-linear range of 0.02-5.0mM, low detection limit (8.0μM), fast response time (~3s), long-term stability, and good selectivity during cholesterol detection. To the best of our knowledge, this novel nanocomposite was utilized for the first time for cholesterol biosensor fabrication that resulted in high sensing performance. Hence, this approach opens a new prospective to utilize CSPPy-g-C 3 N 4 H + composite as cost-effective, biocompatible, eco-friendly, and superior electrocatalytic as well as electroconductive having great application potentials that could pave the ways to explore many other new sensors fabrication and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanoporous spongy graphene: Potential applications for hydrogen adsorption and selective gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostoglou, Nikolaos, E-mail: nikolaos.kostoglou@stud.unileoben.ac.at [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Constantinides, Georgios [Research Unit for Nanostructured Materials Systems, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, Cyprus University of Technology, 3036 Lemesos (Cyprus); Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Steriotis, Theodore [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Agia Paraskevi Attikis, 15310 Athens (Greece); Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Li, Yuanqing; Liao, Kin [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ryzhkov, Vladislav [Nanotube Production Department, Fibrtec Incorporation, TX, 75551 Atlanta (United States); Mitterer, Christian [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Rebholz, Claus, E-mail: claus@ucy.ac.cy [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, a nanoporous (pore width ~ 0.7 nm) graphene-based sponge-like material with large surface area (~ 350 m{sup 2}/g) was synthesized by wet chemical reduction of graphene oxide in combination with freeze-drying. Surface morphology and elemental composition were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Surface chemistry was qualitatively examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, while the respective structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Textural properties, including Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) surface area, micropore volume and surface area as well as pore size distribution, were deduced from nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption data obtained at 77 K and up to 1 bar. Potential use of the spongy graphene for gas storage and separation applications was preliminarily assessed by low-pressure (0–1 bar) H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} sorption measurements at different temperatures (77, 273 and 298 K). The adsorption capacities for each gas were evaluated up to ~ 1 bar, the isosteric enthalpies of adsorption for CO{sub 2} (28–33 kJ/mol) and CH{sub 4} (30–38 kJ/mol) were calculated using the Clausius–Clapeyron equation, while the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas selectivity (up to 95:1) was estimated using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST). - Highlights: • Nanoporous sponge produced by chemical reduction of graphene oxide and freeze-drying • Characterization performed using SEM, EDS, TEM, FT-IR, BET and XRD methods • Gas storage performance evaluated towards H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption up to 1 bar • CO{sub 2} over CH{sub 4} gas selectivity estimated between 45 and 95 at 273 K using the IAST model.

  11. Comparison of the trabeculae structure of the spongy bone of the bilateral pastern bones in racehorses based on the imaging analysis of radiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierzecka, M; Czerwinski, E

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of a digital analysis of radiograms it was checked if, and to what extent, the extended loading of one of the sides of the body of racehorses leads to differences in the microstructure of the spongy bone of the bilateral pastern bones of the thoracic limbs. The research material consisted of radiograms of the pastern bones of the right and left thoracic limbs of racehorses. On the basis of computer image radiological analysis with the use of the "Trabecula,, programme, a quantative evaluation of the structure of the spongy bone of the pastern bones was conducted. It was noted that the differences between the right and the left pastern bones, despite extensive loading of the left thoracic limb, were not statistically significant as far as all studied parameters of the trabecula structure of the spongy bone were concerned.

  12. Selective response of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid at gold nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes grafted with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid modified electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-fei Long

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available By grafting with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, novel multi-walled carbon nanotube nano-composites (EDTA-MWCNTs have been successfully prepared. The integration of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and novel functionalized matrix shows very promising applications in the fabrication of biosensors for sensitive detection of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid with the combination of the charge repelling property of carboxylic anion and the electrocatalytic effect of EDTA. The AuNPs and EDTA-MWCNTs modified film shows excellent sensitivity and selectivity for the dopamine analysis due to the synergic effect of AuNPs and EDTA-MWCNTs. As high as 2000 fold and 150 fold acceptable tolerance of ascorbic acid and uric acid for the determination of trace dopamine is reached, respectively. The linear concentration range for dopamine is from 1.0 × 10-8 to 6.0 × 10-6 mol.L-1, and the detection limit is 3.0 × 10-9 mol.L-1. The response of the sensor is very quick and response time is less than 1 s. The method can be applied to detect the dopamine in human urine samples.

  13. Carbon nanotubes decorated with gold, platinum and rhodium clusters by injection of colloidal solutions into the post-discharge of an RF atmospheric plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claessens, N; Demoisson, F; Dufour, T; Reniers, F [Service de Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces (CHANI), Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, CP255, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Mansour, Ali; Guillot, J [Department ' Science and Analysis of Materials' (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J [Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matiere et du Rayonnement (PMR), 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2010-09-24

    In this paper, we present a new, simple, robust and efficient technique to decorate multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with metal nanoparticles. As case studies, Au, Pt and Rh nanoparticles are grafted onto MWCNTs by spraying a colloidal solution into the post-discharge of an atmospheric argon or argon/oxygen RF plasma. The method that we introduce here is different from those usually described in the literature, since the treatment is operated at atmospheric pressure, allowing the realization in only one step of the surface activation and the deposition processes. We demonstrate experimentally that the addition of oxygen gas in the plasma increases significantly the amount of grafted metal nanoparticles. Moreover, TEM pictures clearly show that the grafted nanoparticles are well controlled in size.

  14. Supramolecular immobilization of xanthine oxidase on electropolymerized matrix of functionalized hybrid gold nanoparticles/single-walled carbon nanotubes for the preparation of electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalonga, Reynaldo; Díez, Paula; Eguílaz, Marcos; Martínez, Paloma; Pingarrón, José M

    2012-08-01

    Glassy carbon electrodes modified with single-walled carbon nanotubes and a three-dimensional network of electropolymerized Au nanoparticles capped with 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid, p-aminothiophenol, and 1-adamantanethiol were used as hybrid electrochemical platforms for supramolecular immobilization of a synthesized artificial neoglycoenzyme of xanthine oxidase and β-cyclodextrin through host-guest interactions. The ensemble was further employed for the bioelectrochemical determination of xanthine. The biosensor showed fast amperometric response within 5 s and a linear behavior in the 50 nM to 9.5 μM xanthine concentration range with high sensitivity, 2.47 A/(M cm(2)), and very low detection limit of 40 nM. The stability of the biosensor was significantly improved and the interferences caused by ascorbic and uric acids were noticeably minimized by coating the electrode surface with a Nafion thin film.

  15. Nanotube junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  16. Inorganic nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenne, Reshef; Rao, C N R

    2004-10-15

    Following the discovery of carbon fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, it was hypothesized that nanoparticles of inorganic compounds with layered (two-dimensional) structure, such as MoS(2), will not be stable against folding and form nanotubes and fullerene-like structures: IF. The synthesis of numerous other inorganic nanotubes has been reported in recent years. Various techniques for the synthesis of inorganic nanotubes, including high-temperature reactions and strategies based on 'chemie douce' (soft chemistry, i.e. low-temperature) processes, are described. First-principle, density functional theory based calculations are able to provide substantial information on the structure and properties of such nanotubes. Various properties of inorganic nanotubes, including mechanical, electronic and optical properties, are described in brief. Some potential applications of the nanotubes in tribology, protection against impact, (photo)catalysis, batteries, etc., are discussed.

  17. Plasmonic gold nanocrystals coupled with photonic crystal seamlessly on TiO2 nanotube photoelectrodes for efficient visible light photoelectrochemical water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhonghai

    2013-01-09

    A visible light responsive plasmonic photocatalytic composite material is designed by rationally selecting Au nanocrystals and assembling them with the TiO2-based photonic crystal substrate. The selection of the Au nanocrystals is so that their surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) wavelength matches the photonic band gap of the photonic crystal and thus that the SPR of the Au receives remarkable assistance from the photonic crystal substrate. The design of the composite material is expected to significantly increase the Au SPR intensity and consequently boost the hot electron injection from the Au nanocrystals into the conduction band of TiO2, leading to a considerably enhanced water splitting performance of the material under visible light. A proof-of-concept example is provided by assembling 20 nm Au nanocrystals, with a SPR peak at 556 nm, onto the photonic crystal which is seamlessly connected on TiO2 nanotube array. Under visible light illumination (>420 nm), the designed material produced a photocurrent density of ∼150 μA cm-2, which is the highest value ever reported in any plasmonic Au/TiO2 system under visible light irradiation due to the photonic crystal-assisted SPR. This work contributes to the rational design of the visible light responsive plasmonic photocatalytic composite material based on wide band gap metal oxides for photoelectrochemical applications. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Hexachlorophene and cuprizone induce the spongy change of the developing rat brain by different mechanisms: the role of 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Takeshi; Sasaki, Satoshi; Yamada, Naoaki; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tsuchitani, Minoru

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this research was to identify mechanisms responsible for the spongy change induced in rats after repeated hexachlorophene (HCP) or cuprizone (CPZ) dosing. Rats were dosed with 35 mg/kg HCP for 5 days followed by drug withdrawal for 7 days suffered spongy changes to the white matter of the cerebrum, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, and spinal cord that were accompanied by degeneration of oligodendroglia. The severity of both lesions increased prominently on day 5; however, the spongy change decreased and degeneration of oligodendroglia reversed on day 12 (7 days after dosing ceased). On day 12, cerebral cortex oligodendroglia were stained strongly by anti-CNPase. Other rats were fed for 8 days with powdered chow containing 1% (w/w) CPZ, which was then withdrawn for 16 days. The rats exhibited the spongy change in the white matter of the cerebrum and cerebellum as well as oligodendroglial cell death from day 3. The severity of both lesions increased prominently on day 8. Cerebral cortex oligodendroglia were stained strongly by anti-CNPase on days 3 to 8 and decreased to the control levels by day 24 (16 days after dosing ceased). Electron microscopy revealed that oligodendroglia frequently displayed apoptotic morphology. These findings suggest that CNPase expression was induced in the course of restoration following HCP-induced insults to oligodendroglia and the myelin sheath, and in the course of demyelination by CPZ-induced damage to oligodendroglia. However, the role of CNPase on both courses is unclear.

  19. Highly sensitive voltammetric sensor based on immobilization of bisphosphoramidate-derivative and quantum dots onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified gold electrode for the electrocatalytic determination of olanzapine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi-Behzad, Leila [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher, E-mail: mbgholivand@yahoo.com [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholivand, Khodayar [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barati, Ali [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholami, Akram [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, a new bisphosphoramidate derivative compound, 1, 4-bis(N-methyl)-benzene-bis(N-phenyl, N-benzoylphosphoramidate) (BMBPBP), was synthesized and used as a mediator for the electrocatalytic oxidation of olanzapine. The electro-oxidation of olanzapine at the surface of the BMBPBP/CdS-quantum dots/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BMBPBP/CdS-QDs/MWCNTs) modified gold electrode was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This sensor showed an excellent electrocatalytic oxidation activity toward olanzapine at less positive potential, pronounced current response, and good sensitivity. The diffusion coefficient and kinetic parameters (such as electron transfer coefficient and the heterogeneous rate constant) were determined for olanzapine oxidation, using the electrochemical approaches. Surface morphology and electrochemical properties of the prepared modified electrode were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The hydrodynamic amperometry at rotating modified electrode at constant potential versus reference electrode was used for detection of olanzapine. Under optimized conditions, the calibration plot was linear in the concentration range of 20 nM to 100 μM and detection limit was found to be 6 nM. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of olanzapine in pharmaceuticals and human serum samples. - Highlights: • A highly sensitive sensor for OLZ determination was developed. • The sensor constructed based on immobilization of BMBPBP on CdS-QDs/MWCNTs Au electrode • The morphology of the modified electrode was examined by SEM. • The prepared sensor shows stable electrochemical behavior at a wide pH range. • The proposed sensor is used for trace determination of OLZ in real samples.

  20. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  1. An amperometric biosensor based on acetylcholinesterase immobilized onto iron oxide nanoparticles/multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified gold electrode for measurement of organophosphorus insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Nidhi [Department of Biochemistry, M.D. University, Rohtak 124001, Haryana (India); Pundir, Chandra Shekhar, E-mail: pundircs@rediffmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, M.D. University, Rohtak 124001, Haryana (India)

    2011-09-02

    Graphical abstract: The stepwise amperometric biosensor fabrication process and immobilized acetylcholinesterase inhibition in pesticide solution. Highlights: {center_dot} Constructed a novel composite material using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}NP and c-MWCNT at Au electrode for electrocatalysis. {center_dot} The properties of nanoparticles modified electrodes were studied by SEM, FTIR, CVs and EIS. {center_dot} The biosensor exhibited good sensitivity (0.475 mA {mu}M{sup -1}) {center_dot} The half life of electrode was 2 months. {center_dot} The sensor was suitable for trace detection of OP pesticide residues in milk and water. - Abstract: An acetylcholinesterase (AChE) purified from maize seedlings was immobilized covalently onto iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}NP) and carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNT) modified Au electrode. An organophosphorus (OP) biosensor was fabricated using this AChE/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/c-MWCNT/Au electrode as a working electrode, Ag/AgCl as standard and Pt wire as an auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The biosensor was based on inhibition of AChE by OP compounds/insecticides. The properties of nanoparticles modified electrodes were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), cyclic voltammograms (CVs) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The synergistic action of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}NP and c-MWCNT showed excellent electrocatalytic activity at low potential (+0.4 V). The optimum working conditions for the sensor were pH 7.5, 35 deg. C, 600 {mu}M substrate concentration and 10 min for inhibition by pesticide. Under optimum conditions, the inhibition rates of OP pesticides were proportional to their concentrations in the range of 0.1-40 nM, 0.1-50 nM, 1-50 nM and 10-100 nM for malathion, chlorpyrifos, monocrotophos and endosulfan respectively. The detection limits were 0.1 nM for malathion and chlorpyrifos, 1 nM for monocrotophos and 10 nM for endosulfan. The

  2. Gold prices

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph G. Haubrich

    1998-01-01

    The price of gold commands attention because it serves as an indicator of general price stability or inflation. But gold is also a commodity, used in jewelry and by industry, so demand and supply affect its pricing and need to be considered when gold is a factor in monetary policy decisions.

  3. Nanotube cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  4. Nanotube cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  5. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  6. Nanotube News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  7. Gold Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Robert J. Barro; Sanjay P. Misra

    2013-01-01

    From 1836 to 2011, the average real rate of price change for gold in the United States is 1.1% per year and the standard deviation is 13.1%, implying a one-standard-deviation confidence band for the mean of (0.1%, 2.1%). The covariances of gold's real rate of price change with consumption and GDP growth rates are small and statistically insignificantly different from zero. These negligible covariances suggest that gold's expected real rate of return--which includes an unobserved dividend yiel...

  8. Three-dimensional Sponges with Super Mechanical Stability: Harnessing True Elasticity of Individual Carbon Nanotubes in Macroscopic Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhaohe; Liu, Luqi; Qi, Xiaoying; Kuang, Jun; Wei, Yueguang; Zhu, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-01-06

    Efficient assembly of carbon nanotube (CNT) based cellular solids with appropriate structure is the key to fully realize the potential of individual nanotubes in macroscopic architecture. In this work, the macroscopic CNT sponge consisting of randomly interconnected individual carbon nanotubes was grown by CVD, exhibiting a combination of super-elasticity, high strength to weight ratio, fatigue resistance, thermo-mechanical stability and electro-mechanical stability. To deeply understand such extraordinary mechanical performance compared to that of conventional cellular materials and other nanostructured cellular architectures, a thorough study on the response of this CNT-based spongy structure to compression is conducted based on classic elastic theory. The strong inter-tube bonding between neighboring nanotubes is examined, believed to play a critical role in the reversible deformation such as bending and buckling without structural collapse under compression. Based on in-situ scanning electron microscopy observation and nanotube deformation analysis, structural evolution (completely elastic bending-buckling transition) of the carbon nanotubes sponges to deformation is proposed to clarify their mechanical properties and nonlinear electromechanical coupling behavior.

  9. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  10. Biological Sensors Using DNA Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    when put into solution. The potential window is one of the most important factors for an electroanalytic electrode, and well- performing electrodes...materials with important electroanalytical features. Various research efforts have been made to attach gold nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes. Even then...there is a lack on reports regarding the performance and applications of such hybrid materials. Very few biosensors using gold nanoparticles– carbon

  11. Gold Museum

    OpenAIRE

    Efraín Sánchez Cabra

    2003-01-01

    On 22 december 1939, the Banco de la República, the Central Bank of Colombia, purchased a 23.5 centimetres high pre-Columbian gold arte fact weighing 777·7 grams that was to become the Gold M useum's foundation stone. Described as a Quimbaya poporo, it is a masterpiece of pre-Hispanic goldwork, an object of beauty whose brightly burnished body and neck, crowned with four sphere-like or naments, rest on an exquisite cast metal tiligree base and which seems to ftoat in a space of its own. The b...

  12. Green Gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamandra Martinez, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to offer a general panoramic of the processes or experiences pilot that are carried out in the Project Green Gold, as strategy of environmental sustainability and organizational invigoration in Choco, especially in the 12 communities of the municipalities of Tado and Condoto. It is also sought to offer a minimum of information on the techniques of handmade production and to show the possibilities to carry out in a rational way the use and use of the natural resources. The Project Green Gold is carried out by the Corporation Green Gold (COV) and co-financed with resources of international and national character, the intervention of the financial resources it achievement mainly for the use of clean processes in the extraction stages and metals benefit. The project is centered primarily in the absence of use of products or toxic substances as the mercury, fair trade, organizational invigoration, execution of 11 approaches and certification of the metals Gold and Platinum. The COV, it has come executing the proposal from the year 2001 with the premise of contributing to the balance between the rational exploitation of the natural resources and the conservation of the environment in the Choco. In the project they are used technical handmade characteristic of the region framed inside the mining activity and production activities are diversified in the productive family units. Those producing with the support of entities of juridical character, specify the necessary game rules for the extraction and products commercialization

  13. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-Carbon Nanotube based Cotinine sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; Bomer, Johan G.; Brusse-Keizer, M.G.J.; Movig, K; van der Valk, P.D.L.P.M.; Pieterse, Marcel E.; Segerink, Loes Irene; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-01-01

    A cotinine sensor based on the dc resistance of a polymer composite films is presented. The composite film comprises a cotinine selective molecularly imprinted polymer and carbon nanotube particles. This polymer film is deposited over a gold interdigitated electrode array to measure its electrical

  14. New Trends in Gold Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonarda F. Liotta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold is an element that has fascinated mankind for millennia. The catalytic properties of gold have been a source of debate, due to its complete chemical inertness when in a bulk form, while it can oxidize CO at temperatures as low as ~200 K when in a nanocrystalline state, as discovered by Haruta in the late 1980s [1]. Since then, extensive activity in both applied and fundamental research on gold has been initiated. The importance of the catalysis by gold represents one of the fasted growing fields in science and is proven by the promising applications in several fields, such as green chemistry and environmental catalysis, in the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, as modifiers of Ni catalysts for methane steam and dry reforming reactions and in biological and electrochemistry applications. The range of reactions catalyzed by gold, as well as the suitability of different supports and the influence of the preparation conditions have been widely explored and optimized in applied research [2]. Gold catalysts appeared to be very different from the other noble metal-based catalysts, due to their marked dependence on the preparation method, which is crucial for the genesis of the catalytic activity. Several methods, including deposition-precipitation, chemical vapor deposition and cation adsorption, have been applied for the preparation of gold catalysts over reducible oxides, like TiO2. Among these methods, deposition-precipitation has been the most frequently employed method for Au loading, and it involves the use of tetrachloroauric (III acid as a precursor. On the other hand, the number of articles dealing with Au-loaded acidic supports is smaller than that on basic supports, possibly because the deposition of [AuCl4]− or [AuOHxCl4−x]− species on acidic supports is difficult, due to their very low point of zero charge. Despite this challenge, several groups have reported the use of acidic zeolites as supports for gold. Zeolites

  15. Preserving π-conjugation in covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setaro, Antonio; Adeli, Mohsen; Glaeske, Mareen; Przyrembel, Daniel; Bisswanger, Timo; Gordeev, Georgy; Maschietto, Federica; Faghani, Abbas; Paulus, Beate; Weinelt, Martin; Arenal, Raul; Haag, Rainer; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Covalent functionalization tailors carbon nanotubes for a wide range of applications in varying environments. Its strength and stability of attachment come at the price of degrading the carbon nanotubes sp2 network and destroying the tubes electronic and optoelectronic features. Here we present a non-destructive, covalent, gram-scale functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes by a new [2+1] cycloaddition. The reaction rebuilds the extended π-network, thereby retaining the outstanding quantum optoelectronic properties of carbon nanotubes, including bright light emission at high degree of functionalization (1 group per 25 carbon atoms). The conjugation method described here opens the way for advanced tailoring nanotubes as demonstrated for light-triggered reversible doping through photochromic molecular switches and nanoplasmonic gold-nanotube hybrids with enhanced infrared light emission.

  16. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  17. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  18. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  19. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  20. Remediation of nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater using a pilot-scale two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification permeable reactive barrier with spongy iron/pine bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoxin; Huang, Yuanying; Hu, Hongyan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Renwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was proposed for remediating nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater in an oxygen rich environment, which has a packing structure of an upstream pine bark layer and a downstream spongy iron and river sand mixture layer. The HAD PRB involves biological deoxygenation, heterotrophic denitrification, hydrogenotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic Fe corrosion. Column and batch experiments were performed to: (1) investigate the NO3(-)-N removal and inorganic geochemistry; (2) explore the nitrogen transformation and removal mechanisms; (3) identify the hydrogenotrophic denitrification capacity; and (4) evaluate the HAD performance by comparison with other approaches. The results showed that the HAD PRB could maintain constant high NO3(-)-N removal efficiency (>91%) before 38 pore volumes (PVs) of operation (corresponding to 504d), form little or even negative NO2(-)-N during the 45 PVs, and produce low NH4(+)-N after 10 PVs. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria played a dominant role in oxygen depletion via aerobic respiration, providing more CO2 for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The HAD PRB significantly relied on heterotrophic denitrification. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification removed 10-20% of the initial NO3(-)-N. Effluent total organic carbon decreased from 403.44mgL(-1) at PV 1 to 9.34mgL(-1) at PV 45. Packing structure had a noticeable effect on its denitrification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cyclodextrin polyurethanes polymerized with multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salipira, K.L. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Chemical Technology, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg (South Africa); Krause, R.W. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Chemical Technology, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)], E-mail: rkrause@uj.ac.za; Mamba, B.B.; Malefetse, T.J. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Chemical Technology, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg (South Africa); Cele, L.M.; Durbach, S.H. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Chemical Technology, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2008-10-15

    Insoluble cyclodextrin polymers co-polymerized with multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by polymerizing {beta}-cyclodextrin with acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and diisocyanate linkers; hexamethylene- and toluene-2,4-diisocyanate. The polymers are useful in removing some organic pollutants from water, and we now report the full characterization of these polymers using infrared spectroscopy (IR), Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and thermal techniques such as thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The polymers could be synthesized as either powders or amorphous solids. Results of the IR analysis showed the presence of functional groups such as C=O, C=C, C-H and C-O, indicating that polymerization indeed took place. Characterization of the polymers by scanning electron microscopy and BET analysis showed that these polymers had a spongy appearance indicating a hierarchical pore structure. Incorporation of small amounts (<5%) of multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) improved the thermal stability of the polymers. This observation was further confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements.

  2. Influence of solution pH on the electron transport of the self-assembled nanoarrays of single-walled carbon nanotube-cobalt tetra-aminophthalocyanine on gold electrodes: Electrocatalytic detection of epinephrine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozoemena, Kenneth I. [Chemistry Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)], E-mail: kenneth.ozoemena@up.ac.za; Nkosi, Dudu; Pillay, Jeseelan [Chemistry Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2008-02-15

    This paper provides first evidence of the impact of solution pH on the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants of self-assembled films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and SWCNT integrated to cobalt(II)tetra-aminophthalocyanine (SWCNT-CoTAPc) by sequential self-assembly. Using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we proved that both SAMs exhibit notable differences in their response to different buffered solution pH, with and without the presence of redox probe, [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 4-}/[Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-}. Surface pK{sub a} value for the Au-Cys-SWCNT-CoTAPc was estimated as ca. 7.8, compared to that of the Au-Cys-SWCNT of about 5.5. Interestingly, both redox-active SAMs gave similar analytical response for epinephrine, giving well-resolved square wave voltammograms, with linear concentration range up to 130 {mu}M, sensitivity of ca. 9.4 x 10{sup -3} AM{sup -1}, and limit of detection ca. 6 {mu}M. This analytical result implies that there is no detectable advantage of one of the SAMs over the other in the electrocatalytic detection of this neurotransmitter.

  3. Gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pingarron, Jose M.; Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli

    2008-01-01

    The unique properties of gold nanoparticles to provide a suitable microenvironment for biomolecules immobilization retaining their biological activity, and to facilitate electron transfer between the immobilized proteins and electrode surfaces, have led to an intensive use of this nanomaterial for the construction of electrochemical biosensors with enhanced analytical performance with respect to other biosensor designs. Recent advances in this field are reviewed in this article. The advantageous operational characteristics of the biosensing devices designed making use of gold nanoparticles are highlighted with respect to non-nanostructured biosensors and some illustrative examples are commented. Electrochemical enzyme biosensors including those using hybrid materials with carbon nanotubes and polymers, sol-gel matrices, and layer-by-layer architectures are considered. Moreover, electrochemical immunosensors in which gold nanoparticles play a crucial role in the electrode transduction enhancement of the affinity reaction as well as in the efficiency of immunoreagents immobilization in a stable mode are reviewed. Similarly, recent advances in the development of DNA biosensors using gold nanoparticles to improve DNA immobilization on electrode surfaces and as suitable labels to improve detection of hybridization events are considered. Finally, other biosensors designed with gold nanoparticles oriented to electrically contact redox enzymes to electrodes by a reconstitution process and to the study of direct electron transfer between redox proteins and electrode surfaces have also been treated

  4. Gold in Modern Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boryshkevych Olena V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the role of gold in modern economy. It analyses dynamics and modern state of the gold market. It studies volumes of contracts in exchange and off-exchange markets. In order to reveal changes of key features of the gold market, it focuses on the study of gold demand volumes, studies volumes and geographical changes in the world gold mining, and analyses volumes of monetary gold of central banks and its share in gold and currency reserves. It analyses price fluctuations in the gold market during 1968 – 2013 and identifies main factors that determine the gold price. It identifies interconnection between the state of the gold market and financial markets of countries. The study showed that namely geopolitical and economic instability restricts the spectrum of financial assets for investing and gold is not only a safe investment object but also a profitable one.

  5. Nanoparticle Traffic on Helical Tracks: Thermophoretic Mass Transport through Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, Philipp A.E.; Walther, Jens Honore; Arcidiacono, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate and quantify thermophoretic motion of solid gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes subject to wall temperature gradients ranging from 0.4 to 25 K/nm. For temperature gradients below 1 K/nm, we find that the particles move "on tracks......" in a predictable fashion as they follow unique helical orbits depending on the geometry of the carbon nanotubes. These findings markedly advance our knowledge of mass transport mechanisms relevant to nanoscale applications....

  6. Purification of carbon nanotubes via selective heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A.; Wilson, William L.; Jin, Sung Hun; Dunham, Simon N.; Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad; Du, Frank; Huang, Yonggang; Song, Jizhou

    2017-11-21

    The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.

  7. Gold-Mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaballe, J.; Grundy, B.D.

    2002-01-01

    of operating gold mines. Asymmetric information on the reserves in the mine implies that, at a high enough price of gold, the manager of high type finds the extraction value of the company to be higher than the current market value of the non-operating gold mine. Due to this under valuation the maxim of market...... value maximization forces the manager of high type to extract the gold.The implications are three-fold. First, all managers (except the lowest type) extract the gold too soon compared to the first-best policy of leaving the gold in the mine forever. Second, a manager of high type extracts the gold......  Based on standard option pricing arguments and assumptions (including no convenience yield and sustainable property rights), we will not observe operating gold mines. We find that asymmetric information on the reserves in the gold mine is a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence...

  8. Organic Electrolyte Based Pulsed Nanoplating and Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Network Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myung Gil; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Tae Geun; Hwang, Jong Seung; Ahn, Doyeol; Whang, Dongmok; Hwang, Sung Woo

    2011-06-01

    The formation of gold nanocontacts was performed using a pulsed electrochemical plating technique. The effect of various plating variables on the surface roughness of the plated electrodes was studied in the high frequency regime where the reduction reaction of gold complex becomes the bottleneck process. We demonstrated the selective contact formation of single wall carbon nanotube network field effect transistors (FETs) with this technique. The fabricated FETs exhibit usual p-type behavior with the performance comparable to usual network FETs.

  9. Skin contact with gold and gold alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapson, W S

    1985-08-01

    3 types of reaction to gold merit discussion. First, there is the effect known as black dermographism, in which stroking with certain metals immediately produces well-defined black lines on the skin. Some gold alloys are amongst such metals. The evidence indicates that the effect is the result of impregnation of the skin with black metallic particles generated by mechanical abrasion of the metal by contaminants of the skin. There is no positive and unequivocal evidence of the ability of metals to mark uncontaminated skin so rapidly that it is possible to write upon it. Secondly there are the 2 related phenomena of the wear of gold jewelry, and the susceptibility to certain individuals to blackening of the skin where it is in contact with such jewelry. The occurrence of smudge, as it is often called, is not very common, but is brought to the attention of most jewelers from time to time. In extreme cases it may make it embarrassing for the person concerned to wear metallic jewelry. It would appear as if gold smudge also results mainly from mechanical abrasion of jewelry, though this may be aided and/or supplemented in some instances by corrosion of gold or gold alloy induced by certain components of the sweat. Finally, there is the question of true allergic responses to contact of the skin with gold and its alloys. Judging from the very few cases which have been recorded, such responses are extremely rare. Some recent observations on the reactions of metallic gold with amino acids and of reaction to contact of the skin with gold on the part of rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing gold therapy, are, however, relevant in this connection.

  10. Gold in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girling, C.A.; Peterson, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    Many plants have the ability to take up gold from the soil and to accumulate it in their tisssue. Advances have been made in understanding these processes to the point where their exploitation in the field of prospecting for gold appears practically feasible. Neutron activation analysis is used for the determination of the small quantities of gold in plants

  11. Nanotube resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  12. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  13. Carbon nanotube-based black coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, J.; Yung, C.; Tomlin, N.; Conklin, D.; Stephens, M.

    2018-03-01

    Coatings comprising carbon nanotubes are very black, that is, characterized by uniformly low reflectance over a broad range of wavelengths from the visible to far infrared. Arguably, there is no other material that is comparable. This is attributable to the intrinsic properties of graphitic material as well as the morphology (density, thickness, disorder, and tube size). We briefly describe a history of other coatings such as nickel phosphorous, gold black, and carbon-based paints and the comparable structural morphology that we associate with very black coatings. The need for black coatings is persistent for a variety of applications ranging from baffles and traps to blackbodies and thermal detectors. Applications for space-based instruments are of interest and we present a review of space qualification and the results of outgassing measurements. Questions of nanoparticle safety depend on the nanotube size and aspect ratio as well as the nature and route of exposure. We describe the growth of carbon nanotube forests along with the catalyst requirements and temperature limitations. We also describe coatings derived from carbon nanotubes and applied like paint. Building the measurement apparatus and determining the optical properties of something having negligible reflectance are challenging and we summarize the methods and means for such measurements. There exists information in the literature for effective media approximations to model the dielectric function of vertically aligned arrays. We summarize this along with the refractive index of graphite from the literature that is necessary for modeling the optical properties. In our experience, the scientific questions can be overshadowed by practical matters, so we provide an appendix of recipes for making as-grown and sprayed coatings along with an example of reflectance measurements.

  14. Coinage metal (4, 4) nanotubes, simulated by first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Wei; Zhou, Jian; Dong, Jinming; Kawazoe, Y.

    2011-06-01

    The structural stability of coinage metal nanotubes with a square cross-section has been investigated by the first-principles numerical simulations. In addition to the reported (4, 4) silver tube, it is found that the hollow (4, 4) copper and gold nanotubes can also be formed by applying an appropriate stress to an 8A/8B fcc wire. The stability of these coinage metal (4, 4) nanotubes, formed by tip-stretching the wires, has been explained by a local minimum in the string tension variation with their tube lengths. Interestingly, we have explained why a low-stress stretching is needed to obtain the (4, 4) Cu tube in contrast to a higher one for both the (4, 4) Ag and Au tubes due to the larger stiffness coefficient of copper than those of silver and gold, which could be proved by future experiments.

  15. Plasmonic Gold Decorated MWCNT Nanocomposite for Localized Plasmon Resonance Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhikandathil, J.; Badilescu, S.; Packirisamy, M.

    2015-01-01

    The synergism of excellent properties of carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles is used in this work for bio-sensing of recombinant bovine growth hormones (rbST) by making Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) locally optically responsive by augmenting it optical properties through Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR). To this purpose, locally gold nano particles decorated gold–MWCNT composite was synthesized from a suspension of MWCNT bundles and hydrogen chloroauric acid in an aqueous solution, activated ultrasonically and, then, drop-casted on a glass substrate. The slow drying of the drop produces a “coffee ring” pattern that is found to contain gold–MWCNT nanocomposites, accumulated mostly along the perimeter of the ring. The reaction is studied also at low-temperature, in the vacuum chamber of the Scanning Electron Microscope and is accounted for by the local melting processes that facilitate the contact between the bundle of tubes and the gold ions. Biosensing applications of the gold–MWCNT nanocomposite using their LSPR properties are demonstrated for the plasmonic detection of traces of bovine growth hormone. The sensitivity of the hybrid platform which is found to be 1 ng/ml is much better than that measuring with gold nanoparticles alone which is only 25 ng/ml. PMID:26282187

  16. Fabrication of nanoparticles on vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes by e-beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Tung-Feng; Chuang, Chia-Chih; Chou, Yu-Chuan; Shu, Chi-Min

    2010-01-01

    A novel composite electrode containing gold/platinum nanoparticles on the vertically aligned multi-wall nanotubes (MWCNTs) by electron beam evaporation (e-beam evaporation) is reported herein. The size of gold/platinum nanoparticles by e-beam evaporation was less than 10 nm, and distributed uniformly on the surface of vertically aligned MWCNTs. This straightforward process can fabricate high specific surface areas of gold/platinum nanoparticles on the MWCNTs, enhance the efficiency of organic fuel decomposition, and advance the sensor precision. In addition, the nanoparticles on the MWCNTs can also facilitate high electron mobility and chemical stability.

  17. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  18. Paraconductivity in Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Livanov, D. V.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the calculation of paraconductivity in carbon nanotubes above the superconducting transition temperature. The complex behavior of paraconductivity depending upon the tube radius, temperature and magnetic field strength is analyzed. The results are qualitatively compared with recent experimental observations in carbon nanotubes of an inherent transition to the superconducting state and pronounced thermodynamic fluctuations above $T_{c}$. The application of our results to single-wall ...

  19. Facile Synthesis and Growth Mechanism of SiO2 Nanotubes with ZnS Nanowires as Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuo, Hui Xin; Wu, Li Li

    2016-04-01

    SiO2 nanotubes with good chemical purity and well defined morphology were synthesized successfully in a one-step gas phase condensation process using gold catalyst. The as-synthesized products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and nanoprobe X-ray energy dispersive. In the observations, a growth mechanism of the nanotubes is suggested. The new synthetic route to prepare SiO2 nanotubes is favorable to satisfy the special needs in commercial and industrial application and can be easily applied to other semiconductor materials.

  20. Tea-bag-like polymer nanoreactors filled with gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitschang, Fabian; Schmalz, Holger; Agarwal, Seema; Greiner, Andreas

    2014-05-05

    Gold-containing polymer nanotubes, which showed both catalytic activity and resistance to leaching, were prepared by the "tubes by fiber templates" (TUFT) process. For this purpose, electrospun polymer nonwovens with incorporated poly(L-lactide)-stabilized gold nanoparticles were coated with poly(p-xylylene) by the chemical vapor deposition process, and then the inner fiber templates were removed. The resulting polymer tubes carried encapsulated gold nanoparticles which were shown to be immobilized and featured pronounced catalytic activity towards the hydrolytic oxidation of dimethylphenylsilane and the alcoholysis of dimethylphenylsilane with n-butanol. The macroscopic nonwovens could be used as tea-bag-like catalyst systems and showed excellent reusability. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  2. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  3. Gold induced apoptsis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2008-01-01

    Introduction   Cancer cells are highly thermo sensitive. On the basis of an article in Nature the idea arose, for a new non-invasive thermotherapy technique, based on radio frequency inductive heating of nano gold particles in an MR-scanner. Thermotherapy is getting considerably attention...... at the moment, especially in the fields of lasers, they though have some problems concerning the placement of the tumor in the human body. Local heating by MR has tremendous advance in comparison too lasers. The first step is to validate the hypothesis of the inductive heating of the gold nano particles trough...... in silico methods are here proposed for apoptosis studies and for AMG studies.   Methods   MR - heating of high concentration micrometer gold and low concentration nano gold.   CSLM of ethidum bromide stained cell lines, with and witout gold and automated image processing.   AMG gold uptake study...

  4. Photocatalytic Oxidation of a Volatile Organic Component of Acetaldehyde Using Titanium Oxide Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium oxide nanotubes are prepared and treated with Au (Au/nanotube sample and Pt (Pt/nanotube sample, and the photoactivity of these catalysts compared to a standard Degussa P25 photocatalyst is investigated. The samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM. Both high-resolution TEM images and high-angle annular dark-field (HAAD images were recorded for the specimens. Oxidation of acetaldehyde was used to test the efficiency of the catalysts. Nanotube samples showed better photoactivity than the standard P25, because the P25 titania deactivates quickly. Enhanced reactivity of the nanotube is related to surface charge polarity developed on outer and inner surfaces due to the difference in overlap of oxygen anions that resulted from curving of octahedral sheets. A tentative and qualitative surface polarity model is proposed for enhancing electron-hole pair separation. The inner surface benefits reduction; whereas, the outer surface benefits oxidation reactions. Both the metal identity and the size of the metal particles in the nanotubes affected the photocatalytic activity. Specifically, the addition of platinum increased the activity significantly, and increased the total yield. The addition of gold had lesser impact compared to the platinum. Formation of Pt large nanoparticles on the nanotube surfaces reduces the oxidation reactivity.

  5. Gold mineralogy and extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashion, J.D.; Brown, L.J. [Monash University, Physics Department (Australia)

    1998-12-15

    Several examples are examined in which Moessbauer spectroscopic analysis of gold mineral samples, treated concentrates and extracted species has provided information not obtainable by competing techniques. Descriptions are given of current work on bacterial oxidation of pyritic ores and on the adsorbed species from gold extracted from cyanide and chloride solutions onto activated carbon and polyurethane foams. The potential benefits for the gold mining industry from Moessbauer studies and some limitations on the use of the technique are also discussed.

  6. Gold and uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, G.S.; Davidson, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process for extracting gold and uranium from an ore containing them both comprising the steps of pulping the finely comminuted ore with a suitable cyanide solution at an alkaline pH, acidifying the pulp for uranium dissolution, adding carbon activated for gold recovery to the pulp at a suitable stage, separating the loaded activated carbon from the pulp, and recovering gold from the activated carbon and uranium from solution

  7. Magnetism in nanocrystalline gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuboltsev, Vladimir; Savin, Alexander; Pirojenko, Alexandre; Räisänen, Jyrki

    2013-08-27

    While bulk gold is well known to be diamagnetic, there is a growing body of convincing experimental and theoretical work indicating that nanostructured gold can be imparted with unconventional magnetic properties. Bridging the current gap in experimental study of magnetism in bare gold nanomaterials, we report here on magnetism in gold nanocrystalline films produced by cluster deposition in the aggregate form that can be considered as a crossover state between a nanocluster and a continuous film. We demonstrate ferromagnetic-like hysteretic magnetization with temperature dependence indicative of spin-glass-like behavior and find this to be consistent with theoretical predictions, available in the literature, based on first-principles calculations.

  8. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm 2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m 2 /gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm 3 , an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm

  9. Carbon nanotubes as liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanju; Kumar, Satish

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the best of known materials with a combination of excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. To fully exploit individual nanotube properties for various applications, the grand challenge is to fabricate macroscopic ordered nanotube assemblies. Liquid-crystalline behavior of the nanotubes provides a unique opportunity toward reaching this challenge. In this Review, the recent developments in this area are critically reviewed by discussing the strategies for fabricating liquid-crystalline phases, addressing the solution properties of liquid-crystalline suspensions, and exploiting the practical techniques of liquid-crystal routes to prepare macroscopic nanotube fibers and films.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  11. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  12. Colorimetric gold nanoparticles-based aptasensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezavn Yazdian-Robati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of different agents including chemical and biological plays important role in forensic, biomedical and environmentalfield.In recent decades, nanotechnology and nano materials had a high impact on development of sensors. Using  nanomaterials in construction of biosensors can effectively improve the Sensitivity and other features of biosensors. Different type of nanostructures including nanotubes, nanodiamonds, thin films ,nanorods, nanoparticles(NP, nanofibers andvarious clusters have been explored and applied in construction of biosensors. Among nanomaterials mentioned above, gold nanoparticle (GNPas a new class of unique fluorescence quenchers, is receiving significant attention in developing of optical biosensors because of their unique physical, chemical and biological properties. In this mini review, we discussed the use of GNPs in construction of colorimetric aptasensorsas a class of optical sensors for detection of antibiotics, toxins and infection diseases.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabr...

  14. Contacting nanowires and nanotubes with atomic precision for electronic transport

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Shengyong

    2012-01-01

    Making contacts to nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Existing contacting techniques use top-down lithography and chemical etching, but lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we report that a field-induced emission process can be used to make local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. The gold nano-islands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable method to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. To demonstrate the wide applicability of the technique, nano-contacts are fabricated on silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. The electrical transport measurements are performed in situ by utilizing the nanocontacts to bridge the nanostructures to the transport probes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Electric moulding of dispersed lipid nanotubes into a nanofluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frusawa, Hiroshi; Manabe, Tatsuhiko; Kagiyama, Eri; Hirano, Ken; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophilic nanotubes formed by lipid molecules have potential applications as platforms for chemical or biological events occurring in an attolitre volume inside a hollow cylinder. Here, we have integrated the lipid nanotubes (LNTs) by applying an AC electric field via plug-in electrode needles placed above a substrate. The off-chip assembly method has the on-demand adjustability of an electrode configuration, enabling the dispersed LNT to be electrically moulded into a separate film of parallel LNT arrays in one-step. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique as well as the digital microscopy visualised the overall filling of gold nanoparticles up to the inner capacity of an LNT film by capillary action, thereby showing the potential of this flexible film for use as a high-throughput nanofluidic device where not only is the endo-signalling and product in each LNT multiplied but also the encapsulated objects are efficiently transported and reacted.

  16. TiO2 Nanotubes Membrane Flexible Sensor for Low-Temperature H2S Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia María Perillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a flexible gas sensor based on TiO2 nanotubes membrane, onto which array interdigitated gold electrodes in one side and a common heater in the backside were obtained using conventional microfabrication techniques. This was used to detect hydrogen sulphide within a concentration range of 6–38 ppm. The response to low concentrations of H2S at low temperature and good stability make the sensor a promising candidate for practical applications. These results support the proposal that the TiO2 nanotubes membrane flexible sensors are promising in portable on-site detection based on low cost nanomaterials.

  17. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  18. Spectroelectrochemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2011), s. 47-55 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electrochemistry * nanotubes * photoluminiscence Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.412, year: 2011

  19. Medicinal gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, R.V.; Cottrill, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A major use of gold compounds in the pharmaceutical industry is for anti-arthritic agents. The disease itself is not understood and little is known about the way in which the drugs act, but detailed pictures of the distribution of gold in the body are available, and some of the relevant biochemistry is beginning to emerge. The purpose of this article is to give a survey of the types of compounds presently employed in medicine, of the distribution of gold in the body which results from their use, and of some relevant chemistry. Emphasis is placed on results obtained in the last few years

  20. Electrodeposition of polyfluorene on a carbon nanotube electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, L; Mengoni, F; Mattiello, L; Kenny, J M

    2007-01-01

    Electrophoretically deposited single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films on a transparent conducting surface are used as electrodes for the electrodeposition of a π-conjugated polymer formed by the oxidative coupling of fluorene units. This method provides a uniform coverage of the conducting surface with respect to SWCNTs chemically assembled on a gold substrate. Electron microscopy reveals the formation of a polymer-SWCNT nanostructure which imparts distinct electrical properties from those of the polymer electrodeposited on the neat electrode. By combining the attractive properties of SWCNTs and polyfluorene, these nanocomposites open up new opportunities to achieve electrical contacts in nano- to micro-devices

  1. Axially chiral allenyl gold complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alice; Laguna, Antonio; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2014-09-17

    Unprecedented allenyl gold complexes have been achieved starting from triphenylpropargylphosphonium bromide. Two different coordination modes of the allene isomer of triphenylphosphoniumpropargylide to gold have been found depending on the gold oxidation state. Bromo-, pentafluorophenyl-, and triphenylphosphine-gold(I) allenyl complexes were prepared in which the α carbon coordinates to the gold(I) center. A chiral pentafluorophenyl-gold(III) allenyl complex with the gold atoms coordinated to the γ carbon was also prepared. All the complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction showing the characteristic distances for a C═C═C unit.

  2. Continuum theory for nanotube piezoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, P J; Sai, Na; Mele, E J

    2005-09-09

    We develop and solve a continuum theory for the piezoelectric response of one-dimensional nanotubes and nanowires, and apply the theory to study electromechanical effects in boron-nitride nanotubes. We find that the polarization of a nanotube depends on its aspect ratio, and a dimensionless constant specifying the ratio of the strengths of the elastic and electrostatic interactions. The solutions of the model as these two parameters are varied are discussed. The theory is applied to estimate the electric potential induced along the length of a boron-nitride nanotube in response to a uniaxial stress.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  4. Gold nanoprobes for theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchapakesan, Balaji; Book-Newell, Brittany; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rao, Madhusudhana; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoprobes have become attractive diagnostic and therapeutic agents in medicine and life sciences research owing to their reproducible synthesis with atomic level precision, unique physical and chemical properties, versatility of their morphologies, flexibility in functionalization, ease of targeting, efficiency in drug delivery and opportunities for multimodal therapy. This review highlights some of the recent advances and the potential for gold nanoprobes in theranostics. PMID:22122586

  5. The Gold Standard Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Tim; Rasmussen, Mette; Ghith, Nermin

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates.......To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates....

  6. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using diatoms-silica-gold and EPS-gold bionanocomposite formation

    OpenAIRE

    Schröfel, Adam; Kratošová, Gabriela; Bohunická, Markéta; Dobročka, Edmund; Vávra, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Novel synthesis of gold nanoparticles, EPS-gold, and silica-gold bionanocomposites by biologically driven processes employing two diatom strains (Navicula atomus, Diadesmis gallica) is described. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction analysis (SAED) revealed a presence of gold nanoparticles in the experimental solutions of the diatom culture mixed with tetrachloroaureate. Nature of the gold nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. Scanning electron m...

  7. Au nanoparticles in carbon nanotubes with high photocatalytic activity for hydrocarbon selective oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Ruihua; Li, Haitao; Kong, Weiqian; Huang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Kang, Zhenhui

    2014-09-14

    High-efficiency and high-selectivity catalytic oxidation of alkanes under mild conditions with air is a major aim of current catalytic chemistry and chemical production. Despite extensive development efforts on new catalysts for cyclohexane oxidation, current commercial processes still suffer from low conversion, poor selectivity, and excessive production of waste. Here, we present the design and synthesis of gold nanoparticle/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites for high-efficiency and high-selectivity photocatalyst systems for the green oxidation of cyclohexane. Remarkably, Au nanoparticles confined in carbon nanotubes (Au-in-CNTs) are photocatalytically active for the oxidation of cyclohexane with 14.64% conversion of cyclohexane and a high selectivity of 86.88% of cyclohexanol using air and visible light at room temperature. Given its diversity and versatility of structural and composition design, gold nanoparticle/CNT composites may provide a powerful pathway for the development of high-performance catalysts and production processes for green chemical industry.

  8. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generalov, A A; Anoshkin, I V; Lioubtchenko, D V; Räisänen, A V; Erdmanis, M; Ovchinnikov, V; Nasibulin, A G

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling. (paper)

  9. Atomistic Simulations of Thermophoretic Motion of water Nanodroplets in Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2008-01-01

    fabricated nanomotors, and thermodiffusion is expected to allow microscale manipulation and control of flow in nanofluidic devices. In a recent theoretical study, thermophoresis was shown to induce motion of solid gold nanoparticles confined inside carbon nanotubes. In the present investigation, we study......Open-ended nanotubes offer unique possibilities as fluid conduits with applications ranging from molecule separation devices in biocatalysis to encapsulation media for drug storage and delivery. Liquids and solids in nanochannels may be driven by electrophoresis, osmosis, gradients in the surface...... gradients imposed in nanopipes have been used to generate controlled flows for nanoscale applications9, and to enhance electrophoretic motion across carbon nanotube membranes The use of thermal gradients to induce mass transport is known as thermophoresis, the Soret effect or thermodiffusion. The first...

  10. Molecular dynamics investigation of carbon nanotube junctions in non-aqueous solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Gkionis, Konstantinos

    2014-07-23

    The properties of liquids in a confined environment are known to differ from those in the bulk. Extending this knowledge to geometries defined by two metallic layers in contact with the ends of a carbon nanotube is important for describing a large class of nanodevices that operate in non-aqueous environments. Here we report a series of classical molecular dynamics simulations for gold-electrode junctions in acetone, cyclohexane and N,N-dimethylformamide solutions and analyze the structure and the dynamics of the solvents in different regions of the nanojunction. The presence of the nanotube has little effect on the ordering of the solvents along its axis, while in the transversal direction deviations are observed. Importantly, the orientational dynamics of the solvents at the electrode-nanotube interface differ dramatically from that found when only the electrodes are present.

  11. An approach to a multi walled carbon nanotube based mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Davis, Zachary James; Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard

    2004-01-01

    We propose an approach to a nanoscale mass sensor based on a gold electrode structure, on which a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bridge can be placed and soldered. The structure is comprised of three electrodes with a width of 2 or 4 mum. Two outer electrodes with a length of 10 or 15 mum...... serve as source and drain electrodes for the MWCNT bridge, whereas an inner electrode with a length of 8 or 13 mum is for electrostatic excitation of the CNT. Some structures have an extra pair of outer electrodes, which may deflect the inner electrodes and thereby be used for stretching or compressing...... the bridging nanotube. The free standing MWCNTs were fabricated by chemical vapour deposition of Fe(H) phthalocyanine. A nanomanipulator with an x - y - z translation stage was used for placing the MWCNTs across the source-drain electrodes. The nanotubes were soldered onto the substrate by electron beam...

  12. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas [Denver, CO; Raffaelle, Ryne P [Honeoye Falls, NY; Landi, Brian J [Rochester, NY; Heben, Michael J [Denver, CO

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  13. Nanosecond nonlinear optical and optical limiting properties of hollow gold nanocages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chan; Huang, Jiaxin; Lei, Li; Chen, Wenzhe; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Gold nanocages (NCs) were prepared using the galvanic replacement reaction. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed the porous morphology and completely hollow interior of the gold NCs. The nanosecond nonlinear optical and optical limiting (OL) properties of the NCs were characterized using the open-aperture Z-scan technique with 8-ns laser pulses at 532 nm. The gold NCs exhibited intensity-dependent transformation from saturable absorption to reverse-saturable absorption. The nonlinear absorption coefficient and saturable energy of the NCs were 5 × 10- 12 m/W and 2.5 × 1010 W/m2, respectively. Meanwhile, the gold NCs were found to display strong OL properties towards nanosecond laser pulses. The OL threshold of the gold NCs was lower than that of solid gold nanoparticles and comparable with that of a carbon nanotube suspension. Input fluence and angle-dependent scattering measurements indicated that nonlinear scattering plays an important role in the OL behavior of the gold nanostructures at high laser excitation. The improved OL response in gold NCs was discussed from the viewpoint of structural characteristic. The ultrathin and highly porous walls of the gold NCs can effectively transfer the photon-induced heat to the surrounding solvent, resulting in enhanced OL properties compared with those of solid gold nanoparticles. The intensity-dependent transformation from saturable absorption to reverse-saturable absorption and excellent OL response indicate that the smart gold NCs with ultrathin and highly porous walls can be considered as potential candidate in pulse shaping, passive mode locking, and eye protection against powerful lasers.

  14. Magnetic nanotubes for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic nanotubes hold the potential for neuroscience applications because of their capability to deliver chemicals or biomolecules and the feasibility of controlling the orientation or movement of these magnetic nanotubes by an external magnetic field thus facilitating directed growth of neurites. Therefore, we sought to investigate the effects of laminin treated magnetic nanotubes and external alternating magnetic fields on the growth of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in cell culture. Magnetic nanotubes were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and characterized to confirm their hollow structure, the hematite and maghemite phases, and the magnetic properties. DRG neurons were cultured in the presence of magnetic nanotubes under alternating magnetic fields. Electron microscopy showed a close interaction between magnetic nanotubes and the growing neurites Phase contrast microscopy revealed live growing neurons suggesting that the combination of the presence of magnetic nanotubes and the alternating magnetic field were tolerated by DRG neurons. The synergistic effect, from both laminin treated magnetic nanotubes and the applied magnetic fields on survival, growth and electrical activity of the DRG neurons are currently being investigated.

  15. Simultaneous atomic force microscopy measurement of topography and contact resistance of metal films and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadermann, M.; Grube, H.; Boland, J.J.; Papadakis, S.J.; Falvo, M.R.; Superfine, R.; Washburn, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a quartz tuning-fork-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) setup that is capable of mapping the surface contact resistance while scanning topography. The tuning-fork setup allows us to use etched Pt/Ir tips, which have higher durability and better conductivity than probes used in earlier AFM conductance measurements. The performance of the method is demonstrated with contact resistance measurements of gold lines on silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes on graphite

  16. Gas Sensors Based on Locally Heated Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Savu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the design and fabrication of microreactors and sensors based on metal nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes. Titanium adhesion layers and gold films were sputtered onto Si/SiO2 substrates for obtaining the electrical contacts. The gold layers were electrochemically thickened until 1 μm and the electrodes were patterned using photolithography and wet chemical etching. Before the dielectrophoretic deposition of the nanotubes, a gap 1 μm wide and 5 μm deep was milled in the middle of the metallic line by focused ion beam, allowing the fabrication of sensors based on suspended nanotubes bridging the electrodes. Subsequently, the sputtering technique was used for decorating the nanotubes with metallic nanoparticles. In order to test the as-obtained sensors, microreactors (100 μL volume were machined from a single Kovar piece, being equipped with electrical connections and 1/4′′ Swagelok-compatible gas inlet and outlets for controlling the atmosphere in the testing chamber. The sensors, electrically connected to the contact pins by wire-bonding, were tested in the 10−5 to 10−2 W working power interval using oxygen as target gas. The small chamber volume allowed the measurement of fast characteristic times (response/recovery, with the sensors showing good sensitivity.

  17. Physical removal of metallic carbon nanotubes from nanotube network devices using a thermal and fluidic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Alexandra C; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M; Kane, Alexander A; Krafcik, Karen L; Léonard, François; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V; Billups, W Edward; Hauge, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is versatile and is applied to devices post-fabrication. (paper)

  18. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  19. Electromechanical properties of nanotube-PVA composite actuator bimorphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholome, Christele; Derre, Alain; Roubeau, Olivier; Zakri, Cecile; Poulin, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube (oxidized-MWNT)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composite sheets have been prepared for electromechanical actuator applications. MWNT have been oxidized by nitric acid treatments. They were then dispersed in water and mixed with various amounts of PVA of high molecular weight (198 000 g mol -1 ). The composite sheets were then obtained through a membrane filtration process. The composition of the systems has been optimized to combine suitable mechanical and electrical properties. Thermogravimetric analysis, mechanical tensile tests and conductivity measurements show that the best compromise of mechanical and electrical properties was obtained for a PVA weight fraction of about 30 wt%. In addition, one face of the sheets was coated with gold to increase the conductivity of the sheets and promote uniform actuation. Pseudo-bimorph devices have been realized by subsequently coating the composite sheets with an inert layer of PVA. The devices have been tested electromechanically in a liquid electrolyte (tetrabutylammonium/tetrafluoroborate (TBA/TFB) in acetonitrile) at constant frequency and different applied voltages, from 2 to 10 V. Measurements of the bimorph deflections were used to determine the stress generated by the nanotube-PVA sheets. The results show that the stress generated increases with increasing amplitude of the applied voltage and can reach 1.8 MPa. This value compares well with and even exceeds the stress generated by recently obtained bimorphs made of gold nanoparticles

  20. GOLD IS EARNED FROM THE PRODUCTION OF THAI GOLD LEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Bax

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Thai people like to cover sacred objects or things dear to them with gold leaf.. Statues of Buddha are sometimes covered with so many layers of gold leaf that they become formless figures, that can hardly be recognized. Portraits of beloved ancestors, statues of elephants and grave tombs are often covered with gold leaf. If one considers the number of Thai people and the popularity of the habit, the amount of gold involved could be considerable.

  1. Activated carbons and gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, G.J.; Hancock, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The literature on activated carbon is reviewed so as to provide a general background with respect to the effect of source material and activation procedure on carbon properties, the structure and chemical nature of the surface of the activated carbon, and the nature of absorption processes on carbon. The various theories on the absorption of gold and silver from cyanide solutions are then reviewed, followed by a discussion of processes for the recovery of gold and silver from cyanide solutions using activated carbon, including a comparison with zinc precipitation

  2. Rushing for gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Jesper Bosse; Bryceson, Deborah Fahy

    2009-01-01

    African rural dwellers have faced depressed economic prospects for several decades. Now, in a number of mineral-rich countries, multiple discoveries of gold and precious stones have attracted large numbers of prospective small-scale miners. While their 'rush' to, and activities within, mining sites...... are increasingly being noted, there is little analysis of miners' mobility patterns and material outcomes. In this article, on the basis of a sample survey and interviews at two gold-mining sites in Tanzania, we probe when and why miners leave one site in favour of another. Our findings indicate that movement...

  3. Azide photochemistry for facile modification of graphitic surfaces: preparation of DNA-coated carbon nanotubes for biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam, Minoo J; Yang Wenrong; Bojarski, Barbara; Gengenbach, Thomas R; Gao Mei; Zareie, Hadi; McCall, Maxine J

    2012-01-01

    A facile, two-step method for chemically attaching single-stranded DNA to graphitic surfaces, represented here by carbon nanotubes, is reported. In the first step, an azide-containing compound, N-5-azido-nitrobenzoyloxy succinimide (ANB-NOS), is used to form photo-adducts on the graphitic surfaces in a solid-state photochemical reaction, resulting in active ester groups being oriented for the subsequent reactions. In the second step, pre-synthesized DNA strands bearing a terminal amine group are coupled in an aqueous solution with the active esters on the photo-adducts. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by attaching pre-synthesized DNA to surfaces of carbon nanotubes in two platforms—as vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a solid support and as tangled single-walled carbon nanotubes in mats. The reaction products at various stages were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two different assays were used to check that the DNA strands attached to the carbon nanotubes were able to bind their partner strands with complementary base sequences. The first assay, using partner DNA strands tethered to gold nanoparticles, enabled the sites of DNA attachment to the carbon nanotubes to be identified in TEM images. The second assay, using radioactively labelled partner DNA strands, quantified the density of functional DNA strands attached to the carbon nanotubes. The diversity of potential applications for these DNA-modified carbon-nanotube platforms is exemplified here by the successful use of a DNA-modified single-walled carbon-nanotube mat as an electrode for the specific detection of metal ions. (paper)

  4. ['Gold standard', not 'golden standard'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2005-01-01

    In medical literature, both 'gold standard' and 'golden standard' are employed to describe a reference test used for comparison with a novel method. The term 'gold standard' in its current sense in medical research was coined by Rudd in 1979, in reference to the monetary gold standard. In the same

  5. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  6. Digging for Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, John K.

    2012-01-01

    In the case of higher education, the hills are more like mountains of data that "we're accumulating at a ferocious rate," according to Gerry McCartney, CIO of Purdue University (Indiana). "Every higher education institution has this data, but it just sits there like gold in the ground," complains McCartney. Big Data and the new tools people are…

  7. Turning lead into gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    For years the field of entrepreneurship has been blinded by the alchemical promise of turning lead into gold, of finding the ones most likely to become the next Branson, Zuckerberg or Gates. The promise has been created in the midst of political and scientific agendas where certain individuals...

  8. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krantz, Kelsie E.; Christian, Jonathan H.; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Washington II, Aaron L.; Murph, Simona H.

    2016-01-01

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Kelsie E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Christian, Jonathan H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coopersmith, Kaitlin [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, II, Aaron L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murph, Simona H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-27

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  10. Tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniukov, E; Yakimchuk, D; Kozlovsky, A; Shlimas, D; Zdorovets, M; Kadyrzhanov, K

    2016-01-01

    Simple method of tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes based on template synthesis was developed. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of the obtained nanostructures was carried out. Characterization of structural features was made by methods of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry analysis. Evaluation of wall thickness is made by methods of gas permeability. Electrical conductivity of nanotubes was define in the study of their current-voltage characteristics. The possibility to control of copper nanotubes physical properties by variation of the deposition parameters was shown. (paper)

  11. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  12. Electrochemical characterization of mixed self-assembled films of water-soluble single-walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid) and Iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Agboola, BO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The redox activities of water-soluble iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine (FeTSPc) and single-walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid) (SWCNT-PABS) adsorbed on a gold surface precoated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 2...

  13. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable backs...

  14. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  15. Moessbauerspectroscopy on Gold Ruby Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslbeck, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the chemical states of gold and the physical mechanisms of the growing process of the particles under the influence of additional ingredients like tin, lead, antimony and selenium before, during and after the colouring process are investigated by using the Moessbauer spectroscopy on 197 Au, 119 Sn and 121 Sb, optical spectroscopy and X-ray-diffraction. Gold in an unnealed, colourless state of the glasses consists of monovalent forming linear bonds to two neighbouring oxygen atoms. The Lamb-Moessbauer factor of these gold oxide bondings is observed as 0.095 at 4.2 K. The gold in it's oxide state transforms to gold particles with a diameter of 3 nm to 60 nm. The size of the gold particles is quite definable within the optical spectra and certain sizes are also discernable within the Moessbauer spectra. One component of the Moessbauer spectra is assigned to the surface layer of the gold particles. By comparing this surface component with the amount of the bulk metallic core, one can calculate the size of the gold particles. In the Moessbauer spectra of the colourless glass one also can find parts of bulk metallic gold. Investigations with X-ray diffraction show that these are gold particles with a diameter of 100 nm to 300 nm and therefore have no additional colouring effect within the visible spectrum. The Moessbauer spectra on gold of the remelt glasses are similar to those which have been measured on the initial colourless glasses

  16. For the love of gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Gold is found in minute quantities and gold mining generates enormous amounts of waste materials and long history of environmental destruction: mercury in tailing, eroded land, and acid mine drainage are legacies of the past. The problem has become worse in recent years in North America, Australia, the Amazon basin, Philippines. This paper describes the economics of gold and the changes in the world economy which has precipitated the new gold rushes. Current technology uses a cyanide solution for leaching small amounts of gold from tons of waste, and mercury remains a toxic waste of gold mining. Both short and long term results of gold mining, on the environment and on indiginous populations are described

  17. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  18. Noble-Metal Chalcogenide Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourdine Zibouche

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the stability and the electronic properties of hypothetical noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes PtS2, PtSe2, PdS2 and PdSe2 by means of density functional theory calculations. Our findings show that the strain energy decreases inverse quadratically with the tube diameter, as is typical for other nanotubes. Moreover, the strain energy is independent of the tube chirality and converges towards the same value for large diameters. The band-structure calculations show that all noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes are indirect band gap semiconductors. The corresponding band gaps increase with the nanotube diameter rapidly approaching the respective pristine 2D monolayer limit.

  19. Proposal of Carbon Nanotube Inductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsubaki, K; Nakajima, Y; Hanajiri, T; Yamaguchi, H

    2006-01-01

    The inductors made of carbon Nanotube (CNT) have been proposed. Though the fabrication of the proposed inductor is still challenging and has many problems, merits of the proposed inductor are following...

  20. Atomistic simulations of nanotube fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belytschko, T.; Xiao, S. P.; Schatz, G. C.; Ruoff, R. S.

    2002-06-01

    The fracture of carbon nanotubes is studied by molecular mechanics simulations. The fracture behavior is found to be almost independent of the separation energy and to depend primarily on the inflection point in the interatomic potential. The fracture strain of a zigzag nanotube is predicted to be between 10% and 15%, which compares reasonably well with experimental results. The predicted range of fracture stresses is 65-93 GPa and is markedly higher than observed. The computed fracture strengths of chiral and armchair nanotubes are above these values. Various plausible small-scale defects do not suffice to bring the failure stresses into agreement with available experimental results. As in the experiments, the fracture of carbon nanotubes is predicted to be brittle.

  1. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Santa Fe, NM; Perry, William L [Jemez Springs, NM; Chen, Chun-Ku [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  2. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries, enabled by sophisticated fabrication, have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin...... blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits, and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two...

  3. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  4. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  5. Chronic cardiomyopathy and encephalic spongy changes in sheep experimentally fed Ateleia glazioviana Miocardiopatia crônica e degeneração esponjosa do encéfalo em ovinos intoxicados experimentalmente por Ateleia glazioviana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Buss Raffi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen mature crossbred sheep were fed different daily amounts (2.5-35g kg-1 bw of the fresh green leaves of Ateleia glazioviana for different periods of time (1-24 days. One sheep was not fed the plant and served as a control. All 16 sheep were euthanatized at different stages of the experiment, necropsied, and several organs, including heart and brain were evaluated histologically. Samples of five brain regions from three affected sheep were evaluated by electron microscopy. Clinical signs observed in three sheep included depression, anorexia, general weakness, staggering gait and prolonged recumbency. One sheep had signs of congestive heart failure. Necropsy findings included subcutaneous dependent edema and edema of the body cavities in two sheep and nutmeg liver in one. Histopathological findings included degeneration, necrosis and interstitial fibrosis in the myocardium of four sheep and vacuolation of cerebral white matter (spongy degeneration, status spongiosus in 10 sheep, although this latter change were marked only in two of those 10. The ultrastructure of the brain lesion was morphologically consistent with that found in diseases grouped as spongiform myelinopathies in which vacuolation of the myelin occurs in the absence of significant myelin breakdown or phagocytosis. The morphology and pathogenesis of the chronic cardiomyopathy and of the cerebral spongy degeneration in affected sheep in this experiment are discussed and compared with other similar conditions in domestic ruminants.Quinze ovinos mestiços adultos receberam quantidades variáveis (2,5-35g kg-1 pv, por via oral, das folhas verdes frescas de Ateleia glazioviana durante períodos de tempo que variaram de 1 a 24 dias. Um ovino não recebeu a planta e serviu como controle. Todos os 16 ovinos foram submetidos à eutanásia em diferentes estágios do experimento, necropsiados, e vários órgãos, incluindo coração e encéfalo, foram avaliados histologicamente

  6. Adsorption behavior of DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes on self-assembled monolayer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangmeister, Rebecca A; Maslar, James E; Opdahl, Aric; Tarlov, Michael J

    2007-05-22

    We have examined the adsorption of DNA-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (DNA-SWNTs) on hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and charged surfaces of alkylthiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold. Our goal is to understand how DNA-SWNTs interact with surfaces of varying chemical functionality. These samples were characterized using reflection absorption FTIR (RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. We have found that DNA-SWNTs preferentially adsorb to positively charged amine-terminated SAMs and to bare gold surfaces versus hydrophobic methyl-terminated or negatively charged carboxylic acid-terminated SAMs. Examination of the adsorption on gold of single-strand DNA (ssDNA) of the same sequence used to wrap the SWNTs suggests that the DNA wrapping plays a role in the adsorption behavior of DNA-SWNTs.

  7. The RHIC gold rush

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, T

    2003-01-01

    Physicists are colliding gold nuclei to recreate the fireball that existed in the very early universe, and they may have found evidence for quark-gluon plasma. What happens to ordinary matter as you heat it to higher and higher temperatures, or compress it to greater and greater densities? This simple question underpins a major effort to create extreme conditions in the lab, which has recently taken the shape of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This machine has been colliding gold nuclei since 2000, and has produced tantalizing hints that a new state of matter - the quark-gluon plasma - is created in the reactions. But it has also sparked surprises that are sending researchers back to the drawing board. (U.K.)

  8. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. (Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  9. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy

  10. Direct evidence of oxidized gold on supported gold catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, L; Wu, N Q; Yang, J H; Qu, F; Johnson, D L; Kung, M C; Kung, H H; Dravid, V P

    2005-03-10

    Supported gold catalysts have drawn worldwide interest due to the novel properties and potential applications in industries. However, the origin of the catalytic activity in gold nanoparticles is still not well understood. In this study, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) has been applied to investigate the nature of gold in Au (1.3 wt %)/gamma-Al2O3 and Au (2.8 wt %)/TiO2 catalysts prepared by the deposition-precipitation method. The SIMS spectrum of the supported gold catalysts presented AuO-, AuO2-, and AuOH- ion clusters. These measurements show direct evidence for oxidized gold on supported gold catalysts and may be helpful to gaining better understanding of the origin of the catalytic activity.

  11. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  12. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  13. Polymer nanotube nanocomposites: synthesis, properties, and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mittal, Vikas

    2010-01-01

    ... in these commercially important areas of polymer technology. It sums up recent advances in nanotube composite synthesis technology, provides basic introduction to polymer nanotubes nanocomposite technology for the readers new to this field, provides valuable...

  14. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, Haider, E-mail: h.butt@bham.ac.uk; Ahmed, Rajib [Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun [Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Dai, Qing [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  18. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  19. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  20. Refractive index dependent local electric field enhancement in cylindrical gold nanohole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jian

    2011-01-01

    We report on the local electric field characters in a long cylindrical gold nanohole. Theoretical calculation results based on quasi-static model show that the local environmental dielectric constant dependent electric field intensity and field distribution in the gold nanohole show quite unique properties, different from those in the thin gold nanotube. Because of the thick gold wall, no plasmon hybridization exists. So there is only one resonance frequency taking place, and the intense local field has been focused into the gold nanohole. Our main finding is that, the local field in the nanohole is largely dependent on the inner hole refractive index and outer environmental refractive index. The competition between inner hole and outer polarization leads to a non-monotonic change of the local field intensity with increasing the dielectric constant of the nanohole. This refractive index controlled local field enhancement in cylindrical gold nanohole presents a potential for tunable surface-enhanced fluorescence and novel nano-optical biosensing applications.

  1. Extracting metals with carbon nanotubes: environmental possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Alguacil, Francisco José; Cerpa Naranjo, Arisbel; Lado Touriño, María Isabel; López, Félix A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the environmental possibilities of using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for extracting metals, taken into account the characteristics of carbon nanotubes to be used as adsorbents and the influence of different factors on the adsorption processes, among them: kind of carbon nanotubes used as adsorbent, particle size, pH of solutions and diameter and length of carbon nanotubes. Also, some images of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force micr...

  2. Electronics with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avouris, P.

    2007-01-01

    From mobile phones and laptops to Xboxes and iPods, it is difficult to think of any aspect of modern life that has not been touched by developments in electronics, computing and communications over the last few decades. Many of these technological advances have arisen from our ability to create ever smaller electronic devices, in particular silicon-based field effect transistors (FETs), which has led to denser, faster and less power-hungry circuits. The problem is that this device miniaturization, or 'scaling', cannot continue forever. Fundamental scientific and technological limitations exist that will make it impossible to build better performing silicon devices below a certain size. This potential show-stopper has inspired a worldwide effort to develop alternative device technologies based on 1D materials or those that exploit the spin, as well as the charge, of electrons. One promising and, in principle, simpler approach is to maintain the operating concept of today's silicon-based FETs but to replace a key component of the device - the semiconducting silicon channel - with 1D nanostructures that have much more versatile electrical-transport properties. Among the different 1D materials that have been developed, those with the most desirable properties are 'single-walled' carbon nanotubes, which were first created in 1993 by Sumio Ijima at the NEC Fundamental Research Laboratory in Tsukuba, Japan, and by Donald Bethune of IBM's Almaden Research Center in California. These materials are hollow tubes made from rolled up sheets of carbon just one atom thick, otherwise known as graphene. In the March issue of Physics World, Phaedon Avouris discusses some of the many properties and applications of carbon nanotubes, which he describes as an 'engineer's dream' because of their exceptionally high strength and heat conduction. (U.K.)

  3. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  4. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes bridging metal electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlar, M.; Vojs, M.; Marton, M.; Vesel, M.; Redhammer, R.

    2012-01-01

    In our work we demonstrate growth of carbon nanotubes that can conductively bridge the metal electrodes. The role of different catalysts was examined. Interdigitated metal electrodes are made from copper and we are using bimetal Al/Ni as catalyst for growth of carbon nanotubes. We are using this catalyst composition for growth of the single-walled carbon nanotube network. (authors)

  5. Gold--a controversial sensitizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruze, M; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1999-01-01

    of clinical relevance, i.e., causing or aggravating a contact dermatitis. In this paper, these steps are discussed with regard to gold. With our present knowledge of contact allergy-allergic contact dermatitis, we do not recommend including gold sodium thiosulfate in the standard series. It should be applied......Until recently, gold allergy was considered to be extremely rare. Gold has been used and worshipped for thousands of years without any obvious complaints of skin problems, either in those participating in mining and other ways of prospecting, or in those wearing jewellery. When studies on contact...... allergy to gold sodium thiosulfate were published at the beginning of the 1990s, the allergic nature of the reported positive patch test reactions to gold was questioned. The major argument for such questioning was the lack of demonstrable clinical relevance in most positive reactors. A major reason...

  6. Immunological properties of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykman, Lev A; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G

    2017-03-01

    In the past decade, gold nanoparticles have attracted strong interest from the nanobiotechnological community owing to the significant progress made in robust and easy-to-make synthesis technologies, in surface functionalization, and in promising biomedical applications. These include bioimaging, gene diagnostics, analytical sensing, photothermal treatment of tumors, and targeted delivery of various biomolecular and chemical cargos. For the last-named application, gold nanoparticles should be properly fabricated to deliver the cargo into the targeted cells through effective endocytosis. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the selective penetration of gold nanoparticles into immune cells. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with immune cell receptors is discussed. As distinct from other published reviews, we present a summary of the immunological properties of gold nanoparticles. This review also summarizes what is known about the application of gold nanoparticles as an antigen carrier and adjuvant in immunization for the preparation of antibodies in vivo . For each of the above topics, the basic principles, recent advances, and current challenges are discussed. Thus, this review presents a detailed analysis of data on interaction of gold nanoparticles with immune cells. Emphasis is placed on the systematization of data over production of antibodies by using gold nanoparticles and adjuvant properties of gold nanoparticles. Specifically, we start our discussion with current data on interaction of various gold nanoparticles with immune cells. The next section describes existing technologies to improve production of antibodies in vivo by using gold nanoparticles conjugated with specific ligands. Finally, we describe what is known about adjuvant properties of bare gold or functionalized nanoparticles. In the Conclusion section, we present a short summary of reported data and some challenges and perspectives.

  7. Bats, cyanide, and gold mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    Although the boom days of prospectors and gold nuggets are long gone, modern technology enables gold to continue to be extracted from ore. Unfortunately, the extraction method has often been disastrous for bats and other wildlife, an issue I first became aware of in early 1989. Phone calls from Drs. Merlin Tuttle and Elizabeth Pierson, a BCI member and bat researcher from Berkeley, California, alerted me that bats were dying from apparent cyanide poisoning at gold mines in the western United States.

  8. The extractive metallurgy of gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongolo, K.; Mwema, M.D. [University of Lubumbashi, Zaire, Gecamines Metallurgical Research Centre, Likasi, Zaire, c/o Gecamines Brussels (Belgium)

    1998-12-15

    Moessbauer spectroscopy has been successfully used in investigation of the gold compounds present in ores and the gold species which occur during the process metallurgy of this metal. This paper is a survey of the basic recovery methods and techniques used in extractive metallurgy of gold. Process fundamentals on mineral processing, ore leaching, zinc dust cementation, adsorption on activated carbon, electrowinning and refining are examined. The recovery of gold as a by-product of the copper industry is also described. Alternative processing methods are indicated in order to shed light on new interesting research topics where Moessbauer spectroscopy could be applied.

  9. The extractive metallurgy of gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kongolo, K.; Mwema, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy has been successfully used in investigation of the gold compounds present in ores and the gold species which occur during the process metallurgy of this metal. This paper is a survey of the basic recovery methods and techniques used in extractive metallurgy of gold. Process fundamentals on mineral processing, ore leaching, zinc dust cementation, adsorption on activated carbon, electrowinning and refining are examined. The recovery of gold as a by-product of the copper industry is also described. Alternative processing methods are indicated in order to shed light on new interesting research topics where Moessbauer spectroscopy could be applied

  10. Surface-stabilized gold nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Yan, Wenfu [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst includes a solid support having stabilizing surfaces for supporting gold nanoparticles, and a plurality of gold nanoparticles having an average particle size of less than 8 nm disposed on the stabilizing surfaces. The surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst provides enhanced stability, such as at high temperature under oxygen containing environments. In one embodiment, the solid support is a multi-layer support comprising at least a first layer having a second layer providing the stabilizing surfaces disposed thereon, the first and second layer being chemically distinct.

  11. Determining gold content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, C.G.; Wormald, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for determining the gold content of a material, comprises irradiating a body of the material with neutrons and determining the intensity of γ-rays having an energy of 279 keV arising from the reaction 179 Au(nn') 179 Au → 279 keV. The apparatus has means for conveying the materials past an assembly, which has a neutron source, which does not produce neutrons having sufficient energy to excite fast neutron reactions in non-auriferous constituents. (author)

  12. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before January 30, 1934, are exchangeable, as provided...

  13. Theoretical properties of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palser, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are invariably terminated with hemi-fullerene caps. In order to investigate the effect of these caps on the electronic structure, a method is developed to enumerate every hemi-fullerene cap which is commensurate with a given nanotube body. This algorithm is then applied to nanotubes for which I + m ≤ 25. The results of this algorithm are then used to study the effects of caps with different symmetries on the electronic structure of metallic and semi-conducting nanotubes within the Hueckel model. It is found that caps can cause localised and resonance states, although the likelihood of localised states occurring in capped metallic nanotubes is shown to be small. In addition, caps induce a non-uniform charge distribution, in which negative charge tends to accumulate on pentagon vertices. The thesis ends by describing two new density matrix methods for performing linear-scaling electronic-structure calculations within the independent electron approximation. Example calculations demonstrate that these methods provide efficient and robust ways of performing linear-scaling calculations, either grand canonically (at a fixed chemical potential) or canonically (at a fixed electron count). (author)

  14. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  15. Determination of Gold from Gold Matrix of North Western Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research paper presents analytical results of Au, Mn and V concentrations of some Nigerian gold ores using two techniques: epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) and proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Fourteen samples were collected from gold fields of North Western Nigeria, prepared separately to a ...

  16. Energy conversion efficiency in nanotube optoelectronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Francois Leonard; Stewart, Derek A.

    2004-09-01

    We present theoretical performance estimates for nanotube optoelectronic devices under bias. Current-voltage characteristics of illuminated nanotube p-n junctions are calculated using a self-consistent nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Energy conversion rates reaching tens of percent are predicted for incident photon energies near the band gap energy. In addition, the energy conversion rate increases as the diameter of the nanotube is reduced, even though the quantum efficiency shows little dependence on nanotube radius. These results indicate that the quantum efficiency is not a limiting factor for use of nanotubes in optoelectronics.

  17. All carbon nanotubes are not created equal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geohegan, David B.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents the various factors that enter into consideration when choosing the source of carbon nanotubes for a specific application. Carbon nanotubes are giant molecules made of pure carbon. They have captured the imagination of the scientific community by the unique structure that provides superior physical, chemical, and electrical properties. However, a surprisingly wide disparity exists between the intrinsic properties determined under ideal conditions and the properties that carbon nanotubes exhibit in real world situations. The lack of uniformity in carbon nanotube properties is likely to be the main obstacle holding back the development of carbon nanotube applications. This tutorial addresses the nonuniformity of carbon nanotube properties from the synthesis standpoint. This synthesis-related nonuniformity is on top of the intrinsic chirality distribution that gives the ∼1:2 ratio of metallic to semiconducting nanotubes. From the standpoint of carbon bonding chemistry the variation in the quality and reproducibility of carbon nanotube materials is not unexpected. It is an intrinsic feature that is related to the metastability of carbon structures. The extent to which this effect is manifested in carbon nanotube formation is governed by the type and the kinetics of the carbon nanotube synthesis reaction. Addressing this variation is critical if nanotubes are to live up to the potential already demonstrated by their phenomenal physical properties.

  18. Activation analysis in gold industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kist, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear techniques and methods were, are, and will be very important for many fields of science, agriculture, industry, etc. Among other examples one can remember role of the nuclear medicine (radiotherapy and radiodiagnostic methods) or semiconductors (communication, computing, information, etc.) which industrial production has been on initial stage based on activation analysis. One of very illustrative examples is application of nuclear methods in gold industry. This is given by favorable nuclear properties of gold. Uzbekistan is one of the main producers of gold. Open-cast mining and hydro metallurgic extraction (using leaching by cyanide and sorption by ion-exchange resin) is the mostly used technology. The typical gold ores are sulfide and contain elevated concentration of As and Sb. That needs special technology of gold extraction. Importance of gold for Uzbekistan economy is a reason why for many years there are carried out studies concerning to gold production. These studies include also nuclear methods and their results are successfully used in gold industry. The present paper gives a brief overview for period of 25 years. For many reasons most of these studies were not published before completely. Despite some results are obtained decades ago we decided to present the overview as an example how nuclear methods can cover requirements of the whole process. We are trying to sort these studies according to methods and applications

  19. Mechanics of carbon nanotube scission under sonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, J

    2014-06-28

    As-produced carbon nanotubes come in bundles that must be exfoliated for practical applications in nanocomposites. Sonication not only causes the exfoliation of nanotube bundles but also unwanted scission. An understanding of how precisely sonication induces the scission and exfoliation of nanotubes will help maximising the degree of exfoliation while minimising scission. We present a theoretical study of the mechanics of carbon nanotube scission under sonicaton, based on the accepted view that it is caused by strong gradients in the fluid velocity near a transiently collapsing bubble. We calculate the length-dependent scission rate by taking the actual movement of the nanotube during the collapse of a bubble into account, allowing for the prediction of the temporal evolution of the length distribution of the nanotubes. We show that the dependence of the scission rate on the sonication settings and the nanotube properties results in non-universal, experiment-dependent scission kinetics potentially explaining the variety in experimentally observed scission kinetics. The non-universality arises from the dependence of the maximum strain rate of the fluid experienced by a nanotube on its length. The maximum strain rate that a nanotube experiences increases with decreasing distance to the bubble. As short nanotubes are dragged along more easily by the fluid flow they experience a higher maximum strain rate than longer nanotubes. This dependence of the maximum strain rate on nanotube length affects the scaling of tensile strength with terminal length. We find that the terminal length scales with tensile strength to the power of 1/1.16 instead of with an exponent of 1/2 as found when nanotube motion is neglected. Finally, we show that the mechanism we propose responsible for scission can also explain the exfoliation of carbon nanotube bundles.

  20. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  1. Cardiomyocyte behavior on biodegradable polyurethane/gold nanocomposite scaffolds under electrical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganji, Yasaman; Li, Qian; Quabius, Elgar Susanne; Böttner, Martina; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Kasra, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Following a myocardial infarction (MI), cardiomyocytes are replaced by scar tissue, which decreases ventricular contractile function. Tissue engineering is a promising approach to regenerate such damaged cardiomyocyte tissue. Engineered cardiac patches can be fabricated by seeding a high density of cardiac cells onto a synthetic or natural porous polymer. In this study, nanocomposite scaffolds made of gold nanotubes/nanowires incorporated into biodegradable castor oil-based polyurethane were employed to make micro-porous scaffolds. H9C2 cardiomyocyte cells were cultured on the scaffolds for one day, and electrical stimulation was applied to improve cell communication and interaction in neighboring pores. Cells on scaffolds were examined by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, revealing that the combination of scaffold design and electrical stimulation significantly increased cell confluency of H9C2 cells on the scaffolds. Furthermore, we showed that the gene expression levels of Nkx2.5, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANF) and natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB), which are functional genes of the myocardium, were up-regulated by the incorporation of gold nanotubes/nanowires into the polyurethane scaffolds, in particular after electrical stimulation. - Highlights: • Biodegradable polyurethane/gold nanocomposites for cardiomyocyte adhesion are proposed. • The nanocomposite scaffolds are porous and electrical stimulation enhances cell adhesion. • Expression levels of functional myocardium genes were upregulated after electrical stimulation.

  2. Cardiomyocyte behavior on biodegradable polyurethane/gold nanocomposite scaffolds under electrical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, Yasaman [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, 424 Hafez Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Materials Science, Dept. Biocompatible Nanomaterials, University of Kiel, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Li, Qian [Institute for Materials Science, Dept. Biocompatible Nanomaterials, University of Kiel, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Quabius, Elgar Susanne [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Str. 3, Building 27, D-24105 Kiel (Germany); Institute of Immunology, University of Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Str. 3, Building 17, D-24105 Kiel (Germany); Böttner, Martina [Department of Anatomy, University of Kiel, Otto-Hahn-Platz 8, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Selhuber-Unkel, Christine, E-mail: cse@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Dept. Biocompatible Nanomaterials, University of Kiel, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Kasra, Mehran [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, 424 Hafez Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-01

    Following a myocardial infarction (MI), cardiomyocytes are replaced by scar tissue, which decreases ventricular contractile function. Tissue engineering is a promising approach to regenerate such damaged cardiomyocyte tissue. Engineered cardiac patches can be fabricated by seeding a high density of cardiac cells onto a synthetic or natural porous polymer. In this study, nanocomposite scaffolds made of gold nanotubes/nanowires incorporated into biodegradable castor oil-based polyurethane were employed to make micro-porous scaffolds. H9C2 cardiomyocyte cells were cultured on the scaffolds for one day, and electrical stimulation was applied to improve cell communication and interaction in neighboring pores. Cells on scaffolds were examined by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, revealing that the combination of scaffold design and electrical stimulation significantly increased cell confluency of H9C2 cells on the scaffolds. Furthermore, we showed that the gene expression levels of Nkx2.5, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANF) and natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB), which are functional genes of the myocardium, were up-regulated by the incorporation of gold nanotubes/nanowires into the polyurethane scaffolds, in particular after electrical stimulation. - Highlights: • Biodegradable polyurethane/gold nanocomposites for cardiomyocyte adhesion are proposed. • The nanocomposite scaffolds are porous and electrical stimulation enhances cell adhesion. • Expression levels of functional myocardium genes were upregulated after electrical stimulation.

  3. Exploration of conductance peak splitting in carbon nanotube field effect transistors at critical field strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jeffrey D.; Licini, Jerome C.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Strachan, Doug R.; Johnston, Danvers E.; Khamis, Sam

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotube field effect transistors were produced by chemical vapor deposition growth of nanotubes on oxidized silicon substrate. Samples were back gated on doped silicon and contacted with gold/chrome contacts. Conductance measurements were performed at low temperature and high magnetic field using a dilution refrigerator and a superconducting magnet. Data was taken at 0.5 Tesla increments from 0-11Tesla. The differential conductance (dI/dV) shows an interesting asymmetry with bias voltage as well as a near zero bias conductance peak. The near zero bias conductance peak demonstrates splitting at two critical magnetic field strengths on the 0.5T scale. These two critical regimes are further explored on a finer magnetic field scale.

  4. Carbon nanotubes and methods of making carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-27

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods that can be used to produce carbon nanotubes (hereinafter CNT) having an inner diameter about 5-55 nm, methods of tuning the inner diameter of CNTs (e.g., by adjusting reaction pressure), CNTs having an inner diameter of greater than 20 nm or more, and the like.

  5. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  6. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy versus cyclic voltammetry for the electroanalytical sensing of capsaicin utilising screen printed carbon nanotube electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randviir, Edward P; Metters, Jonathan P; Stainton, John; Banks, Craig E

    2013-05-21

    Screen printed carbon nanotube electrodes (SPEs) are explored as electroanalytical sensing platforms for the detection of capsaicin in both synthetic capsaicin solutions and capsaicin extracted from chillies and chilli sauces utilising both cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). It is found that the technique which is most applicable to the electroanalytical detection of capsaicin depends upon the analyte concentration: for the case of low capsaicin concentrations, CV is a more appropriate method as capsaicin exhibits characteristic voltammetric waves of peak heights relevant to the capsaicin concentration; but for the case of high capsaicin concentrations where the voltammetric waves merge and migrate out of the potential window, EIS is shown to be a more appropriate technique, owing to the observed linear increases in R(ct) with increasing concentration. Furthermore, we explore different types of screen printed carbon nanotube electrodes, namely single- and multi- walled carbon nanotubes, finding that they are technique-specific: for the case of low capsaicin concentrations, single-walled carbon nanotube SPEs are preferable (SW-SPE); yet for the case of EIS at high capsaicin concentrations, multi-walled carbon nanotube SPEs (MW-SPE) are preferred, based upon analytical responses. The analytical performance of CV and EIS is applied to the sensing of capsaicin in grown chillies and chilli sauces and is critically compared to 'gold standard' HPLC analysis.

  7. Stretchable conducting gold films prepared with composite MWNT/PDMS substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. U. Manzoor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Novel stretchable conducting films were prepared by depositing gold layers onto polymer nano-composites substrates formed by in-situ crosslinking of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS in the presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT. The MWNT content interferes with the PDMS cure reaction giving variations in thermal degradation, solvent swelling, mechanical and electrical properties. Tensile cycling experiments were carried out on the gold-coated PDMS and nano-composite substrates SEM analysis and electrical measurements demonstrated that the crack widening and increased electrical resistance observed during strain cycling were reversible. The inclusion of 8 % MWNT into PDMS brought more micro-cracking in the gold layer yet reduced the electrical resistance of the gold-coated samples by 172X at 5 % strain, 38X at 10 % strain and 19X at 20 %. Hence, this improvement in conduction is attributed to assisted-conduction through the MWNT loaded substrate. This mechanism results in a more stable and reproducible electrical behaviour, making electrical conduction less critically dependent on defects in the gold layer.

  8. An overview of synthetic strategies and current applications of gold nanorods in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manish Lakhani, Prit; Vishnu Kiran Rompicharla, Sri; Ghosh, Balaram; Biswas, Swati

    2015-10-01

    Photothermal therapy, also referred to as optical hyperthermia or photothermal ablation, is an emerging strategy for treating solid tumours. Colloidal gold converts the absorbed light into localized heat via a non-radiative mechanism, surface plasmon resonance, which ablates the solid tumours. Several plasmon resonating nanostructures, including gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), gold nanorods (AuNRs), gold nanoshells, gold nanocages, copper sulphide and carbon nanotubes, have shown potential for photo-activated cancer therapy. Generally, spherical AuNPs display absorption maxima between 500-550 nm, making them inefficient due to low tissue penetration. On the other hand, AuNRs absorb light in the near-infrared (NIR) region that penetrates deeper with higher spatial precision, and causes no damage to the surrounding healthy tissues due to the low energy absorption of NIR light by normal tissue. Moreover, the absorption range of light can be fine-tuned to the NIR region by adjusting the aspect ratios of AuNRs. However, large-scale synthesis and stability of this colloidal system still poses challenges for clinical translation. In this review, we discuss various strategies applied up to now for the synthesis of AuNRs. Current trends in the pre-clinical development of multifunctional AuNRs with emphasis on preparation and application strategies in cancer therapy have been delineated.

  9. Stealing the Gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittington, S G

    2005-01-01

    Stealing the Gold presents a survey of some of the most exciting topics in condensed matter physics today, from the perspective of the pioneering work of Sam Edwards. Original articles from leaders in the field, including several Nobel laureates, highlight the historical development as well as new and emerging areas. This book would be of interest to graduate students and researchers in condensed matter physics, statistical physics and theoretical physics. Over the course of nearly half a century, Sam Edwards has led the field of condensed matter physics in new directions, ranging from the electronic and statistical properties of disordered materials to the mechanical properties of granular materials. Along the way he has provided seminal contributions to fluid mechanics, polymer science, surface science and statistical mechanics. This volume celebrates the immense scope of his influence by presenting a collection of original articles by recognized leaders in theoretical physics, including two Nobel laureates and a Fields medalist, which describe the genesis, evolution and future prospects of the various sub-fields of condensed matter theory, along with reprints of a selection of Edwards' seminal papers that helped give birth to the subject. Stealing the Gold, Edwards' favourite caricature of the relationship between theoretical physicists and nature, will be of singular interest to graduate students looking for an overview of some of the most exciting areas of theoretical physics, as well as to researchers in condensed matter physics looking for a comprehensive, broad and uniquely incisive snapshot of their subject at the dawn of the 21st century. (book review)

  10. Emerging Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits, Modeling, and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yao; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    2010-01-01

    Current transport and dynamic models of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are presented. A model of single-walled carbon nanotube as interconnect is also presented and extended in modeling of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. These models are applied in studying the performances of circuits such as the complementary carbon nanotube inverter pair and carbon nanotube as interconnect. Cadence/Spectre simulations show that carbon nanotube field-effect transistor circuits can operate a...

  11. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M; Sahu, Rakesh P; Wallar, Cameron J; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K

    2017-02-17

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g -1 and  an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm -2 at a scan rate of 2 mV s -1 is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm -2 .

  12. Shape evolution of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Liang, W. S.; Geng, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The tetraoctylammonium bromide-stabilized gold nanoparticles have been successfully fabricated. The shape evolution of these nanoparticles under different annealing temperatures has been investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. After an annealing at 100 o C for 30 min, the average diameters of the gold nanoparticles change a little. However, the shapes of gold nanoparticles change drastically, and facets appear in most nanoparticles. After an annealing at 200 o C for 30 min, not only the size but also the shape changes a lot. After an annealing at 300 o C for 30 min, two or more gold nanoparticles coalesce into bigger ones. In addition, because of the presence of Cu grid during the annealing, some gold particles become the nucleation sites of Cu 2 O nanocubes, which possess a microstructure of gold-particle core/Cu 2 O shell. These Au/Cu 2 O heterostructure nanocubes can only be formed at a relatively high temperature (≥300 o C). The results can provide some insights on controlling the shapes of gold nanoparticles.

  13. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This

  14. Carbon nanotube-chalcogenide composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stehlík, Š.; Orava, J.; Kohoutek, T.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.; Zima, Vítězslav; Hara, T.; Matsui, Y.; Ueda, K.; Pumera, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 1 (2010), s. 144-149 ISSN 0022-4596 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0208 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbon nanotube s * chalcogenide glasses * composites Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.261, year: 2010

  15. Platinum-carbon nanotube interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bittencourt, C.; Hecq, M.; Felten, A.; Pireaux, J. J.; Ghijsen, J.; Felicissimo, M. P.; Rudolf, P.; Drube, W.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between evaporated Pt and pristine or oxygen-plasma-treated multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. Pt is found to nucleate at defect sites, whether initially present or introduced by oxygen plasma treatment. The plasma treatment induces a uniform dispersion of Pt

  16. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  17. Polypyrrole nanotubes: mechanism of formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecká, J.; Kopecký, D.; Vrňata, M.; Fitl, P.; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana; Prokeš, J.; Sapurina, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2014), s. 1551-1558 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08944S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : conducting polymer * polypyrrole * nanotubes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.840, year: 2014

  18. Synthesis of PbI(2) single-layered inorganic nanotubes encapsulated within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Laura; Ballesteros, Belén; Batista, Eudar; Magén, César; Arenal, Raúl; Oró-Solé, Judith; Rurali, Riccardo; Tobias, Gerard

    2014-04-02

    The template assisted growth of single-layered inorganic nanotubes is reported. Single-crystalline lead iodide single-layered nanotubes have been prepared using the inner cavities of carbon nanotubes as hosting templates. The diameter of the resulting inorganic nanotubes is merely dependent on the diameter of the host. This facile method is highly versatile opening up new horizons in the preparation of single-layered nanostructures. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Directed Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, Axel Rune Fredrik; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a complement to common "top-down" lithography techniques, "bottom-up" assembly techniques are emerging as promising tools to build nanoscale structures in a predictable way. Gold nanoparticles that are stable and relatively easy to synthesize are important building blocks in many such structures...... due to their useful optical and electronic properties. Programmed assembly of gold nanoparticles in one, two, and three dimensions is therefore of large interest. This review focuses on the progress from the last three years in the field of directed gold nanoparticle and nanorod assembly using...

  20. GOLD and the fixed ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vestbo J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Jørgen VestboUniversity of Manchester, Manchester, UKI read with interest the paper entitled "Diagnosis of airway obstruction in the elderly: contribution of the SARA study" by Sorino et al in a recent issue of this journal.1 Being involved in the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Diseases (GOLD, it is nice to see the interest sparked by the GOLD strategy document. However, in the paper by Sorino et al, there are a few misunderstandings around GOLD and the fixed ratio (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced volume vital capacity < 0.70 that need clarification.View original paper by Sorino and colleagues.

  1. Grafting of Gold Nanoparticles on Glass Using Sputtered Gold Interlayers

    OpenAIRE

    Kvítek, Ondřej; Hendrych, Robin; Kolská, Zdeňka; Švorčík, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Three-step preparation of nanostructured Au layer on glass substrate is described. The procedure starts with sputtered gold interlayer, followed by grafting with dithiols and final coverage with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Successful binding of dithiols on the sputtered Au film was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. AuNPs bound to the surface were observed using atomic force microscopy. Both single nanoparticles and their aggregates were observed. UV-Vis spectra show b...

  2. Facile Synthesis of Ternary Boron Carbonitride Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Lijie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a novel and facile approach for the synthesis of ternary boron carbonitride (B–C–N nanotubes was reported. Growth occurred by heating simple starting materials of boron powder, zinc oxide powder, and ethanol absolute at 1150 °C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. As substrate, commercial stainless steel foil with a typical thickness of 0.05 mm played an additional role of catalyst during the growth of nanotubes. The nanotubes were characterized by SEM, TEM, EDX, and EELS. The results indicate that the synthesized B–C–N nanotubes exhibit a bamboo-like morphology and B, C, and N elements are homogeneously distributed in the nanotubes. A catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism was proposed for the growth of the nanotubes.

  3. Telescopic nanotube device for hot nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Adrian; Woods, Lilia M

    2014-12-30

    A device for maintaining a constant tip-surface distance for producing nanolithography patterns on a surface using a telescopic nanotube for hot nanolithography. An outer nanotube is attached to an AFM cantilever opposite a support end. An inner nanotube is telescopically disposed within the outer nanotube. The tip of the inner nanotube is heated to a sufficiently high temperature and brought in the vicinity of the surface. Heat is transmitted to the surface for thermal imprinting. Because the inner tube moves telescopically along the outer nanotube axis, a tip-surface distance is maintained constant due to the vdW force interaction, which in turn eliminates the need of an active feedback loop.

  4. Transport diffusion in deformed carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiamei; Chen, Peirong; Zheng, Dongqin; Zhong, Weirong

    2018-03-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, we have studied the transport diffusion of gas in deformed carbon nanotubes. Perfect carbon nanotube and various deformed carbon nanotubes are modeled as transport channels. It is found that the transport diffusion coefficient of gas does not change in twisted carbon nanotubes, but changes in XY-distortion, Z-distortion and local defect carbon nanotubes comparing with that of the perfect carbon nanotube. Furthermore, the change of transport diffusion coefficient is found to be associated with the deformation factor. The relationship between transport diffusion coefficient and temperature is also discussed in this paper. Our results may contribute to understanding the mechanism of molecular transport in nano-channel.

  5. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  6. Graphitization of amorphous carbon on a multiwall carbon nanotube surface by catalyst-free heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Koji; Karita, Motoyuki; Saito, Yahachi

    2011-08-01

    Structural changes in amorphous carbon coating the surfaces of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under applying an electric current were investigated by in situ transmission electron microscopy with simultaneous measurements of the bias voltage and electric current. Joule heating transformed amorphous carbon on the surfaces of individual MWNTs suspended between gold electrodes into graphite layers even without a metal catalyst through a phase of glasslike carbon. The MWNTs after the formation of ordered surface layers sustained a high current with a density of up to 3.1 × 108 A/cm2.

  7. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed bid...

  8. Size fraction assaying of gold bearing rocks (for gold extraction) by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel method has been developed for processing and extraction of gold from gold bearing rocks for use by small-scale gold miners in Ghana. The methodology involved crushing of gold bearing hard rocks to fine particles to form a composite sample and screening at a range of sizes. Gold distribution in the composite ...

  9. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  10. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  11. Ordered metal nanotube arrays fabricated by PVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, F; Morant, C; Campo, T; Sanz, J M; Elizalde, E

    2010-02-01

    In this work we report a simple method to fabricate ordered arrays of metal nanotubes. This method is based on the deposition of a metal by PVD onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template. The dimensions of the synthesized nanotubes depend both on the AAO template and on the deposited metal. In fact, it is observed that the aspect ratios of the nanotubes clearly depend significantly on the metal, ranging from 0.6 (Fe) to at least 3 (Zr).

  12. Functional Materials based on Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Adrian Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, no matter if they are single-walled or multi-walled, are an integral component in the vastly growing field of nanotechnology. Since their discovery by TEM and the invention of numerous large-scale production techniques, nanotubes are close to making their way into industrial products. Although many properties and modification processes are still under intensive research, the first real-market applications for carbon nanotubes have already been presented. However, if function...

  13. Carbon nanotubes as heat dissipaters in microelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Paz, Alejandro; García-Lastra, Juan María; Markussen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We review our recent modelling work of carbon nanotubes as potential candidates for heat dissipation in microelectronics cooling. In the first part, we analyze the impact of nanotube defects on their thermal transport properties. In the second part, we investigate the loss of thermal properties...... of nanotubes in presence of an interface with various substances, including air and water. Comparison with previous works is established whenever is possible....

  14. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped...... in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping...... of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing...

  15. Gold, currencies and market efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2016-05-01

    Gold and currency markets form a unique pair with specific interactions and dynamics. We focus on the efficiency ranking of gold markets with respect to the currency of purchase. By utilizing the Efficiency Index (EI) based on fractal dimension, approximate entropy and long-term memory on a wide portfolio of 142 gold price series for different currencies, we construct the efficiency ranking based on the extended EI methodology we provide. Rather unexpected results are uncovered as the gold prices in major currencies lay among the least efficient ones whereas very minor currencies are among the most efficient ones. We argue that such counterintuitive results can be partly attributed to a unique period of examination (2011-2014) characteristic by quantitative easing and rather unorthodox monetary policies together with the investigated illegal collusion of major foreign exchange market participants, as well as some other factors discussed in some detail.

  16. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-08-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644K, a glass transition temperature of 401K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is ˜350Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.

  17. Biomass processing over gold catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Simakova, Olga A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2014-01-01

    The book describes the valorization of biomass-derived compounds over gold catalysts. Since biomass is a rich renewable feedstock for diverse platform molecules, including those currently derived from petroleum, the interest in various transformation routes has become intense. Catalytic conversion of biomass is one of the main approaches to improving the economic viability of biorefineries.  In addition, Gold catalysts were found to have outstanding activity and selectivity in many key reactions. This book collects information about transformations of the most promising and important compounds derived from cellulose, hemicelluloses, and woody biomass extractives. Since gold catalysts possess high stability under oxidative conditions, selective oxidation reactions were discussed more thoroughly than other critical reactions such as partial hydrogenation, acetalization, and isomerization. The influence of reaction conditions, the role of the catalyst, and the advantages and disadvantages of using gold are pre...

  18. Core-shell titanium dioxide-titanium nitride nanotube arrays with near-infrared plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsinezhad, Samira; Shanavas, Thariq; Mahdi, Najia; Askar, Abdelrahman M.; Kar, Piyush; Sharma, Himani; Shankar, Karthik

    2018-04-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a ceramic with high electrical conductivity which in nanoparticle form, exhibits localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the visible region of the solar spectrum. The ceramic nature of TiN coupled with its dielectric loss factor being comparable to that of gold, render it attractive for CMOS polarizers, refractory plasmonics, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and a whole host of sensing applications. We report core-shell TiO2-TiN nanotube arrays exhibiting LSPR peaks in the range 775-830 nm achieved by a simple, solution-based, low cost, large area-compatible fabrication route that does not involve laser-writing or lithography. Self-organized, highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays were grown by electrochemical anodization of Ti thin films on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass substrates and then conformally coated with a thin layer of TiN using atomic layer deposition. The effects of varying the TiN layer thickness and thermal annealing on the LSPR profiles were also investigated. Modeling the TiO2-TiN core-shell nanotube structure using two different approaches, one employing effective medium approximations coupled with Fresnel coefficients, resulted in calculated optical spectra that closely matched the experimentally measured spectra. Modeling provided the insight that the observed near-infrared resonance was not collective in nature, and was mainly attributable to the longitudinal resonance of annular nanotube-like TiN particles redshifted due to the presence of the higher permittivity TiO2 matrix. The resulting TiO2-TiN core-shell nanotube structures also function as visible light responsive photocatalysts, as evidenced by their photoelectrochemical water-splitting performance under light emitting diode illumination using 400, 430 and 500 nm photons.

  19. Immunological properties of gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Dykman, Lev A.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, gold nanoparticles have attracted strong interest from the nanobiotechnological community owing to the significant progress made in robust and easy-to-make synthesis technologies, in surface functionalization, and in promising biomedical applications. These include bioimaging, gene diagnostics, analytical sensing, photothermal treatment of tumors, and targeted delivery of various biomolecular and chemical cargos. For the last-named application, gold nanoparticles should be...

  20. Quantum conductance of carbon nanotube peapods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S.C.; Louie, Steven G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a first-principles study of the quantum conductance of hybrid nanotube systems consisting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) encapsulating either an isolated single C60 molecule or a chain of C60 molecules (nanotube peapods). The calculations show a rather weak bonding interaction between the fullerenes and the SWCNTs. The conductance of a (10,10) SWCNT with a single C60 molecule is virtually unaffected at the Fermi level, but exhibits quantized resonant reductions at the molecular levels. The nanotube peapod arrangement gives rise to high density of states for the fullerene highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital bands

  1. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  2. Thermal conductivity of deformed carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Rong; Zhang, Mao-Ping; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of four types of deformed carbon nanotubes by using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. It is reported that various deformations have different influences on the thermal properties of carbon nanotubes. For bending carbon nanotubes, the thermal conductivity is independent of the bending angle. However, the thermal conductivity increases lightly with xy-distortion and decreases rapidly with z-distortion. The thermal conductivity does not change with the screw ratio before the breaking of carbon nanotubes, but it decreases sharply after the critical screw ratio.

  3. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  4. Coulomb drag in multiwall armchair carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, A.M.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the transresistivity rho(21) between two concentric armchair nanotubes in a diffusive multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F). We approximate the tight-binding band structure by two crossing bands with a linear dispersion near the Fermi...... surface. The cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes and the different parities of the Bloch states are accounted for in the evaluation of the effective Coulomb interaction between charges in the concentric nanotubes. We find a broad peak in rho(21) as a function of temperature at roughly T similar to 0.4T...

  5. Goldenphilicity: Luminescent gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansores, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the solids and molecules different types of bonds are presented depending on the involved atoms, covalent bonds are common among elements of open shell, where more bond orbitals are filled than anti bond orbitals. It is expected that ionic bonds among closed shell atoms which have charges of opposite sign. Bonds type Van der Waals are presented among molecules which have a bipolar moment. It would not be expected bonds among zero charge species, or more generally with the same nominal charge and in any case the attractive forces would be very small. In fact it is expected that two metallic cations to be repelled each other. There recently is evidence that in organic or organometallic compounds could exist attractive interactions between two cations of the d 8 -d 10 -s 2 families. These bonds are weak but stronger than those of Van der Waals. They are compared with the hydrogen bonds. In this work it was reviewed some examples in which the goldenphilicity plays an important role in the luminescence that the gold complexes present. Examples of mono, bi and trinuclear and the structures that these organometallic compounds could take are examined. (Author)

  6. Gold and palladium adsorption from leached electronic scrap using ordered mesoporous carbon nanoscaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) nanoscaffolds are engineered agglomerates of carbon nanotubes held together by small carbon nanofibers with uniform pore sizes, high pore volume, and high channel permeability. These materials exhibit very high affinity for the adsorption of gold from aqueous acidic mixtures. The efficiency of gold recovery is comparable to those typically accomplished using biopolymer-based adsorbents. The adsorption efficiency for other precious metals such as palladium and platinum is lower. Studies on the precious metal (Au, Pd) adsorption on OMC materials from actual liquors of leached electronics will be presented. Adsorption properties will be compared for several different sorbents used for the recovery of precious metals. The leach liquor compositions for three different types of electronic scrap materials (personal computer board, cell phone and tv input/output board) will be presented. The sorption efficiencies for Au, Pd, together with a spectrum of competing and non-competing metals, from such leach mixtures will be compared.

  7. Gold and palladium adsorption from leached electronic scrap using ordered mesoporous carbon nanoscaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) nanoscaffolds are engineered agglomerates of carbon nanotubes held together by small carbon nanofibers with uniform pore sizes, high pore volume, and high channel permeability. These materials exhibit very high affinity for the adsorption of gold from aqueous acidic mixtures. The efficiency of gold recovery is comparable to those typically accomplished using biopolymer-based adsorbents. The adsorption efficiency for other precious metals such as palladium and platinum is lower. Studies on the precious metal (Au, Pd) adsorption on OMC materials from actual liquors of leached electronics will be presented. Adsorption properties will be compared for several different sorbents used for the recovery of precious metals. The leach liquor compositions for three different types of electronic scrap materials (personal computer board, cell phone and tv input/output board) will be presented. The sorption efficiencies for Au, Pd, together with a spectrum of competing and non-competing metals, from such leach mixtures will be compared.

  8. Electrical Characterization and Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing Properties of Gold/Nafion:Polypyrrole/MWCNTs Electrochemical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Saitta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical devices using as substrates copier grade transparency sheets are developed by using ion conducting Nafion:polypyrrole mixtures, deposited between gold bottom electrodes and upper electrodes based on Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs. The electrical properties of the Nafion:polypyrrole blends and of the gold/Nafion:polypyrrole/MWCNTs devices are investigated under dry conditions and in deionized water by means of frequency dependent impedance measurements and time domain electrical characterization. According to current-voltage measurements carried out in deionized water, the steady state current forms cycles characterized by redox peaks, the intensity and position of which reversibly change in response to H2O2, with a lower detection limit in the micromolar range. The sensitivity that is obtained is comparable with that of other electrochemical sensors that however, unlike our devices, require supporting electrolytes.

  9. Application of Nanoparticles/Nanowires and Carbon Nanotubes for Breast Cancer Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2005-01-01

    .... Variety of techniques such as fabrication of single wall carbon nanotubes, functionalization of nanotubes with antibodies, interaction of cells with antibodies on nanotube surfaces, and finally cell...

  10. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    CVD) and thermal chemical vapor deposition (T-CVD), are developed. The physical properties of the resulting CNTs are analyzed using Raman...MWCNTs) [1]. In the ensuing years the characterization of unique and phenomenal mechanical, electrical, thermal , and chemical properties of CNTs has...rediscovered or introduced carbon nanotubes to the scientific community as a by-product of an electric arc discharge method of synthesizing C60 fullerenes [1

  13. Underwater Acoustic Carbon Nanotube Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    electrically connected to the transducer cable. A silicon sealant material is used to for attachment points on the thermophone. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF...300 degrees Celsius) rated silicon sealant material 62 is used to for attachment points on the thermophone 10. [0030] Advantages and features of...of a cable is soldered to the carbon nanotube material chip at electrodes of the material chip. A high temperature rated silicon sealant is used for attachment points on the thermophone.

  14. Oriented nanotube electrodes for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Arthur J.; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Qing

    2013-03-05

    An electrode having an oriented array of multiple nanotubes is disclosed. Individual nanotubes have a lengthwise inner pore defined by interior tube walls which extends at least partially through the length of the nanotube. The nanotubes of the array may be oriented according to any identifiable pattern. Also disclosed is a device featuring an electrode and methods of fabrication.

  15. Structure and bonding in gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in chemical applications of 197 Au Moessbauer spectroscopy are reviewed. For gold(I) and gold(III), systematic variations in isomer shift and quadrupole splitting are seen as the ligands are changed; the effects of change in coordination number of the gold atoms are also systematic. Data for gold(II) systems involving gold-gold bonds lie between those for corresponding gold(I) and gold(III) materials, showing a small increase in isomer shift and a larger increase in quadrupole splitting as the oxidation state decreases; these trends are explained in terms of the structures. Data for mixed-metal cluster compounds are much more sensitive to structural effects than in homonuclear clusters. Both sets of data show systematic changes with increase in the number of metal atoms to which the gold atom is bound. The connectivity also influences the recoil-free fraction. (orig.)

  16. Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takale, Balaram S; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2014-04-07

    Organic synthesis using gold has gained tremendous attention in last few years, especially heterogeneous gold catalysis based on gold nanoparticles has made its place in almost all organic reactions, because of the robust and green nature of gold catalysts. In this context, gold nanopore (AuNPore) with a 3D metal framework is giving a new dimension to heterogeneous gold catalysts. Interestingly, AuNPore chemistry is proving better than gold nanoparticles based chemistry. In this review, along with recent advances, major discoveries in heterogeneous gold catalysis are discussed.

  17. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  18. Grafting of Gold Nanoparticles on Glass Using Sputtered Gold Interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Kvítek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-step preparation of nanostructured Au layer on glass substrate is described. The procedure starts with sputtered gold interlayer, followed by grafting with dithiols and final coverage with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. Successful binding of dithiols on the sputtered Au film was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. AuNPs bound to the surface were observed using atomic force microscopy. Both single nanoparticles and their aggregates were observed. UV-Vis spectra show broadening of surface plasmon resonance peak after AuNPs binding caused by aggregation of AuNPs on the sample surface. Zeta potential measurements suggest that a large part of the dithiol molecules are preferentially bound to the gold interlayer via both –SH groups.

  19. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Zeke [Darien, IL; Hassanein, Ahmed [Bolingbrook, IL

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  20. Interaction of multiwalled carbon nanotube produces structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) has been found to produce structural changes in Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA). The interaction or binding of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was investigated in order to discover if it brings about any significant changes of the DNA double helix using CD spectra ...

  1. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-07-08

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  2. Electronic properties of magnetically doped nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Electronic properties of magnetically doped nanotubes. KEIVAN ESFARJANI*, Z CHEN† and Y KAWAZOE†. Sharif Institute of Technology, and Institute for Physics and Mathematics, Tehran, Iran. †Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. Abstract. Effect of doping of carbon nanotubes by magnetic ...

  3. Nanoscratch technique for aligning multiwalled carbon nanotubes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to align a MWCNT, as well as the energy required to align a gram of nanotubes, has been estimated. The method demonstrated represents an economical approach for large-scale synthesis of aligned MWCNTs at low costs. Keywords. Carbon nanotube; arc discharge; characterization; alignment; nanoscratch. 1.

  4. Surface Chemistry of Gold Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Nathan D; Lin, Wayne; Hinman, Joshua G; Dennison, Jordan M; Vartanian, Ariane M; Abadeer, Nardine S; Grzincic, Elissa M; Jacob, Lisa M; Li, Ji; Murphy, Catherine J

    2016-10-04

    Gold nanorods have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique optical properties, and they have the potential to greatly impact many areas of science and technology. Understanding the structure and chemical makeup of their surfaces as well as how to tailor them is of paramount importance in the development of their successful applications. This Feature Article reviews the current understanding of the surface chemistry of as-synthesized gold nanorods, methods of tailoring the surface chemistry of gold nanorods with various inorganic and organic coatings/ligands, and the techniques employed to characterize ligands on the surface of gold nanorods as well as the associated measurement challenges. Specifically, we address the challenges of determining how thick the ligand shell is, how many ligands per nanorod are present on the surface, and where the ligands are located in regiospecific and mixed-ligand systems. We conclude with an outlook on the development of the surface chemistry of gold nanorods leading to the development of a synthetic nanoparticle surface chemistry toolbox analogous to that of synthetic organic chemistry and natural product synthesis.

  5. Continuous flow synthesis and characterization of tailor-made bare gold nanoparticles for use in SERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López -Lorente, Ángela I.; Valcárcel, Miguel; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles in a stainless steel continuous flow tubular reactor using tetrachloroauric acid as a precursor but without using a classical reducing agent. Gold(III) ion is reduced by stainless steel to form gold nanoparticles which are collected at the end of the coil. A single-phase system is introduced that generates dispersed nanoparticles in the absence of reducing agents on their surface. By controlling flow rates and temperature, the size of the nanoparticles can be tuned in the range from 24 nm to 36 nm. The reproducibility of the preparation was investigated, relative standard deviation of both the wavelength of the peak and the intensity of the plasmonic absorption band were determined and found to vary by 0.15 % and 6.5 %, respectively. Flow synthesis is found to be an excellent alternative to chemical methods to produce stable gold nanoparticles of varying size in an efficiently way. The particles obtained also perform very well when used as a substrate in surface enhanced Raman scattering as shown by the characterization of carboxylated single walled carbon nanotubes. (author)

  6. The formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Liren; Lu, Junzhe; Zhu, Hengjiang

    2018-02-01

    The nuclei and the formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes, namely, single-, double-, and triple-walled carbon nanotubes are simulated by the first principle density functional theory. The formation mechanism from nuclei to corresponding infinitely long carbon nanotubes occurs spirally and via absorbing carbon atoms layer by layer. Carbon atoms at the open end are metastable state compared with ones in the tube wall or the closed end, which indicate the growth point of chiral carbon nanotubes is located at the open end. Growth of outer layer tubular clusters takes precedence over the inner layer in the process of forming multi-walled nuclear structures. Because of the ratio of carbon atoms at the open end to all carbon atoms decreases, the stability of the tubular clusters increases with their length. The infinitely long carbon nanotubes are obtained by executing periodic boundary conditions depend on corresponding nuclear structures.

  7. Continuum modeling of boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J; Wu, J; Hwang, K C; Huang, Y

    2008-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes display unique properties and have many potential applications. A finite-deformation shell theory is developed for boron nitride nanotubes directly from the interatomic potential to account for the effect of bending and curvature. Its constitutive relation accounts for the nonlinear, multi-body atomistic interactions, and therefore can model the important effect of tube chirality and radius. The theory is then used to determine whether a single-wall boron nitride nanotube can be modeled as a linear elastic isotropic shell. Instabilities of boron nitride nanotubes under different loadings (e.g., tension, compression, and torsion) are also studied. It is shown that the tension instability of boron nitride nanotubes is material instability, while the compression and torsion instabilities are structural instabilities.

  8. Phage based green chemistry for gold ion reduction and gold retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawati, Magdiel I; Xie, Jianping; Leong, David T

    2014-01-22

    The gold mining industry has taken its toll on the environment, triggering the development of more environmentally benign processes to alleviate the waste load release. Here, we demonstrate the use of bacteriophages (phages) for biosorption and bioreduction of gold ions from aqueous solution, which potentially can be applied to remediate gold ions from gold mining waste effluent. Phage has shown a remarkably efficient sorption of gold ions with a maximum gold adsorption capacity of 571 mg gold/g dry weight phage. The product of this phage mediated process is gold nanocrystals with the size of 30-630 nm. Biosorption and bioreduction processes are mediated by the ionic and covalent interaction between gold ions and the reducing groups on the phage protein coat. The strategy offers a simple, ecofriendly and feasible option to recover of gold ions to form readily recoverable products of gold nanoparticles within 24 h.

  9. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  10. Schottky barriers at metal-finite semiconducting carbon nanotube interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Yongqiang; Ratner, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Electronic properties of metal-finite semiconducting carbon nanotube interfaces are studied as a function of the nanotube length using a self-consistent tight-binding theory. We find that the shape of the potential barrier depends on the long-range tail of the charge transfer, leading to an injection barrier thickness comparable to half of the nanotube length until the nanotube reaches the bulk limit. The conductance of the nanotube junction shows a transition from tunneling to thermally-acti...

  11. Gold nanoparticles stabilized by chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana N.; Oliveira, Maria Jose A.; Silva, Andressa A. da; Leal, Jessica; Batista, Jorge G.S.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2015-01-01

    In our laboratory has been growing the interest in studying gold nanoparticles and for this reason, the aim of this work is report the first results of the effect of chitosan as stabilizer in gold nanoparticle formulation. AuNPs were synthesized by reducing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl 4 ) using NaBH 4 or gamma irradiation (25kGy) as reduction agent. The chitosan (3 mol L -1 ) was added at 0.5; 1.0 and 1.5 mL. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their physical stability was determined using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer over one week during storage at room temperature. Absorption measurements indicated that the plasmon resonance wavelength appears at a wavelength around 530 nm. Has been observed that Chitosan in such quantities were not effective in stabilizing the AuNPs. (author)

  12. Rapid and Controlled In Situ Growth of Noble Metal Nanostructures within Halloysite Clay Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamzadeh, Taha; Islam Khan, Md Shahidul; Riche', Kyle; Lvov, Yuri M; Stavitskaya, Anna V; Wiley, John B

    2017-11-14

    A rapid (≤2 min) and high-yield low-temperature synthesis has been developed for the in situ growth of gold nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled sizes in the interior of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs). A combination of HAuCl 4 in ethanol/toluene, oleic acid, and oleylamine surfactants and ascorbic acid reducing agent with mild heating (55 °C) readily lead to the growth of targeted nanostructures. The sizes of Au NPs are tuned mainly by adjusting nucleation and growth rates. Further modification of the process, through an increase in ascorbic acid, allows for the formation of nanorods (NRs)/nanowires within the HNTs. This approach is not limited to gold-a modified version of this synthetic strategy can also be applied to the formation of Ag NPs and NRs within the clay nanotubes. The ability to readily grow such core-shell nanosystems is important to their further development as nanoreactors and active catalysts. NPs within the tube interior can further be manipulated by the electron beam. Growth of Au and Ag could be achieved under a converged electron beam suggesting that both Au@HNT and Ag@HNT systems can be used for the fundamental studies of NP growth/attachment.

  13. A Selective Iodide Ion Sensor Electrode Based on Functionalized ZnO Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, ZnO nanotubes were fabricated on a gold coated glass substrate through chemical etching by the aqueous chemical growth method. For the first time a nanostructure-based iodide ion selective electrode was developed. The ZnO nanotubes were functionalized with miconazole ion exchanger and the electromotive force (EMF was measured by the potentiometric method. The iodide ion sensor exhibited a linear response over a wide range of concentrations (1 × 10−6 to 1 × 10−1 M and excellent sensitivity of –62 ± 1 mV/decade. The detection limit of the proposed sensor was found to be 5 × 10−7 M. The effects of pH, temperature, additive, plasticizer and stabilizer on the potential response of iodide ion selective electrode were also studied. The proposed iodide ion sensor demonstrated a fast response time of less than 5 s and high selectivity against common organic and the inorganic anions. All the obtained results revealed that the iodide ion sensor based on functionalized ZnO nanotubes may be used for the detection of iodide ion in environmental water samples, pharmaceutical products and other real samples.

  14. Immunosensors Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT for the Detection of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondes BOURIGUA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to their properties, Single-Walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT open a new way to the fabrication of Immunosensors with the particularity to amplify the response signal from antibody–antigen interaction and to improve the Immunosensors characteristics. In this context, two new impedimetric immunosensors were developed by immobilizing antibody on Single-Walled carbon, the later was immobilized following two ways the first consist of immobilizing the carbon nanotubes on a polypyrrole layer by adsorption and the second consist of functionalized gold with amino thiol and then immobilizing the carbon nanotubes with covalent binding. The electrical properties and the morphology of the immunosensors have been characterized respectively by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and Atomic Force Spectroscopy. A low detection limit for both immunosensors was determined as 1 pg/ml and linear ranges up to 10 ng/ml with polypyrrole and up to 100 ng/ml with amino thiol were obtained. Moreover, the studied Immunosensors exhibited high sensitivity, stability and reproducibility.

  15. Nanobubble trouble on gold surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Kuhle, A.; Garnaes, J.

    2003-01-01

    When analyzing surfaces related to biosensors with in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), the existence of nanobubbles called for our attention. The bubbles seem to form spontaneously when gold surfaces are immersed in clean water and are probably a general phenomenon at water-solid interfaces....... Besides from giving rise to undesired effects in, for example, biosensors, nanobubbles can also cause artifacts in AFM imaging. We have observed nanobubbles on unmodified gold surfaces, immersed in clean water, using standard silicon AFM probes. Nanobubbles can be made to disappear from contact mode AFM...

  16. A Novel Strategy for Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticle Self Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verma, Jyoti; Lal, Sumit; van Veen, Henk A.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle self assemblies are one-dimensional structures of gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticle self assemblies exhibit unique physical properties and find applications in the development of biosensors. Methodologies currently available for lab-scale and commercial synthesis of gold

  17. Mechanistic Characteristics of Surface Modified Organic Semiconductor g-C3N4 Nanotubes Alloyed with Titania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ching Sim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The visible-light-driven photocatalytic degradation of Bisphenol A (BPA was investigated using the binary composite of alkaline treated g-C3N4 (HT-g-C3N4 deposited over commercial TiO2 (Evonik Degussa GmbH, Essen, Germany. The existence and contribution of both TiO2 and g-C3N4/HT-g-C3N4 in the composite was confirmed through various analytical techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis-DRS, and photoluminescence (PL analysis. The results showed that the titania in the binary composite exhibited both pure rutile and anatase phases. The morphological analysis indicated that the spongy “morel-like” structure of g-C3N4 turned to nanotube form after alkaline hydrothermal treatment and thereby decreased the specific surface area of HT-g-C3N4. The low surface area of HT-g-C3N4 dominates its promising optical property and effective charge transfer, resulting in a deprived degradation efficiency of BPA two times lower than pure g-C3N4. The binary composite of HT-g-C3N4/TiO2 exhibited excellent degradation efficiency of BPA with 2.16 times higher than the pure HT-g-C3N4. The enhanced photocatalytic activity was mainly due to the promising optical band gap structure with heterojunction interface, favorable specific surface area, and good charge separation.

  18. Mechanistic Characteristics of Surface Modified Organic Semiconductor g-C3N4 Nanotubes Alloyed with Titania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Lan Ching; Tan, Wei Han; Leong, Kah Hon; Bashir, Mohammed J. K.; Saravanan, Pichiah; Surib, Nur Atiqah

    2017-01-01

    The visible-light-driven photocatalytic degradation of Bisphenol A (BPA) was investigated using the binary composite of alkaline treated g-C3N4 (HT-g-C3N4) deposited over commercial TiO2 (Evonik Degussa GmbH, Essen, Germany). The existence and contribution of both TiO2 and g-C3N4/HT-g-C3N4 in the composite was confirmed through various analytical techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis-DRS), and photoluminescence (PL) analysis. The results showed that the titania in the binary composite exhibited both pure rutile and anatase phases. The morphological analysis indicated that the spongy “morel-like” structure of g-C3N4 turned to nanotube form after alkaline hydrothermal treatment and thereby decreased the specific surface area of HT-g-C3N4. The low surface area of HT-g-C3N4 dominates its promising optical property and effective charge transfer, resulting in a deprived degradation efficiency of BPA two times lower than pure g-C3N4. The binary composite of HT-g-C3N4/TiO2 exhibited excellent degradation efficiency of BPA with 2.16 times higher than the pure HT-g-C3N4. The enhanced photocatalytic activity was mainly due to the promising optical band gap structure with heterojunction interface, favorable specific surface area, and good charge separation. PMID:28772387

  19. Diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes self-assembled on functionalized metal surfaces for potential application in drug-eluting stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohrabi, Tayebeh; Habibi, Neda; Zarrabi, Ali; Fanaei, Maryam; Lee, Lai Yeng

    2016-09-01

    This study focuses on the potential of diphenylalanine self-assembled peptide nanotubes (FF Nts) for delivery of flufenamic acid (FA) from metal implants. Self-assembly of FF Nts was studied in solution and on surfaces of glass, silicone and gold substrates. FA was loaded inside the shell of FF Nts and subsequently FF/FA Nts were attached to gold surfaces. The substrate were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Release of FA from FF Nts were investigated by immersing coated metal substrates in phosphate-buffered saline for 12 days. Self-assembly of FF in water and solvent resulted in formation of nanotubes, which efficiently loaded 98% of FA with concentration of 20 µg/mL. FESEM images confirmed successful attachment of FF/FA Nts to functionalized gold substrates. In vitro release studies indicated using FF Nts has prolonged the release rate of FA for several days. Biocompatibility studied confirmed more than 50% of the cells were alive in concentration of 250-1000 µg/mL of FF Nts thus suggesting the potential of peptide based self-assemble nanostructures as an alternate system for polymer coating in drugs eluting stents. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2280-2290, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Use of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Covalent Attachment of Nanotubes to Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Dyke, Christopher A.; Maya, Francisco; Stewart, Michael P.; Chen, Bo; Flatt, Austen K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to covalently attach functionalized carbon nanotubes to silicon. This step allows for the introduction of carbon nanotubes onto all manner of silicon surfaces, and thereby introduction of carbon nano - tubes covalently into silicon-based devices, onto silicon particles, and onto silicon surfaces. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed as individuals in surfactant were functionalized. The nano - tube was first treated with 4-t-butylbenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate to give increased solubility to the carbon nanotube; the second group attached to the sidewall of the nanotube has a silyl-protected terminal alkyne that is de-protected in situ. This gives a soluble carbon nanotube that has functional groups appended to the sidewall that can be attached covalently to silicon. This reaction was monitored by UV/vis/NJR to assure direct covalent functionalization.

  1. Helical polycarbodiimide cloaking of carbon nanotubes enables inter-nanotube exciton energy transfer modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhathoki-Uprety, Januka; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2014-11-05

    The use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as near-infrared optical probes and sensors require the ability to simultaneously modulate nanotube fluorescence and functionally derivatize the nanotube surface using noncovalent methods. We synthesized a small library of polycarbodiimides to noncovalently encapsulate SWCNTs with a diverse set of functional coatings, enabling their suspension in aqueous solution. These polymers, known to adopt helical conformations, exhibited ordered surface coverage on the nanotubes and allowed systematic modulation of nanotube optical properties, producing up to 12-fold differences in photoluminescence efficiency. Polymer cloaking of the fluorescent nanotubes facilitated the first instance of controllable and reversible internanotube exciton energy transfer, allowing kinetic measurements of dynamic self-assembly and disassembly.

  2. The geology of the gold deposits of Prestea gold belt of Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the geology of the gold deposits along the Prestea gold belt of Ghana to assist exploration work for new orebodies along the belt. Prestea district is the third largest gold producer in West Africa after Obuasi and Tarkwa districts (over 250 metric tonnes Au during the last century). The gold deposits are ...

  3. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Phototherapy for Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, C.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.; He, Y.; Xin, J.; Wang, S.; Xu, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles exhibit very unique physiochemical and optical properties, which now are extensively studied in range of medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In particular, gold nanoparticles show promise in the advancement of cancer treatments. This review will provide insights into the four different cancer treatments such as photothermal therapy, gold nanoparticle-aided photodynamic therapy, gold nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy, and their use as drug carrier. We also discuss the mechanism of every method and the adverse effects and its limitations

  4. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air-water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple biphasic ...

  5. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air-water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple biphasic ...

  6. Highly active thermally stable nanoporous gold catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, Juergen; Wittstock, Arne; Biener, Monika M.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Baeumer, Marcus; Wichmann, Andre; Neuman, Bjoern

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, a system includes a nanoporous gold structure and a plurality of oxide particles deposited on the nanoporous gold structure; the oxide particles are characterized by a crystalline phase. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing oxide nanoparticles on a nanoporous gold support to form an active structure and functionalizing the deposited oxide nanoparticles.

  7. Gold and Silver Extraction from Leach Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bagdaulet K. Kenzhaliyev; Renata R. Iskhakova; Zamzagul D. Dosymbaeva; Esen N. Sulejmenov

    2014-01-01

    There has been carried out an investigation on the extraction of gold and silver from thiosulfate solutions: standard test and technological solutions of chemical and electrochemical leaching. The influence of related metals on the process of extracting gold from solution was studied. There has been conducted a comparative study of the IR spectra of solutions after the sorption of gold, silver and related metals.

  8. Decorating Mg/Fe oxide nanotubes with nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yong, E-mail: caoyangel@126.com [Institute of Environment and Municipal Engineering, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Jiao Qingze, E-mail: jiaoqz@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao Yun [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Dong Yingchao [Materials and Surface Science Institute (MSSI), University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland)

    2011-09-22

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > Mg/Fe oxide nanotubes arrayed parallel to each other were prepared by an AAO template method. > The Mg/Fe oxide nanotubes decorated with CN{sub x} were realized by CVD of ethylenediamine on the outer surface of oxide nanotubes. > The magnetic properties of Mg/Fe oxide nanotubes were highly improved after being decorated. - Abstract: Mg/Fe oxide nanotubes decorated with nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CN{sub x}) were fabricated by catalytic chemical vapor deposition of ethylenediamine on the outer surface of oxide nanotubes. Mg/Fe oxide nanotubes were prepared using a 3:1 molar precursor solution of Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and anodic aluminum oxide as the substrate. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD pattern shows that the oxide nanotubes are made up of MgO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. TEM and SEM observations indicate the oxide nanotubes are arrayed roughly parallel to each other, and the outer surface of oxide nanotubes are decorated with CN{sub x}. XPS results show the nitrogen-doped level in CN{sub x} is about 7.3 at.%. Magnetic measurements with VSM demonstrate the saturated magnetization, remanence and coercivity of oxide nanotubes are obvious improved after being decorated with CN{sub x}.

  9. Ultrafast vibrations of gold nanorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelf, T; Tanaka, Y; Matsuda, O

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the vibrational modes of gold nanorings on a silica substrate with an ultrafast optical technique. By comparison with numerical simulations, we identify several resonances in the gigahertz range associated with axially symmetric deformations of the nanoring and substrate. We...

  10. Synergy of the Combination of Titanate Nanotubes with Titania Nanoparticles for the Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation from Water-Methanol Mixture Using Simulated Sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Serra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkali digestion of titanium nanoparticles leads, after neutralization, to the formation of titanate nanotubes with long aspect ratio. One salient change in the formation of titanate nanotubes is the observation of an extended visible absorption band up to 550 nm, responsible for their brown colour. Combination of titanate nanotubes with commercial titanium dioxide nanoparticles, either Evonik P25 or Millennium PC500, results in an enhanced photocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation from water-methanol mixtures. This synergy between the two titanium semiconductors has an optimum for a certain proportion of the two components and is observed in both the absence and the presence of platinum or gold nanoparticles. The best efficiency under simulated sunlight irradiation was for a combination of 12 wt.% titanate nanotubes containing 0.32 wt.% platinum in 88 wt.% Millennium PC500, where a two-time increase in the hydrogen generation is observed versus the activity of Millennium PC500 containing platinum. This synergy is proposed to derive from the interfacial electron transfer from titanate nanotubes undergoing photoexcitation at wavelengths in which Millennium PC500 does not absorb this form of titania nanoparticles. Our results illustrate how the combination of several titanium semiconductors can result in an enhancement efficiency with respect to their individual components.

  11. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  12. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian [Newton, MA; Chen, Jinghua [Chestnut Hill, MA; Huang, Zhongping [Belmont, MA; Wang, Dezhi [Wellesley, MA

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  13. Ionizing Radiation Effects in Ni Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlimas, D.; Kozlovsky, A.; Shumskaya, A.; Kaniukov, E.; Ibragimova, M.; Zdorovets, M.; Kadyrzhanov, K.

    2017-01-01

    Polycrystalline nickel nanotubes with diameter of 380 nm and wall thickness 95 nm were synthesized by electrochemical method using PET track-etched membranes with thickness of 12 μm. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of Ni nanotubes irradiated with C+13 ions with energy 1.75 MeV/nucleon and fluence ranging from 109 to 5 × 1011 cm-2 was carried out. The ability of modification of structural parameters such as lattice parameter and the average size of crystallites and conductivity of Ni nanotubes by irradiation was shown.

  14. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  15. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms a...... the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions....

  16. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian Guo [Newton, MA; Lao, Jing Y [Chestnut Hill, MA; Li, Wenzhi [Brookline, MA

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  17. Carbon nanotubes: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, Christian Peter

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess exceptional material properties, making them desirable for use in a variety of applications. In this work, CNTs were grown using two distinct catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) procedures, floating catalyst CVD and thermal CVD, which differed in the method of catalyst introduction. Reaction conditions were optimized to synthesize nanotubes with desired characteristics, and the effects of varying growth parameters were studied. These parameters included gas composition, temperature, reaction duration, and catalyst and substrate material. The CNT products were then examined using several approaches. For each CVD method, nanotube growth rates were determined and the formation and termination mechanisms were investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on nanotube diameters and morphology were also explored to identify means of controlling these important properties. In addition to investigating the effects of different growth parameters, the material properties of nanotubes were also studied. The floating catalyst CVD method produced thick mats of nanotubes, and the mechanical response of these samples was examined using in-situ compression and tension testing. These results indicated that mat structure is composed of discontinuous nanotubes, and a time-dependent response was also observed. In addition, the electrical resistance of bulk CNT samples was found to increase for tubes grown with higher catalyst concentrations and with bamboo morphologies. The properties of nanotubes synthesized using thermal CVD were also examined. Mechanical testing was performed using the same in-situ compression approach developed for floating catalyst CVD samples. A second characterization method was devised, where an optical approach was used to measure the deflection of patterned nanotubes exposed to an applied fluid flow. This response was also simulated, and comparisons with the experimental data were used to determine the flexural

  18. [Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Azospirillum brasilense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriashina, M A; Vetchinkina, E P; Burov, A M; Ponomareva, E G; Nikitina, V E

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense were shown to reduce the gold of chloroauric acid to elemental gold, resulting in formation of gold nanoparicles. Extracellular phenoloxidizing enzymes (laccases and Mn peroxidases) were shown to participate in reduction of Au+3 (HAuCl4) to Au(0). Transmission electron microscopy revealed accumulation of colloidal gold nanoparticles of diverse shape in the culture liquid of A. brasilense strains Sp245 and Sp7. The size of the electron-dense nanospheres was 5 to 50 nm, and the size of nanoprisms varied from 5 to 300 nm. The tentative mechanism responsible for formation of gold nanoparticles is discussed.

  19. Ultrasonic inspection of fake gold jewelry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzi Ismail, Mohamad; Sani, Suhairy; Shofri, Faris Syazwan bin Mohd; Harun, Mohd.; Omar, Norlaili Binti

    2018-01-01

    Hollow jewelry made from combination of gold and other material was found in the market. At the outside it is made of gold and the inside layer is made of other material. X-ray fluorescent method cannot detect the inside material that was covered by gold. This paper explained the experimental result of ultrasonic inspection of fake gold used for jewelry. The ultrasonic pulse echo contact method was used to measure longitudinal wave velocity in the gold jewelry. The results of measurements are explained and discussed.

  20. Surface vertical deposition for gold nanoparticle film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, J J; Qiu, F S; Chen, G D; Reeves, M E

    2003-01-01

    In this rapid communication, we present the surface vertical deposition (SVD) method to synthesize the gold nanoparticle films. Under conditions where the surface of the gold nanoparticle suspension descends slowly by evaporation, the gold nanoparticles in the solid-liquid-gas junction of the suspension aggregate together on the substrate by the force of solid and liquid interface. When the surface properties of the substrate and colloidal nanoparticle suspension define for the SVD, the density of gold nanoparticles in the thin film made by SVD only depends on the descending velocity of the suspension surface and on the concentration of the gold nanoparticle suspension. (rapid communication)

  1. Multiwall carbon nanotube microcavity arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Butt, Haider, E-mail: h.butt@bham.ac.uk [Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Rifat, Ahmmed A. [Integrated Lightwave Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun [Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 65 Landsdowne Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dai, Qing [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-03-21

    Periodic highly dense multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays can act as photonic materials exhibiting band gaps in the visible regime and beyond terahertz range. MWCNT arrays in square arrangement for nanoscale lattice constants can be configured as a microcavity with predictable resonance frequencies. Here, computational analyses of compact square microcavities (≈0.8 × 0.8 μm{sup 2}) in MWCNT arrays were demonstrated to obtain enhanced quality factors (≈170–180) and narrow-band resonance peaks. Cavity resonances were rationally designed and optimized (nanotube geometry and cavity size) with finite element method. Series (1 × 2 and 1 × 3) and parallel (2 × 1 and 3 × 1) combinations of microcavities were modeled and resonance modes were analyzed. Higher order MWCNT microcavities showed enhanced resonance modes, which were red shifted with increasing Q-factors. Parallel microcavity geometries were also optimized to obtain narrow-band tunable filtering in low-loss communication windows (810, 1336, and 1558 nm). Compact series and parallel MWCNT microcavity arrays may have applications in optical filters and miniaturized optical communication devices.

  2. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  3. Carbon nanotube woven textile photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Ahmed; Wang, Xuan; Mirri, Francesca; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Fujimura, Naoki; Suzuki, Daichi; Soundarapandian, Karuppasamy P.; Kawano, Yukio; Pasquali, Matteo; Kono, Junichiro

    2018-01-01

    The increasing interest in mobile and wearable technology demands the enhancement of functionality of clothing through incorporation of sophisticated architectures of multifunctional materials. Flexible electronic and photonic devices based on organic materials have made impressive progress over the past decade, but higher performance, simpler fabrication, and most importantly, compatibility with woven technology are desired. Here we report on the development of a weaved, substrateless, and polarization-sensitive photodetector based on doping-engineered fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes. This room-temperature-operating, self-powered detector responds to radiation in an ultrabroad spectral range, from the ultraviolet to the terahertz, through the photothermoelectric effect, with a low noise-equivalent power (a few nW/Hz 1 /2) throughout the range and with a Z T -factor value that is twice as large as that of previously reported carbon nanotube-based photothermoelectric photodetectors. Particularly, we fabricated a ˜1 -m-long device consisting of tens of p+-p- junctions and weaved it into a shirt. This device demonstrated a collective photoresponse of the series-connected junctions under global illumination. The performance of the device did not show any sign of deterioration through 200 bending tests with a bending radius smaller than 100 μ m as well as standard washing and ironing cycles. This unconventional photodetector will find applications in wearable technology that require detection of electromagnetic radiation.

  4. Gold and not so real gold in Medieval treatises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebrenka Bogovic-Zeskoski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evidence diverse materials and processes used by artisans (and alchemists required to synthesize a visually viable replacement for gold. The emphasis of the research is upon the production of mosaic gold or porporina, a pigment that has survived into modern times, which was used as ink and as paint. Base metals, mostly tin, but also alloys were used both into foils coated with glazes and varnishes and as pigment. The research focuses upon recipes documented in treatises dating from Antiquity to the late Medieval period (ca. 1500 and an attempt is made to answer two questions. In the first place, why was there a need for a surrogate? Secondly, why are there so few tangible examples detected on surviving artifacts? In conclusion, an argument is offered pointing out that, although much can be learned by scientific examination of artifacts, textual analysis is equally important and necessary to unravel mysteries of ancient technologies

  5. Nanotoxicity of gold and gold-cobalt nanoalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, E; Khalil, W K B; Emam, A N; Mohamed, M B; Rao, K V

    2012-05-21

    Nanotoxicology test of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and gold-cobalt (Au-Co) nanoalloy is an important step in their safety evaluation for biomedical applications. The Au and Au-Co NPs were prepared by reducing the metal ions using sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping material. The average size and shape of the nanoparticles (NPs) were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Cobalt presence in the nanoalloy was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis, and the magnetic properties of these particles were determined using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The Gold and gold-cobalt NPs of average size 15 ± 1.5 nm were administered orally to mice with a dose of 80, 160, and 320 mg/kg per body weight (bw) using gavages. Samples were collected after 7 and 14 days of the treatment. The results indicated that the Au-Co NPs were able to induce significant alteration in the tumor-initiating genes associated with an increase of micronuclei (MNs) formation and generation of DNA adduct (8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, 8-OHdG) as well as a reduction in the glutathione peroxidase activity. This action of Au-Co NPs was observed using 160 and 320 mg/kg bw at both time intervals. However, Au NPs had much lower effects than Au-Co NPs on alteration in the tumor-initiating genes, frequency of MNs, and generation of 8-OHdG as well as glutathione peroxidase activity except with the highest dose of Au NPs. This study suggests that the potential to cause in vivo genetic and antioxidant enzyme alterations due to the treatment by Au-Co nanoalloy may be attributed to the increase in oxidative stress in mice.

  6. BX CY NZ nanotubes and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marvin Lou; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides crystalline nanoscale particles and tubes made from a variety of stoichiometries of B.sub.x C.sub.y N.sub.z where x, y, and z indicate a relative amount of each element compared to the others and where no more than one of x, y, or z are zero for a single stoichiometry. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are useful as miniature electronic components, such as wires, coils, schotky barriers, diodes, etc. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are also useful as coating that will protect an item from detection by electromagnetic monitoring techniques like radar. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are additionally useful for their mechanical properties, being comparable in strength and stiffness to the best graphite fibers or carbon nanotubes. The inventive nanoparticles are useful in lubricants and composites.

  7. Epoxy-based carbon nanotubes reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available developed strategy offering promising results is to reinforce epoxy matrices with nano-sized organic and inorganic particles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibres (CNFs), nanoclays, metal oxide nanoparticles, etc. and make new materials...

  8. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  9. Carbon Nanotube Infused Launch Vehicle Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For the past 5 years Orbital ATK has been investing in, prototyping, and testing carbon nanotube infused composite structures to evaluate their impact on launch...

  10. Janus cyclic peptide-polymer nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Maarten; My-Nhi Tran, Carmen; Young, Philip G.; Perrier, Sébastien; Jolliffe, Katrina A.

    2013-11-01

    Self-assembled nanotubular structures have numerous potential applications but these are limited by a lack of control over size and functionality. Controlling these features at the molecular level may allow realization of the potential of such structures. Here we report a new generation of self-assembled cyclic peptide-polymer nanotubes with dual functionality in the form of either a Janus or mixed polymeric corona. A ‘relay’ synthetic strategy is used to prepare nanotubes with a demixing or mixing polymeric corona. Nanotube structure is assessed in solution using 1H-1H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy NMR, and in bulk using differential scanning calorimetry. The Janus nanotubes form artificial pores in model phospholipid bilayers. These molecules provide a viable pathway for the development of intriguing nanotubular structures with dual functionality via a demixing or a mixing polymeric corona and may provide new avenues for the creation of synthetic transmembrane protein channel mimics.

  11. Nitrogen in highly crystalline carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducati, C; Koziol, K; Stavrinadis, A; Friedrichs, S; Windle, A H; Midgley, P A

    2006-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an unprecedented degree of internal order were synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) adding a nitrogen-containing compound to the hydrocarbon feedstock. Ferrocene was used as the metal catalyst precursor. The remarkable crystallinity of these nanotubes lies both in the isochirality and in the crystallographic register of their walls, as demonstrated by electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy experiments. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the walls of the nanotubes consist of truncated stacked cones, instead of perfect cylinders, with a range of apex angles that appears to be related to the nitrogen concentration in the synthesis process. The structure of armchair, zigzag and chiral nanotubes is modelled and discussed in terms of density of topological defects, providing an interesting comparison with our microscopy experiments. A growth mechanism based on the interplay of base- and tip-growth is proposed to account for our experimental observations

  12. Liquid crystalline order of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Ahlawat, Aditya; Mulkern, Brian; Doyle, Robert; Mongeau, Jennifer; Ogilvie, Alex

    2007-03-01

    Topological defects formed during phase transitions in liquid crystals provide a direct proof of the standard Cosmological model and are direct links to the Early Universe. On the other hand in Nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes can be manipulated and oriented directly by changing the liquid crystalline state of the nanotubes, in combination with organic liquid crystals. Currently there are no nano-assemblers, which makes the liquid crystal state of the nanotubes, one of the few ways of controlling them. We show the design of a fast and efficient polarized light ellipsometric system (a new modification of previous optical systems) that can provide fast quantitative real time measurements in two dimensions of the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals during phase transitions in lab settings. Our aim is to provide fundamental information about the formation of optically anisotropic structures in liquid crystals and the orientation of carbon nanotubes in electric field.

  13. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao [Oakland, CA; Johnson, Stephen [Richmond, CA; Kerr, John B [Oakland, CA; Minor, Andrew M [El Cerrito, CA; Mao, Samuel S [Castro Valley, CA

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  14. Subwoofer and nanotube butterfly acoustic flame extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Mayo, Nathanael K.; Baughman, Ray H.; Mills, Brent T.; Habtour, Ed

    2017-01-01

    Nonchemical flame control using acoustic waves from a subwoofer and a lightweight carbon nanotube thermoacoustic projector was demonstrated. The intent was to manipulate flame intensity, direction and propagation. The mechanisms of flame suppression using low frequency acoustic waves were discussed.

  15. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  16. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  17. Cylindrical-shaped nanotube field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-12-29

    A cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may be manufactured on silicon (Si) substrates as a ring etched into a gate stack and filled with semiconductor material. An inner gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack inside the inner circumference of the ring. An outer gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack outside the outer circumference of the ring. The multi-gate cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET operates in volume inversion for ring widths below 15 nanometers. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET demonstrates better short channel effect (SCE) mitigation and higher performance (I.sub.on/I.sub.off) than conventional transistor devices. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may also be manufactured with higher yields and cheaper costs than conventional transistors.

  18. Carbon nanotubes dispersed polymer nanocomposites: mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Carbon nanotubes; nanocomposite; Young's modulus; breakdown strength; dielectric constant; thermal conductivity. 1. Introduction. The polymer composite has material characteristics use- ful for diverse applications such as capacitors and acoustic emission sensors. The nanoscaled fillers are dispersed in po-.

  19. Conformal Carbon Nanotubes for Stray Light Suppression

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed ultra-black CVD (chemical vapor deposition) and embedded carbon nanotube surface treatments for use in the near UV to far infrared for stray light...

  20. Carbon Nano-Tube (CNT) Reinforced COPV

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reduce the structural mass of future aerospace vehicles through the development of ultra lightweight materials and structures through the use of: Carbon nanotube...

  1. Thermophoresis of water droplets inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens Honore; Oyarzua, Elton

    2016-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes(CNTs) offer unique possibilities as fluid conduits with applications ranging from lab on a chip devices to encapsulation media for drug delivery. CNTs feature high mechanical strength, chemical and thermalstability and biocompatibility therefore they are promising candidates...

  2. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  3. Electrochemical biosensing based on polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yibing; Zhao, Ye

    2013-01-01

    The glucose oxidase (GOD) modified polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is fabricated for electrochemical biosensing application. The titania nanotube array is grown directly on a titanium substrate through an anodic oxidation process. A thin film of polypyrrole is coated onto titania nanotube array to form polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid through a normal pulse voltammetry process. GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is prepared by the covalent immobilization of GOD onto polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid via the cross-linker of glutaraldehyde. The morphology and microstructure of nanotube electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosensing properties of this nanotube enzyme electrode have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid provides highly accessible nanochannels for GOD encapsulation, presenting good enzymatic affinity. As-formed GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode well conducts bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, exhibiting a good biosensing performance with a high sensitivity, low detection limit and wide linear detection range. - Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram presents the fabrication of glucose oxidase modified polypyrrole/titania (GOD-PPy/TiO 2 ) nanotube enzyme electrode for biosensing application. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid is well used as biosensing substrate. • Polypyrrole promotes GOD immobilization on titania nanotubes via glutaraldehyde. • GOD-polypyrrole/titania enzyme electrode shows good bioelectrocatalytic reactivity

  4. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Polypropylene Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP composites reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs were prepared by using twin screw extruder. The experimental results showed that with the increasing amount of MWNTs the elongation at break decreased whereas the tensile strength, bending strength, and impact strength increased. By using scanning electron microscope (SEM, we find that the hydroxyl-modified carbon nanotube has better dispersion performance in PP and better mechanical properties.

  5. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  6. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  7. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  8. Attophysics of Thermal Phenomena in Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Marciak-Kozlowska, Janina

    2005-01-01

    In this paper heat transport in carbon nanotubes is investigated. When the dimension of the structure is of the order of the de Broglie wave length transport phenomena must be analysed by quantum mechanics. In this paper we derived the Dirac type thermal equation .The solution of the equation for the temperature fields for electrons can either be damped or can oscillate depending on the dynamics of the scattering. Key words: Carbon nanotubes, ultrashort laser pulses, Dirac thermal equation, t...

  9. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  10. CMS Industries awarded gold, crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CMS collaboration honoured 10 of its top suppliers in the seventh annual awards ceremony The representatives of the firms that recieved the CMS Gold and Crystal Awards stand with their awards after the ceremony. The seventh annual CMS Awards ceremony was held on Monday 13 March to recognize the industries that have made substantial contributions to the construction of the collaboration's detector. Nine international firms received Gold Awards, and General Tecnica of Italy received the prestigious Crystal Award. Representatives from the companies attended the ceremony during the plenary session of CMS week. 'The role of CERN, its machines and experiments, beyond particle physics is to push the development of equipment technologies related to high-energy physics,'said CMS Awards Coordinator Domenico Campi. 'All of these industries must go beyond the technologies that are currently available.' Without the involvement of good companies over the years, the construction of the CMS detector wouldn't be possible...

  11. Byzantine gold coins and jewellery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddy, A.; La Niece, S.

    1986-01-01

    The article deals with the dating of Byzantine gold coinage. The results of such a study are of fundamental importance for the study of the economic history of the later Byzantine Empire and they are also of importance for the historian of technology when studying the composition of the contemporary Byzantine jewellery. Although Carbon-14 dating cannot be used as a method af dating, historians can still benefit from the analysis of the alloy of which the antiquity is made, as this is sometimes characteristic of the period in which it was used. A number of pieces of Byzantine jewellery has been analysed by x-ray fluorescence analysis, after first gently abrading a small area of the surface of the gold with the carborundum paper in an inconspicious position on the back or side of the object. A table is given on the results of this analysis

  12. Distribution and composition of gold in porphyry gold systems: example from the Biely Vrch deposit, Slovakia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koděra, Peter; Kozák, Jaroslav; Brčeková, Jana; Chovan, Martin; Lexa, Jaroslav; Jánošík, Michal; Biroň, Adrián; Uhlík, Peter; Bakos, František

    2018-03-01

    The Biely Vrch deposit in the Western Carpathians is assigned to the shallow, sulfide-poor porphyry gold deposit type and has an exceptionally low Cu/Au ratio. According to 3-D geochemical models, there is a limited spatial correlation between Au and Cu due to the primary introduction of gold by a salt melt and Cu by low-density vapor. Despite a rough spatial correlation of gold grades with quartz stockwork intensity, gold is hosted mostly by altered rock, exclusively in native form. Three main gold mineral assemblages were recognized here. In the deepest parts of the system, the K- and Ca-Na silicate gold assemblage is associated with minerals of high-temperature alteration (plagioclase, K-feldspar, actinolite), with gold grades and fineness depending on depth and potassium content of the host rock: K-silicate alteration hosts the lowest fineness gold ( 914), whereas Ca-Na silicate alteration has the highest ( 983). The intermediate argillic gold assemblage is the most widespread, with gold hosted mainly by chlorite, illite, smectite, and interstratified illite-chlorite-smectite minerals. The gold fineness is mostly variable (875-990) and inherited from the former gold mineral assemblages. The latest advanced argillic gold assemblage has its gold mostly in kaolinite. The extremely high fineness ( 994) results from gold remobilization by late-stage aqueous magmatic-hydrothermal fluids. Uncommon bonanza-grade appears where the earlier gold mineral assemblages were further enriched by this remobilized gold. Primary precipitation of gold occurred during ascent and cooling of salt melts at 450 to 309 °C, mostly during retrograde quartz solubility.

  13. Printing nanotube/nanowire for flexible microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Printing has become an emerging manufacturing technology for mechanics, electronics, and consumer products. Additionally, both nanotubes and nanowires have recently been used as materials for sensors and electrodes due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties. Printed electrodes and conductive traces particularly offer versatility of fabricating low-cost, disposable, and flexible electrical devices and microsystems. While various printing methods such as screen printing have been conventional methods for printing conductive traces and electrodes, inkjet printing has recently attracted great attention due to its unique advantages including no template requirement, rapid printing at low cost, on-demand printing capability, and precise control of the printed material. Computer generated conductive traces or electrode patterns can simply be printed on a thin film substrate with proper conductive ink consisting of nanotubes or nanowires. However, in order to develop nanotube or nanowire ink, there are a few challenges that need to be addressed. The most difficult obstacle to overcome is that of nanotube/nanowire dispersion within a solution. Other challenges include adjusting surface tension and controlling viscosity of the ink as well as treating the surface of the printing substrate. In an attempt to pave the way for nanomaterial inkjet printing, we present a method for preparing carbon nanotube ink as well as its printing technique. A fully printed electrochemical sensor using inkjet-printed carbon nanotube electrodes is also demonstrated as an example of the possibilities for this technology.

  14. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  15. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  16. Gold Nanocages for Biomedical Applications**

    OpenAIRE

    Skrabalak, Sara E.; Chen, Jingyi; Au, Leslie; Lu, Xianmao; Li, Xingde; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    Nanostructured materials provide a promising platform for early cancer detection and treatment. Here we highlight recent advances in the synthesis and use of Au nanocages for such biomedical applications. Gold nanocages represent a novel class of nanostructures, which can be prepared via a remarkably simple route based on the galvanic replacement reaction between Ag nanocubes and HAuCl4. The Au nanocages have a tunable surface plasmon resonance peak that extends into the near-infrared, where ...

  17. Extinction Coefficient of Gold Nanostars

    OpenAIRE

    de Puig, Helena; Tam, Justina O.; Yen, Chun-Wan; Gehrke, Lee; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanostars (NStars) are highly attractive for biological applications due to their surface chemistry, facile synthesis and optical properties. Here, we synthesize NStars in HEPES buffer at different HEPES/Au ratios, producing NStars of different sizes and shapes, and therefore varying optical properties. We measure the extinction coefficient of the synthesized NStars at their maximum surface plasmon resonances (SPR), which range from 5.7 × 108 to 26.8 × 108 M−1cm−1. Measured values correl...

  18. Gold, currencies and market efficiency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištoufek, Ladislav; Vošvrda, Miloslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 449, č. 1 (2016), s. 27-34 ISSN 0378-4371 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Efficient market hypothesis, * Gold * Currencies, * Fractal dimension * Entropy * Long-Term memory Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.243, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/E/kristoufek-0455876.pdf

  19. Ground Optical Lightning Detector (GOLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John, Jr.; Simmons, David

    A photometer developed to characterize lightning from the ground is discussed. The detector and the electronic signal processing and data storage systems are presented along with field data measured by the system. The discussion will include improvements that will be incorporated to enhance the measurement of lightning and the data storage capability to record for many days without human involvement. Finally, the calibration of the GOLD system is presented.

  20. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheel, Christine Marya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  1. Thermal expansion producing easier formation of a black phosphorus nanotube from nanoribbon on carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Cai, Kun

    2018-02-01

    As a novel one-dimensional material having excellent electrical properties, a black phosphorus (BP) nanotube has wide potential applications in nanodevices. A BP nanotube has not yet, however, been discovered in experiments or fabricated via chemical synthesis. In this study, the feasibility of forming a nanotube from a parallelogram nanoribbon upon a carbon nanotube (CNT) at different temperatures is discussed through the use of molecular dynamics simulations. Results obtained demonstrate that an ideal BP nanotube from the same nanoribbon can be obtained via self-assembly on a CNT at 50 K or lower temperature. At temperatures between 50-100 K, the BP nanotube formed from a single ribbon has defects at both ends. When the temperature is higher than 100 K, it is difficult to obtain a BP nanotube of high quality. It is discovered that when the ribbon can only wind upon the same CNT at low temperature, it may form into an ideal nanotube by increasing the temperature of the system. The reason is that the BP ribbon has a higher thermal expansion than the CNT under the same temperature difference.

  2. Nanotube structures, methods of making nanotube structures, and methods of accessing intracellular space

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDersarl, Jules J.; Xu, Alexander M.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Tayebi, Noureddine

    2016-02-23

    In accordance with the purpose(s) of the present disclosure, as embodied and broadly described herein, embodiments of the present disclosure, in one aspect, relate to methods of making a structure including nanotubes, a structure including nanotubes, methods of delivering a fluid to a cell, methods of removing a fluid to a cell, methods of accessing intracellular space, and the like.

  3. Jabiluka gold-uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Jabiluka gold-uranium deposit, 230km east of Darwin in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, was discovered by Pancontinental Mining Limited in 1971. Jabiluka, with reserves in excess of 200,000 tonnes of contained U 3 O 8 in two deposits 500 metres apart, is the world's largest high grade uranium deposit and also contains nearly 12 tonnes of gold. It is proposed that only the larger deposit, Jabiluka II will be mined - by underground extraction methods, and that 275,000 tonnes of ore per year will be mined and processed to produce 1,500 tonnes of U 3 O 8 and up to 30,000 oz of gold. The revenue from the uranium sales is estimated to be of the order of A$100 million per year at A$30/lb. By the end of 1982 all necessary mining and environmental approvals had been obtained and significant marketing progress made. With the Australian Labor Party winning Commonwealth Government in the 1983 election, Pancontinental's permission to seek sales contracts was withdrawn and development of the Jabiluka deposit ceased. Jabiluka remains undeveloped - awaiting a change in Australian Government policy on uranium. figs., maps

  4. General hypothesis and shell model for the synthesis of semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2010-09-01

    Semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes, have vast potential for new technology development. The fundamental physics and growth kinetics of these nanotubes are still obscured. Various models developed to elucidate the growth suffer from limited applicability. An in-depth investigation of the fundamentals of nanotube growth has, therefore, been carried out. For this investigation, various features of nanotube growth, and the role of the foreign element catalytic agent (FECA) in this growth, have been considered. Observed growth anomalies have been analyzed. Based on this analysis, a new shell model and a general hypothesis have been proposed for the growth. The essential element of the shell model is the seed generated from segregation during growth. The seed structure has been defined, and the formation of droplet from this seed has been described. A modified definition of the droplet exhibiting adhesive properties has also been presented. Various characteristics of the droplet, required for alignment and organization of atoms into tubular forms, have been discussed. Employing the shell model, plausible scenarios for the formation of carbon nanotubes, and the variation in the characteristics of these carbon nanotubes have been articulated. The experimental evidences, for example, for the formation of shell around a core, dipole characteristics of the seed, and the existence of nanopores in the seed, have been presented. They appear to justify the validity of the proposed model. The diversities of nanotube characteristics, fundamentals underlying the creation of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes, and the impurity generation on the surface of carbon nanotubes have been elucidated. The catalytic action of FECA on growth has been quantified. The applicability of the proposed model to the nanotube growth by a variety of mechanisms has been elaborated. These mechanisms include the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, the oxide-assisted growth mechanism, the self

  5. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  6. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-09-02

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  7. Growth of ZnO nanotube arrays and nanotube based piezoelectric nanogenerators

    KAUST Repository

    Xi, Yi

    2009-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the growth of hexagonal ZnO nanotube arrays using a solution chemical method by varying the growth temperature (<100 °C), time and solution concentration. A piezoelectric nanogenerator using the as-grown ZnO nanotube arrays has been demonstrated for the first time. The nanogenerator gives an output voltage up to 35 mV. The detailed profile of the observed electric output is understood based on the calculated piezoelectric potential in the nanotube with consideration of the Schottky contact formed between the metal tip and the nanotube; and the mechanism agrees with that proposed for nanowire based nanogenerator. Our study shows that ZnO nanotubes can also be used for harvesting mechanical energy. © 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  9. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  10. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  11. Applications of Nanotubes in Electronic and Nanomechanical Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomanek, David

    2002-01-01

    ... as their potential for energy storage. Our research helps to better understand nanotube properties in case of chemically and structurally modified nanotubes consisting of carbon and boron nitride, including multi-wall systems and peapods...

  12. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  13. Gold nanoparticle based optical and electrochemical sensing of dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff, Norazriena; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Huang, Nay Ming; Ramaraj, Ramasamy; Lim, Hong Ngee

    2015-01-01

    This review (with 110 refs.) gives an overview on the progress that has been made in the past few years on the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for use in sensors and analytical tools for the determination of dopamine (DA). Both AuNPs and their composites with other organic and inorganic materials including noble metals are treated. Following an overview on the clinical significance of DA, we discuss the various analytical methods that are (a) electrochemiluminescence (ECL); (b) surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS); (c) colorimetric probing and visual detection; and (d) the large class of electrochemical sensors. Subsections cover sensors based on plain AuNPs, bimetallic NPs, AuNP-metal-metal oxide nanocomposites, AuNP nanocomposites with organic polymers, AuNP nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes or with graphene, and finally sensors based on ternary materials containing AuNPs. The review ends with a conclusion on current challenges of sensors for DA and an outlook on future trends. (author)

  14. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  15. Carbon nanotubes based vacuum gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyk, N. N.; Il’in, O. I.; Il’ina, M. V.; Fedotov, A. A.; Klimin, V. S.; Ageev, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    We have created an ionization type Vacuum gauge with sensor element based on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Obtained asymmetrical current-voltage characteristics at different voltage polarity on the electrode with the CNTs. It was found that when applying a negative potential on an electrode with the CNTs, the current in the gap is higher than at a positive potential. In the pressure range of 1 ÷ 103 Torr vacuum gauge sensitivity was 6 mV/Torr (at a current of 4.5·10-5 A) and in the range of 10-5 ÷ 1 Torr was 10 mV/Torr (at a current of 1.3·10-5 A). It is shown that the energy efficiency of vacuum gauge can be increased in the case where electrode with CNT operates as an emitter of electrons.

  16. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  17. Methods Reduce Cost, Enhance Quality of Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    For all the challenges posed by the microgravity conditions of space, weight is actually one of the more significant problems NASA faces in the development of the next generation of U.S. space vehicles. For the Agency s Constellation Program, engineers at NASA centers are designing and testing new vessels as safe, practical, and cost-effective means of space travel following the eventual retirement of the space shuttle. Program components like the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, intended to carry astronauts to the International Space Station and the Moon, must be designed to specific weight requirements to manage fuel consumption and match launch rocket capabilities; Orion s gross liftoff weight target is about 63,789 pounds. Future space vehicles will require even greater attention to lightweight construction to help conserve fuel for long-range missions to Mars and beyond. In order to reduce spacecraft weight without sacrificing structural integrity, NASA is pursuing the development of materials that promise to revolutionize not only spacecraft construction, but also a host of potential applications on Earth. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are one material of particular interest. These tubular, single-layer carbon molecules - 100,000 of them braided together would be no thicker than a human hair - display a range of remarkable characteristics. Possessing greater tensile strength than steel at a fraction of the weight, the nanotubes are efficient heat conductors with metallic or semiconductor electrical properties depending on their diameter and chirality (the pattern of each nanotube s hexagonal lattice structure). All of these properties make the nanotubes an appealing material for spacecraft construction, with the potential for nanotube composites to reduce spacecraft weight by 50 percent or more. The nanotubes may also feature in a number of other space exploration applications, including life support, energy storage, and sensor technologies. NASA s various

  18. Selective Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Khare, Bishun

    2010-01-01

    An alternative method of low-temperature plasma functionalization of carbon nanotubes provides for the simultaneous attachment of molecular groups of multiple (typically two or three) different species or different mixtures of species to carbon nanotubes at different locations within the same apparatus. This method is based on similar principles, and involves the use of mostly the same basic apparatus, as those of the methods described in "Low-Temperature Plasma Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes" (ARC-14661-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2004), page 45. The figure schematically depicts the basic apparatus used in the aforementioned method, with emphasis on features that distinguish the present alternative method from the other. In this method, one exploits the fact that the composition of the deposition plasma changes as the plasma flows from its source in the precursor chamber toward the nanotubes in the target chamber. As a result, carbon nanotubes mounted in the target chamber at different flow distances (d1, d2, d3 . . .) from the precursor chamber become functionalized with different species or different mixtures of species. In one series of experiments to demonstrate this method, N2 was used as the precursor gas. After the functionalization process, the carbon nanotubes from three different positions in the target chamber were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to identify the molecular groups that had become attached. On carbon nanotubes from d1 = 1 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-N and C=N. On carbon nanotubes from d2 = 2.5 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-(NH)2 and/or C=NH2. (The H2 was believed to originate as residual hydrogen present in the nanotubes.) On carbon nanotubes from d3 = 7 cm no functionalization could be detected - perhaps, it was conjectured, because this distance is downstream of the plasma source, all of the free ions and free radicals of

  19. Gas transport in aluminosilicate nanotubes by diffusion NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Dvoyashkin, Muslim; Wood, Ryan; Bowers, Clifford R.; Yucelen, Ipek; Nair, Sankar; Katihar, Aakanksha; Vasenkov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion of tetrafluoromethane in aluminosilicate nanotubes was studied by means of 13C pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR at 297 K. The measured data allow the estimation of the diffusivity of tetrafluoromethane inside the nanotubes as well as the diffusivity for these molecules undergoing fast exchange between many nanotubes. The results support the assumption about the one-dimensional nature of the tetrafluoromethane diffusion inside nanotubes.

  20. Quantification and Prediction of Bulk Gold Fineness at Placer Gold Mines: A New Zealand Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Craw

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study documents the bulk Au fineness (Au parts per thousand of the bullion from a placer gold mine in southern New Zealand. The compositions of doré bars produced approximately every 10 days over nearly three years is compared to the range of compositions of gold particles which have been extracted. Silver is the principal impurity in the gold, and the doré bars contained 2–3 wt % Ag over the period examined. At the scale of a typical individual 0.5 mm gold particle, there are three different types of gold: an Ag-bearing core (2–9 wt % Ag, a 10–50 µm wide Ag-poor rim (typically <1 wt % Ag, and micron scale overgrowth gold (0% Ag. The overgrowths are volumetrically negligible, and the average Ag content of a gold particle is controlled principally by the proportions of core and rim gold. The rims have been formed by recrystallisation of deformed core gold, with associated leaching of the Ag from the recrystallised gold. The volumetric proportion of cores has decreased with increasing flattening of gold particles, and highly flattened and folded flakes have little or no remnant cores. The bulk Au fineness of doré bars from the mine has decreased from ~980 to ~970 as the mine progressed upstream in a Pleistocene paleochannel because the upstream gold has been less flattened than the downstream gold.

  1. CO extrusion in homogeneous gold catalysis: reactivity of gold acyl species generated through water addition to gold vinylidenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Janina; Stößer, Tim; Rudolph, Matthias; Rominger, Frank; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2015-01-26

    Herein, we describe a new gold-catalyzed decarbonylative indene synthesis. Synergistic σ,π-activation of diyne substrates leads to gold vinylidene intermediates, which upon addition of water are transformed into gold acyl species, a type of organogold compound hitherto only scarcely reported. The latter are shown to undergo extrusion of CO, an elementary step completely unknown for homogeneous gold catalysis. By tuning the electronic and steric properties of the starting diyne systems, this new reactivity could be exploited for the synthesis of indene derivatives in high yields. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. An intimately bonded titanate nanotube–polyaniline–gold nanoparticle ternary composite as a scaffold for electrochemical enzyme biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: liuxiaoqiang@henu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan Province, 475004 (China); Zhu, Jie; Huo, Xiaohe; Yan, Rui [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan Province, 475004 (China); Wong, Danny K.Y., E-mail: Danny.Wong@mq.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2016-03-10

    In this work, titanate nanotubes (TNTs), polyaniline (PANI) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were assembled to form a ternary composite, which was then applied on an electrode as a scaffold of an electrochemical enzyme biosensor. The scaffold was constructed by oxidatively polymerising aniline to produce an emeraldine salt of PANI on TNTs, followed by gold nanoparticle deposition. A novel aspect of this scaffold lies in the use of the emeraldine salt of PANI as a molecular wire between TNTs and GNPs. Using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a model enzyme, voltammetric results demonstrated that direct electron transfer of HRP was achieved at both TNT-PANI and TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrodes. More significantly, the catalytic reduction current of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by HRP was ∼75% enhanced at the TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrode, compared to that at the TNT-PANI-modified electrode. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of HRP was found to be ∼3 times larger at the TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrode than that at the TNT-PANI-modified electrode. Based on chronoamperometric detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, a linear range from 1 to 1200 μM, a sensitivity of 22.7 μA mM{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.13 μM were obtained at the TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrode. The performance of the biosensor can be ascribed to the superior synergistic properties of the ternary composite. - Highlights: • A ternary TiO{sub 2} nanotube–polyaniline–gold nanoparticle composite was developed. • New synthetic route for ternary composite with a polyaniline molecular wire between TiO{sub 2} nanotubes and gold nanoparticles. • An electrochemical biosensor with ternary composite as a scaffold. • Ternary composite facilitated improved analytical performance of electrochemical biosensor.

  3. Synthesis of silver impregnated carbon nanotubes and cyclodextrin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis of silver impregnated carbon nanotubes and cyclodextrin polyurethanes for the disinfection of water. L.P Lukhele, R Krause, B Mamba, M Momba. Abstract. Silver impregnated carbon nanotubes and cyclodextrin polymers were synthesised by first functionalising carbon nanotubes in a mixture of nitric and ...

  4. Filled and empty states of carbon nanotubes in water: Dependence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Filled and empty states of carbon nanotubes in water: Dependence on nanotube diameter, wall thickness and dispersion interactions. Malay Rana ... The thickness of the nanotube wall, however, is found to have only minor effects on the density profiles, hydrogen bond network and the wetting characteristics. This indicates ...

  5. On Young's modulus of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    ssion electron microscopy of carbon nanotube/aluminum nanocomposites is given to calculate approximately the. Young's modulus of multi-walled carbon nanotubes. 2. Experimental. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthe- sized by arc discharge technique with 20 V d.c. and 100 amps current. The CNT/Al ...

  6. Effect of aligned carbon nanotubes on electrical conductivity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    continuing networks while direct current electric field only prevented agglomeration of the carbon nanotubes in the polycarbonate matrix and created relatively uniform distribution of nanotubes in the matrix. Keywords. Carbon nanotube; nanocomposite; electrical effect; magnetic effect. 1. Introduction. To reinforce materials ...

  7. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  8. Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and their Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, K. J.; Srivastava, Deepak; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the folloving: carbon nanotube (CNT): structures, application of carbon nanotubes, simulation method, Elastic properties of carbon nanotubes, yield strain of CNT, yielding under tensile stress, yielding: strain-rate and temperature dependence, yield strain under tension, yielding at realistic conditions, nano fibers, polymer CNT composite, force field, density dependency on temperature, diffusion coefficients, young modulus, and conclusions.

  9. Synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes from a lamellar type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    These nanotubes are applicable to store more hydrogen. Keywords. AlPO4-L; single wall carbon nanotubes. 1. Introduction. Carbon nanotubes (Iijima 1991) are nano-scale structures formed by self assembly. They possess excellent chemical and physical properties (Rodney and Donald 1995; Chen et al 1998) that make ...

  10. Metallic/semiconducting ratio of carbon nanotubes in a bundle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iijima and Ichihashi [1], much efforts have been devoted to improve the methods of nanotube production, and significant progress has been made to narrow the diame- ter distribution of nanotubes produced by different catalysts and growth processes. [2]. The symmetry and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes depend ...

  11. Immobilization of redox mediators on functionalized carbon nanotube

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with redox mediators, namely, toluidine blue and thionin have been carried out and the performance of graphite electrode modified with functionalized carbon nanotubes is described. Mechanical immobilization of functionalized single-walled nanotube (SWNT) ...

  12. Application of Gold Nanoparticles to Paint Colorants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Hideo

    Metal nanoparticles possess unique properties that they do not exhibit in their bulk states. One of these properties is the color due to surface plasmon resonance. Gold nanoparticles appear red. This color has been utilized in glass for a long long time. In recent years, highly concentrated pastes of gold and silver nanoparticles have been successfully produced by using a special type of protective polymer and a mild reductant. The paste of gold nanoparticles can be used for paint and other materials as red colorants. In this article,application examples of gold nanoparticles as colorant are introduced. Recently, methods for producing bimetal nanoparticles such as gold/silver and gold/copper have been developed. These nanoparticles allow colors from yellow to green to be created. These methods and colors they produce are also described in this article.

  13. Linear Optical Properties of Gold Colloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin XIA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gold colloid was prepared by reducing HAuCl4·4H2O with Na3C6H5O7·2H2O. The morphology, size of gold nanoparticles and the optical property of colloid were characterized by transmission electron microscope and UV-Vis spectrophotometer, respectively. It shows that the gold nanoparticles are in the shape of spheres with diameters less than 8 nm, and the surface plasmon resonance absorption peak is located at about 438 nm. As the volume fraction of gold particles increases, the intensity of absorption peak strengthens. The optical property of gold colloid was analyzed by Maxwell-Garnett (MG effective medium theory in the company of Drude dispersion model. The results show that the matrix dielectric constant is a main factor, which influences the optical property of gold colloid.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9558

  14. Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticles Doped DVB Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yu; Luo Xuan; Fan Yongheng; Zhang Qingjun; Ren Hongbo; Xiao Lei

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams was researched, which can be used as ICF target materials. By high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) method, gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams were prepared, with gold nanoparticles dissolved in inner phase. The results show that the content of Au in the gold nanoparticles doped DVB foam is 3. 19%, the axial direction density of the foam is uniform which indicates none evident settlement of gold nanoparticles. SEM tests show that the gold doped DVB polymer foams have open-celled structure and very uniform aperture, and the average pore size is about 1 μm, which is much smaller than that of pure DVB foams. EDX test shows that Au disperses uniformly in the foams. (authors)

  15. Recovery of carrier-free gold-195

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iofa, B.Z.; Ivanova, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is known that gold(III) is readily extracted from nitric acid solutions with ethers. The authors have studied extraction of trace amounts of gold(III) from nitric acid solutions with diethyl and diisopropyl ethers in the presence of significant excess of Pt(IV). Distribution coefficients of gold(III) were measured radiometrically using carrier-free gold-195 or spectrophotometrically in the presence of platinum(IV). Very high coefficients of gold separation from platinum may be achieved. Preliminary experiments have shown that zinc-65 was not extracted with ethers from nitric acid solutions. As an extraction system, the authors have chosen the system 10 M HNO 3 -diisopropyl ether. After model experiments, the authors have performed recovery of carrier-free gold-195 from a real platinum target irradiated with protons in a cyclotron

  16. Metallic gold beads in hyaluronic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dan Sonne; Tran, Thao Phuong; Smidt, Kamille

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by recurring attacks of neuroinflammation leading to neuronal death. Immune-suppressing gold salts are used for treating connective tissue diseases; however, side effects occur from systemic spread of gold ions. This is limited...... by exploiting macrophage-induced liberation of gold ions (dissolucytosis) from gold surfaces. Injecting gold beads in hyaluronic acid (HA) as a vehicle into the cavities of the brain can delay clinical signs of disease progression in the MS model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). This study...... investigates the anti-inflammatory properties of metallic gold/HA on the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor (Tnf-α), Interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, Il-10, Colony-stimulating factor (Csf)-v2, Metallothionein (Mt)-1/2, Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) and B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 in cultured J774 macrophages...

  17. Physiological investigation of gold nanorods toward watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yujie; Li, Junli; Ren, Hongxuan; Huang, Jin; Yuan, Hong

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the phytotoxicity and oxidant stress of the gold nanorods toward watermelon, and hence give a quantitative risk assessment of both seeds and plants phase. The seed germination, the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and the contents of soluble protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) have been measured while the plant roots were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the gold nanorods significantly promoted the root elongation. Furthermore, the results on the enzymes activities of plant indicated that oxidative stress happened in the plant treated with gold nanorods. However, the gold nanorods resulted in the phytotoxicity toward plant especially at high concentration. The TEM images of the plant roots with and without the treatment of gold nanorods showed the significant different size of starch granules. In conclusion, significant physiological changes of plant occurred after treatment with the gold nanorods.

  18. Production and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanotube-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William; Gorelik, Olga; Files, Brad; Scott, Carl; Santos, Beatrice; Mayeaux, Brian; Victor, Joe

    1999-01-01

    The Nobel Prize winning discovery of the Buckuball (C60) in 1985 at Rice University by a group including Dr. Richard Smalley led to the whole new class of carbon allotropes including fullerenes and nanotubes. Especially interesting from many viewpoints are single-walled carbon nanotubes, which structurally are like a single graphitic sheet wrapped around a cylinder and capped at the ends. This cylinders have diameter as small as 0.5 - 2 nm (1/100,000th the diameter of a human hair) and are as long as 0.1 - 1 mm. Nanotubes are really individual molecules and believed to be defect-free, leading to high tensile strength despite their low density. Additionally, these fibers exhibit electrical conductivity as high as copper, thermal conductivity as high as diamond, strength 100 times higher than steel at one-sixth the weight, and high strain to failure. Thus it is believed that developments in the field of nanotechnology will lead to stronger and lighter composite materials for next generation spacecraft. Lack of a bulk method of production is the primary reason nanotubes are not used widely today. Toward this goal JSC nanotube team is exploring three distinct production techniques: laser ablation, arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition (CVD, in collaboration with Rice University). In laser ablation technique high-power laser impinges on the piece of carbon containing small amount of catalyst, and nanotubes self-assemble from the resulting carbon vapor. In arc generator similar vapor is created in arc discharge between carbon electrodes with catalyst. In CVD method nanotubes grow at much lower temperature on small catalyst particles from carbon-containing feedstock gas (methane or carbon monoxide). As of now, laser ablation produces cleanest material, but mass yield is rather small. Arc discharge produces grams of material, but purity is low. CVD technique is still in baby steps, but preliminary results look promising, as well as perspective of scaling the process

  19. Glyco-gold nanoparticles: synthesis and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Compostella, Federica; Pitirollo, Olimpia; Silvestri, Alessandro; Polito, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Glyco-gold nanoparticles combine in a single entity the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles with the biological activity of carbohydrates. The result is an exciting nanosystem, able to mimic the natural multivalent presentation of saccharide moieties and to exploit the peculiar optical properties of the metallic core. In this review, we present recent advances on glyco-gold nanoparticle applications in different biological fields, highlighting the key parameters which inspire the glyco ...

  20. Glyco-gold nanoparticles: synthesis and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Compostella

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glyco-gold nanoparticles combine in a single entity the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles with the biological activity of carbohydrates. The result is an exciting nanosystem, able to mimic the natural multivalent presentation of saccharide moieties and to exploit the peculiar optical properties of the metallic core. In this review, we present recent advances on glyco-gold nanoparticle applications in different biological fields, highlighting the key parameters which inspire the glyco nanoparticle design.

  1. Gold, fiat money and price stability

    OpenAIRE

    Michael D. Bordo; Robert Dittmar; William T. Gavin

    2006-01-01

    The classical gold standard has long been associated with long-run price stability. But short-run price variability led critics of the gold standard to propose reforms that look much like modern versions of price-path targeting. This paper uses a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model to examine price dynamics under alternative policy regimes. In the model, an inflation target provides more short-run price stability than does the gold standard and, although it introduces a unit root int...

  2. Gold and Silver Extraction from Leach Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagdaulet K. Kenzhaliyev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been carried out an investigation on the extraction of gold and silver from thiosulfate solutions: standard test and technological solutions of chemical and electrochemical leaching. The influence of related metals on the process of extracting gold from solution was studied. There has been conducted a comparative study of the IR spectra of solutions after the sorption of gold, silver and related metals.

  3. Shape-Controlled Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Shankar, S. S.; Bhargava, S.; Sastry, M. Synthesis of Gold Nanospheres and Nanotriangles by the Turkevich Approach. Journal of Nanoscience and...Accounts of Chemical Research 2008, 41, 1587–1595. 22. Sun, Y.; Xia, Y. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Gold And Silver Nanoparticles. Science...N.; Griep, M. H.; and Karna, S. P. Chemical vs. Sonochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Silver , Gold, and Hybrid Nanoparticles; ARL-TR-5764

  4. Carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in amphibians: assessment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and comparison with double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, Florence; Landois, Perine; Puech, Pascal; Pinelli, Eric; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Gauthier, Laury

    2010-08-01

    The potential impact of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated under normalized laboratory conditions according to the International Standard micronucleus assay ISO 21427-1 for 12 days of half-static exposure to 0.1, 1, 10 and 50 mg/l of MWNTs in water. Three different end points were carried out for 12 days of exposure: mortality, growth inhibition and micronuclei induction in erythrocytes of the circulating blood of larvae. Raman spectroscopy analysis was used to study the presence of carbon nanotubes in the biological samples. Considering the high diversity of carbon nanotubes according to their different characteristics, MWNTs were analyzed in Xenopus larvae, comparatively to double-walled carbon nanotubes used in a previous study in similar conditions. Growth inhibition in larvae exposed to 50 mg/l of MWNTs was evidenced; however, no genetoxicity (micronucleus assay) was noticed, at any concentration. Carbon nanotube localization in the larvae leads to different possible hypothesis of mechanisms explaining toxicity in Xenopus.

  5. Coal gold agglomeration: an innovative approach to the recovery of gold in environmentally sensitive areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, N.C.; Hughes-Narborough, C.; Willey, G. [Davy (Stockton) Ltd., Stockton-on-Tees (United Kingdom)

    1994-11-01

    Coal Gold Agglomeration (CGA) was developed by BP Minerals and involves the selective recovery of oleophilic gold particles from an aqueous slurry into coal-oil agglomerates. These agglomerates are allowed to build up to a high gold loading and are then separated from the slurry. The loaded agglomerates are burned and the gold is finally recovered from the ash residue by dissolution and precipitation or by direct smelting. 6 figs.

  6. Chemistry of Oligonucleotibe-Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Letsinger, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Conjugates prepared by immobilizing thiol-terminated oligonucleotides onto gold nanoparticles from stable colloidal solutions in aqueous media The oligo nucleotides can serve as linkers to organize...

  7. Gold nano-particles fixed on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worsch, Christian; Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Kracker, Michael; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We produced wear resistant gold–ruby coatings on amorphous substrates. ► Thin sputtered gold layers were covered by or embedded in silica coatings. ► Annealing above T g of the substrate glass led to the formation of gold nano particles. ► A 1 1 1-texture of the gold particles is observed via XRD and EBSD. ► EBSD-patterns can be acquired from crystals covered by a thin layer of glass. - Abstract: A simple process for producing wear resistant gold nano-particle coatings on transparent substrates is proposed. Soda-lime-silica glasses were sputtered with gold and subsequently coated with SiO 2 using a combustion chemical vapor deposition technique. Some samples were first coated with silica, sputtered with gold and then coated with a second layer of silica. The samples were annealed for 20 min at either 550 or 600 °C. This resulted in the formation of round, well separated gold nano-particles with sizes from 15 to 200 nm. The color of the coated glass was equivalent to that of gold–ruby glasses. Silica/gold/silica coatings annealed at 600 °C for 20 min were strongly adherent and scratch resistant. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to describe the crystal orientations of the embedded particles. The gold particles are preferably oriented with their (1 1 1) planes perpendicular to the surface.

  8. CO oxidation on gold nanoparticles: Theoretical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remediakis, Ioannis; Lopez, Nuria; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    We present a summary of our theoretical results regarding CO oxidation on both oxide-supported and isolated gold nanoparticles. Using Density Functional Theory we have studied the adsorption of molecules and the oxidation reaction of CO on gold clusters. Low-coordinated sites on the gold...... nanoparticles can adsorb small inorganic molecules such as O2 and CO, and the presence of these sites is the key factor for the catalytic properties of supported gold nanoclusters. Other contributions, induced by the presence of the support, can provide parallel channels for the reaction and modulate the final...

  9. Gold Rushes and mineral property rights allocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinding, Knud

    , is to handle the other projects that are generated by the "gold rush" informational externalities created by the initial discovery. At the core of the problems of dealing with a gold rush situation is both the informational externality and an institutional framework which is not designed to deal with large...... influxes of prospectors competing for a very limited area. This paper charts significant gold rush events in the mineral industry in recent decades and uses preliminary data on the areas impacted by these gold rushes to argue that many mineral tenure systems should be modified in order to be better able...

  10. Gold Cleaning Methods for Electrochemical Detection Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Lee MacKenzie; Tenje, Maria; Heiskanen, Arto

    2009-01-01

    This work investigates methods for obtaining reliably clean gold film surfaces. Nine gold cleaning methods are investigated here: UV ozone photoreactor; potassium hydroxide-hydrogen peroxide; potassium hydroxide potential sweep; sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide; sulfuric acid potential cycling......-ray photo-electron spectroscopy are used to characterize surface cleanliness. A low peak-current potential-difference and charge transfer resistance indicates a cleaner surface, as does a higher percentage of elemental gold on the electrode surface. The potassium hydroxide potential sweep method is found...... to leave the gold surface the cleanest overall....

  11. Nuclear excitation in muonic gold

    CERN Document Server

    Robert Tissot, B; Debrunner, P; Engfer, R; Link, R; Schellenberg, L; Schneuwly, H; Walter, H K

    1973-01-01

    Energies and intensities of muonic X-rays in gold were measured at the CERN muon channel with an experimental set-up as described by Backe et al. (1972). The 2p-1s and 3d-2p transitions could only be analysed taking into account beside the static quadrupole interaction a dynamical hyperfine interaction of the 2p states, which leads to an excitation of the first four nuclear levels. The dynamical hyperfine interaction was calculated using the core excitation model (de Shalit, (1961)). (0 refs).

  12. Carbon nanotubes: Sensor properties. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Zaporotskova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent publications dealing with dealing with the fabrication of gas and electrochemical biosensors based on carbon nanotubes have been reviewed. Experimental and theoretical data on the working principles of nanotubes have been presented. The main regularities of the structure, energy parameters and sensor properties of modified semiconducting systems on the basis of cabon nanotubes have been studied by analyzing the mechanisms of nanotubule interaction with functional groups (including carboxyl and amino groups, metallic nanoparticles and polymers leading to the formation of chemically active sensors. The possibility of using boundary modified nanotubes for the identification of metals has been discussed. Simulation results have been reported for the interaction of nanotubes boundary modified by –СООН and –NH2 groups with atoms and ions of potassium, sodium and lithium. The simulation has been carried out using the molecular cluster model and the MNDO and DFT calculation methods. Sensors fabricated using this technology will find wide application for the detection of metallic atoms and their ions included in salts and alkali.

  13. Mesoscale mechanics of twisting carbon nanotube yarns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-03-12

    Fabricating continuous macroscopic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns with mechanical properties close to individual CNTs remains a major challenge. Spinning CNT fibers and ribbons for enhancing the weak interactions between the nanotubes is a simple and efficient method for fabricating high-strength and tough continuous yarns. Here we investigate the mesoscale mechanics of twisting CNT yarns using full atomistic and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, considering concurrent mechanisms at multiple length-scales. To investigate the mechanical response of such a complex structure without losing insights into the molecular mechanism, we applied a multiscale strategy. The full atomistic results are used for training a coarse grained model for studying larger systems consisting of several CNTs. The mesoscopic model parameters are updated as a function of the twist angle, based on the full atomistic results, in order to incorporate the atomistic scale deformation mechanisms in larger scale simulations. By bridging across two length scales, our model is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical behavior of twisted yarns while the atomistic level deformations in individual nanotubes are integrated into the model by updating the parameters. Our results focused on studying a bundle of close packed nanotubes provide novel mechanistic insights into the spinning of CNTs. Our simulations reveal how twisting a bundle of CNTs improves the shear interaction between the nanotubes up to a certain level due to increasing the interaction surface. Furthermore, twisting the bundle weakens the intertube interactions due to excessive deformation in the cross sections of individual CNTs in the bundle.

  14. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  15. Radionuclides incorporation in activated natural nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose Parra

    2016-01-01

    Natural palygorskite nanotubes show suitable physical and chemical properties and characteristics to be use as potential nanosorbent and immobilization matrix for the concentration and solidification of radionuclides present in nuclear wastes. In the development process of materials with sorption properties for the incorporation and subsequent immobilization of radionuclides, the most important steps are related with the generation of active sites simultaneously to the increase of the specific surface area and suitable heat treatment to producing the structural folding. This study evaluated the determining parameters and conditions for the activation process of the natural palygorskite nanotubes aiming at the sorption of radionuclides in the nanotubes structure and subsequent evaluation of the parameters involve in the structural folding by heat treatments. The optimized results about the maximum sorption capacity of nickel in activated natural nanotubes show that these structures are apt and suitable for incorporation of radionuclides similar to nickel. By this study is verified that the optimization of the acid activation process is fundamental to improve the sorption capacities for specifics radionuclides by activated natural nanotubes. Acid activation condition optimized maintaining structural integrity was able to remove around 33.3 wt.% of magnesium cations, equivalent to 6.30·10 -4 g·mol -1 , increasing in 42.8% the specific surface area and incorporating the same molar concentration of nickel present in the liquid radioactive waste at 80 min. (author)

  16. Carbon nanotube based stationary phases for microchip chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an overview and critical evaluation of the use of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microchip chromatography. The unique properties of carbon nanotubes, such as a very high surface area and intriguing adsorptive behaviour, have...... integrated, tailor-made nanotube columns by means of catalytic growth of the nanotubes inside the fluidic channels. An evaluation of the different implementations of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microfluidic chromatography devices is given in terms of separation performance...

  17. Shear Flow Induced Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes in Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for the fabrication of natural rubber composite with aligned carbon nanotubes is provided in this study. The two-step approach is based on (i the preparation of mixture latex of natural rubber, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and other components and (ii the orientation of carbon nanotubes by a flow field. Rubber composite sheets filled with variable volume fraction of aligned carbon nanotubes were fabricated and then confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies. An obvious increase in thermal conductivity has been obtained after the alignment of carbon nanotubes. The dynamic mechanical analysis was carried out in a tear mode for the composite.

  18. Geckolike high shear strength by carbon nanotube fiber adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Y.; Nakayama, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube adhesives can adhere strongly to surfaces as a gecko does. The number of carbon nanotube layers is an important determinant of the contact area for adhesion. Balancing the catalyst ratio and buffer layer used for chemical vapor deposition processing controls the number of carbon nanotube layers and their distribution. The features of carbon nanotubes determine the shear strength of adhesion. Carbon nanotubes with a broad distribution of layers exhibit enhanced shear strength with equivalent adhesive capability to that of a natural Tokay Gecko (Gekko gecko)

  19. Symmetry Properties of Single-Walled BC2N Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jianyi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The symmetry properties of the single-walled BC2N nanotubes were investigated. All the BC2N nanotubes possess nonsymmorphic line groups. In contrast with the carbon and boron nitride nanotubes, armchair and zigzag BC2N nanotubes belong to different line groups, depending on the index n (even or odd and the vector chosen. The number of Raman- active phonon modes is almost twice that of the infrared-active phonon modes for all kinds of BC2N nanotubes.

  20. Nanomechanics of Individual Carbon Nanotubes from Pyrolytically Grown Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruiping; Wang, Zhong L.; Bai, Zhigang; de Heer, Walter A.; Dai, Liming; Gao, Mei

    2000-07-01

    The bending modulus of individual carbon nanotubes from aligned arrays grown by pyrolysis was measured by in situ electromechanical resonance in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The bending modulus of nanotubes with point defects was ~30 GPa and that of nanotubes with volume defect was 2-3 GPa. The time-decay constant of nanotube resonance in a vacuum of 10-4 Torr was ~85 μs. A femtogram nanobalance was demonstrated based on nanotube resonance; it has the potential for measuring the mass of chain-structured large molecules. The in situ TEM provides a powerful approach towards nanomechanics of fiberlike nanomaterials with well-characterized defect structures.

  1. Preparation of aligned nanotube membranes for water and gas separation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulevich, Valentin; Bakajin, Olgica; Klare, Jennifer E.; Noy, Aleksandr

    2016-01-05

    Fabrication methods for selective membranes that include aligned nanotubes can advantageously include a mechanical polishing step. The nanotubes have their ends closed off during the step of infiltrating a polymer precursor around the nanotubes. This prevents polymer precursor from flowing into the nanotubes. The polishing step is performed after the polymer matrix is formed, and can open up the ends of the nanotubes.

  2. Metallogeny of gold in the Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, G.; Sundblad, K.

    1990-12-01

    Gold occurs in a number of different ore types in the Fennoscandian Shield ranging in age from Late Archean to Late Proterozoic. Until recently, the metal was exploited primarily as a byproduct in volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits but during the 1980s more gold mines have been opened than during any other episode in the mining history of northern Europe. The occurrence of gold in the Fennoscandian Shield is reviewed in the context of the major tectonostratigraphic units: 1. In the Karelian Province, gold is hosted by greenstone belts of the Archean basement complex e.g. at Ilomantsi, eastern Finland. Greenstone belts of the Nordkalott Province, which are interpreted as part of an Early Proterozoic cover sequence, contain gold deposits associated with copper (Bidjovagge, Saattopora and Pahtohavare). Gold is also associated with cobalt in the metasomatically altered Early Proterozoic cover in north-eastern Finland (Meurastuksenaho and Juomasuo). 2. In the Svecofennian Domain, the major gold deposits were generated during the emplacement of 1.92 1.87 Ga old accretional magmatism. These deposits occur in the northeastern part of the Svecofennian Domain, close to the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. They comprise two major types: (a) the porphyry-type and shear-zone gold hosted by tonalite at Tallberg, Laivakangas, Kopsa and Osikonmäki; (b) as a component of volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits (e.g. Holmtjärn, Boliden and Pyhäsalmi). Other types are: (c) gold-bearing quartz-alumina alteration zones formed during the 1.92 1.87 Ga magmatic period (Enåsen); (d) gold in massive sulphide and iron ore deposits in Bergslagen. 3. Gold associated with 1.84 1.54 Ga granites has been reported from several sites in the Shield, including quartz veins and contact-metasomatic deposits. In addition, shear-zone-related gold deposits post-dating these granites have been identified in southeastern Sweden (Ädelfors). 4. In the Sveconorwegian Domain, the gold deposits at Bleka

  3. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  4. Synthesis of Au and Au/Cu alloy nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by using microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangari, Vijaya K.; Dey, Sanchita; Jeelani, Shaik

    2010-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles and gold-copper alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl 4 .xH 2 O) and co-reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl 4 .xH 2 O) and Copper(II) acetate [(CH 3 COO) 2 Cu.H 2 O] by ethylene glycol through microwave irradiation technique. In this reaction ethylene glycol used as a solvent and also reducing agent. The cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) used as surfactant. Au nanoparticles and Au-Cu nanoparticles on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotube also produced by using same procedure. The XRD analysis confirmed the formation of Au and Au-Cu alloy nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes(CNTs). The morphology and size of the particles were examined by the transmission electron microscopy. The EDS analysis on individual particles confirmed that the presence of two metals in a particle in case of alloy nanoparticle. The results presented here show that a variety of well defined metal and metal alloy nanoparticles can be produced by using the microwave polyol process with in a short period of time. (author)

  5. Geochemical methodology for gold prospect ion in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangenber, J.

    1987-01-01

    This work is about the history of gold prospection in Uruguay. In this study there are considered the geochemical aspects, the gold performance, the applicability to mining prospection and the gold prospection aluvionar

  6. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Using Sol Gel Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek

    2002-12-01

    Since 1990, carbon nanotubes were discovered and they have been the object of intense scientific study ever since. A carbon nanotube is a honeycomb lattice rolled into a cylinder. The diameter of a carbon nanotube is of nanometer size and the length is in the range of micrometer. Many of the extraordinary properties attributed to nanotubes, such as tensile strength and thermal stability, have inspired predictions of microscopic robots, dent-resistant car bodies and earthquake-resistant buildings. The first products to use nanotubes were electrical. Some General Motors cars already include plastic parts to which nanotubes were added; such plastic can be electrified during painting so that the paint will stick more readily. Two nanotube-based lighting and display products are well on their way to market. In the long term, perhaps the most valuable applications will take further advantage of nanotubes' unique electronic properties. Carbon nanotubes can in principle play the same role as silicon does in electronic circuits, but at a molecular scale where silicon and other standard semiconductors cease to work. There are several routes to synthesize carbon nanotubes; laser vaporization, carbon arc and vapor growth. We have applied a different route using sol gel chemistry to obtain carbon nanotubes. This work is patent-pending.

  7. Gold emissivities for hydrocode applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, C.; Wagon, F.; Galmiche, D.; Loiseau, P.; Dattolo, E.; Babonneau, D.

    2004-01-01

    The Radiom model [M. Busquet, Phys Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] is designed to provide a radiative-hydrodynamic code with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) data efficiently by using LTE tables. Comparison with benchmark data [M. Klapisch and A. Bar-Shalom, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 58, 687 (1997)] has shown Radiom to be inaccurate far from LTE and for heavy ions. In particular, the emissivity was found to be strongly underestimated. A recent algorithm, Gondor [C. Bowen and P. Kaiser, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 81, 85 (2003)], was introduced to improve the gold non-LTE ionization and corresponding opacity. It relies on fitting the collisional ionization rate to reproduce benchmark data given by the Averroes superconfiguration code [O. Peyrusse, J. Phys. B 33, 4303 (2000)]. Gondor is extended here to gold emissivity calculations, with two simple modifications of the two-level atom line source function used by Radiom: (a) a larger collisional excitation rate and (b) the addition of a Planckian source term, fitted to spectrally integrated Averroes emissivity data. This approach improves the agreement between experiments and hydrodynamic simulations

  8. Carbon nanotube network-silicon oxide non-volatile switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Albert D; Araujo, Paulo T; Xu, Runjie; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2014-12-08

    The integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon is important for their incorporation into next-generation nano-electronics. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile switch that utilizes carbon nanotube networks to electrically contact a conductive nanocrystal silicon filament in silicon dioxide. We form this device by biasing a nanotube network until it physically breaks in vacuum, creating the conductive silicon filament connected across a small nano-gap. From Raman spectroscopy, we observe coalescence of nanotubes during breakdown, which stabilizes the system to form very small gaps in the network~15 nm. We report that carbon nanotubes themselves are involved in switching the device to a high resistive state. Calculations reveal that this switching event occurs at ~600 °C, the temperature associated with the oxidation of nanotubes. Therefore, we propose that, in switching to a resistive state, the nanotube oxidizes by extracting oxygen from the substrate.

  9. Mussel inspired polymerized P(TA-TETA) for facile functionalization of carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Shuxian; Gao, Tingting; Wang, Junhao; Liu, Qinze; Zhou, Guowei

    2018-03-01

    This article describes a novel and effective approach for non-covalent modification of carbon nanotube (CNT) via the mussel inspired polymerization of tannic acid (TA) and triethylenetetramine (TETA) and subsequent surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and photograph were used to study the successful preparation of polymer brush grafted CNT (CNT-P(TA-TETA)-PDMAEMA) composite as well as the pH-responsive behavior of the composite. Furthermore, by amine protonation and in situ reduction, gold nanoparticles were successfully uploaded and the catalytic property of CNT-P(TA-TETA)-PDMAEMA/Au was investigated. We believe that the surface functionalization strategy can be extended to graphene and other substrates, and the surface properties can be regulated by grafting polymer brushes with different functionalities.

  10. Carbon nanotube field-effect devices with asymmetric electrode configuration by contact geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotprayoonsak, P.; Talukdar, D.; Ahlskog, M.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied experimentally the conductive properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based field-effect type devices, with different contact geometries at the connecting electrode. The device designs are asymmetric with one end of the SWNT having the metal electrode deposited on top and immersing it, while at the other end, the SWNT is on top of the electrode. The devices were made with either gold or palladium as electrode materials, of which the latter resulted in different behavior of the different contact types. This is argued to be caused by the existence of a thin insulating layer of surface adsorbents on the palladium, possibly Pd5O4, the effect of which is enhanced by the 1D nature of the contact area in the configuration with SWNT on top of electrode.

  11. First-principles simulations on suspended coinage-metal nanotubes composed of different atomic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Wei; Zhou, Jian; Dong, Jinming

    2013-04-07

    Substitutional doping of gold and copper atoms in a (4, 4) silver single-wall nanotube has been investigated using first-principles simulations. It is found that the Au- and Cu-substitutional doping of the tip-suspended (4, 4) Ag tube can maintain the hollow tubular structure at different alloy compositions due to the existence of a local minimum in the string tension variation with their unit cell lengths. The bonding energy differences between the mono-elements and hetero-elements and string tension may play important roles in suppressing the "self-purification" effects so that the nanoalloy tubes can be formed. Analysis of the band structure suggests that the number of conduction channels of the Ag-Au alloy tubes may lie between the pure (4, 4) Ag and Au tubes.

  12. Paper Money but a Gold Debt. Italy in the Gold Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Tattara; or consequences)

    2002-01-01

    During the 52 years between the Unification of the Kingdom of Italy and World War 1, the lira was legally convertible into metal for a limited period of time. Although not formally committed to gold, the lira exchange towards the gold standard countries proved remarkably stable, \\223shadowing\\224 gold. It is widely claimed that being one of the successful members of the gold standard circle entailed a number of advantages. If the lira was closely linked to gold, suggesting that there was only...

  13. Carbon Nanotubes and Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P. Barna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of nanomaterials in manufactured consumer products is a rapidly expanding industry and potential toxicities are just beginning to be explored. Combustion-generated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT or nanoparticles are ubiquitous in non-manufacturing environments and detectable in vapors from diesel fuel, methane, propane, and natural gas. In experimental animal models, carbon nanotubes have been shown to induce granulomas or other inflammatory changes. Evidence suggesting potential involvement of carbon nanomaterials in human granulomatous disease, has been gathered from analyses of dusts generated in the World Trade Center disaster combined with epidemiological data showing a subsequent increase in granulomatous disease of first responders. In this review we will discuss evidence for similarities in the pathophysiology of carbon nanotube-induced pulmonary disease in experimental animals with that of the human granulomatous disease, sarcoidosis.

  14. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  15. Batch fabrication of nanotubes suspended between microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Stöckli, T.; Knapp, H. F.

    2007-01-01

    We report a fabrication method, which uses standard UV-lithography to pattern the catalyst for the chemical vapour deposition(CVD) of suspended double clamped single walled carbon nanotubes. By using an aqueous solution of Fe(NO3)3 the patterning of the catalyst material onto microelectrodes can...... to the regions of maximum electric field, enabling accurate positioning of a nanotube by controlling the shape of the microelectrodes. The CNT bridges are deflected tens of nm when a DC voltage is applied between the nanotube and a gate microelectrode indicating that the clamping through the catalyst particles...... is not only mechanically stable but also electrical conducting. This method could be used to fabricate nanoelectromechanical systems based on suspended double clamped CNTs depending only on photolithography and standard Cleanroom processes....

  16. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  17. Boron Nitride Nanotube: Synthesis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha I.; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; hide

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800 C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  18. Photothermoelectric Effect in Suspended Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspitarte, Lee; Deborde, Tristan; Sharf, Tal; Kevek, Josh; Minot, Ethan

    2014-03-01

    We have performed scanning photocurrent microscopy measurements of field-effect transistors (FETs) made from individual suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs).Photocurrent generation in individual carbon nanotube based devices has been previously attributed the photovoltaic effect, in contrast to graphene based devices which are dominated by the photothermoelectric effect. In this work, we present the first measurements of strong photothermoelectric currents in individual suspended carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. In certain electrostatic doping regimes light induced temperature gradients lead to significant thermoelectric currents which oppose and overwhelm the photovoltaic contribution. Our measurements give new insight into the tunable and spatially inhomogeneous Seebeck coefficient of electrostatically-gated CNTs and demonstrate a new mechanism for optimizing CNT-based photodetectors and energy harvesting devices.

  19. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  20. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  1. Optical trapping of carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vasi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We study optical trapping of nanotubes and graphene. We extract the distribution of both centre-of-mass and angular fluctuations from three-dimensional tracking of these optically trapped carbon nanostructures. The optical force and torque constants are measured from auto and cross-correlation of the tracking signals. We demonstrate that nanotubes enable nanometer spatial, and femto-Newton force resolution in photonic force microscopy by accurately measuring the radiation pressure in a double frequency optical tweezers. Finally, we integrate optical trapping with Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrating the use of a Raman and photoluminescence tweezers by investigating the spectroscopy of nanotubes and graphene flakes in solution. Experimental results are compared with calculations based on electromagnetic scattering theory.

  2. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  3. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008,. India e-mail: ... to the Brust method for the synthesis of hydrophobized gold nanoparticles.33 This process essentially consists of .... due to rearrangement of the gold nanoparticles within domains (and reorganization of the domains themselves) on ...

  4. Dress Images on Gold-foil Figures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannering, Ulla; Andersson Strand, Eva Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    From the Late Iron Age settlement Sorte Muld on Bornholm both gold foil figures with depictions of costumes and textile tools can tell about textile production.......From the Late Iron Age settlement Sorte Muld on Bornholm both gold foil figures with depictions of costumes and textile tools can tell about textile production....

  5. Nonlinear optical studies of single gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Meindert Alexander van

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are spherical clusters of gold atoms, with diameters typically between 1 and 100 nanometers. The applications of these particles are rather diverse, from optical labels for biological experiments to data carrier for optical data storage. The goal of my project was to develop new

  6. Computational approaches to homogeneous gold catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faza, Olalla Nieto; López, Carlos Silva

    2015-01-01

    Homogenous gold catalysis has been exploding for the last decade at an outstanding pace. The best described reactivity of Au(I) and Au(III) species is based on gold's properties as a soft Lewis acid, but new reactivity patterns have recently emerged which further expand the range of transformations achievable using gold catalysis, with examples of dual gold activation, hydrogenation reactions, or Au(I)/Au(III) catalytic cycles.In this scenario, to develop fully all these new possibilities, the use of computational tools to understand at an atomistic level of detail the complete role of gold as a catalyst is unavoidable. In this work we aim to provide a comprehensive review of the available benchmark works on methodological options to study homogenous gold catalysis in the hope that this effort can help guide the choice of method in future mechanistic studies involving gold complexes. This is relevant because a representative number of current mechanistic studies still use methods which have been reported as inappropriate and dangerously inaccurate for this chemistry.Together with this, we describe a number of recent mechanistic studies where computational chemistry has provided relevant insights into non-conventional reaction paths, unexpected selectivities or novel reactivity, which illustrate the complexity behind gold-mediated organic chemistry.

  7. Geochemistry of hydrothermal gold deposits: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Zhu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineral assemblages formed during hydrothermal alteration reflect the geochemical composition of ore-forming fluids. Gold is mainly transported in solution as Au–Cl and Au–S complexes. The change of physicochemical conditions such as temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and sulfur fugacity are effective mechanisms for gold precipitation. Gold tends to be concentrated in the vapor phase of fluids at high temperatures and pressures. Au–As and Au–Sb associations are common in gold deposit. Native antimony and/or arsenic – native gold assemblages may precipitate from hydrothermal fluids with low sulfur fugacity. Hydrothermal fluids forming epithermal gold deposits are Au-saturated in most cases, whereas fluids of Carlin-type are Au-undersaturated. Quasi-steady As-bearing pyrite extracts solid solution Au from hydrothermal fluids through absorption. The capability of As-bearing pyrite to absorb Au from under-saturated fluid is the key to the formation of large-scale Carlin-type deposits. With increasing new data, studies on the geochemistry of gold deposits can be used to trace the origin of ore-forming fluids, the source of gold, and the transporting form of Au and other ore-forming elements, such as Si, S, F, Cl, As and Ag.

  8. Gold - Old Drug with New Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faa, Gavino; Gerosa, Clara; Fanni, Daniela; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Nurchi, Valeria M

    2018-01-01

    Research into gold-based drugs for a range of human diseases has seen a revival in recent years. This article reviews the most important applications of gold products in different fields of human pathology. Au(I) and Au(III) compounds have been re-introduced in clinical practice for targeting the cellular components involved in the onset and progression of viral and parasitic diseases, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. After some brief historical notes, this article takes into account the applications of gold compounds against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and also in tuberculosis and in rheumatoid arthritis treatment. The use of gold containing drugs in the cure of cancer are then considered, with special emphasis to the use of nanoparticles and to the photo-thermal cancer therapy. The use of colloidal gold in diagnostics, introduced in the last decade is widely discussed. As a last point a survey on the adverse effects and on the toxicity of the various gold derivatives in use in medicine is presented. In this review, we described the surprisingly broad spectrum of possible uses of gold in diagnostics and in therapeutic approaches to multiple human diseases, ranging from degenerative to infectious diseases, and to cancer. In particular, gold nanoparticles appear as attractive elements in modern clinical medicine, combining high therapeutic properties, high selectivity in targeting cancer cells and low toxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Goudafzettingen in Suriname (Gold deposits in Surinam)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinck, J.W.

    1956-01-01

    THE GOLD DEPOSITS IN SURINAM AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF CONCESSIONS THROUGH THE COUNTRY The fieldwork on the occurrence of primary and secondary gold deposits in Surinam on which this thesis is based was carried out by order of the Welfare Fund Surinam (Welvaarts Fonds Suriname) during the periods

  10. Numerical simulations of nanostructured gold films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repän, Taavi; Frydendahl, Christian; Novikov, Sergey M.

    2017-01-01

    We present an approach to analyse near-field effects on nanostructured gold films by finite element simulations. The studied samples are formed by fabricating gold films near the percolation threshold and then applying laser damage. Resulting samples have complicated structures, which...

  11. Spherical aggregates composed of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C-C; Kuo, P-L; Cheng, Y-C

    2009-01-01

    Alkylated triethylenetetramine (C12E3) was synthesized and used as both a reductant in the preparation of gold nanoparticles by the reduction of HAuCl 4 and a stabilizer in the subsequent self-assembly of the gold nanoparticles. In acidic aqueous solution, spherical aggregates (with a diameter of about 202 ± 22 nm) of gold nanoparticles (with the mean diameter of ∼18.7 nm) were formed. The anion-induced ammonium adsorption of the alkylated amines on the gold nanoparticles was considered to provide the electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance between the gold nanoparticles, which constituted the barrier that prevented the individual particles from coagulating. However, as the amino groups became deprotonated with increasing pH, the ammonium adsorption was weakened, and the amino groups were desorbed from the gold surface, resulting in discrete gold particles. The results indicate that the morphology of the reduced gold nanoparticles is controllable through pH-'tunable' aggregation under the mediation of the amino groups of alkylated amine to create spherical microstructures.

  12. Synthesis and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy studies of chitosan capped gold nanoparticles and their reactions with analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Sultan, Norfazila; Johan, Mohd Rafie

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) had been synthesized with various molarities and weights of reducing agent, monosodium glutamate (MSG), and stabilizer chitosan, respectively. The significance of chitosan as stabilizer was distinguished through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and UV-Vis absorption spectra in which the interparticles distance increases whilst retaining the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) characteristics peak. The most stable AuNPs occurred for composition with the lowest (1 g) weight of chitosan. AuNPs capped with chitosan size stayed small after 1 month aging compared to bare AuNPs. The ability of chitosan capped AuNPs to uptake analyte was studied by employing amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNT), copper oxide (Cu2O), and zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) as the target material. The absorption spectra showed dramatic intensity increased and red shifted once the analyte was added to the chitosan capped AuNPs.

  13. Synthesis and Ultraviolet Visible Spectroscopy Studies of Chitosan Capped Gold Nanoparticles and Their Reactions with Analytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norfazila Mohd Sultan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs had been synthesized with various molarities and weights of reducing agent, monosodium glutamate (MSG, and stabilizer chitosan, respectively. The significance of chitosan as stabilizer was distinguished through transmission electron microscopy (TEM images and UV-Vis absorption spectra in which the interparticles distance increases whilst retaining the surface plasmon resonance (SPR characteristics peak. The most stable AuNPs occurred for composition with the lowest (1 g weight of chitosan. AuNPs capped with chitosan size stayed small after 1 month aging compared to bare AuNPs. The ability of chitosan capped AuNPs to uptake analyte was studied by employing amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNT, copper oxide (Cu2O, and zinc sulphate (ZnSO4 as the target material. The absorption spectra showed dramatic intensity increased and red shifted once the analyte was added to the chitosan capped AuNPs.

  14. Nanotube Production Devices Expand Research Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In order for the Hubble Space Telescope to take incredible, never-seen-before shots of celestial bodies and then send them back to Earth, the spacecraft needs power. While in orbit, Hubble cannot plug into an electrical outlet or stop at a store for some batteries. One of the ways NASA supplies power aboard a spacecraft is by harnessing energy from the most powerful entity in the solar system: the Sun. Since the 1960s, photovoltaic technology, or technology that converts sunlight into electricity, has been instrumental in the exploration of space. To build upon existing photovoltaic technology, NASA s Glenn Research Center has worked on a variety of innovative designs and materials to incorporate into photovoltaic cells, the building blocks of solar power systems. One of these materials is the carbon nanotube - a tiny structure about 50,000 times finer than the average human hair, with notably high electrical and thermal conductivity and an extreme amount of mechanical strength. Such properties give carbon nanotubes great potential to enhance the reliability of power generation and storage devices in space and on Earth. Dennis J. Flood, the branch chief of the photovoltaic division at Glenn in the 1990s, was looking into using carbon nanotubes to improve the efficiency of solar cells when he ran into a major roadblock - high-quality carbon nanotubes were not readily available. To address this problem, one of the chemists in Flood s group came up with a process and system for growing them. A senior chemist at Glenn, Aloysius F. Hepp, devised an injection chemical vapor deposition process using a specific organometallic catalyst in a two-zone furnace. Hepp's group found the unique process produced high-quality carbon nanotubes with less than 5 percent metal impurity. In addition, the process was more efficient than existing techniques, as it eliminated pre-patterning of the substrate used for growing the nanotubes, a timely and cost-prohibitive step.

  15. Carbon nanotube oscillators for applications as nanothermometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmat, Fainida; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Hill, James M

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes have a broad range of potential applications such as nanomotors, nano-oscillators and electromechanical nanothermometers, and a proper understanding of the molecular interaction between nanostructures is fundamentally important for these applications. In this paper, we determine the molecular interaction potential of interacting carbon nanotubes for two configurations. The first is a shuttle configuration involving a short outer tube sliding on a fixed inner tube, and the second involves a telescopic configuration for which an inner tube moves both in the region between two outer tubes and through the tubes themselves. For the first configuration we examine two cases of semi-infinite and finite inner carbon nanotubes. We employ the continuum approximation and the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential for non-bonded molecules to determine the molecular interaction potential and the resulting van der Waals force, and we evaluate the resulting surface integrals numerically. We also investigate the acceptance condition and suction energy for the first configuration. Our results show that for the shuttle configuration with a semi-infinite inner tube, the suction energy is maximum when the difference between the outer and inner tubes radii is approximately 3.4 A, which is the ideal inter-wall spacing between graphene sheets. For the finite inner tube, the potential energy is dependent on both the inner and outer tube lengths as well as on the inter-wall spacing. In terms of the oscillating frequency, the critical issue is the length of the moving outer tube, and the shorter the length, the higher the frequency. Further, for the telescopic configuration with two semi-infinite outer nanotubes of different radii, we find that the interaction energy also depends on the difference of the tube radii. For two outer nanotubes of equal radii we observe that the shorter the distance between the two outer nanotubes, the higher the magnitude of the

  16. Gold 100: proceedings of the international conference on gold. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fivaz, C.E.; King, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of Gold 100 have been published in three separate volumes. The first deals with the mining of gold, the second with the extractive metallurgy of gold, and the third with industrial uses of gold. In this second volume, the papers on extractive metallurgy presented at the Conference reflect most of the problems that are currently of significant technical interest to the industry. This volume is divided in six main parts covering plant design, carbon-in-pulp technology, refractory gold, new technology, grinding and concentration, and leaching. The part on new technology includes papers on x-ray fluorescence analyzers, Moessbauer spectroscopy and leaching processes for uranium, while the part on grinding and concentration includes papers on nuclear and radiotracer techniques for the recovery of gold as well as various flotation parameters in the flotation behaviour of gold and uranium

  17. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Jeremy; Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in nanostructure technology have made it possible to create small devices at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes (CNT's) are among the most exciting building blocks of nanotechnology. Their versatility and extremely desirable properties for electronic and other devices have driven intense research and development efforts in recent years. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be presented. The theoretical investigation is mainly based on molecular dynamics. Green Kubo relation is used for the study of thermal conductivity. Results include kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux autocorrelation function, and heat conduction of various CNT structures. Most of the computation and simulation has been conducted on the Beowulf cluster at Ball State University. Various software packages and tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), and NanoHUB, the open online resource at Purdue University have been used for the research. The work has been supported by the Indiana Academy of Science Research Fund, 2010-2011.

  18. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, Ahmed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Heimbeck, Martin S. [Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Everitt, Henry O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Pasquali, Matteo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kono, Junichiro, E-mail: kono@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ∼−30 dB with a low insertion loss (<0.5 dB) throughout a frequency range of 0.2–1.1 THz. In addition, we used a THz ellipsometer to measure the Müller matrix of the CNT-fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  19. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  20. Nanobody-Displaying Flagellar Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ágnes; Kovács, Mátyás; Muskotál, Adél; Jankovics, Hajnalka; Tóth, Balázs; Pósfai, Mihály; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2018-02-26

    In this work we addressed the problem how to fabricate self-assembling tubular nanostructures displaying target recognition functionalities. Bacterial flagellar filaments, composed of thousands of flagellin subunits, were used as scaffolds to display single-domain antibodies (nanobodies) on their surface. As a representative example, an anti-GFP nanobody was successfully inserted into the middle part of flagellin replacing the hypervariable surface-exposed D3 domain. A novel procedure was developed to select appropriate linkers required for functional internal insertion. Linkers of various lengths and conformational properties were chosen from a linker database and they were randomly attached to both ends of an anti-GFP nanobody to facilitate insertion. Functional fusion constructs capable of forming filaments on the surface of flagellin-deficient host cells were selected by magnetic microparticles covered by target GFP molecules and appropriate linkers were identified. TEM studies revealed that short filaments of 2-900 nm were formed on the cell surface. ITC and fluorescent measurements demonstrated that the fusion protein exhibited high binding affinity towards GFP. Our approach allows the development of functionalized flagellar nanotubes against a variety of important target molecules offering potential applications in biosensorics and bio-nanotechnology.

  1. Synthesis of camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhimin; Liu Zhiguo; Zu Yuangang; Fu Yujie; Zhao Chunjian; Zhao Xiuhua; Meng Ronghua; Tan Shengnan

    2010-01-01

    Camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials have been synthesized by the sodium borohydride reduction method under a strong basic condition. The obtained gold nanomaterials have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The camptothecin-loaded gold colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored for more than two months at room temperature without obvious changes. The color of the colloidal solution can change from wine red to purple and blue during the acidifying process. It was revealed that the release of camptothecin and the aggregation of gold nanoparticles can be controlled by tuning the solution pH. The present study implied that the gold nanomaterials can be used as the potential carrier for CPT delivery.

  2. Optical constant of thin gold films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakubovsky, D. I.; Fedyanin, D. Yu; Arsenin, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of metal-based devices is limited by ohmic losses in the metal, which are determined by electron scattering. The structural properties of gold thin films also play an important role in the film quality, which may affect its' optical properties and the overall capability of the dev......The performance of metal-based devices is limited by ohmic losses in the metal, which are determined by electron scattering. The structural properties of gold thin films also play an important role in the film quality, which may affect its' optical properties and the overall capability...... and spectroscopic ellipsometry, the structural morphology and optical properties of polycrystalline gold thin films (fabricated by e-beam deposition at a low sputtering rate smooth gold) in the thickness range of 20 - 200 nm. By extracting the real and imaginary dielectric function and the Drude parameter...... predicts optical losses based on structure of the gold films....

  3. The interaction of gold with gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar-cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments designed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions have yielded several interesting results. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are also explained by invoking this mechanism.

  4. Gold analysis by the gamma absorption technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtoglu, Arzu; Tugrul, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    Gold (Au) analyses are generally performed using destructive techniques. In this study, the Gamma Absorption Technique has been employed for gold analysis. A series of different gold alloys of known gold content were analysed and a calibration curve was obtained. This curve was then used for the analysis of unknown samples. Gold analyses can be made non-destructively, easily and quickly by the gamma absorption technique. The mass attenuation coefficients of the alloys were measured around the K-shell absorption edge of Au. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficient values were obtained using the WinXCom program and comparison of the experimental results with the theoretical values showed generally good and acceptable agreement

  5. Gold Liquid Crystals in the XXI Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Bardají

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the first gold liquid crystal was described in 1986, much effort has been done to prepare new compounds bearing this property. The review deals with the last results obtained in this new century. Gold(I has a strong affinity to give linear co-ordination and metal-metal interactions, which produce a rich supramolecular chemistry, and can promote the behavior as liquid crystal. Therefore, most liquid crystals are based on rod-like gold(I compounds, while gold(III liquid crystals are scarce. Calamitic and discotic mesogens have been reported, as well as chiral liquid crystals. Weak interactions such as H-bonds have also been used to obtain gold mesogens. Some of them exhibit additional properties, such as color, luminescence, and chirality. Luminescence has been reported, not only in the solid state or in solution, but also in the mesophase. This is relevant for applications in LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, information storage, and sensors.

  6. Fabrication of arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes by shadow evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michael D; Weiss, Emily A; Smythe, Elizabeth J; Chiechi, Ryan C; Capasso, Federico; Whitesides, George M

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for fabricating uniform arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes with controlled heights and diameters. The technique involves depositing material onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template using a collimated electron beam evaporation source. The evaporating material enters the porous openings of the AAO membrane and deposits onto the walls of the pores. The membrane is tilted with respect to the column of evaporating material, so the shadows cast by the openings of the pores onto the inside walls of the pores define the geometry of the tubes. Rotation of the membrane during evaporation ensures uniform deposition inside the pores. After evaporation, dissolution of the AAO in base easily removes the template to yield an array of nanotubes connected by a thin backing of the same metal or metal oxide. The diameter of the pores dictates the diameter of the tubes, and the incident angle of evaporation determines the height of the tubes. Tubes up to approximately 1.5 mum in height and 20-200 nm in diameter were fabricated. This method is adaptable to any material that can be vapor-deposited, including indium-tin oxide (ITO), a conductive, transparent material that is useful for many opto-electronic applications. An array of gold nanotubes produced by this technique served as a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: the Raman signal (per molecule) from a monolayer of benzenethiolate was a factor of approximately 5 x 10(5) greater than that obtained using bulk liquid benzenethiol.

  7. Fabrication of chitosan/Au-TiO2nanotube-based dry electrodes for electroencephalography recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanjuan; Li, Penghai; Li, Mingji; Li, Hongji; Li, Cuiping; Sun, Dazhi; Yang, Baohe

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a method for fabricating dry electrodes for use in recording electroencephalograms (EEGs), which are based on the use of chitosan (Ch), gold (Au) particles, and titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanotube arrays deposited on titanium (Ti) thin sheets. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and EEG signal collection. The TiO 2 nanotube arrays were grown on the Ti thin sheet by an electrochemical anodic oxidation method. The Au particles were deposited on the bottom and surface layers of the TiO 2 nanotube array using an electrochemistry-based multi-potential step technology. The fabricated dry Ch/Au-TiO 2 electrodes have an efficient conversion interface for ion current/electron current, a high biocompatible contact surface, and a fast electron transfer channel. To confirm that the Ch/Au-TiO 2 layer can be used in dry EEG electrodes, the impedance spectra of the electrodes in solution and skin were analyzed. The mean impedance values for skin were found to be approximately 169±33.0kΩ at 2.15Hz and 67.4±8.9kΩ at 100Hz. In addition, EEG signals from the forehead and sites with hair were collected using both the dry Ch/Au-TiO 2 electrode and a wet Ag/AgCl electrode for comparison purposes. It was found that high quality EEG signal recordings could be obtained using the dry electrodes. The fact that electrolytes are not required means that the electrodes are suitable for use in long-term bio-potential testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Stein Moura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  9. Electrical device fabrication from nanotube formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Nolan Walker; Kittrell, W. Carter; Kim, Myung Jong; Schmidt, Howard K.

    2013-03-12

    A method for forming nanotube electrical devices, arrays of nanotube electrical devices, and device structures and arrays of device structures formed by the methods. Various methods of the present invention allow creation of semiconducting and/or conducting devices from readily grown SWNT carpets rather than requiring the preparation of a patterned growth channel and takes advantage of the self-controlling nature of these carpet heights to ensure a known and controlled channel length for reliable electronic properties as compared to the prior methods.

  10. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Landi, Brian J.; Denno, Patrick L.; DiLeo, Roberta A.; VanDerveer, William; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be envisioned as an individual graphene sheet rolled into a seamless cylinder (single-walled, SWNT), or concentric sheets as in the case of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) (1). The role-up vector will determine the hexagonal arrangement and "chirality" of the graphene sheet, which will establish the nanotube to be metallic or semiconducting. The optoelectronic properties will depend directly on this chiral angle and the diameter of the SWNT, with semiconductor types exhibiting a band gap energy (2). Characteristic of MWNTs are the concentric graphene layers spaced 0.34 nm apart, with diameters from 10-200 nm and lengths up to hundreds of microns (2). In the case of SWNTs, the diameters range from 0.4 - 2 nm and lengths have been reported up to 1.5 cm (3). SWNTs have the distinguishable property of "bundling" together due to van der Waal's attractions to form "ropes." A comparison of these different structural types is shown in Figure 1. The use of SWNTS in space photovoltaic (PV) applications is attractive for a variety of reasons. Carbon nanotubes as a class of materials exhibit unprecedented optical, electrical, mechanical properties, with the added benefit of being nanoscale in size which fosters ideal interaction in nanomaterial-based devices like polymeric solar cells. The optical bandgap of semiconducting SWNTs can be varied from approx. 0.4 - 1.5 eV, with this property being inversely proportional to the nanotube diameter. Recent work at GE Global Research has shown where a single nanotube device can behave as an "ideal" pn diode (5). The SWNT was bridged over a SiO2 channel between Mo contacts and exhibited an ideality factor of 1, based on a fit of the current-voltage data using the diode equation. The measured PV efficiency under a 0.8 eV monochromatic illumination showed a power conversion efficiency of 0.2 %. However, the projected efficiency of these junctions is estimated to be > 5 %, especially when one considers the

  12. Carbon nanotubes as anti-bacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Teodora; Matea, Cristian T; Pop, Teodora; Mosteanu, Ofelia; Buzoianu, Anca Dana; Suciu, Soimita; Puia, Cosmin; Zdrehus, Claudiu; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Lucian

    2017-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections that have evolved via natural selection have increased alarmingly at a global level. Thus, there is a strong need for the development of novel antibiotics for the treatment of these infections. Functionalized carbon nanotubes through their unique properties hold great promise in the fight against multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. This new family of nanovectors for therapeutic delivery proved to be innovative and efficient for the transport and cellular translocation of therapeutic molecules. The current review examines the latest progress in the antibacterial activity of carbon nanotubes and their composites.

  13. Advantages of electrodes with dendrimer-protected platinum nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes for electrochemical methanol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriviriyanun, Ampornphan; Imae, Toyoko

    2013-04-14

    Electrochemical sensors consisting of electrodes loaded with carbon nanotubes and Pt nanoparticles (PtNPs) protected by dendrimers have been developed using a facile method to fabricate them on two types of disposable electrochemical printed chips with a screen-printed circular gold or a screen-printed circular glassy carbon working electrode. The electrochemical performance of these sensors in the oxidation of methanol was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. It was revealed that such sensors possess stable durability and high electrocatalytic activity: the potential and the current density of an anodic peak in the oxidation of methanol increased with increasing content of PtNPs on the electrodes, indicating the promotion of electrocatalytic activity in relation to the amount of catalyst. The low anodic potential suggests the easy electrochemical reaction, and the high catalyst tolerance supports the almost complete oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. The significant performance of these sensors in the detection of methanol oxidation comes from the high electrocatalytic ability of PtNPs, excellent energy transfer of carbon nanotubes and the remarkable ability of dendrimers to act as binders. Thus these systems are effective for a wide range of applications as chemical, biomedical, energy and environmental sensors and as units of direct methanol fuel cells.

  14. On the anomalies in gold nanoparticles prepared by micelle nanolithography and their impact on one-dimensional material synthesis. Role of substrate, size effects and impurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbenkum, B.N.

    2007-07-23

    The synthesis of one-dimensional (1-D) inorganic semiconductor materials such as nanotubes and silicon (Si) nanowires is usually achieved by catalyst nanoparticlemediated synthetic routes. Despite the well-established nature of this technique, problems such as low temperature synthesis and adequate control of catalyst nanoparticle diameter in order to control 1-D material diameter still prevail. Additionally, the expansion of this technology from crystalline to cheaper substrates such as glass remains demanding. This work employs a previously established selfassembly route to produce controlled spatial distribution of substrate anchored small diameter gold nanoparticles with controlled size. This enabled successful synthesis of Si 1-D structures with controlled diameters less than 20 nm. Low temperature synthesis due to enhanced catalytic activity was achieved via introduction of impurity by treatment of gold nanoparticles in different plasma environments. This enabled Si 1-D structure growth on Si, SiO{sub x}/Si and borosilicate glass substrates at 320 C. Substrate-induced stress affected Si diffusion at the gold nanoparticle determining whether Si nanowires or nanotubes were grown. These results are of technological relevance because low temperature synthesis provides an economical approach and controlled diameter enhances material functionality. Additionally, exploiting substrate-induced stress to influence Si diffusion in nanoparticles provides an alternate route to tuning Si 1-D structure. (orig.)

  15. Carbonate hosted gold deposit in Tasmania, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadi, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: This study uses elemental and isotopic composition of carbonates associated with gold from Henty and Beaconsfield in Tasmania, Australia, to illustrate source of gold-bearing fluids, salinity, temperature and dissolution and reprecipitation of carbonate. The Beaconsfield and Henty gold mines are located in northern and western Tasmania respectively. Gold mineralisation in Beaconsfield occurs within the quartz-carbonate Tasmania Reef (Lower to Middle Palaeozoic sequence, Hills, 1998). The Henty gold mine is located at the base of the Cambrian Tyndall Group (volcano-sedimentary succession, White and McPhie, 1996) close to Henty Fault. Gold in carbonate samples from Henty ranges from 7.7 to 9360 ppm and in Beaconsfield ranges from 0.01 to 434 ppm. The amount of carbonate in samples from Henty and Beaconsfield gold mines varies from approximately 24 to 99.8%. Bivariate plot of Ca relative to total amounts of Mg, Fe and Mn illustrates that the major carbonate minerals at Beaconsfield and Henty gold mines are magnesian ankerite and calcite. The difference in carbonate mineralogy, at Henty and Beaconsfield gold mines, is attributed to the composition of fluids responsible for carbonate alteration. Gold and magnesium in Beaconsfield ankerite are derived from the leaching of Cambrian ultramafic rocks during the Devonian by the passage of meteoric fluids through tectonically affected Ordovician carbonates (Rao and Adabi, 1999). The total concentration of Fe and Mn are low (0.5 to 2%) in Henty and high (1 to 17.5%) in Beaconsfield ankerite, possibly due to oxidising conditions at Henty and reducing conditions at Beaconsfield gold mines during gold mineralisation. Variation of Sr values between Beaconsfield ankerite and Henty calcite is related to dissolution of limestone that increase Sr concentrations in gold mineralising fluids. Na values in both Beaconsfield (20 to 1100 ppm) and Henty carbonates (25 to 1650 ppm) suggest low salinity fluids responsible for gold

  16. Lead titanate nanotubes synthesized via ion-exchange method: Characteristics and formation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Liang; Cao Lixin; Li Jingyu; Liu Wei; Zhang Fen; Zhu Lin; Su Ge

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Lead titanate nanotubes PbTi 3 O 7 were firstly synthesized by ion-exchange method. → Sodium titanate nanotubes have ion exchangeability. → Lead titanate nanotubes show a distinct red shift on absorption edge. - Abstract: A two-step method is presented for the synthesis of one dimensional lead titanate (PbTi 3 O 7 ) nanotubes. Firstly, titanate nanotubes were prepared by an alkaline hydrothermal process with TiO 2 nanopowder as precursor, and then lead titanate nanotubes were formed through an ion-exchange reaction. We found that sodium titanate nanotubes have ion exchangeability with lead ions, while protonated titanate nanotubes have not. For the first time, we distinguished the difference between sodium titanate nanotubes and protonated titanate nanotubes in the ion-exchange process, which reveals a layer space effect of nanotubes in the ion-exchange reaction. In comparison with sodium titanate, the synthesized lead titanate nanotubes show a narrowed bandgap.

  17. The conversion of polyaniline nanotubes to nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes and their comparison with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trchová, Miroslava; Konyushenko, Elena; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Kovářová, Jana; Ciric-Marjanovic, G.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 6 (2009), s. 929-938 ISSN 0141-3910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0686; GA AV ČR IAA400500905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * carbon ization * FTIR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.154, year: 2009

  18. Manipulation and functionalization of nano-tubes: application to boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguer, A.

    2007-01-01

    This PhD work is divided into two parts dealing with boron nitride (BNNT) and carbon nano-tubes. The first part is about synthesis, purification and chemical functionalization of BNNT. Single-walled BNNT are synthesized by LASER ablation of a hBN target. Improving the synthesis parameters first allowed us to limit the byproducts (hBN, boric acid). A specific purification process was then developed in order to enrich the samples in nano-tubes. Purified samples were then used to develop two new chemical functionalization methods. They both involve chemical molecules that present a high affinity towards the BN network. The use of long chain-substituted quinuclidines and borazines actually allowed the solubilization of BNNT in organic media. Purification and functionalization were developed for single-walled BNNT and were successfully applied to multi-walled BNNT. Sensibility of boron to thermic neutrons finally gave birth to a study about covalent functionalization possibilities of the network. The second part of the PhD work deals with separation of carbon nano-tubes depending on their properties. Microwave irradiation of carbon nano-tubes first allowed the enrichment of initially polydisperse samples in large diameter nano-tubes. A second strategy involving selective interaction between one type of tubes and fullerene micelles was finally envisaged to selectively solubilize carbon nano-tubes with specific electronic properties. (author) [fr

  19. Surfactant-nanotube interactions in water and nanotube separation by diameter: atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, E. J. F.; Dos Santos, M. C.

    2010-05-01

    A non-destructive sorting method to separate single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by diameter was recently proposed. By this method, SWNTs are suspended in water by surfactant encapsulation and the separation is carried out by ultracentrifugation in a density gradient. SWNTs of different diameters are distributed according to their densities along the centrifuge tube. A mixture of two anionic surfactants, namely sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and sodium cholate (SC), presented the best performance in discriminating nanotubes by diameter. Unexpectedly, small diameter nanotubes are found at the low density part of the centrifuge tube. We present molecular dynamics studies of the water-surfactant-SWNT system to investigate the role of surfactants in the sorting process. We found that surfactants can actually be attracted towards the interior of the nanotube cage, depending on the relationship between the surfactant radius of gyration and the nanotube diameter. The dynamics at room temperature showed that, as the amphiphile moves to the hollow cage, water molecules are dragged together, thereby promoting the nanotube filling. The resulting densities of filled SWNT are in agreement with measured densities.

  20. Wrapping and dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes improves electrical conductivity of protein-nanotube composite biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voge, Christopher M; Johns, Jeremy; Raghavan, Mekhala; Morris, Michael D; Stegemann, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    Composites of extracellular matrix proteins reinforced with carbon nanotubes have the potential to be used as conductive biopolymers in a variety of biomaterial applications. In this study, the effect of functionalization and polymer wrapping on the dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in aqueous media was examined. Carboxylated MWCNT were wrapped in either Pluronic(®) F127 or gelatin. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that covalent functionalization of the pristine nanotubes disrupted the carbon lattice and added carboxyl groups. Polymer and gelatin wrapping resulted in increased surface adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen, respectively. Wrapping also markedly increased the stability of MWCNT suspensions in water as measured by settling time and zeta potential, with Pluronic(®)-wrapped nanotubes showing the greatest effect. Treated MWCNT were used to make 3D collagen-fibrin-MWCNT composite materials. Carboxylated MWCNT resulted in a decrease in construct impedance by an order of magnitude, and wrapping with Pluronic(®) resulted in a further order of magnitude decrease. Functionalization and wrapping also were associated with maintenance of fibroblast function within protein-MWCNT materials. These data show that increased dispersion of nanotubes in protein-MWCNT composites leads to higher conductivity and improved cytocompatibility. Understanding how nanotubes interact with biological systems is important in enabling the development of new biomedical technologies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.