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Sample records for spoilage bacteria electronic

  1. Food spoilage - interactions between food spoilage bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Flodgaard, Lars; Rasch, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Food spoilage is a complex process and excessive amounts of foods are lost due to microbial spoilage even with modem day preservation techniques. Despite the heterogeneity in raw materials and processing conditions, the microflora that develops during storage and in spoiling foods can be predicted...... based on knowledge of the origin of the food, the substrate base and a few central preservation parameters such as temperature, atmosphere, a(w) and pH. Based on such knowledge, more detailed sensory, chemical and microbiological analysis can be carried out on the individual products to determine......-regulation of phenotypes potentially involved in spoilage through cell-to-cell communication. In particular, we report for the first time the widespread occurrence of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) in stored and spoiling fresh foods and we discuss the potential implications for spoilage and food preservation....

  2. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    2003-01-01

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and

  3. Bioactive proteins against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Z. Sitohy

    2014-10-01

    activities equivalent to or higher than the activity of penicillin, with the basic sub-unit exhibiting the highest activity, followed by glycinin.; β-conglycinin exhibited the lowest level of activity with a MIC of 50, 100 and 1000 μg/mL, respectively. The IC50% values of the basic subunit, glycinin and β-conglycinin, against Listeria monocytogenes, were 15, 16 and 695 μg/mL; against Bacillus subtilis the values were 17, 20, and 612 μg/mL; and against Salmonella Enteritidis the values were 18, 21 and 526 μg/mL, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy images of L. monocytogenes and S. Enteritidis exhibited an increase in cell size and a separation of the cell wall from the cell membrane when treated with glycinin or basic sub-unit. The scanning electron microscopy of B. subtilis indicated signs of an irregular, wrinkled outer surface as well as the fragmentation, adhesion, and aggregation of damaged cells or cellular debris when treated with glycinin or the basic subunits; however not with penicillin. The proliferation of L. monocytogenes, S. Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7-when artificially inoculated in raw milk ,stored at 4 or 25 °C was significantly (P<0·05 reduced by the glycinin sub-unit and nisin (0·5% w/v; but they were only slightly reduced by β-conglycinin and moderately reduced by lysozyme. The two substances (MSP and MCP exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibitory action against two of the studied bacteria with a minimum inhibitory concentration of approximately 100 µg/mL. The supplementation of raw milk with esterified legume proteins (MSP and MCP has significantly (p < 0.05 reduced the levels of TBC, PBC and PSC in raw milk stored at a temperature of 4 °C. This potentially will delaythe onset of spoilage of by four days. Conclusion: Both glycinin and the basic sub-unit have a more swift antimicrobial action than that of penicillin. Basic sub-units exhibited the highest efficiency at killing bacterial cells, followed by glycinin

  4. Fish spoilage bacteria - problems and solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Dalgaard, Paw

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms are the major cause of spoilage of most seafood products. However, only a few members of the microbial community, the specific spoilage organisms (SSOs), give rise to the offensive off-flavours associated with seafood spoilage. Combining microbial ecology, molecular techniques, ana...

  5. Investigation of spoilage in saveloy samples inoculated with four potential spoilage bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Esben Skibsted; Schäfer, A.; Koch, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Sliced saveloy samples were inoculated with monocultures of four potential spoilage bacteria and studied during a four week storage period. The objective was to investigate the resulting changes in the composition of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the sensory quality of the product. Based...... on the sensory scores and the VOC composition Brochothrix thermosphacta, Chryseomonas luteola and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum were found to have a high spoilage potential in saveloy samples subjected to consumer simulated storage during the fourth week. Inoculation with Leuconostoc carnosum only resulted...... in a low level of spoilage. The sensory changes in the saveloy samples were modeled based on the VOC composition using Partial Least Squares Regression. The changes in the six sensory descriptors were closely related to the amount of diacetyl, acetoin, 2- and 3-methylbutanol, 2- and 3-methylbutanal and 2...

  6. Acetic acid bacteria spoilage of bottled red wine -- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartowsky, Eveline J; Henschke, Paul A

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are ubiquitous organisms that are well adapted to sugar and ethanol rich environments. This family of Gram-positive bacteria are well known for their ability to produce acetic acid, the main constituent in vinegar. The oxidation of ethanol through acetaldehyde to acetic acid is well understood and characterised. AAB form part of the complex natural microbial flora of grapes and wine, however their presence is less desirable than the lactic acid bacteria and yeast. Even though AAB were described by Pasteur in the 1850s, wine associated AAB are still difficult to cultivate on artificial laboratory media and until more recently, their taxonomy has not been well characterised. Wine is at most risk of spoilage during production and the presence of these strictly aerobic bacteria in grape must and during wine maturation can be controlled by eliminating, or at least limiting oxygen, an essential growth factor. However, a new risk, spoilage of wine by AAB after packaging, has only recently been reported. As wine is not always sterile filtered prior to bottling, especially red wine, it often has a small resident bacterial population (wines, sealed with natural cork closures, and stored in a vertical upright position may develop spoilage by acetic acid bacteria. This spoilage is evident as a distinct deposit of bacterial biofilm in the neck of the bottle at the interface of the wine and the headspace of air, and is accompanied with vinegar, sherry, bruised apple, nutty, and solvent like off-aromas, depending on the degree of spoilage. This review focuses on the wine associated AAB species, the aroma and flavour changes in wine due to AAB metabolism, discusses the importance of oxygen ingress into the bottle and presents a hypothesis for the mechanism of spoilage of bottled red wine.

  7. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-04

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  8. Growth characteristics and biofilm formation of various spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-Min; Zheng, Ling; Hyun, Jeong-Eun; Jung, Kyu-Seok; Heu, Sunggi; Lee, Sun-Young

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce including growth at various temperatures, biofilm formation, cell hydrophobicity, and colony spreading. The number of spoilage bacteria present when stored at 35 °C was significantly greater than when stored at lower temperatures, and maximum population size was achieved after 10 h. However, Bacillus pumilus, Dickeya zeae, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. Carotovorum Pcc21, and Bacillus pumilus (RDA-R) did not grow at the storage temperature of 5 °C. The biofilm formation by Clavibacter michiganensis, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and A. calcoaceticus (RDA-R) are higher than other spoilage bacteria. Biofilm formation showed low correlation between hydrophobicity, and no significant correlation with colony spreading. These results might be used for developing safe storage guidelines for fresh produce at various storage temperatures, and could be basic information on the growth characteristics and biofilm formation properties of spoilage bacteria from fresh produce. Growth of spoilage bacteria was different depending on the bacteria strains and storage temperature. Between biofilm formation and cell hydrophobicity was low correlation on spoilage bacteria. Therefore, growth characteristics and biofilm formation of spoilage bacteria might be used for developing safe storage guidelines for fresh produce at various storage temperatures. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Development of detection medium for hard-to-culture beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K; Asano, S; Iijima, K; Kuriyama, H; Kitagawa, Y

    2008-05-01

    To develop a detection medium for hard-to-culture beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Four hard-to-culture beer-spoilage strains of LAB, belonging to Lactobacillus paracollinoides and Lactobacillus lindneri, have been obtained by repeatedly subculturing the wild-type strains in beer. To develop a countermeasure against these hard-to-culture beer-spoilage LAB, a beer-based medium was modified. As a consequence, the supplementation of a small amount of de Man Rogosa Sharpe medium was found to enhance the growth of hard-to-culture beer-spoilage LAB strains obtained in this study. In addition, sodium acetate was shown to improve the selectivity of this beer-based medium. Further comparative study was performed with five other media widely used for the detection of beer-spoilage LAB in the brewing industry. This study revealed that the newly developed medium, designated advanced beer-spoiler detection (ABD) medium, possessed superior sensitivity for hard-to-culture beer-spoilage LAB and comparable sensitivity with easy-to-culture beer-spoilage LAB. Moreover, ABD medium was found to suppress the growth of nonspoilage micro-organisms, and thereby allow the selective growth of beer-spoilage LAB. Advanced beer-spoiler detection medium is considered as an effective tool for comprehensive detection of beer-spoilage LAB in breweries. The detection by ABD medium can be used as an indicator for differentiating the beer-spoilage ability of LAB without further confirmatory tests in breweries.

  10. Contamination of salmon fillets and processing plants with spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møretrø, Trond; Moen, Birgitte; Heir, Even; Hansen, Anlaug Å; Langsrud, Solveig

    2016-11-21

    The processing environment of salmon processing plants represents a potential major source of bacteria causing spoilage of fresh salmon. In this study, we have identified major contamination routes of important spoilage associated species within the genera Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Photobacterium in pre-rigor processing of salmon. Bacterial counts and culture-independent 16S rRNA gene analysis on salmon fillet from seven processing plants showed higher levels of Pseudomonas spp. and Shewanella spp. in industrially processed fillets compared to salmon processed under strict hygienic conditions. Higher levels of Pseudomonas spp. and Shewanella spp. were found on fillets produced early on the production day compared to later processed fillets. The levels of Photobacterium spp. were not dependent on the processing method or time of processing. In follow-up studies of two plants, bacterial isolates (n=2101) from the in-plant processing environments (sanitized equipment/machines and seawater) and from salmon collected at different sites in the production were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Pseudomonas spp. dominated in equipment/machines after sanitation with 72 and 91% of samples from the two plants being Pseudomonas-positive. The phylogenetic analyses, based on partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing, showed 48 unique sequence profiles of Pseudomonas of which two were dominant. Only six profiles were found on both machines and in fillets in both plants. Shewanella spp. were found on machines after sanitation in the slaughter department while Photobacterium spp. were not detected after sanitation in any parts of the plants. Shewanella spp. and Photobacterium spp. were found on salmon in the slaughter departments. Shewanella was frequently present in seawater tanks used for bleeding/short term storage. In conclusion, this study provides new knowledge on the processing environment as a source of contamination of salmon fillets with Pseudomonas spp. and

  11. Characterization of cucumber fermentation spoilage bacteria by enrichment culture and 16S rDNA cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidt, Fred; Medina, Eduardo; Wafa, Doria; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys; Franco, Wendy; Huang, Hsin-Yu; Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D; Kim, Jae Ho

    2013-03-01

    Commercial cucumber fermentations are typically carried out in 40000 L fermentation tanks. A secondary fermentation can occur after sugars are consumed that results in the formation of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, concomitantly with the loss of lactic acid and an increase in pH. Spoilage fermentations can result in significant economic loss for industrial producers. The microbiota that result in spoilage remain incompletely defined. Previous studies have implicated yeasts, lactic acid bacteria, enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridia as having a role in spoilage fermentations. We report that Propionibacterium and Pectinatus isolates from cucumber fermentation spoilage converted lactic acid to propionic acid, increasing pH. The analysis of 16S rDNA cloning libraries confirmed and expanded the knowledge gained from previous studies using classical microbiological methods. Our data show that Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria supersede Gram-positive Fermincutes species after the pH rises from around 3.2 to pH 5, and propionic and butyric acids are produced. Characterization of the spoilage microbiota is an important first step in efforts to prevent cucumber fermentation spoilage. An understanding of the microorganisms that cause commercial cucumber fermentation spoilage may aid in developing methods to prevent the spoilage from occurring. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Antifungal Activity of Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria against Dairy-Associated Spoilage Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsbjerg, Stina Dissing

    Bacterial cultures of lactic and propionic acid bacteria are widely used in fermented products including dairy products. Spoilage fungi may constitute a quality and safety issue in these products. The antifungal properties of some lactic and propionic acid bacteria make them potential candidates...... diacetyl and lactic acid, 6 antifungal hydroxy acids were identified. Of these, 3 have previously been reported from antifungal lactic acid bacteria, whereas the other 3 hydroxy acids have not previously been reported produced by antifungal lactic acid bacteria....

  13. Photocatalytic disinfection of spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens and Macrococcus caseolyticus by nano-TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photocatalytic disinfection of spoilage bacteria gram-negative (G-) P. fluorescens and gram-positive (G+) M. caseolyticus by nano-TiO2 under different experimental conditions and the disinfection mechanism were investigated. The experimental conditions included the initial bacterial populations, nan...

  14. Microbial community analysis of food-spoilage bacteria in commercial custard creams using culture-dependent and independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, K; Kawai, Y; Iioka, H; Tanioka, M; Nishimura, J; Kitazawa, H; Tsurumi, K; Saito, T

    2008-08-01

    Custard cream is made from highly nutritive raw materials such as milk and sugar and is easily spoiled by the multiplication of specific microbial contaminants or residents. However, this spoilage microbial community has not been studied. We determined the spoilage microbiota in commercial custard creams using culture-dependent and independent methods. Using the culture-dependent analysis with various agar media, 185 bacterial colonies and 43 eukaryal colonies were isolated from 7 commercial custard cream products. All bacterial isolates were morphologically, physiologically, and genetically identified as bacilli, staphylococci, lactic acid bacteria, and psychrotrophic gram-negative rods. Using culture-independent molecular analysis, the PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technique, spoilage of the commercial custard creams was found to be caused by bacilli, staphylococci, lactic acid bacteria, psychrotrophic gram-negative rods, Anoxybacillus sp., Caurobacter sp., and Streptococcus sp. bacteria. The detected spoilage bacteria were the same species as previously detected in spoiled milk products and shown in other reports, suggesting that spoilage bacteria in a raw material easily grow in processed foods made from milk. We determined the spoilage microbial communities in commercial custard creams, and these are the first data concerning spoilage microbiota in nonfermented processed foods using a culture-independent analysis. Our study will be useful for the manufacture and safe preservation of dairy products because the first step toward safe food preservation by food manufacturers is to understand the spoilage microbiota in a target food to select optimal preservatives and to reduce the use of food additives.

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss Essential Oil against Some Fish Spoilage Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate antimicrobial effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss essential oil (EO against six fish spoilage bacteria for evaluation of its potential utilization in the preservation of minimally processed fish products. Methods: Firstly, GC-MS analysis of the EO was performed to determine its chemical composition. Then, antibacterial effect of the EO in a range of 0.031 to 4 mg/ml was tested against different fish spoilage bacteria such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Shewanella putrefaciens, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by broth microdilution method to determine minimum inhibitory (MIC and minimum bactericidal (MBC concentrations. Results: GC-MS results showed that phenolic components such as carvacrol (51.55% and thymol (25.49% were predominant constituents of the EO. Zataria multiflora Boiss EO exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria. Shewanella Putrefaciens was the most sensitive bacteria with MBC value of 0. 5 mg/ml. Conclusion: According to the results, this EO could be used as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food specially seafood products to preserve them against bacterial spoilage.

  16. Antagonistic pattern of lactic acid bacteria against native spoilage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CIBA

    2012-11-08

    borne bacteria. All three LABs exhibited inhibition ... enhance its keeping quality may have undesirable effects to consumers. Antibacterial ... dilutions, onto Baird parker agar (BPA, Hi- media, Mumbai) supplemented with sterile ...

  17. Factors Affecting Microbial Load and Profile of Potential Pathogens and Food Spoilage Bacteria from Household Kitchen Tables

    OpenAIRE

    Biranjia-Hurdoyal, Susheela; Latouche, Melissa Cathleen

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study the bacterial load and isolate potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria from kitchen tables, including preparation tables and dining tables. Methods. A total of 53 households gave their consent for participation. The samples were collected by swabbing over an area of 5?cm by 5?cm of the tables and processed for bacterial count which was read as colony forming units (CFU), followed by isolation and identification of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria. Res...

  18. Effect of microbial cell-free meat extract on the growth of spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nychas, G-J E; Dourou, D; Skandamis, P; Koutsoumanis, K; Baranyi, J; Sofos, J

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effect of microbial cell-free meat extract (CFME) derived from spoiled meat, in which quorum sensing (QS) compounds were present, on the growth kinetics (lag phase, and growth rate) of two spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Serratia marcescens. Aliquots of CFME from spoiled meat were transferred to Brain Heart Infusion broth inoculated with 10(3) CFU ml(-1) of 18 h cultures of Ps. fluorescens or Ser. marcescens, both fresh meat isolates; CFME derived from unspoiled fresh meat ('clean' meat) served as a control. Changes in impedance measurements were monitored for 48 h, and the detection time (Tdet) was recorded. It was found that in the absence of CFME containing QS compounds the Tdet was shorter (P meat. The rate of growth of Ps. fluorescens, recorded as the maximum slope rate of conductance changes (MSrCC), after Tdet, was higher (P meat. Similar results in MSrCC of impedance changes were obtained for Ser. marcescens. The study indicated that the growth rate (expressed in MSrCC units) of meat spoilage bacteria in vitro was enhanced in samples supplemented with CFME containing QS compounds compared to control samples (i.e., without CFME or with CFME from 'clean' meat). This behaviour may explain the dominant role of these two bacteria in the spoilage of meat. These results illustrate the potential effect of signalling compounds released during storage of meat on the behaviour of meat spoilage bacteria. Understanding such interactions may assist in the control of fresh meat quality and the extension of its shelf life.

  19. Antagonistic pattern of lactic acid bacteria against native spoilage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CIBA

    2012-11-08

    Nov 8, 2012 ... Different strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) namely Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIM 2287,. Lactobacillus plantarum NCIM 2085, Lactobacillus helveticus NCIM 2126 and Lactococcus lactis NCIM. 2114 were procured from the National Chemical Laboratory (NCL) Pune, India. These LAB cells were.

  20. Characterization of the spoilage lactic acid bacteria in "sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalschne, Daneysa Lahis; Womer, Rute; Mattana, Ademir; Sarmento, Cleonice Mendes Pereira; Colla, Luciane Maria; Colla, Eliane

    2015-03-01

    The lactic acid bacteria are involved with food fermentation and in such cases with food spoilage. Considering the need to reduce the lactic acid bacteria growth in meat products, the aim of this work was to enumerated and investigated the lactic acid bacteria present on sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham stored at 4 °C and 8 °C for 45 days by phenotypic and molecular techniques. The quantification showed that the lactic acid bacteria were present from the first day with mean count of 1.98 log cfu/g for the four batches analyzed. The lactic acid bacteria grew rapidly on the samples, and plate counts around 7.59 log cfu/g and 8.25 log cfu/g were detected after 45 days of storage at 4 °C and 8 °C, respectively; storage temperatures studied showed significant influence on the microorganism in study growth. The predominant lactic acid bacteria associated with the spoilage samples at one day of storage includes Lactobacillus sp., the phenotypic overlap Leuconostoc / Weissella sp. and Enterococcus sp. At 45 days of storage at 4 and 8 °C the mainly specie was Lactobacillus curvatus , following by Lactobacillus sakei and Leuconostoc mesentereoides ; the Enterococcus sp. was not present in the samples.

  1. Characterization of the spoilage lactic acid bacteria in “sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalschne, Daneysa Lahis; Womer, Rute; Mattana, Ademir; Sarmento, Cleonice Mendes Pereira; Colla, Luciane Maria; Colla, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    The lactic acid bacteria are involved with food fermentation and in such cases with food spoilage. Considering the need to reduce the lactic acid bacteria growth in meat products, the aim of this work was to enumerated and investigated the lactic acid bacteria present on sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham stored at 4 °C and 8 °C for 45 days by phenotypic and molecular techniques. The quantification showed that the lactic acid bacteria were present from the first day with mean count of 1.98 log cfu/g for the four batches analyzed. The lactic acid bacteria grew rapidly on the samples, and plate counts around 7.59 log cfu/g and 8.25 log cfu/g were detected after 45 days of storage at 4 °C and 8 °C, respectively; storage temperatures studied showed significant influence on the microorganism in study growth. The predominant lactic acid bacteria associated with the spoilage samples at one day of storage includes Lactobacillus sp., the phenotypic overlap Leuconostoc / Weissella sp. and Enterococcus sp. At 45 days of storage at 4 and 8 °C the mainly specie was Lactobacillus curvatus , following by Lactobacillus sakei and Leuconostoc mesentereoides ; the Enterococcus sp. was not present in the samples. PMID:26221105

  2. Characterization of the spoilage lactic acid bacteria in “sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneysa Lahis Kalschne

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lactic acid bacteria are involved with food fermentation and in such cases with food spoilage. Considering the need to reduce the lactic acid bacteria growth in meat products, the aim of this work was to enumerated and investigated the lactic acid bacteria present on sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham stored at 4 °C and 8 °C for 45 days by phenotypic and molecular techniques. The quantification showed that the lactic acid bacteria were present from the first day with mean count of 1.98 log cfu/g for the four batches analyzed. The lactic acid bacteria grew rapidly on the samples, and plate counts around 7.59 log cfu/g and 8.25 log cfu/g were detected after 45 days of storage at 4 °C and 8 °C, respectively; storage temperatures studied showed significant influence on the microorganism in study growth. The predominant lactic acid bacteria associated with the spoilage samples at one day of storage includes Lactobacillus sp., the phenotypic overlap Leuconostoc/Weissella sp. and Enterococcus sp. At 45 days of storage at 4 and 8 °C the mainly specie was Lactobacillus curvatus, following by Lactobacillus sakei and Leuconostoc mesentereoides; the Enterococcus sp. was not present in the samples.

  3. Modified-atmosphere packaging of hen table eggs: effects on pathogen and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, F; Manfreda, G; Olivi, P; Rocculi, P; Sirri, F; Meluzzi, A

    2012-12-01

    As part of a more comprehensive research activity on the use of modified-atmosphere packaging for the improvement of quality and functional properties of table eggs, the effects of air, 100% CO(2), and 100% O(2) packaging were also evaluated on the survival of experimentally inoculated pathogen bacteria (Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes) as well as on spoilage bacteria (total aerobic mesophilic bacteria) on table eggs during 30 d of storage at 4, 25, and 37°C by colony count method. In general, temperatures played a major role, rather than gasses, in influencing the bacterial survival. In particular, the lowest microbial loads were registered at 4°C on E. coli and spoilage bacteria, whereas 37°C was the best storage temperature to avoid the psychrotropic microorganism L. monocytogenes development regardless of the gas used. One hundred percent CO(2) packaging, in association with a low storage temperature (4°C), had a significant positive effect in reducing Salmonella loads. On eggs inoculated with L. monocytogenes and stored at 4°C as well as on eggs containing only spoilage bacteria and stored at 25°C, 100% CO(2) resulted the best gas in comparison with air and O(2). One hundred percent CO(2) packaging showed no negative effect on pathogen survival compared with air. Although further improvements are required to control RH within packaging to limit bacteria growth/survival, in view of the positive effects of CO(2) packaging on quality traits of table eggs, 100% CO(2) packaging might represent a promising innovative technique for the maintenance of egg characteristics during transport, retail, and domestic storage.

  4. Characterization of spoilage bacteria in pork sausage by PCR-DGGE analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Silva Dias

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate microbial diversity and identify spoilage bacteria in fresh pork sausages during storage, twelve industrial pork sausages of different trademarks were stored at 4 ºC for 0, 14, 28 and 42 days, 80% relative humidity and packaged in sterile plastic bags. Microbiological analysis was performed. The pH and water activity (a w were measured. The culture-independent method performed was the Polymerase Chain Reaction - Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE. The culture-dependent method showed that the populations of mesophilic bacteria and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB increased linearly over storage time. At the end of the storage time, the average population of microorganisms was detected, in general, at the level of 5 log cfu g-1. A significant (P < 0.005 increase was observed in pH and a w values at the end of the storage time. The PCR-DGGE allowed a rapid identification of dominant communities present in sausages. PCR-DGGE discriminated 15 species and seven genera of bacteria that frequently constitute the microbiota in sausage products. The most frequent spoilage bacteria identified in the sausages were Lactobacillus sakei and Brochothrix thermosphacta. The identification of dominant communities present in fresh pork sausages can help in the choice of the most effective preservation method for extending the product shelf-life.

  5. Draft genome sequence and annotation of Lactobacillus acetotolerans BM-LA14527, a beer-spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyan; Li, Lin; Peters, Brian M; Li, Bing; Deng, Yang; Xu, Zhenbo; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2016-09-01

    Lactobacillus acetotolerans is a hard-to-culture beer-spoilage bacterium capable of entering into the viable putative nonculturable (VPNC) state. As part of an initial strategy to investigate the phenotypic behavior of L. acetotolerans, draft genome sequencing was performed. Results demonstrated a total of 1824 predicted annotated genes, with several potential VPNC- and beer-spoilage-associated genes identified. Importantly, this is the first genome sequence of L. acetotolerans as beer-spoilage bacteria and it may aid in further analysis of L. acetotolerans and other beer-spoilage bacteria, with direct implications for food safety control in the beer brewing industry. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The Occurrence of Beer Spoilage Lactic Acid Bacteria in Craft Beer Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Cristiana; Osimani, Andrea; Milanović, Vesna; Taccari, Manuela; Aquilanti, Lucia; Clementi, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Beer is one of the world's most ancient and widely consumed fermented alcoholic beverages produced with water, malted cereal grains (generally barley and wheat), hops, and yeast. Beer is considered an unfavorable substrate of growth for many microorganisms, however, there are a limited number of bacteria and yeasts, which are capable of growth and may spoil beer especially if it is not pasteurized or sterile-filtered as craft beer. The aim of this research study was to track beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inside a brewery and during the craft beer production process. To that end, indoor air and work surface samples, collected in the brewery under study, together with commercial active dry yeasts, exhausted yeasts, yeast pellet (obtained after mature beer centrifugation), and spoiled beers were analyzed through culture-dependent methods and PCR-DGGE in order to identify the contaminant LAB species and the source of contamination. Lactobacillus brevis was detected in a spoiled beer and in a commercial active dry yeast. Other LAB species and bacteria ascribed to Staphylococcus sp., Enterobaceriaceae, and Acetobacter sp. were found in the brewery. In conclusion, the PCR-DGGE technique coupled with the culture-dependent method was found to be a useful tool for identifying the beer spoilage bacteria and the source of contamination. The analyses carried out on raw materials, by-products, final products, and the brewery were useful for implementing a sanitization plan to be adopted in the production plant. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. The influence of substrate on siderophore production by fish spoilage bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone

    1996-01-01

    Siderophore production of fish spoilage bacteria (5 isolates of Shewanella putrefaciens and 5 of Pseudomonas sp.) was determined in fish extract, Tris-succinate medium, a liquid medium of the Chrome-Azurol-S (CAS) agar and in M9 medium supplemented with glucose and casamino acids (M9GC). One...... isolates. S. putrefaciens produced siderophores of the hydroxamate type in fish extract and to a lesser extend in the M9GC medium. Growth was supported by the other media. S. putrefaciens grew weakly on the Chrome-azurol-S (CAS agar as this medium did not support siderophore-production. However...

  8. Influence of sodium chloride, pH, and lactic acid bacteria on anaerobic lactic acid utilization during fermented cucumber spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D; Franco, Wendy; Perez-Diaz, Ilenys; McFeeters, Roger F

    2012-07-01

    Cucumbers are preserved commercially by natural fermentations in 5% to 8% sodium chloride (NaCl) brines. Occasionally, fermented cucumbers spoil after the primary fermentation is complete. This spoilage has been characterized by decreases in lactic acid and a rise in brine pH caused by microbial instability. Objectives of this study were to determine the combined effects of NaCl and pH on fermented cucumber spoilage and to determine the ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) spoilage isolates to initiate lactic acid degradation in fermented cucumbers. Cucumbers fermented with 0%, 2%, 4%, and 6% NaCl were blended into slurries (FCS) and adjusted to pH 3.2, 3.8, 4.3, and 5.0 prior to centrifugation, sterile-filtration, and inoculation with spoilage organisms. Organic acids and pH were measured initially and after 3 wk, 2, 6, 12, and 18 mo anaerobic incubation at 25 °C. Anaerobic lactic acid degradation occurred in FCS at pH 3.8, 4.3, and 5.0 regardless of NaCl concentration. At pH 3.2, reduced NaCl concentrations resulted in increased susceptibility to spoilage, indicating that the pH limit for lactic acid utilization in reduced NaCl fermented cucumbers is 3.2 or lower. Over 18 mo incubation, only cucumbers fermented with 6% NaCl to pH 3.2 prevented anaerobic lactic acid degradation by spoilage bacteria. Among several LAB species isolated from fermented cucumber spoilage, Lactobacillus buchneri was unique in its ability to metabolize lactic acid in FCS with concurrent increases in acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol. Therefore, L. buchneri may be one of multiple organisms that contribute to development of fermented cucumber spoilage. Microbial spoilage of fermented cucumbers during bulk storage causes economic losses for producers. Current knowledge is insufficient to predict or control these losses. This study demonstrated that in the absence of oxygen, cucumbers fermented with 6% sodium chloride to pH 3.2 were not subject to spoilage. However, lactic acid was degraded

  9. The use of chitooligosaccharide in beer brewing for protection against beer-spoilage bacteria and its influence on beer performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Yu, Zhimin; Wang, Ting; Guo, Xuan; Luan, Jing; Sun, Yumei; Li, Xianzhen

    2016-04-01

    To identify a biological preservative that can protect beer from microbial contamination, which often results in the production of turbidity and off-flavor. The antimicrobial activity of a chitooligosaccharide against beer-spoilage bacteria and its effect on the fermentation performance of brewer's yeast was studied. Chitooligosaccharide with an average 2 kDa molecular weight was the best at inhibiting all tested beer-spoilage bacteria. The application of chitooligosaccharide in the brewing process did not influence the fermentation of brewer's yeast. The change in beer performance induced by the contamination of Lactobacillus brevis could be effectively controlled by application of chitooligosaccharide in the beer brewing process. The experimental data suggested that chitooligosaccharide should be an excellent preservative to inhibit beer-spoilage bacteria in the brewing process and in the end product.

  10. Spoilage of vegetable crops by bacteria and fungi and related health hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournas, V H

    2005-01-01

    After harvest, vegetables are often spoiled by a wide variety of microorganisms including many bacterial and fungal species. The most common bacterial agents are Erwinia carotovora, Pseudomonas spp., Corynebacterium, Xanthomonas campestris, and lactic acid bacteria with E. carotovora being the most common, attacking virtually every vegetable type. Fungi commonly causing spoilage of fresh vegetables are Botrytis cinerea, various species of the genera Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Colletotrichum, Phomopsis, Fusarium, Penicillium, Phoma, Phytophthora, Pythium and Rhizopus spp., Botrytis cinerea, Ceratocystis fimbriata, Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and some mildews. A few of these organisms show a substrate preference whereas others such as Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Phytophthora, and Rhizopus spp., affect a wide variety of vegetables causing devastating losses. Many of these agents enter the plant tissue through mechanical or chilling injuries, or after the skin barrier has been broken down by other organisms. Besides causing huge economic losses, some fungal species could produce toxic metabolites in the affected sites, constituting a potential health hazard for humans. Additionally, vegetables have often served as vehicles for pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and parasites and were implicated in many food borne illness outbreaks. In order to slow down vegetable spoilage and minimize the associated adverse health effects, great caution should be taken to follow strict hygiene, good agricultural practices (GAPs) and good manufacturing practices (GMPs) during cultivation, harvest, storage, transport, and marketing.

  11. Lipidomics as an important key for the identification of beer-spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řezanka, T; Matoulková, D; Benada, O; Sigler, K

    2015-06-01

    Electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was used for characterizing intact plasmalogen phospholipid molecules in beer-spoilage bacteria. Identification of intact plasmalogens was carried out using collision-induced dissociation and the presence of suitable marker molecular species, both qualitative and quantitative, was determined in samples containing the anaerobic bacteria Megasphaera and Pectinatus. Using selected ion monitoring (SIM), this method had a limit of detection at 1 pg for the standard, i.e. 1-(1Z-octadecenyl)-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine and be linear in the range of four orders of magnitude from 2 pg to 20 ng. This technique was applied to intact plasmalogen extracts from the samples of contaminated and uncontaminated beer without derivatization and resulted in the identification of contamination of beer by Megasphaera and Pectinatus bacteria. The limit of detection was about 830 cells of anaerobic bacteria, i.e. bacteria containing natural cyclopropane plasmalogenes (c-p-19:0/15:0), which is the majority plasmalogen located in both Megasphaera and Pectinatus. The SIM ESI-MS method has been shown to be useful for the analysis of low concentration of plasmalogens in all biological samples, which were contaminated with anaerobic bacteria, e.g. juice, not only in beer. Significance and impact of the study: Electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) using collision-induced dissociation was used to characterize intact plasmalogen phospholipid molecules in beer-spoilage anaerobic bacteria Megasphaera and Pectinatus. Using selected ion monitoring (SIM), this method has a detection limit of 1 pg for the standard 1-(1Z-octadecenyl)-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine and is linear within four orders of magnitude (2 pg to 20 ng). The limit of detection was about 830 cells of bacteria containing natural cyclopropane plasmalogen (c-p-19:0/15:0). SIM ESI-MS method is useful for analyzing low

  12. Evaluation of the spoilage potential of bacteria isolated from spoiled raw salmon (Salmo salar) fillets stored under modified atmosphere packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Sabrina; Joffraud, Jean-Jacques; Cardinal, Mireille; Malcheva, Mariya; Cornet, Josiane; Lalanne, Valérie; Chevalier, Frédérique; Sérot, Thierry; Pilet, Marie-France; Dousset, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The spoilage potential of eight bacterial groups/species (Serratia spp., Hafnia alvei, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Shewanella baltica, Lactococcus piscium, Photobacterium phosphoreum, "other Enterobacteriaceae" [containing one strain of Moellerella sp., Morganella sp. and Pectobacterium sp.]) isolated from spoiled raw salmon fillets stored under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) was evaluated by inoculation into sterile raw salmon cubes followed by storage for 12days at 8°C. Microbial growth and sensory changes were monitored during the storage period. The dominant spoilage bacteria were C. maltaromaticum, H. alvei and P. phosphoreum. In order to further characterize their spoilage potential and to study the effect of their interactions, each of these 3 specific spoilage organisms (SSO) and two mixed-cultures, C. maltaromaticum/H. alvei and C. maltaromaticum/P. phosphoreum were tested in the sterile salmon model system using a combination of complementary methods: molecular (PCR-TTGE), sensory, chemical and conventional microbiological analyses. It was concluded that, in the mixed-culture inoculated samples, the dominant species determined the spoilage characteristics. The volatile fraction of P. phosphoreum inoculated samples was analyzed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among the specific volatile compounds present on P. phosphoreum spoiled inoculated samples, acetic acid was correlated with sensory analysis and can be proposed as a raw salmon spoilage marker. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of siraitia grosvenorii on the spoilage bacteria isolated from sauced pork head meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Xu, L. Y.; Cui, Y. Q.; Pang, M. X.; Wang, F.; Qi, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    Extraction and anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of Siraitia grosvenorii were studied in this paper. Extraction combined with ultrasonic was adopted. The optimum extraction condition was determined by single factor test; the anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were valued by Oxford-cup method. The results indicated that optimum extraction condition of active ingredients extracted from Siraitia grosvenorii were described as follows: ethanol concentrations of sixty-five percent and twenty minutes with ultrasonic assisted extraction; the active ingredients of Siraitia grosvenorii had anti-bacteria effect on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus sp, Serratia sp and MIC was 0.125g/mL, 0.0625g/mL, 0.125g/mL and 0.125g/mL. The active constituent of Siraitia grosvenorii has obvious anti-bacteria effect on the spoilage bacteria isolated from Sauced pork head meat and can be used as a new natural food preservation to prolong the shelf-life of Low-temperature meat products.

  14. Use of an electronic nose for the early detection and differentiation between spoilage fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, G; Magan, N; Voysey, P

    1998-11-01

    Six spoilage fungi (four Eurotium species, a Penicillium sp. and Wallemia sebi) were grown as spore lawn surface cultures at 0.95 water activity and 25 degrees C. Prior to and during visible growth (24 and 48, and 72 h), single cultures were enclosed in polyethylene bags, the head space was sampled with an electronic nose unit, consisting of 14 polymer sensors, and the data analysed. There was good replication between volatile patterns of the same species and using principal component, discriminant function and cluster analyses it was possible to differentiate between the agar blanks, three Eurotium spp., the Penicillium sp. and W. sebi during microscopic growth for the first time. This suggests that there is potential for the early detection of the activity of spoilage fungi in general, as well as possible differentiation between related xerophilic spoilage fungi, by detection of the patterns of volatile odours produced using an electronic nose system.

  15. SPOILAGE BACTERIA AND QUALITY INDEX METHOD SCORE IN REARED GILTHEAD SEABREAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Panebianco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A model to predict the Quality Index Method (QIM score increase during the storage was set for Sparus aurata. In this regard, 126 specimens were analysed during the storage in ice, enumerating the spoilage bacteria in Iron Agar as well as evaluating the QIM. The growth curves and the observed QIM scores were used to calculate (fitting method the terms a and b which relate the bacterial growth to the predicted QIM values. The presumptive Pseudomonas better explains the QIM trends; furthermore the model was validated with regard to other QIM curves obtained during a temperature fluctuating storage, introducing into the predictive system the secondary model for Shewanella spp. (Dalgard, 1995 and Rasmussen et al. (2002. In this case, the model produced a good estimation of the observed QIM.

  16. Meat spoilage: a critical review of a neglected alteration due to ropy slime producing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. Iulietto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The shelf-life of a product is the period of time during which the food retains its qualitative characteristics. Bacteria associated with meat spoilage produce unattractive odours and flavours, discolouration, gas and slime. There are several neglected alterations that deserve more attention from food business operators and competent authorities. Ropy slime is a typical alteration of the surface of vacuum and modified atmosphere packed cooked meat products, that causes major economic losses due to the increasingly sophisticated consumer requirements. This is a review article that aims at raising awareness of an old problem of new concern, in the light of new advances and trends for understanding the aetiology of the phenomenon, the origins of contamination and the prevention measures.

  17. Comparison of antibacterial effect of seven 1-monoglycerides on food-borne pathogens or spoilage bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leona Buňková

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare under the same conditions in vitro the inhibitory effects of seven 1-monoglycerides (MAG containing fatty acids with a medium chain on ten strains of food-borne pathogens or spoilage gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and on their growth indicatos. The inhibitory effect of MAGs (monocaprylin, monocaprin, monolaurin, monomyristin, monopalmitin, MAG of undecanoic and 10-undecenoic acids at a concentration of 25 – 1500 mg·l-1 was observed. Growth of bacteria in the presence of MAG was studied by means of optical density of bacteria for 24 h. The data were modelled through a Gompertz equation and the lag-time, the maximum specific growth rate and the maximal value reached were calculated. MAGs inhibited mainly the growth of gram-positive bacteria, which was shown by the extended lag-time, decrease in specific growth rate and decrease in cell density. Inhibitory effects of tested MAGs could be ranked from point of view of the minimum inhibitory concentration: MAG-C12:0 > MAG-C11:0 > MAG-C10:0 > MAG-C14:0 > MAG-C11:1 > MAG-C8:0 > MAG-C16:0. In vitro, no significant inhibitory effects of 1-monoglycerides, with the exception of the highest concentrations applied, on the growth of gram-negative bacteria were detected. The main contribution of this study is to compare the effects of several MAG containing fatty acids with a medium chain under the same conditions on the growth indicators of bacteria.

  18. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Mechanism of Action of Electrospun Chitosan-Based Nanofibers against Meat Spoilage and Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkoun, Mounia; Daigle, France; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Ajji, Abdellah

    2017-04-06

    This study investigates the antibacterial mechanism of action of electrospun chitosan-based nanofibers (CNFs), against Escherichia coli , Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria innocua , bacteria frequently involved in food contamination and spoilage. CNFs were prepared by electrospinning of chitosan and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) blends. The in vitro antibacterial activity of CNFs was evaluated and the susceptibility/resistance of the selected bacteria toward CNFs was examined. Strain susceptibility was evaluated in terms of bacterial type, cell surface hydrophobicity, and charge density, as well as pathogenicity. The efficiency of CNFs on the preservation and shelf life extension of fresh red meat was also assessed. Our results demonstrate that the antibacterial action of CNFs depends on the protonation of their amino groups, regardless of bacterial type and their mechanism of action was bactericidal rather than bacteriostatic. Results also indicate that bacterial susceptibility was not Gram-dependent but strain-dependent, with non-virulent bacteria showing higher susceptibility at a reduction rate of 99.9%. The susceptibility order was: E. coli > L. innocua > S. aureus > S. Typhimurium. Finally, an extension of one week of the shelf life of fresh meat was successfully achieved. These results are promising and of great utility for the potential use of CNFs as bioactive food packaging materials in the food industry, and more specifically in meat quality preservation.

  20. Spoilage potential and sensory profile associated with bacteria isolated from cold-smoked salmon

    OpenAIRE

    Stohr, Valerie; Joffraud, Jean-jacques; Cardinal, Mireille; Leroi, Francoise

    2001-01-01

    Off-odours/flavours associated with cold-smoked salmon spoilage are due to the activity of microflora. This study evaluated the spoilage potential of nine bacterial groups (Shewanella putrefaciens, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Aeromonas spp., Lactobacillus alimentarius, Lactobacillus sake,Lactobacillus farciminis, Carnobacterium piscicola, Photobacterium phosphoreum and Serratia liquefaciens) isolated from cold-smoked salmon. Five different isolates from each group were inoculated into sterile ...

  1. Factors Affecting Microbial Load and Profile of Potential Pathogens and Food Spoilage Bacteria from Household Kitchen Tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranjia-Hurdoyal, Susheela; Latouche, Melissa Cathleen

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study the bacterial load and isolate potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria from kitchen tables, including preparation tables and dining tables. Methods. A total of 53 households gave their consent for participation. The samples were collected by swabbing over an area of 5 cm by 5 cm of the tables and processed for bacterial count which was read as colony forming units (CFU), followed by isolation and identification of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria. Result. Knowledge about hygiene was not always put into practice. Coliforms, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., and S. aureus were detected from both dining and preparation tables. The mean CFU and presence of potential pathogens were significantly affected by the hygienic practices of the main food handler of the house, materials of kitchen tables, use of plastic covers, time of sample collection, use of multipurpose sponges/towels for cleaning, and the use of preparation tables as chopping boards (p food spoilage bacteria causing foodborne diseases. Lack of hygiene was confirmed by presence of coliforms, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp. The use of plastic covers, multipurpose sponges, and towels should be discouraged.

  2. Factors Affecting Microbial Load and Profile of Potential Pathogens and Food Spoilage Bacteria from Household Kitchen Tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susheela Biranjia-Hurdoyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the bacterial load and isolate potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria from kitchen tables, including preparation tables and dining tables. Methods. A total of 53 households gave their consent for participation. The samples were collected by swabbing over an area of 5 cm by 5 cm of the tables and processed for bacterial count which was read as colony forming units (CFU, followed by isolation and identification of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria. Result. Knowledge about hygiene was not always put into practice. Coliforms, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., and S. aureus were detected from both dining and preparation tables. The mean CFU and presence of potential pathogens were significantly affected by the hygienic practices of the main food handler of the house, materials of kitchen tables, use of plastic covers, time of sample collection, use of multipurpose sponges/towels for cleaning, and the use of preparation tables as chopping boards (p<0.05. Conclusion. Kitchen tables could be very important source of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria causing foodborne diseases. Lack of hygiene was confirmed by presence of coliforms, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp. The use of plastic covers, multipurpose sponges, and towels should be discouraged.

  3. Antimicrobial effect of emulsion-encapsulated isoeugenol against biofilms of food pathogens and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogsgård Nielsen, Christina; Kjems, Jørgen; Mygind, Tina; Snabe, Torben; Schwarz, Karin; Serfert, Yvonne; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2017-02-02

    Food-related biofilms can cause food-borne illnesses and spoilage, both of which are problems on a global level. Essential oils are compounds derived from plant material that have a potential to be used in natural food preservation in the future since they are natural antimicrobials. Bacterial biofilms are particularly resilient towards biocides, and preservatives that effectively eradicate biofilms are therefore needed. In this study, we test the antibacterial properties of emulsion-encapsulated and unencapsulated isoeugenol against biofilms of Lis. monocytogenes, S. aureus, P. fluorescens and Leu. mesenteroides in tryptic soy broth and carrot juice. We show that emulsion encapsulation enhances the antimicrobial properties of isoeugenol against biofilms in media but not in carrot juice. Some of the isoeugenol emulsions were coated with chitosan, and treatment of biofilms with these emulsions disrupted the biofilm structure. Furthermore, we show that addition of the surfactant Tween 80, which is commonly used to disperse oils in food, hampers the antibacterial properties of isoeugenol. This finding highlights that common food additives, such as surfactants, may have an adverse effect on the antibacterial activity of preservatives. Isoeugenol is a promising candidate as a future food preservative because it works almost equally well against planktonic bacteria and biofilms. Emulsion encapsulation has potential benefits for the efficacy of isoeugenol, but the effect of encapsulation depends on the properties of food matrix in which isoeugenol is to be applied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants against several foodborne and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nuno; Alves, Sofia; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Amaral, Joana S; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of essential oils extracted from a variety of aromatic plants, often used in the Portuguese gastronomy was studied in vitro by the agar diffusion method. The essential oils of thyme, oregano, rosemary, verbena, basil, peppermint, pennyroyal and mint were tested against Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative strains (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). For most essential oils examined, S. aureus, was the most susceptible bacteria, while P. aeruginosa showed, in general, least susceptibility. Among the eight essential oils evaluated, thyme, oregano and pennyroyal oils showed the greatest antimicrobial activity, followed by rosemary, peppermint and verbena, while basil and mint showed the weakest antimicrobial activity. Most of the essential oils considered in this study exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. Thyme oil showed a promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, thus revealing its potential as a natural preservative in food products against several causal agents of foodborne diseases and food spoilage. In general, the results demonstrate that, besides flavoring the food, the use of aromatic herbs in gastronomy can also contribute to a bacteriostatic effect against pathogens.

  5. A Rapid Detection of Meat Spoilage using an Electronic Nose and Fuzzy-Wavelet systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kodogiannis, V.

    2018-01-01

    Freshness and safety of muscle foods are generally considered as the most important parameters for the food industry. To address the rapid detection of meat spoilage microorganisms during aerobic or modified atmosphere storage, an electronic nose with the aid of fuzzy wavelet network has been considered in this research. The proposed model incorporates a clustering pre-processing stage for the definition of fuzzy rules. The dual purpose of the proposed modelling approach is not only to classi...

  6. Comparison of extracellular DNase- and protease-producing spoilage bacteria isolated from Delaware pond-sourced and retail channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Michael E; Accumanno, Gina M; McIntosh, Dennis M; Blank, Grant S; Lee, Jung-Lim

    2015-03-30

    Spoilage of fishery products begins immediately following filleting due to microbial growth that degrades fish tissue quality prior to consumption. Extensive research has been conducted to identify such bacterial populations. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in fish spoilage is necessary as a novel remedy for microbial spoilage inhibition has yet to be established for fish tissue. The present study identified, for the first time, bacterial populations that produce extracellular DNase and protease from Delaware and local retail distributed channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fillets. A clear trend was identified between bacteria derived from catfish filleted under aseptic conditions where Pseudomonas was the dominant genus. Bacteria isolated from retail catfish contained high quantities of DNase-producing isolates, in contrast to aseptic-filleted catfish tissue which had none. Both types of catfish sample maintained high populations of protease-producing bacterial colonies throughout the duration of the study. Most bacteria isolated from catfish intestines exhibited DNase production with no protease production. Specific spoilage organism populations were significantly higher on retail-derived catfish in comparison to lab-filleted Delaware cultured catfish tissue. It is suggested that DNase production and protease production contribute to the spoilage of fish tissue as a result of mishandling and septic filleting being the major cause of rapid catfish tissue spoilage. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Identification of lactic acid bacteria from spoilage associations of cooked and brined shrimps stored under modified atmosphere between 0 degrees C and 25 degrees C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Paw; Vancanneyt, M.; Vilalta, N.E.

    2003-01-01

    MAP shrimps were characterized by phenotypic tests and identified as lactic acid bacteria (78 isolates), other Gram-positive bacteria (13 isolates) and Gram-negative bacteria (11 isolates). A selection of 48 LAB isolates were further characterized and identified by phenotypic tests and SDS-PAGE...... the dominant parts of spoilage associations of cooked and brined MAP shrimps stored at high and low temperatures, respectively. Significance and Impact of the Study: The SDS-PAGE technique and simple biochemical keys allowed the majority of LAB isolates from spoilage associations of cooked and brined MAP...

  8. Rapid species identification of seafood spoilage and pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria by MALDI-TOF mass fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, Karola; Fernández-No, Inmaculada C; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Gallardo, Jose M; Cañas, Benito; Calo-Mata, Pilar

    2011-11-01

    The rapid identification of food pathogenic and spoilage bacteria is important to ensure food quality and safety. Seafood contaminated with pathogenic bacteria is one of the major causes of food intoxications, and the rapid spoilage of seafood products results in high economic losses. In this study, a collection of the main seafood pathogenic and spoilage Gram-positive bacteria was compiled, including Bacillus spp., Listeria spp., Clostridium spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Carnobacterium spp. The strains, belonging to 20 different species, were obtained from the culture collections and studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A reference library was created, including the spectral fingerprints of 32 reference strains and the extracted peak lists with 10-30 peak masses. Genus-specific as well as species-specific peak masses were assigned and could serve as biomarkers for the rapid bacterial identification. Furthermore, the peak mass lists were clustered with the web-application SPECLUST to show the phyloproteomic relationships among the studied strains. Afterwards, the method was successfully applied to identify six strains isolated from seafood by comparison with the reference library. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene was carried out and contrasted with the proteomic approach. This is the first time MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is applied to Gram-positive bacterial identification in seafood, being a fast and accurate technique to ensure seafood quality and safety. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Growth inhibitory effect of grape phenolics against wine spoilage yeasts and acetic acid bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pastorková, E.; Žáková, T.; Landa, Přemysl; Nováková, J.; Vadlejch, J.; Kokoška, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 161, č. 3 (2013), s. 209-213 ISSN 0168-1605 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Phenolic compound * Antimicrobial activity * Wine spoilage microorganism Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 3.155, year: 2013

  10. Evaluation of natural antimicrobials on typical meat spoilage bacteria in vitro and in vacuum-packed pork meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Bjørn Christian; Langsrud, Solveig

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of natural antimicrobials on the growth of typical spoilage bacteria from marinated pork. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of thymol, cinnamaldehyde, allyl isothiocyanate, citric acid, ascorbic acid, a rosemary extract, and a grapefruit seed extract against Lactobacillus algidus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc carnosum, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Carnobacterium divergens, Brochothrix thermosphacta, and Serratia proteamaculans were determined in a microplate assay. Combinations of antimicrobials were tested and several combinations showed synergistic effects in inhibiting bacterial growth. Single and combined antimicrobials were added to vacuum-packed pork meat to evaluate preserving effects. Antimicrobial concentrations of up to 10 times the MIC values showed no effect on total bacterial growth in vacuum packed pork meaning that although most antimicrobials inhibited the growth of spoilage bacteria in vitro, results from the microplate assay could not be transferred to the meat system. Most natural antimicrobials possess strong odor and flavor that limit their use as a food preservative. In conclusion, this study showed that the use of natural antimicrobials in meat products is limited and that bacterial quality and shelf life was not enhanced under the chosen conditions.

  11. Antimicrobial activities of commercial essential oils and their components against food-borne pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mith, Hasika; Duré, Rémi; Delcenserie, Véronique; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Clinquart, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 15 commercial essential oils and their main components in order to pre-select candidates for potential application in highly perishable food preservation. The antibacterial effects against food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7) and food spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were tested using paper disk diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations. Most of the tested essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria, except galangal oil. The essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, and thyme showed strong antimicrobial activities with MIC ≥ 0.125 μL/mL and MBC ≥ 0.25 μL/mL. Among tested bacteria, P. fluorescens was the most resistant to selected essential oils with MICs and MBCs of 1 μL/mL. The results suggest that the activity of the essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, thyme, and clove can be attributed to the existence mostly of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, which appear to possess similar activities against all the tested bacteria. These materials could be served as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food products. PMID:25473498

  12. Antimicrobial activities of commercial essential oils and their components against food-borne pathogens and food spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mith, Hasika; Duré, Rémi; Delcenserie, Véronique; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Clinquart, Antoine

    2014-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 15 commercial essential oils and their main components in order to pre-select candidates for potential application in highly perishable food preservation. The antibacterial effects against food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7) and food spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were tested using paper disk diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations. Most of the tested essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria, except galangal oil. The essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, and thyme showed strong antimicrobial activities with MIC ≥ 0.125 μL/mL and MBC ≥ 0.25 μL/mL. Among tested bacteria, P. fluorescens was the most resistant to selected essential oils with MICs and MBCs of 1 μL/mL. The results suggest that the activity of the essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, thyme, and clove can be attributed to the existence mostly of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, which appear to possess similar activities against all the tested bacteria. These materials could be served as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food products.

  13. Antibacterial activity of guava (Psidium guajava L.) and Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) extracts against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfuzul Hoque, M D; Bari, M L; Inatsu, Y; Juneja, Vijay K; Kawamoto, S

    2007-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of guava (Psidium guajava) and neem (Azadirachta indica) extracts against 21 strains of foodborne pathogens were determined--Listeria monocytogenes (five strains), Staphylococcus aureus (four strains), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (six strains), Salmonella Enteritidis (four strains), Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Bacillus cereus, and five food spoilage bacteria: Pseudomonas aeroginosa, P. putida, Alcaligenes faecalis, and Aeromonas hydrophila (two strains). Guava and neem extracts showed higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria compared to Gram-negative bacteria except for V. parahaemolyticus, P. aeroginosa, and A. hydrophila. None of the extracts showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ethanol extracts of guava showed the highest inhibition for L. monocytogenes JCM 7676 (0.1 mg/mL), S. aureus JCM 2151 (0.1 mg/mL), S. aureus JCM 2179 (0.1 mg/mL), and V. parahaemolyticus IFO 12711 (0.1 mg/mL) and the lowest inhibition for Alcaligenes faecalis IFO 12669, Aeromonas hydrophila NFRI 8282 (4.0 mg/mL), and A. hydrophila NFRI 8283 (4.0 mg/mL). The MIC of chloroform extracts of neem showed similar inhibition for L. monocytogenes ATCC 43256 (4.0 mg/mL) and L. monocytogenes ATCC 49594 (5.0 mg/mL). However, ethanol extracts of neem showed higher inhibition for S. aureus JCM 2151 (4.5 mg/mL) and S. aureus IFO 13276 (4.5 mg/mL) and the lower inhibition for other microorganisms (6.5 mg/mL). No significant effects of temperature and pH were found on guava and neem extracts against cocktails of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus. The results of the present study suggest that guava and neem extracts possess compounds containing antibacterial properties that can potentially be useful to control foodborne pathogens and spoilage organisms.

  14. Mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria from meat and their spoilage potential in vitro and in beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolini, Danilo; Russo, Federica; Nasi, Antonella; Ferranti, Pasquale; Villani, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Mesophilic and psychrotrophic populations from refrigerated meat were identified in this study, and the spoilage potential of microbial isolates in packaged beef was evaluated by analyzing the release of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Fifty mesophilic and twenty-nine psychrotrophic isolates were analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, and representative strains were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum and C. divergens were the species most frequently found in both mesophilic and psychrotrophic populations. Acinetobacter baumannii, Buttiauxella spp. and Serratia spp. were identified among the mesophilic isolates, while Pseudomonas spp. were commonly identified among the psychrotrophs. The isolates were further characterized for their growth at different temperatures and their proteolytic activity in vitro on meat proteins extracts at 7 degrees C. Selected proteolytic strains of Serratia proteamaculans, Pseudomonas fragi, and C. maltaromaticum were used to examine their spoilage potential in situ. Single strains of these species and mixtures of these strains were used to contaminate beef chops that were packed and stored at 7 degrees C. At time intervals up to 1 month, viable counts were determined, and VOC were identified by GC/MS. Generally, the VOC concentrations went to increase during the storage of the contaminated meats, and the profiles of the analyzed meat changed dramatically depending on the contaminating microbial species. About 100 volatiles were identified in the different contaminated samples. Among the detected volatiles, some specific molecules were identified only when the meat was contaminated by a specific microbial species. Compounds such as 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, 2-buten-1-ol, 2-hexyl-1-octanol, 2-nonanone, and 2-ethylhexanal were detectable only for C. maltaromaticum, which also produced the highest number of aldehydes, lactones, and sulfur compounds. The

  15. Pulsed-light inactivation of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria on cheese surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, J; Hsu, L C; Miller, B M; Sullivan, G; Paradis, K; Moraru, C I

    2015-09-01

    Cheese products are susceptible to postprocessing cross-contamination by bacterial surface contamination during slicing, handling, or packaging, which can lead to food safety issues and significant losses due to spoilage. This study examined the effectiveness of pulsed-light (PL) treatment on the inactivation of the spoilage microorganism Pseudomonas fluorescens, the nonenterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (nonpathogenic surrogate of Escherichia coli O157:H7), and Listeria innocua (nonpathogenic surrogate of Listeria monocytogenes) on cheese surface. The effects of inoculum level and cheese surface topography and the presence of clear polyethylene packaging were evaluated in a full factorial experimental design. The challenge microorganisms were grown to early stationary phase and subsequently diluted to reach initial inoculum levels of either 5 or 7 log cfu/slice. White Cheddar and process cheeses were cut into 2.5×5 cm slices, which were spot-inoculated with 100 µL of bacterial suspension. Inoculated cheese samples were exposed to PL doses of 1.02 to 12.29 J/cm(2). Recovered survivors were enumerated by standard plate counting or the most probable number technique, as appropriate. The PL treatments were performed in triplicate and data were analyzed using a general linear model. Listeria innocua was the least sensitive to PL treatment, with a maximum inactivation level of 3.37±0.2 log, followed by P. fluorescens, with a maximum inactivation of 3.74±0.8 log. Escherichia coli was the most sensitive to PL, with a maximum reduction of 5.41±0.1 log. All PL inactivation curves were nonlinear, and inactivation reached a plateau after 3 pulses (3.07 J/cm(2)). The PL treatments through UV-transparent packaging and without packaging consistently resulted in similar inactivation levels. This study demonstrates that PL has strong potential for decontamination of the cheese surface. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  16. Antimicrobial Effect of Filipendula ulmaria Plant Extract Against Selected Foodborne Pathogenic and Spoilage Bacteria in Laboratory Media, Fish Flesh and Fish Roe Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Proestos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-methanol extract from Filipendula ulmaria contains a variety of phenolic compounds, such as caffeic, p-coumaric and vanillic acid, myricetin, etc, which demonstrate antibacterial activity. Monitoring this activity in the broth using absorbance measurements showed that species of the Enterobacteriaceae family were more resistant than other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria tested. Acidic environment enhanced the antibacterial activity of Filipendula ulmaria extract when it was tested against Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 and Listeria monocytogenes Scott A. The efficacy of Filipendula ulmaria extract against selected foodborne psychrotrophic bacteria was also tested using solid laboratory media and low incubation temperatures for better simulation of food preservation conditions. Higher concentrations of the extract, compared to minimum inhibitory concentration determined in the broth, were needed for satisfactory inhibition of spoilage bacteria. Potential use of Filipendula ulmaria extract as natural food preservative was also examined against natural spoilage flora and inoculated pathogenic bacteria on fish flesh and fish roe product (tarama salad. No significant differences of viable populations of spoilage or pathogenic bacteria were found between the treated samples and controls. Further trials of Filipendula ulmaria extract should be carried out in acidic foods with low fat and protein content, supplemented with additional adjuncts, in order to explore its potential as effective natural food antimicrobial agent.

  17. A gaseous acetic acid treatment to disinfect fenugreek seeds and black pepper inoculated with pathogenic and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nei, Daisuke; Enomoto, Katsuyoshi; Nakamura, Nobutaka

    2015-08-01

    Contamination of spices by pathogenic and/or spoilage bacteria can be deleterious to consumer's health and cause deterioration of foods, and inactivation of such bacteria is necessary for the food industry. The present study examined the effect of gaseous acetic acid treatment in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis and Bacillus subtilis populations inoculated on fenugreek seeds and black pepper. Treatment with gaseous acetic acid at 0.3 mmol/L, 0.6 mmol/L and 4.7 mmol/L for 1-3 h significantly reduced the populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis on black pepper and fenugreek seeds at 55 °C (p pathogens than the treatment at 0.3 mmol/L. An approximately 5.0 log reduction was obtained after 3 h of treatment with 4.7 mmol/L acetic acid. No significant reductions in the population of B. subtilis spores inoculated on fenugreek seeds and black pepper were obtained after the gas treatments at 0.3 mmol/L or 0.6 mmol/L (p > 0.05). However, the gas treatment at 4.7 mmol/L significantly reduced B. subtilis spores (p < 0.05), and 4.0 log CFU/g and 3.5 log CFU/g reductions on fenugreek seeds and black pepper, respectively, were obtained after 3 h of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensory characteristics of spoilage and volatile compounds associated with bacteria isolated from cooked and peeled tropical shrimps using SPME-GC-MS analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffres, Emmanuel; Lalanne, Valerie; Mace, Sabrina; Cornet, Josiane; Cardinal, Mireille; Serot, Thierry; Dousset, Xavier; Joffraud, Jean-jacques

    2011-01-01

    The spoilage potential of six bacterial species isolated from cooked and peeled tropical shrimps (Brochothrix thermosphacta, Serratia liquefaciens-like, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Carnobacterium divergens, Carnobacterium alterfunditum-like and Vagococcus penaei sp. nov.) was evaluated. The bacteria were inoculated into shrimps, packaged in a modified atmosphere and stored for 27 days at 8 °C. Twice a week, microbial growth, as well as chemical and sensory changes, were monitored during th...

  19. Note: Reaction of bacteria associated with fish spoilage to chemical and physical stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirby, R.; Silva, da M.; Capell, C.; Vaz-Pires, P.; Luten, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    A cocktail made up of six bacteria isolated from fish was subjected to various heats (30 °C and 60 °C, 20 s) and chemical preservative stresses, alone and in combination. The chemical preservatives tested were potassium sorbate (PS, 1Œ trisodium phosphate (TSP, 10€and tetrasodium pyrophosphate

  20. Application of Electronic Noses for Disease Diagnosis and Food Spoilage Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Casalinuovo, Ida A.; Di Pierro, Donato; Coletta, Massimiliano; Di Francesco, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, newly developed chemical sensor systems (so-called “electronic noses”) have odour analyses made possible. This paper describes the applications of these systems for microbial detection in different fields such as medicine and the food industry, where fast detection methods are essential for appropriate management of health care. Several groups have employed different electronic noses for classification and quantification of bacteria and fungi to obtain accurate med...

  1. Spoilage of Microfiltered and Pasteurized Extended Shelf Life Milk Is Mainly Induced by Psychrotolerant Spore-Forming Bacteria that often Originate from Recontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Etienne V; Scherer, Siegfried; Wenning, Mareike

    2017-01-01

    Premature spoilage and varying product quality due to microbial contamination still constitute major problems in the production of microfiltered and pasteurized extended shelf life (ESL) milk. Spoilage-associated bacteria may enter the product either as part of the raw milk microbiota or as recontaminants in the dairy plant. To identify spoilage-inducing bacteria and their routes of entry, we analyzed end products for their predominant microbiota as well as the prevalence and biodiversity of psychrotolerant spores in bulk tank milk. Process analyses were performed to determine the removal of psychrotolerant spores at each production step. To detect transmission and recontamination events, strain typing was conducted with isolates obtained from all process stages. Microbial counts in 287 ESL milk packages at the end of shelf life were highly diverse ranging from shelf life is influenced only to a minor extent by raw-milk-associated factors. In contrast, recontamination with spores, particularly from the B. cereus complex, seems to occur. To enhance milk quality throughout the entire shelf life, improved plant sanitation and disinfection that target the elimination of spores are necessary.

  2. Anti-bacteria Effect of Active Ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi on the Spoilage Bacteria of Sauced Pork Head Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Xu, Lingyi; Cui, Yuqian; Pang, Meixia; Wang, Fang; Qi, Jinghua

    2017-12-01

    Extraction and anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi were studied in this paper. Extraction combined with ultrasonic was adopted. The optimum extraction condition was determined by single factor test; the anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients and minimum inhibitory concentration(MIC) were valued by Oxford-cup method. The results indicated that kaempferol was the active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi whose optimum extraction condition for ethanol concentrations were sixty-five percent and twenty minutes with ultrasonic assisted extraction.; the active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi had anti-bacteria effect on Staphylococcus, Proteus, Bacillus, Serratia and MIC was 0.5 g/mL,0.5 g/mL,0.0313 g/mL and 0.0625 g/mL. The active constituent of Cacumen Platycladi is kaempferol which has obvious anti-bacteria effect and can be used to prolong the shelf-life of Low-temperature meat products.

  3. Antimicrobial Activity of Kefir against Various Food Pathogens and Spoilage Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Jeong, Dana; Kim, Hyunsook; Kang, Il-Byeong; Chon, Jung-Whan; Song, Kwang-Young; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Kefir is a unique fermented dairy product produced by a mixture of lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, and yeast. Here, we compared the antimicrobial spectra of four types of kefirs (A, L, M, and S) fermented for 24, 36, 48, or 72 h against eight food-borne pathogens. Bacillus cereus , Staphylococcus aureus , Listeria monocytogenes , Enterococcus faecalis , Escherichia coli , Salmonella Enteritidis , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and Cronobacter sakazakii were used as test strains, and antibacterial activity was investigated by the spot on lawn method. The spectra, potencies, and onsets of activity varied according to the type of kefir and the fermentation time. The broadest and strongest antimicrobial spectrum was obtained after at least 36-48 h of fermentation for all kefirs, although the traditional fermentation method of kefir is for 18-24 h at 25℃. For kefir A, B. cereus , E. coli , S . Enteritidis, P. aeruginosa , and C. sakazakii were inhibited, while B. cereus , S. aureus , E. coli , S . Enteritidis, P. aeruginosa , and C. sakazakii were inhibited to different extents by kefirs L, M, and S. Remarkably, S. aureus , S . Enteritidis, and C. sakazakii were only inhibited by kefirs L, M, and S, and L. monocytogenes by kefir M after fermentation for specific times, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity is attributable not only to a low pH but also to antimicrobial substances secreted during the fermentation.

  4. Essential oils against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria in minced meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Lidiane Nunes; Rall, Vera Lucia Mores; Fernandes, Ana Angélica Henrique; Ushimaru, Priscila Ikeda; da Silva Probst, Isabella; Fernandes, Ary

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of essential oils of oregano, thyme, basil, marjoram, lemongrass, ginger, and clove was investigated in vitro by agar dilution method and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes) and Gram-negative strains (Escherichia coli and Salmonella Enteritidis). MIC(90%) values were tested against bacterial strains inoculated experimentally in irradiated minced meat and against natural microbiota (aerobic or facultative, mesophilic, and psychrotrophic bacteria) found in minced meat samples. MIC(90%) values ranged from 0.05%v/v (lemongrass oil) to 0.46%v/v (marjoram oil) to Gram-positive bacteria and from 0.10%v/v (clove oil) to 0.56%v/v (ginger oil) to Gram-negative strains. However, the MIC(90%) assessed on minced meat inoculated experimentally with foodborne pathogen strains and against natural microbiota of meat did not show the same effectiveness, and 1.3 and 1.0 were the highest log CFU/g reduction values obtained against tested microorganisms.

  5. Effect of different packaging materials containing poly-[2-(tert-butylamino) methylstyrene] on the growth of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria on fresh meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohlen, S; Braun, C; Brodkorb, F; Fischer, B; Ilg, Y; Kalbfleisch, K; Lorenz, R; Kreyenschmidt, M; Kreyenschmidt, J

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of novel antimicrobial packaging materials containing poly-[2-(tertbutylamino) methylstyrene] (poly(TBAMS)) on the growth of typical spoilage and pathogenic bacteria present on meat. The antimicrobial activity of materials containing different poly(TBAMS) concentrations was determined by comparing the bacterial counts on reference and sample materials at different temperatures and times and in the presence of meat components. Storage tests with poultry fillets and veal cutlets were conducted with samples vacuum packaged in the reference foil and foil containing 10% poly(TBAMS). After specific time intervals, typical spoilage microorganisms, total viable count (TVC), sensory changes and pH value were analysed. The results of the different poly(TBAMS) containing packaging materials showed an increase of the antimicrobial activity with an increasing amount of poly(TBAMS) in the base polymer. A high antimicrobial activity against inoculum of spoilage and pathogenic organisms typical for meat products was detected of a multilayer foil containing 10% poly(TBAMS) in the inner layer after 24h at 7°C. Gram positive-bacteria were more sensitive to poly(TBAMS) foil than gram-negative bacteria. In storage tests however, over the entire storage, a significant effect of this poly(TBAMS) foil on microbial growth on chicken breast fillets and veal cutlets could not be identified. Poly(TBAMS) packaging materials showed very good antimicrobial properties against a wide range of bacteria. However, for a significant inhibition of microbial growth on fresh meat, a higher amount of poly(TBAMS) was necessary to prolong the shelf life of meat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid detection and counting of viable beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria using a monoclonal chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay and a CCD camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Carmen; Manclús, Juan J; Abad, Antonio; Navarro, Alfonso; Montoya, Angel

    2005-08-01

    A chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay carried out with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was developed for rapid enumeration of viable beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria. LA-4 MAb, which recognizes a broad spectrum of lactic acid bacteria isolated from several breweries across Spain, was produced and characterized. Test samples were filtered through polycarbonate membranes, and the membranes with retained bacteria were incubated at 31 degrees C for 2 days. They were then subjected to a two-step chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay with MAb LA-4, and light-emitting points were detected and counted with a CCD camera. Eighteen out of 19 beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria analysed produced luminous spots that could be enumerated. Results provided by the immunochemiluminescence assay correlated very well with those obtained by visual plate counting within a range of 3-100 CFU/100 ml. Correlation coefficients were 0.994 for four strains in sterile saline solution and 0.984 for 14 strains in artificially contaminated beer. The excellent agreement suggests that luminous spots detected within 2 days of culture are produced only by viable cells.

  7. Effect of brine marination on survival and growth of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria during processing and subsequent storage of ready-to-eat shrimp (Pandalus borealis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Devitt, Tina D.; Dalgaard, Paw

    2012-01-01

    The effect of brine marination at chill temperatures on survival and growth of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria during processing and subsequent storage of ready-to-eat cold water shrimp was studied. Survival and growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Staphylococcus...... aureus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were examined. The effect of brine composition and pH was determined in 12 screening experiments without addition of shrimp. Sixteen challenge tests with shrimp were then carried out to examine the effect of brine composition and storage temperature on survival...... development and establishment of shell-life for ready-to-eat shrimp taking into account both quality and safety aspects....

  8. Quantitative analyses of the bacterial microbiota of rearing environment, tilapia and common carp cultured in earthen ponds and inhibitory activity of its lactic acid bacteria on fish spoilage and pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaktcham, Pierre Marie; Temgoua, Jules-Bocamdé; Ngoufack Zambou, François; Diaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Wacher, Carmen; Pérez-Chabela, María de Lourdes

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the bacterial load of water, Nile Tilapia and common Carp intestines from earthen ponds, isolate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and assess their antimicrobial activity against fish spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. Following enumeration and isolation of microorganisms the antimicrobial activity of the LAB isolates was evaluated. Taxonomic identification of selected antagonistic LAB strains was assessed, followed by partial characterisation of their antimicrobial metabolites. Results showed that high counts (>4 log c.f.u ml -1 or 8 log c.f.u g -1 ) of total aerobic bacteria were recorded in pond waters and fish intestines. The microbiota were also found to be dominated by Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Escherichia coli. LAB isolates (5.60%) exhibited potent direct and extracellular antimicrobial activity against the host-derived and non host-derived spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. These antagonistic isolates were identified and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis was found as the predominant (42.85%) specie. The strains displayed the ability to produce lactic, acetic, butyric, propionic and valeric acids. Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances with activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative (Vibrio spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria were produced by three L. lactis subsp. lactis strains. In this study, the LAB from the microbiota of fish and pond water showed potent antimicrobial activity against fish spoilage or pathogenic bacteria from the same host or ecological niche. The studied Cameroonian aquatic niche is an ideal source of antagonistic LAB that could be appropriate as new fish biopreservatives or disease control agents in aquaculture under tropical conditions in particular or worldwide in general.

  9. Application of Electronic Noses for Disease Diagnosis and Food Spoilage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Di Francesco

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last twenty years, newly developed chemical sensor systems (socalled“electronic noses" have odour analyses made possible. This paper describes theapplications of these systems for microbial detection in different fields such as medicineand the food industry, where fast detection methods are essential for appropriatemanagement of health care. Several groups have employed different electronic noses forclassification and quantification of bacteria and fungi to obtain accurate medicaldiagnosis and food quality control. So far, detection and identification of bacterial andfungal volatiles have been achieved by use of e-noses offering different correctclassification percentages. The present review includes examples of bacterial and fungalspecies producing volatile compounds and correlated to infectious diseases or fooddeterioration. The results suggest the possibility of using this new technology both inmedical diagnostics and in food control management.

  10. Meat Processing Plant Microbiome and Contamination Patterns of Cold-Tolerant Bacteria Causing Food Safety and Spoilage Risks in the Manufacture of Vacuum-Packaged Cooked Sausages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahkila, Riitta; Ali, Javeria; Rousu, Juho; Björkroth, K. Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Refrigerated food processing facilities are specific man-made niches likely to harbor cold-tolerant bacteria. To characterize this type of microbiota and study the link between processing plant and product microbiomes, we followed and compared microbiota associated with the raw materials and processing stages of a vacuum-packaged, cooked sausage product affected by a prolonged quality fluctuation with occasional spoilage manifestations during shelf life. A total of 195 samples were subjected to culturing and amplicon sequence analyses. Abundant mesophilic psychrotrophs were detected within the microbiomes throughout the different compartments of the production plant environment. However, each of the main genera of food safety and quality interest, e.g., Leuconostoc, Brochothrix, and Yersinia, had their own characteristic patterns of contamination. Bacteria from the genus Leuconostoc, commonly causing spoilage of cold-stored, modified-atmosphere-packaged foods, were detected in high abundance (up to >98%) in the sausages studied. The same operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were, however, detected in lower abundances in raw meat and emulsion (average relative abundance of 2% ± 5%), as well as on the processing plant surfaces (food safety concerns related to their resilient existence on surfaces. PMID:26231646

  11. Microbiological spoilage of fish and fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1996-01-01

    biochemical indicators of spoilage. Shewanzella putrefaciens and Pseudomonas spp. are the specific spoilage bacteria of iced fresh fish regardless of the origin of the fish. Modified atmosphere stored marine fish from temperate waters are spoiled by the CO2 resistant Photobacterium phosphoreum whereas Gram......Spoilage of fresh and lightly preserved fish products is caused by microbial action. This paper reviews the current knowledge in terms of the microbiology of fish and fish products with particular emphasis on identification of specific spoilage bacteria and the qualitative and quantitative...

  12. Solving Microbial Spoilage Problems in Processed Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavero, Rocelle

    This chapter surveys common microbial food spoilage processes. The chapter is organized by food products and includes sections addressing spoilage in meat, poultry, fish; dairy products (milk, butter, cheese); beverage products; bakery products; canned foods; fruit and confectionery products; and emulsions. It addresses the isolation and identification of spoilage organisms and provides several case studies as examples. It introduces various organisms responsible for spoilage including Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria, Gram-negative aerobic bacteria, yeasts, molds, and fungal contaminants. Throughout the chapter, attention is given to when, where, and how spoilage organisms enter the food processing chain. Troubleshooting techniques are suggested. The effect (or lack of effect) of heating, dehydration, pH change, cooling, and sealing on various organisms is explained throughout. The chapter contains four tables that connect specific organisms to various spoilage manifestations in a variety of food products.

  13. Diversity of spore-forming bacteria and identification of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens as a species frequently associated with the ropy spoilage of bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, F; De Bellis, P; Di Biase, M; Lonigro, S L; Giussani, B; Visconti, A; Lavermicocca, P; Sisto, A

    2012-06-01

    This study examines the diversity of spore-forming bacteria isolated from raw materials/bread using molecular methods along with a rapid and innovative technology, the FT-NIR spectroscopy. Microbiological analysis showed that 23% of semolina and 42% of other raw materials (including grain, brewer yeast, improvers) contained more than 100 spores/g and more than 50% of each kind of sample was contaminated at a level ranging from 1 to 100 spores/g. A high bacterial diversity characterized raw materials. In total 176 isolates were collected and characterized: 13 bacterial species belonging to Bacillus (10) and Paenibacillus (3) genera were identified by sequencing of 16S rRNA, gyrA or gyrB genes. The two closely related species Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (strain N45.1) and Bacillus subtilis (strain S63) were also analyzed by the spectroscopic technique FT-NIR. This analysis gave clear discrimination between the strains in the score plot obtained by the PCA and allowed to identify the spectral region 5600-4000 cm(-1) as the information-rich region for discrimination. B. amyloliquefaciens, possibly misidentified as B. subtilis in previous studies, was recognized as the most frequent species, found also in ropy bread. Moreover, the screening test for rope production indicated that mainly B. amyloliquefaciens, together with B. subtilis and Bacillus pumilus, could cause spoilage in bread, even if the last two species were represented by a low number of isolates. The Bacillus cereus group and Bacillus megaterium showed a lower percentage (30-70%) of isolates potentially able to cause the rope, but considering the high number of B. cereus group isolates detected in this study, this bacterial group should also be considered important in rope spoilage. In conclusion, results demonstrate that raw materials used to produce bread represent a rich source of spore-forming bacteria, therefore their microbiological quality should be monitored before use. Moreover, this study

  14. Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Essential Oil Terpenes against Pathogenic and Spoilage-Forming Bacteria and Cell Structure-Activity Relationships Evaluated by SEM Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Zengin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity and antioxidant effect of the compounds α-terpineol, linalool, eucalyptol and α-pinene obtained from essential oils (EOs, against pathogenic and spoilage forming bacteria were determined. The antibacterial activities of these compounds were observed in vitro on four Gram-negative and three Gram-positive strains. S. putrefaciens was the most resistant bacteria to all tested components, with MIC values of 2% or higher, whereas E. coli O157:H7 was the most sensitive strain among the tested bacteria. Eucalyptol extended the lag phase of S. Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus at the concentrations of 0.7%, 0.6% and 1%, respectively. In vitro cell growth experiments showed the tested compounds had toxic effects on all bacterial species with different level of potency. Synergistic and additive effects were observed at least one dose pair of combination against S. Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus, however antagonistic effects were not found in these combinations. The results of this first study are encouraging for further investigations on mechanisms of antimicrobial activity of these EO components.

  15. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  16. Bacteria classification using Cyranose 320 electronic nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardner Julian W

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An electronic nose (e-nose, the Cyrano Sciences' Cyranose 320, comprising an array of thirty-two polymer carbon black composite sensors has been used to identify six species of bacteria responsible for eye infections when present at a range of concentrations in saline solutions. Readings were taken from the headspace of the samples by manually introducing the portable e-nose system into a sterile glass containing a fixed volume of bacteria in suspension. Gathered data were a very complex mixture of different chemical compounds. Method Linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA method was able to classify four classes of bacteria out of six classes though in reality other two classes were not better evident from PCA analysis and we got 74% classification accuracy from PCA. An innovative data clustering approach was investigated for these bacteria data by combining the 3-dimensional scatter plot, Fuzzy C Means (FCM and Self Organizing Map (SOM network. Using these three data clustering algorithms simultaneously better 'classification' of six eye bacteria classes were represented. Then three supervised classifiers, namely Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP, Probabilistic Neural network (PNN and Radial basis function network (RBF, were used to classify the six bacteria classes. Results A [6 × 1] SOM network gave 96% accuracy for bacteria classification which was best accuracy. A comparative evaluation of the classifiers was conducted for this application. The best results suggest that we are able to predict six classes of bacteria with up to 98% accuracy with the application of the RBF network. Conclusion This type of bacteria data analysis and feature extraction is very difficult. But we can conclude that this combined use of three nonlinear methods can solve the feature extraction problem with very complex data and enhance the performance of Cyranose 320.

  17. Antimicrobial assays of natural extracts and their inhibitory effect against Listeria innocua and fish spoilage bacteria, after incorporation into biopolymer edible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturriaga, L; Olabarrieta, I; de Marañón, I Martínez

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of twelve natural extracts was tested against two fish spoilage bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens and Aeromonas hydrophila/caviae) and Listeria innocua, in order to assess their potential utilization in the preservation and safety of minimally processed fish products. After a screening of the active extracts by agar diffusion and vapour diffusion methods, oregano and thyme essential oils and citrus extract were selected. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the selected extracts was determined by disc diffusion method against target bacteria and at two temperatures: bacteria's optimal growth temperature (30 °C or 37 °C) and refrigeration temperature (4 °C). Due to its better solubility, lack of odour and greater inhibitory effect obtained against L. innocua at refrigerated temperature, citrus extract was selected and incorporated at 1% (v/v) into different biopolymer film forming solutions (gelatin, methyl cellulose and their blend 50:50 w/w). The antimicrobial activity of the developed films was then evaluated, just after preparation of the films and after one month of storage at 43±3% relative humidity and 24±3 °C. Regardless of the biopolymer matrix, all the developed films showed antimicrobial activity against the target bacteria. The most sensitive bacterium towards active films was L. innocua while P. fluorescens appeared as the most resistant one, in accordance with the previously performed antimicrobial tests for pure extracts. The differences in activity of the films between the tested two temperatures were not significant except for L. innocua, for which three times higher inhibition diameters were observed at refrigerated temperature. The inhibitory effectiveness of the films against the tested strains was maintained regardless of the biopolymer matrix for at least one month. Therefore, these edible films show potential for their future use in fresh fish fillets preservation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All

  18. Production of reuterin in a fermented milk product by Lactobacillus reuteri: Inhibition of pathogens, spoilage microorganisms, and lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rivera, Y; Sánchez-Vega, R; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; León-Félix, J; Acosta-Muñiz, C; Sepulveda, D R

    2017-06-01

    We assessed the antimicrobial activity of reuterin produced in vitro in glycerol aqueous solutions in situ by Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 53608 as part of a fermented milk product against starter (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus), spoilage (Penicillium expansum), pathogenic (Staphylococcus aureus Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes), and pathogen surrogate (Escherichia coli DH5α) microorganisms. We also assayed the influence of cold storage (28 d at 4°C) and reuterin on the color and rheology of the fermented milk product. We obtained maximum reuterin concentrations of 107.5 and 33.97 mM in glycerol aqueous solution and fermented milk product, respectively. Reuterin was stable throughout its refrigerated shelf life. Gram-positive microorganisms were more resistant to reuterin than gram-negative microorganisms. Penicillium expansum and Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 53608 survived at concentrations up to 10 and 8.5 mM, respectively. Escherichia coli DH5α was the most sensitive to reuterin (0.9 mM). The presence of reuterin did not cause relevant changes in the quality parameters of the fermented milk product, including pH, acidity, soluble solids, color, and rheological aspects (storage and loss moduli and viscosity). This study demonstrated the viability of using Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 53608 as a biopreservative in a fermented milk product through reuterin synthesis, without drastically modifying its quality parameters. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of carbon dioxide on the fate of Listeria monocytogenes, of aerobic bacteria and on the development of spoilage in minimally processed fresh endive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, F; Nguyen-the, C; Abreu Da Silva, A; Cochet, C

    1996-09-01

    Minimally processed fresh broad-leaved endive (Cichorium endivia L.) were stored at 3 and 10 degrees C in modified atmospheres containing air, 10% CO2/10% O2, 30% CO2/10% O2, and 50% CO2/10% O2. The effects of these modified atmospheres on the fate of both aerobic bacteria and three strains of Listeria monocytogenes, was investigated. Increases in CO2 concentrations significantly reduced the growth of the aerobic microflora. The best preservation of the visual quality occurred on endive leaves stored in 10% CO2/10% O2, whereas leaves stored in 30% CO2/10% O2 and 50% CO2/10% O2, and to a lesser extent in air, showed extensive spoilage after storage. Listeria monocytogenes was slightly affected at 3 degrees C by the modified atmospheres, as compared to air. At 10 degrees C, results varied between replicate experiments, but L. monocytogenes generally grew better as the CO2 concentration was increased. The three test strains behaved in a similar way. In conclusion, among the modified atmospheres tested, a modified atmosphere containing 10% CO2/10% O2 resulted in improved visual quality of minimally processed fresh endive, without a marked effect on the growth of the aerobic microflora or of L. monocytogenes.

  20. Use of Extract of Citrus sinensis as an antimicrobial agent for foodborne zoonotic pathogens and spoilage bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foodborne pathogens remain global health problems despite concerted efforts to control the transmission of these microorganisms through food. The resurgence of drug resistant bacteria has renewed interest in developing and testing new sources of antimicrobial agents to control foodborne illness. Thi...

  1. Significance of volatile compounds produced by spoilage bacteria in vacuum-packed cold-smoked salmon ( Salmo salar ) analyzed by GC-MS and multivariate regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik; Dalgaard, Paw

    2001-01-01

    -carboxaldehyde produced by autolytic activity. Only a few of the volatile compounds produced during spoilage of cold-smoked salmon had an aroma value high enough to indicate contribution to the spoilage off- flavor of cold-smoked salmon. These were trimethylamine, 3- methylbutanal, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol......, 1- penten-3-ol, and 1-propanol. The potency and importance of these compounds was confirmed by gas chromatography- olfactometry. The present study provides valuable information on the bacterial reactions responsible for spoilage off-flavors of cold-smoked salmon, which can be used to develop...

  2. Effects of Two Application Methods of Plantaricin BM-1 on Control of Listeria monocytogenes and Background Spoilage Bacteria in Sliced Vacuum-Packaged Cooked Ham Stored at 4°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huimin; Xie, Yuanhong; Liu, Hui; Jin, Junhua; Duan, Huixia; Zhang, Hongxing

    2015-10-01

    Two application methods were used to investigate the effect of plantaricin BM-1 on the control of Listeria monocytogenes and background spoilage bacteria in sliced vacuum-packaged cooked ham without the addition of any chemical preservatives, including sodium nitrite, during 35 days of storage at 4°C. Regardless of the application method, plantaricin BM-1 treatment (320, 640, or 1,280 arbitrary units [AU]/g of sliced cooked ham) significantly (P ham) compared with its survival in the control during the first 21 days of storage at 4°C. The inhibitory effect of plantaricin applied to the surface of the ham was significantly better than the same concentration of plantaricin incorporated into the cooked ham (P ham on days 1, 14, and 28. A level of 1,280 AU/g plantaricin applied to the surface of the ham reduced L. monocytogenes counts to below the detection limit from the 1st to the 21st day of storage at 4°C. Afterwards, L. monocytogenes was able to regrow, and the viable counts of L. monocytogenes at the end of storage reached 2.76 log CFU/g (6.11 log CFU/g lower than in the control). In the control ham, the counts of background spoilage bacteria increased gradually and surpassed the microbiological spoilage limitation level on the 21st day of storage. However, plantaricin BM-1 treatment significantly (P ham compared with their survival in the control from day 21 to 35 of storage at 4°C. A level of 1,280 AU/g plantaricin incorporated into cooked ham was the most effective, reducing the count of background spoilage bacteria count from an initial 2.0 log CFU/g to 1.5 log CFU/g on day 7. This was then maintained for another 14 days and finally increased to 2.76 log CFU/g at the end of the storage at 4°C (2.85 log CFU/g lower than in the control). In conclusion, plantaricin BM-1 application inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes and background spoilage bacteria in cooked ham during storage at 4°C and could be used as an antimicrobial additive for meat

  3. Effect of Essential Oils on Germination and Growth of Some Pathogenic and Spoilage Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voundi, Stève Olugu; Nyegue, Maximilienne; Lazar, Iuliana; Raducanu, Dumitra; Ndoye, Florentine Foe; Marius, Stamate; Etoa, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    The use of essential oils as a food preservative has increased due to their capacity to inhibit vegetative growth of some bacteria. However, only limited data are available on their effect on bacterial spores. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of some essential oils on the growth and germination of three Bacillus species and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. Essential oils were chemically analyzed using gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of vegetative growth and spore germination were assessed using the macrodilution method. Germination inhibitory effect of treated spores with essential oils was evaluated on solid medium, while kinetic growth was followed using spectrophotometry in the presence of essential oils. Essential oil from Drypetes gossweileri mainly composed of benzyl isothiocyanate (86.7%) was the most potent, with minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.0048 to 0.0097 mg/mL on vegetative cells and 0.001 to 0.002 mg/mL on spore germination. Furthermore, essential oil from D. gossweileri reduced 50% of spore germination after treatment at 1.25 mg/mL, and its combination with other oils improved both bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities with additive or synergistic effects. Concerning the other essential oils, the minimal inhibitory concentration ranged from 5 to 0.63 mg/mL on vegetative growth and from 0.75 to 0.09 mg/mL on the germination of spores. Spectrophotometric evaluation showed an inhibitory effect of essential oils on both germination and outgrowth. From these results, it is concluded that some of the essential oils tested might be a valuable tool for bacteriological control in food industries. Therefore, further research regarding their use as food preservatives should be carried out.

  4. Evaluation of the spoilage potential of bacteria isolated from spoiled cooked whole tropical shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) stored under modified atmosphere packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Sabrina; Cardinal, Mireille; Jaffrès, Emmanuel; Cornet, Josiane; Lalanne, Valérie; Chevalier, Frédérique; Sérot, Thierry; Pilet, Marie-France; Dousset, Xavier; Joffraud, Jean-Jacques

    2014-06-01

    The spoilage potential of isolates belonging to five bacterial groups/species (Shewanella baltica, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Aeromonas salmonicida, Vibrio sp., "other Gamma-Proteobacteria" [containing one strain of Pseudoalteromonas sp. and one strain of Psychrobacter sp.]) isolated from spoiled cooked and whole tropical shrimp stored under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) was evaluated by inoculation into ionized cooked and peeled tropical shrimp followed by storage for 32 days at 8 °C. Microbial growth and sensory changes were monitored during the storage period. The major spoilage bacterial isolate groups were C. maltaromaticum and S. baltica. In order to characterize their spoilage potential further and to study the effect of their interactions, each of these two specific spoilage organisms (SSO) and one mixed-culture, C. maltaromaticum/S. baltica, were tested using a combination of complementary methods: molecular (PCR-TTGE), sensory, chemical, and conventional microbiological analyses. It was concluded that, in the mixed-culture-inoculated samples, both species groups imposed their spoilage characteristics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of an acidic, copper sulfate-based commercial sanitizer on indicator, pathogenic, and spoilage bacteria associated with broiler chicken carcasses when applied at various intervention points during poultry processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, S M

    2008-07-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate 1) the effect of an acidic, copper sulfate-based commercial sanitizer on pathogenic, indicator, and spoilage bacteria in a model scalder system, 2) the effect of this sanitizer on total aerobic bacteria (APC) and Escherichia coli counts, and Salmonella prevalence on broiler chicken carcasses when applied during scalding or scalding and postpick dipping, and 3) the ability of sanitizer to extend the shelf-life of broiler chicken carcasses. Exposure of Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, or Shewanella putrefaciens to the sanitizer in scalder water at 54 degrees C for 2 min resulted in complete elimination of these bacterial species. Exposure of E. coli to the treated scald water resulted in a 4.9 log(10) reduction. These data suggest that this sanitizer would be effective for use in scalders. When applied during scalding in a commercial processing plant, APC and E. coli counts were significantly (P sanitizer, APC were significantly P sanitizer, except for d 2 and 10. Averages on these days were higher for controls, but were not significantly different. Salmonella prevalence was not consistently impacted overall. For the shelf-life study, odor scores were significantly (P sanitizer suppressed spoilage bacteria with a 99.99% reduction at d 10 and a 99.9% reduction at d 12 of storage. This effect could result in an extension of the shelf life of the poultry carcasses by up to 4 d.

  6. Effect of different storage temperatures on bacterial spoilage of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the bacterial organisms associated with Oreochromis niloticus spoilage at two storage temperatures (6 and 20°C) and also assessed the ability of the individual bacterial isolates to cause spoilage at the two storage temperatures. Bacteriological analysis revealed the association of five bacteria ...

  7. Bacterial spoilage of fresh meat in some selected Lagos markets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the bacteria associated with spoilage of fresh meat was carried out. The flora causing spoilage of meat include Alcaligenes liquefaciens, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Lactobacillus sp., Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sarcina sp. Serratia ...

  8. Significance of volatile compounds produced by spoilage bacteria in vacuum-packed cold-smoked salmon ( Salmo salar ) analyzed by GC-MS and multivariate regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik; Dalgaard, Paw

    2001-01-01

    , 1- penten-3-ol, and 1-propanol. The potency and importance of these compounds was confirmed by gas chromatography- olfactometry. The present study provides valuable information on the bacterial reactions responsible for spoilage off-flavors of cold-smoked salmon, which can be used to develop......Changes were studied in the concentration of 38 volatile compounds during chilled storage at 5 degreesC of six lots of commercially produced vacuum-packed cold-smoked salmon and sterile cold-smoked salmon. The majority of volatile compounds produced during spoilage of cold-smoked salmon were...... alcohols, which were produced by microbial activity. Partial least- squares regression of volatile compounds and sensory results allowed for a multiple compound quality index to be developed. This index was based on volatile bacterial metabolites, 1- propanol and 2-butanone, and 2-furan...

  9. Evaluation of the spoilage potential of bacteria isolated from spoiled cooked whole tropical shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) stored under modified atmosphere packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Mace, Sabrina; Cardinal, Mireille; Jaffres, Emmanuel; Cornet, Josiane; Lalanne, Valerie; Chevalier, Frederique; Serot, Thierry; Pilet, Marie-france; Dousset, Xavier; Joffraud, Jean-jacques

    2014-01-01

    The spoilage potential of isolates belonging to five bacterial groups/species (Shewanella baltica, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Aeromonas salmonicida, Vibrio sp., “other Gamma-Proteobacteria” [containing one strain of Pseudoalteromonas sp. and one strain of Psychrobacter sp.]) isolated from spoiled cooked and whole tropical shrimp stored under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) was evaluated by inoculation into ionized cooked and peeled tropical shrimp followed by storage for 32 days at 8°...

  10. Antimicrobial activity of different sodium and potassium salts of carboxylic acid against some common foodborne pathogens and spoilage-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Pizarro, Jorge; Redondo-Solano, Mauricio; Umaña-Gamboa, Christian; Arias-Echandi, María Laura

    Cleaning and disinfection represent the most important activities associated with the elimination of dirt and microorganisms at food processing plants. Improper procedures may lead to cross contamination of food leading to its spoilage or even the transmission of foodborne pathogens. Several strategies have been used in order to achieve a good disinfection of surfaces and products; nevertheless, microbial resistance to common-use-products has developed lately. Due to this fact, the development of new non-toxic-food compatible chemical agents that reduce the impact of foodborne pathogens and spoilage causing microorganisms is desirable for the food industry. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different sodium and potassium salts of aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acid on the growth of common food spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. Growth curves were determined for Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Listeria monocytogenes in contact with different concentrations of carboxylic acid salts. The inhibitory effect of both aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acid salts, in accordance with concentration levels, was 100>50>25mg/ml. The inhibitory effect of aliphatic salts was butanoic>hexanoic> octanoic>decanoic and, benzoic>gallic>caffeic acid salts for aromatic salts. In general, sodium salts were more inhibitory than potassium salts (p≤0.05). Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Spoilage potential of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species: Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum and Lactococcus piscium, on sweet bell pepper (SBP) simulation medium under different gas compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Nyambi, Clarice; Zhang, Bao-Yu; Papastergiadis, Antonios; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Devlieghere, Frank

    2014-05-16

    Sweet bell peppers are a significant constituent of retail, chilled-stored and packaged food products like fresh salads, marinades and ready-to-eat (RTE) meals. Previously, through general screening of the Belgian market and by means of source tracking analysis in a plant manufacturing minimally processed, vegetable salads the susceptibility of fresh-cut sweet bell peppers to lactic acid bacterium (LAB) contamination was substantiated. The determination of the metabolic profiles of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum and Lactococcus piscium, two major psychrotrophic, spoilage-related LAB species, on sweet bell pepper (SBP) simulation medium under different packaging conditions - 1.) vacuum: 100% N2, 2.) air: 21% O2, 79% N2, 3.) MAP1: 30% CO2, 70% N2 and 4.) MAP2: 50% O2, 50% CO2 - facilitated a better understanding of the spoilage potential of these microbes as well as the presumptive contribution of O2 in the spectrum of produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with poor organoleptic properties of food products. Generally, none of the applied gas compositions inhibited the growth of the 4 L. gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum isolates, however the presence of O2 resulted in buttery off-odors by inducing primarily the accumulation of diacetyl and pungent "vinegar" smell due to acetic acid. The 3 tested isolates of L. piscium varied greatly among their growth dynamics and inhibition at MAP2. They exhibited either weak spoilage profile or very offensive metabolism confirming significant intraspecies diversity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Stereo and scanning electron microscopy of in-shell Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.): part two-surface sound nut fungi spoilage susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scussel, Vildes M; Manfio, Daniel; Savi, Geovana D; Moecke, Elisa H S

    2014-11-01

    This work reports the in-shell Brazil nut spoilage susceptible morpho-histological characteristics and fungi infection (shell, edible part, and brown skin) through stereo and scanning electron microscopies (SEM). The following characteristics related to shell (a) morphology-that allow fungi and insects' entrance to inner nut, and (b) histology-that allow humidity absorption, improving environment conditions for living organisms development, were identified. (a.1) locule in testae-the nut navel, which is a cavity formed during nut detaching from pods (located at 1.0 to 2.0/4th of the shell B&C nut faces linkage). It allows the nut brown skin (between shell and edible part) first contact to the external environment, through the (a.2) nut channel-the locule prolongation path, which has the water/nutrients cambium function for their transport and distribution to the inner seed (while still on the tree/pod). Both, locule followed by the channel, are the main natural entrance of living organisms (fungi and insects), including moisture to the inner seed structures. In addition, the (a.3) nut shell surface-which has a crinkled and uneven surface morphology-allows water absorption, thus adding to the deterioration processes too. The main shell histological characteristic, which also allows water absorption (thus improving environment conditions for fungi proliferation), is the (b.1) cell wall porosity-the multilayered wall and porous rich cells that compose the shell faces double tissue layers and the (b.2) soft tissue-the mix of tissues 2 faces corner/linkage. This work also shows in details the SEM nut spoilage susceptible features highly fungi infected with hyphae and reproductive structures distribution. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Bacteria, mould and yeast spore inactivation studies by scanning electron microscope observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozali, Siti N M; Milani, Elham A; Deed, Rebecca C; Silva, Filipa V M

    2017-12-18

    Spores are the most resistant form of microbial cells, thus difficult to inactivate. The pathogenic or food spoilage effects of certain spore-forming microorganisms have been the primary basis of sterilization and pasteurization processes. Thermal sterilization is the most common method to inactivate spores present on medical equipment and foods. High pressure processing (HPP) is an emerging and commercial non-thermal food pasteurization technique. Although previous studies demonstrated the effectiveness of thermal and non-thermal spore inactivation, the in-depth mechanisms of spore inactivation are as yet unclear. Live and dead forms of two food spoilage bacteria, a mould and a yeast were examined using scanning electron microscopy before and after the inactivation treatment. Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris and Geobacillus stearothermophilus bacteria are indicators of acidic foods pasteurization and sterilization processes, respectively. Neosartorya fischeri is a phyto-pathogenic mould attacking fruits. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast with various applications for winemaking, brewing, baking and the production of biofuel from crops (e.g. sugar cane). Spores of the four microbial species were thermally inactivated. Spores of S. cerevisiae were observed in the ascus and free form after thermal and HPP treatments. Different forms of damage and cell destruction were observed for each microbial spore. Thermal treatment inactivated bacterial spores of A. acidoterrestris and G. stearothermophilus by attacking the inner core of the spore. The heat first altered the membrane permeability allowing the release of intracellular components. Subsequently, hydration of spores, physicochemical modifications of proteins, flattening and formation of indentations occurred, with subsequent spore death. Regarding N. fischeri, thermal inactivation caused cell destruction and leakage of intracellular components. Both thermal and HPP treatments of S. cerevisiae free spores attacked

  14. Moulds in food spoilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filtenborg, Ole; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Thrane, Ulf

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing knowledge and understanding of the role played by moulds in food spoilage. Especially the discovery of mycotoxin production in foods has highligh-ted the importance of moulds in food quality. It is, however, only within the last 5-10 years that major progresses have been made...... towards the prevention of spoilage caused by moulds. This is due to recent international agreements on taxonomy and analytical methods for foodborne moulds, which has led to the discovery, that a specific, very limited funga (=mycobiota) is responsible for the spoilage of each kind of food. This is called...... of foods. The important mycotoxin pattern of each food is described including toxins which originates from "carry over". For some foods examples are also given on spoilage of sensoric properties due to moulds. Finally, preventi-ve actions towards the growth of the associated funga is described for some...

  15. Visualizing aquatic bacteria by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago P; Noyma, Natália P; Duque, Thabata L A; Gamalier, Juliana P; Vidal, Luciana O; Lobão, Lúcia M; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Roland, Fábio; Melo, Rossana C N

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the functional role of aquatic bacteria in microbial food webs is largely dependent on methods applied to the direct visualization and enumeration of these organisms. While the ultrastructure of aquatic bacteria is still poorly known, routine observation of aquatic bacteria by light microscopy requires staining with fluorochromes, followed by filtration and direct counting on filter surfaces. Here, we used a new strategy to visualize and enumerate aquatic bacteria by light microscopy. By spinning water samples from varied tropical ecosystems in a cytocentrifuge, we found that bacteria firmly adhere to regular slides, can be stained by fluorochoromes with no background formation and fast enumerated. Significant correlations were found between the cytocentrifugation and filter-based methods. Moreover, preparations through cytocentrifugation were more adequate for bacterial viability evaluation than filter-based preparations. Transmission electron microscopic analyses revealed a morphological diversity of bacteria with different internal and external structures, such as large variation in the cell envelope and capsule thickness, and presence or not of thylakoid membranes. Our results demonstrate that aquatic bacteria represent an ultrastructurally diverse population and open avenues for easy handling/quantification and better visualization of bacteria by light microscopy without the need of filter membranes.

  16. Bacteriophages against Serratia as Fish Spoilage Control Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hern?ndez, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Serratia, mainly S. proteamaculans and S. fonticola, are important spoilage agents in Atlantic horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). In order to evaluate whether bacteriophages against Serratia could delay the spoilage process, 11 viral strains active against this genus were isolated from food and best candidate was applied to fresh mackerel filets. All the phages belong to the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families and were active at multiplicity of infection (MOI) level...

  17. Moulds in food spoilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filtenborg, Ole; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Thrane, Ulf

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing knowledge and understanding of the role played by moulds in food spoilage. Especially the discovery of mycotoxin production in foods has highligh-ted the importance of moulds in food quality. It is, however, only within the last 5-10 years that major progresses have been made...... towards the prevention of spoilage caused by moulds. This is due to recent international agreements on taxonomy and analytical methods for foodborne moulds, which has led to the discovery, that a specific, very limited funga (=mycobiota) is responsible for the spoilage of each kind of food. This is called...... the associated or critical funga and has been shown to consist of less than 10 species. In this paper the associated funga is described for the following foods: Citrus and pomaceous fruits, potato and yam tubers, onions, rye, wheat, rye bread, cheese and fermented sausages and whenever possible the selective...

  18. Microbiological diversity and prevalence of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria in commercial fermented alcoholic beverages (beer, fruit wine, refined rice wine, and yakju).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Se Hui; Kim, Nam Hee; Shim, Moon Bo; Jeon, Young Wook; Ahn, Ji Hye; Lee, Soon Ho; Hwang, In Gyun; Rhee, Min Suk

    2015-04-01

    The present study examined 469 commercially available fermented alcoholic beverages (FABs), including beer (draft, microbrewed, and pasteurized), fruit wine (grape and others), refined rice wine, and yakju (raw and pasteurized). Samples were screened for Escherichia coli and eight foodborne pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Yersinia enterocolitica), and the aerobic plate count, lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, fungi, and total coliforms were also enumerated. Microbrewed beer contained the highest number of microorganisms (average aerobic plate count, 3.5; lactic acid bacteria, 2.1; acetic acid bacteria, 2.0; and fungi, 3.6 log CFU/ml), followed by draft beer and yakju (P coliforms (detected in 23.8% of microbrewed beer samples) and B. cereus (detected in all FABs) were present in some products. B. cereus was detected most frequently in microbrewed beer (54.8% of samples) and nonpasteurized yakju (50.0%), followed by pasteurized yakju (28.8%), refined rice wine (25.0%), other fruit wines (12.3%), grape wine (8.6%), draft beer (5.6%), and pasteurized beer (2.2%) (P coliform bacteria can survive the harsh conditions present in alcoholic beverages should be taken into account (alongside traditional quality indicators such as the presence of lactic acid-producing bacteria, acetic acid-producing bacteria, or both) when developing manufacturing systems and methods to prolong the shelf life of high-quality FAB products. New strategic quality management plans for various FABs are needed.

  19. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  20. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Nagy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM to digital processing (dTEM, and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM. Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200–350 nm than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85–200 nm and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60–280 nm in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100–500 nm, but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50–100 nm. These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics.

  1. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Riedel, Dietmar; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje

    2015-10-22

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. In marine sediments, AOM is performed by dual-species consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhabiting the methane-sulfate transition zone. The biochemical pathways and biological adaptations enabling this globally relevant process are not fully understood. Here we study the syntrophic interaction in thermophilic AOM (TAOM) between ANME-1 archaea and their consortium partner SRB HotSeep-1 (ref. 6) at 60 °C to test the hypothesis of a direct interspecies exchange of electrons. The activity of TAOM consortia was compared to the first ANME-free culture of an AOM partner bacterium that grows using hydrogen as the sole electron donor. The thermophilic ANME-1 do not produce sufficient hydrogen to sustain the observed growth of the HotSeep-1 partner. Enhancing the growth of the HotSeep-1 partner by hydrogen addition represses methane oxidation and the metabolic activity of ANME-1. Further supporting the hypothesis of direct electron transfer between the partners, we observe that under TAOM conditions, both ANME and the HotSeep-1 bacteria overexpress genes for extracellular cytochrome production and form cell-to-cell connections that resemble the nanowire structures responsible for interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic consortia of Geobacter. HotSeep-1 highly expresses genes for pili production only during consortial growth using methane, and the nanowire-like structures are absent in HotSeep-1 cells isolated with hydrogen. These observations suggest that direct electron transfer is a principal mechanism in TAOM, which may also explain the enigmatic functioning and specificity of other methanotrophic ANME-SRB consortia.

  2. Microbiological Spoilage of High-Sugar Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sterling

    The high-sugar products discussed in this chapter are referred to as chocolate, sugar confectionery (non-chocolate), liquid sugars, sugar syrups, and honey. Products grouped in the sugar confectionery category include hard candy, soft/gummy candy, caramel, toffee, licorice, marzipan, creams, jellies, and nougats. A common intrinsic parameter associated with high-sugar products is their low water activity (a w), which is known to inhibit the growth of most spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. However, spoilage can occur as a result of the growth of osmophilic yeasts and xerophilic molds (Von Richter, 1912; Anand & Brown, 1968; Brown, 1976). The a w range for high-sugar products is between 0.20 and 0.80 (Banwart, 1979; Richardson, 1987; Lenovich & Konkel, 1992; ICMSF, 1998; Jay, Loessner, & Golden, 2005). Spoilage of products, such as chocolate-covered cherries, results from the presence of yeasts in the liquid sugar brine or the cherry. Generally, the spoiled product will develop leakers. The chocolate covering the cherry would not likely be a source of yeast contamination.

  3. Bacterial spoilage of meat and cured meat products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borch, E.; Kant-Muermans, M.L.T.; Blixt, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors (product composition and storage conditions) on the selection, growth rate and metabolic activity of the bacterial flora is presented for meat (pork and beef) and cooked, cured meat products. The predominant bacteria associated with spoilage of refrigerated

  4. Involvement of Bacterial Quorum-Sensing Signals in Spoilage of Bean Sprouts

    OpenAIRE

    Rasch, Maria; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Flodgaard, Lars Ravn; Christensen, Henrik; Givskov, Michael; Gram, Lone

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial communication signals, acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), were extracted from samples of commercial bean sprouts undergoing soft-rot spoilage. Bean sprouts produced in the laboratory did not undergo soft-rot spoilage and did not contain AHLs or AHL-producing bacteria, although the bacterial population reached levels similar to those in the commercial sprouts, 108 to 109 CFU/g. AHL-producing bacteria (Enterobacteriaceae and pseudomonads) were isolated from commercial sprouts, and s...

  5. Microbiological Spoilage of Cereal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Frederick K.; Johnson, Billie L.

    A wide range of cereal products, including bakery items, refrigerated dough, fresh pasta products, dried cereal products, snack foods, and bakery mixes, are manufactured for food consumption. These products are subject to physical, chemical, and microbiological spoilage that affects the taste, aroma, leavening, appearance, and overall quality of the end consumer product. Microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature and have the potential for causing food spoilage and foodborne disease. However, compared to other categories of food products, bakery products rarely cause food poisoning. The heat that is applied during baking or frying usually eliminates pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, and low moisture contributes to product stability. Nevertheless, microbiological spoilage of these products occurs, resulting in substantial economic losses.

  6. Spoilage potential of Paenibacillussp. in Brazilian raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Ribeiro Júnior

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Bacterial spores are widespread in the environment and can contaminate milk. Spores are resistant to thermal conditions and your germination reduces milk shelf-life because the aerobic bacteria that are sporulated produce proteases and lipases. The aim of this study was identify Paenibacillus sp., the spoilage microbiota, arising from the germination of spores in raw milk and your spoilage potential. Twenty different milk samples were treated at 80°C/12min and plated to isolate spore-forming bacteria. These strains were picked in milk agar and tributyrin agar for verification of their potential proteolytic and lipolytic activities, respectively. Amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of the strains for identification by similarity to the DNA sequences deposited in GenBank was performed. One hundred and thirty-seven isolates were obtained, of which 40 (29.2% showed spoilage activity for milk. Of these, three (7.5% were identified as strains of Paenibacillus sp., and all were lipolytic. Paenibacillus sp. have been identified as primarily responsible for the spoilage of pasteurized milk with a long shelf-life in other countries. To increase the shelf-life of Brazilian pasteurized milk, it is important to identify the sporulated microbes to determine their origin and to control the contamination of milk by vegetative forms such as spores.

  7. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria - walking on crutches is part of their lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooijmans, Rob; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lactic acid bacteria contain rudimentary electron transport chains that can be reconstituted by the addition of heme and menaquinone to the growth medium. These activated electron transport chains lead to higher biomass production and increased robustness, which is beneficial for industrial applications, but a major concern when dealing with pathogenic lactic acid bacteria. PMID:20948651

  8. Exploring lot-to-lot variation in spoilage bacterial communities on commercial modified atmosphere packaged beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säde, Elina; Penttinen, Katri; Björkroth, Johanna; Hultman, Jenni

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the factors influencing meat bacterial communities is important as these communities are largely responsible for meat spoilage. The composition and structure of a bacterial community on a high-O 2 modified-atmosphere packaged beef product were examined after packaging, on the use-by date and two days after, to determine whether the communities at each stage were similar to those in samples taken from different production lots. Furthermore, we examined whether the taxa associated with product spoilage were distributed across production lots. Results from 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing showed that while the early samples harbored distinct bacterial communities, after 8-12 days storage at 6 °C the communities were similar to those in samples from different lots, comprising mainly of common meat spoilage bacteria Carnobacterium spp., Brochothrix spp., Leuconostoc spp. and Lactococcus spp. Interestingly, abundant operational taxonomic units associated with product spoilage were shared between the production lots, suggesting that the bacteria enable to spoil the product were constant contaminants in the production chain. A characteristic succession pattern and the distribution of common spoilage bacteria between lots suggest that both the packaging type and the initial community structure influenced the development of the spoilage bacterial community. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Monitoring of spoilage-associated microbiota on modified atmosphere packaged beef and differentiation of psychrophilic and psychrotrophic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgarth, M; Behr, J; Vogel, R F

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the discriminatory power of MALDI-TOF MS as a high-throughput method to monitor growth dynamics of meat-spoiling bacteria on modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) beef and to differentiate psychrophilic and psychrotrophic spoilage-associated strains. MAP beef steaks were incubated for 21 days at constant 4 and 10°C. Development of headspace gas composition, pH, CFU and spoilage-associated microbial composition were monitored. MALDI-TOF MS exhibited high discriminatory power for reliable, high-throughput identification of spoilage-associated, psychrotrophic microbiota. Microbiota development was highly dependent on initial abundance of specific species. Organoleptic onset of spoilage was concomitant with an alteration of headspace atmosphere and pH. Screening for psychrophiles at 4°C on beef revealed the abundance of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gelidum TMW2·1998 with characteristic psychrophilic growth behaviour. We suggest that control of initial contaminants is crucial to predict the onset of spoilage and that headspace atmosphere and pH are important parameters with spoilage-indicative potential. MALDI-TOF MS proved suitable for high-resolution monitoring of psychrotrophic and psychrophilic spoilage-associated microbiota and enables improved insights in the spoilage progress. The presence of psychrophilic strains on beef is the likely causative for unexplained spoilage events. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Investigations of the effect of electron-beam irradiation on bacteria in sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterstock, G.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of electron beams on bacteria was investigated in 2 experimental facilities. A 400 kV electron accelerator was used to irradiate sludge quantities of 10 l and 180 l. The total bacterial count, number of coliform bacteria and, in injected sludge, the relative bacteria density of salmonella were investigated. A dose of 0.5 to 0.75 Mrad was required to reduce coliform bacteria to below the detectable level in 0.1 ml. With a dose of 1.5 Mrad salmonella were reduced by 6 orders of magnitude on the average. In addition, the dependence of the reduction in bacteria on the dose rate as well as on mixing of the irradiation material was investigated. Substantial reproduction of bacteria in digested sludge was found in all cases after the irradiation. (author)

  11. Investigations of the effect of electron-beam irradiation on bacteria in sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterstock, G.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of electron beams on bacteria was investigated in 2 experimental facilities. A 400 kV electron accelerator was used to irradiate sludge quantities of 10 l and 180 l. The total bacterial count, the number of coliform bacteria and, in injected sludge, the relative bacteria density of salmonella were investigated. A dose of 0.5 to 0.75 Mrad was required to reduce coliform bacteria to below the detectable level in 0.1 ml. With a dose of 1.5 Mrad salmonella were reduced by 6 orders of magnitude on the average. In addition, the dependence of the reduction in bacteria on the dose rate as well as on mixing of the irradiated material was investigated. Substantial reproduction of bacteria in digested sludge was found in all cases after the irradiation. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Bioleaching of metals from electronic scrap by moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyas, Sadia; Anwar, Munir A.; Niazi, Shahida B.; Ghauri, M. Afzal

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of metals from electronic scrap by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and an unidentified acidophilic

  13. Lactobacilli and tartrazine as causative agents of red-color spoilage in cucumber pickle products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; Kelling, R E; Hale, S; Breidt, F; McFeeters, R F

    2007-09-01

    The cucumber pickling industry has sporadically experienced spoilage outbreaks in pickled cucumber products characterized by development of red color on the surface of the fruits. Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei were isolated from 2 outbreaks of this spoilage that occurred about 15 y apart during the last 3 decades. Both organisms were shown to produce this spoilage when inoculated into pickled cucumbers while concomitantly degrading the azo dye tartrazine (FD&C yellow nr 5). This food dye is used as a yellow coloring in the brine cover solutions of commercial pickled cucumber products. The red color does not occur in the absence of tartrazine, nor when turmeric is used as a yellow coloring in the pickles. Addition of sodium benzoate to the brine cover solutions of a pickled cucumber product, more specifically hamburger dill pickles, prevented growth of these lactic acid bacteria and the development of the red spoilage.

  14. Heme and menaquinone induced electron transport in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Filipe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For some lactic acid bacteria higher biomass production as a result of aerobic respiration has been reported upon supplementation with heme and menaquinone. In this report, we have studied a large number of species among lactic acid bacteria for the existence of this trait. Results Heme- (and menaquinone stimulated aerobic growth was observed for several species and genera of lactic acid bacteria. These include Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacilllus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Streptococcus entericus and Lactococcus garviae. The increased biomass production without further acidification, which are respiration associated traits, are suitable for high-throughput screening as demonstrated by the screening of 8000 Lactococcus lactis insertion mutants. Respiration-negative insertion-mutants were found with noxA, bd-type cytochrome and menaquinol biosynthesis gene-disruptions. Phenotypic screening and in silico genome analysis suggest that respiration can be considered characteristic for certain species. Conclusion We propose that the cyd-genes were present in the common ancestor of lactic acid bacteria, and that multiple gene-loss events best explains the observed distribution of these genes among the species.

  15. Electron uptake by iron-oxidizing phototrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, A; Gardel, EJ; Vidoudez, C; Parra, EA; Girguis, PR

    2014-02-26

    Oxidation-reduction reactions underlie energy generation in nearly all life forms. Although most organisms use soluble oxidants and reductants, some microbes can access solid-phase materials as electron-acceptors or -donors via extracellular electron transfer. Many studies have focused on the reduction of solid-phase oxidants. Far less is known about electron uptake via microbial extracellular electron transfer, and almost nothing is known about the associated mechanisms. Here we show that the iron-oxidizing photoautotroph Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 accepts electrons from a poised electrode, with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source/electron acceptor. Both electron uptake and ruBisCo form I expression are stimulated by light. Electron uptake also occurs in the dark, uncoupled from photosynthesis. Notably, the pioABC operon, which encodes a protein system essential for photoautotrophic growth by ferrous iron oxidation, influences electron uptake. These data reveal a previously unknown metabolic versatility of photoferrotrophs to use extracellular electron transfer for electron uptake.

  16. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: scanning electron microscopy observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Churpita, Olexandr; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Deyneka, I.G.; Meshkovskii, I.K.; Jäger, Aleš; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 5 (2015), "053703-1"-"053703-5" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk LO1309 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101219; SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * plasma medicine * bacteria * cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  17. Photosynthetic electron transport in purple bacteria: An in vivo spectroscopic study

    OpenAIRE

    BÍNA, David

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in purple bacteria was studied using combination of absorption spectroscopy and induced bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence in whole cells in vivo. Focus is placed on relations between fluorescence yield, the state of the electron transport chain and the membrane potential. A laboratory-built absorption spectrophotometer-fluorimeter is described.

  18. Occurrence and growth of yeasts in processed meat products - implications for potential spoilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Jacobsen, Tomas; Jespersen, Lene

    2008-01-01

    Spoilage of meat products is in general attributed to bacteria but new processing and storage techniques inhibiting growth of bacteria may provide opportunities for yeasts to dominate the microflora and cause spoilage of the product. With the aim of obtaining a deeper understanding of the potential...... role of yeast in spoilage of five different processed meat products (bacon, ham, salami and two different liver patés), yeasts were isolated, enumerated and identified during processing, in the final product and in the final product at the end of shelf life. Yeasts were isolated along the bacon...... of the processed meat products. The yeast microflora was complex with 4-12 different species isolated from the different production sites. In general, Candida zeylanoides, Debaryomyces hansenii and the newly described Candida alimentaria were found to be the dominant yeast species. In addition, three putatively...

  19. Classification of human pathogen bacteria for early screening using electronic nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifli, Syahida Amani; Mohamad, Che Wan Syarifah Robiah; Abdullah, Abu Hassan

    2017-10-01

    This paper present human pathogen bacteria for early screening using electronic nose. Electronic nose (E-nose) known as gas sensor array is a device that analyze the odor measurement give the fast response and less time consuming for clinical diagnosis. Many bacterial pathogens could lead to life threatening infections. Accurate and rapid diagnosis is crucial for the successful management of these infections disease. The conventional method need more time to detect the growth of bacterial. Alternatively, the bacteria are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella cultured on different media agar can be detected and classifies according to the volatile compound in shorter time using electronic nose (E-nose). Then, the data from electronic nose (E-nose) is processed using statistical method which is principal component analysis (PCA). The study shows the capability of electronic nose (E-nose) for early screening for bacterial infection in human stomach.

  20. Bacterial populations and the volatilome associated to meat spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaburi, Annalisa; Piombino, Paola; Nychas, George-John; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-02-01

    Microbial spoilage of meat is a complex event to which many different bacterial populations can contribute depending on the temperature of storage and packaging conditions. The spoilage can derive from microbial development and consumption of meat nutrients by bacteria with a consequent release of undesired metabolites. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are generated during meat storage can have an olfactory impact and can lead to rejection of the product when their concentration increase significantly as a result of microbial development. The VOCs most commonly identified in meat during storage include alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, fatty acids, esters and sulfur compounds. In this review, the VOCs found in fresh meat during storage in specific conditions are described together with the possible bacterial populations responsible of their production. In addition, on the basis of the data available in the literature, the sensory impact of the VOCs and their dynamics during storage is discussed to highlight their possible contribution to the spoilage of meat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characteristics of Spoilage-Associated Secondary Cucumber Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Wendy; Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D.; McFeeters, Roger F.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary fermentations during the bulk storage of fermented cucumbers can result in spoilage that causes a total loss of the fermented product, at an estimated cost of $6,000 to $15,000 per affected tank. Previous research has suggested that such fermentations are the result of microbiological utilization of lactic acid and the formation of acetic, butyric, and propionic acids. The objectives of this study were to characterize the chemical and environmental conditions associated with secondary cucumber fermentations and to isolate and characterize potential causative microorganisms. Both commercial spoilage samples and laboratory-reproduced secondary fermentations were evaluated. Potential causative agents were isolated based on morphological characteristics. Two yeasts, Pichia manshurica and Issatchenkia occidentalis, were identified and detected most commonly concomitantly with lactic acid utilization. In the presence of oxygen, yeast metabolic activities lead to lactic acid degradation, a small decline in the redox potential (Eh, Ag/AgCl, 3 M KCl) of the fermentation brines, and an increase in pH to levels at which bacteria other than the lactic acid bacteria responsible for the primary fermentation can grow and produce acetic, butyric, and propionic acids. Inhibition of these yeasts by allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) resulted in stabilization of the fermented medium, while the absence of the preservative resulted in the disappearance of lactic and acetic acids in a model system. Additionally, three Gram-positive bacteria, Lactobacillus buchneri, a Clostridium sp., and Pediococcus ethanolidurans, were identified as potentially relevant to different stages of the secondary fermentation. The unique opportunity to study commercial spoilage samples generated a better understanding of the microbiota and environmental conditions associated with secondary cucumber fermentations. PMID:22179234

  2. Amplicon sequencing for the quantification of spoilage microbiota in complex foods including bacterial spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de P.; Caspers, M.; Sanders, J.W.; Kemperman, R.; Wijman, J.; Lommerse, G.; Roeselers, G.; Montijn, R.; Abee, T.; Kort, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background
    Spoilage of food products is frequently caused by bacterial spores and lactic acid bacteria. Identification of these organisms by classic cultivation methods is limited by their ability to form colonies on nutrient agar plates. In this study, we adapted and optimized 16S rRNA amplicon

  3. Involvement of bacterial quorum-sensing signals in spoilage of bean sprouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Maria; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2005-01-01

    sprouts. Thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed the presence of N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone in spoiled bean sprouts and in extracts from pure cultures of bacteria. During normal spoilage, the pH of the sprouts increased due to proteolytic...

  4. Classification of photobacteria associated with spoilage of fish products by numerical taxanomy and pyrolysis mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Paw; Manfio, G.P.; Goodfellow, M.

    1997-01-01

    sub-groups. One sub-group of psychrotolerant P. phosphoreum strains, which was selected in modified atmosphere packed fish stored at low temperature, was also highlighted using each of the methods. The importance of classifying food spoilage bacteria has been shown and a simple key generated...

  5. Bioleaching of electronic waste using bacteria isolated from the marine sponge Hymeniacidon heliophila (Porifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, Enrique E; Mendes, Maria A; Nascimento, Claudio A O; Espinosa, Denise C R; Oliveira, Renato; Oliveira, Guilherme; Custodio, Marcio R

    2017-05-05

    The bacteria isolated from Hymeniacidon heliophila sponge cells showed bioleaching activity. The most active strain, Hyhel-1, identified as Bacillus sp., was selected for bioleaching tests under two different temperatures, 30°C and 40°C, showing rod-shaped cells and filamentous growth, respectively. At 30°C, the bacteria secreted substances which linked to the leached copper, and at 40°C metallic nanoparticles were produced inside the cells. In addition, infrared analysis detected COOH groups and linear peptides in the tested bacteria at both temperatures. The Hyhel-1 strain in presence of electronic waste (e-waste) induced the formation of crust, which could be observed due to bacteria growing on the e-waste fragment. SEM-EDS measurements showed that the bacterial net surface was composed mostly of iron (16.1% w/w), while a higher concentration of copper was observed in the supernatant (1.7% w/w) and in the precipitated (49.8% w/w). The substances linked to copper in the supernatant were sequenced by MALDI-TOF-ms/ms and identified as macrocyclic surfactin-like peptides, similar to the basic sequence of Iturin, a lipopeptide from Bacillus subtilis. Finally, the results showed that Hyhel-1 is a bioleaching bacteria and cooper nanoparticles producer and that this bacteria could be used as a copper recovery tool from electronic waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stimulatory Effect of Xenobiotics on Oxidative Electron Transport of Chemolithotrophic Nitrifying Bacteria Used as Biosensing Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznica, Andrzej; Nowak, Agnieszka; Ziemski, Przemyslaw; Kwasniewski, Mirosław; Bernas, Tytus

    2013-01-01

    Electron transport chain (ETCh) of ammonium (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) participates in oxidation of ammonium to nitrate (nitrification). Operation of ETCh may be perturbed by a range of water-soluble xenobiotics. Therefore, consortia of nitrifying bacteria may be used as a biosensor to detect water contamination. A surprising feature of this system is an increase of oxygen consumption, detected in the presence of certain inhibitors of ETCh. Thus, to shed light on the mechanism of this effect (and other differences between inhibitors) we monitored separately respiration of the bacteria of the first (AOB - Nitrosomonas) and second (NOB -Nitrobacter) stages of nitrification. Furthermore, we measured plasma membrane potential and the level of reduction of NAD(P)H. We propose a novel model of ETCh in NOB to explain the role of reverse electron transport in the stimulation of oxygen consumption (previously attributed to hormesis). PMID:23326438

  7. Genome Sequence of a Food Spoilage Lactic Acid Bacterium, Leuconostoc gasicomitatum LMG 18811T, in Association with Specific Spoilage Reactions ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Per; Paulin, Lars; Säde, Elina; Salovuori, Noora; Alatalo, Edward R.; Björkroth, K. Johanna; Auvinen, Petri

    2011-01-01

    Leuconostoc gasicomitatum is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium causing spoilage of cold-stored, modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP), nutrient-rich foods. Its role has been verified by challenge tests in gas and slime formation, development of pungent acidic and buttery off odors, and greening of beef. MAP meats have especially been prone to L. gasicomitatum spoilage. In addition, spoilage of vacuum-packaged vegetable sausages and marinated herring has been reported. The genomic sequencing project of L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T was prompted by a need to understand the growth and spoilage potentials of L. gasicomitatum, to study its phylogeny, and to be able to knock out and overexpress the genes. Comparative genomic analysis was done within L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T and the three fully assembled Leuconostoc genomes (those of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc citreum, and Leuconostoc kimchii) available. The genome of L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T is plasmid-free and contains a 1,954,080-bp circular chromosome with an average GC content of 36.7%. It includes genes for the phosphoketolase pathway and alternative pathways for pyruvate utilization. As interesting features associated with the growth and spoilage potential, LMG 18811T possesses utilization strategies for ribose, external nucleotides, nucleosides, and nucleobases and it has a functional electron transport chain requiring only externally supplied heme for respiration. In respect of the documented specific spoilage reactions, the pathways/genes associated with a buttery off odor, meat greening, and slime formation were recognized. Unexpectedly, genes associated with platelet binding and collagen adhesion were detected, but their functionality and role in food spoilage and processing environment contamination need further study. PMID:21571876

  8. Reducing Salt in Raw Pork Sausages Increases Spoilage and Correlates with Reduced Bacterial Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougy, Lysiane; Desmonts, Marie-Hélène; Coeuret, Gwendoline; Fassel, Christine; Hamon, Erwann; Hézard, Bernard; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Raw sausages are perishable foodstuffs; reducing their salt content raises questions about a possible increased spoilage of these products. In this study, we evaluated the influence of salt reduction (from 2.0% to 1.5% [wt/wt]), in combination with two types of packaging (modified atmosphere [50% mix of CO2-N2] and vacuum packaging), on the onset of spoilage and on the diversity of spoilage-associated bacteria. After 21 days of storage at 8°C, spoilage was easily observed, characterized by noticeable graying of the products and the production of gas and off-odors defined as rancid, sulfurous, or sour. At least one of these types of spoilage occurred in each sample, and the global spoilage intensity was more pronounced in samples stored under modified atmosphere than under vacuum packaging and in samples with the lower salt content. Metagenetic 16S rRNA pyrosequencing revealed that vacuum-packaged samples contained a higher total bacterial richness (n = 69 operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) than samples under the other packaging condition (n = 46 OTUs). The core community was composed of 6 OTUs (Lactobacillus sakei, Lactococcus piscium, Carnobacterium divergens, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Serratia proteamaculans, and Brochothrix thermosphacta), whereas 13 OTUs taxonomically assigned to the Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Leuconostocaceae families comprised a less-abundant subpopulation. This subdominant community was significantly more abundant when 2.0% salt and vacuum packaging were used, and this correlated with a lower degree of spoilage. Our results demonstrate that salt reduction, particularly when it is combined with CO2-enriched packaging, promotes faster spoilage of raw sausages by lowering the overall bacterial diversity (both richness and evenness). IMPORTANCE Our study takes place in the context of raw meat product manufacturing and is linked to a requirement for salt reduction. Health guidelines are calling for a reduction in

  9. Reducing Salt in Raw Pork Sausages Increases Spoilage and Correlates with Reduced Bacterial Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougy, Lysiane; Desmonts, Marie-Hélène; Coeuret, Gwendoline; Fassel, Christine; Hamon, Erwann; Hézard, Bernard; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Chaillou, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Raw sausages are perishable foodstuffs; reducing their salt content raises questions about a possible increased spoilage of these products. In this study, we evaluated the influence of salt reduction (from 2.0% to 1.5% [wt/wt]), in combination with two types of packaging (modified atmosphere [50% mix of CO2-N2] and vacuum packaging), on the onset of spoilage and on the diversity of spoilage-associated bacteria. After 21 days of storage at 8°C, spoilage was easily observed, characterized by noticeable graying of the products and the production of gas and off-odors defined as rancid, sulfurous, or sour. At least one of these types of spoilage occurred in each sample, and the global spoilage intensity was more pronounced in samples stored under modified atmosphere than under vacuum packaging and in samples with the lower salt content. Metagenetic 16S rRNA pyrosequencing revealed that vacuum-packaged samples contained a higher total bacterial richness (n = 69 operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) than samples under the other packaging condition (n = 46 OTUs). The core community was composed of 6 OTUs (Lactobacillus sakei, Lactococcus piscium, Carnobacterium divergens, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Serratia proteamaculans, and Brochothrix thermosphacta), whereas 13 OTUs taxonomically assigned to the Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Leuconostocaceae families comprised a less-abundant subpopulation. This subdominant community was significantly more abundant when 2.0% salt and vacuum packaging were used, and this correlated with a lower degree of spoilage. Our results demonstrate that salt reduction, particularly when it is combined with CO2-enriched packaging, promotes faster spoilage of raw sausages by lowering the overall bacterial diversity (both richness and evenness). Our study takes place in the context of raw meat product manufacturing and is linked to a requirement for salt reduction. Health guidelines are calling for a reduction in dietary salt intake

  10. Microbiological Spoilage of Meat and Poultry Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveny, John; Meyer, Joseph D.; Hall, Paul A.

    Humankind has consumed animal protein since the dawn of its existence. The archaeological record shows evidence of animal protein consumption as early as 12,500 BC (Mann, 2005). Raw meat and poultry are highly perishable commodities subject to various types of spoilage depending on handling and storage conditions. Because of this high potential for spoilage, the historical record reveals that early civilizations used techniques such as salting, smoking, and drying to preserve meat (Mack, 2001; Bailey, 1986). Today, more than ever, because of the globalization of the food supply, and increasing demands from exacting consumers, the control of meat and poultry spoilage is essential.

  11. Spoilage of lightly salted lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) roe at 5°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basby, Merethe; Jeppesen, V.F.; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Lightly salted lumpfish roe (3.5–4.8% fw/w] salt in the water-phase, pH 5.4, vacuum-packed) was stored at 5°C. After 2 1/2 or 3 months of storage, different degrees of spoilage, caused by bacterial activity, occurred in eleven roe batches. Off-odors ranged from no or very weak odors to strong...... sulphury, sour odors. The microflora consisted of lactic acid bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrio spp. Concentration of lactic acid, acetic acid, trimethylamine and total volatile bases were unrelated to spoilage odors. Volatile sulfur compounds (H2S, probably CS2, CH3SH and CH3CH2SH or CH3SCH3......), produced during storage, appeared to be contributors to spoilage odors....

  12. Spoilage microorganisms in milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Skelin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Spoilage microorganisms cause changes of primary characteristics and properties of milk and dairy products. The product defects depends on the specific species and number of microorganisms involved in pre- and post- technological processing. Most often, these changes are related to single undesirable sensory characteristic, smell, flavour or conistency. However, in the case of heavier microbial contamination all these undesirable characteristics can occur simultaneously. Besides, even small changes caused by presence of spoilage microorganisms lead to decreased quality of milk and various dairy products. Despite of the importance for the overall quality, the control of spoilage microorganisms for dairy industry is not obligated and therefore, only a few producers control them. Therefore, the present study describes the undesirable effect of spoilage microorganisms on quality of raw, pasteurized and sterilized milk, fermented milk, butter, sour cream and cheeses with the intention to emphasize the importance and significance of their control in the dairy industry.

  13. In vitro comparison of epidural bacteria filters permeability and screening scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysin Sener

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Epidural catheter bacteria filters are barriers in the patient-controlled analgesia/anaesthesia for preventing contamination at the epidural insertion site. The efficiency of these filters varies according to pore sizes and materials. METHOD: The bacterial adhesion capability of the two filters was measured in vitro experiment. Adhesion capacities for standard Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853 strains of the two different filters (Portex and Rusch which have the same pore size were examined. Bacterial suspension of 0.5 Mc Farland was placed in the patient-controlled analgesia pump, was filtered at a speed of 5 mL/h. in continuous infusion for 48 h and accumulated in bottle. The two filters were compared with colony counts of bacteria in the filters and bottles. At the same time, the filters and adhered bacteria were monitored by scanning electron microscope. RESULTS: Electron microscopic examination of filters showed that the Portex filter had a granular and the Rusch filter fibrillary structure. Colony counting from the catheter and bottle showed that both of the filters have significant bacterial adhesion capability (p < 0.001. After the bacteria suspension infusion, colony countings showed that the Portex filter was more efficient (p < 0.001. There was not any difference between S. aureus and P. aeruginosa bacteria adhesion. In the SEM monitoring after the infusion, it was physically shown that the bacteria were adhered efficiently by both of the filters. CONCLUSION: The granular structured filter was found statistically and significantly more successful than the fibrial. Although the pore sizes of the filters were same - of which structural differences shown by SEM were the same - it would not be right to attribute the changes in the efficiencies to only structural differences. Using microbiological and physical proofs with regard to efficiency at the same time has been

  14. Long-distance electron transfer by cable bacteria in aquifer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Hubert; Bosch, Julian; Griebler, Christian; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Lueders, Tillmann; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2016-08-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous 'cable bacteria' has recently been discovered in marine sediments to couple spatially separated redox half reactions over centimeter scales. Here we provide primary evidence that such sulfur-oxidizing cable bacteria can also be found at oxic-anoxic interfaces in aquifer sediments, where they provide a means for the direct recycling of sulfate by electron transfer over 1-2-cm distance. Sediments were taken from a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer, amended with iron sulfide and saturated with water, leaving the sediment surface exposed to air. Steep geochemical gradients developed in the upper 3 cm, showing a spatial separation of oxygen and sulfide by 9 mm together with a pH profile characteristic for sulfur oxidation by LDET. Bacterial filaments, which were highly abundant in the suboxic zone, were identified by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as cable bacteria belonging to the Desulfobulbaceae. The detection of similar Desulfobulbaceae at the oxic-anoxic interface of fresh sediment cores taken at a contaminated aquifer suggests that LDET may indeed be active at the capillary fringe in situ.

  15. Spoilage of sous vide cooked salmon (Salmo salar) stored under refrigeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, P; Garrido, M D; Bañón, S

    2011-02-01

    The spoilage of Sous Vide 'SV' cooked salmon stored under refrigeration was studied. Samples were packaged under vacuum in polyamide-polypropylene pouches, cooked at an oven temperature/time of 80 (°)C/45 min, quickly chilled at 3 (°)C and stored at 2 (°)C for 0, 5 or 10 weeks for catering use. Microbial (aerobic and anaerobic psychrotrophs, lactic acid bacteria, molds and yeasts and Enterobacteriaceae), physical-chemical (pH, water activity, TBARS, acidity, L*a*b* color, texture profile analysis and shear force) and sensory (appearance, odor, flavor, texture and overall quality) parameters were determined. SV processing prevented the growth of aerobic and anaerobic psychrotrophs, lactic acid bacteria, molds and yeasts and Enterobacteriaceae. There were no relevant changes in pH, water activity, TBARS, CIELab color associated with cooked salmon spoilage. Instrumental texture data were contradictory. Slight decrease in lactic acid levels was found. In contrast, the SV cooked salmon suffered considerable sensory deterioration during its refrigerated storage, consisting of severe losses of cooked salmon odor and flavor, slight rancidity, discoloration associated with white precipitation, and moderates softness, and loss of chewiness and juiciness. No acidification, putrefaction or relevant rancidity was detected. The sensory spoilage preceded microbiological and physical-chemical spoilage, suggesting that microbiological quality alone may overestimate the shelf life of SV cooked salmon.

  16. Microbiological Spoilage of Canned Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evancho, George M.; Tortorelli, Suzanne; Scott, Virginia N.

    Nicolas Appert (1749-1841) developed the first commercial process that kept foods from spoiling in response to an offer from the French government for a method of preserving food for use by the army and navy. Appert, a confectioner and chef, began to experiment in his workshop in Massy, near Paris, but since little was known about bacteriology and the causes of spoilage (Louis Pasteur had yet to formulate the germ theory), much of his work involved trial and error. In 1810, after years of experimenting, he was awarded the prize of 12,000 francs for his method of preservation, which involved cooking foods in sealed jars at high temperatures. He described his method of preserving food in a book published in 1811, "L'Art De Conserver, Pendant Plusiers Annes, Toutes les Substances Animales et Végétales," which translated means "The Art of Preserving All Kinds of Animal and Vegetable Substances for Several Years." He later built a bottling factory and began to produce preserved foods for the people of France and is credited with being the "Father of Canning."

  17. Current strategies for improving food bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, O P; Buist, Girbe; Kok, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Novel concepts and methodologies are emerging that hold great promise for the directed improvement of food-related bacteria, specifically lactic acid bacteria. Also, the battle against food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria can now be fought more effectively. Here we describe recent advances in

  18. Modeling the electron transport chain of purple non-sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; Grammel, Hartmut; Straube, Ronny; Ghosh, Robin; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhodospirillaceae) have been extensively employed for studying principles of photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport phosphorylation and for investigating the regulation of gene expression in response to redox signals. Here, we use mathematical modeling to evaluate the steady-state behavior of the electron transport chain (ETC) in these bacteria under different environmental conditions. Elementary-modes analysis of a stoichiometric ETC model reveals nine operational modes. Most of them represent well-known functional states, however, two modes constitute reverse electron flow under respiratory conditions, which has been barely considered so far. We further present and analyze a kinetic model of the ETC in which rate laws of electron transfer steps are based on redox potential differences. Our model reproduces well-known phenomena of respiratory and photosynthetic operation of the ETC and also provides non-intuitive predictions. As one key result, model simulations demonstrate a stronger reduction of ubiquinone when switching from high-light to low-light conditions. This result is parameter insensitive and supports the hypothesis that the redox state of ubiquinone is a suitable signal for controlling photosynthetic gene expression.

  19. Differential Real-Time PCR Assay for Enumeration of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, Ezekiel T.; Phister, Trevor G.; Mills, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is often employed to perform the malolactic fermentation in wine production, while nonoenococcal lactic acid bacteria often contribute to wine spoilage. Two real-time PCR assays were developed to enumerate the total, and nonoenococcal, lactic acid bacterial populations in wine. Used together, these assays can assess the spoilage risk of juice or wine from lactic acid bacteria. PMID:16332898

  20. Seafood Spoilage Predictor - development and distribution of a product specific application software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Paw; Buch, P.; Silberg, Steen

    2002-01-01

    To allow shelf-life prediction of a range of products, the Seafood Spoilage Predictor (SSP) software has been developed to include both kinetic models for growth of specific spoilage microorganisms and empirical relative rates of spoilage models. SSP can read and evaluate temperature profile data...... of different formats and in this way the software is a flexible device for electronic time-temperature integration. Predicted values of microbial growth and of remaining product shelf life can be exported from SSP as graphs and tables in ASCII, HTML and eXtensible Mark-up Language (XML) formats and this allows...... SSP to be used in combination with other programmes. More than 300 people have downloaded SSP and distribution of this software from the internet has been efficient in stimulating the application of predictive microbiology and of mathematical seafood shelf-life models within industry, research...

  1. Bacteriophages againstSerratiaas Fish Spoilage Control Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Serratia , mainly S. proteamaculans and S. fonticola , are important spoilage agents in Atlantic horse mackerel ( Trachurus trachurus ). In order to evaluate whether bacteriophages against Serratia could delay the spoilage process, 11 viral strains active against this genus were isolated from food and best candidate was applied to fresh mackerel filets. All the phages belong to the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families and were active at multiplicity of infection (MOI) levels below 1:1 in Long & Hammer broth. The ability of phage AZT6 to control Serratia populations in real food was tested in Atlantic horse mackerel extract and applied to fresh mackerel filets. Treatment with high phage concentration (MOI 350:1, initial Serratia population 3.9 ± 0.3 Log cfu/g) can reduce the Serratia populations up to 90% during fish storage (a maximum of 6 days) at low temperatures (6°C). Bacterial inhibition was dependent on the bacteriophage dosage, and MOI of 10:1 or lower did not significantly affect the Serratia populations.

  2. In vitro comparison of epidural bacteria filters permeability and screening scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Aysin; Erkin, Yuksel; Sener, Alper; Tasdogen, Aydin; Dokumaci, Esra; Elar, Zahide

    2015-01-01

    Epidural catheter bacteria filters are barriers in the patient-controlled analgesia/anaesthesia for preventing contamination at the epidural insertion site. The efficiency of these filters varies according to pore sizes and materials. The bacterial adhesion capability of the two filters was measured in vitro experiment. Adhesion capacities for standard Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) strains of the two different filters (Portex and Rusch) which have the same pore size were examined. Bacterial suspension of 0.5 Mc Farland was placed in the patient-controlled analgesia pump, was filtered at a speed of 5 mL/h. in continuous infusion for 48 h and accumulated in bottle. The two filters were compared with colony counts of bacteria in the filters and bottles. At the same time, the filters and adhered bacteria were monitored by scanning electron microscope. Electron microscopic examination of filters showed that the Portex filter had a granular and the Rusch filter fibrillary structure. Colony counting from the catheter and bottle showed that both of the filters have significant bacterial adhesion capability (pbacteria suspension infusion, colony countings showed that the Portex filter was more efficient (pbacteria adhesion. In the SEM monitoring after the infusion, it was physically shown that the bacteria were adhered efficiently by both of the filters. The granular structured filter was found statistically and significantly more successful than the fibrial. Although the pore sizes of the filters were same - of which structural differences shown by SEM were the same - it would not be right to attribute the changes in the efficiencies to only structural differences. Using microbiological and physical proofs with regard to efficiency at the same time has been another important aspect of this experiment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Isolation and Identification of Spoilage Fungi Associated With Rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spoilage fungi isolated were Aspergillus species, Rhizopus, Penicilluim, Fusarium, Eurotium, Mucor, Geotrichum, Alternaria, Cladosporium and Actinomyces species. The predominant spoilage fungi in the grains were Aspergillus species. The populations of some spoilage fungi isolated from the grains were not high ...

  4. Modeling growth of specific spoilage organisms in tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-29

    Mar 29, 2012 ... Tilapia is an important aquatic fish, but severe spoilage of tilapia is most likely related to the global aquaculture. The spoilage is mostly caused by specific spoilage organisms (SSO). Therefore, it is very important to use microbial models to predict the growth of SSO in tilapia. This study firstly verified.

  5. Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises Specific to Food Spoilage Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Abigail B.; Worobo, Randy W.; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Food spoilage has an enormous economic impact, and microbial food spoilage plays a significant role in food waste and loss; subsequently, an equally significant portion of undergraduate food microbiology instruction should be dedicated to spoilage microbiology. Here, we describe a set of undergraduate microbiology laboratory exercises that focus…

  6. Modeling growth of specific spoilage organisms in tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tilapia is an important aquatic fish, but severe spoilage of tilapia is most likely related to the global aquaculture. The spoilage is mostly caused by specific spoilage organisms (SSO). Therefore, it is very important to use microbial models to predict the growth of SSO in tilapia. This study firstly verified Pseudomonas and Vibrio ...

  7. Modelling and predicting the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage micro-organisms in cold-smoked salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimenez, B.; Dalgaard, Paw

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate and model the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage micro-organisms in cold-smoked salmon.Methods and Results: Growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Enterobacteriaceae, enterococci and Photobacterium phosphoreum were determined in ...

  8. Bacterial diversity and spoilage-related microbiota associated with freshly prepared chicken products under aerobic conditions at 4°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rongrong; Yu, Xiaoqiao; Wang, Renhuan; Luo, Xin; Mao, Yanwei; Zhu, Lixian; Zhang, Yimin

    2012-06-01

    This study analyzed the bacterial diversity and spoilage-related microbiota associated with freshly prepared chicken products stored aerobically at 4°C, using "bone and chicken string," a product popular in the People's Republic of China, as the study subject. Samples collected from three different factories were tray packaged with cling film and stored at 4°C. Bacterial diversity and dominant bacteria were analyzed using PCR amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Combined with selective cultivation of the dominant bacteria and correlation analysis, the dominant spoilage microbiota was determined. The results showed that bacterial diversity varied with different manufacturers. Such bacteria as Acinetobacter sp., Carnobacterium sp., Rahnella sp., Pseudomonas sp., Brochothrix sp., and Weissella sp. were detected in freshly prepared chicken products during storage. And Carnobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Brochothrix sp. bacteria were the common dominant spoilage bacteria groups in most freshly prepared chicken products from different factories. Carnobacterium was, for the first time, shown to be an important contributor to the spoilage-related microflora of freshly prepared chicken products stored aerobically under refrigeration. Our work shows the bacterial diversity and dominant spoilage microbiota of freshly prepared chicken products stored aerobically under refrigeration.

  9. Effect of bacterial interactions on the spoilage of cold-smoked salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffraud, Jean-Jacques; Cardinal, Mireille; Cornet, Josiane; Chasles, Jean-Sébastien; Léon, Sandrine; Gigout, Frédérique; Leroi, Françoise

    2006-10-15

    Cold-smoked salmon is a lightly preserved fish product in which a mixed microbial flora develops during storage and where the interactive behaviour of micro-organisms may contribute to their growth and spoilage activity. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the bacterial interactions between the main species contaminating the cold-smoked salmon on bacterial growth, chemical and sensory changes, and spoilage. First, Carnobacterium piscicola, Photobacterium phosphoreum, Lactobacillus sakei, Vibrio sp., Brochothrix thermosphacta and Serratia liquefaciens-like were inoculated as pure cultures on sterile cold-smoked salmon. All bacterial species grew well; Vibrio sp. was the fastest and L. sakei strains developed very rapidly as well with a high maximum cell density on cold-smoked salmon blocks (up to 10(9) cfu g(-1) after 10 days at 8 degrees C). Based on sensory analysis, Vibrio sp. was identified as non-spoilage bacteria, C. piscicola as very lightly and B. thermosphacta as lightly spoiling. L. sakei and S. liquefaciens-like were found to be the most spoiling bacteria. Secondly, C. piscicola and L. sakei, two species frequently occurring in the lactic flora of the product, were inoculated together and each of them in mixed cultures with respectively P. phosphoreum, Vibrio sp., B. thermosphacta, and S. liquefaciens-like. The growth of L. sakei was shown to strongly inhibit most of the co-inoculated strains i.e. P. phosphoreum, B. thermosphacta, S. liquefaciens-like and, to a lesser extent, Vibrio sp. The growth of C. piscicola seemed to be enhanced with B. thermosphacta and to develop earlier with P. phosphoreum and Vibrio sp. Conversely, S. liquefaciens-like and P. phosphoreum were weakly inhibited by C. piscicola. The main observation resulting from the sensory evaluation was the delay in the appearance of the spoilage characteristics in the mixed cultures with L. sakei, in particular L. sakei/ S. liquefaciens-like. On the other hand, the spoilage

  10. Characterisation of the spoilage bacterial microbiota in oyster gills during storage at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huibin; Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Meiying; Chen, Shaojun; Chen, Tuanwei

    2013-12-01

    The spoilage bacterial community in oyster gill was investigated during storage at 4, 10 and 20 °C. Aerobic plate counts and pH values were determined. Total bacterial DNA was extracted from oyster gill and bulk cells of plate count media. The major bacterial species during fresh or different temperatures storage were determined by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The initial aerobic plate count in oyster gill reached 6.70 log CFU g(-1). PCR-DGGE fingerprinting analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region revealed that most of the strains in fresh oyster gill belonged to the genera Lactococcus and Enterobacter. The major spoilage bacteria at a storage temperature of 20 °C were Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, an uncultured bacterium, Cytophaga fermentans, Lactococcus lactis, Pseudoalteromonas sp., Enterococcus mundtii, Clostridium difficile and an uncultured Fusobacteria; those at 10 °C were Lactococcus spp., Lactobacillus curvatus, Weissella confusa and C. difficile; those at 4 °C were Lactococcus, Weissella, Enterobacter and Aeromonas. The other minor species were L. curvatus, Pseudomonas sp. and E. mundtii. Lactococcus spp. was the most common main spoilage bacteria in oyster gill during chilled storage. PCR-DGGE revealed the complexity of the bacterial microbiota and the major bacteria species in oyster gill for fresh and storage. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Single-Cell Resolution of Uncultured Magnetotactic Bacteria via Fluorescence-Coupled Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Heng; Menguy, Nicolas; Benzerara, Karim; Wang, Fuxian; Lin, Xiaoting; Chen, Zhibao; Pan, Yongxin

    2017-06-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) form intracellular chain-assembled nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite termed magnetosomes. The characterization of magnetosome crystals requires electron microscopy due to their nanoscopic sizes. However, electron microscopy does not provide phylogenetic information for MTB. We have developed a strategy for the simultaneous and rapid phylogenetic and biomineralogical characterization of uncultured MTB at the single-cell level. It consists of four steps: (i) enrichment of MTB cells from an environmental sample, (ii) 16S rRNA gene sequencing of MTB, and (iii) fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses coordinated with (iv) transmission or scanning electron microscopy of the probe-hybridized cells. The application of this strategy identified a magnetotactic Gammaproteobacteria strain, SHHR-1, from brackish sediments collected from the Shihe River estuary in Qinhuangdao City, China. SHHR-1 magnetosomes are elongated prismatic magnetites which can be idealized as hexagonal prisms. Taxonomic groups of uncultured MTB were also identified in freshwater sediments from Lake Miyun in northern Beijing via this novel coordinated fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy method based on four group-specific rRNA-targeted probes. Our analyses revealed that major magnetotactic taxonomic groups can be accurately determined only with coordinated scanning electron microscopy observations on fluorescently labeled single cells due to limited group coverage and specificity for existing group-specific MTB fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our reported strategy is simple and efficient, offers great promise toward investigating the diversity and biomineralization of MTB, and may also be applied to other functional groups of microorganisms. IMPORTANCE Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are phylogenetically diverse and biomineralize morphologically diverse magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite in intracellular structures termed

  12. Effects of gamma ray and electron-beam irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Michiko; Miyahara, Makoto [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    An extension of the approval for food irradiation is desired due to the increase in the incidence of food poisoning in the world. One anaerobic (Clostridium perfringens) and four facultatively anaerobic (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis) bacteria irradiated with gamma ray or electron beam (E-beam) were tested in terms of survival on agar under packaging atmosphere. Using pouch pack, effects of two irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria were evaluated comparatively. E-beam irradiation was more effective than gamma ray irradiation in decreasing the lethal dose 10% (D{sub 10}) value of B. cereus at 4 deg C, slightly more effective in that of E. coli O157, and similarly effective in that of the other three bacteria at 4 deg C. The gamma irradiation of the bacteria without incubation at 4 deg C before irradiation was more effective than that of the bacteria with incubation overnight at 4 deg C before irradiation in decreasing the D10 values of these bacteria (B. cereus, E. coli O157, and L. monocytogenes). Furthermore, ground beef patties inoculated with bacteria were irradiated with 1 kGy by E-beam (5 MeV) at 4 deg C. The inoculated bacteria in the 1-9 mm beef patties were killed by 1 kGy E-beam irradiation and some bacteria in more than 9 mm beef patties were not killed by the irradiation. (author)

  13. Effects of gamma ray and electron-beam irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Michiko; Miyahara, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    An extension of the approval for food irradiation is desired due to the increase in the incidence of food poisoning in the world. One anaerobic (Clostridium perfringens) and four facultatively anaerobic (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis) bacteria irradiated with gamma ray or electron beam (E-beam) were tested in terms of survival on agar under packaging atmosphere. Using pouch pack, effects of two irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria were evaluated comparatively. E-beam irradiation was more effective than gamma ray irradiation in decreasing the D10 value of B. cereus at 4 degrees C, slightly more effective in that of E. coli O157, and similarly effective in that of the other three bacteria at 4 degrees C. The gamma irradiation of the bacteria without incubation at 4 degrees C before irradiation was more effective than that of the bacteria with incubation overnight at 4 degrees C before irradiation in decreasing the D10 values of these bacteria (B. cereus, E. coli O157, and L. monocytogenes). Furthermore, ground beef patties inoculated with bacteria were irradiated with 1 kGy by E-beam (5 MeV) at 4 degrees C. The inoculated bacteria in the 1-9 mm beef patties were killed by 1 kGy E-beam irradiation and some bacteria in more than 9 mm beef patties were not killed by the irradiation.

  14. Chemotaxonomy of bacteria by comprehensive GC and GC-MS in electron impact and chemical ionisation mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Frank; Tienpont, Bart; Sandra, Pat

    2008-10-01

    The analysis of the cellular lipidic fraction of bacteria is described. After hydrolysis and methylation, the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) are determined by 1-D GC using the Sherlock MIDI bacteria identification system, by comprehensive GC (GC x GC) and by GC-MS in electron impact (EI) and positive chemical ionisation (PCI) mode. With GC x GC, the enhanced selectivity and group type separation provides a more complete elucidation of the fatty acids in microorganisms. GC-EI-MS and GC-PCI-MS were helpful for confirmation. The bacteria selected in this study are Brevundimonas diminuta, Chryseobacterium gleum and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

  15. Detection and quantification of bacterial spoilage in milk and pork meat using MALDI-TOF-MS and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Nicoletta; Xu, Yun; Goodacre, Royston

    2012-07-17

    Microbiological safety is one of the cornerstones of quality control in the food industry. Identification and quantification of spoilage bacteria in pasteurized milk and meat in the food industry currently relies on accurate and sensitive yet time-consuming techniques which give retrospective values for microbial contamination. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), a proven technique in the field of protein and peptide identification and quantification, may be a valuable alternative approach for the rapid assessment of microbial spoilage. In this work we therefore developed MALDI-TOF-MS as a novel analytical approach for the assessment of food that when combined with chemometrics allows for the detection and quantification of milk and pork meat spoilage bacteria. To develop this approach, natural spoilage of pasteurized milk and raw pork meat samples incubated at 15 °C and at room temperature, respectively, was conducted. Samples were collected for MALDI-TOF-MS analysis (which took 4 min per sample) at regular time intervals throughout the spoilage process, with concurrent calculation and documentation of reference total viable counts using traditional microbiological methods (these took 2 days). Multivariate statistical techniques such as principal component discriminant function analysis, canonical correlation analysis, partial least-squares (PLS) regression, and kernel PLS (KPLS) were used to analyze the data. The results from MALDI-TOF-MS combined with PLS or KPLS gave excellent bacterial quantification results for both milk and meat spoilage, and typical root mean squared errors for prediction in test spectra were between 0.53 and 0.79 log unit. Overall these novel findings strongly indicate that MALDI-TOF-MS when combined with chemometric approaches would be a useful adjunct for routine use in the milk and meat industry as a fast and accurate viable bacterial detection and quantification method.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus against pathogenic and food spoilage microorganisms: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dinev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The purpose of this review is to summarize the information regarding the antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus, an important species of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria are constituents of many beneficent for the consumer's health food products. They are considered potentially promising in the strategy to combat infections and prevent the growth of spoilage microorganisms, and also have antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, hypolipidemic and hypocholesterolemic properties, improve the lactose metabolism, stimulate the immune system, etc. In the resent years Lactobacillus acidophilus is considered the main probiotic species in the intestinal tract of healthy humans and is widely used in functional dairy foods. It produces a variety of metabolic products with antimicrobial properties, including organic acids and bacteriocins, such as lactacins B and F, acidophilin, acidocin, acidophilucin, acidophilicin, which are active against many pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms - Escherichia coli (including Escherichi coli 0157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholerae, Helicobacter pylori, Klebsiella, Salmonella, Shigella, Bacillus, Clostridium, Mucor, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Trichoderma and Candida spp., etc. Because of the above mentioned reasons Lactobacillus acidophilus could be used as an alternative therapeutic agent against infections caused by susceptible microorganisms. On the other hand Lactobacillus acidophilus based antimicrobial products (mainly bacteriocins and pure cultures could also be applied to food products to prevent the growth of spoilage microorganisms and food-borne pathogens. To better understand the mode of action and the spectrum of antifungal activity more clinical and laboratory studies of different Lactobacillus acidophilus strains are required.

  17. Can spoilage bacteria cause blackspot (melanosis) in stored prawns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinivasagam, H.N.; Bremner, Allan; Reeves, R.

    1998-01-01

    Several isolates of Pseudomonas fragi can metabolize tyrosine to produce a red-brown colour within 8-10 days when incubated (5 degrees C) in artificial media. It is possible that bacterial production of melanin occurs on stored prawns.......Several isolates of Pseudomonas fragi can metabolize tyrosine to produce a red-brown colour within 8-10 days when incubated (5 degrees C) in artificial media. It is possible that bacterial production of melanin occurs on stored prawns....

  18. Effects of dietary rosemary extract on lamb spoilage under retail display conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañón, Sancho; Méndez, Lorena; Almela, Elisabet

    2012-03-01

    A dietary rosemary extract (RE) was tested to extend the shelf life of raw lamb meat. Lambs were supplemented with 0.6mgkg(-1) RE during fattening (from 13 to 25kg live weight). Meat spoilage (total viable counts, psycrophilic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, molds and yeasts), TBARS, CIE L*a*b* color and the sensory traits of lamb cuts were analyzed on days 0, 7, 14 or 21 under retail display conditions (70/30 O(2)/CO(2) atmosphere, 2°C temperature and 1600lx lighting). Supplementation of the lamb diet with RE was effective (Pretail display conditions. Dietary rosemary clearly inhibited lipid oxidation and rancidity, and was moderately efficient in preventing sensory deterioration and microbial spoilage. Although the results concerning meat preservation were limited, the dietary use of rosemary extracts in lambs seems to be promising as a nutritional strategy for improving meat quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Xanthine oxidase biosensor for monitoring meat spoilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Gomes, C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have designed an electrochemical biosensor for real-time detection of specific biomarkers of bacterial metabolism related to meat spoilage (hypoxanthine and xanthine). The selective biosensor was developed by assembling a `sandwich' of nanomaterials and enzymes on a platinum-iridium electrode (1.6 mm tip diameter). The materials deposited on the sensor tip include amorphous platinum nanoclusters (i.e. Pt black), reduced graphene oxide, nanoceria, and xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase was encapsulated in laponite hydrogel and used for the biorecognition of hypoxanthine and xanthine (two molecules involved in the rotting of meat by spoilage microorganisms). The developed biosensor demonstrated good electrochemical performance toward xanthine with sensitivity of 2.14 +/- 1.48 μA/mM, response time of 5.2 +/- 1.5 sec, lower detection limit of 150 +/- 39 nM, and retained at least 88% of its activity after 7 days of continuous use.

  20. Spoilage-related microbiota associated with chilled beef stored in air or vacuum pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchia, C; Ercolini, D; Villani, F

    2011-02-01

    In order to study the spoilage-related microbiota of beef at species level, a combination of culture-independent and culture-dependent methods was used to analyse nine different beef samples stored at 4°C in air or in vacuum pack. Plate counts on selective agars after 0, 7 and 20 days of storage showed that vacuum packaging reduced the viable counts of Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae, whereas the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was unaffected. Storage in vacuum pack mainly affected viable counts and not necessarily the species diversity of microbial populations on meat. Such populations were studied by PCR-DGGE of DNA directly extracted from meat and from bulk cells from culture media, followed by sequencing of DGGE fragments. Pseudomonas spp., Carnobacterium divergens, B. thermosphacta, Rahnella spp. and Serratia grimesii, or close relatives were detected in the meat at time zero. The use of the culture-independent method highlighted the occurrence of species that were not detected by plating. Photobacterium spp. occurred in most meat samples stored in air or in vacuum pack, which indicates this organism probably has a role in spoilage. In contrast, culture-dependent analysis allowed detection of bacterial species that were not found in DNA extracted directly from meat. This was the case for several species of Serratia or Rhanella among the enterobacteria, and Leuconostoc spp. among the LAB. Besides advancing our knowledge of the species involved in the spoilage of vacuum-packaged meat, this study shows the benefits of combining culture-based and direct approaches to enhance understanding of populations of spoilage bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-distance electron transport by cable bacteria in mangrove sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burdorf, L.D.; Hidalgo-Martinez, S.; Cook, P.L.M.C.; Meysman, F.

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are long, filamentoussulphur-oxidizing bacteria that induce long-distanceelectron transport in aquatic sediments. They turnthe seafloor into an electro-active environment, characterizedby currents and electrical fields, and whenpresent, they exert a strong impact on the

  2. Mtr Extracellular Electron Transfer Pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing Bacteria: A Genomic Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-12-01

    Originally discovered in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), the Mtr (i.e., metal-reducing) pathway exists in all characterized strains of metal-reducing Shewanella. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway of MR-1 include four multi-heme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts), CymA, MtrA, MtrC and OmcA, and a porin-like, outer membrane protein MtrB. They are strategically positioned along the width of the MR-1 cell envelope to mediate electron transfer from the quinone/quinol pool in the inner-membrane to the Fe(III)-containing minerals external to the bacterial cells. A survey of microbial genomes revealed homologues of the Mtr pathway in other dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Ferrimonas balearica and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, and in the Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Dechloromonas aromatica RCB, Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2 and Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1. The widespread distribution of Mtr pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria emphasizes the importance of this type of extracellular electron transfer pathway in microbial redox transformation of Fe. Their distribution in these two different functional groups of bacteria also emphasizes the bi-directional nature of electron transfer reactions carried out by the Mtr pathways. The characteristics of the Mtr pathways may be shared by other pathways used by microorganisms for exchanging electrons with their extracellular environments.

  3. Evaluation of spoilage potential and volatile metabolites production by Shewanella baltica isolated from modified atmosphere packaged live mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeyemi, Olumide A; Burke, Christopher M; Bolch, Christopher J S; Stanley, Roger

    2018-01-01

    Under the current commercial practice, live mussels only have 10days' shelf-life. Observed spoilage indices reduce consumers' acceptance, palatability and shelf-life of modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) live mussels. The aims of this study are to isolate specific spoilage bacteria from modified atmosphere packaged live mussels, evaluate isolates for microbial spoilage indices using qualitative methods and volatile metabolites production. Forty-six hydrogen sulphide producing bacteria were isolated and evaluated for trimethylamine n-oxide (TMAO) reduction, proteolytic and lipolytic activities and hydrogen sulphide production. Twenty-eight isolates were obtained from pouch water and 18 from mussel meat. All the isolates could produce H 2 S on Iron agar at 25°C while 30/46 produced H 2 S at 4°C and tolerate 0-6% NaCl. Four (4/46) isolates could not hydrolyse mussel protein. Over 80% isolates reduced TMAO to TMA in 3days with the production of H 2 S. Results of this study shows hydrogen sulphide producing bacteria isolated from MAP live mussels produce microbial spoilage indices. Isolate with highest enzymatic activities and hydrogen sulphide production was identified as Shewanella baltica using 16S rRNA gene. Axenic culture of the isolate was inoculated into sterile mussel broth. Inoculated sample was further stored at 4°C for 10days for spoilage study. Volatile metabolites produced during storage were evaluated using headspace solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME GC/MS). A total of 44 compounds were identified in the sample after 10days while 27 compounds were identified in inoculated mussel broth. Group of compounds identified are alcohols, aldehydes, phenol, furans, ketone, esters, organic acid, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkanes, nitrogen and sulphur containing compounds. Dimethyl trisulphide, methyl-phenol, 3,5-octadiene and thiohexene were unique to inoculated mussel broth. Understanding spoilage mechanism and attendant

  4. Single-cell analysis of uncultured magnetotactic bacteria via fluorescence-coupled electron microscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, J.; Zhang, H.; Liu, P.; Menguy, N.; Pan, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are phylogenetically diverse and can biomineralize magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite in intracellular structures termed magnetosomes. Their remains within sediments or sedimentary rocks, i.e. magnetofossils, have been used to retrieve paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental information of deposition time, as well as to trace the origin and evolution of life on Earth and even perhaps Mars. A precise identification of magnetofossils heavily depends on our knowledge of phylogenetic diversity and magnetosomal biomineralization within natural MTB. In this paper, we will present a novel method which can rapidly characterize both the phylogenetic and biomineralogical properties of uncultured MTB at the single-cell level by coupling fluorescence and electron microscopy. Using this method, we have successfully identified several uncultured MTB strains from natural environments in China. These MTB are phylogenetically affiliated with the Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Nitrospirae phylum, and form octahedral, cuboctahedral, prismatic, tooth-like and bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes. A corresponding analysis of magnetosome morphology and bacterial phylogenetics on each MTB strain has shown a species/strain-specific magnetosome biomineralization. The new method is not only promising for better understanding the correlation between magnetosome mineral habits and MTB phylogenies, but also crucial for unambiguously identifying magnetofossils.

  5. Electron Microscopic Evidence for Linear Insertion of Bacteriophage MU-1 in Lysogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martuscelli, J.; Taylor, A. L.; Cummings, D. J.; Chapman, V. A.; DeLong, S. S.; Cañedo, L.

    1971-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophage Mu-1 was used to generate a lysogenic derivative of the F′lac episome of Escherichia coli. Intact, covalently circular molecules of F′lac and lysogenic F′lac Mu+ deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were isolated and examined by electron microscopy. The mean contour lengths of F′lac and F′lac Mu+ molecules were 37.6 ± 0.4 μm and 53.2 ± 0.4 μm, respectively. The mean difference, 15.6 μm, is similar to the mean contour length of 12.9 ± 0.1 μm obtained for linear DNA molecules released by osmotic shock from mature phage Mu-1 virions. These results provide direct physical evidence that phage Mu-1 integrates by linear insertion of its genome into the DNA of lysogenic host bacteria. Chemical and physical analyses of phage Mu-1 DNA indicate that it is similar to E. coli DNA in respect of gross base composition, buoyant density, and melting temperature. Images PMID:4943078

  6. Preventing spoilage of poultry meat: focus on spoilage microorganisms and their control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The shelf-life of fresh poultry meat is determined by the level of contamination of processed meat by spoilage microorganisms, storage temperature and storage atmosphere. This chapter looks at the various ways by which to extend the shelf-life of poultry meat: vacuum and modified atmosphere packagin...

  7. Mycology and spoilage of retail cashew nuts | Adebajo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the species recovered induced detectable loss in weights of the milled nuts, though to varying extents and would be expected to cause considerable spoilage of the nuts. Key words: Cashew nut, Anacardium occidentale, fungal count, mycology, Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., spoilage. African Journal of Biotechnology ...

  8. Stress tolerance in fungi - to kill a spoilage yeast.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, G.J.; Brul, S.

    2005-01-01

    The fungal spoilage of ingredients of food manufacture is an economic problem, often causes product loss and may constitute a health hazard. To effectively combat fungal food spoilage, a mechanistic understanding of tolerance for, and adaptation to, the preservation method used is crucial. Both are

  9. The Biodiversity of the Microbiota Producing Heat-Resistant Enzymes Responsible for Spoilage in Processed Bovine Milk and Dairy Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Solimar G.; Baglinière, François; Marchand, Sophie; Van Coillie, Els; Vanetti, Maria C. D.; De Block, Jan; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Raw bovine milk is highly nutritious as well as pH-neutral, providing the ideal conditions for microbial growth. The microbiota of raw milk is diverse and originates from several sources of contamination including the external udder surface, milking equipment, air, water, feed, grass, feces, and soil. Many bacterial and fungal species can be found in raw milk. The autochthonous microbiota of raw milk immediately after milking generally comprises lactic acid bacteria such as Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Leuconostoc species, which are technologically important for the dairy industry, although they do occasionally cause spoilage of dairy products. Differences in milking practices and storage conditions on each continent, country and region result in variable microbial population structures in raw milk. Raw milk is usually stored at cold temperatures, e.g., about 4°C before processing to reduce the growth of most bacteria. However, psychrotrophic bacteria can proliferate and contribute to spoilage of ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated and sterilized milk and other dairy products with a long shelf life due to their ability to produce extracellular heat resistant enzymes such as peptidases and lipases. Worldwide, species of Pseudomonas, with the ability to produce these spoilage enzymes, are the most common contaminants isolated from cold raw milk although other genera such as Serratia are also reported as important milk spoilers, while for others more research is needed on the heat resistance of the spoilage enzymes produced. The residual activity of extracellular enzymes after high heat treatment may lead to technological problems (off flavors, physico-chemical instability) during the shelf life of milk and dairy products. This review covers the contamination patterns of cold raw milk in several parts of the world, the growth potential of psychrotrophic bacteria, their ability to produce extracellular heat-resistant enzymes and the consequences for

  10. The Biodiversity of the Microbiota Producing Heat-Resistant Enzymes Responsible for Spoilage in Processed Bovine Milk and Dairy Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Solimar G; Baglinière, François; Marchand, Sophie; Van Coillie, Els; Vanetti, Maria C D; De Block, Jan; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Raw bovine milk is highly nutritious as well as pH-neutral, providing the ideal conditions for microbial growth. The microbiota of raw milk is diverse and originates from several sources of contamination including the external udder surface, milking equipment, air, water, feed, grass, feces, and soil. Many bacterial and fungal species can be found in raw milk. The autochthonous microbiota of raw milk immediately after milking generally comprises lactic acid bacteria such as Lactococcus , Lactobacillus , Streptococcus , and Leuconostoc species, which are technologically important for the dairy industry, although they do occasionally cause spoilage of dairy products. Differences in milking practices and storage conditions on each continent, country and region result in variable microbial population structures in raw milk. Raw milk is usually stored at cold temperatures, e.g., about 4°C before processing to reduce the growth of most bacteria. However, psychrotrophic bacteria can proliferate and contribute to spoilage of ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated and sterilized milk and other dairy products with a long shelf life due to their ability to produce extracellular heat resistant enzymes such as peptidases and lipases. Worldwide, species of Pseudomonas , with the ability to produce these spoilage enzymes, are the most common contaminants isolated from cold raw milk although other genera such as Serratia are also reported as important milk spoilers, while for others more research is needed on the heat resistance of the spoilage enzymes produced. The residual activity of extracellular enzymes after high heat treatment may lead to technological problems (off flavors, physico-chemical instability) during the shelf life of milk and dairy products. This review covers the contamination patterns of cold raw milk in several parts of the world, the growth potential of psychrotrophic bacteria, their ability to produce extracellular heat-resistant enzymes and the consequences

  11. Role of Plasmids in Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 Hop Tolerance and Beer Spoilage

    OpenAIRE

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Baecker, Nina; Pittet, Vanessa; Ziola, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Specific isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can grow in the harsh beer environment, thus posing a threat to brew quality and the economic success of breweries worldwide. Plasmid-localized genes, such as horA, horC, and hitA, have been suggested to confer hop tolerance, a trait required for LAB survival in beer. The presence and expression of these genes among LAB, however, do not universally correlate with the ability to grow in beer. Genome sequencing of the virulent beer spoilage organi...

  12. Recall costs balanced against spoilage control in Dutch custard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, A G J; Reij, M W; Baritakis, K; Dang, M; van Wagenberg, C P A

    2010-06-01

    The relation between the moment at which a recall of Dutch custard is initiated and the direct costs of this recall was investigated. A simulation model of the custard supply chain was developed to compare scenarios with and without a quarantine of 48 h at the storage of the production plant. The model consists of 3 parts: 1) the distribution of a 24,000-L batch of custard over the supply chain over time is simulated; 2) the time to detect spoilage bacteria with a recontamination test procedure is simulated; and 3) the direct recall costs of custard over the different parts of the supply chain are calculated. Direct recall costs increase from about 25,000 euros/batch to 36,171 euros/batch from 57 to 135 h in the situation without quarantine and from 25,000 euros/batch to 36,648 euros/batch from 123 h to 163 h for the situation with quarantine. Then costs decrease because more and more custard is at the consumer level and only 0.13% of the consumers will ask for a refund. With low true contamination probabilities quarantine is not profitable, but at later detection moments with high probabilities it is. We conclude that a simulation model is a helpful tool to evaluate the efficiency of risk management strategies like end product testing and a quarantine situation. 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Species-Level Discrimination of Psychrotrophic Pathogenic and Spoilage Gram-Negative Raw Milk Isolates Using a Combined MALDI-TOF MS Proteomics-Bioinformatics-based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithanage, Nuwan R; Bhongir, Jeevana; Jadhav, Snehal R; Ranadheera, Chaminda S; Palombo, Enzo A; Yeager, Thomas R; Datta, Nivedita

    2017-06-02

    Identification of psychrotrophic pathogenic and spoilage Gram-negative bacteria using rapid and reliable techniques is important in commercial milk processing, as these bacteria can produce heat-resistant proteases and act as postprocessing contaminants in pasteurized milk. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a proven technology for identification of bacteria in food, however, may require optimization for identification of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria in milk and dairy products. The current study evaluated the effects of various culture conditions and sample preparation methods on assigning of raw milk isolates to the species level by MALDI-TOF MS. The results indicated that culture media, incubation conditions (temperature and time), and sample preparation significantly affected the identification rates of bacteria to the species level. Nevertheless, the development of spectral libraries of isolates grown on different media using a web tool for hierarchical clustering of peptide mass spectra (SPECLUST) followed by a ribosomal protein based bioinformatics approach significantly enhanced the assigning of bacteria, with at least one unique candidate biomarker peak identified for each species. Phyloproteomic relationships based on spectral profiles were compared to phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences and demonstrated similar clustering patterns with significant discriminatory power. Thus, with appropriate optimization, MALDI-TOF MS is a valuable tool for species-level discrimination of pathogenic and milk spoilage bacteria.

  14. Photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria from spoiled raw chicken carcasses in aqueous suspensions by TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial spoilage is a major cause of reduced shelf life of fresh poultry; therefore, decreasing contamination by spoilage bacteria could increase the shelf life of these products. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in the presence of UVA light possess antibacterial activities towards several ba...

  15. Non-destructive detection of fish spoilage using a wireless basic volatile sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Sharmistha; Narvaez, Claudia; Thomson, Douglas J; Bridges, Greg E

    2015-03-01

    A hydrogel-pH-electrode based near-field passive volatile sensor is described for real-time monitoring of fish spoilage. The sensor employs a varactor-based LC resonator that can be interrogated remotely using inductive coupling. The sensor's resonant frequency varies in response to the basic volatile spoilage compounds (total volatile basic nitrogen, TVB-N) in the headspace of packaged fish. The sensor is shown to have a linear response to logarithm of the ammonia gas concentration with a detection limit of 0.001 mg L(-1) (1.5 ppm). Trials on tilapia at 24 °C and 4 °C, employing direct comparison of sensor measurements with microbial analysis, indicate that the sensor response is correlated with the bacterial growth pattern in fish samples. It is shown that the sensor can distinctly identify when the product rejection level (10(7) cfu g(-1) bacterial population) occurs for both 24 °C and 4 °C storage conditions. This demonstrates a potential for real-time monitoring of fish spoilage. The wireless sensor is suited to embedding in packaging material and does not require an integrated circuit, making it amenable to inexpensive mass production using printed electronic technology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolism of Fructophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from the Apis mellifera L. Bee Gut: Phenolic Acids as External Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Addante, Rocco; Pontonio, Erica; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) are strongly associated with the gastrointestinal tracts (GITs) of Apis mellifera L. worker bees due to the consumption of fructose as a major carbohydrate. Seventy-seven presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from GITs of healthy A. mellifera L. adults, which were collected from 5 different geographical locations of the Apulia region of Italy. Almost all of the isolates showed fructophilic tendencies: these isolates were identified as Lactobacillus kunkeei (69%) or Fructobacillus fructosus (31%). A high-throughput phenotypic microarray targeting 190 carbon sources was used to determine that 83 compounds were differentially consumed. Phenotyping grouped the strains into two clusters, reflecting growth performance. The utilization of phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric, caffeic, syringic, or gallic acids, as electron acceptors was investigated in fructose-based medium. Almost all FLAB strains showed tolerance to high phenolic acid concentrations. p-Coumaric acid and caffeic acid were consumed by all FLAB strains through reductases or decarboxylases. Syringic and gallic acids were partially metabolized. The data collected suggest that FLAB require external electron acceptors to regenerate NADH. The use of phenolic acids as external electron acceptors by the 4 FLAB showing the highest phenolic acid reductase activity was investigated in glucose-based medium supplemented with p-coumaric acid. Metabolic responses observed through a phenotypic microarray suggested that FLAB may use p-coumaric acid as an external electron acceptor, enhancing glucose dissimilation but less efficiently than other external acceptors such as fructose or pyruvic acid. IMPORTANCE Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) remain to be fully explored. This study intends to link unique biochemical features of FLAB with their habitat. The quite unique FLAB phenome within the group lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may have practical relevance

  17. introduction aerobic mesophilic bacteria associated with irish potato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    faecalis showed inhibitory activity due to the effect of organic acid against Erwinia sp. and Bacillus sp. (A ). The. 1 results indicated the high prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains associated with the spoilage of Irish potato. Key words: Irish Potato, Aerobic Mesophilic Bacteria, Antimicrobial Agents, Lactic Acid Bacteria,.

  18. Fungal inhibitory lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Ström, Katrin

    2005-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are microorganisms that have been used for centuries to prepare and improve storage of food and for ensiling of different crops for animal feed. This thesis explores the possibility of using LAB to inhibit growth of spoilage fungi in food and feed products. LAB isolates, collected from plant material or dairy products, were screened for antifungal activity in a dual culture assay. Strains with antifungal activity were identified and the fungal inhibitory activity wa...

  19. Testing commercial biopreservative against spoilage microorganisms in MAP packed Ricotta fresca cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, C; Scarano, C; Piras, F; Spanu, V; Pala, C; Casti, D; Lamon, S; Cossu, F; Ibba, M; Nieddu, G; De Santis, E P L

    2017-09-01

    Ricotta fresca cheese is susceptible to secondary contamination and is able to support the growth of pathogens or spoilage psychotrophic bacteria during storage. The aim of the present study was to evaluate which among three commercial biopreservatives was suitable to be used to control the growth of spoilage microorganisms in sheep's milk MAP ricotta fresca cheese. 144 Ricotta fresca cheese samples were inoculated either with the bioprotective culture Lyofast FPR 2 (including Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus plantarum e Lactobacillus rhamnosus) or Lyofast CNBAL (Carnobacterium spp) or the fermentate MicroGARD 430. Not inoculated control and experimental ricotta were MAP packed (30% CO 2 and 70% N 2 ) and stored at 4 °C. Triplicate samples were analyzed after 5 h and 7, 14 and 21 days after inoculation for total bacterial count, mesophilic lactic acid bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp, Listeria monocytogenes, moulds and yeasts. Among the tested biopreservatives only Carnobacterium spp was able to control Pseudomonas spp and Enterobacteriaceae. The maximum reduction in the concentration of Pseudomonas spp and Enterobacteriaceae was respectively 1.93 and 2.66 log 10  cfu/g, observed 14 days after production. Therefore, Carnobacterium spp was selected as the culture of choice to conduct a challenge study against Pseudomonas spp. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Microbiological Spoilage of Spices, Nuts, Cocoa, and Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkas, Joan M.; Battista, Karen; Morille-Hinds, Theodora

    Spices, nuts, cocoa, and coffee are raw materials that may be used alone or as ingredients in the manufacture of processed food products. The control of microbiological spoilage of these raw materials at the ingredient stage will enable the food processor to better assure the production of high-quality foods with an acceptable shelf life. While this chapter is limited to four materials, many of the spoilage control procedures recommended can also be applied to other raw materials of a similar nature.

  1. Exploring the use of natural antimicrobial agents and pulsed electric fields to control spoilage bacteria during a beer production process Exploración del uso de agentes antimicrobianos naturales y de campos eléctricos pulsantes para el control de bacterias contaminantes durante el proceso de elaboración de cerveza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Galvagno

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Different natural antimicrobials affected viability of bacterial contaminants isolated at critical steps during a beer production process. In the presence of 1 mg/ml chitosan and 0.3 mg/ml hops, the viability of Escherichia coli in an all malt barley extract wort could be reduced to 0.7 and 0.1% respectively after 2 hour- incubation at 4 °C. The addition of 0.0002 mg/ml nisin, 0.1 mg/ml chitosan or 0.3 mg/ml hops, selectively inhibited growth of Pediococcus sp. in more than 10,000 times with respect to brewing yeast in a mixed culture. In the presence of 0.1mg ml chitosan in beer, no viable cells of the thermoresistant strain Bacillus megaterium were detected. Nisin, chitosan and hops increased microbiological stability during storage of a local commercial beer inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum or Pediococcus sp. isolated from wort. Pulsed Electric Field (PEF (8 kV/cm, 3 pulses application enhanced antibacterial activity of nisin and hops but not that of chitosan. The results herein obtained suggest that the use of these antimicrobial compounds in isolation or in combination with PEF would be effective to control bacterial contamination during beer production and storage.Diferentes antimicrobianos naturales disminuyeron la viabilidad de bacterias contaminantes aisladas en etapas críticas del proceso de producción de cerveza. En un extracto de malta, el agregado de 1 mg/ml de quitosano y de 0,3 mg ml de lúpulo permitió reducir la viabilidad de Escherichia coli a 0,7 y 0,1%, respectivamente, al cabo de 2 horas de incubación a 4 °C. El agregado de 0,0002 mg/ml de nisina, 0,1 mg/ml de quitosano o de 0,3 mg/ml de lúpulo inhibió selectivamente (10.000 veces más el crecimiento de Pediococcus sp. respecto de la levadura de cerveza en un cultivo mixto. El agregado de 0,1 mg/ml de quitosano permitió disminuir la viabilidad de una cepa bacteriana termorresistente, Bacillus megaterium, hasta niveles no detectables. Por otra parte, el

  2. Evaluation of the role of Carnobacterium piscicola in spoilage of vacuum- and modified-atmosphere-packed cold-smoked salmon stored at 5 degrees C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Müller, Christine; Dalgaard, Paw; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    The microflora on spoiled cold-smoked salmon often consists of a mixture of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and Gram-negative bacteria. To elucidate the role of the different groups, a storage trial was carried out in which nisin and CO2 were used for the selective inhibition of the two bacterial groups...... piscicola, which was found to account for 87% of the 255 LAB isolates characterized. Whole-cell-protein patterns analysed by SDS-PAGE confirmed the Carnobacterium species identification. The spoilage potential of C. piscicola isolates was further studied by inoculation of approx. 10(6) cfu/g in cold......, rancid and bitter off-flavours at the point of spoilage, irrespective of the length of shelf-life and low or high total counts of LAB and Gram-negative bacteria. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V...

  3. Fungal volatiles as indicators of food and feeds spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnürer, J; Olsson, J; Börjesson, T

    1999-01-01

    Fungal growth leads to spoilage of food and animal feeds and to formation of mycotoxins and potentially allergenic spores. Fungi produce volatile compounds, during both primary and secondary metabolism, which can be used for detection and identification. Fungal volatiles from mainly Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium have been characterized with gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and sensory analysis. Common volatiles are 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 3-methylfuran, ethyl acetate, and the malodorous 2-methyl-isoborneol and geosmin. Volatile sesquiterpenes can be used for taxonomic classification and species identification in Penicillium, as well as to indicate mycotoxin formation in Fusarium and Aspergillus. Developments in sensor technology have led to the construction of "electronic noses" (volatile compound mappers). Exposure of different nonspecific sensors to volatile compounds produces characteristic electrical signals. These are collected by a computer and processed by multivariate statistical methods or in an artificial neural network (ANN). Such systems can grade cereal grain with regard to presence of molds as efficiently as sensory panels evaluating grain odor. Volatile compound mapping can also be used to predict levels of ergosterol and fungal colony-forming units in grain. Further developments should make it possible to detect individual fungal species as well as the degree of mycotoxin contamination of food and animal feeds. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Origin and ecological selection of core and food-specific bacterial communities associated with meat and seafood spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Stéphane; Chaulot-Talmon, Aurélie; Caekebeke, Hélène; Cardinal, Mireille; Christieans, Souad; Denis, Catherine; Desmonts, Marie Hélène; Dousset, Xavier; Feurer, Carole; Hamon, Erwann; Joffraud, Jean-Jacques; La Carbona, Stéphanie; Leroi, Françoise; Leroy, Sabine; Lorre, Sylvie; Macé, Sabrina; Pilet, Marie-France; Prévost, Hervé; Rivollier, Marina; Roux, Dephine; Talon, Régine; Zagorec, Monique; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2015-05-01

    The microbial spoilage of meat and seafood products with short shelf lives is responsible for a significant amount of food waste. Food spoilage is a very heterogeneous process, involving the growth of various, poorly characterized bacterial communities. In this study, we conducted 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing on 160 samples of fresh and spoiled foods to comparatively explore the bacterial communities associated with four meat products and four seafood products that are among the most consumed food items in Europe. We show that fresh products are contaminated in part by a microbiota similar to that found on the skin and in the gut of animals. However, this animal-derived microbiota was less prevalent and less abundant than a core microbiota, psychrotrophic in nature, mainly originated from the environment (water reservoirs). We clearly show that this core community found on meat and seafood products is the main reservoir of spoilage bacteria. We also show that storage conditions exert strong selective pressure on the initial microbiota: alpha diversity in fresh samples was 189±58 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but dropped to 27±12 OTUs in spoiled samples. The OTU assemblage associated with spoilage was shaped by low storage temperatures, packaging and the nutritional value of the food matrix itself. These factors presumably act in tandem without any hierarchical pattern. Most notably, we were also able to identify putative new clades of dominant, previously undescribed bacteria occurring on spoiled seafood, a finding that emphasizes the importance of using culture-independent methods when studying food microbiota.

  5. Origin and ecological selection of core and food-specific bacterial communities associated with meat and seafood spoilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Stéphane; Chaulot-Talmon, Aurélie; Caekebeke, Hélène; Cardinal, Mireille; Christieans, Souad; Denis, Catherine; Hélène Desmonts, Marie; Dousset, Xavier; Feurer, Carole; Hamon, Erwann; Joffraud, Jean-Jacques; La Carbona, Stéphanie; Leroi, Françoise; Leroy, Sabine; Lorre, Sylvie; Macé, Sabrina; Pilet, Marie-France; Prévost, Hervé; Rivollier, Marina; Roux, Dephine; Talon, Régine; Zagorec, Monique; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    The microbial spoilage of meat and seafood products with short shelf lives is responsible for a significant amount of food waste. Food spoilage is a very heterogeneous process, involving the growth of various, poorly characterized bacterial communities. In this study, we conducted 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing on 160 samples of fresh and spoiled foods to comparatively explore the bacterial communities associated with four meat products and four seafood products that are among the most consumed food items in Europe. We show that fresh products are contaminated in part by a microbiota similar to that found on the skin and in the gut of animals. However, this animal-derived microbiota was less prevalent and less abundant than a core microbiota, psychrotrophic in nature, mainly originated from the environment (water reservoirs). We clearly show that this core community found on meat and seafood products is the main reservoir of spoilage bacteria. We also show that storage conditions exert strong selective pressure on the initial microbiota: alpha diversity in fresh samples was 189±58 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but dropped to 27±12 OTUs in spoiled samples. The OTU assemblage associated with spoilage was shaped by low storage temperatures, packaging and the nutritional value of the food matrix itself. These factors presumably act in tandem without any hierarchical pattern. Most notably, we were also able to identify putative new clades of dominant, previously undescribed bacteria occurring on spoiled seafood, a finding that emphasizes the importance of using culture-independent methods when studying food microbiota. PMID:25333463

  6. Global overview of the risk linked to the Bacillus cereus group in the egg product industry: identification of food safety and food spoilage markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techer, C; Baron, F; Delbrassinne, L; Belaïd, R; Brunet, N; Gillard, A; Gonnet, F; Cochet, M-F; Grosset, N; Gautier, M; Andjelkovic, M; Lechevalier, V; Jan, S

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the food safety and spoilage risks associated with psychrotrophic Bacillus cereus group bacteria for the egg product industry and to search for relevant risk markers. A collection of 68 psychrotrophic B. cereus group isolates, coming from pasteurized liquid whole egg products, was analysed through a principal component analysis (PCA) regarding their spoilage and food safety risk potentials. The principal component analysis showed a clear differentiation between two groups within the collection, one half of the isolates representing a safety risk and the other half a spoilage risk. Relevant risk markers were highlighted by PCA, that is (i) for the food safety risk, the presence of the specific 16S rDNA-1m genetic signature and the ability to grow at 43°C on solid medium and (ii) for the spoilage risk, the presence of the cspA genetic signature. This work represents a first step in the development of new diagnostic technologies for the assessment of the microbiological quality of foods likely to be contaminated with psychrotrophic B. cereus group bacteria. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Direct observation and quantification of extracellular long-range electron flow in anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Yalcin, Sibel; Vargas, Madeline; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2013-03-01

    Some anaerobic microorganisms are capable of transporting electrons outside their cell to distant electron acceptors such as metals, minerals or partner species. Previous studies have focused primarily on transport over short distances ( 10 μm) using pili filaments that show organic metal-like conductivity. Pili also enable direct exchange of electrons among syntrophic Geobacter co-cultures. In order to establish the physical principles underlying this remarkable electron transport, we have employed a novel scanning probe microscopy-based method to perform quantitative measurements of electron flow at a single cell level under physiological conditions. Using this nanoscopic approach, we have directly observed the propagation and distribution of injected electrons in individual native bacterial extracellular proteins. Our direct measurements demonstrate unambiguously for the first time that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are a novel class of electronically functional proteins that can sustain electron flow in a surprising manner that has not been observed previously in any other natural protein. Funded by Office of Naval Research, DOE Genomic Sciences and NSF-NSEC Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing grant no. CMMI-1025020.

  8. Characterization and evaluation of the spoilage potential of Lactococcus piscium isolates from modified atmosphere packaged meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahkila, Riitta; Nieminen, Timo; Johansson, Per; Säde, Elina; Björkroth, Johanna

    2012-05-01

    A total of 222 psychrotrophic lactococci isolated from use-by day, modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) meat were identified to the species level by numerical analyses of EcoRI and ClaI ribopatterns and phylogenetic sequence analyses of 16S, rpoA and pheS genes. In addition, their meat spoilage potential was studied. The majority of the isolates (n=215) were identified as Lactococcus piscium, while seven isolates belonged to Lactococcus raffinolactis. L. piscium was shown to be adapted to growing in a variety of MAP meat products including broiler, turkey, pork, and minced meat from beef and pork, where they belonged to the predominating microbiota at the end of the storage. Numerical analyses of EcoRI and ClaI ribopatterns, and phylogenetic sequence analyses of rpoA and pheS genes were shown to be reliable tools in species level identification of meat lactococci. The spoilage potential of L. piscium was evaluated by inoculating representative isolates to MAP pork stored at 6 °C for 22 days. Development of spoilage population was monitored using a culture-independent T-RFLP approach. The sensory shelf life of pork inoculated with L. piscium was shortened compared to the uninoculated control. Alongside with the inoculated L. piscium isolates, Leuconostoc spp. present as initial contaminants in the samples thrived. This shows that even though lactococci were inoculated at higher levels compared to the natural microbiota, they did not occupy the niche and prevent the growth of other lactic acid bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of plasmids in Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 hop tolerance and beer spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Baecker, Nina; Pittet, Vanessa; Ziola, Barry

    2015-02-01

    Specific isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can grow in the harsh beer environment, thus posing a threat to brew quality and the economic success of breweries worldwide. Plasmid-localized genes, such as horA, horC, and hitA, have been suggested to confer hop tolerance, a trait required for LAB survival in beer. The presence and expression of these genes among LAB, however, do not universally correlate with the ability to grow in beer. Genome sequencing of the virulent beer spoilage organism Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 revealed the presence of eight plasmids, with plasmids 1, 2, and 3 containing horA, horC, and hitA, respectively. To investigate the roles that these and the other five plasmids play in L. brevis BSO 464 growth in beer, plasmid curing with novobiocin was used to derive 10 plasmid variants. Multiplex PCRs were utilized to determine the presence or absence of each plasmid, and how plasmid loss affected hop tolerance and growth in degassed (noncarbonated) beer was assessed. Loss of three of the eight plasmids was found to affect hop tolerance and growth in beer. Loss of plasmid 2 (horC and 28 other genes) had the most dramatic effect, with loss of plasmid 4 (120 genes) and plasmid 8 (47 genes) having significant, but smaller, impacts. These results support the contention that genes on mobile genetic elements are essential for bacterial growth in beer and that beer spoilage ability is not dependent solely on the three previously described hop tolerance genes or on the chromosome of a beer spoilage LAB isolate.

  10. Hydroxycinnamic acids used as external acceptors of electrons: an energetic advantage for strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella

    2014-12-01

    The metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (19 strains) was investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was the most tolerant to hydroxycinnamic acids, followed by strains of Weissella spp., Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, for which the MIC values were the same. The highest sensitivity was found for Lactobacillus rossiae strains. During growth in MRS broth, lactic acid bacteria reduced caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids into dihydrocaffeic, phloretic, and dihydroferulic acids, respectively, or decarboxylated hydroxycinnamic acids into the corresponding vinyl derivatives and then reduced the latter compounds to ethyl compounds. Reductase activities mainly emerged, and the activities of selected strains were further investigated in chemically defined basal medium (CDM) under anaerobic conditions. The end products of carbon metabolism were quantified, as were the levels of intracellular ATP and the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. Electron and carbon balances and theoretical ATP/glucose yields were also estimated. When CDM was supplemented with hydroxycinnamic acids, the synthesis of ethanol decreased and the concentration of acetic acid increased. The levels of these metabolites reflected on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetate kinase activities. Overall, some biochemical traits distinguished the common metabolism of strictly heterofermentative strains: main reductase activity toward hydroxycinnamic acids, a shift from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetate kinase activities, an increase in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, and the accumulation of supplementary intracellular ATP. Taken together, the above-described metabolic responses suggest that strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria mainly use hydroxycinnamic acids as external acceptors of electrons. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Structural and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of mononuclear molybdenum enzymes from sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondino, Carlos D; Rivas, María G; Romão, Maria J; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2006-10-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are found in biological systems in a mononuclear form in the active site of a diverse group of enzymes that generally catalyze oxygen-atom-transfer reactions. The metal atom (Mo or W) is coordinated to one or two pyranopterin molecules and to a variable number of ligands such as oxygen (oxo, hydroxo, water, serine, aspartic acid), sulfur (cysteines), and selenium (selenocysteines) atoms. In addition, these proteins contain redox cofactors such as iron-sulfur clusters and heme groups. All of these metal cofactors are along an electron-transfer pathway that mediates the electron exchange between substrate and an external electron acceptor (for oxidative reactions) or donor (for reductive reactions). We describe in this Account a combination of structural and electronic paramagnetic resonance studies that were used to reveal distinct aspects of these enzymes.

  12. Long-distance electron transfer by cable bacteria in aquifer sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hubert; Bosch, Julian; Griebler, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous ‘cable bacteria’ h...... to the Desulfobulbaceae. The detection of similar Desulfobulbaceae at the oxic–anoxic interface of fresh sediment cores taken at a contaminated aquifer suggests that LDET may indeed be active at the capillary fringe in situ.......The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous ‘cable bacteria’ has...

  13. Characterization of the Biodiversity of the Spoilage Microbiota in Chicken Meat Using Next Generation Sequencing and Culture Dependent Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the psychrotrophic bacteria isolated from chicken meat to characterize their microbial composition during refrigerated storage. The bacterial community was identified by the Illumina MiSeq method based on bacterial DNA extracted from spoiled chicken meat. Molecular identification of the isolated psychrotrophic bacteria was carried out using 16S rDNA sequencing and their putrefactive potential was investigated by the growth at low temperature as well as their proteolytic activities in chicken meat. From the Illumina sequencing, a total of 187,671 reads were obtained from 12 chicken samples. Regardless of the type of chicken meat (i.e., whole meat and chicken breast) and storage temperatures (4°C and 10°C), Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis and Pseudomonas congelans were the most prominent bacterial species. Serratia spp. and Acinetobacter spp. were prominent in chicken breast and whole chicken meat, respectively. The 118 isolated strains of psychrotrophic bacteria comprised Pseudomonas spp. (58.48%), Serratia spp. (10.17%), and Morganella spp. (6.78%). All isolates grew well at 10°C and they induced different proteolytic activities depending on the species and strains. Parallel analysis of the next generation sequencing and culture dependent approach provides in-depth information on the biodiversity of the spoilage microbiota in chicken meat. Further study is needed to develop better preservation methods against these spoilage bacteria. PMID:28943766

  14. Usage of ferrum (ІІІ and manganese (IV ions as electron acceptors by Desulfuromonas sp. bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Moroz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of metal ions to microorganisms, in particular at high concentrations, is one of the main impediments to their usage in remediation technologies. The purpose of this work is to analyze the possibility of usage by bacteria of the Desulfuromonas genus, isolated by us from Yavorivske Lake, of ferrum (ІІІ and manganese (IV ions at concentrations in the medium of 1,74–10,41 mM as electron acceptors of anaerobic respiration to assesss resistance of sulphur reducing bacteria strains to heavy metal compounds. Cells of Desulfuromonas acetoxidans ІМV V-7384, Desulfuromonas sp. Yavor-5 and Desulfuromonas sp. Yavor-7 were cultivated for 10 days at 30 °C under anaerobic conditions in Kravtsov-Sorokin’s medium without sulphate ions, sulphur, with cysteine as the sulphur source (0.2 g/l and sodium lactate or citrate as the electron donor (17.86 g/l, in which were added sterile 1 M solutions of C6H5O7Fe and C4H4O4 (control and also weights of MnO2 to their terminal concentrations 1.74, 3.47, 5.21, 6.94, 10.41 mM. Biomass was determined by the turbidimetric method. In the culture liquid the presence of Fe3+ and Mn4+ were qualitatively determined, and the content of Fe2+ in reaction with о-phenanthroline was determined quantitatively. It was established that sulphur reducing bacteria used with different intensity ferrum (ІІІ and manganese (IV ions as electron acceptors during the process of anaerobic respiration at concentrations of 1.74–10.41 mM C6H5O7Fe and MnO2 in the medium, which demonstrated the important role of the investigated microorganisms in reductive detoxication of natural and technogenic media from oxidized forms of transitional heavy metals. An insignificant difference in biomass accumulation during usage of 5.21–10.41 mM ferrum (ІІІ ions and fumarate is caused by toxicity of the metal ions to cells since the high redox potential of the Fe(III/Fe(ІІ pair with increase in concentrations of electron acceptors in

  15. A mixed-species microarray for identification of food spoilage bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspers, Martien P M; Schuren, Frank H J; van Zuijlen, Andre C M; Brul, Stanley; Montijn, Roy C; Abee, Tjakko; Kort, Remco

    2011-04-01

    Failure of food preservation is frequently caused by thermostable spores of members of the Bacillaceae family, which show a wide spectrum of resistance to cleaning and preservation treatments. We constructed and validated a mixed-species genotyping array for 6 Bacillus species, including Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus sporothermodurans, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus coagulans, and 4 Geobacillus species, including Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Geobacillus thermocatenulatus, Geobacillus toebii and Geobacillus sp., in order to track food spoilage isolates from ingredient to product. The discriminating power of the array was evaluated with sets of 42 reference and 20 test strains. Bacterial isolates contain a within-species-conserved core genome comprising 68-88% of the entire genome and a non-conserved accessory genome comprising 7-22%. The majority of the core genome markers do not hybridise between species, thus they allow for efficient discrimination at the species level. The accessory genome array markers provide high-resolution discrimination at the level of individual isolates from a single species. In conclusion, the reported mixed-species microarray contains discriminating markers that allow rapid and cost-effective typing of Bacillus food spoilage bacteria in a wide variety of food products. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Farm and abattoir sources of Carnobacterium species and implications for lamb meat spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, John; Horváth, Kylie Marree; Reynolds, Angela Denise; Brightwell, Gale

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the transmission route of Carnobacterium from the farm environment to the meat-manufacturing plant and potential risk for meat spoilage. A sheep farm level survey of Carnobacterium, consisting of 150 environmental and animal (no 100) associated samples, was carried out on two farms. A further 20 lamb carcass samples were taken from an abattoir servicing one of the farms. The majority of C. maltaromaticum isolates were associated with fleece followed by hard sheep contact surfaces, rectal-anal-mucosal swabs and carcasses. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consenus PCR (ERIC-PCR) profiling revealed 4 distinct ERIC types. Each ERIC type was found on both farms, three of which were also found on lamb carcasses. ERIC-PCR was effective at demonstrating within-species variability of C. maltaromaticum. This study provides initial information showing that farm sources maybe an important transmission route of Carnobacterium for contamination of lamb carcasses and subsequently the meat processing environment. Data on distribution, diversity, sources and transmission routes for meat product contamination is limited for spoilage bacteria. This study highlights the importance of good hygienic slaughter practices and cleaning routines to remove accumulated detritus from the handling of animals that may lead to cross contamination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. The involvement of bacterial quorum sensing in the spoilage of refrigerated Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Suqin; Wu, Haohao; Zeng, Mingyong; Liu, Zunying; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-02

    Quorum-sensing signals in refrigerated shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) undergoing spoilage were examined using bioreporter assays, thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the results revealed the presence of three types of autoinducers including acetylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) (i.e., N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone, N-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone and N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone), autoinducer-2, and cyclic dipeptides (i.e., cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu), cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe)). Autoinducer-2, rather than any AHL, was detected in extracts from pure cultures of the specific spoilage organisms (SSO), i.e., Shewanella putrefaciens (SS01) and Shewanella baltica (SA02). As for the cyclic peptides, only SA02 was determined to produce cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu). According to the transcription levels of LuxR (the master quorum-sensing regulator) in the SSO in response to exogenous autoinducers, the SSO could sense AHLs and cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu), rather than autoinducer-2, cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe). In accordance with the results of LuxR expression, the production of biofilm matrixes and extracellular proteases in the SSO was regulated by exogenous AHLs and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu), rather than 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (the autoinducer-2 precursor), cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe). Exogenous N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu) increased the growth rates and population percentages of the SSO in shrimp samples under refrigerated storage, and interestingly, exogenous 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione also increased the population percentages of the SSO in vivo by inhibiting the growth of the competing bacteria. However, according to the levels of TVB-N and the volatile organic components in the shrimp samples, exogenous 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione did not accelerate the shrimp spoilage process as N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu) did. In summary, our results suggest that

  18. Amplicon sequencing for the quantification of spoilage microbiota in complex foods including bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Paulo; Caspers, Martien; Sanders, Jan-Willem; Kemperman, Robèr; Wijman, Janneke; Lommerse, Gijs; Roeselers, Guus; Montijn, Roy; Abee, Tjakko; Kort, Remco

    2015-01-01

    Spoilage of food products is frequently caused by bacterial spores and lactic acid bacteria. Identification of these organisms by classic cultivation methods is limited by their ability to form colonies on nutrient agar plates. In this study, we adapted and optimized 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing for quantification of bacterial spores in a canned food matrix and for monitoring the outgrowth of spoilage microbiota in a ready-to-eat food matrix. The detection limit of bar-coded 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was determined for the number of bacterial spores in a canned food matrix. Analysis of samples from a canned food matrix spiked with a mixture of equinumerous spores from the thermophiles, Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, and the mesophiles, Bacillus sporothermodurans, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus subtilis, led to the detection of these spores with an average limit of 2 × 10(2) spores ml(-1). The data were normalized by setting the number of sequences resulting from DNA of an inactivated bacterial species, present in the matrix at the same concentration in all samples, to a fixed value for quantitative sample-to-sample comparisons. The 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing method was also employed to monitor population dynamics in a ready-to-eat rice meal, incubated over a period of 12 days at 7 °C. The most predominant outgrowth was observed by the genera Leuconostoc, Bacillus, and Paenibacillus. Analysis of meals pre-treated with weak acids showed inhibition of outgrowth of these three genera. The specificity of the amplicon synthesis was improved by the design of oligonucleotides that minimize the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from chloroplasts originating from plant-based material present in the food. This study shows that the composition of complex spoilage populations, including bacterial spores, can be monitored in complex food matrices by bar-coded amplicon sequencing in a quantitative manner. In order to allow sample

  19. Susceptibility of Pediococcus isolates to antimicrobial compounds in relation to hop-resistance and beer-spoilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziola Barry

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though important in the context of food microbiology and as potential pathogens in immuno-compromised humans, bacterial isolates belonging to the genus Pediococcus are best known for their association with contamination of ethanol fermentation processes (beer, wine, or fuel ethanol. Use of antimicrobial compounds (e.g., hop-compounds, Penicillin by some industries to combat Pediococcus contaminants is long-standing, yet knowledge about the resistance of pediococci to antimicrobial agents is minimal. Here we examined Pediococcus isolates to determine whether antibiotic resistance is associated with resistance to hops, presence of genes known to correlate with beer spoilage, or with ability to grow in beer. Results Lactic acid bacteria susceptibility test broth medium (LSM used in combination with commercially available GPN3F antimicrobial susceptibility plates was an effective method for assessing antimicrobial susceptibility of Pediococcus isolates. We report the finding of Vancomycin-susceptible Pediococcus isolates from four species. Interestingly, we found that hop-resistant, beer-spoilage, and beer-spoilage gene-harbouring isolates had a tendency to be more susceptible, rather than more resistant, to antimicrobial compounds. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the mechanisms involved in conferring hop-resistance or ability to spoil beer by Pediococcus isolates are not associated with resistance to antibiotics commonly used for treatment of human infections. Also, Vancomycin-resistance was found to be isolate-specific and not intrinsic to the genus as previously believed.

  20. Susceptibility of Pediococcus isolates to antimicrobial compounds in relation to hop-resistance and beer-spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakensen, Monique; Vickers, David M; Ziola, Barry

    2009-09-07

    Though important in the context of food microbiology and as potential pathogens in immuno-compromised humans, bacterial isolates belonging to the genus Pediococcus are best known for their association with contamination of ethanol fermentation processes (beer, wine, or fuel ethanol). Use of antimicrobial compounds (e.g., hop-compounds, Penicillin) by some industries to combat Pediococcus contaminants is long-standing, yet knowledge about the resistance of pediococci to antimicrobial agents is minimal. Here we examined Pediococcus isolates to determine whether antibiotic resistance is associated with resistance to hops, presence of genes known to correlate with beer spoilage, or with ability to grow in beer. Lactic acid bacteria susceptibility test broth medium (LSM) used in combination with commercially available GPN3F antimicrobial susceptibility plates was an effective method for assessing antimicrobial susceptibility of Pediococcus isolates. We report the finding of Vancomycin-susceptible Pediococcus isolates from four species. Interestingly, we found that hop-resistant, beer-spoilage, and beer-spoilage gene-harbouring isolates had a tendency to be more susceptible, rather than more resistant, to antimicrobial compounds. Our findings indicate that the mechanisms involved in conferring hop-resistance or ability to spoil beer by Pediococcus isolates are not associated with resistance to antibiotics commonly used for treatment of human infections. Also, Vancomycin-resistance was found to be isolate-specific and not intrinsic to the genus as previously believed.

  1. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S., E-mail: gsengel@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850{sup ∗} states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs.

  2. A simple and low-toxic method of preparing small specimens of bacteria, flagellates and their likes for Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, O. S.; Buchman, K.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2013-01-01

    The preparation of samples of bacteria and other very small organisms (<50 μm) for Scanning Electron Microscopy is often complex and intricate, which typically involve the use of specialized filter systems, complex handling and toxic chemicals. Based on the methods described in the literature and...... relatively quickly. So far, this method has yielded good results on several pathogenic bacteria and parasites; Aeromonas salmonicida, Yersinia ruckeri, Ichthyobodo necator and theronts of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis....

  3. Bacterial Ecology of Fermented Cucumber Rising pH Spoilage as Determined by Non-Culture Based Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Eduardo; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M.; Breidt, Fred; Hayes, Janet; Franco, Wendy; Butz, Natasha; Azcarate-Peril, María Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Fermented cucumber spoilage (FCS) characterized by rising pH and the appearance of manure and cheese like aromas is a challenge of significant economical impact for the pickling industry. Previous culture based studies identified the yeasts Pichia manshurica and Issatchenkia occidentalis, four gram positive bacteria, Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus parrafaraginis, Clostridium sp. and Propionibacterium and one gram-negative genus, Pectinatus as relevant in various stages of FCS given their ability to metabolize lactic acid. It was the objective of this study to augment the current knowledge of FCS using culture independent methods to microbiologically characterize commercial spoilage samples. Ion Torrent data and 16S rRNA cloning library analyses of samples collected from commercial fermentation tanks confirmed the presence of L. rapi and L. buchneri and revealed the presence of additional species involved in the development of FCS such as Lactobacillus namurensis, Lactobacillus acetotolerans, Lactobacillus panis, Acetobacter peroxydans, Acetobacter aceti, and Acetobacter pasteurianus at pH below 3.4. The culture independent analyses also revealed the presence of species of Veillonella and Dialister in spoilage samples with pH above 4.0 and confirmed the presence of Pectinatus spp. during lactic acid degradation at the higher pH. Acetobacter spp. were successfully isolated from commercial samples collected from tanks subjected to air purging by plating on Mannitol Yeast Peptone agar. In contrast, Lactobacillus spp. were primarily identified in samples of FCS collected from tanks not subjected to air purging for more than 4 months. Thus, it is speculated that oxygen availability may be a determining factor in the initiation of spoilage and the leading microbiota. Practical Application Understanding of the underlying microbiology and biochemistry driving FCS is essential to enhancing the sodium chloride (NaCl)-free cucumber fermentation technology and in

  4. Bacterial Ecology of Fermented Cucumber Rising pH Spoilage as Determined by Nonculture-Based Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Eduardo; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M; Breidt, Fred; Hayes, Janet; Franco, Wendy; Butz, Natasha; Azcarate-Peril, María Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Fermented cucumber spoilage (FCS) characterized by rising pH and the appearance of manure- and cheese-like aromas is a challenge of significant economical impact for the pickling industry. Previous culture-based studies identified the yeasts Pichia manshurica and Issatchenkia occidentalis, 4 Gram-positive bacteria, Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus parrafaraginis, Clostridium sp., and Propionibacterium and 1 Gram-negative genus, Pectinatus, as relevant in various stages of FCS given their ability to metabolize lactic acid. It was the objective of this study to augment the current knowledge of FCS using culture-independent methods to microbiologically characterize commercial spoilage samples. Ion Torrent data and 16S rRNA cloning library analyses of samples collected from commercial fermentation tanks confirmed the presence of L. rapi and L. buchneri and revealed the presence of additional species involved in the development of FCS such as Lactobacillus namurensis, Lactobacillus acetotolerans, Lactobacillus panis, Acetobacter peroxydans, Acetobacter aceti, and Acetobacter pasteurianus at pH below 3.4. The culture-independent analyses also revealed the presence of species of Veillonella and Dialister in spoilage samples with pH above 4.0 and confirmed the presence of Pectinatus spp. during lactic acid degradation at the higher pH. Acetobacter spp. were successfully isolated from commercial samples collected from tanks subjected to air purging by plating on Mannitol Yeast Peptone agar. In contrast, Lactobacillus spp. were primarily identified in samples of FCS collected from tanks not subjected to air purging for more than 4 mo. Thus, it is speculated that oxygen availability may be a determining factor in the initiation of spoilage and the leading microbiota. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Triplet states of carotenoids from photosynthetic bacteria studied by nanosecond ultraviolet and electron pulse irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensasson, R.; Land, E.J.; Maudinas, B.

    1976-01-01

    Absorptions of the triplet excited states of five carotenoids (15,15'-cis phytoene, all-trans phytoene, zeta-carotene, spheroidene and spirillox-anthin), extracted from the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas spheroides and Rhodospirillum rubrum, have been detected in solution using pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis. Triplet lifetimes, extinction coefficients, lowest energy levels and quantum efficiencies of formation have been determined. Comparison of the carotenoid triplet energy levels with that of O 2 ('Δsub(g)) suggests that spirilloxanthin, spheroidene and possibly also zeta-carotene, would be expected to protect against photodynamic action caused by O 2 ('Δsub(g)), but not cis or trans phytoene. The S → T intersystem crossing efficiencies of all five polyenes were found to be low, being a few per cent or less. In their protective role these triplet states can only therefore be effectively reached via energy transfer from another triplet, except in the case of O 2 (Δsub(g)). The low crossover efficiencies also mean that light absorbed in such carotenoids in their possible role as accessory pigments would not be wasted in crossing over to the triplet state. (author)

  6. Incorporation of nisin in natural casing for the control of spoilage microorganisms in vacuum packaged sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Joyce Regina; Kunigk, Leo; Jurkiewicz, Cynthia Hyppolito

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of natural casing treatment with nisin and phosphoric acid on control of spoilage microorganisms in vacuum packaged sausages. Ovine casings were dipped in the following baths: 1) 0.1% food grade phosphoric acid; 2) 5.0 mg/L nisin; 3) 0.1% phosphoric acid and 5.0 mg/L nisin; and 4) sterile water (control). The sausages were produced in a pilot plant, stuffed into the pretreated natural casings, vacuum packaged and stored at 4 and 10 °C for 56 days. The experiments were performed according to a full factorial design 2(3), totalizing 8 treatments that were repeated in 3 blocks. Aerobic plate counts and lactic acid bacteria analysis were conducted at 1, 14, 28, 42 and 56 days of storage. Treatment of casings with phosphoric acid 0.1% alone did not inhibit the growth of lactic acid bacteria and reduced the aerobic plate count by 1 log. The activity of nisin against lactic acid bacteria was enhanced by the addition of phosphoric acid, demonstrating a synergistic effect. Furthermore nisin activity was more evident at lower storage temperature (4 ºC). Therefore treatment of the natural casings with nisin and phosphoric acid, combined with low storage temperature, are obstacles that present a potential for controlling the growth of lactic acid bacteria in vacuum packaged sausage.

  7. Incorporation of nisin in natural casing for the control of spoilage microorganisms in vacuum packaged sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Regina de Barros

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of natural casing treatment with nisin and phosphoric acid on control of spoilage microorganisms in vacuum packaged sausages. Ovine casings were dipped in the following baths: 1 0.1% food grade phosphoric acid; 2 5.0 mg/L nisin; 3 0.1% phosphoric acid and 5.0 mg/L nisin; and 4 sterile water (control. The sausages were produced in a pilot plant, stuffed into the pretreated natural casings, vacuum packaged and stored at 4 and 10 °C for 56 days. The experiments were performed according to a full factorial design 2³, totalizing 8 treatments that were repeated in 3 blocks. Aerobic plate counts and lactic acid bacteria analysis were conducted at 1, 14, 28, 42 and 56 days of storage. Treatment of casings with phosphoric acid 0.1% alone did not inhibit the growth of lactic acid bacteria and reduced the aerobic plate count by 1 log. The activity of nisin against lactic acid bacteria was enhanced by the addition of phosphoric acid, demonstrating a synergistic effect. Furthermore nisin activity was more evident at lower storage temperature (4 ºC. Therefore treatment of the natural casings with nisin and phosphoric acid, combined with low storage temperature, are obstacles that present a potential for controlling the growth of lactic acid bacteria in vacuum packaged sausage.

  8. Indigenous and spoilage microbiota of farmed sea bream stored in ice identified by phenotypic and 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlapani, F F; Meziti, A; Kormas, K Ar; Boziaris, I S

    2013-02-01

    Investigation of the initial and spoilage microbial diversity of iced stored sea bream was carried out. Culture dependent methods were used for bacterial enumeration and phenotypic identification of bacterial isolates, while culture independent methods, using bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplification, cloning and sequencing of DNA extracted directly from the flesh were also employed. The culture dependent approach revealed that the initial microbiota was dominated by Acinetobacter, Shewanella, Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium, while at the end of shelf-life determined by sensory analysis (16 days), the predominant microbiota was Pseudomonas and Shewanella. Culture independent approach showed that initially the sea bream flesh was strongly dominated by Acinetobacter, while Pseudomonas, Aeromonas salmonicida and Shewanella were the predominant phylotypes at the end of shelf-life. Initial and spoilage microbiota comprised of phylotypes previously identified by others using traditional or molecular techniques. However, Aeromonas has not been reported as part of the dominant microbiota of sea bream at the time of spoilage. Combination of classical and molecular methodologies better reveals the microbiota during storage by revealing bacteria that escape standard approaches and, thus, provides valuable complementary information regarding microbiological spoilage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interaction of monolaurin, eugenol and sodium citrate on growth of common meat spoilage and pathogenic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszyk, M; Holley, R A

    1998-02-17

    Interactions of monolaurin, eugenol (phenolic compound) and sodium citrate (chelator) on the growth of six organisms including common meat spoilage (Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus sake, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Brochothrix thermosphacta) and pathogenic (Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes) organisms were investigated. The combinations of 100 to 250 ppm monolaurin with 500 and 1000 ppm eugenol, and 0.2 and 0.4% sodium citrate were more effective than each component separately. More than one combination prevented detectable growth of each organism. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and E. coli O157:H7 were most resistant and L. monocytogenes and B. thermosphacta most sensitive to control by the chosen combinations. The presence of sodium citrate was necessary to yield potent inhibition of Lb. curvatus and Lb. sake growth by the monolaurin and eugenol combinations.

  10. Microbiological spoilage and volatiles production of gutted European sea bass stored under air and commercial modified atmosphere package at 2 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlapani, Foteini F; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Nychas, George-John E; Boziaris, Ioannis S

    2015-09-01

    Microbiological, sensory, TVB-N and TMA-N changes and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) detection using the SPME/GC-MS technique, were performed to evaluate potential chemical spoilage indices (CSI) of gutted sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) stored at 2 °C under air and in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP CO2: 60%, O2: 10%, N2: 30%). Shelf-life, determined by sensory evaluation, of gutted sea bass stored at 2 °C under air and MAP was 9 and 13 d respectively. Pseudomonas and H2S producing bacteria were among the dominant spoilage microorganisms under both storage conditions, while Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) and Brochothrix thermosphacta were co-dominant with Pseudomonas and H2S producing bacteria under MAP. The traditional CSIs such as TVB-N and TMA-N were increased substantially only at the late stages of storage or after rejection of the products, making them unsuitable for freshness/spoilage monitoring throughout storage. A substantial number of VOCs attributed to microbiological action or chemical activity, were detected including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, organic acids and esters. The level of microbial origin VOCs such as ethanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutanal and some ethyl esters increased during storage, suggesting their potential as CSIs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative study on disinfection potency of spore forming bacteria by electron-beam irradiation and gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Hironobu; Suzuki, Satoru; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Takama, Kozo; Hayashi, Toru; Yasumoto, Kyoden.

    1990-01-01

    Along with gamma-ray irradiation, electron-beam irradiation (EB) is a method to disinfect microorganisms which cause food decomposition and food-poisoning. The present study was undertaken to compare sterilization efficacy of EB and gamma-ray irradiation on bacterial spores and vegetative cells under various conditions. Spores of Bacillus pumilus, a marker strain for irradiation study, and Bacillus stearothermophilus known as a thermophilic bacteria were irradiated by electron-beam and gamma-ray separately at irradiation dose of 0 to 10 kGy on combination of wet/dry and aerobic/anaerobic conditions. Sterilization effect of irradiation on spores was evaluated by colony counting on agar plates. Results showed that both EB and gamma-ray irradiation gave sufficient sterilization effect on spores, and the sterilization effect increased exponentially with irradiation dose. The sterilization effect of gamma-ray irradiation was higher than that of EB in all cases. Higher disinfection effect was observed under aerobic condition. The present study suggests that oxygen supply in EB is more important than gamma-ray irradiation. No results suggesting that chlorine ion at 0.1 ppm (as available chlorine concentration) enhanced the sterilization efficacy of either EB or gamma-ray irradiation was obtained under any conditions examined. (author)

  12. Volatile components associated with bacterial spoilage of tropical prawns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinivasagam, H.N.; Bremner, Allan; Wood, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    , whereas sulphides and amines occurred whether the predominant spoilage organism was Ps.fragi or Shewanella putrefaciens. The free amino acid profiles of banana and king prawns were high in arginine (12-14%) and low in cysteine (0.1-0.17%) and methionine (0.1-0.2%). Filter sterilised raw banana prawn broth...

  13. Spoilage fungi and their mycotoxins in commercially marketed chestnuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overy, David Patrick; Seifert, K.A.; Savard, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    A nationwide survey was carried out to assess mould spoilage of Castanea sativa nuts sold in Canadian grocery stores in 1998-99. Morphological and cultural characters, along with secondary metabolite profiles derived from thin-layer chromatography, were used to sort and identify fungi cultured from...

  14. Using Multispectral Imaging for Spoilage Detection of Pork Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, Bjørn Skovlund; Papadopoulou, Olga S.; Tassou, Chrysoula

    2013-01-01

    different storage conditions: aerobic and modified atmosphere packages as well as under different temperatures. Besides bacterial counts, a sensory panel has judged the spoilage degree of all meat samples into one of three classes. Results showed that the multispectral imaging device was able to classify 76...

  15. 18 Evaluation of Microbial Spoilage of Some Aquacultured Fresh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    autolytic and chemical spoilage (oxidative rancidity) of which microbiological contamination has been noted as the main cause of fish deterioration. Initial microflora on the surface of the fish is directly related to the surrounding aquatic environment while the bacterial flora in the gastrointestinal tract corresponds to the type of ...

  16. Salad dressing spoilage by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens with gas formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Signori Pereira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract B. amyloliquefaciens is a Gram-positive, aerobic, motile rod, often found in soil, which has been described as a plant growth promoter and is used in several industrial processes. This study reports an episode involving the gassy spoilage of salad dressing caused by B. amyloliquefaciens in a production facility located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Nine B. amyloliquefaciens strains were isolated from spoiled salad dressings, the sugar used as a raw material in the manufacture and from the production plant. A genotypic analysis of the isolates by Rep-PCR generated eight band profiles grouped in five Rep-PCR clusters. When re-inoculated into fresh salad dressing three B. amyloliquefaciens isolates belonging to the Rep-PCR clusters A, D and E were able to reproduce the gassy spoilage process, whereas the isolates belonging to the Rep-PCR clusters B and C did not produce any visible spoilage, suggesting that these isolates were not directly involved in the spoilage process. The predominant Rep-PCR cluster, cluster A, included strains isolated from barbecue and passion fruit seed salad dressings and from sugar (raw material, suggesting it is a common source of contamination for such salad dressings.

  17. Controlling Blown Pack Spoilage Using Anti-Microbial Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Rachael; Bolton, Declan; Tiuftin, Andrey A; Kerry, Joe P; Fanning, Séamus; Whyte, Paul

    2017-08-12

    Active (anti-microbial) packaging was prepared using three different formulations; Auranta FV; Inbac-MDA and sodium octanoate at two concentrations (2.5 and 3.5 times their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, the lowest concentration that will inhibit the visible growth of the organisms) against Clostridium estertheticum , DSMZ 8809). Inoculated beef samples were packaged using the active packaging and monitored for 100 days storage at 2 °C for blown pack spoilage. The time to the onset of blown pack spoilage was significantly ( p < 0.01) increased using Auranta FV and sodium octanoate (caprylic acid sodium salt) at both concentrations. Moreover, sodium octanoate packs had significantly ( p < 0.01) delayed blown pack spoilage as compared to Auranta FV. It was therefore concluded that Auranta FV or sodium octanoate, incorporated into the packaging materials used for vacuum packaged beef, would inhibit blown pack spoilage and in the case of the latter, well beyond the 42 days storage period currently required for beef primals.

  18. Microorganisms associated with the spoilage of avocado pear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microorganisms associated with the spoilage of Avocado pear, Persea americana fruits, purchased fresh from various markets in Benin City were investigated. The pour plate method was used for the isolation. A total of nine species of microorganisms were isolated and identified in this study. They comprise of seven ...

  19. Novel applications of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) and Recombinant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), present in intestines of most animals and humans, plays an important role as starters of fermented food products where it acts as a biopreservative, preventing spoilage by pathogenic microorganisms through acidification, competition for essential nutrients, and / or production of inhibitory ...

  20. Identification and Quantification of Volatile Chemical Spoilage Indexes Associated with Bacterial Growth Dynamics in Aerobically Stored Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikš-Krajnik, Marta; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as chemical spoilage indexes (CSIs) of raw chicken breast stored aerobically at 4, 10, and 21 °C were identified and quantified using solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The growth dynamics of total viable count (TVC), psychrotrophs, Pseudomonas spp., lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Brochothrix thermosphacta and H2 S producing bacteria were characterized based on maximum growth rates (μmax ), maximal microbial concentration (Nmax ) and at the moment of microbial shelf life (Svalues ), calculated from Gompertz-fitted growth curves. Pseudomonas spp. was predominant species, while B. thermosphacta was characterized by the highest μmax . The microbiological and sensory shelf lives were estimated based on TVC, Pseudomonas spp., and B. thermosphacta counts and sensory evaluation, respectively. Among 27 VOCs identified by GC-MS in spoiled chicken samples, ethanol (EtOH), 1-butanol-3-methyl (1But-3M), and acetic acid (C2 ) achieved the highest Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.66, 0.61, and 0.59, respectively, with TVC, regardless of storage temperature. Partial least squares (PLS) regression revealed that the synthesis of 1But-3M and C2 was most likely induced by the metabolic activity of B. thermosphacta and LAB, while EtOH was attributed to Pseudomonas spp. The increase in concentration of selected volatile spoilage markers (EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 ) in the headspace over spoiled chicken breast was found to be statistically significant (P growth. These findings highlight the possibility of analyzing the combination of 3 selected spoilage markers: EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 as rapid evaluation for poultry quality testing using SPME-GC-MS. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Various Plant Extracts on Pseudomonas Species Associated with Spoilage of Chilled Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osan Bahurmiz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of various plant extracts on Pseudomonas bacteria isolated from spoiled chilled tilapia (Oreochromis sp. was evaluated in this study. In the first stage of this study, red tilapia was subjected to chilled storage (4°C for 3 weeks, and spoilage bacteria were isolated and identified from the spoiled fish. Pseudomonas was the dominant bacteria isolated from the spoiled fish and further identification revealed that P. putida, P. fluorescens and Pseudomonas spp. were the main species of this group. In the second stage, methanolic extracts of 15 selected plant species were screened for their antimicrobial activity, by agar disc diffusion method, against the Pseudomonas isolates. Results indicated that most of the extracts had different degrees of activity against the bacterial isolates. The strongest activity was exhibited by bottlebrush flower (Callistemon viminalis extract. This was followed by extracts from guava bark (Psidium guajava and henna leaf (Lawsonia inermis. Moderate antimicrobial activities were observed in extracts of clove (Syzygium aromaticum, leaf and peel of tamarind (Tamarindus indica, cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, wild betel leaf (Piper sarmentosum and fresh thyme (Thymus spp.. Weak or no antimicrobial activity was observed from the remaining extracts. The potential antimicrobial activity shown by some plant extracts in this study could significantly contribute to the fish preservation.

  2. Characterization and control of Mucor circinelloides spoilage in yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Abigail B; Churey, John J; Worobo, Randy W

    2016-07-02

    Consumer confidence in the food industry is severely affected by large-scale spoilage incidents. However, relatively little research exists on spoilage potential of members of the fungal subphylum Mucormycotina (e.g. Mucor), which includes dimorphic spoilage organisms that can switch between a yeast-like and hyphal phase depending on environmental conditions. The presence of Mucor circinelloides in yogurt may not cause spoilage, but growth and subsequent changes in quality (e.g. container bloating) can cause spoilage if not controlled. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects on M. circinelloides of pasteurization regimen, natamycin concentrations, and storage temperature in yogurt production, as measured by fungal proliferation and carbon dioxide production. A strain of M. circinelloides isolated from commercially spoiled yogurt showed greater yogurt-spoilage potential than clinical isolates and other industrial strains. D-values and z-values were determined for the spoilage isolate in milk as an evaluation of the fungus' ability to survive pasteurization. Natamycin was added to yogurt at 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20ppm (μg/ml) to determine its ability to inhibit M. circinelloides over the course of month-long challenge studies at 4°C, 15°C, and 25°C. Survivors were recovered on acidified PDA and carbon dioxide levels were recorded. The D-values at 54°C, 56°C, and 58°C for hyphae/sporangiospores were (in min) 38.31±0.02, 10.17±0.28, and 1.94±0.53, respectively, which yielded a z-value of 3.09°C. The D-values at 51°C, 53°C, and 55°C for yeast-like cells were (in min) 14.25±0.12, 6.87±1.19, and 2.44±0.35, respectively, which yielded a z-value of 0.34°C. These results indicated that M. circinelloides would not survive fluid milk pasteurization if contamination occurred prior to thermal treatment. CO2 production was only observed when M. circinelloides was incubated under low-oxygen conditions, and occurred only at temperatures above 4

  3. An automated ranking platform for machine learning regression models for meat spoilage prediction using multi-spectral imaging and metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelles-Lopez, Lucia; Ropodi, Athina; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Fotopoulou, Jenny; Gkousari, Christina; Peyrodie, Audrey; Panagou, Efstathios; Nychas, George-John; Mohareb, Fady

    2017-09-01

    Over the past decade, analytical approaches based on vibrational spectroscopy, hyperspectral/multispectral imagining and biomimetic sensors started gaining popularity as rapid and efficient methods for assessing food quality, safety and authentication; as a sensible alternative to the expensive and time-consuming conventional microbiological techniques. Due to the multi-dimensional nature of the data generated from such analyses, the output needs to be coupled with a suitable statistical approach or machine-learning algorithms before the results can be interpreted. Choosing the optimum pattern recognition or machine learning approach for a given analytical platform is often challenging and involves a comparative analysis between various algorithms in order to achieve the best possible prediction accuracy. In this work, "MeatReg", a web-based application is presented, able to automate the procedure of identifying the best machine learning method for comparing data from several analytical techniques, to predict the counts of microorganisms responsible of meat spoilage regardless of the packaging system applied. In particularly up to 7 regression methods were applied and these are ordinary least squares regression, stepwise linear regression, partial least square regression, principal component regression, support vector regression, random forest and k-nearest neighbours. MeatReg" was tested with minced beef samples stored under aerobic and modified atmosphere packaging and analysed with electronic nose, HPLC, FT-IR, GC-MS and Multispectral imaging instrument. Population of total viable count, lactic acid bacteria, pseudomonads, Enterobacteriaceae and B. thermosphacta, were predicted. As a result, recommendations of which analytical platforms are suitable to predict each type of bacteria and which machine learning methods to use in each case were obtained. The developed system is accessible via the link: www.sorfml.com. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  4. Microbiological spoilage and investigation of volatile profile during storage of sea bream fillets under various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlapani, Foteini F; Mallouchos, Athanasios; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Boziaris, Ioannis S

    2014-10-17

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) profile was determined during storage of sea bream (Sparus aurata) fillets under air and Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP - CO2/O2/N2: 60/10/30) at 0, 5 and 15°C. Microbiological, TVB-N (Total Volatile Base Nitrogen) and sensory changes were also monitored. Shelf-life of sea bream fillets stored under air was 14, 5 and 2days (d) at 0, 5 and 15°C respectively, while under MAP was 18, 8, and 2d at 0, 5 and 15°C respectively. At the end of shelf life, the total microbial population ranged from 7.5 to 8.5logcfu/g. Pseudomonas spp. were among the dominant spoilage microorganisms in all cases, however growth of Brochothrix thermosphacta and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) were favoured under MAP compared to air. TVB-N production was favoured at higher temperatures and under air compared to lower temperatures and MAP. TVB-N increased substantially from the middle of storage and its value never reached concentrations higher than 30-35mgN/100g, which is the legislation limit, making it a poor chemical spoilage index (CSI). A lot of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and ethyl esters that were detected in the present study have been reported as bacterial metabolites, others as products of chemical oxidation while others as aroma constituents. VOCs such as 3-methylbutanal, acetic acid, ethanol, ethyl esters of isovaleric and 2-methylbutyric acids, 1-penten-3-ol, 1-octen-3-ol and cis-4-heptenal appeared from the early or middle stages and increased until the end of storage. From those only 3-methylbutanal, acetic acid, ethanol and the ethyl esters have been reported as microbial origin, making them potential CSI candidates of sea bream fillets. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Determination of Spoilage Microbiota of Pacific White Shrimp During Ambient and Cold Storage Using Next-Generation Sequencing and Culture-Dependent Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Ping; Xie, Jing; Qian, Yun-Fang

    2017-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the initial and spoilage microbiota of Pacific white shrimp during ambient and cold storage using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and a culture-dependent method. The quality changes were also evaluated by sensory analysis and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) values. After 1 d of storage, the psychrotrophic bacteria were only 5.97 log CFU/g, accounting for 1.1% of the mesophilic bacteria counts (7.94 log CFU/g). The psychrotrophic bacteria counts exceeded the counts of mesophilic bacteria for shrimp stored at 4 °C after 6 d of storage, indicating that psychrotrophic bacteria became predominant. The NGS was used to identify the bacterial species in samples stored at 25 and 4 °C. The results showed that the dominant microorganisms were Vibrio at 25 °C, and Acinetobacter, Psychrobacter, and Shewanella at 4 °C. By the culture-dependent method based on 16S rRNA gene and VITEK®2 CompactA system, it showed that the dominant microorganisms were Proteus spp. at 25 °C, and Shewanella putrefaciens, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and Aeromonas sobria at 4 °C. In conclusion, differences in results of microbiota analyzed by culture dependent and independent approaches were observed. The combination of both methodologies may provide more comprehensive information about the dominant spoilage microbiota in Pacific white shrimp during ambient and cold storage. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  6. A new cause of spoilage in goose sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacumin, Lucilla; Manzano, Marisa; Panseri, Sara; Chiesa, Luca; Comi, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the microorganisms present and to investigate their metabolites that cause spoilage of many goose sausages produced in Friuli, a northeast region of Italy. The defect was observed by sensorial analysis using the "needle probing" technique; the spoiled sausages were unsafe and not marketable. Despite the addition of starter, the microorganisms, particularly enterococci and Enterobacteriaceae, grew during ripening and produced a large amount of biogenic amines; therefore, these sausages represented a risk to consumers. The production of those compounds was confirmed in vitro. Furthermore, a second cause of spoilage was attributed to moulds that grew during ripening; the fungi grew between the meat and casing, producing a large amount of total volatile nitrogen, and consequently an ammonia smell was present either in the ripening area or in the sausages. This is the first description of this type of defect in goose sausages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multi spectral imaging analysis for meat spoilage discrimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Papadopoulou, Olga

    In the present study, fresh beef fillets were purchased from a local butcher shop and stored aerobically and in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP, CO2 40%/O2 30%/N2 30%) at six different temperatures (0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20°C). Microbiological analysis in terms of total viable counts (TVC...... microbiological and (bio)chemical methods are employed to assess meat spoilage, the majority of which are slow, time-consuming and expensive procedures and thus, it would be most preferable to be replaced by faster and directly applicable methods. Therefore developing a procedure by associating image data...... with corresponding sensory data would be of great interest. The purpose of this research was to produce a method capable of quantifying and/or predicting the spoilage status (e.g. express in TVC counts as well as on sensory evaluation) using a multi spectral image of a meat sample and thereby avoid any time-consuming...

  8. Binary combination of epsilon-poly-L-lysine and isoeugenol affect progression of spoilage microbiota in fresh turkey meat, and delay onset of spoilage in Pseudomonas putida challenged meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyldgaard, Morten; Meyer, Rikke L; Peng, Min; Hibberd, Ashley A; Fischer, Jana; Sigmundsson, Arnar; Mygind, Tina

    2015-12-23

    Proliferation of microbial population on fresh poultry meat over time elicits spoilage when reaching unacceptable levels, during which process slime production, microorganism colony formation, negative organoleptic impact and meat structure change are observed. Spoilage organisms in raw meat, especially Gram-negative bacteria can be difficult to combat due to their cell wall composition. In this study, the natural antimicrobial agents ε-poly-L-lysine (ε-PL) and isoeugenol were tested individually and in combinations for their activities against a selection of Gram-negative strains in vitro. All combinations resulted in additive interactions between ε-PL and isoeugenol towards the bacteria tested. The killing efficiency of different ratios of the two antimicrobial agents was further evaluated in vitro against Pseudomonas putida. Subsequently, the most efficient ratio was applied to a raw turkey meat model system which was incubated for 96 h at spoilage temperature. Half of the samples were challenged with P. putida, and the bacterial load and microbial community composition was followed over time. CFU counts revealed that the antimicrobial blend was able to lower the amount of viable Pseudomonas spp. by one log compared to untreated samples of challenged turkey meat, while the single compounds had no effect on the population. However, the compounds had no effect on Pseudomonas spp. CFU in unchallenged meat. Next-generation sequencing offered culture-independent insight into population diversity and changes in microbial composition of the meat during spoilage and in response to antimicrobial treatment. Spoilage of unchallenged turkey meat resulted in decreasing species diversity over time, regardless of whether the samples received antimicrobial treatment. The microbiota composition of untreated unchallenged meat progressed from a Pseudomonas spp. to a Pseudomonas spp., Photobacterium spp., and Brochothrix thermosphacta dominated food matrix on the expense of low

  9. Identification of beer spoilage microorganisms using the MALDI Biotyper platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvey, Michelle Elizabeth; Weiland, Florian; Meneses, Jon; Sterenberg, Nick; Hoffmann, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Beer spoilage microorganisms present a major risk for the brewing industry and can lead to cost-intensive recall of contaminated products and damage to brand reputation. The applicability of molecular profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in combination with Biotyper software was investigated for the identification of beer spoilage microorganisms from routine brewery quality control samples. Reference mass spectrum profiles for three of the most common bacterial beer spoilage microorganisms (Lactobacillus lindneri, Lactobacillus brevis and Pediococcus damnosus), four commercially available brewing yeast strains (top- and bottom-fermenting) and Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis wild yeast were established, incorporated into the Biotyper reference library and validated by successful identification after inoculation into beer. Each bacterial species could be accurately identified and distinguished from one another and from over 5600 other microorganisms present in the Biotyper database. In addition, wild yeast contaminations were rapidly detected and distinguished from top- and bottom-fermenting brewing strains. The applicability and integration of mass spectrometry profiling using the Biotyper platform into existing brewery quality assurance practices within industry were assessed by analysing routine microbiology control samples from a local brewery, where contaminating microorganisms could be reliably identified. Brewery-isolated microorganisms not present in the Biotyper database were further analysed for identification using LC-MS/MS methods. This renders the Biotyper platform a promising candidate for biological quality control testing within the brewing industry as a more rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective technology that can be tailored for the detection of brewery-specific spoilage organisms from the local environment.

  10. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii: Foe or friend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuanyshev, Nurzhan; Adamo, Giusy M; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2017-09-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is a non-Saccharomyces budding yeast known as one of the most aggressive food spoilage microorganisms, often isolated as a contaminant during wine fermentation, as well as from many acidic, high-sugar and canned foods. The spoilage ability relies on the yeast's unique feature of tolerating the most common preservatives such as sulphite, dimethyl dicarbonate, acetic acid and sorbic acid. Therefore, many studies have focused on the description of this peculiar tolerance with the aim of developing preventative measures against Z. bailii food spoilage. These studies demonstrated the involvement of diverse molecular and physiological mechanisms in the yeast resistance, comprising detoxification of preservatives, adaptation of the cytoplasmic pH and modulation of the cell wall/membrane composition. At the same time, the described traits unveiled Z. bailii as a novel potential workhorse for industrial bioprocesses. Here we present the yeast Z. bailii starting from important aspects of its robustness and concluding with the exploitation of its potential in biotechnology. Overall, the article describes Z. bailii from different perspectives, converging in presenting it as one of the most interesting species of the Saccharomycotina subphylum. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Bioactive packaging using antioxidant extracts for the prevention of microbial food-spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Gullón, Beatriz; Gullón, Patricia; Gomes, Ana; Tavaria, Freni

    2016-07-13

    Bioactive food packaging is an innovative approach for the prevention of the growth of food-spoilage microorganisms. Four active extracts from agroindustrial subproducts (Eucalyptus wood, almond shells, corn cobs and grape pomace) with demonstrated antioxidant activity have been investigated for bestowing antimicrobial activity to bioactive packaging. To carry out this evaluation, the antioxidant extracts were tested against five food pathogenic bacteria, namely, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella spp. The results obtained showed that all the tested extracts inhibited the growth of all five pathogenic bacteria. From the analysis of the minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), the Eucalyptus wood extract was the most active, being necessary only 2% (v/v) to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, whereas almond shells extract were less active requiring 4% (w/v) to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the extract from corn cobs was bactericidal against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus at a concentration of 4% (w/v). After checking their antimicrobial activity, the antioxidant extracts have been incorporated into sodium alginate films and the maintenance of their antimicrobial properties was confirmed. This work showed that the antioxidant extracts from agroindustrial byproducts exhibited antimicrobial activity and were suitable for incorporation into edible films that could be used in bioactive packaging systems.

  12. Applicability of a microbial Time Temperature Indicator (TTI) for monitoring spoilage of modified atmosphere packed minced meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikousi, Hariklia; Biliaderis, Costas G; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2009-08-15

    The applicability of a microbial Time Temperature Indicator (TTI) prototype, based on the growth and metabolic activity of a Lactobacillus sakei strain developed in a previous study, in monitoring quality of modified atmosphere packed (MAP) minced beef was evaluated at conditions simulating the chill chain. At all storage temperatures examined (0, 5, 10, 15 degrees C), the results showed that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were the dominant bacteria and can be used as a good spoilage index of MAP minced beef. The end of product's shelf life as revealed by the sensory evaluation coincided with a LAB population level of 7 log(10) CFU/g. For all temperatures tested, the growth of L. sakei in the TTI resembled closely the growth of LAB in the meat product, with similar temperature dependence of the micro(max) and thus similar activation energy values calculated as 111.90 and 106.90 kJ/mol, for the two systems, respectively. In addition, the end point of TTI colour change coincided with the time of sensory rejection point of the beef product during its storage under isothermal chilled temperature conditions. The estimated activation energy, E(alpha), values obtained for parameters related to the response of DeltaE (total colour change of the TTI) describing the kinetics of colour change of the TTI during isothermal storage (i.e. the maximum specific rate of DeltaEpsilon evolution curve, micro(DeltaEpsilon), and also the reciprocal of t(i), time at which half of the maximum DeltaEpsilon is reached), were 112.77 and 127.28 kJ/mol, respectively. Finally, the application of the microbial TTI in monitoring the quality deterioration of MAP minced beef due to spoilage was further evaluated under dynamic conditions of storage, using two separate low temperature periodic changing scenarios, resembling the actual conditions occurring in the distribution chill chain. The results showed that the end point of TTI, after storage at those fluctuating temperature conditions, was noted very

  13. Evidence for a role of biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens in the spoilage of fresh aerobically stored chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Glen E; Bentley, Jessica A; Dykes, Gary A

    2011-08-01

    Fresh chicken meat is a fat-rich environment and we therefore hypothesised that production of biosurfactants to increase bioavailability of fats may represent one way in which spoilage bacteria might enhance the availability of nutrients. Numbers of Pseudomonas were determined on a total of 20 fresh and 20 spoiled chicken thighs with skin. A total of 400 randomly isolated Pseudomonas colonies from fresh (200) and spoiled (200) chicken were screened for the presence of biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant producing strains represented 5% and 72% of the Pseudomonas spp. isolates from fresh (mean count 2.3 log(10) cfu g(-1)) and spoiled (mean count 7.4 log(10) cfu g(-1)) chicken skin, respectively. Partially-purified biosurfactants derived from a subgroup of four Pseudomonasfluorescens strains obtained through the screening process were subsequently used to investigate the role that the addition of these compounds plays in the spoilage of aerobically stored chicken. Emulsification potential of the four selected biosurfactants was measured against a range of hydrocarbons and oils. All four biosurfactants displayed a greater ability to emulsify rendered chicken fat than hydrocarbons (paraffin liquid, toluene and hexane) and oils (canola, olive, sunflower and vegetable). Storage trials (4 °C) of chicken meat treated with the four selected biosurfactants revealed a significantly greater (P biosurfactant treated samples, as compared to untreated samples on each day (0, 1, 2, 3) of storage. For biosurfactant treated samples the greatest increase in total aerobic count (1.3-1.7 log(10) cfu g(-1)) occurred following one day of incubation. These results indicate that biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas spp. may play an important role in the spoilage of aerobically stored chicken meat by making nutrients more freely available and providing strains producing them with a competitive advantage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. DNA Barcoding on Bacteria: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Lebonah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are omnipotent and they can be found everywhere. The study of bacterial pathogens has been happening from olden days to prevent epidemics, food spoilage, losses in agricultural production, and loss of lives. Modern techniques in DNA based species identification are considered. So, there is a need to acquire simple and quick identification technique. Hence, this review article covers the efficacy of DNA barcoding of bacteria. Routine DNA barcoding involves the production of PCR amplicons from particular regions to sequence them and these sequence data are used to identify or “barcode” that organism to make a distinction from other species.

  15. The Role of Cold-Shock Proteins in Low-Temperature Adaptation of Food-Related Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Jeroen A.; Rombouts, Frank M.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de; Abee, T.

    2000-01-01

    There is a considerable interest in the cold adaptation of food-related bacteria, including starter cultures for industrial food fermentations, food spoilage bacteria and food-borne pathogens. Mechanisms that permit low-temperature growth involve cellular modifications for maintaining membrane

  16. Rapid monitoring of the spoilage of minced beef stored under conventionally and active packaging conditions using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in tandem with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammor, Mohammed Salim; Argyri, Anthoula; Nychas, George-John E

    2009-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was exploited to measure biochemical changes within fresh minced beef in an attempt to rapidly monitor beef spoilage. Minced beef packaged either aerobically, under modified atmosphere and using an active packaging were held from freshness to spoilage at 0, 5, 10, and 15°C. Frequent FTIR measurements were collected directly from the sample surface using attenuated total reflectance, in parallel the total viable counts of bacteria, the sensory quality and the pH were also determined. Principal components analysis allowed illuminating the wavenumbers potentially correlated with the spoilage process. Qualitative interpretation of spectral data was carried out using discriminant factorial analysis and used to corroborate sensory data and to accurately determine samples freshness and packaging. Partial least-squares regressions permitted estimates of bacterial loads and pH values from the spectral data with a fit of R(2)=0.80 for total viable counts and fit of R(2)=0.92 for the pH. Obtained results demonstrated that a FTIR spectrum may be considered as a metabolic fingerprint and that the method in tandem with chemometrics represents a powerful, rapid, economical and non-invasive method for monitoring minced beef freshness regardless the storage conditions (e.g. packaging and temperature).

  17. Differentiation of Lactobacillus brevis strains using Matrix-Assisted-Laser-Desorption-Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with respect to their beer spoilage potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Carola C; Vogel, Rudi F; Behr, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    Lactobacillus (L.) brevis is one of the most frequently encountered bacteria in beer-spoilage incidents. As the species Lactobacillus brevis comprises strains showing varying ability to grow in beer, ranging from growth in low hopped wheat to highly hopped pilsner beer, differentiation and classification of L. brevis with regard to their beer-spoiling ability is of vital interest for the brewing industry. Matrix-Assisted-Laser-Desorption-Ionization-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been shown as a powerful tool for species and sub-species differentiation of bacterial isolates and is increasingly used for strain-level differentiation. Seventeen L. brevis strains, representative of different spoilage types, were characterized according to their tolerance to iso-alpha-acids and their growth in wheat-, lager- and pilsner beer. MALDI-TOF MS spectra were acquired to perform strain-level identification, cluster analysis and biomarker detection. Strain-level identification was achieved in 90% out of 204 spectra. Misidentification occurred nearly exclusively among strains belonging to the same spoilage type. Though spectra of strongly beer-spoiling strains showed remarkable similarity, no decisive single markers were detected to be present in all strains of one group. However, MALDI-TOF MS spectra can be reliably assigned to the corresponding strain and thus allow to track single strains and connect them to their physiological properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Survival of Spoilage and Pathogenic Microorganisms on Cardboard and Plastic Packaging Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Siroli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the interaction of corrugated and plastic materials with pathogenic and spoiling microorganisms frequently associated to fresh produce. The effect of the two packaging materials on the survival during the storage of microorganisms belonging to the species Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enteritidis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Aspergillus flavus was studied through traditional plate counting and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results obtained showed that cardboard materials, if correctly stored, reduced the potential of packaging to cross-contaminate food due to a faster viability loss by spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms compared to the plastic ones. In fact, the cell loads of the pathogenic species considered decreased over time independently on the inoculation level and packaging material used. However, the superficial viability losses were significantly faster in cardboard compared to plastic materials. The same behavior was observed for the spoilage microorganisms considered. The SEM microphotographs indicate that the reduction of superficial contamination on cardboard surfaces was due to the entrapping of the microbial cells within the fibers and the pores of this material. In addition, SEM data showed that the entrapped cells were subjected to more or less rapid lyses, depending on the species, due to the absence of water and nutrients, with the exception of molds. The latter spoilers were able to proliferate inside the cardboard fibers only when the absorption of water was not prevented during the storage. In conclusion, the findings of this work showed the reduction of cross-contamination potential of corrugated compared to plastic packaging materials used in fruit and vegetable sector. However, the findings outlined the importance of hygiene and low humidity during cardboard storage to prevent the mold growth on

  19. Survival of Spoilage and Pathogenic Microorganisms on Cardboard and Plastic Packaging Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroli, Lorenzo; Patrignani, Francesca; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Chiavari, Cristiana; Benevelli, Marzia; Grazia, Luigi; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of corrugated and plastic materials with pathogenic and spoiling microorganisms frequently associated to fresh produce. The effect of the two packaging materials on the survival during the storage of microorganisms belonging to the species Escherichia coli , Listeria monocytogenes , Salmonella enteritidis , Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Lactobacillus plantarum , Pseudomonas fluorescens , and Aspergillus flavus was studied through traditional plate counting and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained showed that cardboard materials, if correctly stored, reduced the potential of packaging to cross-contaminate food due to a faster viability loss by spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms compared to the plastic ones. In fact, the cell loads of the pathogenic species considered decreased over time independently on the inoculation level and packaging material used. However, the superficial viability losses were significantly faster in cardboard compared to plastic materials. The same behavior was observed for the spoilage microorganisms considered. The SEM microphotographs indicate that the reduction of superficial contamination on cardboard surfaces was due to the entrapping of the microbial cells within the fibers and the pores of this material. In addition, SEM data showed that the entrapped cells were subjected to more or less rapid lyses, depending on the species, due to the absence of water and nutrients, with the exception of molds. The latter spoilers were able to proliferate inside the cardboard fibers only when the absorption of water was not prevented during the storage. In conclusion, the findings of this work showed the reduction of cross-contamination potential of corrugated compared to plastic packaging materials used in fruit and vegetable sector. However, the findings outlined the importance of hygiene and low humidity during cardboard storage to prevent the mold growth on packaging.

  20. Prediction of spoilage of tropical shrimp (Penaeus notialis) under dynamic temperature regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dabade, D.S.; Azokpota, P.; Nout, M.J.R.; Hounhouigan, D.J.; Zwietering, M.H.; Besten, den H.M.W.

    2015-01-01

    The spoilage activity of Pseudomonas psychrophila and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, two tropical shrimp (Penaeus notialis) spoilage organisms, was assessed in cooked shrimps stored at 0 to 28 °C. Microbiological, chemical and sensory analyses were performed during storage. P. psychrophila had a

  1. Metabolic footprinting of Lactobacillus buchneri strain LA1147 during anaerobic spoilage of fermented cucumbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactobacillus buchneri has recently been associated with anaerobic spoilage of fermented cucumbers due to its ability to metabolize lactic acid into acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol. However, we have limited knowledge of other chemical components in fermented cucumber that may be related to spoilage ...

  2. Synergized antimicrobial activity of eugenol incorporated polyhydroxybutyrate films against food spoilage microorganisms in conjunction with pediocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Neera; Mallesha; Ramana, Karna Venkata

    2013-07-01

    Biopolymers and biopreservatives produced by microorganisms play an essential role in food technology. Polyhydroxyalkanoates and bacteriocins produced by bacteria are promising components to safeguard the environment and for food preservation applications. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)-based antimicrobial films were prepared incorporating eugenol, from 10 to 200 μg/g of PHB. The films were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens, spoilage bacteria, and fungi such as Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus cereus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium sp., and Rhizopus sp. The synergistic antimicrobial activity of the films in the presence of crude pediocin was also investigated. The broth system containing pediocin (soluble form) as well as antimicrobial PHB film demonstrated an extended lag phase and a significant growth reduction at the end of 24 h against the bacteria. Crude pediocin alone could not elicit antifungal activity, while inhibition of growth and sporulation were observed in the presence of antimicrobial PHB film containing eugenol (80 μg/g) until 7 days in the case of molds, i.e., A. niger, A. flavus, Penicillium sp., and Rhizopus sp. in potato dextrose broth. In the present study, we identified that use of pediocin containing broth in conjunction with eugenol incorporated PHB film could function in synergized form, providing effective hurdle toward food contaminating microorganisms. Furthermore, tensile strength, percent crystallinity, melting point, percent elongation to break, glass transition temperature, and seal strength of the PHB film with and without eugenol incorporation were investigated. The migration of eugenol on exposure to different liquid food simulants was also analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The study is expected to provide applications for pediocin in conjunction with eugenol containing PHB film to enhance the shelf life of foods in the

  3. Spoilage evaluation, shelf-life prediction, and potential spoilage organisms of tropical brackish water shrimp (Penaeus notialis) at different storage temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dabade, D.S.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Azokpota, P.; Nout, M.J.R.; Hounhouigan, D.J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the freshness of shrimp is a concern to shrimp stakeholders. To improve shrimp quality management, it is of importance to evaluate shrimp spoilage characteristics. Therefore, microbiological, sensory, and chemical changes of naturally contaminated tropical brackish water shrimp (Penaeus

  4. Spoilage fungi and their mycotoxins in commercially marketed chestnuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overy, David Patrick; Seifert, K.A.; Savard, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    A nationwide survey was carried out to assess mould spoilage of Castanea sativa nuts sold in Canadian grocery stores in 1998-99. Morphological and cultural characters, along with secondary metabolite profiles derived from thin-layer chromatography, were used to sort and identify fungi cultured from...... isolated, but at a much lower frequency. HPLC and diode array detection were used to confirm the suspected presence of the mycotoxins penitrem A, chactoglobosin A and C, emodin and ochratoxin A in extracts prepared from naturally infected nut tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time...

  5. Volatile components associated with bacterial spoilage of tropical prawns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinivasagam, H.N.; Bremner, Allan; Wood, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of headspace volatiles by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry from king (Penaeus plebejus), banana (P. merguiensis), tiger (P. esculentus/semisulcatus) and greasy (Metapenaeus bennettae) prawns stored in ice or ice slurry, which is effectively an environment of low oxygen tension......, whereas sulphides and amines occurred whether the predominant spoilage organism was Ps.fragi or Shewanella putrefaciens. The free amino acid profiles of banana and king prawns were high in arginine (12-14%) and low in cysteine (0.1-0.17%) and methionine (0.1-0.2%). Filter sterilised raw banana prawn broth...

  6. Metabolism of fructophilic lactic acid bacteria isolated from Apis mellifera L. bee-gut: a focus on the phenolic acids as external electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Addante, Rocco; Pontonio, Erica; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-09-16

    Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) are strongly associated to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of Apis mellifera L. worker bees due to the consumption of fructose as a major carbohydrate. Seventy-seven presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from GIT of healthy A. mellifera L. adults, which were collected from 5 different geographical locations of Apulia region (Italy). Almost all the isolates showed fructophilic tendencies, which were identified as Lactobacillus kunkeei (69%) or Fructobacillus fructosus (31%). A high-throughput phenotypic microarray, targeting 190 carbon sources, was used to determine that 83 compounds were differentially consumed. Phenotyping grouped the strains into two clusters, reflecting growth performance. The utilization of phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric, caffeic, syringic or gallic acids, as electron acceptors was investigated in fructose based medium. Almost all FLAB strains showed tolerance to high phenolic acid concentrations. p-Coumaric acid and caffeic acid were consumed by all FLAB strains through reductases or decarboxylases. Syringic and gallic acids were partially metabolized. The data collected suggest that FLAB require external electron acceptors to regenerate NADH. The use of phenolic acids as external electron acceptors by 4 FLAB, showing the highest phenolic acid reductase activity, was investigated in glucose based medium supplemented with p-coumaric acid. Metabolic responses observed through phenotypic microarray suggested that FLAB may use p-coumaric acid as external electron acceptor, enhancing glucose dissimilation but less efficiently than other external acceptors such as fructose or pyruvic acid. Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) remain to be fully explored. This study intends to link unique biochemical features of FLAB with their habitat. The quite unique FLAB phenome within the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group may have practical relevance in food fermentations. The FLAB phenome may have

  7. Preservation of protein globules and peptidoglycan in the mineralized cell wall of nitrate-reducing, iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria: a cryo-electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, J; Maclellan, K; Benzerara, K; Boisset, N

    2011-11-01

    Iron-oxidizing bacteria are important actors of the geochemical cycle of iron in modern environments and may have played a key role all over Earth's history. However, in order to better assess that role on the modern and the past Earth, there is a need for better understanding the mechanisms of bacterial iron oxidation and for defining potential biosignatures to be looked for in the geologic record. In this study, we investigated experimentally and at the nanometre scale the mineralization of iron-oxidizing bacteria with a combination of synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We show that the use of cryo-TEM instead of conventional microscopy provides detailed information of the successive iron biomineralization stages in anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacteria. These results suggest the existence of preferential Fe-binding and Fe-oxidizing sites on the outer face of the plasma membrane leading to the nucleation and growth of Fe minerals within the periplasm of these cells that eventually become completely encrusted. In contrast, the septa of dividing cells remain nonmineralized. In addition, the use of cryo-TEM offers a detailed view of the exceptional preservation of protein globules and the peptidoglycan within the Fe-mineralized cell walls of these bacteria. These organic molecules and ultrastructural details might be protected from further degradation by entrapment in the mineral matrix down to the nanometre scale. This is discussed in the light of previous studies on the properties of Fe-organic interactions and more generally on the fossilization of mineral-organic assemblies. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Sea salts as a potential source of food spoilage fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biango-Daniels, Megan N; Hodge, Kathie T

    2018-02-01

    Production of sea salt begins with evaporation of sea water in shallow pools called salterns, and ends with the harvest and packing of salts. This process provides many opportunities for fungal contamination. This study aimed to determine whether finished salts contain viable fungi that have the potential to cause spoilage when sea salt is used as a food ingredient by isolating fungi on a medium that simulated salted food with a lowered water activity (0.95 a w ). The viable filamentous fungi from seven commercial salts were quantified and identified by DNA sequencing, and the fungal communities in different salts were compared. Every sea salt tested contained viable fungi, in concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 1.71 colony-forming units per gram of salt. In total, 85 fungi were isolated representing seven genera. One or more species of the most abundant genera, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium was found in every salt. Many species found in this study have been previously isolated from low water activity environments, including salterns and foods. We conclude that sea salts contain many fungi that have potential to cause food spoilage as well as some that may be mycotoxigenic. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. A CTAB based method for the preparation of total protein extract of wine spoilage microrganisms for proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polati, Rita; Zapparoli, Giacomo; Giudici, Paolo; Bossi, Alessandra

    2009-04-01

    Mapping the proteome of microrganisms by 2D-electrophoresis is often a hard task, because many contaminants, e.g. polysaccharides of the cell wall and nucleic acid, can obstruct the pores of the IEF gel resulting in streaks and smears. A protocol based on the use of the cationic detergent cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and its salt-dependent solubility was developed. The cellulose-producing strain Gluconoacetobacter hansenii AAB0248 was resolved on 7cm Minigels in over 500 protein spots (a hundred more than with protocols reported in literature). The method was further employed for mapping the proteome of some acid adapted, wine spoilage microrganisms e.g. acetic acid bacteria and a yeast.

  10. Antimicrobial properties of commercial annatto extracts against selected pathogenic, lactic acid, and spoilage microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Cuspinera, Veronica; Westhoff, Dennis C; Rankin, Scott A

    2003-06-01

    Annatto preparations are used to impart distinctive flavor and color to foods and are a primary colorant in dairy foods such as cheese and butter. There are several reports indicating that certain fractions of the annatto plant have biological activities against microorganisms of significance in food fermentation, food preservation, and human health. However, little is reported describing the nature of the antimicrobial compound(s) or their potential presence in commercial annatto colorant preparations. This study was conducted to determine whether commonly available annatto extracts are capable of influencing the outgrowth of selected lactic acid, spoilage, and pathogenic microorganisms. Disk diffusion and tube macrodilution techniques were used to determine the MICs and MBCs of double-strength water-soluble annatto extracts. Standard antibiotic disks were used as controls for the disk diffusion assay. The results demonstrate that annatto has an inhibitory effect on Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, and Staphylococcus aureus, with MICs of 0.08, 0.31, and 0.16% (vol/vol) and diameters of inhibition of 9 to 10, 12 to 13, and 15 to 16 mm, respectively. A concentration of 0.63% (vol/vol) inhibited the growth of Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei, Lactococcus lactis, and Paenibacillus polymyxa. The MICs for Listeria monocytogenes and Enterococcus durans were 1.25 and 2.5% (vol/vol), respectively. No activity was detected against Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, yeasts, or selected gram-negative bacteria.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil components against potential food spoilage microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, G; Rüben, C; Upmann, M

    2013-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of six essential oil components against the potential food spoilage bacteria Aeromonas (A.) hydrophila, Escherichia (E.) coli, Brochothrix (B.) thermosphacta, and Pseudomonas (P.) fragi at single use and in combination with each other was investigated. At single use, the most effective oil components were thymol (bacteriostatic effect starting from 40 ppm, bactericidal effect with 100 ppm) and carvacrol (50 ppm/100 ppm), followed by linalool (180 ppm/720 ppm), α-pinene (400 ppm/no bactericidal effect), 1,8-cineol (1,400 ppm/2,800 ppm), and α-terpineol (600 ppm/no bactericidal effect). Antimicrobial effects occurred only at high, sensorial not acceptable concentrations. The most susceptible bacterium was A. hydrophila, followed by B. thermosphacta and E. coli. Most of the essential oil component combinations tested showed a higher antimicrobial effect than tested at single use. Antagonistic antimicrobial effects were observed particularly against B. thermosphacta, rarely against A. hydrophila. The results show that the concentration of at least one of the components necessary for an antibacterial effect is higher than sensorial acceptable. So the use of herbs with a high content of thymol, carvacrol, linalool, 1,8-cineol, α-pinene or α-terpineol alone or in combination must be weighted against sensorial quality.

  12. Effect of antioxidants on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, psychrotrophic bacteria and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meat irradiated with Cobalto-60 and electron beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Pomarico Neto, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Samples of MDCM with skin were divided into three groups: control (without antioxidants), Antioxidant 1 (Sodium Polyphosphate and Sodium Ascorbate and Antioxidant 2 (Rosemary Extract and α-Tocopherol. The three batches of samples were divided into nine groups: no antioxidant and non-irradiated (C), with antioxidant A1 and non-irradiated (A1), with antioxidant A2 and non-irradiated (A2) without antioxidant and irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (Co), with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Cobalt 60 source (A1Co) with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (A2Co) with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Electron beam (A1Eb) and with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Electron beam (A2Eb). The samples was conditioned in a transparent, low density frozen overnight at a temperature of -18 ± 1 deg C in a chamber, and irradiated in this state with a dose of 3.0 kGy, used two sources of radiation: Cobalt-60 (3.1 kGy/h) and electron beam (7.86 kGy/s). After this process, the samples were evaluated during the refrigeration period (2 ± 1 deg C) for 11 days for the following analysis: total psychrotrophic bacteria count and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and the analysis of functional properties were performed after the irradiation process. The use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to significantly decrease TBARS values caused by the irradiation of samples in MDCM cobalt-60 sources and electron beam, and show a synergetic effect to processing with ionizing radiation to reduce of psychrotrophic bacteria count. The use of irradiation processing of MDCM did not negatively affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  13. Advances in the control of wine spoilage by Zygosaccharomyces and Dekkera/Brettanomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuehlke, J M; Petrova, B; Edwards, C G

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of yeast spoilage, as well as the available control technologies, is vital to producing consistent, high-quality wine. Zygosaccharomyces bailii contamination may result in refermentation and CO2 production in sweet wines or grape juice concentrate, whereas Brettanomyces bruxellensis spoilage often contributes off-odors and flavors to red wines. Early detection of these yeasts by selective/differential media or genetic methods is important to minimize potential spoilage. More established methods of microbial control include sulfur dioxide, dimethyl dicarbonate, and filtration. Current research is focused on the use of chitosan, pulsed electric fields, low electric current, and ultrasonics as means to protect wine quality.

  14. High pressure treatment changes spoilage characteristics and shelf life of Pacific oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) during refrigerated storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rong; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Qi

    2017-04-01

    The effects of high pressure (HP) treatment on spoilage characteristic and shelf life extension of Pacific oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) during refrigerated storage were studied. Results showed that HP treatment of 275 MPa for 3 min or 300 MPa for 2 min could achieve 100% full release of oyster adductor muscle, pressures higher than 350 MPa caused excessive release as the shells of oysters were broken, thus use of higher pressures should be cautious in oyster processing industry because of its adverse impact on the appearance of shells. HP treatment (300 MPa, 2 min) was proper for the shucking of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) in China. This treatment caused no organoleptic disadvantage. Moreover, HP treatment resulted in obvious differences in biochemical spoilage indicators (pH, TVB-N and TBARS) changes and volatile compounds profile determined by electronic nose during storage. HP treatment (300 MPa, 2 min) also led to a reduction of aerobic bacterial count (APC) by 1.27 log cycles. Furthermore, the APC values of oysters treated by HP were always lower than those of the control samples during storage. Based on the organoleptic, biochemical and microbiological indicators, shelf life of 6-8 d for control and 12 d for HP-treated oysters could be expected. HP treatment showed great potential in oyster processing and preservation.

  15. Reducing the bloater spoilage incidence in fermented green olives during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito, D.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Fermented green olives of the variety “Picholine” were brined in 5% NaCl solutions, which were adjusted to pH 4.00 and 5.00 with lactic acid. Potassium sorbate was added to the brine at 0.05 % and the assays were inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum strain I159, and Pichia anomala strains S18 from our collection. The pH values and microbial counts including Gram negative bacteria, yeasts and moulds, and lactic acid bacteria were followed during 6 months of storage. Results showed that even if the olives were inoculated with a high gas producing yeast (P. anomala S18, the attack of the fruits by the “bloater” spoilage was drastically reduced in the assays adjusted to pH4, added with potassium sorbate and inoculated with L. plantarum, without affecting the organoleptic characteristics of the product.Aceitunas verdes fermentadas de la variedad Picholine fueron colocadas en soluciones de salmuera al 5% en NaCl, ajustando el pH a 4,00 y 5,00 con ácido láctico. Se agregó sorbato potásico a la salmuera a una concentración del 0,05% y las muestras se inocularon con cepas de Lactobacllius plantarum I159 y Pichia anomala S18 de nuestra procedencia. Los valores del pH y el recuento microbiano incluyendo a las bacterias Gram-negativas, levaduras y mohos y bacterias del ácido láctico se siguieron durante los seis meses de almacenamiento. Los resultados mostraron que incluso inoculando las aceitunas con la levadura (P. anomala S18, productora de alta cantidad de gas, el ataque de los frutos por el alambrado se redujo drásticamente en las muestras ajustadas a pH4, a las que se añadió sorbato potásico e inoculó con Lactobacllius plantarum, sin verse afectadas las características organolépticas del producto.

  16. Evaluation and Comparison of Lactic Strains Isolated from Traditional Iranian Dairy Products (Richal Shiri with Armenian Dairy Products on Control of Food Spoilage Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Karimpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Some bacterial metabolites isolated from fermentative products have antibacterial properties against food spoilage bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of the isolated strains of traditional Armenian dairy products including cheese and traditional yogurts (Matson and Richal  shiri as a traditional dairy products from Iran. Material and method: In the present experimental study, bacterial strains were isolated, and subsequently the antibacterial activity of supernatants of strains on several types of spoilages bacteria such as Salmonella  was assessed. In addition, isolated strains from Rachel shiri showed  a good  antibacterial properties against Salmonella typhimurium. Results: The isolated strains were significantly reduced food contamination and increased the shelf -life. Furthermore, isolated strains from Richal shiri showed a good antibacterial properties against Salmonella typhimurium Conclusion: LAB strains isolated with appropriate inhibition, fermented power as a natural preservative and pragmatic as new products may be used in the dairy industry.

  17. Modelling the effect of ethanol on growth rate of food spoilage moulds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dantigny, P.; Guilmart, A.; Radoi, F.; Bensoussan, M.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of ethanol (E) on the radial growth rate (¿) of food spoilage moulds (Aspergillus candidus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Eurotium herbariorum, Mucor circinelloides, Mucor racemosus, Paecilomyces variotii, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium

  18. Diverse Exopolysaccharide Producing Bacteria Isolated from Milled Sugarcane: Implications for Cane Spoilage and Sucrose Yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Hector

    Full Text Available Bacterial deterioration of sugarcane during harvesting and processing is correlated with significant loss of sucrose yield and the accumulation of bacterial polysaccharides. Dextran, a homoglucan produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides, has been cited as the primary polysaccharide associated with sugarcane deterioration. A culture-based approach was used to isolate extracellular polysaccharide (EPS producing bacterial strains from milled sugarcane stalks. Ribosomal RNA sequencing analysis grouped 25 isolates into 4 genera. This study identified 2 bacterial genera not previously associated with EPS production or sucrose degradation. All isolates produced polysaccharide when grown in the presence of sucrose. Monosaccharide analysis of purified polymers by Gas Chromatography revealed 17 EPSs consisting solely of glucose (homoglucans, while the remainder contained traces of mannose or fructose. Dextranase treatment of polysaccharides yielded full digestion profiles for only 11 extracts. Incomplete hydrolysis profiles of the remaining polysaccharides suggest the release of longer oligosaccharides which may interfere with sucrose crystal formation.

  19. Lipidomics as an important key for the identification of beer-spoilage bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Matoulková, D.; Benada, Oldřich; Sigler, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2015), s. 536-543 ISSN 0266-8254 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-00227S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : beer * contamination * electrospray tandem mass spectrometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology , Virology Impact factor: 1.579, year: 2015

  20. Psychrotrophic bacteria and their negative effects on milk and dairy products quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimun Zamberlin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of bacterial populations in raw milk at the time of processing has a significant influence on shelf-life, organoleptic quality, spoilage and yields of raw milk, processed milk as well as on the other dairy products. Unfortunately, cold and extended storage of raw milk, as a common practice in dairy sector today, favour the growth of psychrotrophic bacteria. Therefore, their count in the refrigerated milk is more than the ideal limit of 10 % of the mesophilic count. Psychrotrophic bacteria are generally able to form extracellular or intracellular thermo-resistant enzymes (proteases, lipases, phospolipases which can contribute to milk and dairy products spoilage. In addition, besides exhibiting spoilage features, some species belonging to the psychrotrops are considered as emerging pathogens that carry innate resistance to antibiotics or produce toxins. In sense of quality, psychrotrophic bacteria have become major problem for today’s dairy industry as leading cause in spoilage of cold-storage milk and dairy products. This review article focuses on the impact of psychrotrops on quality problems associated with raw milk as well as on th final dairy products. Means of controlling the dominant psychrotrophic species responsible for undesirable activities in milk and dairy products were also discussed.

  1. Characterizing mechanisms of extracellular electron transport in sulfur and iron-oxidizing electrochemically active bacteria isolated from marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, A. R.; Bird, L. J.; Lam, B. R.; Nealson, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Lithotrophic reactions, including the oxidation of mineral species, are often difficult to detect in environmental systems. This could be due to the nature of substrate or metabolite quantification or the rapid consumption of metabolic end products or intermediates by proximate biological or abiotic processes. Though recently genetic markers have been applied to detecting these processes in environmental systems, our knowledge of lithotrophic markers are limited to those processes catalyzed by organisms that have been cultured and physiologically characterized. Here we describe the use of electrochemical enrichment techniques to isolate marine sediment-dwelling microbes capable of the oxidation or insoluble forms of iron and sulfur including both the elemental species. All the organisms isolated fall within the Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria and are capable of acquiring electrons from an electrode while using either oxygen or nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor. Electrochemical analysis of these microbes has demonstrated that, though they have similar geochemical abilities (either sulfur or iron oxidation), they likely utilize different biochemical mechanisms demonstrated by the variability in dominant electron transfer modes or interactions (i.e., biofilm, planktonic or mediator facilitated interactions) and the wide range of midpoint potentials observed for dominant redox active cellular components (ranging from -293 to +50 mV vs. Ag/AgCl). For example, organisms isolated on elemental sulfur tended to have higher midpoint potentials than iron-oxidizing microbes. A variety of techniques are currently being applied to understanding the different mechanisms of extracellular electron transport for oxidizing an electrode or corresponding insoluble electron donor including both genomic and genetic manipulation experiments. The insight gained from these experiments is not limited to the physiology of the organisms isolated but will also aid in

  2. Development of spoilage bacterial community and volatile compounds in chilled beef under vacuum or high oxygen atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Elina; Hultman, Jenni; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-04-16

    Research into microbial community development and metabolism is essential to understand meat spoilage. Recent years have seen the emergence of powerful molecular techniques that are being used alongside conventional microbiology approaches. This enables more accurate studies on meat spoilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of packaging (under vacuum and in high oxygen atmosphere) on the development of microbial communities and metabolic activities at 6 °C by using culture-dependent (cultivation, ribotyping) and culture-independent (amplicon sequencing) methods. At the beginning of shelf life, the microbial community mostly consisted of Carnobacterium and Lactobacillus. After two weeks of storage, Lactococcus and Lactobacillus were the dominant genera under vacuum and Leuconostoc in high oxygen meat packages. This indicates that oxygen favoured the genus Leuconostoc comprising only heterofermentative species and hence potential producers of undesirable compounds. Also the number of volatile compounds, such as diacetyl, 1-octen-3-ol and hexanoic acids, was higher in high oxygen packages than under vacuum packages. The beef in high oxygen atmosphere packaging was detected as spoiled in sensory evaluation over 10 days earlier than beef under vacuum packaging. Leuconostoc gelidum, Lactococcus piscium, Lactobacillus sakei and Lactobacillus algidus were the most common species of bacteria. The results obtained from identification of the isolates using ribotyping and amplicon sequencing correlated, except for L. algidus, which was detected in both types of packaging by amplicon sequencing, but only in vacuum packaged samples using the culture-based technique. This indicates that L. algidus grew, but was not cultivable in high oxygen beef using the Nordic Committee on Food Analysis standard method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Longterm storage of post-packaged bread by controlling spoilage pathogens using Lactobacillus fermentum C14 isolated from homemade curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Soma; Ghosh, Ranjan; Sengupta, Shreya; Mandal, Narayan C

    2017-01-01

    One potent lactic acid bacterial strain C14 with strong antifungal activity was isolated from homemade curd. Based on morphological as well as biochemical characters and 16S rDNA sequence homology the strain was identified as Lactobacillus fermentum. It displayed a wide antimicrobial spectrum against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, and also against number of food spoilage, plant and human pathogenic fungi. The cell free supernatant (CFS) of the strain C14 was also effective against the fungi tested. Inhibition of radial growth of Penicillium digitatum, Trichophyton rubrum and Mucor sp. was noticed in the presence of CFS of C14 even at low concentration (1%). More than 94.3 ± 1.6% and 91.5 ± 2.2% inhibition of conidial germination of P. digitatum and Mucor sp. were noticed in the presence of 10-fold-concentrated CFS of C14. Massive deformation of the fungal mycelia was observed by SEM studies, and losses of cellular proteins and DNA are also evident upon its treatment with C14. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of phenyl lactic acid, lactic acid along with some unidentified compounds in the antifungal extract. Challenge experiment showed immense potential of the strain C14 in preventing the spoilage of bread samples caused by Mucor sp. and Bacillus subtilis. The bread samples remained fresh upto 25 days even after inoculation with Mucor sp. (3.7 × 104 spores /ml) and B. subtilis (4.6 × 104 CFU /ml). Along with the antifungal properties, the isolated lactic acid bacterial strain also showed very good antioxidant activities. Unchanged level of liver enzymes serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase and serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase in albino mice upon feeding with C14 also suggested non-toxic nature of the bacterial isolate.

  4. Longterm storage of post-packaged bread by controlling spoilage pathogens using Lactobacillus fermentum C14 isolated from homemade curd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Barman

    Full Text Available One potent lactic acid bacterial strain C14 with strong antifungal activity was isolated from homemade curd. Based on morphological as well as biochemical characters and 16S rDNA sequence homology the strain was identified as Lactobacillus fermentum. It displayed a wide antimicrobial spectrum against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, and also against number of food spoilage, plant and human pathogenic fungi. The cell free supernatant (CFS of the strain C14 was also effective against the fungi tested. Inhibition of radial growth of Penicillium digitatum, Trichophyton rubrum and Mucor sp. was noticed in the presence of CFS of C14 even at low concentration (1%. More than 94.3 ± 1.6% and 91.5 ± 2.2% inhibition of conidial germination of P. digitatum and Mucor sp. were noticed in the presence of 10-fold-concentrated CFS of C14. Massive deformation of the fungal mycelia was observed by SEM studies, and losses of cellular proteins and DNA are also evident upon its treatment with C14. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of phenyl lactic acid, lactic acid along with some unidentified compounds in the antifungal extract. Challenge experiment showed immense potential of the strain C14 in preventing the spoilage of bread samples caused by Mucor sp. and Bacillus subtilis. The bread samples remained fresh upto 25 days even after inoculation with Mucor sp. (3.7 × 104 spores /ml and B. subtilis (4.6 × 104 CFU /ml. Along with the antifungal properties, the isolated lactic acid bacterial strain also showed very good antioxidant activities. Unchanged level of liver enzymes serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase and serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase in albino mice upon feeding with C14 also suggested non-toxic nature of the bacterial isolate.

  5. On-site monitoring of fish spoilage using vanadium pentoxide xerogel modified interdigitated gold electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helali, S.; Abdelghani, A. [Unite de Recherche de Physique des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, IPEST (Tunisia); Jaffrezic-Renault, N. [Laboratoire de Sciences Analytiques, Universite de Claude Bernard, Lyon (France); Trikalitis, P.N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, 71 003, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Efstathiou, C.E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, 157 71, Athens (Greece); Prodromidis, M.I., E-mail: mprodrom@cc.uoi.g [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45 110, Ioannina (Greece)

    2010-05-30

    The development of a vanadium pentoxide xerogel (VXG)-based sensor for the detection of volatile inorganic (ammonia) and organic (dimethylamine, etc.) amines is described. The xerogel film was deposited on interdigitated gold electrodes by dip-coating using an aqueous solution of VXG. The morphology of the sensing layer, its interaction with ammonia, which was used as a model analyte throughout this work, as well as the regeneration of the surface of the sensor electrodes with vapors of HCl were examined with scanning electron microscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. Signal changes, due to changes of the RC-product of the electrochemical cell (Au-VXG-Au), as a result of its interactions with ammonia vapors, were probed with a portable, homemade charge meter, the Multipulser. Exposing the sensor electrodes to various concentrations of ammonia vapors resulted in proportional changes in the signal output. Finally, the proposed sensors were successfully used for on-site, real-time monitoring of fish spoilage in ambient conditions.

  6. Spoilage potential of Pseudomonas species isolated from goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatamburlo, T M; Yamazi, A K; Cavicchioli, V Q; Pieri, F A; Nero, L A

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas spp. are usually associated with spoilage microflora of dairy products due to their proteolytic potential. This is of particular concern for protein-based products, such as goat milk cheeses and fermented milks. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to characterize the proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from goat milk. Goat milk samples (n=61) were obtained directly from bulk tanks on dairy goat farms (n=12), and subjected to a modified International Organization for Standardization (ISO) protocol to determine the number and proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. Isolates (n=82) were obtained, identified by PCR, and subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with XbaI macro-restriction. Then, the isolates were subjected to PCR to detect the alkaline protease gene (apr), and phenotypic tests were performed to check proteolytic activity at 7°C, 25°C, and 35°C. Mean Pseudomonas spp. counts ranged from 2.9 to 4.8 log cfu/mL, and proteolytic Pseudomonas spp. counts ranged from 1.9 to 4.6 log cfu/mL. All isolates were confirmed to be Pseudomonas spp., and 41 were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens, which clustered into 5 groups sharing approximately 82% similarity. Thirty-six isolates (46.9%) were positive for the apr gene; and 57 (69.5%) isolates presented proteolytic activity at 7°C, 82 (100%) at 25°C, and 64 (78%) at 35°C. The isolates were distributed ubiquitously in the goat farms, and no relationship among isolates was observed when the goat farms, presence of apr, pulsotypes, and proteolytic activity were taken into account. We demonstrated proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. present in goat milk by phenotypic and genotypic tests and indicated their spoilage potential at distinct temperatures. Based on these findings and the ubiquity of Pseudomonas spp. in goat farm environments, proper monitoring and control of Pseudomonas spp. during production are critical. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association

  7. Effects of lactic acid bacteria silage inoculation on methane emission and productivity of Holstein Friesian dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, J.L.; Hindrichsen, I.K.; Klop, G.; Kinley, R.D.; Milora, N.; Bannink, A.; Dijkstra, J.

    2016-01-01

    Inoculants of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used to improve silage quality and prevent spoilage via increased production of lactic acid and other organic acids and a rapid decline in silage pH. The addition of LAB inoculants to silage has been associated with increases in silage digestibility,

  8. Aerobic sugar metabolism in the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merico, Annamaria; Capitanio, Daniele; Vigentini, Ileana; Ranzi, Bianca Maria; Compagno, Concetta

    2003-12-01

    Despite the importance of some Zygosaccharomyces species as agents causing spoilage of food, the carbon and energy metabolism of most of them is yet largely unknown. This is the case with Zygosaccharomyces bailii. In this study the occurrence of the Crabtree effect in the petite-negative yeast Z. bailii ATCC 36947 was investigated. In this yeast the aerobic ethanol production is strictly dependent on the carbon source utilised. In glucose-limited continuous cultures a very low level of ethanol was produced. In fructose-limited continuous cultures ethanol was produced at a higher level and its production increased with the dilution rate. As a consequence, on fructose the onset of respiro-fermentative metabolism caused a reduction in biomass yield. An immediate aerobic alcoholic fermentation in Z. bailii was observed during the transition from sugar limitation to sugar excess, both on glucose and on fructose. The analysis of some key enzymes of the fermentative metabolism showed a high level of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Z. bailii growing on fructose. At high dilution rates, the activities of glucose- and fructose-phosphorylating enzymes, as well as of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase, were higher in cells during growth on fructose than on glucose.

  9. Ancient Item Spoilage Ritual Used in Nomadic Burial Rite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisenov Arman Z.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the findings of items in ancient burials which were intentionally spoiled prior to deposition in graves. This tradition was widely spread both in terms of chronology and geography, and therefore cannot be attributed to any individual cultures or regions. The authors present new information on the ritual obtained during an investigation of Borsyk burial mound of the Middle Sarmatian period located in West Kazakhstan. The central grave of barrow 6 contained a heavily damaged bronze cauldron. The grave was looted in antiquity. Individual scattered bones of a human skeleton and minor gold foil adornments from the ceremonial dress of a nobleman were discovered in the grave. The authors suggest that the cauldron was intentionally deformed by the participants of an ancient mortuary and memorial ritual. According to the principal hypothesis concerning the essence of this ritual, spoilage of the items was related to the idea of assign the items with “different” and “transcendent” properties, which resulted from the necessity of burying the owner. Cauldrons played an important role in the life of steppe leaders. The authors assume a sacral nature of the use of cauldrons in the culture of steppe peoples associated with feasts, battles, and sacred hunting. Perhaps, there was a tradition of burying cauldrons together with their owners after spoiling the items in view of the concept of the other world and the role of a heroic leader therein.

  10. Analysis of the inhibition of food spoilage yeasts by vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Daniel J; Stratford, Malcolm; Narbad, Arjan

    2003-09-01

    The antimicrobial potential of vanillin, the major component of vanilla flavour, was examined against the growth of three yeasts associated with food spoilage, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 21, 20 and 13 mM vanillin were determined for the three yeast strains, respectively. The observed inhibition was found to be biostatic. During fermentation, the bioconversion of sub-MIC levels of vanillin in the culture medium was demonstrated. The major bioconversion product was identified as vanillyl alcohol, however low levels of vanillic acid were also detected. Neither the vanillyl alcohol nor the vanillic acid was found to be antagonistic to yeast cell growth. The results indicate the importance of the aldehyde moiety in the vanillin structure regarding its antimicrobial activity and that the bioconversion of vanillin could be advantageous for the yeasts, but only at levels below MIC. These bioconversion activities, presumably catalysed by non-specific dehydrogenases, were shown to be expressed constitutively. It was observed that increased vanillin concentrations inhibited its own bioconversion suggesting that the activity required intact cells with metabolic capacity.

  11. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production: Progress report, February 1, 1987-February 1, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeikus, J.G.; Shen, Gwo-Jenn.

    1988-01-01

    These studies concern the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that control carbon and electron flow in anaerobic bacteria that conserve energy when coupling hydrogen consumption to the production of acetic, propionic, or butyric acids. Two acidogens, Propionispira arboris and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum were chosen as model systems to understand the function of oxidoreductases and electron carriers in the regulation of hydrogen metabolism and single carbon metabolism. In P. arboris, H 2 consumption was linked to the inhibition of CO 2 production and an increase in the propionate/acetate rate; whereas, H 2 consumption was linked to a stimulation of CO 2 consumption and an increase in the butyrate/acetate ratio in B. methylotrophicum. We report studies on the enzymes involved in the regulation of singe carbon metabolism, the enzyme activities and pathways responsible for conversion of multicarbon components to acetate and propionate or butyrate, and how low pH inhibits H 2 and acetic acid production in Sarcina ventriculi as a consequence of hydrogenase regulation. 9 refs

  12. Use of a Titrimetric Method to Assess the Bacterial Spoilage of Fresh Beef 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, Leora A.; Jay, James M.

    1970-01-01

    A new method of determining bacterial spoilage in fresh beef is presented. The technique is based upon the fact that as beef undergoes refrigerator spoilage, there is a gradual increase in the production of alkaline substances by the spoilage flora. The level of these substances was measured by titrating meat homogenates to a pH 5.00 end point, employing 0.02 n HCl and an autotitrator. When 23 samples of ground beef from retail stores were tested, an average of 1.32 ml of acid was required for titration of 1 g of fresh beef to pH 5.00, whereas 2.58 ml was required for the same meat at the onset of spoilage. Preliminary data indicate that beef which requires more than 2 ml of 0.02 n HCl/g to lower its pH to 5.00 under the conditions of the test is in some state of incipient spoilage. The statistical correlation between titration values, log bacterial numbers, and extract-release volume was high (P < 0.001). The technique is simple to execute and is highly reproducible, and duplicate samples can be run within 15 min. PMID:4917189

  13. Efficacy of lactoferricin B in controlling ready-to-eat vegetable spoilage caused by Pseudomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Baruzzi; Pinto, Loris; Quintieri, Laura; Carito, Antonia; Calabrese, Nicola; Caputo, Leonardo

    2015-12-23

    The microbial content of plant tissues has been reported to cause the spoilage of ca. 30% of chlorine-disinfected fresh vegetables during cold storage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial peptides in controlling microbial vegetable spoilage under cold storage conditions. A total of 48 bacterial isolates were collected from ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetables and identified as belonging to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Aeromonas media, Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas jessenii, Pseudomonas koreensis, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas simiae and Pseudomonas viridiflava species. Reddish or brownish pigmentation was found when Pseudomonas strains were inoculated in wounds on leaves of Iceberg and Trocadero lettuce and escarole chicory throughout cold storage. Bovine lactoferrin (BLF) and its hydrolysates (LFHs) produced by pepsin, papain and rennin, were assayed in vitro against four Pseudomonas spp. strains selected for their heavy spoiling ability. As the pepsin-LFH showed the strongest antimicrobial effect, subsequent experiments were carried out using the peptide lactoferricin B (LfcinB), well known to be responsible for its antimicrobial activity. LfcinB significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) spoilage by a mean of 36% caused by three out of four inoculated spoiler pseudomonads on RTE lettuce leaves after six days of cold storage. The reduction in the extent of spoilage was unrelated to viable cell density in the inoculated wounds. This is the first paper providing direct evidence regarding the application of an antimicrobial peptide to control microbial spoilage affecting RTE leafy vegetables during cold storage.

  14. Changes of Bacterial Diversity Depend on the Spoilage of Fresh Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hwan Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Almost 10~30% of vegetables were discarded by the spoilage from farms to tables. After harvest, vegetables are often spoiled by a wide variety of microorganisms including many bacterial and fungal species. This investigation was conducted to extent the knowledge of relationship the spoilage of vegetables and the diversity of microbes. The total aerobic bacterial numbers in fresh lettuce, perilla leaf, and chicory were 2.6~2.7×106, 4.6×105, 1.2×106 CFU/g of fresh weight, respectively. The most common bacterial species were Pseudomonas spp., Alysiella spp., and Burkholderia spp., and other 18 more genera were involved in. After one week of incubation of those vegetables at 28℃, the microbial diversity had been changed. The total aerobic bacterial numbers increased to 1.1~4.6×108, 4.9×107, and 7.6×108 CFU/g of fresh weight for lettuce, perilla leaf, and chicory that is about 102 times increased bacterial numbers than that before spoilage. However, the diversity of microbes isolated had been simplified and fewer bacterial species had been isolated. The most bacterial population (~48% was taken up by Pseudomonas spp., and followed by Arthrobacter spp. and Bacillus spp. The spoilage activity of individual bacterial isolates had been tested using axenic lettuce plants. Among tested isolates, Pseudomonas fluorescence and Pantoea agglomerans caused severe spoilage on lettuce.

  15. Introduction to the Microbiological Spoilage of Foods and Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, William H.

    Though direct evidence of ancient food-handling practices is difficult to obtain and examine, it seems safe to assume that over the span of several million years, prehistoric humans struggled to maintain an adequate food supply. Their daily food needed to be hunted or harvested and consumed before it spoiled and became unfit to eat. Freshly killed animals, for example, could not have been kept for very long periods of time. Moreover, many early humans were nomadic, continually searching for food. We can imagine that, with an unreliable food supply, their lives must have often been literally "feast or famine." Yet, our ancestors gradually learned by accident, or by trial and error, simple techniques that could extend the storage time of their food (Block, 1991). Their brain capacity was similar to that of modern humans; therefore, some of them were likely early scientists and technologists. They would have learned that primitive cereal grains, nuts and berries, etc. could be stored in covered vessels to keep them dry and safer from mold spoilage. Animal products could be kept in cool places or dried and smoked over a fire, as the controlled use of fire by humans is thought to have begun about 400,000 years ago. Quite likely, naturally desiccated or fermented foods were also noticed and produced routinely to provide a more stable supply of edible food. Along with the development of agricultural practices for crop and animal production, the "simple" food-handling practices developed during the relatively countless millennia of prehistory paved the way for human civilizations.

  16. Volatile components associated with bacterial spoilage of tropical prawns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinivasagam, H N; Bremner, H A; Wood, A F; Nottingham, S M

    1998-06-30

    Analysis of headspace volatiles by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry from king (Penaeus plebejus), banana (P. merguiensis), tiger (P. esculentus/semisulcatus) and greasy (Metapenaeus bennettae) prawns stored in ice or ice slurry, which is effectively an environment of low oxygen tension, indicated the presence of amines at the early stages of storage (less than 8 days) irrespective of the nature of the storage media. Esters were more prevalent in prawns stored on ice (normal oxygen conditions) at the latter stages of storage (more than 8 days) and were only produced by Pseudomonas fragi, whereas sulphides and amines occurred whether the predominant spoilage organism was Ps. fragi or Shewanella putrefaciens. The free amino acid profiles of banana and king prawns were high in arginine (12-14%) and low in cysteine (0.1-0.17%) and methionine (0.1-0.2%). Filter sterilised raw banana prawn broth inoculated with a total of 15 cultures of Ps. fragi and S. putrefaciens and incubated for two weeks at 5 degrees C, showed the presence of 17 major compounds in the headspace volatiles analysed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These were mainly amines, sulphides, ketones and esters. Principal Component Analysis of the results for the comparative levels of the volatiles produced by pure cultures, inoculated into sterile prawn broth, indicated three subgroupings of the organisms; I, Ps. fragi from a particular geographic location; II, S. putrefaciens from another geographic location; and III, a mixture of Ps. fragi and S. putrefaciens from different geographic locations. The sensory impression created by the cultures was strongly related to the chemical profile as determined by GC/MS. Organisms, even within the same subgrouping classified as identical by the usual tests, produced a different range of volatiles in the same uniform substrate.

  17. Electronic energy transfer involving carotenoid pigments in chlorosomes of two green bacteria: Chlorobium tepidum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melø, T. B.; Frigaard, N.-U.; Matsuura, K.; Razi Naqvi, K.

    2000-09-01

    Electronic energy transfer processes in chlorosomes isolated from the green sulphur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum and from the green filamentous bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus have been investigated. Steady-state fluorescence excitation spectra and time-resolved triplet-minus-singlet (TmS) spectra, recorded at ambient temperature and under non-reducing or reducing conditions, are reported. The carotenoid (Car) pigments in both species transfer their singlet excitation to bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c) with an efficiency which is high (between 0.5 and 0.8) but smaller than unity; BChl c and bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) transfer their triplet excitation to the Car's with nearly 100% efficiency. The lifetime of the Car triplet states is approximately 3 μs, appreciably shorter than that of the Car triplets in the light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) in green plants and in other antenna systems. In both types of chlorosomes the yield of BChl c triplets (as judged from the yield of the Car triplets) remains insensitive to the redox conditions. In notable contrast the yield of BChl c singlet emission falls, upon a change from reducing to non-reducing conditions, by factors of 4 and 35 in Cfx. aurantiacus and Cb. tepidum, respectively. It is possible to account for these observations if one postulates that the bulk of the BChl c triplets originate either from a large BChl c pool which is essentially non-fluorescent and non-responsive to changes in the redox conditions, or as a result of a process which quenches BChl c singlet excitation and becomes more efficient under non-reducing conditions. In chlorosomes from Cfx. aurantiacus whose Car content is lowered, by hexane extraction, to 10% of the original value, nearly one-third of the photogenerated BChl c triplets still end up on the residual Car pigments, which is taken as evidence of BChl c-to-BChl c migration of triplet excitation; the BChl c triplets which escape rapid static quenching contribute a depletion

  18. Metabolism of lactic acid in fermented cucumbers by Lactobacillus buchneri and related species, potential spoilage organisms in reduced salt fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent evidence suggests that Lactobacillus buchneri may play an important role in spoilage-associated secondary fermentation of cucumbers. Lactic acid degradation during fermented cucumber spoilage is influenced by sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration, pH, and presence of oxygen. Objectives were to...

  19. The antimicrobial efficacy and structure activity relationship of novel carbohydrate fatty acid derivatives against Listeria spp. and food spoilage microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobmann, Patricia; Smith, Aoife; Dunne, Julie; Henehan, Gary; Bourke, Paula

    2009-01-15

    Novel mono-substituted carbohydrate fatty acid (CFA) esters and ethers were investigated for their antibacterial activity against a range of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria focussing on Listeria monocytogenes. Carbohydrate derivatives with structural differences enable comparative studies on the structure/activity relationship for antimicrobial efficacy and mechanism of action. The antimicrobial efficacy of the synthesized compounds was compared with commercially available compounds such as monolaurin and monocaprylin, as well as the pure free fatty acids, lauric acid and caprylic acid, which have proven antimicrobial activity. Compound efficacy was compared using an absorbance based broth microdilution assay to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), increase in lag phase and decrease in maximum growth rate. Among the carbohydrate derivatives synthesized, lauric ether of methyl alpha-d-glucopyranoside and lauric ester of methyl alpha-d-mannopyranoside showed the highest growth-inhibitory effect with MIC values of 0.04 mM, comparable to monolaurin. CFA derivatives were generally more active against Gram positive bacteria than Gram negative bacteria. The analysis of both ester and ether fatty acid derivatives of the same carbohydrate, in tandem with alpha and beta configuration of the carbohydrate moiety suggest that the carbohydrate moiety is involved in the antimicrobial activity of the fatty acid derivatives and that the nature of the bond also has a significant effect on efficacy, which requires further investigation. This class of CFA derivatives has great potential for developing antibacterial agents relevant to the food industry, particularly for control of Listeria or other Gram-positive pathogens.

  20. Oxygen Requirements of the Food Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii in Synthetic and Complex Media

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2001-01-01

    Most yeast species can ferment sugars to ethanol, but only a few can grow in the complete absence of oxygen. Oxygen availability might, therefore, be a key parameter in spoilage of food caused by fermentative yeasts. In this study, the oxygen requirement and regulation of alcoholic fermentation were studied in batch cultures of the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii at a constant pH, pH 3.0. In aerobic, glucose-grown cultures, Z. bailii exhibited aerobic alcoholic fermentation similar to...

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Ethyl Acetate the Extract of Noni Fruit (Morinda citrifolia L.) Against Bacterial Spoilage in Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraheni, E. R.; Adriani, G. R.; Munawaroh, H.

    2017-04-01

    Noni fruit (Morinda citrifolia L.) contains compounds that have potential as antibacterial agent. Antibacterial compounds produced noni fruit (M. citrifolia L.) can inhibit bacterial growth. This study was conducted to test the antibacterial activity of ethyl acetate extract of noni fruit (M. citrifolia L.) against spoilage bacterial in fish. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Enterobacter aerogenes isolates and examine antibacterial phytochemical profile. Extraction of noni compounds was done by maceration, followed by partition with ethyl acetate to obtain the soluble and insoluble ethyl acetate fraction. Previews result show that the ethyl acetate extract had very strong activity. Extraction process continued by separation and isolation used preparative thin layer chromatography method, so that obtained five isolates and mark them as A, B, C, D and E. Antibacterial activity assay performed on isolates A, B, C, D, and E with 20 and 30% concentration. The test results showed that isolates A could not be inhibit the growth of bacteria, isolates B, C, D, and E has antibacterial activity with weak to strong inhibition. Isolate B had the greatest inhibition activity against the B. cereus, whereas isolates E had the greatest inhibition activity against P. aeroginosa. MIC (Minimum Inhibitor Concentration) and MBC (Minimum Bactericidal Concentration) test result showed that MIC and MBC values could not be determined. Analysis of compounds by TLC showed that isolate B suspected contains coumarin or flavonoids compounds that have antibacterial activity.

  2. Mold spoilage of bread and its biopreservation: A review of current strategies for bread shelf life extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axel, Claudia; Zannini, Emanuele; Arendt, Elke K

    2017-11-02

    Microbial spoilage of bread and the consequent waste problem causes large economic losses for both the bakery industry and the consumer. Furthermore the presence of mycotoxins due to fungal contamination in cereals and cereal products remains a significant issue. The use of conventional chemical preservatives has several drawbacks, necessitating the development of clean-label alternatives. In this review, we describe current research aiming to extend the shelf life of bread through the use of more consumer friendly and ecologically sustainable preservation techniques as alternatives to chemical additives. Studies on the in situ-production/-expression of antifungal compounds are presented, with special attention given to recent developments over the past decade. Sourdough fermented with antifungal strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is an area of increasing focus and serves as a high-potential biological ingredient to produce gluten-containing and gluten-free breads with improved nutritional value, quality and safety due to shelf-life extension, and is in-line with consumer's demands for more products containing less additives. Other alternative biopreservation techniques include the utilization of antifungal peptides, ethanol and plant extracts. These can be added to bread formulations or incorporated in antimicrobial films for active packaging (AP) of bread. This review outlines recent progress that has been made in the area of bread biopreservation and future perspectives in this important area.

  3. The effects of packaging method (vacuum pouch vs. plastic tray) on spoilage in a cook-chill pork-based dish kept under refrigeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Pedro; Garrido, María Dolores; Bañón, Sancho

    2010-03-01

    The effects of two packaging methods on the spoilage of a cook-chill pork-based dish kept under refrigeration were studied. Raw pork cuts and pre-cooked tomato sauce were packed under vacuum "sous vide" in polyamide-polypropylene pouches (SV) or into translucent polypropylene trays under modified atmosphere (80% N(2)+20% CO(2)) and sealed with a top film (PT). Samples were cooked inside the pack at an oven temperature/time of 70 degrees C/7h, chilled at 3 degrees C and stored at 2 degrees C for up to 90days. Microbial (psychrotrophs, lactic-acid bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, moulds and yeasts), physical-chemical (pH, water activity and total acidity) and sensory (colour, odour, flavour, texture and acceptance) parameters were determined. Heat penetration was faster in SV (2 degrees C/min) than in PT (1 degrees C/min) (core temperature). Both packaging methods were equally effective in protecting against microbial spoilage for 90 day at 2 degrees C. Minor counts were only detected for lactic-acid bacteria and anaerobic psychrotrophs in SV. No Enterobacteriaceae growth was found. Slight differences between SV and PT in pH and total acidity were observed. SV and PT had similar effects on the sensory preservation of the dishes. A gradual loss of acceptance of the cooked pork and tomato sauce was observed. Rancid flavour in PT and warmed-over-flavour in SV were noted in the final stages of storage. According to acceptance scores, the shelf-life of both SV and PT was 56 days at 2 degrees C. Both packaging methods can be used to manufacture sous vide meat-based dishes subsequently stored under refrigeration for catering use. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Beer-spoiling Ability of Lactic Acid Bacteria and its Relation with Genes horA, horC a hitA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoulková, D.; Kubizniaková, P.; Sigler, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 58, 11-12 (2012), s. 336-342 ISSN 0023-5830 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : beer spoilage * lactic acid bacteria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  5. Development and validation of a colorimetric sensor array for fish spoilage monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsy, Mohamed K.; Zor, Kinga; Kostesha, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    their color changes in response to compounds present in fresh products (hexanal, 1-octane-3-ol) used as negative controls. The colorimetric sensor array was used to follow fish spoilage over time at room temperature for up to 24 h as well as at 4 °C for 9 days. Additionally, fish decay was monitored using...

  6. The occurrence of spoilage yeasts in cream-filled bakery products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osimani, Andrea; Milanović, Vesna; Taccari, Manuela; Cardinali, Federica; Pasquini, Marina; Aquilanti, Lucia; Clementi, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    Filling creams can provide an adequate substrate for spoilage yeasts because some yeasts can tolerate the high osmotic stress in these products. To discover the source of spoilage of a cream-filled baked product, end products, raw materials, indoor air and work surfaces were subjected to microbiological and molecular analyses. The efficacy of disinfectants against spoilage yeasts was also assessed. The analyses on end products revealed the presence of the closest relatives to Zygosaccharomyces bailii with counts ranging from 1.40 to 4.72 log cfu g -1 . No spoilage yeasts were found in the indoor air and work surfaces. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, carried out directly on filling creams collected from unopened cans, showed the presence of bands ascribed to the closest relatives to Z. bailii sensu lato, although with counts < 1 log cfu g -1 . Susceptibility testing of yeast isolates to disinfectants showed a significantly lower effect of 10% alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride. Different responses of isolates to the tested disinfectants were seen. To guarantee the quality of end products, reliable and sensitive methods must be used. Moreover, hygiene and the application of good manufacturing practices represent the most efficient way for the prevention and minimization of cross-contamination. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Importance of Photobacterium phosphoreum in relation to spoilage of modified atmosphere-packed fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Paw; Mejlholm, Ole; Christiansen, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    products and the organism is likely to be of importance for spoilage of several modified atmosphere-packed (MAP) marine fish species when stored at chill temperatures. Some microbiological methods recommended for control of fish products by national and international authorities are inappropriate...

  8. Development of a model system for the study of spoilage associated secondary cucumber fermentation during long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Wendy; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M

    2012-10-01

    Calcium chloride fermentations represent an alternative to reduce chloride concentrations in the wastewaters generated from commercial cucumber fermentations, currently performed in cover brine solutions containing 6% to 12% sodium chloride. However, preliminary attempts to commercially ferment the cucumbers in the presence of oxygen led to the development of a secondary cucumber fermentation or spoilage. The development of cucumber secondary fermentation has also been occasionally reported by processors using cover brine solutions containing sodium chloride. This study focused on the development of a model system to characterize CaCl(2) and NaCl secondary cucumber fermentations under conditions similar to those present on the commercial scale. Cucumber fruits mixed with cover brine solutions, containing 100 mM CaCl(2) or 1.03 M NaCl, and 25 mM acetic acid, were fermented in 2 L fermentation vessels subjected to air-purging at a rate of 5 mL/min. Microorganisms and selected biochemical changes detected in the experimental cucumber fermentations had been previously observed in commercial spoilage samples, suggesting the successful reproduction of the secondary fermentation in the laboratory. Experimental secondary fermentations were characterized by the rapid oxidation of the lactic acid produced during the primary fermentation, which, in turn, increased pH. Lactic acid disappearance seemed to be the result of yeast metabolism that also led to the chemical reduction of the environment to levels at which other bacteria could become established and produce butyric, propionic, and acetic acids. This model system will be applied for the identification of strategies to prevent the initiation of the cucumber secondary fermentation and reduce economic losses in the pickling industry. The study of secondary cucumber fermentation has represented a challenge for many years. The successful development of a model system for the study of this phenomenon in the laboratory is

  9. Inactivation of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage micro-organisms using ultraviolet-A light in combination with ferulic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, A; Watanabe, T; Matsuki, H

    2017-02-01

    The low energy of UV-A (315-400 nm) is insufficient for disinfection. To improve UV-A disinfection technology, we evaluated the effect of ferulic acid (FA) addition on disinfection by UV-A light-emitting diode (LED) (350-385 nm) against various food spoilers and pathogens (seven bacteria and four fungi species). Photoantimicrobial assays were performed at FA concentrations below the MIC. The MIC of the isomerized FA, consisting of 93% cis-form and 7% trans-form, was very similar to that of the commercially available FA (trans-form). Irradiation with UV-A (1·0 J cm -2 ) in the presence of 100 mg l -1 FA resulted in enhanced reducing of all of the tested bacterial strains. A combination of UV-A (10 J cm -2 ) and 1000 mg l -1 FA resulted in enhanced reducing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one of the tested filamentous fungi. These results demonstrated that the combination of a short-term application of UV-A and FA at a low concentration yielded synergistic enhancement of antimicrobial activity, especially against bacteria. Microbial contamination is one of the most serious problems for foods, fruit and sugar thick juices. UV light is suitable for the nonthermal decontamination of food products by inactivating the contaminating micro-organisms. However, UV-A exposure is insufficient for disinfection. This study demonstrates that the combination of UV-A LED light (350-385 nm), which is not hazardous to human eyes and skin, and ferulic acid (FA), a known phytochemical and food additive, provides synergistic antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogenic and spoilage micro-organisms. Therefore, FA addition to UV-A light treatment may be useful for improvement of UV-A disinfection technology to prevent food deterioration. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Michael; Harris, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces’ metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains. PMID:28231223

  11. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lentz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces’ metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains.

  12. Discrimination of wine lactic acid bacteria by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Susan B; Thornton, Mark A; Thornton, Roy J

    2017-08-01

    Species of Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Oenococcus, and Leuconostoc play an important role in winemaking, as either inoculants or contaminants. The metabolic products of these lactic acid bacteria have considerable effects on the flavor, aroma, and texture of a wine. However, analysis of a wine's microflora, especially the bacteria, is rarely done unless spoilage becomes evident, and identification at the species or strain level is uncommon as the methods required are technically difficult and expensive. In this work, we used Raman spectral fingerprints to discriminate 19 strains of Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, and Oenococcus. Species of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus and strains of O. oeni and P. damnosus were classified with high sensitivity: 86-90 and 84-85%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that a simple, inexpensive method utilizing Raman spectroscopy can be used to accurately identify lactic acid bacteria isolated from wine.

  13. Volatile metabolite production of spoilage micro-organisms on a mixed-lettuce agar during storage at 7 degrees C in air and low oxygen atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragaert, P; Devlieghere, F; Devuyst, E; Dewulf, J; Van Langenhove, H; Debevere, J

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes the volatile metabolite production of spoilage bacteria (Pantoea agglomerans and Rahnella aquatilis) and spoilage yeasts (Pichia fermentans and Cryptococcus laurentii), previously isolated from mixed lettuce, on a simulation medium of shredded mixed lettuce (mixed-lettuce agar) both under air conditions and modified atmosphere (MA)-conditions at 7 degrees C. These latter conditions simulated the equilibrium modified atmosphere packaging, which is used to extend the shelf-life of shredded mixed lettuce. Besides volatile metabolites, organic acid metabolites and consumption of sugars were measured. Microbiological growth on the mixed-lettuce agar resulted in metabolite production and consumption of sugars. Bacteria and yeasts produced a range of volatile organic compounds both under air conditions and MA-conditions: ethanol, ethyl acetate, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2,3-butanedione, 3-methyl-1-pentanol, 1-butanol and 1-hexanol. Under MA-conditions, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and ethanol were the first compounds that were detected in the headspace as being produced by the inoculated micro-organisms. In the case of the yeast P. fermentans, production of these compounds was detected from a count of 5.0+/-0.1 log cfu/cm(2) with a fast increase when exceeding 6.0-6.5 log cfu/cm(2). Unlike P. fermentans, the yeast C. laurentii showed a slow metabolism under MA-conditions, compared to air conditions. In the case of the bacteria, production of 2-methyl-1-butanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol was detected starting from a count of 6.7+/-0.1 log cfu/cm(2) in the case of R. aquatilis and from a count of 7.1+/-0.4 log cfu/cm(2) in the case of P. agglomerans with a fast increase when exceeding 8 log cfu/cm(2). No production of ethanol by the bacteria under MA-conditions was detected in contradiction to air conditions. It could be concluded that, if these counts are reached on the cut surfaces of shredded mixed lettuce

  14. Magnetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  15. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  16. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria......, the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size...

  17. Bacterial Community and Spoilage Profiles Shift in Response to Packaging in Yellow-Feather Broiler, a Highly Popular Meat in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huhu Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of yellow-feathered broiler has been advocated for purchasing with chilled meat rather than live broilers in Asia due to the outbreaks of animal influenza. Here, the microbial community of chilled yellow-feathered broiler response to modified-air packaging (MAP, 80% CO2/20% N2 and penetrated-air packaging (PAP, air-filling during storage was revealed by a combination of whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing and traditional isolation methods, and the volatile organic compounds and proteolytic activity of representative dominant isolates were also accessed. The results revealed that MAP prolonged shelf life from 4 to 8 days compared to PAP, when the numbers of total viable counts and lactic acid bacteria reached more than 7 log CFU/g. Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, Escherichia, and Streptococcus occupied the bacteria communities in initial broiler carcasses. MAP dramatically increased the bacteria diversity during storage compared to PAP. Clear shifts of the dominant bacteria species were obviously observed, with the top genera of Aeromonas, Lactococcus, Serratia, and Shewanella in MAP, whereas the microbial communities in PAP were largely dominated by Pseudomonas. The isolates of Pseudomonas from PAP carcasses and Aeromonas from MAP carcasses displayed strong proteolytic activities. Meanwhile, the principal component analysis based on the volatile organic compounds indicated that the metabolic profiles greatly varied between each treatment, and no link between the natural odor of spoilage meat in situ and the volatile odor of the dominant isolates incubated in standard culture was found. These data could lead to new insights into the bacteria communities of yellow-feathered broiler meat during storage and would benefit the development of novel preservative approaches.

  18. Bacterial Community and Spoilage Profiles Shift in Response to Packaging in Yellow-Feather Broiler, a Highly Popular Meat in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huhu; Zhang, Xinxiao; Wang, Guangyu; Jia, Kun; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2017-01-01

    The consumption of yellow-feathered broiler has been advocated for purchasing with chilled meat rather than live broilers in Asia due to the outbreaks of animal influenza. Here, the microbial community of chilled yellow-feathered broiler response to modified-air packaging (MAP, 80% CO2/20% N2) and penetrated-air packaging (PAP, air-filling) during storage was revealed by a combination of whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing and traditional isolation methods, and the volatile organic compounds and proteolytic activity of representative dominant isolates were also accessed. The results revealed that MAP prolonged shelf life from 4 to 8 days compared to PAP, when the numbers of total viable counts and lactic acid bacteria reached more than 7 log CFU/g. Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, Escherichia, and Streptococcus occupied the bacteria communities in initial broiler carcasses. MAP dramatically increased the bacteria diversity during storage compared to PAP. Clear shifts of the dominant bacteria species were obviously observed, with the top genera of Aeromonas, Lactococcus, Serratia, and Shewanella in MAP, whereas the microbial communities in PAP were largely dominated by Pseudomonas. The isolates of Pseudomonas from PAP carcasses and Aeromonas from MAP carcasses displayed strong proteolytic activities. Meanwhile, the principal component analysis based on the volatile organic compounds indicated that the metabolic profiles greatly varied between each treatment, and no link between the natural odor of spoilage meat in situ and the volatile odor of the dominant isolates incubated in standard culture was found. These data could lead to new insights into the bacteria communities of yellow-feathered broiler meat during storage and would benefit the development of novel preservative approaches. PMID:29312261

  19. Origin and ecological selection of core and food-specific bacterial communities associated with meat and seafood spoilage

    OpenAIRE

    Chaillou, Stéphane; Chaulot-Talmon, Aurélie; Caekebeke, Hélène; Cardinal, Mireille; Christieans, Souad; Denis, Catherine; Hélène Desmonts, Marie; Dousset, Xavier; Feurer, Carole; Hamon, Erwann; Joffraud, Jean-Jacques; La Carbona, Stéphanie; Leroi, Françoise; Leroy, Sabine; Lorre, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The microbial spoilage of meat and seafood products with short shelf lives is responsible for a significant amount of food waste. Food spoilage is a very heterogeneous process, involving the growth of various, poorly characterized bacterial communities. In this study, we conducted 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing on 160 samples of fresh and spoiled foods to comparatively explore the bacterial communities associated with four meat products and four seafood products that are among the most...

  20. A chemometrics approach applied to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for monitoring the spoilage of fresh salmon (Salmo salar) stored under modified atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, C; Vasconcelos, H; de Almeida, José M M M

    2017-01-16

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to detect and predict the bacterial load of salmon fillets (Salmo salar) stored at 3, 8 and 30°C under three packaging conditions: air packaging (AP) and two modified atmospheres constituted by a mixture of 50%N 2 /40%CO 2 /10%O 2 with lemon juice (MAPL) and without lemon juice (MAP). Fresh salmon samples were periodically examined for total viable counts (TVC), specific spoilage organisms (SSO) counts, pH, FTIR and sensory assessment of freshness. Principal components analysis (PCA) allowed identification of the wavenumbers potentially correlated with the spoilage process. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of infrared spectral data was performed to support sensory data and to accurately identify samples freshness. The effect of the packaging atmospheres was assessed by microbial enumeration and LDA was used to determine sample packaging from the measured infrared spectra. It was verified that modified atmospheres can decrease significantly the bacterial load of fresh salmon. Lemon juice combined with MAP showed a more pronounced delay in the growth of Brochothrix thermosphacta, Photobacterium phosphoreum, psychrotrophs and H 2 S producers. Partial least squares regression (PLS-R) allowed estimates of TVC and psychrotrophs, lactic acid bacteria, molds and yeasts, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp. and H 2 S producer counts from the infrared spectral data. For TVC, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) value was 0.78logcfug -1 for an external set of samples. According to the results, FTIR can be used as a reliable, accurate and fast method for real time freshness evaluation of salmon fillets stored under different temperatures and packaging atmospheres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mapping microbial ecosystems and spoilage-gene flow in breweries highlights patterns of contamination and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokulich, Nicholas A; Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Ziola, Barry; Mills, David A

    2015-03-10

    Distinct microbial ecosystems have evolved to meet the challenges of indoor environments, shaping the microbial communities that interact most with modern human activities. Microbial transmission in food-processing facilities has an enormous impact on the qualities and healthfulness of foods, beneficially or detrimentally interacting with food products. To explore modes of microbial transmission and spoilage-gene frequency in a commercial food-production scenario, we profiled hop-resistance gene frequencies and bacterial and fungal communities in a brewery. We employed a Bayesian approach for predicting routes of contamination, revealing critical control points for microbial management. Physically mapping microbial populations over time illustrates patterns of dispersal and identifies potential contaminant reservoirs within this environment. Habitual exposure to beer is associated with increased abundance of spoilage genes, predicting greater contamination risk. Elucidating the genetic landscapes of indoor environments poses important practical implications for food-production systems and these concepts are translatable to other built environments.

  2. The Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii Forms Mitotic Spores: a Screening Method for Haploidization

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Ludovico, Paula; Sousa, Maria João; Steensma, H. Yde; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2003-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 and the type strain of this spoilage yeast show a diploid DNA content. Together with a rather peculiar life cycle in which mitotic but no meiotic spores appear to be formed, the diploid DNA content explains the observed difficulties in obtaining auxotrophic mutants. Mitotic chromosome loss induced by benomyl and selection on canavanine media resulted in three haploid strains of Z. bailii. This new set of Z. bailii strains allows the easy isolation...

  3. Genome sequence of the food spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii CLIB 213T.

    OpenAIRE

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Devillers, Hugo; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Dequin, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycetous yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most problematic spoilage yeasts in food and beverage industries, due to its exceptional resistance to various stresses. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these stress resistance phenotypes might help develop strategies to improve food quality. Thus, we determined and annotated the genome sequence of the strain Z. bailii CLIB 213(T) (= CBS 680).

  4. Genome Sequence of the Food Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii CLIB 213T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Devillers, Hugo; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Dequin, Sylvie

    2013-08-22

    The ascomycetous yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most problematic spoilage yeasts in food and beverage industries, due to its exceptional resistance to various stresses. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these stress resistance phenotypes might help develop strategies to improve food quality. Thus, we determined and annotated the genome sequence of the strain Z. bailii CLIB 213(T) (= CBS 680).

  5. A standard bacterial isolate set for research on contemporary dairy spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trmčić, A; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2015-08-01

    Food spoilage is an ongoing issue that could be dealt with more efficiently if some standardization and unification was introduced in this field of research. For example, research and development efforts to understand and reduce food spoilage can greatly be enhanced through availability and use of standardized isolate sets. To address this critical issue, we have assembled a standard isolate set of dairy spoilers and other selected nonpathogenic organisms frequently associated with dairy products. This publicly available bacterial set consists of (1) 35 gram-positive isolates including 9 Bacillus and 15 Paenibacillus isolates and (2) 16 gram-negative isolates including 4 Pseudomonas and 8 coliform isolates. The set includes isolates obtained from samples of pasteurized milk (n=43), pasteurized chocolate milk (n=1), raw milk (n=1), cheese (n=2), as well as isolates obtained from samples obtained from dairy-powder production (n=4). Analysis of growth characteristics in skim milk broth identified 16 gram-positive and 13 gram-negative isolates as psychrotolerant. Additional phenotypic characterization of isolates included testing for activity of β-galactosidase and lipolytic and proteolytic enzymes. All groups of isolates included in the isolate set exhibited diversity in growth and enzyme activity. Source data for all isolates in this isolate set are publicly available in the FoodMicrobeTracker database (http://www.foodmicrobetracker.com), which allows for continuous updating of information and advancement of knowledge on dairy-spoilage representatives included in this isolate set. This isolate set along with publicly available isolate data provide a unique resource that will help advance knowledge of dairy-spoilage organisms as well as aid industry in development and validation of new control strategies. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reduction of spoilage of chilled vacuum-packed lamb by psychrotolerant clostridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Katharine H; Flint, Steve H; Brightwell, Gale

    2013-02-01

    Methods for the reduction of spoilage, of lamb, by psychrotolerant clostridia were investigated including exposure to air, hot and cold water spray washing and tyndallisation. Initially vegetative cells of psychrotolerant clostridia associated with spoilage of chilled vacuum-packed meat were exposed to aerobic cooked meat medium at room temperature (21 °C) to determine how long they remained viable. Survival of strains varied from 2h to 3 days. Vegetative cells of Clostridium estertheticum subsp. estertheticum survived 7 days at 10 °C with little reduction in viable numbers. This ruled out exposure to air as a practical method for reducing spoilage. Trials were also carried out on chilled vacuum-packed lamb inoculated with spores of Cl. estertheticum subsp. estertheticum. The time until inoculated packs reached the loss of vacuum stage varied from 38 to 53 days. Hot and cold water washing extended the shelf life by 12 to 13 days in comparison to untreated packs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In situ control of food spoilage fungus using Lactobacillus acidophilus NCDC 291.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcha, Seema; Natt, Navdeep Kaur

    2012-10-01

    A challenge for food industry today is to produce minimally processed food, without use of chemical preservatives and little compromise on nutritional status. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCDC 291 can be directly added to food where it enhances shelf life by competing with other microflora (both bacterial and fungal) for food and also by production of antimicrobial metabolites as bacteriocins. Comprehensive studies have demonstrated the in vitro activity of bacteriocins. However their role in preventing fresh food spoilage needs more elucidation. The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the whole cells of this organism as biopreservative agent against fungi. Four most commonly occurring spoilage fungi were isolated and were identified as Fusarium, Alternaria, Penicillium and Aspergillus. Growth of all of them was inhibited in in vitro studies, (approximately 33-43% decrease in mycelial dry weight basis between test and control). In situ biopreservation of Indian cheese and raw poultry meat was attempted and the colony count of Alternaria was significantly (p spoilage was not observed up to 6 days.

  8. Sour rot-damaged grapes are sources of wine spoilage yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, André; González, Sara; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel; Querol, Amparo; Loureiro, Virgílio

    2008-11-01

    Yeast species of sound and sour rot-damaged grapes were analysed during fermentation and grape ripening in the vineyard, using general and selective culture media. During 2003 and 2004 vintages, microvinifications were carried out with sound grapes to which different amounts of grapes with sour rot were added. The wine spoilage species Zygosaccharomyces bailii was only recovered during fermentations with sour rot, reaching 5.00 log CFU mL(-1) (2003) and 2.48 log CFU mL(-1) (2004) at the end of fermentation. The study of yeast populations during the sour rot ripening process (2005 vintage) showed that the veraison-damaged grapes always exhibited higher total yeast counts and a much greater diversity of species. From a total of 22 ascomycetous species, 17 were present only in damaged grapes. The most frequent species were Issatchenkia occidentalis and Zygoascus hellenicus. The spoilage species Z. bailii and Zygosaccharomyces bisporus were consistently isolated exclusively from damaged grapes. This work demonstrates that one of the most dangerous wine spoilage species, Z. bailii, is strongly associated with sour rot grapes and survives during fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The use of selective media provides a more accurate characterization of grape contamination species.

  9. EFFECT OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD ON THE SPOILAGE FUNGI OF SOME SELECTED EDIBLE FRUITS IN SOUTHWESTERN, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamidele J. Akinyele

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of electromagnetic field wave on the survival of spoilage fungi associated with some edible fruits consumed in southwestern, Nigeria was studied using cashew (Anacardium occidentale L., pineapple (Ananas comosus, carrot (Daucus carota, cucumber (Cucumis sativus, apple (Malus domestica and African star apple (Chrysophyllum africanum. The spoilage fungi used include the genera of Aspergillus, Penicillium, Articulospora, Mucor, Staphylotrichum, Bisbyopeltis, Fusarium, Rhizopus and a yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a general decrease in fungal growth as shown in the number of spores produced with increase in exposure time of isolates to electromagnetic field except in Articulospora inflata, Penicillium italicum and Mucor mucedo where there was stimulatory effect as there was increase in the fungal spores compared to the control. A decrease was also observed in growth of the fungal isolates with increase in the intensity of the electromagnetic field at voltage of 7 V to 10 V and from 10 V to 13 V. The highest percentage reduction was recorded by Bisbyopeltis phoebesii at intensity of voltage 13V after 60 minutes of exposure. Exposure of the fruits to electromagnetic field wave did not alter the nutrient components of the fruits as observed in the proximate and mineral contents of the treated and untreated fruits. The result of the study revealed that electromagnetic field wave has great potential for use in the control of fruits spoilage and food preservation.

  10. Typing some of lactic acid bacteria in Syria using PCR and FT-IR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mariri, A.; Sharabi, N. D.

    2008-11-01

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) are considered to be the most useful microorganisms. They are beneficial in flavoring foods, inhibiting pathogenic as well as spoilage bacteria in food products. The isolates of LAB were obtained from traditional Syrian dairy products (white cheese and curdled yogurt) obtained from different regions in Syria. The isolates were subjected to phenotypic characterization analyses. The PCR technique of bacterial DNA was evaluated as an advanced tool for the identification of LAB. It was found that strains: E. faecium, E. faecalis and S. thermophilus dominate in white cheese and in yogurt. Our results demonstrated that we could identify LAB using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) patterns. (Authors)

  11. Typing some of lactic acid bacteria in Syria using PCR and FT-IR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mariri, A.; Sharabi, N. D.

    2010-01-01

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) are considered to be the most useful microorganisms. They are beneficial in flavoring foods, inhibiting pathogenic as well as spoilage bacteria in food products. The isolates of LAB were obtained from traditional Syrian dairy products (white cheese and curdled yogurt) obtained from different regions in Syria. The isolates were subjected to phenotypic characterization analyses. The PCR technique of bacterial DNA was evaluated as an advanced tool for the identification of LAB. It was found that strains: E. faecium, E. faecalis and S. thermophilus dominate in white cheese and in yogurt. Our results demonstrated that we could identify LAB using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) patterns. (author)

  12. Rapid and quantitative detection of the microbial spoilage in milk using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Nicoletta; Goodacre, Royston

    2008-10-01

    Microbiological safety plays a very significant part in the quality control of milk and dairy products worldwide. Current methods used in the detection and enumeration of spoilage bacteria in pasteurized milk in the dairy industry, although accurate and sensitive, are time-consuming. FT-IR spectroscopy is a metabolic fingerprinting technique that can potentially be used to deliver results with the same accuracy and sensitivity, within minutes after minimal sample preparation. We tested this hypothesis using attenuated total reflectance (ATR), and high throughput (HT) FT-IR techniques. Three main types of pasteurized milk - whole, semi-skimmed and skimmed - were used and milk was allowed to spoil naturally by incubation at 15 degrees C. Samples for FT-IR were obtained at frequent, fixed time intervals and pH and total viable counts were also recorded. Multivariate statistical methods, including principal components-discriminant function analysis and partial least squares regression (PLSR), were then used to investigate the relationship between metabolic fingerprints and the total viable counts. FT-IR ATR data for all milks showed reasonable results for bacterial loads above 10(5) cfu ml(-1). By contrast, FT-IR HT provided more accurate results for lower viable bacterial counts down to 10(3) cfu ml(-1) for whole milk and, 4 x 10(2) cfu ml(-1) for semi-skimmed and skimmed milk. Using FT-IR with PLSR we were able to acquire a metabolic fingerprint rapidly and quantify the microbial load of milk samples accurately, with very little sample preparation. We believe that metabolic fingerprinting using FT-IR has very good potential for future use in the dairy industry as a rapid method of detection and enumeration.

  13. The Prevalence and Control of Bacillus and Related Spore-Forming Bacteria in the Dairy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Nidhi; Hill, Colin; Ross, Paul R.; Beresford, Tom P.; Fenelon, Mark A.; Cotter, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Milk produced in udder cells is sterile but due to its high nutrient content, it can be a good growth substrate for contaminating bacteria. The quality of milk is monitored via somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts, with prescribed regulatory limits to ensure quality and safety. Bacterial contaminants can cause disease, or spoilage of milk and its secondary products. Aerobic spore-forming bacteria, such as those from the genera Sporosarcina, Paenisporosarcina, Brevibacillus, Paenibacillus, Geobacillus and Bacillus, are a particular concern in this regard as they are able to survive industrial pasteurization and form biofilms within pipes and stainless steel equipment. These single or multiple-species biofilms become a reservoir of spoilage microorganisms and a cycle of contamination can be initiated. Indeed, previous studies have highlighted that these microorganisms are highly prevalent in dead ends, corners, cracks, crevices, gaskets, valves and the joints of stainless steel equipment used in the dairy manufacturing plants. Hence, adequate monitoring and control measures are essential to prevent spoilage and ensure consumer safety. Common controlling approaches include specific cleaning-in-place processes, chemical and biological biocides and other novel methods. In this review, we highlight the problems caused by these microorganisms, and discuss issues relating to their prevalence, monitoring thereof and control with respect to the dairy industry. PMID:26733963

  14. The prevalence and control of Bacillus and related spore-forming bacteria in the dairy industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi eGopal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Milk produced in udder cells is sterile but due to its high nutrient content, it can be a good growth substrate for contaminating bacteria. The quality of milk is monitored via somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts, with prescribed regulatory limits to ensure quality and safety. Bacterial contaminants can cause disease, or spoilage of milk and its secondary products. Aerobic spore-forming bacteria, such as those from the genera Sporosarcina, Paenisporosarcina, Brevibacillus, Paenibacillus, Geobacillus and Bacillus, are a particular concern in this regard as they are able to survive industrial pasteurisation and form biofilms within pipes and stainless steel equipment. These single or multiple-species biofilms become a reservoir of spoilage microorganisms and a cycle of contamination can be initiated. Indeed, previous studies have highlighted that these microorganisms are highly prevalent in dead ends, corners, cracks, crevices, gaskets, valves and the joints of stainless steel equipment used in the dairy manufacturing plants. Hence, adequate monitoring and control measures are essential to prevent spoilage and ensure consumer safety. Common controlling approaches include specific cleaning-in-place processes, chemical and biological biocides and other novel methods. In this review, we highlight the problems caused by these microorganisms, and discuss issues relating to their prevalence, monitoring thereof and control with respect to the dairy industry.

  15. Control of Salmonella and other pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in poultry by gamma and electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1992-07-01

    Salmonella contamination of chicken is a major public health concern, causing sickness and loss of productivity. Modern, concentrated production methods increase the difficulty of Salmonella control. The current and suggested treatments with chlorinated water or heat pasteurization are unsatisfactory. In pasteurization, the end product is partially cooked, and in the chlorine water wash the poultry skin gets bleached if too much chlorine is used. There is also a risk of formation of toxic chloro-organic compounds. Further, the chlorine water wash does not completely eliminate salmonella. Low-dose radiation treatment is much more effective for the control of Salmonella and has the additional benefit of preserving the freshness of the product. Irradiation of fresh chicken carcasses, pieces or deboned chicken meat with a dose of 2.5 kGy appears to be sufficient to eliminate naturally occurring Salmonella contamination, which is generally present in extremely low numbers on this continent (1 to 30 cells/100 g). For elimination of Salmonella in frozen chicken, doses higher than 2.5 kGy are required. There is a large range of D 10 - values for the different Salmonella serotypes that have been tested, with the highest being 0.72 kGy for S. oranienberg at 22 degrees C. Thus the 2.5-kGy dose would reduce the most radio-resistant Salmonella serotype by four orders of magnitude, and the most common serotypes (with D 10 - values of 0.3 to 0.4 kGy) by greater than six orders of magnitude. The 2.5-kGy dose also appears to be sufficient to eliminate other bacterial pathogens, such as Campylobactor jejuni and Yersinia enterocolitica. The microbiological shelf life of fresh chicken carcass or deboned chicken meat (6 to 11 d) is extended by a factor of 2 to 3 with irradiation to a dose of 2.5 kGy followed by storage between 1 and 4 degrees C. In radappertization (at a dose of ≥ 45 kGy at -30 degrees C), the shelf life of enzyme-inactivated chicken meat is extended to years, on storage at ambient temperatures (∼ 20 degrees C)

  16. Identification of lactic acid bacteria with bio-preservative potential isolated from contaminated avian blood obtained at the slaughterhouse

    OpenAIRE

    Zbrun, María Virginia; Altina, Melisa Guadalupe; Bonansea, Emanuel Francisco; Frizzo, Laureano Sebastian; Soto, Lorena Paola; Romero Scharpen, Analía; Rosmini, Marcelo Raul; Sequeira, Gabriel Jorge; Signorini Porchietto, Marcelo Lisandro

    2015-01-01

    Blood is a common by-product of the meat industry, which has several potential applications in the animal feed industry. However, since blood is highly susceptible to microbial spoilage, blood and its fractions are often not suitable ingredients for the feed industry. Biopreservation appears as an alternative for the improvement of blood's quality towards its use as an ingredient in foodstuff. The objective of this work was to isolate and identify Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) in avian blood obt...

  17. Motility of electric cable bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces...... with a highly variable speed of 0.50.3 ms1 (meanstandard deviation) and time between reversals of 155108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed helical rotation of the filaments. Cable bacteria responded to chemical gradients in their environment, and around the oxic......-anoxic interface, they curled and piled up, with straight parts connecting back to the source of sulfide. Thus, it appears that motility serves the cable bacteria in establishing and keeping optimal connections between their distant electron donor and acceptors in a dynamic sediment environment....

  18. Comparison of three Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strains growth behaviour and evaluation of the spoilage risk during bread shelf-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, F; Di Biase, M; Huchet, V; Desriac, N; Lonigro, S L; Lavermicocca, P; Sohier, D; Postollec, F

    2015-02-01

    This study aims at the characterisation of growth behaviour of three strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, isolated from ropy bread (ATCC8473), wheat grain (ISPA-S109.3) and semolina (ISPA-N9.1) to estimate rope spoilage risk in pan bread during shelf-life using the Sym'Previus tool. Cardinal values and growth/no growth boundaries were determined in broth, while artificial spore inoculations were performed in dough for various pan bread recipes to compare experimental counts with in silico growth simulations. Finally, two storage scenarios were tested to determine the probability to reach a spoilage threshold during bread shelf-life. Similarly to the safety criteria fixed for Listeria monocytogenes contamination in foodstuff complying with EC regulation, a potential rope spoilage threshold was arbitrary fixed at 5 log CFU/g for B. amyloliquefaciens. This study further underlines a higher rope spoilage potential of the ISPA strains as compared to the ATCC strain, thus emphasizing the interest to characterise both wild strains and reference strain to account for biological variability. In conclusion, this study showed that available decision making tools which are largely recognized to predict behaviour of pathogenic strains, shall also be used with spoilage strains to help maintain food quality and extend shelf-life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria based on ligation detection reaction coupled to flow-through hybridization on membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, K; Cremonesi, P; Severgnini, M; Villa, Tomás G; Fernández-No, I C; Barros-Velázquez, J; Castiglioni, B; Calo-Mata, P

    2014-01-01

    Traditional culturing methods are still commonly applied for bacterial identification in the food control sector, despite being time and labor intensive. Microarray technologies represent an interesting alternative. However, they require higher costs and technical expertise, making them still inappropriate for microbial routine analysis. The present study describes the development of an efficient method for bacterial identification based on flow-through reverse dot-blot (FT-RDB) hybridization on membranes, coupled to the high specific ligation detection reaction (LDR). First, the methodology was optimized by testing different types of ligase enzymes, labeling, and membranes. Furthermore, specific oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rRNA gene, using the bioinformatic tool Oligonucleotide Retrieving for Molecular Applications (ORMA). Four probes were selected and synthesized, being specific for Aeromonas spp., Pseudomonas spp., Shewanella spp., and Morganella morganii, respectively. For the validation of the probes, 16 reference strains from type culture collections were tested by LDR and FT-RDB hybridization using universal arrays spotted onto membranes. In conclusion, the described methodology could be applied for the rapid, accurate, and cost-effective identification of bacterial species, exhibiting special relevance in food safety and quality.

  20. Detection of Food Spoilage and Pathogenic Bacteria Based on Ligation Detection Reaction Coupled to Flow-Through Hybridization on Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Böhme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional culturing methods are still commonly applied for bacterial identification in the food control sector, despite being time and labor intensive. Microarray technologies represent an interesting alternative. However, they require higher costs and technical expertise, making them still inappropriate for microbial routine analysis. The present study describes the development of an efficient method for bacterial identification based on flow-through reverse dot-blot (FT-RDB hybridization on membranes, coupled to the high specific ligation detection reaction (LDR. First, the methodology was optimized by testing different types of ligase enzymes, labeling, and membranes. Furthermore, specific oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rRNA gene, using the bioinformatic tool Oligonucleotide Retrieving for Molecular Applications (ORMA. Four probes were selected and synthesized, being specific for Aeromonas spp., Pseudomonas spp., Shewanella spp., and Morganella morganii, respectively. For the validation of the probes, 16 reference strains from type culture collections were tested by LDR and FT-RDB hybridization using universal arrays spotted onto membranes. In conclusion, the described methodology could be applied for the rapid, accurate, and cost-effective identification of bacterial species, exhibiting special relevance in food safety and quality.

  1. Detection of Food Spoilage and Pathogenic Bacteria Based on Ligation Detection Reaction Coupled to Flow-Through Hybridization on Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, K.; Cremonesi, P.; Severgnini, M.; Villa, Tomás G.; Fernández-No, I. C.; Barros-Velázquez, J.; Castiglioni, B.; Calo-Mata, P.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional culturing methods are still commonly applied for bacterial identification in the food control sector, despite being time and labor intensive. Microarray technologies represent an interesting alternative. However, they require higher costs and technical expertise, making them still inappropriate for microbial routine analysis. The present study describes the development of an efficient method for bacterial identification based on flow-through reverse dot-blot (FT-RDB) hybridization on membranes, coupled to the high specific ligation detection reaction (LDR). First, the methodology was optimized by testing different types of ligase enzymes, labeling, and membranes. Furthermore, specific oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rRNA gene, using the bioinformatic tool Oligonucleotide Retrieving for Molecular Applications (ORMA). Four probes were selected and synthesized, being specific for Aeromonas spp., Pseudomonas spp., Shewanella spp., and Morganella morganii, respectively. For the validation of the probes, 16 reference strains from type culture collections were tested by LDR and FT-RDB hybridization using universal arrays spotted onto membranes. In conclusion, the described methodology could be applied for the rapid, accurate, and cost-effective identification of bacterial species, exhibiting special relevance in food safety and quality. PMID:24818128

  2. Interaction between fish spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas sp and Shewanella putrefaciens in fish extracts and on fish tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette

    1996-01-01

    , supernatant fluids from siderophore- negative Pseudomonas isolates did not inhibit growth of S. putrefaciens. The inhibitory effect was, except for one strain of Pseudomonas, not seen in supernatant fluids from iron- enriched cultures of Pseudomonas sp. Finally, siderophore- producing Pseudomonas sp. lowered...

  3. Use of a chitosan based natural coating materials to reduce spoilage and pathogenic bacteria on poultry products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitosan is a natural compound with proven antimicrobial activity having GRAS status (generally recognized as safe) as determined by the United States Food and Drug Administration (Smith et al., 2014). Efforts are underway to develop and improve the use of chitosan based films as packaging material...

  4. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii forms mitotic spores: a screening method for haploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Ludovico, Paula; Sousa, Maria João; Steensma, H Yde; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2003-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 and the type strain of this spoilage yeast show a diploid DNA content. Together with a rather peculiar life cycle in which mitotic but no meiotic spores appear to be formed, the diploid DNA content explains the observed difficulties in obtaining auxotrophic mutants. Mitotic chromosome loss induced by benomyl and selection on canavanine media resulted in three haploid strains of Z. bailii. This new set of Z. bailii strains allows the easy isolation of recessive mutants and is suitable for further molecular genetic studies.

  5. Incorporation of nisin in natural casing for the control of spoilage microorganisms in vacuum packaged sausage

    OpenAIRE

    Barros,Joyce Regina de; Kunigk,Leo; Jurkiewicz,Cynthia Hyppolito

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of natural casing treatment with nisin and phosphoric acid on control of spoilage microorganisms in vacuum packaged sausages. Ovine casings were dipped in the following baths: 1) 0.1% food grade phosphoric acid; 2) 5.0 mg/L nisin; 3)?0.1% phosphoric acid and 5.0 mg/L nisin; and 4) sterile water (control). The sausages were produced in a pilot plant, stuffed into the pretreated natural casings, vacuum packaged and stored at 4 and 10??C for 56 days...

  6. Combination treatment of gamma radiation and paraben in controlling spoilage of poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, N.D.; Rege, D.V.

    1977-01-01

    With a view of controlling spoilage, combination treatment of poultry meat with gamma radiation and a chemical preservative has been investigated. Raw poultry pieces of about 25 g. weight were dipped in 0.1% propyl-paraben solution for two hours and were given a 0.1 Mrad dose from 60 Co gamma radiation. It was found that paraben was not affected by irradiation. The flavour evaluation scores indicated the shelf-life of poultry meat was prolonged by a couple of days as compared to untreated controls in refrigerated storage. (M.G.B.)

  7. Characterization of anti-listerial lactic acid bacteria isolated from Thai fermented fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Anya; Embarek, Peter Karim Ben; Wedell-Neergaard, C.

    1998-01-01

    Thai fermented fish products were screened for lactic acid bacteria capable of inhibiting Listeria sp. (Listeria innocua). Of 4150 assumed lactic acid bacteria colonies from MRS agar plates that were screened by an agar-overlay method 58 (1.4%) were positive. Forty four of these strains were...... further characterized and 43 strains were inhibitory against Listeria monocytogenes. The strains were inhibitory to other Gram- positive (lactic acid) bacteria probably because of production of bacteriocins. All 44 strains inhibited both Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus and 37 were inhibitory...... to a mesophilic fish spoilage bacterium tan Aeromonas sp.). Inhibition of Gram-negative bacteria was attributed to production of lactic acid. Most strains were identified as Lactobacillus spp., and all grew well at ambient temperatures (25-37 degrees C) and tolerated up to 6.5% NaCl. Glucose was fermented rapidly...

  8. Characterization of radiation-resistant vegetative bacteria in beef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, A.B.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Ground beef contains numerous microorganisms of various types. The commonly recognized bacteria are associated with current problems of spoilage. Irradiation, however, contributes a new factor through selective destruction of the microflora. The residual microorganisms surviving a nonsterilizing dose are predominantly gram-negative coccobacilli. Various classifications have been given, e.g., Moraxella, Acinetobacter, Achromobacter, etc. For a more detailed study of these radiation-resistant bacteria occurring in ground beef, an enrichment procedure was used for isolation. By means of morphological and biochemical tests, most of the isolates were found to be Moraxella, based on current classifications. The range of growth temperatures was from 2 to 50 C. These bacteria were relatively heat sensitive, e.g., D 10 of 5.4 min at 70 0 C or less. The radiation resistance ranged from D 10 values of 273 to 2,039 krad. Thus, some were more resistant than any presently recognized spores. A reference culture of Moraxella osloensis was irradiated under conditions comparable to the enrichment procedure used with the ground beef. The only apparent changes were in morphology and penicillin sensitivity. However, after a few subcultures these bacteria reverted to the characteristics of the parent strain. Thus, it is apparent that these isolates are a part of the normal flora of ground beef and not aberrant forms arising from the irradiation procedure. The significance, if any, of these bacteria is not presently recognized. (auth)

  9. Mapping microbial ecosystems and spoilage-gene flow in breweries highlights patterns of contamination and resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokulich, Nicholas A; Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Ziola, Barry; Mills, David A

    2015-01-01

    Distinct microbial ecosystems have evolved to meet the challenges of indoor environments, shaping the microbial communities that interact most with modern human activities. Microbial transmission in food-processing facilities has an enormous impact on the qualities and healthfulness of foods, beneficially or detrimentally interacting with food products. To explore modes of microbial transmission and spoilage-gene frequency in a commercial food-production scenario, we profiled hop-resistance gene frequencies and bacterial and fungal communities in a brewery. We employed a Bayesian approach for predicting routes of contamination, revealing critical control points for microbial management. Physically mapping microbial populations over time illustrates patterns of dispersal and identifies potential contaminant reservoirs within this environment. Habitual exposure to beer is associated with increased abundance of spoilage genes, predicting greater contamination risk. Elucidating the genetic landscapes of indoor environments poses important practical implications for food-production systems and these concepts are translatable to other built environments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04634.001 PMID:25756611

  10. Extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Malcolm; Steels, Hazel; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard; Novodvorska, Michaela; Hayer, Kimran; Archer, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Weak-acid preservatives, such as sorbic acid and acetic acid, are used in many low pH foods to prevent spoilage by fungi. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is notorious for its extreme resistance to preservatives and ability to grow in excess of legally-permitted concentrations of preservatives. Extreme resistance was confirmed in 38 strains of Z. bailii to several weak-acid preservatives. Using the brewing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a control, tests showed that Z. bailii was ~ 3-fold more resistant to a variety of weak-acids but was not more resistant to alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, ketones, or hydrophilic chelating acids. The weak acids were chemically very diverse in structure, making it improbable that the universal resistance was caused by degradation or metabolism. Examination of Z. bailii cell populations showed that extreme resistance to sorbic acid, benzoic acid and acetic acid was limited to a few cells within the population, numbers decreasing with concentration of weak acid to bailii is due to population heterogeneity, with a small proportion of cells having a lower intracellular pH. This reduces the level of accumulation of any weak acid in the cytoplasm, thus conferring resistance to all weak acids, but not to other inhibitors. PMID:23856006

  11. Extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Malcolm; Steels, Hazel; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard; Novodvorska, Michaela; Hayer, Kimran; Archer, David B

    2013-08-16

    Weak-acid preservatives, such as sorbic acid and acetic acid, are used in many low pH foods to prevent spoilage by fungi. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is notorious for its extreme resistance to preservatives and ability to grow in excess of legally-permitted concentrations of preservatives. Extreme resistance was confirmed in 38 strains of Z. bailii to several weak-acid preservatives. Using the brewing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a control, tests showed that Z. bailii was ~3-fold more resistant to a variety of weak-acids but was not more resistant to alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, ketones, or hydrophilic chelating acids. The weak acids were chemically very diverse in structure, making it improbable that the universal resistance was caused by degradation or metabolism. Examination of Z. bailii cell populations showed that extreme resistance to sorbic acid, benzoic acid and acetic acid was limited to a few cells within the population, numbers decreasing with concentration of weak acid to bailii is due to population heterogeneity, with a small proportion of cells having a lower intracellular pH. This reduces the level of accumulation of any weak acid in the cytoplasm, thus conferring resistance to all weak acids, but not to other inhibitors. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Potassium transport at the plasma membrane of the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidchik, Vadim; Macpherson, Neil; Davies, Julia M

    2005-01-15

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is a commercially important spoilage yeast capable of growth at low pH in the presence of weak organic acid preservatives, such as benzoic acid. A patch-clamp electrophysiological analysis of plasma membrane K+ transport revealed a high conductance pathway for low-affinity K+ uptake. In contrast to the equivalent K+ transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this system remained operative at low extracellular pH and may therefore facilitate K+ uptake in K(+)-rich and acidic beverages. Benzoate inhibited growth, increased intracellular K+ content, yet decreased the magnitude of the K+ uptake conductance; specifically, the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly-rectifying component was reduced. It is proposed that this adaptation helps maintain a hyperpolarized membrane voltage to effect continued ATPase-mediated H+ extrusion and so combat preservative-induced cytosolic acidosis. Again in contrast to S. cerevisiae, the K+ conductance was relatively insensitive to increased extracellular Ca2+. Paradoxically (and unlike S. cerevisiae) increasing extracellular Ca2+ inhibited growth, suggesting a simple expedient to limit spoilage by Z. bailii.

  13. American Lobsters (Homarus Americanus) not Surviving During Air Transport: Evaluation of Microbial Spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirloni, Erica; Stella, Simone; Gennari, Mario; Colombo, Fabio; Bernardi, Cristian

    2016-04-19

    Eighteen American lobsters ( Homarus americanus ), dead during air transport, were analysed in order to evaluate the microbial population of meat, gills and gut: no specific studies have ever been conducted so far on the microbiological quality of American lobsters' meats in terms of spoilage microbiota. The meat samples showed very limited total viable counts, in almost all the cases below the level of 6 Log CFU/g, while higher loads were found, as expected, in gut and gills, the most probable source of contamination. These data could justify the possibility to commercialise these not-surviving subjects, without quality concerns for the consumers. Most of the isolates resulted to be clustered with type strains of Pseudoalteromonas spp. (43.1%) and Photobacterium spp. (24.1%), and in particular to species related to the natural marine environment. The distribution of the genera showed a marked inhomogeneity among the samples. The majority of the isolates identified resulted to possess proteolytic (69.3%) and lipolytic ability (75.5%), suggesting their potential spoilage ability. The maintanance of good hygienical practices, especially during the production of ready-to-eat lobsters-based products, and a proper storage could limit the possible replication of these microorganisms.

  14. American lobsters (Homarus americanus not surviving during air transport: evaluation of microbial spoilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Tirloni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen American lobsters (Homarus americanus, dead during air transport, were analysed in order to evaluate the microbial population of meat, gills and gut: no specific studies have ever been conducted so far on the microbiological quality of American lobsters’ meats in terms of spoilage microbiota. The meat samples showed very limited total viable counts, in almost all the cases below the level of 6 Log CFU/g, while higher loads were found, as expected, in gut and gills, the most probable source of contamination. These data could justify the possibility to commercialise these notsurviving subjects, without quality concerns for the consumers. Most of the isolates resulted to be clustered with type strains of Pseudoalteromonas spp. (43.1% and Photobacterium spp. (24.1%, and in particular to species related to the natural marine environment. The distribution of the genera showed a marked inhomogeneity among the samples. The majority of the isolates identified resulted to possess proteolytic (69.3% and lipolytic ability (75.5%, suggesting their potential spoilage ability. The maintanance of good hygienical practices, especially during the production of ready-to-eat lobsters-based products, and a proper storage could limit the possible replication of these microorganisms.

  15. Emerging Preservation Techniques for Controlling Spoilage and Pathogenic Microorganisms in Fruit Juices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Rai Aneja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruit juices are important commodities in the global market providing vast possibilities for new value added products to meet consumer demand for convenience, nutrition, and health. Fruit juices are spoiled primarily due to proliferation of acid tolerant and osmophilic microflora. There is also risk of food borne microbial infections which is associated with the consumption of fruit juices. In order to reduce the incidence of outbreaks, fruit juices are preserved by various techniques. Thermal pasteurization is used commercially by fruit juice industries for the preservation of fruit juices but results in losses of essential nutrients and changes in physicochemical and organoleptic properties. Nonthermal pasteurization methods such as high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric field, and ultrasound and irradiations have also been employed in fruit juices to overcome the negative effects of thermal pasteurization. Some of these techniques have already been commercialized. Some are still in research or pilot scale. Apart from these emerging techniques, preservatives from natural sources have also shown considerable promise for use in some food products. In this review article, spoilage, pathogenic microflora, and food borne outbreaks associated with fruit juices of last two decades are given in one section. In other sections various prevention methods to control the growth of spoilage and pathogenic microflora to increase the shelf life of fruit juices are discussed.

  16. Risk assessment of fungal spoilage: A case study of Aspergillus niger on yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2017-08-01

    A quantitative risk assessment model of yogurt spoilage by Aspergillus niger was developed based on a stochastic modeling approach for mycelium growth by taking into account the important sources of variability such as time-temperature conditions during the different stages of chill chain and individual spore behavior. Input parameters were fitted to the appropriate distributions and A. niger colony's diameter at each stage of the chill chain was estimated using Monte Carlo simulation. By combining the output of the growth model with the fungus prevalence, that can be estimated by the industry using challenge tests, the risk of spoilage translated to number of yogurt cups in which a visible mycelium of A. niger is being formed at the time of consumption was assessed. The risk assessment output showed that for a batch of 100,000 cups in which the percentage of contaminated cups with A. niger was 1% the predicted numbers (median (5 th , 95 th percentiles)) of the cups with a visible mycelium at consumption time were 8 (5, 14). For higher percentages of 3, 5 and 10 the predicted numbers (median (5 th , 95 th percentiles)) of the spoiled cups at consumption time were estimated to be 24 (16, 35), 39 (29, 52) and 80 (64, 94), respectively. The developed model can lead to a more effective risk-based quality management of yogurt and support the decision making in yogurt production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Controlling Brochothrix thermosphacta as a spoilage risk using in-package atmospheric cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patange, Apurva; Boehm, Daniela; Bueno-Ferrer, Carmen; Cullen, P J; Bourke, Paula

    2017-09-01

    Brochothrix thermosphacta is the predominant spoilage microorganism in meat and its control in processing environments is important to maintain meat product quality. Atmospheric cold plasma is of interest for control of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in foods. This study ascertained the potential of dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma (DBD-ACP) for control of B. thermosphacta, taking microbial and food environment factors into consideration, and investigated the shelf-life of lamb chop after in-package plasma treatment in modified atmosphere. Community profiling was used to assess the treatment effects on the lamb microflora. ACP treatment (80 kV) for 30s inactivated B. thermosphacta populations below detection levels in PBS, while 5 min treatment achieved a 2 Log cycle reduction using a complex meat model medium and attached cells. The antimicrobial efficacy of plasma was reduced but still apparent on lamb chop surface-inoculated with high concentrations of B. thermosphacta. Lamb chop treated under modified atmosphere exhibited reduced microbial growth over the product shelf-life and community profiling showed no evident changes to the microbial populations after the treatment. The overall results indicated potential of ACP to enhance microbial control leading to meat storage life extension through adjusting the modality of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of specific spoilage organisms (SSOs) in vacuum-packed ham by culture-plating techniques and MiSeq next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Myszka, Kamila; Czarny, Jakub; Ratajczak, Katarzyna; Kowalski, Ryszard; Biegańska-Marecik, Róża; Staninska-Pięta, Justyna; Nowak, Jacek; Cyplik, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge regarding microaerophilic and anaerobic specific spoilage organisms (SSOs) is crucial for an appropriate evaluation of vacuum-packed ham. The objective of this study was to characterize the SSO community in vacuum-packed ham by a culture-dependent technique and MiSeq next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform. The relation between changes among the SSO group in the ham and changes in sensory characteristics of the product was also assessed. In the study, conventional microbiological analyses were employed in order to establish the participation of several groups of microorganisms in the deterioration of vacuum-packed ham. The diversity of the SSO group in the product was further assessed with the use of MiSeq NGS technology. The bacteria identified in sliced cooked ham belonged mostly to four phyla, namely Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. A temperature of 4 °C favoured the development of mesophilic and psychrophilic/psychrotrophic flora, mainly Lactobacillaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Micrococcaceae families. A high ratio of Brochothrix thermosphacta species and new, cold-tolerant Clostridium spp. was also observed. The growth of these microorganisms facilitated changes in the pH value and organoleptic characteristics of the product. This study confirms that the combination of culturing and MiSeq NGS technology improves the microbial evaluation of food. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  20. A novel electronic nose as adaptable device to judge microbiological quality and safety in foodstuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sberveglieri, V; Carmona, E Nunez; Comini, Elisabetta; Ponzoni, Andrea; Zappa, Dario; Pirrotta, Onofrio; Pulvirenti, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents different applications, in various foodstuffs, by a novel electronic nose (EN) based on a mixed metal oxide sensors array composed of thin films as well as nanowires. The electronic nose used for this work has been done, starting from the commercial model EOS835 produced by SACMI Scarl. The SENSOR Lab (CNR-INO, Brescia) has produced both typologies of sensors, classical MOX and the new technologies with nanowire. The aim of this work was to test and to illustrate the broad spectrum of potential uses of the EN technique in food quality control and microbial contamination diagnosis. The EN technique was coupled with classical microbiological and chemical techniques, like gas chromatography with mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) with SPME technique. Three different scenarios are presented: (a) detection of indigenous mould in green coffee beans, (b) selection of microbiological spoilage of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB), and (c) monitoring of potable water. In each case, the novel EN was able to identify the spoiled product by means of the alterations in the pattern of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), reconstructed by principal component analysis (PCA) of the sensor responses. The achieved results strongly encourage the use of EN in industrial laboratories. Finally, recent trends and future directions are illustrated.

  1. A Novel Electronic Nose as Adaptable Device to Judge Microbiological Quality and Safety in Foodstuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sberveglieri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents different applications, in various foodstuffs, by a novel electronic nose (EN based on a mixed metal oxide sensors array composed of thin films as well as nanowires. The electronic nose used for this work has been done, starting from the commercial model EOS835 produced by SACMI Scarl. The SENSOR Lab (CNR-INO, Brescia has produced both typologies of sensors, classical MOX and the new technologies with nanowire. The aim of this work was to test and to illustrate the broad spectrum of potential uses of the EN technique in food quality control and microbial contamination diagnosis. The EN technique was coupled with classical microbiological and chemical techniques, like gas chromatography with mass spectroscopy (GC-MS with SPME technique. Three different scenarios are presented: (a detection of indigenous mould in green coffee beans, (b selection of microbiological spoilage of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB, and (c monitoring of potable water. In each case, the novel EN was able to identify the spoiled product by means of the alterations in the pattern of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, reconstructed by principal component analysis (PCA of the sensor responses. The achieved results strongly encourage the use of EN in industrial laboratories. Finally, recent trends and future directions are illustrated.

  2. Comparison of some physical techniques for detection of spoilage in apple juice inoculated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Optical and photothermal methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirtoc, I.; Chirtoc, M.; Bicanic, D.D.; Cozijnsen, J.L.; Breeuwer, P.

    2003-01-01

    Several physical techniques were used to study the extent of spoilage in apple juice deliberately inoculated with yeast (concentration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ranged from 25 cells mL(-1) to 2.5 x 10(6) cells mL(-1), respectively) and their performance compared in terms of detection limit

  3. Microbial spoilage and formation of biogenic amines in fresh and thawed modified atmosphere-packed salmon ( Salmo salar ) at 2 degrees C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emborg, Jette; Laursen, B.G.; Rathjen, T.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the microbial spoilage, formation of biogenic amines and shelf life of chilled fresh and frozen/thawed salmon packed in a modified atmosphere and stored at 2 degrees C.Methods and Results: The dominating microflora, formation of biogenic amines and shelf life were studied in two...... series of storage trials with naturally contaminated fresh and thawed modified atmosphere-packed (MAP) salmon at 2 degrees C. Photobacterium phosphoreum dominated the spoilage microflora of fresh MAP salmon at more than 106 cfu g-1 and the activity of this specific spoilage organism (SSO) limited...

  4. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase enhances the growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides lactic acid bacteria at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Seitaro; Kawamoto, Jun; Sato, Satoshi B; Iki, Takashi; Watanabe, Itaru; Kudo, Kazuyuki; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Kurihara, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can cause deterioration of food quality even at low temperatures. In this study, we investigated the cold-adaptation mechanism of a novel food spoilage LAB, Leuconostoc mesenteroides NH04 (NH04). L. mesenteroides was isolated from several spoiled cooked meat products at a high frequency in our factories. NH04 grew rapidly at low temperatures within the shelf-life period and resulted in heavy financial losses. NH04 grew more rapidly than related strains such as Leuconostoc mesenteroides NBRC3832 (NBRC3832) at 10°C. Proteome analysis of NH04 demonstrated that this strain produces a homolog of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase--AhpC--the expression of which can be induced at low temperatures. The expression level of AhpC in NH04 was approximately 6-fold higher than that in NBRC3832, which was grown under the same conditions. Although AhpC is known to have an anti-oxidative role in various bacteria by catalyzing the reduction of alkyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide, the involvement of AhpC in cold adaptation of food spoilage bacteria was unclear. We introduced an expression plasmid containing ahpC into NBRC3832, which grows slower than NH04 at 10°C, and found that expression of AhpC enhanced growth. These results demonstrated that AhpC, which likely increases anti-oxidative capacity of LAB, plays an important role in their rapid growth at low temperatures.

  5. Study on the spoilage potential ofPseudomonas fluorescenson salmon stored at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhang, Zhen; Yang, Sheng-Ping; Cheng, Ying; Qian, Yun-Fang

    2018-01-01

    The bacterial kinetics and quality indexes [sensory quality, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid value, biogenic amine, and amino acids] were analyzed on salmon inoculated with Pseudomonas fluorescens during storage under different temperatures (30, 10, and 4 °C). The bacterial kinetics revealed that P. fluorescens showed a steady growth at low temperatures (10 and 4 °C). The TVB-N yield factors of the sample stored at 4 °C indicated that each bacterial cell of P. fluorescens displayed greater spoilage activity at low temperatures. A remarkable correlation was found between the production of biogenic amines and bacterial counts. The results also highlighted that P. fluorescens cultured at 4 °C had higher demand for amino acids.

  6. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 μm. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 μm, and their length is 0.6 μm, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  7. The fate of acetic acid during glucose co-metabolism by the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Ludovico, Paula; Santos, Helena; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2012-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most widely represented spoilage yeast species, being able to metabolise acetic acid in the presence of glucose. To clarify whether simultaneous utilisation of the two substrates affects growth efficiency, we examined growth in single- and mixed-substrate cultures with glucose and acetic acid. Our findings indicate that the biomass yield in the first phase of growth is the result of the weighted sum of the respective biomass yields on single-substrate medium, supporting the conclusion that biomass yield on each substrate is not affected by the presence of the other at pH 3.0 and 5.0, at least for the substrate concentrations examined. In vivo(13)C-NMR spectroscopy studies showed that the gluconeogenic pathway is not operational and that [2-(13)C]acetate is metabolised via the Krebs cycle leading to the production of glutamate labelled on C(2), C(3) and C(4). The incorporation of [U-(14)C]acetate in the cellular constituents resulted mainly in the labelling of the protein and lipid pools 51.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall, our data establish that glucose is metabolised primarily through the glycolytic pathway, and acetic acid is used as an additional source of acetyl-CoA both for lipid synthesis and the Krebs cycle. This study provides useful clues for the design of new strategies aimed at overcoming yeast spoilage in acidic, sugar-containing food environments. Moreover, the elucidation of the molecular basis underlying the resistance phenotype of Z. bailii to acetic acid will have a potential impact on the improvement of the performance of S. cerevisiae industrial strains often exposed to acetic acid stress conditions, such as in wine and bioethanol production.

  8. Oxygen requirements of the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii in synthetic and complex media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, F; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C; van Dijken, J P; Pronk, J T

    2001-05-01

    Most yeast species can ferment sugars to ethanol, but only a few can grow in the complete absence of oxygen. Oxygen availability might, therefore, be a key parameter in spoilage of food caused by fermentative yeasts. In this study, the oxygen requirement and regulation of alcoholic fermentation were studied in batch cultures of the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii at a constant pH, pH 3.0. In aerobic, glucose-grown cultures, Z. bailii exhibited aerobic alcoholic fermentation similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other Crabtree-positive yeasts. In anaerobic fermentor cultures grown on a synthetic medium supplemented with glucose, Tween 80, and ergosterol, S. cerevisiae exhibited rapid exponential growth. Growth of Z. bailii under these conditions was extremely slow and linear. These linear growth kinetics indicate that cell proliferation of Z. bailii in the anaerobic fermentors was limited by a constant, low rate of oxygen leakage into the system. Similar results were obtained with the facultatively fermentative yeast Candida utilis. When the same experimental setup was used for anaerobic cultivation, in complex YPD medium, Z. bailii exhibited exponential growth and vigorous fermentation, indicating that a nutritional requirement for anaerobic growth was met by complex-medium components. Our results demonstrate that restriction of oxygen entry into foods and beverages, which are rich in nutrients, is not a promising strategy for preventing growth and gas formation by Z. bailii. In contrast to the growth of Z. bailii, anaerobic growth of S. cerevisiae on complex YPD medium was much slower than growth in synthetic medium, which probably reflected the superior tolerance of the former yeast to organic acids at low pH.

  9. Physiological characterization of spoilage strains of Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii isolated from high sugar environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Patricia; Stratford, Malcolm; Steels, Hazel; Fernández-Espinar, Ma Teresa; Querol, Amparo

    2007-03-10

    Two isolates of spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii were obtained from a high sugar environment, in a factory producing candied fruit and nougat. Other strains, Z. bailii from other environments and other isolates from high sugar/salt environments were obtained for comparison (Zygosaccharomyces lentus, Candida magnoliae, Candida halophila and Pichia guilliermondii). A full physiological assessment of these isolates was carried out, of preservative and biocide resistance, osmotolerance, ethanol-tolerance, low pH resistance, degree of fermentation, and growth temperature and survival to pasteurisation. Results showed that the strains isolated from high sugar environments did not show extreme physiology. These were robust strains but within the normal parameters expected for the species. One exception to this was that the Z. bailii strains were abnormally able to grow at 37 degrees C. In all strains other than C. magnolia and C. halophila, cells were able to adapt to high levels of sugar. Cultures grown in high glucose concentrations were subsequently able to tolerate higher concentrations of glucose than previously. Similarly, high sugar was found to confer a degree of protection against pasteurisation, enabling survival in what would have otherwise been a lethal treatment. Isolates of Z. bailii showed a high level of resistance to preservatives such as sorbic acid, benzoic acid, acetic acid, cinnamic acid, and ethanol, and also to heat. Unexpectedly Z. bailii isolates were not exceptionally resistant to biocides such as peracetic acid, or hypochlorite. These results indicate that spoilage by yeasts such as Z. bailii may be better prevented by use of biocidal cleaning agents in the factory, rather than treating the food with preservatives.

  10. Control of Native Spoilage Yeast on Dealcoholized Red Wine by Preservatives Alone and in Binary Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rubio, Marta; Guerrouj, Kamal; Taboada-Rodríguez, Amaury; López-Gómez, Antonio; Marín-Iniesta, Fulgencio

    2017-09-01

    In order to preserve a commercial dealcoholized red wine (DRW), a study with 4 preservatives and binary mixtures of them were performed against 2 native spoilage yeasts: Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) for potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate, sodium metabisulfite and dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) were evaluated in DRW stored at 25 °C. MICs of potassium sorbate and sodium metabisulfite were 250 and 60 mg/kg, respectively for both target strains. However for sodium benzoate, differences between yeasts were found; R. mucilaginosa was inhibited at 125 mg/kg, while S. cerevisiae at 250 mg/kg. Regarding MFC, differences between strains were only found for sodium metabisulfite obtaining a MFC of 500 mg/kg for R. mucilaginosa and a MFC of 250 mg/kg for S. cerevisiae. Potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate showed the MFC at 1000 mg/kg and DMDC at 200 mg/kg. Regarding the effect of binary mixtures the Fractional Fungicidal Concentration Index (FFC i ) methodology showed that binary mixtures of 100 mg/kg DMDC/200 mg/kg potassium sorbate (FFC i = 0.7) and 50 mg/kg DMDC / 400 mg/kg sodium benzoate (FFC i = 0.65) have both synergistic effect against the 2 target strains. These binary mixtures can control the growth of spoilage yeasts in DRW without metabisulfite addition. The results of this work may be important in preserving the health of DRW consumers by eliminating the use of metabisulfite and reducing the risk of growth of R. mucilagosa, recently recognized as an emerging pathogen. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  11. Optimized dispersion of ZnO nanoparticles and antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Espitia, Paula Judith; Ferreira Soares, Nilda de Fatima, E-mail: nfsoares1@gmail.com [Department of Food Technology, Federal University of Vicosa (Brazil); Teofilo, Reinaldo F. [Federal University of Vicosa, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Vitor, Debora M.; Reis Coimbra, Jane Selia dos; Andrade, Nelio Jose de [Department of Food Technology, Federal University of Vicosa (Brazil); Sousa, Frederico B. de; Sinisterra, Ruben D. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Medeiros, Eber Antonio Alves [Department of Food Technology, Federal University of Vicosa (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Single primary nanoparticles of zinc oxide (nanoZnO) tend to form particle collectives, resulting in loss of antimicrobial activity. This work studied the effects of probe sonication conditions: power, time, and the presence of a dispersing agent (Na{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}), on the size of nanoZnO particles. NanoZnO dispersion was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) and characterized by the zeta potential (ZP) technique. NanoZnO antimicrobial activity was investigated at different concentrations (1, 5, and 10 % w/w) against four foodborne pathogens and four spoilage microorganisms. The presence of the dispersing agent had a significant effect on the size of dispersed nanoZnO. Minimum size after sonication was 238 nm. An optimal dispersion condition was achieved at 200 W for 45 min of sonication in the presence of the dispersing agent. ZP analysis indicated that the ZnO nanoparticle surface charge was altered by the addition of the dispersing agent and changes in pH. At tested concentrations and optimal dispersion, nanoZnO had no antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Listeria monocytogenes. However, it did have antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Aspergillus niger. Based on the exhibited antimicrobial activity of optimized nanoZnO against some foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms, nanoZnO is a promising antimicrobial for food preservation with potential application for incorporation in polymers intended as food-contact surfaces.

  12. Oxygen Requirements of the Food Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii in Synthetic and Complex Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2001-01-01

    Most yeast species can ferment sugars to ethanol, but only a few can grow in the complete absence of oxygen. Oxygen availability might, therefore, be a key parameter in spoilage of food caused by fermentative yeasts. In this study, the oxygen requirement and regulation of alcoholic fermentation were studied in batch cultures of the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii at a constant pH, pH 3.0. In aerobic, glucose-grown cultures, Z. bailii exhibited aerobic alcoholic fermentation similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other Crabtree-positive yeasts. In anaerobic fermentor cultures grown on a synthetic medium supplemented with glucose, Tween 80, and ergosterol, S. cerevisiae exhibited rapid exponential growth. Growth of Z. bailii under these conditions was extremely slow and linear. These linear growth kinetics indicate that cell proliferation of Z. bailii in the anaerobic fermentors was limited by a constant, low rate of oxygen leakage into the system. Similar results were obtained with the facultatively fermentative yeast Candida utilis. When the same experimental setup was used for anaerobic cultivation, in complex YPD medium, Z. bailii exhibited exponential growth and vigorous fermentation, indicating that a nutritional requirement for anaerobic growth was met by complex-medium components. Our results demonstrate that restriction of oxygen entry into foods and beverages, which are rich in nutrients, is not a promising strategy for preventing growth and gas formation by Z. bailii. In contrast to the growth of Z. bailii, anaerobic growth of S. cerevisiae on complex YPD medium was much slower than growth in synthetic medium, which probably reflected the superior tolerance of the former yeast to organic acids at low pH. PMID:11319090

  13. The fate of acetic acid during glucose co-metabolism by the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most widely represented spoilage yeast species, being able to metabolise acetic acid in the presence of glucose. To clarify whether simultaneous utilisation of the two substrates affects growth efficiency, we examined growth in single- and mixed-substrate cultures with glucose and acetic acid. Our findings indicate that the biomass yield in the first phase of growth is the result of the weighted sum of the respective biomass yields on single-substrate medium, supporting the conclusion that biomass yield on each substrate is not affected by the presence of the other at pH 3.0 and 5.0, at least for the substrate concentrations examined. In vivo(13C-NMR spectroscopy studies showed that the gluconeogenic pathway is not operational and that [2-(13C]acetate is metabolised via the Krebs cycle leading to the production of glutamate labelled on C(2, C(3 and C(4. The incorporation of [U-(14C]acetate in the cellular constituents resulted mainly in the labelling of the protein and lipid pools 51.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall, our data establish that glucose is metabolised primarily through the glycolytic pathway, and acetic acid is used as an additional source of acetyl-CoA both for lipid synthesis and the Krebs cycle. This study provides useful clues for the design of new strategies aimed at overcoming yeast spoilage in acidic, sugar-containing food environments. Moreover, the elucidation of the molecular basis underlying the resistance phenotype of Z. bailii to acetic acid will have a potential impact on the improvement of the performance of S. cerevisiae industrial strains often exposed to acetic acid stress conditions, such as in wine and bioethanol production.

  14. Toxigenic genes, spoilage potential, and antimicrobial resistance of Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Seza; Eyi, Ayla; Küçüksarı, Rümeysa

    2014-02-01

    Bacillus spp. can be recovered from almost every environment. It is also found readily in foods, where it may cause food spoilage and/or food poisoning due to its toxigenic and pathogenic nature, and extracellular enzymes. In this study, 29 Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream were examined for the presence of following virulence genes hblC, nheA, cytK and ces genes, and tested for a range of the extracellular enzymes, and antimicrobial susceptibility. The strains were found to produce extracellular enzymes: proteolytic and lipolytic activity, gelatin hydrolysis and lecithinase production (100%), DNase production (93.1%) and amylase activity (93.1%). Of 29 strains examined, 24 (82.8%) showed hemolytic activity on blood agar. Beta-lactamase enzyme was only produced by 20.7% of B. cereus group. Among 29 B. cereus group from ice cream, nheA was the most common virulence gene detected in 44.8% of the strains, followed by hblC gene with 17.2%. Four (13.8%) of the 29 strains were positive for both hblC gene and nheA gene. Contrarily, cytK and ces genes were not detected in any of the strains. Antimicrobial susceptibility of ice cream isolates was tested to 14 different antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. We detected resistance to penicillin and ampicillin with the same rate of 89.7%. Thirty-one percent of the strains were multiresistant to three or more antibiotics. This study emphasizes that the presence of natural isolates of Bacillus spp. harboring one or more enterotoxin genes, producing extracellular enzymes which may cause spoilage and acquiring antibiotic resistance might hold crucial importance in the food safety and quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria That Produce Protease and Bacteriocin-Like Substance From Mud Crab (Scylla sp. Digestive Tract (Isolasi Bakteri Asam Laktat yang Menghasilkan Protease dan Senyawa Bacteriocin-Like dari Saluran Pencernaan Kepiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Pramono

    2015-03-01

    Kata kunci: Bakteri Asam Laktat, Bakteriosin-like substance, Protease, Scylla  sp. Digestive tract is complex environment consist of large amount of bacteria’s species. Fish intestine bacteria consist of aerobic or facultative anaerob bacteria which can produce antibacterial and enzym. The objectives of this research were to isolated lactic acid bacteria that produce bacteriocin-like and protease from mud crab digestive tract. Isolation and characterization of isolates were conducted employing media MRS.  Neutralized cell free supernatant of isolates were tested using disc diffusion agar of against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria to indicate bacteriocin-like-producing lactic acid bacteria. Protease-producing isolate was tested using disc diffusion method in casein agar. Among a hundred isolates, 96 isolates were showed clear zone in MRS+CaCO3,, catalase negative, and Gram positive bacteria. Thirty four isolates produced protease and only four isolates (i.e. IKP29, IKP30, IKP52, and IKP94 showed strong inhibition against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. There were three patterns of inhibition among three isolates against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Eschericia coli, and Salmonella sp. All three isolates showed potential uses for produce starter culture for fishery product fermentation purpose. This is the first report of isolation lactic acid bacteria that produced protease and bacteriocin-like from digestive tract of mud crab. Keywords: Lactic acid bacteria, Bacteriocin-like substance, Protease, Scylla  sp.

  16. Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus sakei as bio-protective culture to eliminate Leuconostoc mesenteroides spoilage and improve the shelf life and sensorial characteristics of commercial cooked bacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comi, Giuseppe; Andyanto, Debbie; Manzano, Marisa; Iacumin, Lucilla

    2016-09-01

    Cooked bacon is a typical Italian meat product. After production, cooked bacon is stored at 4 ± 2 °C. During storage, the microorganisms that survived pasteurisation can grow and produce spoilage. For the first time, we studied the cause of the deterioration in spoiled cooked bacon compared to unspoiled samples. Moreover, the use of bio-protective cultures to improve the quality of the product and eliminate the risk of spoilage was tested. The results show that Leuconostoc mesenteroides is responsible for spoilage and produces a greening colour of the meat, slime and various compounds that result from the fermentation of sugars and the degradation of nitrogen compounds. Finally, Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis and Lactobacillus sakei were able to reduce the risk of Leuconostoc mesenteroides spoilage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of inorganic electron acceptors on methanogenesis and methanotrophy and on the community structure of bacteria and archaea in sediments of a boreal lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Antti J.; Karvinen, Anu; Nykänen, Hannu; Peura, Sari; Tiirola, Marja; Mäki, Anita; Kankaala, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments are globally significant sources of CH4 to the atmosphere, but the factors controlling the production and consumption of CH4 in these systems are understudied. Increasing availability of electron acceptors (EA) (other than CO2) in sediments can decrease or even suppress CH4 production by diverting the electron flow (from H2 and organic substances) from methanogenic to other anaerobic respiration pathways. However, whether these changes in microbial function extend down to changes in the structure of microbial communities is not known. Also anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) could be enhanced by increased availability of EAs (SO42-, NO3-, Fe3+ and Mn4+), but information on the role of this process in lake sediments is scarce. We studied the effects of inorganic EAs on the potential for CH4 production and consumption and on the structure of microbial communities in sediments of a boreal lake. Anoxic slurries of sediment samples collected from two depths (0 - 10 cm; 10 - 30 cm) of the profundal zone of a boreal, mesotrophic Lake Ätäskö, were amended with 1) CH4 or with CH4 and either 2) 10 mM Mn4+, 3) 10 mM Fe3+, 4) O2 or 5) CH2F2 (inhibitor of aerobic methane oxidation) and incubated at +10° C for up to 4 months. Furthermore, slurries from the 10 - 30 cm layer were amended with CH4 and either 6) 2 mM NO3- or 7) 2 mM SO42- and incubated at +4 ° C for up to 14 months. The processes were measured using 13C-labelling and by concentration measurements of CH4 and CO2. Effects of treatments 1-3 on microbial communities were also analysed by next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA, as well as methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene amplicons and mRNA transcripts. CH4 production (max. 83 nmol gdw-1d-1) took place in the anaerobic treatments but was generally decreased by the addition of NO3-, SO42-, Fe3+ and Mn4+. Although the structure of sediment archaeal community was resistant to Fe3+/Mn4+ - additions, slight changes in the structure of bacterial community

  18. Effects of water activity on the performance of potassium sorbate and natamycin as preservatives against cheese spoilage moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marín P.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the effects of the food preservatives potassium sorbate and natamycin, combined with different levels of ionic (sodium chloride and non-ioinic (glycerol water activity (aw, on growth of fungi involved in cheese spoilage. In general, the combined effect of water stress and presence of preservatives enhanced fungal inhibition. However, some doses of potassium sorbate (0.02% and natamycin (1, 5 and 10 ppm were able to stimulate growth of Aspergillus varians, Mucor racemosus, Penicillium chrysogenum and P. roqueforti at aw values in the range of 0.93–0.97. P. solitum was the only species whose growth was consistently reduced by any doses of preservative. The results also showed that sodium chloride and glycerol differentially affected the efficacy of preservatives. This study indicates that aw of cheese is a critical parameter to be considered in the formulation of preservative coatings used against fungal spoilage.

  19. First study on the formation and resuscitation of viable but nonculturable state and beer spoilage capability of Lactobacillus lindneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyan; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Peters, Brian M; Deng, Yang; Xu, Zhenbo; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the spoilage capability of Lactobacillus lindneri during the induction and resuscitation of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state. L. lindneri strain was identified by sequencing the PCR product (amplifying 16S rRNA gene) using ABI Prism 377 DNA Sequencer. During the VBNC state induction by low temperature storage and beer adaption, total, culturable, and viable cells were assessed by acridine orange direct counting, plate counting, and Live/Dead BacLight bacterial viability kit, respectively. Organic acids and diacetyl concentration were measured by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and head dpace gas chromatography, respectively. VBNC state of L. lindneri was successfully induced by both beer adaption and low temperature storage, and glycerol frozen stock was the optimal way to maintain the VBNC state. Addition of catalase was found to be an effective method for the resuscitation of VBNC L. lindneri cells. Furthermore, spoilage capability remained similar during the induction and resuscitation of VBNC L. lindneri. This is the first report of induction by low temperature storage and resuscitation of VBNC L. lindneri strain, as well as the first identification of spoilage capability of VBNC and resuscitated L. lindneri cells. This study indicated that the potential colonization of L. lindneri strain in brewery environment, formation and resuscitation of VBNC state, as well as maintenance in beer spoilage capability, may be an important risk factor for brewery environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Well-known quorum sensing inhibitors do not affect bacterial quorum sensing-regulated bean sprout spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, M; Rasmussen, T B; Andersen, J B; Persson, T; Nielsen, J; Givskov, M; Gram, L

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the potential of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) as food preservative agents in a food product, where bacterial spoilage is controlled by quorum sensing (QS). The effects of well-known QSI were tested on spoilage phenotypes and on QS-regulated genes of a bean sprout spoiling bacterial isolate (Pectobacterium A2JM) in laboratory substrates and in a bean sprout model system. The acylated homoserine lactones (AHL) analogues PenS-AHL and HepS-AHL decreased the specific protease activity of Pectobacterium A2JM in broth but did not reduce the expression of a QS-regulated secretion protein, and were without effect on soft rot of bean sprouts. The QSI ProS-AHL, furanone C-30, patulin, penicillic acid and 4-nitropyridine-N-oxide did not have any effect on protease activity, on gene expression or bean sprout appearance at nongrowth inhibitory concentrations. Extracts from garlic and bean sprouts induced the QS system of Pectobacterium in bean sprouts and a broth system, respectively. Among the several well-known QSI compounds, only PenS-AHL and HepS-AHL, inhibited QS-regulated protease activity of Pectobacterium A2JM in broth cultures, but had no effect on bean sprout spoilage. The QSI compounds must be selected in the specific system in which they are to function and they cannot easily be transferred from one QS system to another.

  1. Effect of high-oxygen and oxygen-free modified atmosphere packaging on the spoilage process of poultry breast fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Sonja; Klausmann, Sonja; Kreyenschmidt, Judith

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effect of atmospheres containing high oxygen (70% O2 and 30% CO2) or high nitrogen (70% N2 and 30% CO2) on the spoilage process during storage (at 4°C) of poultry fillets. Four samples of each gas atmosphere were analyzed at 7 sample points during storage. For this analysis, the growth of typical spoilage organisms (Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Lactobacilli spp.) and total viable count (TVC) were analyzed and modeled by using the Gompertz function. Sensory analyses of the poultry samples were carried out by trained sensory panelists to analyze color, odor, texture, drip loss, and general appearance. The composition of the spoilage flora differed between the oxygen-free atmosphere and the high-oxygen atmosphere. Anaerobic conditions favored the growth of Lactobacilli spp., whereas aerobic gas composition favored the growth of B. thermosphacta. However, no significant difference (Patmosphere in comparison to a high-nitrogen atmosphere. These results indicate that high-oxygen packaging has no additional beneficial effect on the quality maintenance and shelf life of fresh poultry fillets. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. Identification and growth dynamics of meat spoilage microorganisms in modified atmosphere packaged poultry meat by MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höll, Linda; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-12-01

    Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) is widely used in food industry to extend the microbiological shelf-life of meat. Typically, poultry meat has been packaged in a CO2/N2 atmosphere (with residual low O2). Recently, some producers use high O2 MAP for poultry meat to empirically reach comparable shelf lifes. In this work, we compared spoilage microbiota of skinless chicken breast in high (80% O2, 20% CO2) and low O2 MAP (65% N2 and 35% CO2). Two batches of meat were incubated in each atmosphere for 14 days at 4 °C and 10 °C. Atmospheric composition of each pack and colony forming units (25 °C, 48 h, BHI agar) of poultry samples were determined at seven timepoints. Identification of spoilage organisms was carried out by MALDI-TOF MS. Brochothrix thermosphacta, Carnobacterium sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were the main organisms found after eight days at 4 °C and 10 °C in high O2 MAP. In low O2 MAP, the main spoilage microbiota was represented by species Hafnia alvei at 10 °C, and genera Carnobacterium sp., Serratia sp., and Yersinia sp. at 4 °C. High O2 MAP is suggested as preferential gas because were less detrimental and pathogens like Yersinia were not observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Copper resistance determinants in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, N L; Rouch, D A; Lee, B T

    1992-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element that is utilized in a number of oxygenases and electron transport proteins, but it is also a highly toxic heavy metal, against which all organisms must protect themselves. Known bacterial determinants of copper resistance are plasmid-encoded. The mechanisms which confer resistance must be integrated with the normal metabolism of copper. Different bacteria have adopted diverse strategies for copper resistance, and this review outlines what is known about bacterial copper resistance mechanisms and their genetic regulation.

  4. Antagonistic intestinal microflora produces antimicrobial substance inhibitory to pseudomonas species and other spoilage organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatew, B.; Delessa, T.; Zakin, V.; Gollop, N.

    2011-01-01

    Chicken intestine harbors a vast number of bacterial strains. In the present study, antimicrobial substance produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of healthy chicken was detected, characterized, and purified. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the bacteria were

  5. The emulsifying effect of biosurfactants produced by food spoilage organisms in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianah O. Ogunmola

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Food spoilage organisms were isolated using standard procedures on Nutrient Agar, Cetrimide Agar and Pseudomonas Agar Base (supplemented with CFC. The samples were categorized as animal products (raw fish, egg, raw chicken, corned beef, pasteurized milk and plant products (vegetable salad, water leaf (Talinium triangulare, boiled rice, tomatoes and pumpkin leaf (Teifairia occidentalis.They were characterised as Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Serratia rubidaea, Corynebacterium pilosum, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus laterosporus, Bacillus laterosporus, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus macerans, Alcaligenes faecalis and Alcaligenes eutrophus. Preliminary screening for biosurfactant production was done using red blood haemolysis test and confirmed by slide test, drop collapse and oil spreading assay. The biosurfactant produced was purified using acetone and the composition determined initially using Molisch’s test, thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The components were found to be ethanol, amino acids, butoxyacetic acid, hexadecanoic acid, oleic acid, lauryl peroxide, octadecanoic acid and phthalic acid. The producing organisms grew readily on several hydrocarbons such as crude oil, diesel oil and aviation fuel when used as sole carbon sources.  The purified biosurfactants produced were able to cause emulsification of kerosene (19.71-27.14% as well as vegetable oil (16.91-28.12% based on the emulsification index. This result suggests that the isolates can be an asset and further work can exploit their optimal potential in industries.

  6. Spoilage yeasts in Patagonian winemaking: molecular and physiological features of Pichia guilliermondii indigenous isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, C A; Jofré, V; Sangorrín, M P

    2009-01-01

    Yeasts belonging to the genus Dekkera/Brettanomyces, especially the species Dekkera bruxellensis, have long been associated with the production of volatile phenols responsible for off-flavour in wines. According to recent reports, the species Pichia guilliermondii could also produce these compounds at the initial stages of fermentation. Based on the abundance of P. guilliermondii in Patagonian winemaking, we decided to study the relevance of indigenous isolates belonging to this species as wine spoilage yeast. Twenty-three indigenous isolates obtained from grape surfaces and red wine musts were analyzed in their capacity to produce volatile phenols on grape must. The relationship between molecular Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and physiological (killer biotype) patterns detected in indigenous populations of P. guilliermondii and volatile phenol production was also evaluated. Different production levels of 4-ethylphenol, 4-vinylguaiacol and 4-ethylguaiacol were detected among the isolates; however, the values were always lower than those produced by the D. bruxellensis reference strain in the same conditions. High levels of 4-vinylphenol were detected among P. guilliermondii indigenous isolates. The combined use of RAPD and killer biotype allowed us to identify the isolates producing the highest volatile phenol levels.

  7. Synergism between methods for inhibiting the spoilage of damp maize during storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paster, N.; Menasherov, M.; Lacey, J.; Fanelli, C.

    1992-01-01

    Combinations of physical and chemical treatments were used in attempts to control mould development in maize grain containing 18% moisture. The treatments involved the use of propionic acid (0.1 or 0.2% v/w), γ-irradiation (1.0 or 2.0 kGy) and modified atmospheres (40% or 60% CO 2 in the presence of 20% oxygen) either separately or in combination. Mould colonisation during storage was assessed by dilution plating and measurements of respiratory CO 2 produced by grain samples. Spoilage was most effectively counteracted using a combination of 0.2% propionic acid with 2 kGy irradiation and 40% or 60% CO 2 , and this was more successful than any single component used separately, even after 45 days of treatment. Synergistic interaction between treatments thus allows the prospect of more efficient maize storage rather than employing single techniques. This concept could be important in practice because each component is employed only at a relatively low level of intensity. (author)

  8. Identification and control of moulds responsible for black spot spoilage in dry-cured ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alía, Alberto; Andrade, María J; Rodríguez, Alicia; Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Bernáldez, Victoria; Córdoba, Juan J

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this work were to identify moulds responsible for black spot spoilage in the drying and cellar stages of dry-cured ham processing and evaluate the effectiveness of preventive actions for controlling this alteration. Four mould strains isolated from spoiled hams were identified by morphological characteristics and the ITS and β-tubulin sequencing. Two of them were Cladosporium oxysporum, one was C. cladosporioides and the remaining one was C. herbarum. These spoiling strains reproduced the black spots on dry-cured ham-based media and ham slices. Additionally, the effect of water activity (aw) conditions reached throughout dry-cured ham ripening and the activity of the protective culture Penicillium chrysogenum CECT 20922 against the spoiling moulds were evaluated. In the dry-cured ham model system the growth of the Cladosporium strains was minimised when the aw approaches 0.84 or in P. chrysogenum CECT 20922 inoculated dry-cured ham slices. Therefore such combination could be used to avoid the black spot formation in dry-cured ham. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic discrimination of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage Bacillus spp. based on three housekeeping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caamaño-Antelo, S; Fernández-No, I C; Böhme, K; Ezzat-Alnakip, M; Quintela-Baluja, M; Barros-Velázquez, J; Calo-Mata, P

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus genus includes foodborne pathogenic and spoilage-associated species, such as Bacillus cereus, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus. Bacillus is also a heterogeneous genus that includes closely related species that are difficult to discriminate among, especially when well-conserved genes such as 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA are considered. The main goal of the present work was to study the usefulness of three housekeeping genes, the TU elongation factor (tuf), the DNA gyrase β subunit (gyrB) and the RNA polymerase β subunit (rpoB) genes, for use in differentiating among the most important foodborne Bacillus spp. sequences from 20 foodborne isolated Bacillus strains, and sequences belonging to different Bacillus spp. retrieved from the GenBank were analysed. In general terms, gyrB, rpoB and tuf gene regions for the strains considered in this study exhibited interspecific similarities of 57.8%, 67.23% and 77.66% respectively. Novel tufGPF and tufGPR universal primers targeted to the tuf gene were designed and proved to be useful for the amplification of all Bacillus spp considered. In conclusion, the tuf gene can be considered to be a good target for the differential characterisation of foodborne Bacillus species, especially for differentiating B. subtilis and B. cereus from other closely related species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of system reliability for a stochastic-flow distribution network with the spoilage property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Kuei; Huang, Cheng-Fu; Yeh, Cheng-Ta

    2016-04-01

    In supply chain management, satisfying customer demand is the most concerned for the manager. However, the goods may rot or be spoilt during delivery owing to natural disasters, inclement weather, traffic accidents, collisions, and so on, such that the intact goods may not meet market demand. This paper concentrates on a stochastic-flow distribution network (SFDN), in which a node denotes a supplier, a transfer station, or a market, while a route denotes a carrier providing the delivery service for a pair of nodes. The available capacity of the carrier is stochastic because the capacity may be partially reserved by other customers. The addressed problem is to evaluate the system reliability, the probability that the SFDN can satisfy the market demand with the spoilage rate under the budget constraint from multiple suppliers to the customer. An algorithm is developed in terms of minimal paths to evaluate the system reliability along with a numerical example to illustrate the solution procedure. A practical case of fruit distribution is presented accordingly to emphasise the management implication of the system reliability.

  11. Brettanomyces yeasts--From spoilage organisms to valuable contributors to industrial fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, Jan; Daenen, Luk; Malcorps, Philippe; Derdelinckx, Guy; Verachtert, Hubert; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-08-03

    Ever since the introduction of controlled fermentation processes, alcoholic fermentations and Saccharomyces cerevisiae starter cultures proved to be a match made in heaven. The ability of S. cerevisiae to produce and withstand high ethanol concentrations, its pleasant flavour profile and the absence of health-threatening toxin production are only a few of the features that make it the ideal alcoholic fermentation organism. However, in certain conditions or for certain specific fermentation processes, the physiological boundaries of this species limit its applicability. Therefore, there is currently a strong interest in non-Saccharomyces (or non-conventional) yeasts with peculiar features able to replace or accompany S. cerevisiae in specific industrial fermentations. Brettanomyces (teleomorph: Dekkera), with Brettanomyces bruxellensis as the most commonly encountered representative, is such a yeast. Whilst currently mainly considered a spoilage organism responsible for off-flavour production in wine, cider or dairy products, an increasing number of authors report that in some cases, these yeasts can add beneficial (or at least interesting) aromas that increase the flavour complexity of fermented beverages, such as specialty beers. Moreover, its intriguing physiology, with its exceptional stress tolerance and peculiar carbon- and nitrogen metabolism, holds great potential for the production of bioethanol in continuous fermentors. This review summarizes the most notable metabolic features of Brettanomyces, briefly highlights recent insights in its genetic and genomic characteristics and discusses its applications in industrial fermentation processes, such as the production of beer, wine and bioethanol. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-11-20

    Detection, identification and classification of yeasts have undergone major changes in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of the nuclear large subunit rRNA gene and from ITS now permits many laboratories to identify species quickly and accurately, thus replacing the laborious and often inaccurate phenotypic tests previously used. Phylogenetic analysis of gene sequences has resulted in a major revision of yeast systematics resulting in redefinition of nearly all genera. This new understanding of species relationships has prompted a change of rules for naming and classifying yeasts and other fungi, and these new rules are presented in the recently implemented International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (Melbourne Code). The use of molecular methods for species identification and the impact of Code changes on classification will be discussed, especially in the context of food and beverage spoilage yeasts. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. [Application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in identification of wine spoilage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xian-De; Dong, Da-Ming; Zheng, Wen-Gang; Jiao, Lei-Zi; Lang, Yun

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, fresh and spoiled wine samples from three wines produced by different companies were studied u- sing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. We analyzed the physicochemical property change in the process of spoil- age, and then, gave out the attribution of some main FTIR absorption peaks. A novel determination method was explored based on the comparisons of some absorbance ratios at different wavebands although the absorbance ratios in this method were relative. Through the compare of the wine spectra before and after spoiled, the authors found that they were informative at the bands of 3,020~2,790, 1,760~1,620 and 1,550~800 cm(-1). In order to find the relation between these informative spectral bands and the wine deterioration and achieve the discriminant analysis, chemometrics methods were introduced. Principal compounds analysis (PCA) and soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) were used for classifying different-quality wines. And partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to identify spoiled wines and good wines. Results showed that FTIR technique combined with chemometrics methods could effectively distinguish spoiled wines from fresh samples. The effect of classification at the wave band of 1 550-800 cm(-1) was the best. The recognition rate of SIMCA and PLSDA were respectively 94% and 100%. This study demonstrates that Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is an effective tool for monitoring red wine's spoilage and provides theoretical support for developing early-warning equipments.

  14. Effects of aqueous extract of Cinnamomum verum on growth of bread spoilage fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Doudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Food waste has been identified as a considerable problem and bread is the most wasted food. This study aimed to evaluate In-vitro anti-fungal activity of cinnamon extract on bread spoilage fungi and to determine its anti-fungal effect in the bread slices. At first, the MIC and MFC values of the extract were determined against Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium notatum and Rhizopus oryzae. Then, Aspergillus sp was selected to assess antifungal activities of different doses of cinnamon extract in bread slices. Cinnamon extract at a dose of 64 mg/ml completely inhibited all standard and bread isolated fungi. This concentration of extract also inhibited Aspergillus growth on bread slices and delayed colony formation but adversely affected the sensory characteristics of bread. Cinnamon extract at 32 mg/ml not only delayed fungal growth, but also improved bread shelf life and delayed its staling. Moreover, 32mg/ml of extract did not adversely affect bread aroma, flavor and texture. However, sodium acetate inhibited the growth of Aspergillus sp but is not recommended for fungal control because it is considered as chemical. Therefore 32 mg/ml of extract is recommended for increasing the shelf-life of flat bread.

  15. Effects of storage temperature on the fungal and chemical spoilage of maize grains and flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, T.; Sattar, A.; Khan, I.; Ahmed, A.

    1989-01-01

    The chemical and fungal spoilage of maize grains and flour of Sarhad White and Sarhad Yellow varieties in relation to time temperature (10 C, 15 C, 20 C and room (30-56 C) storage period at 8-12 months was studied. The results showed that total fungal counts and percent infestation markedly increased with advanced storage and increased temperature. Percentage germination generally decreased during extended storage. Peroxide values of both the grain and flour increased with increasing temperature and storage time. At the end of one year storage the total fungal counts in the grain and flour of Sarhad White and Sarhad Yellow ranged 13.6x10/sup 12/ - 20.0x10/sup 13/ and Yellow ranged 17.1x10/sup 13/ - 22.1x10/sup 14/ respectively. germination and infestation percentage of the grains of Sarhad White and Sarhad Yellow ranged 76-78% and 96-99%. The peroxide value ranged 6.6-7.0 and 6.4-6.8 meg/Kg in the grain and flour of Sarhad White respectively after one year storage. There was more fungal infestation, fungal counts and peroxidation in the grain and flour Sarhad Yellow than that of Sarhad White. (author)

  16. Phytoalexins as possible controlling agents of microbial spoilage of irradiated fresh fruit and vegetables during storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    The decline in biogenerating capacity to form natural antibiotic compounds (phytoalexins), rishitin and lubimin in potato tubers and rishitin in tomatoes, after gamma irradiation seems to be the essence of the suppression of natural immunity exhibited by an increase in per cent of rotted tubers and fruits during storage. In vitro studies postulated that the rot-causing fungi Phytophthora infestans (Mond) De Bary, Alternaria solani (Ellis and Martin) James and Grout, Botrytis cinerea Persson., Fusarium oxysporum Syder and Hansen and Rhizopus stolonifer Ehrenberg were significantly controlled by the application of phytoalexins that had been initially formed by potato tubers (rishitin), tomato fruits (rishitin) and pepper fruits (capsidiol). In vivo studies revealed that post-irradiation treatment of potato tubers and tomato fruits with phytoalexins that had been produced by the same plant organ or by another of the same family seems to be experimentally feasible to reduce the radiation dose or increase the efficiency of irradiation in controlling microbial spoilage during storage of irradiated potatoes and tomatoes. (author)

  17. Essential Oils Against Pathogen and Spoilage Microorganisms of Fruit Juices: Use of Versatile Antimicrobial Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinetta, Valentina; Morgan, Mark T; Coupland, John N; Yucel, Umut

    2017-02-01

    Essential oils (EO) are increasingly used as natural antimicrobial compounds, however the effect of delivery system to enhance their antimicrobial activity has not been widely studied. Limonene (0 to 10 μL/mL) was added to microbial suspensions (∼10 5 CFU/mL) of selected foodborne pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus), and spoilage microorganisms (Lactobacillus plantarum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans). S. aureus was found to be the most sensitive foodborne pathogen while Salmonella enterica showed continued growth under all concentrations. Stable nanoemulsions and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) (d ∼ 170 nm) were prepared using an alkane carrier oil (n-tetradecane and n-eicosane, respectively). Interfacial effects and homogenous distribution of limonene in nanoemulsions improved its (8 and 12 μL/mL) antimicrobial effect against S. aureus. Higher aqueous concentrations as a result of expulsion from SLN further enhanced the antimicrobial activity pronounced at higher limonene concentrations. Therefore, our findings confirm that the emulsion-based delivery systems are able to effectively distribute limonene inside a microbial suspension to improve its antimicrobial activity. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Control of chilled beef spoilage by combination of packaging and organic acid treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Hanifian

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the  inhibitory  effect  of  lactic  acid  and  acetic  acid  spray  on  spoilage  of  packaged  fresh chilled  beef  was investigated. Meat from the chuck portion of 1 to 2 year old beef bulls was sprayed with 1% solution of lactic and acetic acids prior to packaging with polystyrene and stretch film. Meat  samples  were  kept  at 2- 4° C  and  the package were removed periodically in 2 day intervals from the refrigerating chamber and underwent microbial (total count, coliform cont and psychrophilic count, chemical (pH and TVN and organoleptic (drip, colour and odor examinations. The experiment was performed with 20 repetitions.  The results indicated that there was a significant increase in total, coliform and psychrophilic counts during an 8 day preservation period (P

  19. Antimicrobial compounds targeting Gram-negative bacteria in food: Their mode of action and combinational effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard, Morten

    2015-01-01

    they interact with bacterial cells to exert their mechanism of inhibition or killing. Furthermore, natural antimicrobials are often not potent enough as single compounds, and may cause unwanted sensory side-effects, which limit the quantities that can be applied to food. These problems might be circumvented......Gram-negative bacteria are a major cause of food spoilage and foodborne illnesses. However, finding effective solutions against Gram-negative bacteria are complicated because of increasing consumer demands for more natural, minimally processed, and fresh high quality food products without...... that isoeugenol permeabilized the cytoplasmic membrane, and probably inhibited intracellular esterases. We proposed that isoeugenol interacted with cytoplasmic membranes of E. coli in a reversible fashion, which destabilized membranes to become leaky in a non-disruptive detergent-like mechanism. In the third...

  20. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  1. Effect of kaolin silver complex on the control of populations of Brettanomyces and acetic acid bacteria in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Cañas, P M; López-Martín, R; García-Romero, E; González-Arenzana, L; Mínguez-Sanz, S; Chatonnet, P; Palacios-García, A; Puig-Pujol, A

    2018-05-01

    In this work, the effects of kaolin silver complex (KAgC) have been evaluated to replace the use of SO 2 for the control of spoilage microorganisms in the winemaking process. The results showed that KAgC at a dose of 1 g/L provided effective control against the development of B. bruxellensis and acetic acid bacteria. In wines artificially contaminated with an initial population of B. bruxellensis at 10 4 CFU/mL, a concentration proven to produce off flavors in wine, only residual populations of the contaminating yeast remained after 24 days of contact with the additive. Populations of acetic bacteria inoculated into wine at concentrations of 10 2 and 10 4  CFU/mL were reduced to negligible levels after 72 h of treatment with KAgC. The antimicrobial effect of KAgC against B. bruxellensis and acetic bacteria was also demonstrated in a wine naturally contaminated by these microorganisms, decreasing their population in a similar way to a chitosan treatment. Related to this effect, wines with KAgC showed lower concentrations of acetic acid and 4-ethyl phenol than wines without KAgC. The silver concentration from KAgC that remained in the finished wines was below the legal limits. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of KAgC to reduce spoilage microorganisms in winemaking.

  2. Differentiation of mixed lactic acid bacteria communities in beverage fermentations using targeted terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokulich, Nicholas A; Mills, David A

    2012-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are an important group of bacteria in beer and wine fermentations both as beneficial organisms and as spoilage agents. However, sensitive, rapid, culture-independent methods for identification and community analyses of LAB in mixed-culture fermentations are limited. We developed a terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP)-based assay for the detection and identification of lactic acid bacteria and Bacilli during wine, beer, and food fermentations. This technique can sensitively discriminate most species of Lactobacillales, and most genera of Bacillales, in mixed culture, as indicated by both bioinformatic predictions and empirical observations. This method was tested on a range of beer and wine fermentations containing mixed LAB communities, demonstrating the efficacy of this technique for discriminating LAB in mixed culture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of yeasts against some pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Younis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to isolate and identify yeast species from milk and meat products, and to test their antimicrobial activity against some bacterial species. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 milk and meat products samples were collected from random sellers and super markets in New Damietta city, Damietta, Egypt. Samples were subjected to yeast isolation procedures and tested for its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. In addition, all yeast species isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detection of khs (kievitone hydratase and pelA (pectate degrading enzyme genes. Results: The recovery rate of yeasts from sausage was 20% (2/10 followed by kareish cheese, processed cheese, and butter 10% (1/10 each as well as raw milk 9% (9/100, and fruit yoghurt 30% (6/20. Different yeast species were recovered, namely, Candida kefyr (5 isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4 isolates, Candida intermedia (3 isolates, Candida tropicalis (2 isolates, Candida lusitaniae (2 isolates, and Candida krusei (1 isolate. khs gene was detected in all S. cerevisiae isolates, however, pelA gene was not detected in all identified yeast species. Antimicrobial activity of recovered yeasts against the selected bacterial species showed high activity with C. intermedia against S. aureus and E. coli, C. kefyr against E. coli, and C. lusitaniae against S. aureus. Moderate activities were obtained with C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and S. cerevisiae against E. coli; meanwhile, all the tested yeasts revealed a very low antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: The obtained results confirmed that some kinds of yeasts have the ability to produce antimicrobial compounds that could inhibit some pathogenic and spoilage bacteria and these antimicrobial activity of yeasts enables them to be one of the novel agents in controlling spoilage of food.

  4. Design of an experimental viscoelastic food model system for studying Zygosaccharomyces bailii spoilage in acidic sauces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, L; Geeraerd, A H; Dang, T D T; Vermeulen, A; Serneels, K; Van Derlinden, E; Cappuyns, A M; Moldenaers, P; Debevere, J; Devlieghere, F; Van Impe, J F

    2009-11-01

    Within the field of predictive microbiology, the number of studies that quantify the effect of food structure on microbial behavior is very limited. This is mainly due to impracticalities related to the use of a nonliquid growth medium. In this study, an experimental food model system for studying yeast spoilage in acid sauces was developed by selecting a suitable thickening/gelling agent. In a first step, a variety of thickening/gelling agents was screened, with respect to the main physicochemical (pH, water activity, and acetic acid and sugar concentrations) and rheological (weak gel viscoelastic behavior and presence of a yield stress) characteristics of acid sauces. Second, the rheological behavior of the selected thickening/gelling agent, Carbopol 980, was extensively studied within the following range of conditions: pH 4.0 to 5.0, acetic acid concentration of 0 to 1.0% (vol/vol), glycerol concentration of 0 to 15% (wt/vol), and Carbopol concentration of 1.0 to 1.5% (wt/vol). Finally, the applicability of the model system was illustrated by performing growth experiments in microtiter plates for Zygosaccharomyces bailii at 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% (wt/vol) Carbopol, 5% (wt/vol) glycerol, 0% (vol/vol) acetic acid, and pH 5.0. A shift from planktonic growth to growth in colonies was observed when the Carbopol concentration increased from 0.5 to 1.0%. The applicability of the model system was illustrated by estimating mu(max) at 0.5% Carbopol from absorbance detection times.

  5. Design of an Experimental Viscoelastic Food Model System for Studying Zygosaccharomyces bailii Spoilage in Acidic Sauces▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, L.; Geeraerd, A. H.; Dang, T. D. T.; Vermeulen, A.; Serneels, K.; Van Derlinden, E.; Cappuyns, A. M.; Moldenaers, P.; Debevere, J.; Devlieghere, F.; Van Impe, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Within the field of predictive microbiology, the number of studies that quantify the effect of food structure on microbial behavior is very limited. This is mainly due to impracticalities related to the use of a nonliquid growth medium. In this study, an experimental food model system for studying yeast spoilage in acid sauces was developed by selecting a suitable thickening/gelling agent. In a first step, a variety of thickening/gelling agents was screened, with respect to the main physicochemical (pH, water activity, and acetic acid and sugar concentrations) and rheological (weak gel viscoelastic behavior and presence of a yield stress) characteristics of acid sauces. Second, the rheological behavior of the selected thickening/gelling agent, Carbopol 980, was extensively studied within the following range of conditions: pH 4.0 to 5.0, acetic acid concentration of 0 to 1.0% (vol/vol), glycerol concentration of 0 to 15% (wt/vol), and Carbopol concentration of 1.0 to 1.5% (wt/vol). Finally, the applicability of the model system was illustrated by performing growth experiments in microtiter plates for Zygosaccharomyces bailii at 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% (wt/vol) Carbopol, 5% (wt/vol) glycerol, 0% (vol/vol) acetic acid, and pH 5.0. A shift from planktonic growth to growth in colonies was observed when the Carbopol concentration increased from 0.5 to 1.0%. The applicability of the model system was illustrated by estimating μmax at 0.5% Carbopol from absorbance detection times. PMID:19783742

  6. The influence of Pichia killer toxins on the wine spoilage yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Błaszczyk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Killer yeasts are able to produce toxins that antagonize the growth of susceptible yeasts cells of the same species or the ones that are related to them. Killer strains are resistant to their own toxins but can be sensitive to killer proteins of other yeasts. The killer proteins of Pichia spp. are known for its broad spectrum of antifungal activity including pathogens such as Candida albicans. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of the partly purified killer toxins to inhibit the growth of selected yeast strains which can contribute to wine spoilage. Three Pichia killer yeast strains (CBS 1982, CBS 5759, CBS 7373 were used in the study. The killer protein secreted by Pichia anomala CBS 1982 was characterized by the highest antifungal activity. The most pronounced effect of the reduction of cell proliferation by killer toxin preparations was found after 2 and 20 h cultivation. Among the 13 tested strains, all Pichia killer toxin preparations inhibited the growth of Rhodotorula graminis Rg, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa Rm and Schizosaccharomyces pombe DSM 70576. Killer toxins produced by Pichia anomala CBS 1982 (K8 and CBS 5759 (K4 limited the growth of Candida pulcherrima K5 and Hanseniaspora guillermondii DSM 3432 after 2, 20 and 168 h of incubation. A significant reduction of Debaryomyces hansenii DSM 3428 biomass was observed in medium with the addition of one toxin preparation (Pichia anomala CBS 1982. The growth limitation of Candida glabrata DSM 6425, Hanseniaspora uvarum DSM 2768, Metchnikowia pulcherrima DSM 70321 and Cryptococcus laurentii DSM 70766 was noticed only after 2 hours cultivation in presence of killer protein preparations. The killer toxins could be used in the food industry as selective tools to control infections during the fermentation of wine and improve the quality of the final product.

  7. Lactobacillus oligofermentans sp. nov., Associated with Spoilage of Modified-Atmosphere-Packaged Poultry Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koort, Joanna; Murros, Anna; Coenye, Tom; Eerola, Susanna; Vandamme, Peter; Sukura, Antti; Björkroth, Johanna

    2005-01-01

    Unidentified lactic acid bacterium (LAB) isolates which had mainly been detected in spoiled, marinated, modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) broiler meat products during two previous studies, were identified and analyzed for their phenotypic properties and the capability to produce biogenic amines. To establish the taxonomic position of these isolates, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, numerical analysis of ribopatterns, and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments were done. Unexpectedly for a meat-spoilage-associated LAB, the strains utilized glucose very weakly. According to the API 50 CHL test, arabinose and xylose were the only carbohydrates strongly fermented. None of the six strains tested for production of histamine, tyramine, tryptamine, phenylethylamine, putrescine, and cadaverine were able to produce these main meat-associated biogenic amines in vitro. The polyphasic taxonomy approach showed that these strains represent a new Lactobacillus species. The six isolates sequenced for the 16S rRNA encoding genes shared the highest similarity (95.0 to 96.3%) with the sequence of the Lactobacillus durianis type strain. In the phylogenetic tree, these isolates formed a distinct cluster within the Lactobacillus reuteri group, which also includes L. durianis. Numerical analyses of HindIII-EcoRI ribotypes placed all isolates together in a cluster with seven subclusters well separated from the L. reuteri group reference strains. The DNA-DNA hybridization levels between Lactobacillus sp. nov. isolates varied from 67 to 96%, and low hybridization levels (3 to 15%) were obtained with the L. durianis type strain confirming that these isolates belong to the same species different from L. durianis. The name Lactobacillus oligofermentans sp. nov. is proposed, with strain LMG 22743T (also known as DSM 15707T or AMKR18T) as the type strain. PMID:16085830

  8. Bio-protective potential of lactic acid bacteria: Effect ofLactobacillus sakeiandLactobacillus curvatuson changes of the microbial community in vacuum-packaged chilled beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Zhu, Lixian; Dong, Pengcheng; Liang, Rongrong; Mao, Yanwei; Qiu, Shubing; Luo, Xin

    2018-04-01

    This study was to determine the bacterial diversity and monitor the community dynamic changes during storage of vacuum-packaged sliced raw beef as affected by Lactobacillus sakei and Lactobacillus curvatus . L. sakei and L. curvatus were separately incubated in vacuumed-packaged raw beef as bio-protective cultures to inhibit the naturally contaminating microbial load. Dynamic changes of the microbial diversity of inoculated or non-inoculated (control) samples were monitored at 4°C for 0 to 38 days, using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The DGGE profiles of DNA directly extracted from non-inoculated control samples highlighted the order of appearance of spoilage bacteria during storage, showing that Enterbacteriaceae and Pseudomonas fragi emerged early, then Brochothrix thermosphacta shared the dominant position, and finally, Pseudomonas putida showed up became predominant. Compared with control, the inoculation of either L. sakei or L. curvatus significantly lowered the complexity of microbial diversity and inhibited the growth of spoilage bacteria (p<0.05). Interestingly, we also found that the dominant position of L. curvatus was replaced by indigenous L. sakei after 13 d for L. curvatus -inoculated samples. Plate counts on selective agars further showed that inoculation with L. sakei or L. curvatus obviously reduced the viable counts of Enterbacteraceae , Pseudomonas spp. and B. thermosphacta during later storage (p< 0.05), with L. sakei exerting greater inhibitory effect. Inoculation with both bio-protective cultures also significantly decreased the total volatile basic nitrogen values of stored samples (p<0.05). Taken together, the results proved the benefits of inoculation with lactic acid bacteria especially L. sakei as a potential way to inhibit growth of spoilage-related bacteria and improve the shelf life of vacuum-packaged raw beef.

  9. Zygosaccharomyces lentus: a significant new osmophilic, preservative-resistant spoilage yeast, capable of growth at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steels, H; James, S A; Roberts, I N; Stratford, M

    1999-10-01

    Zygosaccharomyces lentus is a yeast species recently identified from its physiology and 18S ribosomal sequencing (Steels et al. 1999).The physiological characteristics of five strains of this new yeast so far isolated were investigated, particularly those of technical significance for a spoilage yeast, namely temperature range, pH range, osmotolerance, sugar fermentation, resistance to food preservatives such as sorbic acid, benzoic acid and dimethyldicarbonate (DMDC; Velcorin). Adaptation to benzoic acid, and growth in shaking and static culture were also investigated. Zygosaccharomyces lentus strains grew over a wide range of temperature (4-25 degrees C) and pH 2.2-7.0. Growth at 4 degrees C was significant. Zygosaccharomyces lentus strains grew at 25-26 degrees C in static culture but were unable to grow in aerobic culture close to their temperature maximum. All Z. lentus strains grew in 60% w/v sugar and consequently, are osmotolerant. Zygosaccharomyces lentus strains could utilize sucrose, glucose or fructose as a source of fermentable sugar, but not galactose. Zygosaccharomyces lentus strains were resistant to food preservatives, growing in sorbic acid up to 400 mg l-1 and benzoic acid to 900 mg l-1 at pH 4.0. Adaptation to higher preservative concentrations was demonstrated with benzoic acid. Resistance to DMDC was shown to be greater than that of Z. bailii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study confirms that Z. lentus is an important food spoilage organism potentially capable of growth in a wide range of food products, particularly low pH, high sugar foods and drinks. It is likely to be more significant than Z. bailii in the spoilage of chilled products.

  10. Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Relation to Spoilage of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Packaged in Films of Varying Oxygen Permeabilities and with Different Atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Ma, Li M; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Shelf life of fish packaged under modified atmosphere (MA) is extended, but within the United States, commercial application of MA with impermeable packaging films is restricted due to concerns that botulinum toxin production would precede spoilage when contaminated fish are held at abusive storage temperatures. Use of semipermeable packaging films has been advocated; however, previous studies are inconclusive in determining the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of a film that is needed to achieve an acceptable margin of safety (i.e., toxin production occurs only after spoilage). This study was conducted to determine the influence of OTR (target OTRs of 3 to 15,000) on the development of spoilage volatiles and toxin in salmon inoculated with type E Clostridium botulinum and subjected to air, vacuum, or 75:25 CO2:N2 MA and storage temperatures of 4, 8, 12, or 16°C. The most dominant headspace volatile peak that was produced during spoilage of samples at 4, 8 or 12°C was a peak, having a Kovats retention index (KI) of 753, and at which external standards of 2- or 3-methyl 1-butanol also eluted. Under anaerobic conditions, both the aerobic microbial populations and the size of the KI 753 spoilage peak were less in inoculated samples compared with uninoculated samples. C. botulinum-inoculated samples that were stored at 12 or 16°C under conditions favorable for anaerobic growth were also characterized by a KI 688 peak. Using a previously developed model that related the percentage of elderly consumers who would prepare a sample having the KI 753 spoilage peak of a specific size, it was determined that for salmon packaged with 3 or 3,000 OTR films under any atmosphere and stored at 12 or 16°C, 2 to 61% of the consumers could potentially prepare toxin-contaminated samples. Hence, when abusive storage conditions are suspected, the fish should not be consumed.

  11. Microbiological changes, shelf life and identification of initial and spoilage microbiota of sea bream fillets stored under various conditions using 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlapani, Foteini F; Kormas, Konstantinos Ar; Boziaris, Ioannis S

    2015-09-01

    Sea bream fillets are one of the most important value-added products of the seafood market. Fresh seafood spoils mainly owing to bacterial action. In this study an exploration of initial and spoilage microbiota of sea bream fillets stored under air and commercial modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) at 0 and 5 °C was conducted by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of isolates grown on plates. Sensory evaluation and enumeration of total viable counts and spoilage microorganisms were also conducted to determine shelf life and bacterial growth respectively. Different temperatures and atmospheres affected growth and synthesis of spoilage microbiota as well as shelf life. Shelf life under air at 0 and 5 °C was 14 and 5 days respectively, while under MAP it was 20 and 8 days respectively. Initial microbiota were dominated by Pseudomonas fluorescens, Psychrobacter and Macrococcus caseolyticus. Different temperatures and atmospheres affected the synthesis of spoilage microbiota. At the end of shelf life, different phylotypes of Pseudomonas closely related to Pseudomonas fragi were found to dominate in most cases, while Pseudomonas veronii dominated in fillets under MAP at 0 °C. Furthermore, in fillets under MAP at 5 °C, new dominant species such as Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Carnobacterium divergens and Vagococcus fluvialis were revealed. Different temperature and atmospheric conditions affected bacterial growth, shelf life and the synthesis of spoilage microbiota. Molecular identification revealed species and strains of microorganisms that have not been reported before for sea bream fillets stored under various conditions, thus providing valuable information regarding microbiological spoilage. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Effect of weak acid preservatives on growth of bakery product spoilage fungi at different water activities and pH values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    2004-01-01

    Inhibition of spoilage organisms from bakery products by weak acid preservatives in concentrations of 0%, 0.003%, 0.03% and 0.3% (w/v) was investigated experimentally on a substrate media with water activity (a(w)) and pH ranging from sourdough-fermented acidic rye bread to alkaline intermediate...... activity levels as well as higher pH values decreased spoilage-free times of the fungi. The preservative calcium propionate was less effective than potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate....

  13. Effect of weak acid preservatives on growth of bakery product spoilage fungi at different water activities and pH values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    2004-01-01

    Inhibition of spoilage organisms from bakery products by weak acid preservatives in concentrations of 0%, 0.003%, 0.03% and 0.3% (w/v) was investigated experimentally on a substrate media with water activity (a(w)) and pH ranging from sourdough-fermented acidic rye bread to alkaline intermediate...... of bakery products was conducted using calcium propionate, potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate. The obtained data was modelled using survival analysis to determine 'spoilage-free time' for the fungi. At the low a(w) level (0.80) only Eurotium species grew within the test period of 30 days. Higher water...

  14. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  15. Rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria by volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senecal, Andre G.; Magnone, Joshua; Yeomans, Walter; Powers, Edmund M.

    2002-02-01

    Developments in rapid detection technologies have made countless improvements over the years. However, because of the limited sample that these technologies can process in a single run, the chance of capturing and identifying a small amount of pathogens is difficult. The problem is further magnified by the natural random distribution of pathogens in foods. Methods to simplify pathogenic detection through the identification of bacteria specific VOC were studied. E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium were grown on selected agar medium to model protein, and carbohydrate based foods. Pathogenic and common spoilage bacteria (Pseudomonas and Morexella) were screened for unique VOC production. Bacteria were grown on agar slants in closed vials. Headspace sampling was performed at intervals up to 24 hours using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) techniques followed by GC/MS analysis. Development of unique volatiles was followed to establish sensitivity of detection. E. coli produced VOC not found in either Trypticase Soy Yeast (TSY) agar blanks or spoilage organism samples were - indole, 1-decanol, and 2-nonanone. Salmonella specific VOC grown on TSY were 3-methyl-1-butanol, dimethyl sulfide, 2-undecanol, 2-pentadecanol and 1-octanol. Trials on potato dextrose agar (PDA) slants indicated VOC specific for E. coli and Salmonella when compared to PDA blanks and Pseudomonas samples. However, these VOC peaks were similar for both pathogens. Morexella did not grow on PDA slants. Work will continue with model growth mediums at various temperatures, and mixed flora inoculums. As well as, VOC production based on the dynamics of bacterial growth.

  16. Cereal fungal infection, mycotoxins, and lactic acid bacteria mediated bioprotection: from crop farming to cereal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro M; Zannini, Emanuele; Arendt, Elke K

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) metabolites are a reliable alternative for reducing fungal infections pre-/post-harvest with additional advantages for cereal-base products which convene the food market's trend. Grain industrial use is in expansion owing to its applicability in generating functional food. The food market is directed towards functional natural food with clear health benefits for the consumer in detriment to chemical additives. The food market chain is becoming broader and more complex, which presents an ever-growing fungal threat. Toxigenic and spoilage fungi are responsible for numerous diseases and economic losses. Cereal infections may occur in the field or post-processing, along the food chain. Consequently, the investigation of LAB metabolites with antifungal activity has gained prominence in the scientific research community. LAB bioprotection retards the development of fungal diseases in the field and inhibit pathogens and spoilage fungi in food products. In addition to the health safety improvement, LAB metabolites also enhance shelf-life, organoleptic and texture qualities of cereal-base foods. This review presents an overview of the fungal impact through the cereal food chain leading to investigation on LAB antifungal compounds. Applicability of LAB in plant protection and cereal industry is discussed. Specific case studies include Fusarium head blight, malting and baking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fast Classification of Meat Spoilage Markers Using Nanostructured ZnO Thin Films and Unsupervised Feature Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bosco Balaguru Rayappan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a rapid and accurate detection system for spoilage in meat. We use unsupervised feature learning techniques (stacked restricted Boltzmann machines and auto-encoders that consider only the transient response from undoped zinc oxide, manganese-doped zinc oxide, and fluorine-doped zinc oxide in order to classify three categories: the type of thin film that is used, the type of gas, and the approximate ppm-level of the gas. These models mainly offer the advantage that features are learned from data instead of being hand-designed. We compare our results to a feature-based approach using samples with various ppm level of ethanol and trimethylamine (TMA that are good markers for meat spoilage. The result is that deep networks give a better and faster classification than the feature-based approach, and we thus conclude that the fine-tuning of our deep models are more efficient for this kind of multi-label classification task.

  18. Heat inactivation of wine spoilage yeast Dekkera bruxellensis by hot water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizio, V; Vigentini, I; Parisi, N; Picozzi, C; Compagno, C; Foschino, R

    2015-08-01

    Cell suspensions of four Dekkera bruxellensis strains (CBS 2499, CBS 2797, CBS 4459 and CBS 4601) were subjected to heat treatment in deionized water at four different temperatures (55·0, 57·5, 60·0 and 62·5°C) to investigate their thermal resistance. The decimal reduction times at a specific temperature were calculated from the resulting inactivation curves: the D-values at 55·0°C ranged from 63 to 79·4 s, at 57·5°C from 39·6 to 46·1 s, at 60·0°C from 19·5 to 20·7 s, at 62·5°C from 10·2 to 13·7 s. The z-values were between 9·2 and 10·2°C, confirming that heat resistance is a strain-dependent character. A protocol for the sanitization of 225 l casks by immersion in hot water was set up and applied to contaminated 3-year-old barrels. The heat penetration through the staves was evaluated for each investigated temperature by positioning a thermal probe at 8 mm deep. A treatment at 60°C for an exposure time of 19 min allowed to eliminate the yeast populations up to a log count reduction of 8. Brettanomyces/Dekkera bruxellensis is the main yeast involved in red wine spoilage that occurs during ageing in barrel, generating considerable economic losses. Current sanitization protocols, performed using different chemicals, are ineffective due to the porous nature of the wood. The thermal inactivation of D. bruxellensis cells by hot water treatment proves to be efficacious and easy to perform, provided that the holding time at the killing temperature takes into account the filling time of the vessel and the time for the heat penetration into the wood structure. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. How honey kills bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; te Velde, Anje A.; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2010-01-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria

  20. Activity of R(+) limonene on the maximum growth rate of fish spoilage organisms and related effects on shelf-life prolongation of fresh gilthead sea bream fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarratana, Filippo; Muscolino, Daniele; Beninati, Chiara; Ziino, Graziella; Giuffrida, Alessandro; Panebianco, Antonio

    2016-11-21

    R(+)limonene (LMN) is the major aromatic compound in essential oils obtained from oranges, grapefruits, and lemons. The improvement of preservation techniques to reduce the growth and activity of spoilage microorganisms in foods is crucial to increase their shelf life and to reduce the losses due to spoilage. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of LMN on the shelf life of fish fillets. Its effectiveness was preliminarily investigated in vitro against 60 strains of Specific Spoilage Organisms (SSOs) and then on gilt-head sea bream fillets stored at 2±0.5°C for 15days under vacuum. LMN showed a good inhibitory effect against tested SSOs strains. On gilt-head sea bream fillets, LMN inhibited the growth SSOs effectively, and its use resulted in a shelf-life extension of ca. 6-9days of treated fillets, compared to the control samples. The LMN addition in Sparus aurata fillets giving a distinctive smell and like-lemon taste to fish fillets that resulted pleasant to panellists. Its use contributed to a considerable reduction of fish spoilage given that the fillets treated with LMN were still sensory acceptable after 15days of storage. LMN may be used as an effective antimicrobial system to reduce the microbial growth and to improve the shelf life of fresh gilt-head sea bream fillets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  2. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic ...

  3. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50 μL leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  4. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Daniels, Dwayne; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50  μ L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties.

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae variety diastaticus friend or foe? Spoilage potential and brewing ability of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae variety diastaticus yeast isolates by genetic, phenotypic and physiological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Dörnberg, Tim; Kory, Oliver Ingo; Jacob, Fritz; Michel, Maximilian; Hutzler, Mathias

    2018-03-06

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae variety diastaticus is generally considered to be an obligatory spoilage microorganism and spoilage yeast in beer and beer-mixed beverages (Folz, Hofmann and Stahl 2011; Hutzler et al. 2012). Their super-attenuating ability causes increased carbon dioxide concentrations, beer gushing and potential bottle explosion along with changes in flavor, sedimentation and increased turbidity. This research shows clear differences in the super-attenuating properties of S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus yeast strains and their potential for industrial brewing applications. Nineteen unknown spoilage yeast cultures were obtained as isolates and characterized using a broad spectrum of genetic and phenotypic methods. Results indicated that all isolates represent genetically different S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains except for strain TUM PI BA 124. Yeast strains were screened for their super-attenuating ability and sporulation. Even if the STA1 gene responsible for super-attenuation by encoding for the enzyme glucoamylase, could be verified by RT-PCR, no correlation to the spoilage potential could be demonstrated. Seven strains were further characterized focusing on brewing and sensory properties according to the yeast characterization platform developed by Meier-Dörnberg (Meier-Dörnberg and Michel et al. 2017; Meier-Dörnberg and Hutzler et al. 2017). Yeast strain TUM 3-H-2 cannot metabolize dextrin and soluble starch and showed no spoilage potential or super-attenuating ability even when the strain belongs to the species S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. Overall the beer produced with S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus has a dry and winey body with noticeable phenolic off-flavors desirable in German wheat beers.

  6. Application of bacteriophages in post-harvest control of human pathogenic and food spoiling bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages have attracted great attention for application in food biopreservation. Lytic bacteriophages specific for human pathogenic bacteria can be isolated from natural sources such as animal feces or industrial wastes where the target bacteria inhabit. Lytic bacteriophages have been tested in different food systems for inactivation of main food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni and Cronobacter sakazkii, and also for control of spoilage bacteria. Application of lytic bacteriophages could selectively control host populations of concern without interfering with the remaining food microbiota. Bacteriophages could also be applied for inactivation of bacteria attached to food contact surfaces or grown as biofilms. Bacteriophages may receive a generally recognized as safe status based on their lack of toxicity and other detrimental effects to human health. Phage preparations specific for L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serotypes have been commercialized and approved for application in foods or as part of surface decontamination protocols. Phage endolysins have a broader host specificity compared to lytic bacteriophages. Cloned endolysins could be used as natural preservatives, singly or in combination with other antimicrobials such as bacteriocins.

  7. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  8. Hydrogen production by nonphotosynthetic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, S.D.; Secor, C.K.; Zweig, R.M.; Ascione, R.

    1984-01-01

    H-producing nonphotosynthetic bacteria are identified and H from sewage treatment plants, H from rumen bacteria, and large-scale production of H through the genetic manipulation of H-producing nonphotosynthetic bacteria are discussed. (Refs. 36).

  9. Effect of MAP and Multi-layer Flexible Films on the Growth of Anaerobic Bacteria of Fresh Ostrich Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Zand

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The usage of different concentrations of two gas mixture (Carbon dioxide, Nitrogen, and also vacuum conditions and the effect of flexible multi-layer pouches has been studied on the growth of anaerobic bacteria in fresh ostrich meat at refrigerator (T=4 0C. Ordinary condition as a control packaging was compared with three types of modified atmosphere packaging: {(N270% + CO230%, (N230% + CO270%} and vacuum conditions in this project. Ostrich fresh meat were packaged into 3 kinds of polymeric flexible pouch” 4-layers with thickness 131μ, {PET (12 / AL (7 / PET (12 / LLD (100}, 3-layer with thickness 124μ {PET (12 / AL (12 / LLD (100 and 3- layer with thickness 119 μ {PET (12 / AL (7 / LLD (100}. Samples were performed microbial tests (Total count of anaerobic bacteria, in different times with 12 treatment ,3 run, statistical analysis and comparison of data, were done by software SAS (Ver:9/1 and Duncan’s new multiple range test, with confidence level of 95% (P <0.05. The usage of MAP was not adequate for controlling spoilage, but the spoilage process was delayed. Anaerobic bacteria population of ostrich meat under (% 30 CO2 +% 70 N2 and also vacuum conditions in this container were more than 104 (not acceptable.However, the best condition belonged to ( N2 30% + CO2 70% ,and was acceptable till15 days. Maximum anaerobic bacteria s which were grown in these meat samples was related to % 30 CO2 conditions in 3-layer Al(7 μ, and the lowest growth belonged to treatment under % 70 CO2 in 4-layer. The Characteristic of this multi-layer flexible pouch (4-layers with less water vapor and oxygen permeability and also increasing more percentage of CO2 due to antibacterial properties of carbon dioxide gas, caused to control microbial growth in samples, so could be extended shelf life of fresh ostrich meat.

  10. Literature Survey on Causes of Spoilage of Fresh Produce - 1959 to 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    Crater Spot Early Blight Freezing Injury Gray Mold Rot Late Blight Virus Diseases Pencil Stripe Phoma Root Rot Pithiness Watery Soft Rot Table...fruits or sulfur dioxide released from fumigated grapes may cause impart off odors to other crops. Chilling injury can occur in certain fruits as avocados ...with precise descriptions and illustrations of each. With the exception of bacterial soft rot , diseases caused by fungi and most bacteria are not

  11. [Darwin and bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2009-02-01

    As in 2009 the scientific world celebrates two hundreds years from the birthday of Charles Darwin and one hundred and fifty from the publication of The Origin of Species, an analysis of his complete work is performed, looking for any mention of bacteria. But it seems that the great naturahst never took knowledge about its existence, something rather improbable in a time when the discovery of bacteria shook the medical world, or he deliberately ignored them, not finding a place for such microscopic beings into his theory of evolution. But the bacteria badly affected his familiar life, killing scarlet fever one of his children and worsening to death the evolution of tuberculosis of his favourite Annie. Darwin himself could suffer the sickness of Chagas, whose etiological agent has a similar level to bacteria in the scale of evolution.

  12. Extracellular communication in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Philipp, B.; Eberl, L.

    2005-01-01

    molecules, in different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria they control pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production, biofilm differentiation, DNA transfer and bioluminescence. The development of biosensors for the detection of these signal molecules has greatly facilitated their subsequent chemical...

  13. AIDS: "it's the bacteria, stupid!".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxmeyer, Lawrence; Cantwell, Alan

    2008-11-01

    Acid-fast tuberculous mycobacterial infections are common in AIDS and are regarded as secondary "opportunistic infections." According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, TB is the major attributable cause of death in AIDS patients. Could such bacteria play a primary or causative role in AIDS? Certainly, In screening tests for HIV, there is frequent, up to 70%, cross-reactivity, between the gag and pol proteins of HIV and patients with mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis. By 1972, five years before gays started dying in the U.S., Rolland wrote Genital Tuberculosis, a Forgotten Disease? And ironically, in 1979, on the eve of AIDS recognition, Gondzik and Jasiewicz showed that even in the laboratory, genitally infected tubercular male guinea pigs could infect healthy females through their semen by an HIV-compatible ratio of 1 in 6 or 17%, prompting him to warn his patients that not only was tuberculosis a sexually transmitted disease, but also the necessity of the application of suitable contraceptives, such as condoms, to avoid it. Gondzik's solution and date of publication are chilling; his findings significant. Since 1982 Cantwell et al found acid-fast bacteria closely related to tuberculosis (TB) and atypical tuberculosis in AIDS tissue. On the other hand molecular biologist and virologist Duesberg, who originally defined retroviral ultrastructure, has made it clear that HIV is not the cause of AIDS and that the so-called AIDS retrovirus has never been isolated in its pure state. Dr. Etienne de Harven, first to examine retroviruses under the electron, agrees. In 1993 HIV co-discoverer Luc Montagnier reported on cell-wall-deficient (CWD) bacteria which he called "mycoplasma" in AIDS tissue. He suspected these as a necessary "co-factor" for AIDS. Remarkably, Montagnier remained silent on Cantwell's reports of acid-fast bacteria which could simulate "mycoplasma" in AIDS tissue. Mattman makes clear that the differentiation between

  14. Antimicrobial effect of essential oils on the seafood spoilage micro-organism Photobacterium phosphoreum in liquid media and fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Dalgaard, Paw

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the antimicrobial effect of nine essential oils (EO) on P. phosphoreum and determine the effect of oregano oil on the shelf-life of modified atmosphere-packed (MAP) cod fillets. Methods and Results: The antimicrobial effect of EO was studied in a liquid medium and in product...... storage trials. Oils of oregano and cinnamon had strongest antimicrobial activity, followed by lemongrass, thyme, clove, bay, marjoram, sage and basil oils. Oregano oil (0.05%, v/w) reduced growth of P. phosphoreum in naturally contaminated MAP cod fillets and extended shelf-life from 11-12 d to 21-26 d...... at 2degreesC. Conclusions: Oregano oil reduced the growth of P. phosphoreum and extended the shelf-life of MAP cod fillets. Significance and Impact of the Study: Mild and natural preservation using EO can extend the shelf-life of MAP seafood through inhibiting the specific spoilage organism P...

  15. Effect of Ethanol, Sulfur Dioxide and Glucose on the Growth of Wine Spoilage Yeasts Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Chandra

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology (RSM was used to study the effect of three factors, sulfur dioxide, ethanol and glucose, on the growth of wine spoilage yeast species, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Seventeen central composite rotatable design (CCRD trials were designed for each test yeast using realistic concentrations of the factors (variables in premium red wine. Polynomial regression equations were fitted to experimental data points, and the growth inhibitory conditions of these three variables were determined. The overall results showed Sa. ludwigii as the most resistant species growing under high ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations, i.e., 15% (v/v/20 mg L-1, 14% (v/v/32 mg L-1 and 12.5% (v/v/40 mg L-1, whereas other yeasts did not survive under the same levels of ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations. The inhibitory effect of ethanol was primarily observed during longer incubation periods, compared with sulfur dioxide, which showed an immediate effect. In some CCRD trials, Sa. ludwigii and S. cerevisiae showed growth recovery after a short death period under the exposure of 20-32 mg L-1 sulfur dioxide in the presence of 11% (v/v or more ethanol. However, Sc. pombe and Z. bailii did not show such growth recovery under similar conditions. Up to 10 g L-1 of glucose did not prevent cell death under the sulfur dioxide or ethanol stress. This observation demonstrates that the sugar levels commonly used in wine to sweeten the mouthfeel do not increase wine susceptibility to spoilage yeasts, contrary to the anecdotal evidence.

  16. Effect of Ethanol, Sulfur Dioxide and Glucose on the Growth of Wine Spoilage Yeasts Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Mahesh; Oro, Inês; Ferreira-Dias, Suzana; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study the effect of three factors, sulfur dioxide, ethanol and glucose, on the growth of wine spoilage yeast species, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Seventeen central composite rotatable design (CCRD) trials were designed for each test yeast using realistic concentrations of the factors (variables) in premium red wine. Polynomial regression equations were fitted to experimental data points, and the growth inhibitory conditions of these three variables were determined. The overall results showed Sa. ludwigii as the most resistant species growing under high ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations, i.e., 15% (v/v)/20 mg L-1, 14% (v/v)/32 mg L-1 and 12.5% (v/v)/40 mg L-1, whereas other yeasts did not survive under the same levels of ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations. The inhibitory effect of ethanol was primarily observed during longer incubation periods, compared with sulfur dioxide, which showed an immediate effect. In some CCRD trials, Sa. ludwigii and S. cerevisiae showed growth recovery after a short death period under the exposure of 20-32 mg L-1 sulfur dioxide in the presence of 11% (v/v) or more ethanol. However, Sc. pombe and Z. bailii did not show such growth recovery under similar conditions. Up to 10 g L-1 of glucose did not prevent cell death under the sulfur dioxide or ethanol stress. This observation demonstrates that the sugar levels commonly used in wine to sweeten the mouthfeel do not increase wine susceptibility to spoilage yeasts, contrary to the anecdotal evidence.

  17. Thymus Vulgaris (Red Thyme) and Caryophyllus Aromaticus (Clove) Essential Oils to Control Spoilage Microorganisms in Pork Under Modified Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Amato, Serena; Mazzarrino, Giovanni; Rossi, Chiara; Serio, Annalisa; López, Clemencia Chaves; Celano, Gaetano Vitale; Paparella, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has been confirmed that essential oils (EOs) exert antimicrobial activity as they are able to inhibit cell growth and inactivate microbial cells. The application of biopreservation strategies by means of EOs opens up interesting perspectives in the food industry, including meat production. The paper aims to evaluate the effects of Thymus vulgaris (red thyme) and Caryophyllus aromaticus (cloves) EOs on the development of the spoilage population of fresh pork packaged under modified atmosphere (MAP). In particular, the research was focused on Brochothrix thermosphacta, a specific spoilage microorganism of fresh meat packed in anaerobic conditions or under MAP. Amongst seven EOs, those that showed the highest antimicrobial activity on 5 B. thermosphacta strains in vitro were: cloves [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.6-2.5 mg/mL], savory (MIC 2.5-5.0 mg/mL), and red thyme (MIC 2.5 to 20 mg/mL). Red thyme and cloves EOs were selected for meat treatment, by increasing the dose at 20 and 40 mg/mL respectively, to take into account the matrix effect that can reduce EO availability. In spite of the minor efficacy observed in vitro, 40 mg/mL red thyme EO strongly limited the growth of B. thermosphacta in pork samples up to day 6 of storage [below 3.0 Log colony forming unit (CFU)/g, starting from 2.0 Log CFU/g at time 0], and exerted an antimicrobial effect also on the aerobic mesophilic count. Good results were obtained also with 20 mg/mL red thyme EO. The control of B. thermosphacta growth through EOs encourages research on alternative methods for extending the shelf life of fresh meat under MAP. PMID:27853710

  18. Spoilage-related activity of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum strains in air-stored and vacuum-packed meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaburi, Annalisa; Nasi, Antonella; Ferrocino, Ilario; Di Monaco, Rossella; Mauriello, Gianluigi; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2011-10-01

    One hundred three isolates of Carnobacterium spp. from raw meat were analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and PCR and were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Forty-five strains of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum were characterized for their growth capabilities at different temperatures, NaCl concentrations, and pH values and for in vitro lipolytic and proteolytic activities. Moreover, their spoilage potential in meat was investigated by analyzing the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in meat stored in air or vacuum packs. Almost all the strains were able to grow at 4, 10, and 20°C, at pH values of 6 to 9, and in the presence of 2.5% NaCl. The release of VOCs by each strain in beef stored at 4°C in air and vacuum packs was evaluated by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME)-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. All the meat samples inoculated and stored in air showed higher numbers of VOCs than the vacuum-packed meat samples. Acetoin, 1-octen-3-ol, and butanoic acid were the compounds most frequently found under both storage conditions. The contaminated meat samples were evaluated by a sensory panel; the results indicated that for all sensory odors, no effect of strain was significant (P > 0.05). The storage conditions significantly affected (P meat, and mozzarella cheese odors, which were more intense in meat stored in air than in vacuum packs but were never very intense. In conclusion, different strains of C. maltaromaticum can grow efficiently in meat stored at low temperatures both in air and in vacuum packs, producing volatile molecules with low sensory impacts, with a negligible contribution to meat spoilage overall.

  19. Thymus vulgaris (red thyme and Caryophyllus aromaticus (clove essential oils to control spoilage microorganisms in pork under modified atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena D'Amato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been confirmed that essential oils (EOs exert antimicrobial activity as they are able to inhibit cell growth and inactivate microbial cells. The application of biopreservation strategies by means of EOs opens up interesting perspectives in the food industry, including meat production. The paper aims to evaluate the effects of Thymus vulgaris (red thyme and Caryophyllus aromaticus (cloves EOs on the development of the spoilage population of fresh pork packaged under modified atmosphere (MAP. In particular, the research was focused on Brochothrix thermosphacta, a specific spoilage microorganism of fresh meat packed in anaerobic conditions or under MAP. Amongst seven EOs, those that showed the highest antimicrobial activity on 5 B. thermosphacta strains in vitro were: cloves [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC 0.6-2.5 mg/mL], savory (MIC 2.5-5.0 mg/mL, and red thyme (MIC 2.5 to 20 mg/mL. Red thyme and cloves EOs were selected for meat treatment, by increasing the dose at 20 and 40 mg/mL respectively, to take into account the matrix effect that can reduce EO availability. In spite of the minor efficacy observed in vitro, 40 mg/mL red thyme EO strongly limited the growth of B. thermosphacta in pork samples up to day 6 of storage [below 3.0 Log colony forming unit (CFU/g, starting from 2.0 Log CFU/g at time 0], and exerted an antimicrobial effect also on the aerobic mesophilic count. Good results were obtained also with 20 mg/mL red thyme EO. The control of B. thermosphacta growth through EOs encourages research on alternative methods for extending the shelf life of fresh meat under MAP.

  20. Spoilage-Related Activity of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum Strains in Air-Stored and Vacuum-Packed Meat ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaburi, Annalisa; Nasi, Antonella; Ferrocino, Ilario; Di Monaco, Rossella; Mauriello, Gianluigi; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2011-01-01

    One hundred three isolates of Carnobacterium spp. from raw meat were analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and PCR and were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Forty-five strains of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum were characterized for their growth capabilities at different temperatures, NaCl concentrations, and pH values and for in vitro lipolytic and proteolytic activities. Moreover, their spoilage potential in meat was investigated by analyzing the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in meat stored in air or vacuum packs. Almost all the strains were able to grow at 4, 10, and 20°C, at pH values of 6 to 9, and in the presence of 2.5% NaCl. The release of VOCs by each strain in beef stored at 4°C in air and vacuum packs was evaluated by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME)-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. All the meat samples inoculated and stored in air showed higher numbers of VOCs than the vacuum-packed meat samples. Acetoin, 1-octen-3-ol, and butanoic acid were the compounds most frequently found under both storage conditions. The contaminated meat samples were evaluated by a sensory panel; the results indicated that for all sensory odors, no effect of strain was significant (P > 0.05). The storage conditions significantly affected (P meat, and mozzarella cheese odors, which were more intense in meat stored in air than in vacuum packs but were never very intense. In conclusion, different strains of C. maltaromaticum can grow efficiently in meat stored at low temperatures both in air and in vacuum packs, producing volatile molecules with low sensory impacts, with a negligible contribution to meat spoilage overall. PMID:21784913

  1. Effects of Exogenous Yeast and Bacteria on the Microbial Population Dynamics and Outcomes of Olive Fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Jose; Bendiks, Zachary; Tyler, Charlotte; Kable, Mary E; Williams, Thomas R; Luchkovska, Yelizaveta; Chow, Elaine; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Marco, Maria L

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examined Sicilian-style green olive fermentations upon the addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 and/or Pichia kudriazevii UCDFST09-427 or the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum AJ11R and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides BGM3R. Olives containing S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448, a strain able to hydrolyze pectin, but not P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427, a nonpectinolytic strain, exhibited excessive tissue damage within 4 weeks. DNA sequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and comparisons to a yeast-specific ITS sequence database remarkably showed that neither S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 nor P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427 resulted in significant changes to yeast species diversity. Instead, Candida boidinii constituted the majority (>90%) of the total yeast present, independent of whether S. cerevisiae or P. kudriazevii was added. By comparison, Lactobacillus species were enriched in olives inoculated with potential starter LAB L. plantarum AJ11R and L. pseudomesenteroides BGM3R according to community 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterial diversity of those olives was significantly reduced and resembled control fermentations incubated for a longer period of time. Importantly, microbial populations were highly dynamic at the strain level, as indicated by the large variations in AJ11R and BGM3R cell numbers over time and reductions in the numbers of yeast isolates expressing polygalacturonase activity. These findings show the distinct effects of exogenous spoilage and starter microbes on indigenous communities in plant-based food fermentations that result in very different impacts on product quality. IMPORTANCE Food fermentations are subject to tremendous selective pressures resulting in the growth and persistence of a limited number of bacterial and fungal taxa. Although these foods are vulnerable to spoilage by unintended contamination of certain microorganisms, or alternatively, can be

  2. Presence of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) and AHL-producing bacteria in meat and potential role of AHL in spoilage of meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Christensen, Allan Beck; Flodgaard, Lars

    2004-01-01

    -producing bacterium. Thin-layer chromatographic profiles of supernatants from six H. alvei isolates and of extracts from spoiling meat revealed that the major AHL species had an R-f value and shape similar to N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (OHHL). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) (high-resolution MS...

  3. Assertiveness of meat-borne Lactococcus piscium strains and their potential for competitive exclusion of spoilage bacteria in situ and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgarth, M; Nani, M; Vogel, R F

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate intraspecies assertiveness of meat-borne Lactococcus piscium isolates, inhibitory effects on unwanted and harmful meat spoilers, and the prevalence on beef deliberately inoculated with Lc. piscium. Co-inoculation of Lc. piscium isolates and spoilers (Brochothrix thermosphacta, Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum, Carnobacterium divergens, Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis, Serratia liquefaciens, Hafnia alvei) were conducted in sterile meat simulation medium. Differentiation of Lc. piscium strains was carried out with colony-based RAPD-PCR. Selective cultivation was used to differentiate spoilers from Lc. piscium. Intraspecies assertiveness revealed Lc. piscium TMW2.1614 as most assertive strain. Co-inoculation of selected Lc. piscium strains caused substantial growth reduction of spoilers while the extent was strain- and spoiler dependent. Monitoring the microbiota on beef steaks deliberately inoculated with Lc. piscium revealed prevalence over the endogenous microbiota while maintaining a ripened sensory impression without undesired alterations. This study reveals Lc. piscium strains TMW2.1612/2.1614/2.1615 as highly competitive against spoilers in vitro while beef deliberately inoculated with these strains maintained acceptable organoleptics. Selected Lc. piscium strains exhibit high potential for application as bioprotective cultures for competitive exclusion on beef in order to extend minimum shelf life and enhance product safety of meat. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Effect of X-ray treatments on salmonella enterica and spoilage bacteria on skin-on chicken breast fillets and shell eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy of X-ray irradiation on the inactivation of a 3- strain mixture of Salmonella enterica (S. Enteritidis E190-88, S. Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and S. Montevideo ATCC 8387) using an RS 2400 X-ray system on chicken breast fillets and shell eggs a...

  5. Modification of azo dyes by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; McFeeters, R F

    2009-08-01

    The ability of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei to modify the azo dye, tartrazine, was recently documented as the result of the investigation on red coloured spoilage in acidified cucumbers. Fourteen other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were screened for their capability to modify the food colouring tartrazine and other azo dyes of relevance for the textile industry. Most LAB modified tartrazine under anaerobic conditions, but not under aerobic conditions in modified chemically defined media. Microbial growth was not affected by the presence of the azo dyes in the culture medium. The product of the tartrazine modification by LAB was identified as a molecule 111 daltons larger than its precursor by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. This product had a purple colour under aerobic conditions and was colourless under anaerobic conditions. It absorbed light at 361 and 553 nm. LAB are capable of anabolizing azo dyes only under anaerobic conditions. IMPACT AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY: Although micro-organisms capable of reducing the azo bond on multiple dyes have been known for decades, this is the first report of anabolism of azo dyes by food related micro-organisms, such as LAB.

  6. The fecal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  7. Comparison of adhesion of the food spoilage bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens to stainless steel and silver surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm, Mette; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Møller, Per

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the number of attached bacteria, Shewanella putrefaciens, on stainless steel with different silver surfaces. Thus evaluating if silver surfaces could contribute to a higher hygienic status in the food industry. Bacterial adhesion to three types of silver surfaces...... than one log unit in bacterial numbers on the two types of materials was observed, but for most samples the difference was within one log unit. Treating new silver with sulphide to try to reproduce a tarnished silver surface did not result in a similar lowering of adhering cells when compared to steel...

  8. Effect of Equilibrated pH and Indigenous Spoilage Microorganisms on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Experimental Meals under Temperature Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Kottapalli, Bala; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a foreseeable biological hazard in prepared refrigerated meals that needs to be addressed in food safety plans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of product composition and storage temperature on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in nine experimental meals (meat, vegetable, or carbohydrate based). Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin in samples stored at 25°C for up to 96 h for phase 1, or at 25°C for 12 h and then transferred to 12.5°C for up to 12 and 6 weeks in phases 1 and 2, respectively. For phase 1, none of the treatments (equilibrated pH 5.8) supported toxin production when stored at 25°C for 48 h, but toxin production was observed in all treatments at 72 h. For the remaining experiments with storage at 12.5°C, toxin production was dependent on equilibrated pH, storage time, and growth of indigenous spoilage microorganisms. In phase 1, no gross spoilage and no botulinum toxin was detected for any treatment (pH ≤5.8) stored at 12.5°C for 12 weeks. In phase 2, gross spoilage varied by commodity, with the brussels sprouts meal with pH 6.5 showing the most rapid spoilage within 2 weeks and botulinum toxin detected at 5 and 6 weeks for the control and cultured celery juice treatments, respectively. In contrast, spoilage microbes decreased the pH of a pH 5.9 beef treatment by 1.0 unit, potentially inhibiting C. botulinum through 6 weeks at 12.5°C. None of the other treatments with pH 5.8 or below supported toxin production or spoilage. This study provides validation for preventive controls in refrigerated meals. These include equilibrated product pH and storage temperature and time to inhibit toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum, but the impact of indigenous microflora on safety and interpretation of challenge studies is also highlighted.

  9. Antimicrobial effects of Turkish propolis, pollen, and laurel on spoilage and pathogenic food-related microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Osman; Ozcan, Mehmet Musa

    2008-09-01

    The antimicrobial activities of propolis extract, pollen extract, and essential oil of laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) at concentrations from 0.02% to 2.5% (vol/vol) were investigated on bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica, Enterococcus faecalis, and Listeria monocytogenes), yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida rugosa), and molds (Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae). Pollen has no antimicrobial effects on the bacteria and fungi tested in the concentrations used. Propolis showed a bactericidal effect at 0.02% on B. cereus and B. subtilis, at 1.0% on S. aureus and E. faecalis, and at 0.2% on L. monocytogenes. The minimum inhibitory concentration of propolis for fungi was 2.5%. Propolis and laurel were ineffective against E. coli and S. typhimurium at the concentrations tested. The results showed that the antimicrobial activity were concentration dependent. Propolis and essential oil of laurel may be used as biopreservative agents in food processing and preservation.

  10. Novel touchdown-PCR method for the detection of putrescine producing gram-negative bacteria in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlichová, Leona; Buňková, Leona; Koutný, Marek; Valenta, Tomáš; Buňka, František

    2013-06-01

    Formation of biogenic amines may occur in food due to metabolic activities of contaminating Gram-negative bacteria. Putrescine is assumed to be the major biogenic amine associated with microbial food spoilage. Gram-negative bacteria can form putrescine by three metabolic pathways that can include eight different enzymes. The objective of this study was to design new sets of primers able to detect all important enzymes involved in the production of putrescine by Gram-negative bacteria. Seven new sets of consensual primers based on gene sequences of different bacteria were designed and used for detection of the speA, adiA, adi, speB, aguA, speC, and speF genes. A newly developed touchdown polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using these primers was successfully applied on several putrescine-producers. Selected PCR products were sequenced and high similarity of their sequences (99-91%) with known sequences of the corresponding genes confirmed high specificity of the developed sets of primers. Furthermore, all the investigated bacteria produced both putrescine and agmatine, an intermediate of putrescine production, which was confirmed by chemical analysis. The developed new touchdown PCR method could easily be used to detect potential foodborne Gram-negative producers of putrescine. The newly developed sets of primers could also be useful in further research on putrescine metabolism in contaminating microbiota. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mycorrhiza helper bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Labbe, Jessy [ORNL

    2016-10-01

    This chapter focuses on the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacteria (MHB), a generic name given to bacteria which stimulate the formation of mycorrhizal symbiosis. By extension, some bacterial strains that positively impact the functioning of mycorrhizal symbiosis are also called MHB. These bacteria have applicative interests, as they indirectly improve the health and growth of tree seedlings. MHB are not restricted to a specific type of ecosystem, but are rather generalist in the way that they associate with both herbaceous and woody mycorrhizal plants from boreal, temperate, arid and tropical ecosystems. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms and their specificities will help us to know more about the ecology of the MHB. The process of acquisition varies between fungal species; while ectomycorrhizal fungi most probably recurrently acquire them from the environment, the association between bacterial endosymbionts and Glomeromycota probably dates back to very ancient times, and has since been vertically transmitted.

  12. Magnetosome chain superstructure in uncultured magnetotactic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraçado, Leida G; Farina, Marcos; Abreu, Fernanda; Keim, Carolina N; Lins, Ulysses; Campos, Andrea P C

    2010-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetosomes, which are magnetic particles enveloped by biological membranes, in a highly controlled mineralization process. Magnetosomes are used to navigate in magnetic fields by a phenomenon called magnetotaxis. Two levels of organization and control are recognized in magnetosomes. First, magnetotactic bacteria create a spatially distinct environment within vesicles defined by their membranes. In the vesicles, the bacteria control the size, composition and purity of the mineral content of the magnetic particles. Unique crystal morphologies are produced in magnetosomes as a consequence of this bacterial control. Second, magnetotactic bacteria organize the magnetosomes in chains within the cell body. It has been shown in a particular case that the chains are positioned within the cell body in specific locations defined by filamentous cytoskeleton elements. Here, we describe an additional level of organization of the magnetosome chains in uncultured magnetotactic cocci found in marine and freshwater sediments. Electron microscopy analysis of the magnetosome chains using a goniometer showed that the magnetic crystals in both types of bacteria are not oriented at random along the crystal chain. Instead, the magnetosomes have specific orientations relative to the other magnetosomes in the chain. Each crystal is rotated either 60°, 180° or 300° relative to their neighbors along the chain axis, causing the overlapping of the (1 1 1) and (1-bar 1-bar 1-bar) capping faces of neighboring crystals. We suggest that genetic determinants that are not present or active in bacteria with magnetosomes randomly rotated within a chain must be present in bacteria that organize magnetosomes so precisely. This particular organization may also be used as an indicative biosignature of magnetosomes in the study of magnetofossils in the cases where this symmetry is observed

  13. Teknik Pengawetan Fillet Ikan Nila Merah dengan Senyawa Anti Bakteri asal Lactobacillus Acidophilus dan Bifido Bacteria Biffidum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Saputra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Red tilapia is a good commodity to be developed because it has a high nutritional value composition, with a protein content 17.8%, fat 2.8%, and others composition. The fillet of red tilapia fish is easy to spoil, because of S. aureus, Salmonella sp., and other microbes. Many methods are used to save and preserve the quality of fillet, such fillet preparation through good sanitation practices, cooling process, but the effort were not optimal. The objectives of this study were to 1 evaluate the potency of antibacterial produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacteria biffidum to inhibit the growth of spoilage bacteria that contaminated the red tilapia fillet; 2 evaluate the effect of antibacterial compounds produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacteria biffidum of inhibiting the setback fillet quality, 3 determine the shelf life of red tilapia fillet at room temperature. Antibacterial activity test is done by using the well diffusion method; the rate of deterioration of quality of fish tests done by observing the organoleptic parameters, pH measurement test, total volatile base method. Total number of bacteria were performed by Standard Plate Count (SPC test. The LAB’s are able to inhibit the growth of spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa about 8.67-9.00 mm and Listeria monocytogenes about 8.33-9.00 mm through the well diffusion method. pH values about 5.71-5.74, TVB values about 1,26-21.43 with SPC test about 1.39-4.83 CFU/mL. The antibacterial compounds could inhibit  the rate of deterioration of quality red tilapia fillets until 14 hours.

  14. Electron beam irradiation effects on xanthan gum, rheological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastro, N.L. del; Vieira, F.F.

    2003-01-01

    Food ingredients to be used for food processing should be decontaminated in order to prevent food spoilage and food-borne diseases. Xanthan gum is a well-known microbial polysaccharide produced by Xanthomonas campestris used in the hydrocolloid market. This paper describes the application of electron beam (EB) irradiation to xanthan gum as used as ingredient by the food or cosmetics industry in order to establish their radiosensitivity. Viscosity of 1% xanthan gum solutions prepared with the irradiated powder decreased with the increase of the EB irradiation dose. The radiation-induced viscosity detriment of this additive must be considered for practical applications. (author)

  15. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus by the commensal bacteria of human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, M P; Saris, P E J

    2003-01-01

    To study the bacterial diversity in expressed human milk with a focus on detecting bacteria with an antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, known as a causative agent of maternal breast infections and neonatal infections. Random isolates (n = 509) were collected from breast milk samples (n = 40) of healthy lactating women, genotypically identified, and tested for antimicrobial activity against Staph. aureus. Commensal staphylococci (64%) and oral streptococci (30%), with Staph. epidermidis, Strep. salivarius, and Strep. mitis as the most frequent isolates, were the predominant bacterial species in breast milk. One-fifth of Staph. epidermidis and half of Strep. salivarius isolates suppressed growth of Staph. aureus. Enterococci (Ent. faecalis), isolated from 7.5% of samples, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lact. crispatus, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconoctoc mesenteroides), isolated from 12.5% of samples, were also effective against Staph. aureus. One L. lactis isolate was shown to produce nisin, a bacteriocin used in food industry to prevent bacterial pathogens and spoilage. Expressed breast milk contains commensal bacteria, which inhibit Staph. aureus. The strains inhibitory against the pathogen Staph. aureus have potential use as bacteriotherapeutic agents in preventing neonatal and maternal breast infections caused by this bacterium.

  16. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030 ...

  17. (PHB)-producing bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... Bioplastics are naturally occurring biodegradable polymers made from polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) of which poly 3-hydroxy butyric acid ... The plastic polymers accumulate intracellularly as light- refracting amorphous ... study focuses on the isolation and identification of novel species of bacteria capable ...

  18. Do Bacteria Age?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacteria are thought to be examples of organisms that do not age. ... sues, organs, organ systems, organism, population, species, and .... Humans inevitably grow old through aging. All vertebrates show physical manifestations of aging somewhat similar to humans (other than white hair!). Aging is also seen in plants.

  19. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030. Keywords.

  20. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  1. (PHB)-producing bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and characterization of two novel polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)-producing bacteria. ... subsequently studied using phenotype microarray panels which allowed the testing of the effect of more than 90 different carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and phosphorus sources as well as pH on the growth characteristics of these strains.

  2. Seafood Spoilage Predictor - development and distribution of a product specific application software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Paw; Buch, P.; Silberg, Steen

    2002-01-01

    of different formats and in this way the software is a flexible device for electronic time-temperature integration. Predicted values of microbial growth and of remaining product shelf life can be exported from SSP as graphs and tables in ASCII, HTML and eXtensible Mark-up Language (XML) formats and this allows...

  3. Characterisation of the spoilage microbiota in raw salmon (Salmo salar) steaks stored under vacuum or modified atmosphere packaging combining conventional methods and PCR-TTGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Sabrina; Cornet, Josiane; Chevalier, Frédérique; Cardinal, Mireille; Pilet, Marie-France; Dousset, Xavier; Joffraud, Jean-Jacques

    2012-05-01

    In order to characterise the spoilage related to microbiota of raw salmon, a combination of culture-dependent and -independent methods, including PCR-TTGE, was used to analyse 3 raw salmon batches stored for 3 days at chilled temperature in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) (50% CO₂/50% N₂) or under vacuum. Sensory evaluation, microbiological enumeration and chemical analysis were performed after 3, 7 and 10 days of storage. At the onset of spoilage, 65 bacterial isolates were picked from the plates. Thus, 13 different genera or species were identified by phenotypic and molecular tests: Serratia spp., Photobacterium phosphoreum, Yersinia intermedia, Hafnia alvei, Buttiauxella gaviniae, Pseudomonas sp., Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Carnobacterium divergens, Lactococcus piscium, Lactobacillus fuchuensis, Vagococcus carniphilus, Leuconostoc gasicomitatum and Brochothrix thermosphacta. The PCR-TTGE profiles and band identification enabled a shift of the dominant populations during the storage to be visualised for all the batches, probably due to the temperature change and the packaging. At the beginning of storage, Pseudomonas sp. dominated the raw salmon microbiota while in the following days (7 and 10), P. phosphoreum and L. piscium were identified as the main bacterial groups. This study enhances the knowledge of MAP and vacuum-packed raw salmon spoilage microbiota. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microbial Profile of Soil-Free versus In-Soil Grown Lettuce and Intervention Methodologies to Combat Pathogen Surrogates and Spoilage Microorganisms on Lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirsat, Sujata A; Neal, Jack A

    2013-11-11

    Aquaponics is an effective method to practice sustainable agriculture and is gaining popularity in the US; however, the microbial safety of aquaponically grown produce needs to be ascertained. Aquaponics is a unique marriage of fish production and soil-free produce (e.g., leafy greens) production. Fish are raised in fresh water tanks that are connected to water filled beds where fruits and vegetables are grown. The fish bi-products create nutrient-rich water that provides the key elements for the growth of plants and vegetables. The objective of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the microbial safety and quality of aquaponic lettuce and soil grown lettuce (conventional, bagged, certified organic, and field lettuce). Following this, an intervention study was performed to combat foodborne pathogen surrogates ( Salmonella and E. coli ), spoilage, and fecal microorganisms using 2.5% acetic acid. The results of the comparative analysis study showed that aquaponically grown lettuce had significantly lower concentration of spoilage and fecal microorganisms compared to in-soil grown lettuce. The intervention study showed that diluted vinegar (2.5% acetic acid) significantly reduced Salmonella , E. coli , coliforms, and spoilage microorganisms on fresh lettuce by 2 to 3 log CFU/g. Irrespective of growing methods (in-soil or soilless), it is crucial to incorporate good agricultural practices to reduce microbial contamination on fresh produce. The intervention employed in this study can be proposed to small farmers and consumers to improve quality and safety of leafy greens.

  5. Microbial Profile of Soil-Free versus In-Soil Grown Lettuce and Intervention Methodologies to Combat Pathogen Surrogates and Spoilage Microorganisms on Lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata A. Sirsat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aquaponics is an effective method to practice sustainable agriculture and is gaining popularity in the US; however, the microbial safety of aquaponically grown produce needs to be ascertained. Aquaponics is a unique marriage of fish production and soil-free produce (e.g., leafy greens production. Fish are raised in fresh water tanks that are connected to water filled beds where fruits and vegetables are grown. The fish bi-products create nutrient-rich water that provides the key elements for the growth of plants and vegetables. The objective of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the microbial safety and quality of aquaponic lettuce and soil grown lettuce (conventional, bagged, certified organic, and field lettuce. Following this, an intervention study was performed to combat foodborne pathogen surrogates (Salmonella and E. coli, spoilage, and fecal microorganisms using 2.5% acetic acid. The results of the comparative analysis study showed that aquaponically grown lettuce had significantly lower concentration of spoilage and fecal microorganisms compared to in-soil grown lettuce. The intervention study showed that diluted vinegar (2.5% acetic acid significantly reduced Salmonella, E. coli, coliforms, and spoilage microorganisms on fresh lettuce by 2 to 3 log CFU/g. Irrespective of growing methods (in-soil or soilless, it is crucial to incorporate good agricultural practices to reduce microbial contamination on fresh produce. The intervention employed in this study can be proposed to small farmers and consumers to improve quality and safety of leafy greens.

  6. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria for its possible use in the fermentation of green algerian olives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour-Eddine, Karam

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken with the aim of obtaining lactic acid bacteria with the ability to ferment olives for possible use as starter cultures. For this reason, 32 isolates of lactic acid bacteria isolated from the spontaneous fermentation of green olives were characterized and identified on the basis of morphological and biochemical criteria. 14 of them were identified as Lactococcus lactis, 11 isolates as Lactobacillus plantarum and 7 isolates as Enterococcus sp. Of the 18 isolates examined for antagonistic activity, 3 isolates of Lactobacillus plantarum and one isolate of Enterococcus sp. were able to give distinct zones of inhibition against 5 indicator strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated in this study. Cell free supernatant of Lactobacillus plantarum OL9 was active against Gram-positive bacteria (Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Propionibacterium and also against one Gram-negative bacteria strain of spoilage significance (Erwinia.Este estudio se emprendió con el objetivo de obtener bacterias del ácido láctico con capacidad para utilizarse como cultivo iniciador en la fermentación de aceitunas. Por esta razón, 32 cepas de bacterias del ácido láctico procedentes de fermentaciones espontáneas de aceitunas verdes se caracterizaron e identificaron en función de criterios morfológicos y bioquímicos. Catorce cepas se identificaron como Lactococcus lactis, 11 cepas como Lactobacillus plantarum y 7 cepas como Enterococcus sp. De las 18 cepas que se examinaron para detectar actividades antagónicas, se encontró que 3 cepas de Lactobacillus plantarum y una de Enterococcus sp. mostraban zonas de inhibición contra 5 cepas indicadoras de bacterias del ácido láctico aisladas en este estudio. El sobrenadante libre de células Lactobacillus plantarum OL9 fue activo contra diversas bacterias Gram-positivas (Lactobacillus, Enterococcus y Propionibacterium y contra una cepa de bacteria Gram-negativa relacionada con alteraciones (Erwinia.

  7. The friendly bacteria within us Commensal bacteria of the intestine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The friendly bacteria within us Commensal bacteria of the intestine: Roles in health and disease B.S. Ramakrishna Professor & Head Gastroenterology & Hepatology Christian Medical College Vellore · Slide 2 · Intestinal bacteria: the hidden organ · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · The normal bacterial flora prevents GI disease · Slide 7.

  8. The friendly bacteria within us Commensal bacteria of the intestine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) are main source of energy for colonic epithelial cells · SCFA – role in colonic disease · SCFA prevent mucosal inflammation · Immunoregulation by gut bacteria · Balance of bacterial species in the gut · Immunosensory detection of intestinal bacteria · Pathogenic bacteria release interleukin-8 ...

  9. Motility of magnetotactic bacteria/MTB to Geomagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidajatullah-Maksoed, Fatahillah

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria with motility directed by a local geomagnetic fields have been observed in marine sediments'' discussed by R. Blakemore, 1975. Magnetotactic bacteria/MTB discovered in 1963 by Salvatore Bellini. For ``off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope was used to correlates the physical & magnetic microstructure of magnetite nanocrystals in magnetotactic bacteria'' sought ``single-domain magnetite in hemopelagic sediments'' from JF Stolz. Otherwise, for potential source of bioproducts- product meant from result to multiplier -of magnetotactic bacteria[ACV Araujo, et.al, 2014 ] of marine drugs retrieved the `measurement of cellular chemotaxis with ECIS/Taxis, from KM Pietrosimone, 2012, whereas after ``earth magnetic field role on small living models'' are other interpretation of ``taxis'' as a movement of a cell instead usual ``tax'' for yew's taxus cuspidate, hired car & taxes in financial realms. Acknowledgements to HE. Mr. H. TUK SETYOHADI, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, South-Jakarta, INDONESIA.

  10. Aspergilli with Neosartorya-type ascospores: heat resistance and effect of sugar concentration on growth and spoilage incidence in berry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Elettra; Tranquillini, Roberta; Scaramuzza, Nicoletta; Brutti, Andrea; Bernini, Valentina

    2017-10-03

    This study focused on four different heat resistant aspergilli: two strains of Aspergillus hiratsukae (≡Neosartorya hiratsukae), one strain of Aspergillus neoglaber (≡Neosartorya glabra), and one strain of Aspergillus thermomutatus (≡Neosartorya pseudofischeri), all isolated from spoiled pasteurized products. Their heat-resistance, the sugar concentration limiting their germination and growth in berry-based media, and a possible relation between the contamination levels of the raw materials used and the spoilage incidence in strawberry jams were assessed. Heat resistance data obtained from thermal death curves showed that the D values of the strains tested ranged between 3.7 and 13.5min at 87°C; 1.5 and 3.5min at 90°C; and 0.3 and 0.4min at 95°C in glucose solution. Similarly, D values ranged between 3.3 and 15.4min at 87°C; 1.3 and 4.3min at 90°C; and 0.3 and 0.6min at 95°C in strawberry-based formulation. For all strains, the corresponding z-values ranged between 5.7 and 8.3°C in glucose solution and from 5.7 to 8.4°C in strawberry formulation. With regard to the limitation of fungal germination and growth in fruit-based media, sucrose concentrations required to avoid growth varied between 45.0 and 55.0% for strawberry medium and between 42.5% and 50.0% for blueberry medium. Spore inactivation was observed below aw 0.88-0.91 for strawberries and aw 0.87-0.90 for blueberries; above 49.7-56.5°Bx for strawberries and 49.6-56.0°Bx for blueberries. The threshold optical refractometric residue proved strain-dependent, but substrate-independent, as for each strain the highest Brix degree value at which germination occurred was the same on both media, despite their different sucrose concentrations. With regard to the relation between contamination of raw materials by heat-resistant mould spores and spoilage incidence on final product, an equation was modelled to estimate the occurrence of fungal spoilage in strawberry jams for low contamination levels (26

  11. Effect of gamma-irradiation to prevent the spoilage of fried-Kamaboko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Siagian, E.G.

    1979-01-01

    The study was done to determine the effect of irradiation on the shelf life and quality of a fish meat jelly product named as Fried-Kamaboko which is sometimes called as Satsumaage. Fresh samples were packed and sealed in cellophane coated polyvinylchloride bag with nitrogen gas, and irradiated at 0, 300 and 500 krad followed by storage at 10 0 C. The results showed that irradiation of 300 krad extended the shelf life of Fried-Kamaboko to be 20 days, in contrast to unirradiated samples which were kept only 3 to 6 days at 10 0 C. The species of main microorganisms which grew in unirradiated samples were Micrococcus, Moraxella-Acinetobacter, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and molds. Irradiation of Fried-Kamaboko at 300 krad reduced the aforementioned flora to the yeasts. The most radio-resistant microorganisms of Fried-Kamaboko was brownish black Fungi identified as Spicaria, and its D 10 value was obtained to be 130 krad. No remarkable difference was observed between the irradiated Fried-Kamaboko and unirradiated ones with respect to the organoleptic evaluation. But off-odor was slightly induced with the dose of 500 krad irradiation. (author)

  12. When cheese gets the blues: Pseudomonas fluorescens as the causative agent of cheese spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N H; Murphy, S C; Ralyea, R D; Wiedmann, M; Boor, K J

    2011-06-01

    A bacterial contamination of fresh, low-acid cheese that resulted in production of a blue fluorescent pigment on the surface of the cheese was determined to be caused by Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar IV, a gram-negative bacteria that produces a blue, nondiffusible pigment as well as the soluble pigment pyoverdin, which fluoresces under UV light. Ten isolates collected from contaminated cheese and environmental samples were initially identified as P. fluorescens using 16S rDNA sequencing, but only 8 of the isolates produced blue pigment and fluoresced under UV light when re-inoculated onto fresh, low-acid cheese. The Biolog Metabolic Fingerprint system (Biolog Inc., Hayward, CA) and the Analytical Profile Index (BioMerieux Vitek Inc., Hazelwood, MO) for nonenteric gram-negative species as well as EcoRI ribotyping did not differentiate between the isolates that produced blue color and those that did not. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis with the enzyme XbaI was able to distinguish between the isolates that produced pigment and those that did not and allowed for identification of a specific environmental site (i.e., an overhead cheese vat agitator system) as the likely source of product contamination. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  14. Bacteria in ulcera crurum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontiainen, S; Rinne, E

    1988-01-01

    Bacterial cultures derived from 432 chronic leg ulcers were analysed retrospectively to determine which bacteria are most commonly found in these ulcers. The study covered a 2-year period. Two-thirds of the patients were over 70 years of age. Staphylococcus aureus was found in nearly half of the ulcers studied, Pseudomonas sp. in one-third, pyogenic streptococci and enterococci in every fifth and Proteus sp. in every tenth. The frequency by which pyogenic streptococci were isolated was about 10 to 20 times as high as previously reported. Obligate anaerobic bacteria were also frequently isolated. The sensitivity of the isolates from the second year to antimicrobial agents likely to be chosen if systemic therapy were required is also reported. The results are discussed in relation to previous findings.

  15. Past and Future of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts: From Spoilage Microorganisms to Biotechnological Tools for Improving Wine Aroma Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; Gil, José V.; Manzanares, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, considered in the past as undesired or spoilage yeasts, can enhance the analytical composition, and aroma profile of the wine. The contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, including the ability to secret enzymes and produce secondary metabolites, glycerol and ethanol, release of mannoproteins or contributions to color stability, is species- and strain-specific, pointing out the key importance of a clever strain selection. The use of mixed starters of selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts with strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an alternative to both spontaneous and inoculated wine fermentations, taking advantage of the potential positive role that non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species play in the organoleptic characteristics of wine. In this context mixed starters can meet the growing demand for new and improved wine yeast strains adapted to different types and styles of wine. With the aim of presenting old and new evidences on the potential of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to address this market trend, we mainly review the studies focused on non-Saccharomyces strain selection and design of mixed starters directed to improve primary and secondary aroma of wines. The ability of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts to produce enzymes and metabolites of oenological relevance is also discussed. PMID:27065975

  16. Dekkera bruxellensis--spoilage yeast with biotechnological potential, and a model for yeast evolution, physiology and competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Johanna; Passoth, Volkmar

    2015-06-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional yeast normally considered a spoilage organism in wine (off-flavours) and in the bioethanol industry. But it also has potential as production yeast. The species diverged from Saccharomyces cerevisiae 200 mya, before the whole genome duplication. However, it displays similar characteristics such as being Crabtree- and petite positive, and the ability to grow anaerobically. Partial increases in ploidy and promoter rewiring may have enabled evolution of the fermentative lifestyle in D. bruxellensis. On the other hand, it has genes typical for respiratory yeasts, such as for complex I or the alternative oxidase AOX1. Dekkera bruxellensis grows more slowly than S. cerevisiae, but produces similar or greater amounts of ethanol, and very low amounts of glycerol. Glycerol production represents a loss of energy but also functions as a redox sink for NADH formed during synthesis of amino acids and other compounds. Accordingly, anaerobic growth required addition of certain amino acids. In spite of its slow growth, D. bruxellensis outcompeted S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited cultures, indicating a more efficient energy metabolism and/or higher affinity for glucose. This review tries to summarize the latest discoveries about evolution, physiology and metabolism, and biotechnological potential of D. bruxellensis. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis: the physiology of a new species related to the spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces lentus and Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steels, Hazel; James, Steve A; Bond, Chris J; Roberts, Ian N; Stratford, Malcolm

    2002-05-01

    Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis was recently discovered in the 'tea fungus' used to make fermented tea. Z. kombuchaensis was shown by ribosomal DNA sequencing to be a novel species, and a close relative of Zygosaccharomyces lentus, from which it could not be distinguished by conventional physiological tests. Z. lentus was originally established as a new taxon by growth at 4 degrees C, sensitivity for heat and oxidative stress, and lack of growth in aerobic shaken culture at temperatures above 25 degrees C. Subsequent analysis of Z. kombuchaensis reveals that this species shares these unusual characteristics, confirming its close genealogical relationship to Z. lentus. Detailed physiological data from a number of Z. kombuchaensis and Z. lentus strains clearly demonstrate that these two species can in fact be distinguished from one another based on their differing resistance/sensitivity to the food preservatives benzoic acid and sorbic acid. The spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Z. lentus are resistant to both acetic acid and sorbic acid, whereas Z. kombuchaensis is resistant to acetic acid but sensitive to sorbic acid. This would indicate that Z. kombuchaensis strains lack the mechanism for resistance to sorbic acid, but possess the means of resistance to acetic acid. This observation would therefore suggest that these two resistance mechanisms are different, and that in all probability acetic and sorbic acids inhibit yeast growth by different modes of action. Z. kombuchaensis strains were also sensitive to benzoic acid, again suggesting inhibition dissimilar from that to acetic acid.

  18. Modeling yeast spoilage in cold-filled ready-to-drink beverages with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Candida lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battey, Alyce Stiles; Duffy, Siobain; Schaffner, Donald W

    2002-04-01

    Mathematical models were developed to predict the probability of yeast spoilage of cold-filled ready-to-drink beverages as a function of beverage formulation. A Box-Behnken experimental design included five variables, each at three levels: pH (2.8, 3.3, and 3.8), titratable acidity (0.20, 0.40, and 0.60%), sugar content (8.0, 12.0, and 16.0 degrees Brix), sodium benzoate concentration (100, 225, and 350 ppm), and potassium sorbate concentration (100, 225, and 350 ppm). Duplicate samples were inoculated with a yeast cocktail (100 microl/50 ml) consisting of equal proportions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Candida lipolytica (approximately 5.0 x 10(4) CFU/ml each). The inoculated samples were plated on malt extract agar after 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Logistic regression was used to create the predictive models. The pH and sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate concentrations were found to be significant factors controlling the probability of yeast growth. Interaction terms for pH and each preservative were also significant in the predictive model. Neither the titratable acidity nor the sugar content of the model beverages was a significant predictor of yeast growth in the ranges tested.

  19. Evaluation of treatments with hot water, chemicals and ventilated containers to reduce microbial spoilage in irradiated potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirsat, S.G.; Thomas, P.; Nair, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    Potatoes irradiated to control sprouting were dipped in: hot water (56°C, 5 min; 52°C, 10, 15 and 20 min); cold (25°C, 5 min) or hot (56°C, 5 min) salicylic acid (1000 and 2000 ppm); or sodium hypochlorite (0.1 and 0.2%, 5 min); or dusted with salicylic acid (1 and 2%), to try to reduce the incidence of bacterial soft rot (Erwinia sp.) during controlled temperature (10°C, 15°C) and ambient temperature (20–34°C) storage. All treatments, particularly hot water and hot salicylic acid dip, increased microbial spoilage, possibly as a result of handling damage during the treatments combined with the inhibition of wound periderm formation as a result of irradiation. Storing irradiated tubers in well ventilated containers reduced soft rot compared to storing them in sacks and after 6 months storage at 10, 15 and 20–34°C, 95, 90 and 77% respectively were healthy and marketable. (author)

  20. Past and future of non-Saccharomyces yeasts: from spoilage microorganisms to biotechnological tools for improving wine aroma complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz ePadilla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, considered in the past as undesired or spoilage yeasts, can enhance the analytical composition and aroma profile of the wine. The contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, including the ability to secret enzymes and produce secondary metabolites, glycerol and ethanol, release of mannoproteins or contributions to color stability, is species- and strain-specific, pointing out the key importance of a clever strain selection. The use of mixed starters of selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts with strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an alternative to both spontaneous and inoculated wine fermentations, taking advantage of the potential positive role that non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species play in the organoleptic characteristics of wine. In this context mixed starters can meet the growing demand for new and improved wine yeast strains adapted to different types and styles of wine. With the aim of presenting old and new evidences on the potential of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to address this market trend, we mainly review the studies focused on non-Saccharomyces strain selection and design of mixed starters directed to improve primary and secondary aroma of wines. The ability of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts to produce enzymes and metabolites of oenological relevance is also discussed.

  1. In vitro antifungal effect of black cumin seed quinones against dairy spoilage yeasts at different acidity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamova, Katerina; Kokoska, Ladislav; Flesar, Jaroslav; Sklenickova, Olga; Svobodova, Blanka; Marsik, Petr

    2010-12-01

    The antiyeast activity of the black cumin seed (Nigella sativa) quinones dithymoquinone, thymohydroquinone (THQ), and thymoquinone (TQ) were evaluated in vitro with a broth microdilution method against six dairy spoilage yeast species. Antifungal effects of the quinones were compared with those of preservatives commonly used in milk products (calcium propionate, natamycin, and potassium sorbate) at two pH levels (4.0 and 5.5). THQ and TQ possessed significant antiyeast activity and affected the growth of all strains tested at both pH levels, with MICs ranging from 8 to 128 μg/ml. With the exception of the antibiotic natamycin, the inhibitory effects of all food preservatives against the yeast strains tested in this study were strongly affected by differences in pH, with MICs of ≥16 and ≥512 μg/ml at pH 4.0 and 5.5, respectively. These findings suggest that HQ and TQ are effective antiyeast agents that could be used in the dairy industry as chemical preservatives of natural origin.

  2. Nanoemulsion of orange oil with non ionic surfactant produced emulsion using ultrasonication technique: evaluating against food spoilage yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugumar, Saranya; Singh, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, food industries have shown great interest in developing nanoemulsion (NE) using essential oils (EOs) to prevent food spoilage caused by microorganisms. The hydrophobic properties of EOs have lead to reduced solubilization effect of food, which in turn, created a negative impact on the quality of food and its antimicrobial efficacy. Focusing this issue, we attempted a unique NE preparation using orange oil, Tween 80 (organic phase) and water (aqueous phase) by sonication technique. Based on thermodynamic stability studies, the effective diameter was reported to be in the size range from 20 to 30 nm. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in testing the anti-yeast effect. Their activity was studied in both growth medium and apple juice. The minimum inhibitory concentration of this NE was determined using broth dilution method. At 2 μl/ml, orange oil NE demonstrated inhibition of tested microorganisms. The kinetics of killing curve, have shown that the NE treated cells had lost its viability within 30 min of interaction. Also, SEM image revealed that the treated cells became distorted in comparison to their control cells. NE treated apple juice showed complete loss of viability even on dilution as compared to their controls.

  3. Bacteria in ancient sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, G.

    1986-01-01

    In order to ascertain the role of biological activity in ancient sediments, two microbiological studies were carried out. The first was on pleistocenic clay sediments on land, the second on deep oceanic sediments. In the present paper by direct counting the samples is demonstrated the presence of bacteria in a range of 10 5 to 10 7 . Further studies must be carried out to ascertain the activities by in situ incubation methods

  4. Bacteria colonizing paper machines

    OpenAIRE

    Ekman, Jaakko

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria growing in paper machines can cause several problems. Biofilms detaching from paper machine surfaces may lead to holes and spots in the end product or even break the paper web leading to expensive delays in production. Heat stable endospores will remain viable through the drying section of paper machine, increasing the microbial contamination of paper and board. Of the bacterial species regularly found in the end products, Bacillus cereus is the only one classified as a pathogen. Cer...

  5. Cable Bacteria Take a New Breath Using Long-Distance Electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meysman, Filip J R

    2017-11-21

    Recently, a new group of multicellular microorganisms was discovered, called 'cable bacteria', which are capable of generating and mediating electrical currents across centimetre-scale distances. By transporting electrons from cell to cell, cable bacteria can harvest electron donors and electron acceptors that are widely separated in space, thus providing them with a competitive advantage for survival in aquatic sediments. The underlying process of long-distance electron transport challenges some long-held ideas about the energy metabolism of multicellular organisms and entails a whole new type of electrical cooperation between cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about these intriguing multicellular bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on Luminous Bacteria Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryasheva, N.; Rozhko, T.; Alexandrova, M.; Vasyunkina, E.; Arkhipova, V.

    2011-01-01

    Marine luminous bacteria were used to monitor toxicity of alpha- (Am-241, U-235+238) and beta- (tritium) radionuclide solutions. Increase or inhibition of bacterial luminescence was observed under exposure to radionuclides. Radiation toxicity of Am and chemical toxicity of U were demonstrated. Effects of U were similar to those of stable heavy metals: sensitivity was about 10-5 M. Sensitivity of the bacteria to Am-241 was 300 Bq/L (10 -11 M). Inhibition of bacterial growth was observed under exposure to Am-241 and tritium. Role of peroxides and electron transfer processes in the effects of radionuclides on luminous bacteria is discussed.

  7. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria and their potential in the preservation of fruit products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ana Andréa Teixeira; Mantovani, Hilário Cuquetto; Jain, Sona

    2017-11-01

    Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are well-recognized for their potential as natural food preservatives. These antimicrobial peptides usually do not change the sensorial properties of food products and can be used in combination with traditional preservation methods to ensure microbial stability. In recent years, fruit products are increasingly being associated with food-borne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms, and bacteriocins are important candidates to preserve these products. Bacteriocins have been extensively studied to preserve foods of animal origin. However, little information is available for their use in vegetable products, especially in minimally processed ready-to-eat fruits. Although, many bacteriocins possess useful characteristics that can be used to preserve fruit products, to date, only nisin, enterocin AS-48, bovicin HC5, enterocin 416K1, pediocin and bificin C6165 have been tested for their activity against spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in these products. Among these, only nisin and pediocin are approved to be commercially used as food additives, and their use in fruit products is still limited to certain countries. Considering the increasing demand for fresh-tasting fruit products and concern for public safety, the study of other bacteriocins with biochemical characteristics that make them candidates for the preservation of these products are of great interest. Efforts for their approval as food additives are also important. In this review, we discuss why the study of bacteriocins as an alternative method to preserve fruit products is important; we detail the biotechnological approaches for the use of bacteriocins in fruit products; and describe some bacteriocins that have been tested and have potential to be tested for the preservation of fruit products.

  8. Use of Autochthonous Yeasts and Bacteria in Order to Control Brettanomyces bruxellensis in Wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Berbegal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Biocontrol strategies for the limitation of undesired microbial developments in foods and beverages represent a keystone toward the goal of more sustainable food systems. Brettanomyces bruxellensis is a wine spoilage microorganism that produces several compounds that are detrimental for the organoleptic quality of the wine, including some classes of volatile phenols. To control the proliferation of this yeast, sulfur dioxide is commonly employed, but the efficiency of this compound depends on the B. bruxellensis strain; and it is subject to wine composition and may induce the entrance in a viable, but nonculturable state of yeasts. Moreover, it can also elicit allergic reactions in humans. In recent years, biological alternatives to sulfur dioxide such as the use of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria starter cultures as biocontrol agents are being investigated. The controlled inoculation of starter cultures allows secure, fast and complete alcoholic and malolactic fermentations, limiting the residual nutrients that B. bruxellensis utilizes to survive and grow in wine. The current study is focused on the assessment of the effect of autochthonous yeasts and bacterial strains from the Apulia Region on the development of B. bruxellensis in wine, in terms of both growth and volatile phenols’ production. The investigation evidences the positive role of indigenous mixed cultures in the control of this spoilage yeast, either co-inoculating different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces or co-inoculating S. cerevisiae/Oenococcus oeni. Our findings expand the existing knowledge of the application of protechnological microbial diversity and of non-Saccharomyces as a biocontrol agent in oenology. We report a further demonstration of the interest in selecting indigenous strains as a strategic tool for winemakers interested in the improvement of regional wines.

  9. Myrtus communis essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activities against food spoilage pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hsouna, Anis; Hamdi, Naceur; Miladi, Ramzi; Abdelkafi, Slim

    2014-04-01

    Myrtus communis is a typical plant of the Mediterranean area, which is mainly used as animal and human food and, in folk medicine, for treating some disorders. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antibacterial and antifungal properties of the essential oils of Myrtus communis (McEO), as well as its phytochemical composition. The GC/MS analysis of the essential oil revealed 17 compounds. Myrtenyl acetate (20.75%), 1,8-cineol (16.55%), α-pinene (15.59%), linalool (13.30%), limonene (8.94%), linalyl acetate (3.67%), geranyl acetate (2.99%), and α-terpineol (2.88%) were the major components. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was also investigated on several microorganisms. The inhibition zones and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of bacterial strains were in the range of 16-28 mm and 0.078-2.5 mg/ml, respectively. The inhibitory activity of the McEO against Gram-positive bacteria was significantly higher than against Gram-negative. It also exhibited remarkable activity against several fungal strains. The investigation of the mode of action of the McEO by the time-kill curve against Listeria monocytogenes (food isolate) showed a drastic bactericidal effect after 5 min using a concentration of 312 μg/ml. These results evidence that the McEO possesses antimicrobial properties, and it is, therefore, a potential source for active ingredients for food and pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  10. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  11. Pepsin homologues in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Alex

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidase family A1, to which pepsin belongs, had been assumed to be restricted to eukaryotes. The tertiary structure of pepsin shows two lobes with similar folds and it has been suggested that the gene has arisen from an ancient duplication and fusion event. The only sequence similarity between the lobes is restricted to the motif around the active site aspartate and a hydrophobic-hydrophobic-Gly motif. Together, these contribute to an essential structural feature known as a psi-loop. There is one such psi-loop in each lobe, and so each lobe presents an active Asp. The human immunodeficiency virus peptidase, retropepsin, from peptidase family A2 also has a similar fold but consists of one lobe only and has to dimerize to be active. All known members of family A1 show the bilobed structure, but it is unclear if the ancestor of family A1 was similar to an A2 peptidase, or if the ancestral retropepsin was derived from a half-pepsin gene. The presence of a pepsin homologue in a prokaryote might give insights into the evolution of the pepsin family. Results Homologues of the aspartic peptidase pepsin have been found in the completed genomic sequences from seven species of bacteria. The bacterial homologues, unlike those from eukaryotes, do not possess signal peptides, and would therefore be intracellular acting at neutral pH. The bacterial homologues have Thr218 replaced by Asp, a change which in renin has been shown to confer activity at neutral pH. No pepsin homologues could be detected in any archaean genome. Conclusion The peptidase family A1 is found in some species of bacteria as well as eukaryotes. The bacterial homologues fall into two groups, one from oceanic bacteria and one from plant symbionts. The bacterial homologues are all predicted to be intracellular proteins, unlike the eukaryotic enzymes. The bacterial homologues are bilobed like pepsin, implying that if no horizontal gene transfer has occurred the duplication

  12. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Wessel

    Full Text Available Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR, yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing

  13. Bacteria counting method based on polyaniline/bacteria thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhihua, Li; Xuetao, Hu; Jiyong, Shi; Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Xucheng, Zhou; Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid; Holmes, Mel; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-07-15

    A simple and rapid bacteria counting method based on polyaniline (PANI)/bacteria thin film was proposed. Since the negative effects of immobilized bacteria on the deposition of PANI on glass carbon electrode (GCE), PANI/bacteria thin films containing decreased amount of PANI would be obtained when increasing the bacteria concentration. The prepared PANI/bacteria film was characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique to provide quantitative index for the determination of the bacteria count, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was also performed to further investigate the difference in the PANI/bacteria films. Good linear relationship of the peak currents of the CVs and the log total count of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) could be established using the equation Y=-30.413X+272.560 (R(2)=0.982) over the range of 5.3×10(4) to 5.3×10(8)CFUmL(-1), which also showed acceptable stability, reproducibility and switchable ability. The proposed method was feasible for simple and rapid counting of bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Design and performance testing of a DNA extraction assay for sensitive and reliable quantification of acetic acid bacteria directly in red wine using real time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eLONGIN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although strategies exist to prevent AAB contamination, the increased interest for wines with low sulfite addition leads to greater AAB spoilage. Hence there is a real need for a rapid, specific, sensitive and reliable method for detecting these spoilage bacteria. All these requirements are met by real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (or quantitative PCR; qPCR. Here, we compare existing methods of isolating DNA and their adaptation to a red wine matrix. Two different protocols for isolating DNA and three PCR mix compositions were tested to select the best method. The addition of insoluble polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP at 1% (v/v during DNA extraction using a protocol succeeded in eliminating PCR inhibitors from red wine. We developed a bacterial internal control which was efficient in avoiding false negative results due to decreases in the efficiency of DNA isolation and/or amplification. The specificity, linearity, repeatability and reproducibility of the method were evaluated. A standard curve was established for the enumeration of AAB inoculated into red wines. The limit of quantification in red wine was 3.7 log AAB/mL and about 2.8 log AAB/mL when the volume of the samples was increased from 1 mL to 10 mL. Thus the DNA extraction method developed in this paper allows sensitive and reliable AAB quantification without underestimation thanks to the presence of an internal control. Moreover, monitoring of both the AAB population and the amount of acetic acid in ethanol medium and red wine highlighted that a minimum about 6.0 log cells/mL of AAB is needed to significantly increase the production of acetic acid leading to spoilage.

  15. Contamination pathways of spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Loïc; Planchon, Stella; Guinebretiere, Marie-Hélène; André, Stéphane; Carlin, Frédéric; Remize, Fabienne

    2015-06-02

    Spoilage of low-acid canned food during prolonged storage at high temperatures is caused by heat resistant thermophilic spores of strict or facultative bacteria. Here, we performed a bacterial survey over two consecutive years on the processing line of a French company manufacturing canned mixed green peas and carrots. In total, 341 samples were collected, including raw vegetables, green peas and carrots at different steps of processing, cover brine, and process environment samples. Thermophilic and highly-heat-resistant thermophilic spores growing anaerobically were counted. During vegetable preparation, anaerobic spore counts were significantly decreased, and tended to remain unchanged further downstream in the process. Large variation of spore levels in products immediately before the sterilization process could be explained by occasionally high spore levels on surfaces and in debris of vegetable combined with long residence times in conditions suitable for growth and sporulation. Vegetable processing was also associated with an increase in the prevalence of highly-heat-resistant species, probably due to cross-contamination of peas via blanching water. Geobacillus stearothermophilus M13-PCR genotypic profiling on 112 isolates determined 23 profile-types and confirmed process-driven cross-contamination. Taken together, these findings clarify the scheme of contamination pathway by thermophilic spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lactic Acid Bacteria Selection for Biopreservation as a Part of Hurdle Technology Approach Applied on Seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Wiernasz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As fragile food commodities, microbial, and organoleptic qualities of fishery and seafood can quickly deteriorate. In this context, microbial quality and security improvement during the whole food processing chain (from catch to plate, using hurdle technology, a combination of mild preserving technologies such as biopreservation, modified atmosphere packaging, and superchilling, are of great interest. As natural flora and antimicrobial metabolites producers, lactic acid bacteria (LAB are commonly studied for food biopreservation. Thirty-five LAB known to possess interesting antimicrobial activity were selected for their potential application as bioprotective agents as a part of hurdle technology applied to fishery products. The selection approach was based on seven criteria including antimicrobial activity, alteration potential, tolerance to chitosan coating, and superchilling process, cross inhibition, biogenic amines production (histamine, tyramine, and antibiotics resistance. Antimicrobial activity was assessed against six common spoiling bacteria in fishery products (Shewanella baltica, Photobacterium phosphoreum, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Lactobacillus sakei, Hafnia alvei, Serratia proteamaculans and one pathogenic bacterium (Listeria monocytogenes in co-culture inhibitory assays miniaturized in 96-well microtiter plates. Antimicrobial activity and spoilage evaluation, both performed in cod and salmon juice, highlighted the existence of sensory signatures and inhibition profiles, which seem to be species related. Finally, six LAB with no unusual antibiotics resistance profile nor histamine production ability were selected as bioprotective agents for further in situ inhibitory assays in cod and salmon based products, alone or in combination with other hurdles (chitosan, modified atmosphere packing, and superchilling.

  17. Lactic acid bacteria stress response to preservation processes in the beverage and juice industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucka-Kolendo, Joanna; Sokołowska, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    In this review we summarize stress factors that affect the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and cause different molecular stress responses. LAB belong to a group of bacteria that is very widespread in food and beverages. They are present, and desired, in fermented products like yogurts, cheese, vegetables, meat or wine. In most of them, LAB are providing positive sensory and nutritive features. However, as harmless and desired microbes in one product, LAB can cause spoilage and a bad taste of others, especially in juices and beverages. LAB are resistant to many stress factors which allows them to survive in harsh environments. The most common stress factors they have to deal with are: heat, cold, acidity, NaCl and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Their ability to survive depends on their skills to cope with stress factors. Under stress conditions, LAB activate mechanisms that allow them to adjust to the new conditions, which can influence their viability and technological properties. This ability to adapt to different stress conditions may come from the cross-protection systems they have, as resistance to one factor may help them to deal with the other stress effectors. LAB are highly valuable for the food industry and that is why it is important to understand their stress response mechanisms.

  18. Prevalence and Characterization of High Histamine-Producing Bacteria in Gulf of Mexico Fish Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin; Bowers, John C; Benner, Ronald A

    2015-07-01

    Recent developments in detection and enumeration of histamine-producing bacteria (HPB) have created powerful molecular-based tools to better understand the presence of spoilage bacteria and conditions, resulting in increased risk of scombrotoxin fish poisoning. We examined 235 scombrotoxin-forming fish from the Gulf of Mexico for the presence of high HPB. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae was the most prevalent HPB (49%), followed by Morganella morganii (14%), Enterobacter aerogenes (4%), and Raoultella planticola (3%). The growth characteristics and histamine production capabilities of the two most prevalent HPB were further examined. M. morganii and P. damselae had optimum growth at 35°C and 30 to 35°C and 0 to 2% and 1 to 3% NaCl, respectively. P. damselae produced significantly (P tuna, possibly due to differences in muscle composition and salt content. Results in this study showed that P. damselae was the most prevalent high HPB in Gulf of Mexico fish. In addition, previously reported results using the traditional Niven's method may underreport the prevalence of P. damselae. Molecular-based methods should be used in addition to culture-based methods to enhance detection and enumeration of HPB.

  19. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J.; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M.; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny. PMID:26933816

  20. Chemical communication in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suravajhala, Srinivasa Sandeep; Saini, Deepak; Nott, Prabhu

    Luminescence in Vibrio fischeri is a model for quorum-sensing-gene-regulation in bacteria. We study luminescence response of V. fischeri to both internal and external cues at the single cell and population level. Experiments with ES114, a wild-type strain, and ainS mutant show that luminescence induction in cultures is not always proportional to cell-density and there is always a basal level of luminescence. At any given concentration of the exogenously added signals, C6-HSL and C8-HSL, luminescence per cell reaches a maximum during the exponential phase and decreases thereafter. We hypothesize that (1) C6-HSL production and LuxR activity are not proportional to cell-density, and (2) there is a shift in equilibrium from C6-HSL to C8-HSL during the later stages of growth of the culture. RT-PCR analysis of luxI and luxR shows that the expression of these genes is maximum corresponding to the highest level of luminescence. The shift in equilibrium is shown by studying competitive binding of C6-HSL and C8-HSL to LuxR. We argue that luminescence is a unicellular behaviour, and an intensive property like per cell luminescence is more important than gross luminescence of the population in understanding response of bacteria to chemical signalling. Funding from the Department of Science and Technology, India is acknowledged.

  1. Modeling growth of three bakery product spoilage molds as a function of water activity, temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Onno, Bernard; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of water activity, pH and storage temperature on the growth of Eurotium repens, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium corylophilum, isolated from spoiled bakery products. Moreover, the behaviors of these three mold species were compared to assess whether a general modeling framework may be set and re-used in future research on bakery spoilage molds. The mold growth was modeled by building two distinct Gamma-type secondary models: one on the lag time for growth and another one on the radial growth rate. A set of 428 experimental growth curves was generated. The effect of temperature (15-35 °C), water activity (0.80-0.98) and pH (3-7) was assessed. Results showed that it was not possible to apply the same set of secondary model equations to the three mold species given that the growth rate varied significantly with the factors pH and water activity. In contrast, the temperature effect on both growth rate and lag time of the three mold species was described by the same equation. The equation structure and model parameter values of the Gamma models were also compared per mold species to assess whether a relationship between lag time and growth rate existed. There was no correlation between the two growth responses for E. repens, but a slight one for A. niger and P. corylophilum. These findings will help in determining bakery product shelf-life and guiding future work in the predictive mycology field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fermentative Bacteria Influence the Competition between Denitrifiers and DNRA Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline M. van den Berg

    2017-09-01

    results of this study clearly show that not only the ratio of available substrates, but also the nature of the electron donor influences the outcome of competition between DNRA and denitrification. Apparently, fermentative bacteria are competitive for the electron donor and thereby alter the ratio of available substrates for nitrate reduction.

  3. Culture-dependent and culture-independent assessment of spoilage community growth on VP lamb meat from packaging to past end of shelf-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Shang, Hongshan; Tamplin, Mark; Ross, Tom; Bowman, John P

    2017-12-01

    Packaging and storage temperature are important factors that influence the shelf-life of vacuum packed (VP) meat. In this study the shelf-life of VP bone-in lamb hind shanks stored at 8 °C and -1.2 °C was determined in parallel to analyses of starting and eventual spoilage bacterial communities via Illumina MiSeq based 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. The mean total viable counts (TVC) and lactic acid bacterial viable counts (LAB) were observed to increase to log 7.5 CFU/cm 2 and 7 CFU/cm 2 after 6 and 42 days at 8 °C and -1.2 °C and stayed stable until shelf-life termination after 13 and 124 days, respectively. The sequence data showed initial communities were patchily distributed and were mainly derived from skin microbiome taxa likely prevalent within the abattoir. A broad diversity of VP meat associated specific spoilage organisms (SSO) were comparatively abundant in this initial population. Overtime meat spoilage communities developed a distinctive and stable microbiome. At -1.2 °C SSO included mainly Carnobacterium, Yersinia and Clostridium spp. while at 8 °C SSO expanded to include Hafnia, Lactococcus, Providencia spp. Growth curves inferred from the sequence data after taking into account rRNA copy number suggested that SSO growth rates were consistent with overall growth rates determined from TVC and LAB data and are predictable. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spoilage of light (PSE-like) and dark turkey meat under aerobic or modified atmosphere package: microbial indicators and their relationship with total volatile basic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, M J; Ferreira, M C; Barreto, A S

    2008-01-01

    1. The aim of this work was to evaluate the shelf life of turkey meat from different colour categories (Pale, Soft and Exudative (PSE)-like), intermediate and dark), packaged under aerobic or modified atmosphere (MAP) conditions; also to establish a relationship between microbial quality and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), evaluating its capacity for shelf life determination. 2. Breasts were selected according to luminance (L*) and pH(24): L >/= 51 and pH 5.8 for dark colour. Sliced meat was packaged under aerobic or MAP conditions with 50% N(2) and 50% CO(2), then stored in the dark at 0 +/- 1 degrees C for periods of 12 or 25 d. Meat under aerobic conditions was evaluated for microbiological characteristics and TVB-N on d 0, 5 and 12. This evaluation was extended to include d 19 and 25 when samples were under MAP conditions. 3. The dark meat group after 12 d of storage in aerobiosis presented significantly higher plate counts of aerobic mesophilic, psychrotrophic micro-organisms and higher TVB-N than other meat colour categories. The shelf life of turkey meat under MAP was one week longer for intermediate and light colour meat (20 d) than for dark meat. TVB-N values of 20 to 30 mg NH(3)/100 g turkey meat correspond to advanced spoilage stages. We proposed 14 mg NH(3)/100 g as the limit of freshness acceptability for turkey meat. 4. TVB-N was an indicator of turkey meat microbial spoilage but was not a suitable early predictor for microbial spoilage and in particular for turkey meat stored under MAP conditions because counts of micro-organisms were moderately correlated (Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae) with this index, as they were inhibited by MAP gas mixture and storage temperature used in the present study.

  5. Mineral deposition in bacteria-filled and bacteria-free calcium bodies in the crustacean Hyloniscus riparius (Isopoda: Oniscidea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Vittori

    Full Text Available Crustacean calcium bodies are epithelial sacs which contain a mineralized matrix. The objectives of this study were to describe the microscopic anatomy of calcium bodies in the terrestrial isopod Hyloniscus riparius and to establish whether they undergo molt-related structural changes. We performed 3D reconstruction of the calcium bodies from paraffin sections and analyzed their structure with light and electron microscopy. In addition, we analyzed the chemical composition of their mineralized matrices with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two pairs of these organs are present in H. riparius. One pair is filled with bacteria while the other pair is not. In non-molting animals, the bacteria-filled calcium bodies contain apatite crystals and the bacteria-free calcium bodies enclose CaCO3-containing concretions with little organic matrix. During preparation for molt, an additional matrix layer is deposited in both pairs of calcium bodies. In the bacteria-filled calcium bodies it contains a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate, whereas only calcium carbonate is present in bacteria-free calcium bodies. After ecdysis, all mineral components in bacteria-free calcium bodies and the additional matrix layer in bacteria-filled calcium bodies are completely resorbed. During calcium resorption, the apical surface of the calcium body epithelium is deeply folded and electron dense granules are present in spaces between epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the presence of bacteria might be linked to calcium phosphate mineralization. Calcium bodies likely provide a source of calcium and potentially phosphate for the mineralization of the new cuticle after molt. Unlike other terrestrial isopods, H. riparius does not form sternal CaCO3 deposits and the bacteria-free calcium bodies might functionally replace them in this species.

  6. Detection methods for cereal grains treated with low and high energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Delincée, Henry; Stahl, Mario; Röder, Olaf; Schaller, Hans Jürgen

    2005-04-01

    Cereal grains can be treated with low energy (<300keV) or high energy (1-10MeV) electrons for decontamination of phytopathogenic and spoilage organisms. In this preliminary study, wheat and barley samples were treated with low energy electrons of 145keV or high energy electrons of 10MeV. To identify the electron treatment, different detection methods have been investigated: (1) photostimulated luminescence (PSL), (2) thermoluminescence (TL), (3) electron spin resonance (ESR) and (4) DNA Comet Assay. These four methods are already standardised at a European level and are now adopted as general Codex methods for detection of irradiated foodstuffs. The results suggest that the most suitable detection methods for electron-treated grains are the PSL and TL methods. The results from the other two methods (ESR and Comet Assay) are not so promising because they seem only to be applicable in special cases.

  7. Effects of different ozonized slurry-ice treatments and superchilling storage (-1°C) on microbial spoilage of two important pelagic fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Gioacchino; Okpala, Charles Odilichukwu R; Vitale, Sergio; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Noto, Annamaria Di; Costa, Antonella; Di Bella, Calogero; Monaco, Daniela Lo

    2017-11-01

    Combining different preservative treatments for improving quality and safety of fishery products increasingly receives global research attention. Consistent with this pursuit, the current research was undertaken to determine the effects of different ozonized slurry-ice treatments and superchilling (-1°C) storage on microbial spoilage of European anchovy ( Eugraulis encrasicolus ) and sardine ( Sardina pilchardus ), which are two commercially important pelagic fish species. After the catch (within iced and control samples. Thus, combined slurry-ice and superchilling storage at Seq-T produced improved antimicrobial activity over One-T application. Largely, ozonized slurry-ice outcomes/results appear promising thanks to superchilling storage.

  8. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  9. Immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen

    2007-01-01

    Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are part of the commensal intestinal flora and considered beneficial for health, as they compete with pathogens for adhesion sites in the intestine and ferment otherwise indigestible compounds. Another important property of these so-called probiotic bacteria...... with bacteria, and the cytokine pattern induced by specific bacteria resembled the pattern induced in MoDC, except for TNF-alpha and IL-6, which were induced in response to different bacteria in blood DC/monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Autologous NK cells produced IFN-gamma when cultured with blood DC......, monocytes and monocyte-derived DC and IL-12-inducing bacteria, whereas only DC induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic T cells. In vitro-generated DC is a commonly used model of tissue DC, but they differ in certain aspects from intestinal DC, which are in direct contact with the intestinal microbiota...

  10. Phenotypic switching in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrin, Jack

    Living matter is a non-equilibrium system in which many components work in parallel to perpetuate themselves through a fluctuating environment. Physiological states or functionalities revealed by a particular environment are called phenotypes. Transitions between phenotypes may occur either spontaneously or via interaction with the environment. Even in the same environment, genetically identical bacteria can exhibit different phenotypes of a continuous or discrete nature. In this thesis, we pursued three lines of investigation into discrete phenotypic heterogeneity in bacterial populations: the quantitative characterization of the so-called bacterial persistence, a theoretical model of phenotypic switching based on those measurements, and the design of artificial genetic networks which implement this model. Persistence is the phenotype of a subpopulation of bacteria with a reduced sensitivity to antibiotics. We developed a microfluidic apparatus, which allowed us to monitor the growth rates of individual cells while applying repeated cycles of antibiotic treatments. We were able to identify distinct phenotypes (normal and persistent) and characterize the stochastic transitions between them. We also found that phenotypic heterogeneity was present prior to any environmental cue such as antibiotic exposure. Motivated by the experiments with persisters, we formulated a theoretical model describing the dynamic behavior of several discrete phenotypes in a periodically varying environment. This theoretical framework allowed us to quantitatively predict the fitness of dynamic populations and to compare survival strategies according to environmental time-symmetries. These calculations suggested that persistence is a strategy used by bacterial populations to adapt to fluctuating environments. Knowledge of the phenotypic transition rates for persistence may provide statistical information about the typical environments of bacteria. We also describe a design of artificial

  11. Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkin, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The extraordinary ability of indigenous microorganisms, like metal-resistant bacteria, for biotransformation of toxic compounds is of considerable interest for the emerging area of environmental bioremediation. However, the underlying mechanisms by which metal-resistant bacteria transform toxic compounds are currently unknown and await elucidation. The project's objective was to study stress-induced responses of metal-resistant bacteria to environmental changes and chemical stimulants. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the group of Dr. H.-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). In this project, we have utilized metal-resistant bacteria Arthrobacter oxydans as a model bacterial system. We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize for the first time at the nanometer scale formation of stress-induced structures on bacterial surfaces in response to Cr (VI) exposure. We have demonstrated that structure, assembly, and composition of these stress-induced structures are dependent on Cr (VI) concentrations. Our AFM observations of the appearance and development of stress-induced layers on the surfaces of Arthrobacter oxydans bacteria exposed to Cr (VI) were confirmed by Dr. Holman's biochemical, electron microscopy, and synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy studies. In general, in vitro imaging of live microbial and cellular systems represents one of the most challenging issues in application of AFM. Various approaches for immobilization of bacteria on the substrate for in vitro imaging were tested in this project. Imaging of live bacteria was achieved, however further optimization of experimental methods are needed for high-resolution visualization of the cellular environmental structural dynamics by AFM. This project enhanced the current insight into molecular architecture, structural and environmental variability of bacterial systems. The project partially funded research for two book chapters (1

  12. [Chitinolytic activity of bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, Elzbieta; Jankiewicz, Urszula

    2010-01-01

    Chitinolytic bacteria play an important role in degradation of chitin, one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature. These microorganisms synthesize specific enzymes, that catalyze hydrolysis of beta-1,4-glycosidic bonds in low-digestible chitin polymers, turning it into low-molecular, easy to digest compounds. During last decades many bacterial chitinolytic enzymes have been studied and characterized, mainly for their potential applications in agriculture, industry and medicine. Several chitinase classifications have been proposed, either on the base of substrate specificity or amino acid sequence similarities. X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy techniques enabled the determination of three dimensional structure of some chitinases, what was helpful in explaining their catalytic mechanism. Development of biotechnology and molecular biology enables a deep research in regulation and cloning of bacterial chitinase genes.

  13. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  14. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Sixing; Huang, Tony Jun; Ma, Fen; Zeng, Xiangqun; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device. (paper)

  15. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sixing; Ma, Fen; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E.; Zeng, Xiangqun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device.

  16. The anammoxosome: an intracytoplasmic compartment in anammox bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niftrik, Laura A; Fuerst, John A; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Kuenen, J Gijs; Jetten, Mike S M; Strous, Marc

    2004-04-01

    Anammox bacteria belong to the phylum Planctomycetes and perform anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox); they oxidize ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor to yield dinitrogen gas. The anammox reaction takes place inside the anammoxosome: an intracytoplasmic compartment bounded by a single ladderane lipid-containing membrane. The anammox bacteria, first found in a wastewater treatment plant in The Netherlands, have the potential to remove ammonium from wastewater without the addition of organic carbon. Very recently anammox bacteria were also discovered in the Black Sea where they are responsible for 30-50% of the nitrogen consumption. This review will introduce different forms of intracytoplasmic membrane systems found in prokaryotes and discuss the compartmentalization in anammox bacteria and its possible functional relation to catabolism and energy transduction.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) cultivar Avenger against pathogenic bacteria, phytopathogenic filamentous fungi and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Cano, R D; Salcedo-Hernández, R; López-Meza, J E; Bideshi, D K; Barboza-Corona, J E

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to show whether the edible part of broccoli has antibacterial and antifungal activity against micro-organism of importance in human health and vegetable spoilage, and to test if this effect was partially due to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Crude extracts were obtained from florets and stems of broccoli cultivar Avenger and the inhibitory effect was demonstrated against pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Proteus vulgaris), phytopathogenic fungi (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Asperigillus niger) and yeasts (Candida albicans and Rhodotorula sp.). It was shown that samples treated with proteolytic enzymes had a reduction of approximately 60% in antibacterial activity against Staph. xylosus, suggesting that proteinaceous compounds might play a role in the inhibitory effect. Antimicrobial components in crude extracts were thermoresistant and the highest activity was observed under acidic conditions. It was shown that antifungal activity of broccoli's crude extracts might not be attributed to chitinases. Organic broccoli cultivar Avenger has antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria, yeast and phytophatogenic fungi. Data suggest that this effect is partially due to AMPs. Broccoli's crude extracts have activity not only against pathogenic bacteria but also against phytophatogenic fungi of importance in agriculture. We suggest for first time that the inhibitory effect is probably due to AMPs. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. In vitro evaluation of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances produced by lactic acid bacteria isolated during traditional Sicilian cheese making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giusi Macaluso

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins are antimicrobial proteins produced by bacteria that inhibit the growth of other bacteria with a bactericidal or bacteriostatic mode of action. Many lactic acid bacteria (LAB produce a high diversity of different bacteriocins. Bacteriocinogenic LAB are generally recognised as safe (GRAS and useful to control the frequent development of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. For this reason they are commonly used as starter cultures in food fermentations. In this study, the authors describe the results of a screening on 699 LAB isolated from wooden vat surfaces, raw milk and traditional Sicilian cheeses, for the production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances, by comparing two alternative methods. The antagonistic activity of LAB and its proteinaceous nature were evaluated using the spot-on-the-lawn and the well-diffusion assay (WDA and the sensitivity to proteolytic (proteinase K, protease B and trypsin, amylolytic (α-amylase and lipolytic (lipase enzymes. The indicator strains used were: Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis. A total of 223 strains (belonging to the species Enterococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp. and Lactococcus lactis were found to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes by using the spot-on-the-lawn method; only 37 of these were confirmed by using the WDA. The direct addition of bacteriocin-producing cultures into dairy products can be a more practical and economic option for the improvement of the safety and quality of the final product.

  19. Synergistic action of cinnamaldehyde with silver nanoparticles against spore-forming bacteria: a case for judicious use of silver nanoparticles for antibacterial applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh IN

    2013-12-01

    nanoform in combination with essential oil component cinnamaldehyde can be effectively used for controlling the spore-forming bacterial species.Keywords: antibacterial activity, bacterial food spoilage, erythrocyte toxicity, essential oil, in vitro, synergy, toxin producing spore-forming bacteria

  20. The anammoxosome : An intracytoplasmic compartment in anammox bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Niftrik, L.A. van; Fuerst, J.A.; Kuenen, J.G.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2004-01-01

    Anammox bacteria belong to the phylum Planctomycetes and perform anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox); they oxidize ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor to yield dinitrogen gas. The anammox reaction takes place inside the anammoxosome: an intracytoplasmic compartment bounded by a single