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Sample records for spnir quorum-sensing system

  1. Quorum-Sensing Systems as Targets for Antivirulence Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoirdt, Tom

    2018-04-01

    The development of novel therapies to control diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens is one of the major challenges we are currently facing. Many important plant, animal, and human pathogens regulate virulence by quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication with small signal molecules. Consequently, a significant research effort is being undertaken to identify and use quorum-sensing-interfering agents in order to control diseases caused by these pathogens. In this review, an overview of our current knowledge of quorum-sensing systems of Gram-negative model pathogens is presented as well as the link with virulence of these pathogens, and recent advances and challenges in the development of quorum-sensing-interfering therapies are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. RND efflux pump and its interrelationship with quorum sensing system.

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    Liang, Zhi-bin; Chen, Yu-mei; Chen, Yu-fan; Cheng, Ying-ying; Zhang, Lian-hui

    2016-10-20

    Antibiotic resistance has become a serious concern in treatment of bacterial infections. Overexpression of efflux pump is one of the important mechanisms in antibiotic resistance. In Gram negative bacteria, RND (Resistance-nodulation-cell division) superfamily efflux pump plays a vital important role in antibiotics resistance. Recent research progress unveils an intriguing interrelationship between RND efflux pump and the bacterial quorum sensing system, whose regulation is dependent on small signal molecules. This article reviews the latest findings on the structure and transport mechanism of RND efflux pump, as well as the general features and regulatory mechanisms of quorum sensing, with a special focus on the role and mechanism of quorum sensing system in regulation of RND efflux pump, and the influence of efflux pump on quorum sensing signal transportation. Further investigation of the interrelationship between RND efflux pumps and the bacterial quorum sensing systems is critical for elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that govern the expression of the RND efflux pumps genes, and may also provide useful clues to overcome the efflux pump mediated antibiotic resistance.

  3. Self-sensing in Bacillus subtilis quorum-sensing systems.

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    Bareia, Tasneem; Pollak, Shaul; Eldar, Avigdor

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial cell-cell signalling, or quorum sensing, is characterized by the secretion and groupwide detection of small diffusible signal molecules called autoinducers. This mechanism allows cells to coordinate their behaviour in a density-dependent manner. A quorum-sensing cell may directly respond to the autoinducers it produces in a cell-autonomous and quorum-independent manner, but the strength of this self-sensing effect and its impact on bacterial physiology are unclear. Here, we explore the existence and impact of self-sensing in the Bacillus subtilis ComQXP and Rap-Phr quorum-sensing systems. By comparing the quorum-sensing response of autoinducer-secreting and non-secreting cells in co-culture, we find that secreting cells consistently show a stronger response than non-secreting cells. Combining genetic and quantitative analyses, we demonstrate this effect to be a direct result of self-sensing and rule out an indirect regulatory effect of the autoinducer production genes on response sensitivity. In addition, self-sensing in the ComQXP system affects persistence to antibiotic treatment. Together, these findings indicate the existence of self-sensing in the two most common designs of quorum-sensing systems of Gram-positive bacteria.

  4. Quasisynchronization in Quorum Sensing Systems with Parameter Mismatches

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    Jianbao Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates quasisynchronization in a communication system, which consists of cells communicating through quorum sensing. With the help of Lyapunov function method and Lur’e system approach, some sufficient conditions for quasisynchronization are presented, and a bound on the synchronization errors is derived. The obtained theoretical results show that the synchronization quality is influenced by two parameters detrimentally: the error bound depends almost linearly on the mismatches between cells and depends sensitively on the diffusion rates of the signals inward the cell membrane. Numerical experiments are carried out to verify the theoretical results.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasl and rhll quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared....

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasl and rhll quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared...

  7. The organophosphate malathion disturbs gut microbiome development and the quorum-Sensing system.

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    Gao, Bei; Chi, Liang; Tu, Pengcheng; Bian, Xiaoming; Thomas, Jesse; Ru, Hongyu; Lu, Kun

    2018-02-01

    The gut microbiome has tremendous potential to impact health and disease. Various environmental toxicants, including insecticides, have been shown to alter gut microbiome community structures. However, the mechanism that compositionally and functionally regulates gut microbiota remains unclear. Quorum sensing is known to modulate intra- and interspecies gene expression and coordinate population responses. It is unknown whether quorum sensing is disrupted when environmental toxicants cause perturbations in the gut microbiome community structure. To reveal the response of the quorum-sensing system to environmental exposure, we use a combination of Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon and shotgun metagenome sequencing to examine the impacts of a widely used organophosphate insecticide, malathion, on the gut microbiome trajectory, quorum sensing system and behaviors related to quorum sensing, such as motility and pathogenicity. Our results demonstrated that malathion perturbed the gut microbiome development, quorum sensing and quorum sensing related behaviors. These findings may provide a novel mechanistic understanding of the role of quorum-sensing in the gut microbiome toxicity of malathion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. [Wastewater treatment based on biofilm regulation by Lux type quorum sensing system-a review].

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    Zhao, Chang; Wang, Ning; Wang, Wenzhao; Xu, Qiyong

    2017-09-25

    Studies on biofilm regulation based on Lux type quorum sensing system in wastewater treatment have attracted much attention. The intervention of quorum sensing system includes both mechanisms of positive and negative control. The positive invigorating effect improves the efficiency of biofilm wastewater treatment, promotes the production of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP), and increases the yield of biofilm. The negative weakening effect of quorum sensing can decompose the signal molecules needed in the process of biofilm formation, interrupts the gene expression process of biofilm formation, and inhibits the formation of biofilm on MBR membrane surface effectively. The further study of the structure and mechanism of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHLs), the immobilization technology and application of quorum quenching bacteria, the synergistic effect verification of different biofouling control methods and the application feasibility of quorum sensing system based technology in more wastewater treatment fields are the next important researches to explore.

  9. Specificity and complexity in bacterial quorum-sensing systems

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    Hawver, Lisa A.; Jung, Sarah A.; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a microbial cell-to-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of chemical signals called autoinducers (AIs) to monitor cell density and species complexity in the population. QS allows bacteria to behave as a cohesive group and coordinate collective behaviors. While most QS receptors display high specificity to their AI ligands, others are quite promiscuous in signal detection. How do specific QS receptors respond to their cognate signals with high fidelity? Why do some receptors maintain low signal recognition specificity? In addition, many QS systems are composed of multiple intersecting signaling pathways: what are the benefits of preserving such a complex signaling network when a simple linear ‘one-to-one’ regulatory pathway seems sufficient to monitor cell density? Here, we will discuss different molecular mechanisms employed by various QS systems that ensure productive and specific QS responses. Moreover, the network architectures of some well-characterized QS circuits will be reviewed to understand how the wiring of different regulatory components achieves different biological goals. PMID:27354348

  10. Variability of the Quorum Sensing System in Natural Isolates of Bacillus sp.

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    Ines Mandic-Mulec

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria communicate with one another by (emitting and/or reacting to chemical signals. These communications, also known as quorum sensing, enable cells to control gene expression in response to cell density at the intra- and inter-species level. While bacteria use common signaling themes, variations in the design of the extracellular signals, the signal detection apparatus, and the biochemical mechanisms of signal relay have allowed quorum sensing systems to be adapted to diverse uses. The quorum sensing systems that govern natural genetic competence in Bacillus subtilis involve the ComX pheromones and the ComP-ComA, two-component regulator. ComX is synthesized as an inactive precursor and is then cleaved and modified by ComQ before export to the extra-cellular environment. The comQXP' loci of a set of natural Bacillus isolates have been sequenced and a striking polymorphism that correlates with specific patterns of activation of the quorum sensing response was shown. The ComX molecules representing different pherotypes were purified and characterized by mass spectroscopy. The analyses revealed that ComX variants also differ at the level of posttranslational modification of a conserved tryptophane residue, which was found to be an isoprenoid. The striking variability found in competence quorum sensing systems might be important for the survival of these bacteria in nature to escape the inappropriate induction of competence by closely related strains, playing the role of a sexual isolation mechanism.

  11. Logic of two antagonizing intra-species quorum sensing systems in bacteria.

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    Prajapat, Mahendra Kumar; Saini, Supreet

    2018-03-01

    Bacteria release signaling molecules into the surrounding environment and sense them when present in their proximity. Using this strategy, a cell estimates the number of neighbors in its surrounding. Upon sensing a critical number of individuals, bacteria coordinate a number of cellular processes. This density-dependent control of gene expression and physiology is called quorum sensing (QS). Quorum sensing controls a wide variety of functions in bacteria, including those related to motility, growth, virulence etc. Quorum sensing has been widely observed in bacteria while the individuals of the same species or different species compete and cooperate each other. Interestingly, many species possess more than one QS system (intra-species) and these QS systems interact each other to perform quorum sensing. Thus, several logical arrangements can be possible based on the interaction among intra-species QS systems - parallel, series, antagonizing, and agonizing. In this work, we perform simulations to understand the logic of interaction between two antagonizing intra-species QS systems. In such an interaction, one QS system gets fully expressed and the other only gets partially expressed. This is found to be dictated by the interplay between autoinducer's diffusivity and antagonizing strength. In addition, we speculate an important role of the intracellular regulators (eg. LuxR) in maintaining the uniform response among the individual cells from the different localities. We also expect the interplay between the autoinducer's diffusivity and distribution of cells in fine tuning the collective response. Interestingly, in a localized niche with a heterogeneous cell distribution, the cells are expected to perform a global quorum sensing via fully expressed QS system and a local quorum sensing via partially expressed QS system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quorum sensing inhibition

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    Persson, T.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Nielsen, J.

    2005-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems comprise a new therapeutic target potentially substitutive or complementary to traditional antibiotic treatment of chronic diseases. One route to disrupt the previously established interrelationship between pathogenesis and QS is by blocking the dual functioning signal...

  13. Quorum-Sensing Signal-Response Systems in Gram-Negative Bacteria

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    Papenfort, Kai; Bassler, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract / Preface Bacteria use quorum sensing to orchestrate gene expression programmes that underlie collective behaviours. Quorum sensing relies on the production, release, detection and group-level response to extracellular signalling molecules, which are called autoinducers. Recent work has discovered new autoinducers in Gram-negative bacteria, shown how these molecules are recognized by cognate receptors, revealed new regulatory components that are embedded in canonical signalling circuits and identified novel regulatory network designs. In this Review we examine how, together, these features of quorum sensing signal–response systems combine to control collective behaviours in Gram-negative bacteria and we discuss the implications for host–microbial associations and antibacterial therapy. PMID:27510864

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasI and rhlI quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Givskov, Michael

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared...

  15. Detection of Possible AI-2-mediated Quorum Sensing System in Commensal Intestinal Bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukáš, Filip; Gorenc, G.; Kopečný, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2008), s. 221-224 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/06/0974 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : quorum sensing system Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  16. Quorum Sensing of Periodontal Pathogens.

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    Plančak, Darije; Musić, Larisa; Puhar, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    The term 'quorum sensing' describes intercellular bacterial communication which regulates bacterial gene expression according to population cell density. Bacteria produce and secrete small molecules, named autoinducers, into the intercellular space. The concentration of these molecules increases as a function of population cell density. Once the concentration of the stimulatory threshold is reached, alteration in gene expression occurs. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria possess different types of quorum sensing systems. Canonical LuxI/R-type/acyl homoserine lactone mediated quorum sensing system is the best studied quorum sensing circuit and is described in Gram-negative bacteria which employ it for inter-species communication mostly. Gram-positive bacteria possess a peptide-mediated quorum sensing system. Bacteria can communicate within their own species (intra-species) but also between species (inter-species), for which they employ an autoinducer-2 quorum sensing system which is called the universal language of the bacteria. Periodontal pathogenic bacteria possess AI-2 quorum sensing systems. It is known that they use it for regulation of biofilm formation, iron uptake, stress response and virulence factor expression. A better understanding of bacterial communication mechanisms will allow the targeting of quorum sensing with quorum sensing inhibitors to prevent and control disease.

  17. Small RNA target genes and regulatory connections in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing system

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    Hammer, Brian K; Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    2011-01-01

    The two-component quorum sensing (QS) system, first described in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi and evolutionarily conserved among members of the genus Vibrio, has been best studied in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae (1, 2). In the V. cholerae QS system, the response to the accumulation o...... manner. This mechanism ensures the proper timing of the QS response, which includes the expression of traits critical for virulence and for the formation of biofilms (2-6)....

  18. The Social Life of Aeromonas through Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Systems

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    Talagrand-Reboul, Emilie; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Lamy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Aeromonas display multicellular behaviors herein referred to as “social life”. Since the 1990s, interest has grown in cell-to-cell communication through quorum sensing signals and biofilm formation. As they are interconnected, these two self-organizing systems deserve to be considered together for a fresh perspective on the natural history and lifestyles of aeromonads. In this review, we focus on the multicellular behaviors of Aeromonas, i.e., its social life. First, we review and discuss the available knowledge at the molecular and cellular levels for biofilm and quorum sensing. We then discuss the complex, subtle, and nested interconnections between the two systems. Finally, we focus on the aeromonad multicellular coordinated behaviors involved in heterotrophy and virulence that represent technological opportunities and applied research challenges. PMID:28163702

  19. Intra-Species Bacterial Quorum Sensing Studied at Single Cell Level in a Double Droplet Trapping System

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    Wilhelm T. S. Huck

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the intra-species bacterial quorum sensing at the single cell level using a double droplet trapping system. Escherichia coli transformed to express the quorum sensing receptor protein, LasR, were encapsulated in microdroplets that were positioned adjacent to microdroplets containing the autoinducer, N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL. Functional activation of the LasR protein by diffusion of the OdDHL across the droplet interface was measured by monitoring the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP from a LasR-dependent promoter. A threshold concentration of OdDHL was found to induce production of quorum-sensing associated GFP by E. coli. Additionally, we demonstrated that LasR-dependent activation of GFP expression was also initiated when the adjacent droplets contained single E. coli transformed with the OdDHL synthase gene, LasI, representing a simple quorum sensing circuit between two droplets.

  20. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

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    H A Darshanee Ruwandeepika

    Full Text Available Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels, which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells.

  1. A distinctive dual-channel quorum-sensing system operates in Vibrio anguillarum.

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    Croxatto, Antony; Pride, John; Hardman, Andrea; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel; Milton, Debra L

    2004-06-01

    Many bacterial cells communicate using diffusible signal molecules to monitor cell population density via a process termed quorum sensing. In marine Vibrio species, the Vibrio harveyi-type LuxR protein is a key player in a quorum-sensing phosphorelay cascade, which controls the expression of virulence, symbiotic and survival genes. Previously, we characterized Vibrio anguillarum homologues of LuxR (VanT) and LuxMN (VanMN) and, in this study, we have identified homologues of LuxPQ (VanPQ) and LuxOU (VanOU). In contrast to other Vibrio species, vanT was expressed at low cell density and showed no significant induction as the cell number increased. In addition, although the loss of VanO increased vanT expression, the loss of VanU, unexpectedly, decreased it. Both VanN and VanQ were required for repression of vanT even in a vanU mutant, suggesting an alternative route for VanNQ signal transduction other than via VanU. VanT negatively regulated its own expression by binding and repressing the vanT promoter and by binding and activating the vanOU promoter. The signal relay results in a cellular response as expression of the metalloprotease, empA, was altered similar to that of vanT in all the mutants. Consequently, the V. anguillarum quorum-sensing phosphorelay systems work differently from those of V. harveyi and may be used to limit rather than induce vanT expression.

  2. A quorum sensing-based in vivo expression system and its application in multivalent bacterial vaccine.

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    Chu, Teng; Ni, Chunshan; Zhang, Lingzhi; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2015-03-18

    Delivery of antigens by live bacterial carriers can elicit effective humoral and cellular responses and may be an attractive strategy for live bacterial vaccine production through introduction of a vector that expresses an exogenous protective antigen. To overcome the instability and metabolic burden associated with plasmid introduction, alternative strategies, such as the use of in vivo-inducible promoters, have been proposed. However, screening an ideal in vivo-activated promoter with high efficiency and low leak expression in a particular strain poses great challenges to many researchers. In this work, we constructed an in vivo antigen-expressing vector suitable for Edwardsiella tarda, an enteric Gram-negative invasive intracellular pathogen of both animals and humans. By combining quorum sensing genes from Vibrio fischeri with iron uptake regulons, a synthetic binary regulation system (ironQS) for E. tarda was designed. In vitro expression assay demonstrated that the ironQS system is only initiated in the absence of Fe2+ in the medium when the cell density reaches its threshold. The ironQS system was further confirmed in vivo to present an in vivo-triggered and cell density-dependent expression pattern in larvae and adult zebrafish. A recombinant E. tarda vector vaccine candidate WED(ironQS-G) was established by introducing gapA34, which encodes the protective antigen glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from the fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila LSA34 into ironQS system, and the immune protection afforded by this vaccine was assessed in turbot (Scophtalmus maximus). Most of the vaccinated fish survived under the challenge with A. hydrophila LSA34 (RPS=67.0%) or E. tarda EIB202 (RPS=72.3%). Quorum sensing system has been extensively used in various gene structures in synthetic biology as a well-functioning and population-dependent gene circuit. In this work, the in vivo expression system, ironQS, maintained the high expression efficiency of the

  3. Modeling quorum sensing trade-offs between bacterial cell density and system extension from open boundaries

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    Marenda, Mattia; Zanardo, Marina; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Squartini, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial communities undergo collective behavioural switches upon producing and sensing diffusible signal molecules; a mechanism referred to as Quorum Sensing (QS). Exemplarily, biofilm organic matrices are built concertedly by bacteria in several environments. QS scope in bacterial ecology has been debated for over 20 years. Different perspectives counterpose the role of density reporter for populations to that of local environment diffusivity probe for individual cells. Here we devise a model system where tubes of different heights contain matrix-embedded producers and sensors. These tubes allow non-limiting signal diffusion from one open end, thereby showing that population spatial extension away from an open boundary can be a main critical factor in QS. Experimental data, successfully recapitulated by a comprehensive mathematical model, demonstrate how tube height can overtake the role of producer density in triggering sensor activation. The biotic degradation of the signal is found to play a major role and to be species-specific and entirely feedback-independent.

  4. Baicalein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and the Quorum Sensing System In Vitro.

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    Yan Chen

    Full Text Available Biofilm formed by Staphylococcus aureus significantly enhances antibiotic resistance by inhibiting the penetration of antibiotics, resulting in an increasingly serious situation. This study aimed to assess whether baicalein can prevent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic bactericidal effects with antibiotics in vitro. To do this, we used a clinically isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus 17546 (t037 for biofilm formation. Virulence factors were detected following treatment with baicalein, and the molecular mechanism of its antibiofilm activity was studied. Plate counting, crystal violet staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein clearly inhibited 3- and 7-day biofilm formation in vitro. Moreover, colony forming unit count, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy showed that vancomycin (VCM and baicalein generally enhanced destruction of biofilms, while VCM alone did not. Western blotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (RTQ-PCR confirmed that baicalein treatment reduced staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA and α-hemolysin (hla levels. Most strikingly, real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein downregulated the quorum-sensing system regulators agrA, RNAIII, and sarA, and gene expression of ica, but 16 μg/mL baicalein had no effect. In summary, baicalein inhibited Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, destroyed biofilms, increased the permeability of vancomycin, reduced the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A and α-hemolysin, and inhibited the quorum sensing system. These results support baicalein as a novel drug candidate and an effective treatment strategy for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  5. Quorum sensing by farnesol revisited.

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    Polke, Melanie; Jacobsen, Ilse D

    2017-10-01

    Quorum sensing, a form of molecular communication in microbial communities, is relatively well studied in bacterial species, but poorly understood in fungi. Farnesol, a quorum sensing molecule secreted by the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, was the first quorum sensing molecule described in a eukaryotic organism. However, despite considerable research efforts and advances in recent years, the mechanisms behind its action remain largely elusive. Only recently, we showed that deletion of the C. albicans gene EED1 (eed1Δ), which is essential for hyphal maintenance, resulted in both increased farnesol production and hypersensitivity to farnesol, providing a link between farnesol signaling and elongated hyphal growth. This finding raised several questions concerning farnesol signaling. In this short review we use the unique phenotype of the eed1Δ mutant to summarize current hypotheses and to speculate on possible mechanisms of quorum sensing in C. albicans and its implication in fungus-host interaction, by drawing comparisons to comparatively well-studied quorum sensing systems in bacteria.

  6. A Quorum-Sensing System That RegulatesStreptococcus pneumoniaeBiofilm Formation and Surface Polysaccharide Production.

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    Junges, Roger; Salvadori, Gabriela; Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Åmdal, Heidi A; Periselneris, Jimstan N; Chen, Tsute; Brown, Jeremy S; Petersen, Fernanda C

    2017-01-01

    Despite vaccines, Streptococcus pneumoniae kills more than a million people yearly. Thus, understanding how pneumococci transition from commensals to pathogens is particularly relevant. Quorum sensing regulates collective behaviors and thus represents a potential driver of commensal-to-pathogen transitions. Rgg/small hydrophobic peptide (SHP) quorum-sensing systems are widespread in streptococci, yet they remain largely uncharacterized in S. pneumoniae . Using directional transcriptome sequencing, we show that the S. pneumoniae D39 Rgg0939/SHP system induces the transcription of a single gene cluster including shp and capsule gene homologs. Capsule size measurements determined by fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran exclusion allowed assignment of the system to the regulation of surface polysaccharide expression. We found that the SHP pheromone induced exopolysaccharide expression in R36A, an unencapsulated derivative of D39. In the encapsulated parent strain, overexpression of the Rgg system resulted in a mutant with increased capsule size. In line with previous studies showing that capsule expression is inversely associated with biofilm formation, we found that biofilm formed on lung epithelial cells was decreased in the overexpression strain and increased in an rgg deletion mutant. Although no significant differences were observed between D39 and the rgg deletion mutant in a mouse model of lung infection, in competitive assays, overexpression reduced fitness. This is the first study to reveal a quorum-sensing system in streptococci that regulates exopolysaccharide synthesis from a site distinct from the original capsule locus. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing regulates bacterial social behaviors by production, secretion, and sensing of pheromones. In this study, we characterized a new quorum-sensing system of the Rgg/SHP class in S. pneumoniae D39. The system was found to directly induce the expression of a single gene cluster comprising the gene for the SHP pheromone

  7. Optimal census by quorum sensing

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    Taillefumier, Thibaud

    Bacteria regulate their gene expression in response to changes in local cell density in a process called quorum sensing. To synchronize their gene-expression programs, these bacteria need to glean as much information as possible about local density. Our study is the first to physically model the flow of information in a quorum-sensing microbial community, wherein the internal regulator of the individual's response tracks the external cell density via an endogenously generated shared signal. Combining information theory and Lagrangian optimization, we find that quorum-sensing systems can improve their information capabilities by tuning circuit feedbacks. At the population level, external feedback adjusts the dynamic range of the shared input to individuals' detection channels. At the individual level, internal feedback adjusts the regulator's response time to dynamically balance output noise reduction and signal tracking ability. Our analysis suggests that achieving information benefit via feedback requires dedicated systems to control gene expression noise, such as sRNA-based regulation.

  8. Quorum sensing inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2006-01-01

    Many opportunistic pathogenic bacteria rely on quorum sensing (QS) circuits as central regulators of virulence expression. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, QS-regulated gene expression contributes to the formation and maintenance of biofilms and their tolerance to conventional antimicrobials and the host...... of plant pathogens in several models....... innate immune system. Therefore, QS is an obvious target for a novel class of antimicrobial drugs which would function to efficiently block reception of the cognate QS signals in vivo, and thereby be capable of inducing chemical attenuation of pathogens. As QS is not directly involved in processes...

  9. Expression of the las and rhl quorum-sensing systems in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa does not correlate with efflux pump expression or antimicrobial resistance.

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    Bratu, Simona; Gupta, Jyoti; Quale, John

    2006-12-01

    Quorum-sensing systems regulate expression of several virulence factors and may affect the MexAB-OprM efflux system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study investigated the relationship between two quorum-sensing systems, efflux pump MexAB-OprM expression and antimicrobial resistance in 33 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Expression of the quorum-sensing regulatory genes lasR and rhlR was assessed by real time RT-PCR. The autoinducer synthetase genes lasI and rhlI and the regulatory genes mexT and mexS were characterized by DNA sequencing. Production of pyocyanin and elastase in each of the isolates was also determined. While there was a significant correlation between expression of the quorum-sensing regulatory genes and production of pyocyanin and elastase, there was no correlation with expression of mexA or with antimicrobial resistance. There were no mutations in lasI, rhlI, mexT or mexS that correlated with quorum-sensing expression. Increased activity of two quorum-sensing systems in P. aeruginosa does not contribute to increased mexA expression or antimicrobial resistance.

  10. The effect of quorum sensing system for growth competitiveness on Shigella flexneri.

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    Xu, Ping; Yang, Jing; Lu, Li-lan; Feng, Er-ling; Wang, Heng-liang; Lu, Ying; Zhu, Li

    2015-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates the onset of bacterial social responses related to cell density. Comparison between the gene sequences of all components of QS system of Escherichia coli and Shigella strains, shows that the QS system is generally lost or mutated in Shigella. Since AI-2 is produced and processed by the lsr operon, we analyzed the potential function of the lsr operon. We first detected AI-2 in Shigella flexneri 2a strain 301 through the reporter bacteria Vibrio harveyi BB170, indicating that S. flexneri can produce AI-2. Then, the lsr operon of E. coli MG1655 was cloned into S. flexneri using the Golden Gate method. Colony counting experiments showed that the QS system recovery strain had growth advantage over the wild-type strain when they were mixed and cultured. The preliminary comparative proteomics analysis showed that the lsr operon could be expressed and the abundance of stress response proteins also changed when the QS system was introduced into S. flexneri.

  11. Collective behavior and quorum sensing in a system of communicating microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakov, German; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Balazs, Anna

    2009-11-01

    We report the results on collective motion of polymeric microcapsules in a fluid-filled microchannel. We consider the case where motion of the nanoparticle-filled microcapsules is controlled by adhesion at the channel's wall and hydrodynamic coupling between the capsules. Using the hybrid Lattice Boltzmann method for fluid dynamics and Lattice spring model for the micromechanics of elastic solid, we determined how the characteristics of the substrate, the polymeric shell, encapsulated fluid and the surrounding solution affect the capsule's velocity and ``gait'' of the capsule within the system. In numerical computations we find the conditions under which microcapsules communicating through modification of the microchannel surface by released nanoparticles exhibit collective motion, thereby mimicking behavior of the colony of living cells. In particular, we show that this system demonstrates a quorum sensing. That is, the capsules motion depends on population and behavior of neighboring groups of capsules. Finally, the design of a repair-and-go system is presented, in which we show that deposition of nanoparticles from moving microcapsules onto a damaged substrate can be used as an effective tool for selective repair of defects or cracks on the substrate.

  12. Quorum Sensing Controls Adaptive Immunity through the Regulation of Multiple CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Adrian G; Jackson, Simon A; Taylor, Corinda; Evans, Gary B; Salmond, George P C; Przybilski, Rita; Staals, Raymond H J; Fineran, Peter C

    2016-12-15

    Bacteria commonly exist in high cell density populations, making them prone to viral predation and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) through transformation and conjugation. To combat these invaders, bacteria possess an arsenal of defenses, such as CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity. Many bacterial populations coordinate their behavior as cell density increases, using quorum sensing (QS) signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that QS regulation results in increased expression of the type I-E, I-F, and III-A CRISPR-Cas systems in Serratia cells in high-density populations. Strains unable to communicate via QS were less effective at defending against invaders targeted by any of the three CRISPR-Cas systems. Additionally, the acquisition of immunity by the type I-E and I-F systems was impaired in the absence of QS signaling. We propose that bacteria can use chemical communication to modulate the balance between community-level defense requirements in high cell density populations and host fitness costs of basal CRISPR-Cas activity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Selection of Functional Quorum Sensing Systems by Lysogenic Bacteriophages in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Saucedo-Mora

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates the expression of virulence factors, some of which are used as public goods. Since their production is a cooperative behavior, it is susceptible to social cheating in which non-cooperative QS deficient mutants use the resources without investing in their production. Nevertheless, functional QS systems are abundant; hence, mechanisms regulating the amount of cheating should exist. Evidence that demonstrates a tight relationship between QS and the susceptibility of bacteria against the attack of lytic phages is increasing; nevertheless, the relationship between temperate phages and QS has been much less explored. Therefore, in this work, we studied the effects of having a functional QS system on the susceptibility to temperate bacteriophages and how this affects the bacterial and phage dynamics. We find that both experimentally and using mathematical models, that the lysogenic bacteriophages D3112 and JBD30 select QS-proficient P. aeruginosa phenotypes as compared to the QS-deficient mutants during competition experiments with mixed strain populations in vitro and in vivo in Galleria mellonella, in spite of the fact that both phages replicate better in the wild-type background. We show that this phenomenon restricts social cheating, and we propose that temperate phages may constitute an important selective pressure toward the conservation of bacterial QS.

  14. The response of Serratia marcescens JG to environmental changes by quorum sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu-Jing; Liu, Hui-Jun; Weng, Cai-Hong; Lai, Chun-Fen; Ai, Liu-Ying; Liu, Yu-Chen; Zhu, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Many bacterial cells are known to regulate their cooperative behaviors and physiological processes through a molecular mechanism called quorum sensing. Quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens JG is mediated by the synthesis of autoinducer 2 (AI-2) which is a furanosyl borate diester. In this study, the response of quorum sensing in S. marcescens JG to environment changes such as the initial pH, carbon sources and boracic acid was investigated by a bioreporter and real-time PCR analysis. The results show that glucose can affect AI-2 synthesis to the greatest extent, and 2.0 % glucose can stimulate S. marcescens JG to produce more AI-2, with a 3.5-fold increase in activity compared with control culture. Furthermore, the response of quorum sensing to changes in glucose concentration was performed by changing the amount of luxS RNA transcripts. A maximum of luxS transcription appeared during the exponential growth phase when the glucose concentration was 20.0 g/L. AI-2 production was also slightly impacted by the low initial pH. It is significant for us that the addition of boracic acid at microdosage (0.1-0.2 g/L) can also induce AI-2 synthesis, which probably demonstrated the feasible fact that the 4,5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione cyclizes by the addition of borate and the loss of water, is hydrated and is converted to the final AI-2 in S. marcescens JG.

  15. Identification and Characterization of a Second Quorum-Sensing System in Agrobacterium tumefaciens A6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yan, Chunlan; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread mechanism of bacterial communication in which individual cells produce and respond to small chemical signals. In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, an acylhomoserine lactone-dependent QS mechanism is known to regulate the replication and conjugation of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid. Most of the QS regulatory proteins are encoded within the Ti plasmid. Among them, TraI is the LuxI-type enzyme synthesizing the QS signal N-3-oxooctanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3OC8HSL), TraR is the LuxR-type transcriptional factor that recognizes 3OC8HSL, and TraM is an antiactivator that antagonizes TraR. Recently, we identified a TraM homolog encoded by the traM2 gene in the chromosomal background of A. tumefaciens A6. In this study, we further identified additional homologs (TraI2 and TraR2) of TraI and TraR in this strain. We showed that similar to TraI, TraI2 could predominantly synthesize the QS signal 3OC8HSL. We also showed that TraR2 could recognize 3OC8HSL and activate the tra box-containing promoters as efficiently as TraR. Further analysis showed that traM2, traI2, and traR2 are physically linked on a mobile genetic element that is not related to the Ti plasmid. These findings indicate that A. tumefaciens A6 carries a second QS system that may play a redundant role in the regulation of the replication and conjugation of the Ti plasmid. PMID:24464459

  16. Quorum sensing and microbial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-fan; Liu, Shi-yin; Liang, Zhi-bin; Lv, Ming-fa; Zhou, Jia-nuan; Zhang, Lian-hui

    2016-10-20

    Microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem of global concern, and the evolution and regulatory mechanisms of microbial drug resistance has become a hotspot of research in recent years. Recent studies showed that certain microbial resistance mechanisms are regulated by quorum sensing system. Quorum sensing is a ubiquitous cell-cell communication system in the microbial world, which associates with cell density. High-density microbial cells produce sufficient amount of small signal molecules, activating a range of downstream cellular processes including virulence and drug resistance mechanisms, which increases bacterial drug tolerance and causes infections on host organisms. In this review, the general mechanisms of microbial drug resistance and quorum-sensing systems are summarized with a focus on the association of quorum sensing and chemical signaling systems with microbial drug resistance mechanisms, including biofilm formation and drug efflux pump. The potential use of quorum quenching as a new strategy to control microbial resistance is also discussed.

  17. How to desynchronize quorum-sensing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we investigate how so-called quorum-sensing networks can be desynchronized. Such networks, which arise in many important application fields, such as systems biology, are characterized by the fact that direct communication between network nodes is superimposed to communication with a shared, environmental variable. In particular, we provide a new sufficient condition ensuring that the trajectories of these quorum-sensing networks diverge from their synchronous evolution. Then, we apply our result to study two applications.

  18. Transcriptome analysis revealed that a quorum sensing system regulates the transfer of the pAt megaplasmid in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhedbi-Hajri, Nadia; Yahiaoui, Noura; Mondy, Samuel; Hue, Nathalie; Pélissier, Franck; Faure, Denis; Dessaux, Yves

    2016-08-20

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain P4 is atypical, as the strain is not pathogenic and produces a for this species unusual quorum sensing signal, identified as N-(3-hydroxy-octanoyl)-homoserine lactone (3OH,C8-HSL). By sequence analysis and cloning, a functional luxI-like gene, named cinI, has been identified on the At plasmid of A. tumefaciens strain P4. Insertion mutagenesis in the cinI gene and transcriptome analyses permitted the identification of 32 cinI-regulated genes in this strain, most of them encoding proteins responsible for the conjugative transfer of pAtP4. Among these genes were the avhB genes that encode a type 4 secretion system (T4SS) involved in the formation of the conjugation apparatus, the tra genes that encode the DNA transfer and replication (Dtr) machinery and cinI and two luxR orthologs. These last two genes, cinR and cinX, exhibit an unusual organization, with the cinI gene surrounded by the two luxR orthologs. Conjugation experiments confirmed that the conjugative transfer of pAtP4 is regulated by 3OH,C8-HSL. Root colonization experiments indicated that the quorum sensing regulation of the conjugation of the pAtP4 does not confer a gain or a loss of fitness to the bacterial host in the tomato plant rhizosphere. This work is the first identification of the occurrence of a quorum sensing regulation of the pAt conjugation phenomenon in Agrobacterium.

  19. Quorum-Sensing Synchronization of Synthetic Toggle Switches: A Design Based on Monotone Dynamical Systems Theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeni V Nikolaev

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic constructs in biotechnology, biocomputing, and modern gene therapy interventions are often based on plasmids or transfected circuits which implement some form of "on-off" switch. For example, the expression of a protein used for therapeutic purposes might be triggered by the recognition of a specific combination of inducers (e.g., antigens, and memory of this event should be maintained across a cell population until a specific stimulus commands a coordinated shut-off. The robustness of such a design is hampered by molecular ("intrinsic" or environmental ("extrinsic" noise, which may lead to spontaneous changes of state in a subset of the population and is reflected in the bimodality of protein expression, as measured for example using flow cytometry. In this context, a "majority-vote" correction circuit, which brings deviant cells back into the required state, is highly desirable, and quorum-sensing has been suggested as a way for cells to broadcast their states to the population as a whole so as to facilitate consensus. In this paper, we propose what we believe is the first such a design that has mathematically guaranteed properties of stability and auto-correction under certain conditions. Our approach is guided by concepts and theory from the field of "monotone" dynamical systems developed by M. Hirsch, H. Smith, and others. We benchmark our design by comparing it to an existing design which has been the subject of experimental and theoretical studies, illustrating its superiority in stability and self-correction of synchronization errors. Our stability analysis, based on dynamical systems theory, guarantees global convergence to steady states, ruling out unpredictable ("chaotic" behaviors and even sustained oscillations in the limit of convergence. These results are valid no matter what are the values of parameters, and are based only on the wiring diagram. The theory is complemented by extensive computational bifurcation analysis

  20. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

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    Jaime Canovas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci

  1. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S.; Andersen, Paal S.; Gless, Bengt H.; Grzeskowiak, Piotr K.; Stegger, Marc; Damborg, Peter; Olsen, Christian A.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly

  2. Regular Wounding in a Natural System: Bacteria Associated With Reproductive Organs of Bedbugs and Their Quorum Sensing Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Otti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During wounding, tissues are disrupted so that bacteria can easily enter the host and trigger a host response. Both the host response and bacterial communication can occur through quorum sensing (QS and quorum sensing inhibition (QSI. Here, we characterize the effect of wounding on the host-associated bacterial community of the bed bug. This is a model system where the male is wounding the female during every mating. Whereas several aspects of the microbial involvement during wounding have been previously examined, it is not clear to what extent QS and QSI play a role. We find that the microbiome differs depending on mating and feeding status of female bedbugs and is specific to the location of isolation. Most organs of bedbugs harbor bacteria, which are capable of both QS and QSI signaling. By focusing on the prokaryotic quorum communication system, we provide a baseline for future research in this unique system. We advocate the bedbug system as suitable for studying the effects of bacteria on reproduction and for addressing prokaryote and eukaryote communication during wounding.

  3. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-05-16

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control.

  4. The cep quorum-sensing system of Burkholderia cepacia H111 controls biofilm formation and swarming motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, B.; Riedel, K.; Hentzer, Morten

    2001-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa often co-exist as mixed biofilms in the lungs of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, the isolation of random mini-Tn5 insertion mutants of B. cepacia H111 defective in biofilm formation on an abiotic surface is reported....... It is demonstrated that one of these mutants no longer produces N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) due to an inactivation of the cepR gene. cepR and the cepI AHL synthase gene together constitute the cep quorum-sensing system of B. cepacia. By using a gene replacement method, two defined mutants, H111-I and H111-R......, were constructed in which cepI and cepR, respectively, had been inactivated. These mutants were used to demonstrate that biofilm formation by B. cepacia H111 requires a functional cep quorum-sensing system. A detailed quantitative analysis of the biofilm structures formed by wild-type and mutant...

  5. IMPACT OF BACTERIAL QUORUM SENSING SYSTEM ON CHANGES OF ORGANOLEPTIC MARKERS OF STORAGE CABBAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Myszka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of phenotypes of vegetable-associated bacteria can be mediated through the production of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs. This knowledge is essential for successful control of bacterial diseases of vegetable. The purpose of these investigations was to define the AHL patterns of gram-negative bacteria presented in storage cabbage by LC/MS technique. The phenomenon of regulating the pectinolytic activity and the exopolysaccharide (EPS production by AHLs that are associated with microbial spoilage of cabbage was also examined. Among 100 strains isolated from storage cabbage, 47 isolates produced AHLs. The results of the 16S rDNA sequence analysis indicated that selected microflora was highly closely related to Pantoea agglomerans, Rahnella aquatilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas syringae, and Pseudomonas cedrina (approximately 98%-99% confidence. The chemical nature of AHLs produced by selected microflora differ from species to species. The pattern of AHLs of Ps. cedrina consisting of C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C10-HSL, and 3-hydroxy-C14-HSL, has not been previously reported. The present study demonstrates that bacterial spoilage of storage cabbage is influenced by quorum sensing. Application of furanone C-30 that acts as quorum sensing inhibitor, caused the significant reduction in the production of EPS and pectinolytic enzymes by examined bacteria.

  6. Escherichia coli O157:H7 lacking qseBC encoded quorum sensing system outcompetes the parent strain in colonization of cattle intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The qseBC encoded quorum-sensing system (QS) regulates motility of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 in response to bacterial autoinducer-3 (AI-3) and mammalian stress hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE). The qseC gene encodes a sensory kinase that post-autophosphorylati...

  7. Identification and characterization of a GDSL esterase gene located proximal to the swr quorum-sensing system of Serratia liquefaciens MG1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K.; Talker-Huiber, D.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2003-01-01

    Serratia liquefaciens MG1 employs the swr quorum-sensing system to control various functions, including production of extracellular enzymes and swarming motility. Here we report the sequencing of the swr flanking DNA regions. We identified a gene upstream of swrR and transcribed in the same...

  8. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  9. Quorum Sensing Regulation in Aeromonas hydrophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Christian; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We present detailed results on the C4-HSL-mediated quorum sensing (QS) regulatory system of the opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila. This bacterium contains a particularly simple QS system that allows for a detailed modeling of kinetics. In a model system (i.e., the Escheri......We present detailed results on the C4-HSL-mediated quorum sensing (QS) regulatory system of the opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila. This bacterium contains a particularly simple QS system that allows for a detailed modeling of kinetics. In a model system (i...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgR Represses the Rhl Quorum-Sensing System in a Biofilm-Specific Manner▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morici, Lisa A.; Carterson, Alexander J.; Wagner, Victoria E.; Frisk, Anders; Schurr, Jill R.; zu Bentrup, Kerstin Höner; Hassett, Daniel J.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Sauer, Karin; Schurr, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    AlgR controls numerous virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including alginate, hydrogen cyanide production, and type IV pilus-mediated twitching motility. In this study, the role of AlgR in biofilms was examined in continuous-flow and static biofilm assays. Strain PSL317 (ΔalgR) produced one-third the biofilm biomass of wild-type strain PAO1. Complementation with algR, but not fimTU-pilVWXY1Y2E, restored PSL317 to the wild-type biofilm phenotype. Comparisons of the transcriptional profiles of biofilm-grown PAO1 and PSL317 revealed that a number of quorum-sensing genes were upregulated in the algR deletion strain. Measurement of rhlA::lacZ and rhlI::lacZ promoter fusions confirmed the transcriptional profiling data when PSL317 was grown as a biofilm, but not planktonically. Increased amounts of rhamnolipids and N-butyryl homoserine lactone were detected in the biofilm effluent but not the planktonic supernatants of the algR mutant. Additionally, AlgR specifically bound to the rhlA and rhlI promoters in mobility shift assays. Moreover, PAO1 containing a chromosomal mutated AlgR binding site in its rhlI promoter formed biofilms and produced increased amounts of rhamnolipids similarly to the algR deletion strain. These observations indicate that AlgR specifically represses the Rhl quorum-sensing system during biofilm growth and that such repression is necessary for normal biofilm development. These data also suggest that AlgR may control transcription in a contact-dependent or biofilm-specific manner. PMID:17766417

  11. Quorum sensing in gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Høiby, N.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria can communicate with each other by means of signal molecules to coordinate the behavior of the entire community, and the mechanism is referred to as quorum sensing (QS). Signal systems enable bacteria to sense the size of their densities by monitoring the concentration of the signal...... molecules. Among Gram-negative bacteria N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-dependent quorum sensing systems are particularly widespread. These systems are used to coordinate expression of phenotypes that are fundamental to the interaction of bacteria with each other and with their environment...

  12. Metagenomic approaches to understanding phylogenetic diversity in quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Nobutada

    2014-04-01

    Quorum sensing, a form of cell-cell communication among bacteria, allows bacteria to synchronize their behaviors at the population level in order to control behaviors such as luminescence, biofilm formation, signal turnover, pigment production, antibiotics production, swarming, and virulence. A better understanding of quorum-sensing systems will provide us with greater insight into the complex interaction mechanisms used widely in the Bacteria and even the Archaea domain in the environment. Metagenomics, the use of culture-independent sequencing to study the genomic material of microorganisms, has the potential to provide direct information about the quorum-sensing systems in uncultured bacteria. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of quorum sensing focused on phylogenetic diversity, and presents examples of studies that have used metagenomic techniques. Future technologies potentially related to quorum-sensing systems are also discussed.

  13. Quorum sensing and density-dependent dispersal in an aquatic model system.

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    Simon Fellous

    Full Text Available Many organisms use cues to decide whether to disperse or not, especially those related to the composition of their environment. Dispersal hence sometimes depends on population density, which can be important for the dynamics and evolution of sub-divided populations. But very little is known about the factors that organisms use to inform their dispersal decision. We investigated the cues underlying density-dependent dispersal in inter-connected microcosms of the freshwater protozoan Paramecium caudatum. In two experiments, we manipulated (i the number of cells per microcosm and (ii the origin of their culture medium (supernatant from high- or low-density populations. We found a negative relationship between population density and rates of dispersal, suggesting the use of physical cues. There was no significant effect of culture medium origin on dispersal and thus no support for chemical cues usage. These results suggest that the perception of density - and as a result, the decision to disperse - in this organism can be based on physical factors. This type of quorum sensing may be an adaptation optimizing small scale monitoring of the environment and swarm formation in open water.

  14. The Evolution of Quorum Sensing as a Mechanism to Infer Kinship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Jonas; Schoech, Armin P; Foster, Kevin R; Mitri, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Bacteria regulate many phenotypes via quorum sensing systems. Quorum sensing is typically thought to evolve because the regulated cooperative phenotypes are only beneficial at certain cell densities. However, quorum sensing systems are also threatened by non-cooperative "cheaters" that may exploit quorum-sensing regulated cooperation, which begs the question of how quorum sensing systems are maintained in nature. Here we study the evolution of quorum sensing using an individual-based model that captures the natural ecology and population structuring of microbial communities. We first recapitulate the two existing observations on quorum sensing evolution: density-dependent benefits favor quorum sensing but competition and cheating will destabilize it. We then model quorum sensing in a dense community like a biofilm, which reveals a novel benefit to quorum sensing that is intrinsically evolutionarily stable. In these communities, competing microbial genotypes gradually segregate over time leading to positive correlation between density and genetic similarity between neighboring cells (relatedness). This enables quorum sensing to track genetic relatedness and ensures that costly cooperative traits are only activated once a cell is safely surrounded by clonemates. We hypothesize that under similar natural conditions, the benefits of quorum sensing will not result from an assessment of density but from the ability to infer kinship.

  15. Quorum sensing in nitrogen-fixing rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan E; Marketon, Melanie M

    2003-12-01

    Members of the rhizobia are distinguished for their ability to establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with leguminous plants. While many details of this relationship remain a mystery, much effort has gone into elucidating the mechanisms governing bacterium-host recognition and the events leading to symbiosis. Several signal molecules, including plant-produced flavonoids and bacterially produced nodulation factors and exopolysaccharides, are known to function in the molecular conversation between the host and the symbiont. Work by several laboratories has shown that an additional mode of regulation, quorum sensing, intercedes in the signal exchange process and perhaps plays a major role in preparing and coordinating the nitrogen-fixing rhizobia during the establishment of the symbiosis. Rhizobium leguminosarum, for example, carries a multitiered quorum-sensing system that represents one of the most complex regulatory networks identified for this form of gene regulation. This review focuses on the recent stream of information regarding quorum sensing in the nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Seminal work on the quorum-sensing systems of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae, R. etli, Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum is presented and discussed. The latest work shows that quorum sensing can be linked to various symbiotic phenomena including nodulation efficiency, symbiosome development, exopolysaccharide production, and nitrogen fixation, all of which are important for the establishment of a successful symbiosis. Many questions remain to be answered, but the knowledge obtained so far provides a firm foundation for future studies on the role of quorum-sensing mediated gene regulation in host-bacterium interactions.

  16. Quadruple quorum-sensing inputs control Vibrio cholerae virulence and maintain system robustness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Jung

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use quorum sensing (QS for cell-cell communication to carry out group behaviors. This intercellular signaling process relies on cell density-dependent production and detection of chemical signals called autoinducers (AIs. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, detects two AIs, CAI-1 and AI-2, with two histidine kinases, CqsS and LuxQ, respectively, to control biofilm formation and virulence factor production. At low cell density, these two signal receptors function in parallel to activate the key regulator LuxO, which is essential for virulence of this pathogen. At high cell density, binding of AIs to their respective receptors leads to deactivation of LuxO and repression of virulence factor production. However, mutants lacking CqsS and LuxQ maintain a normal LuxO activation level and remain virulent, suggesting that LuxO is activated by additional, unidentified signaling pathways. Here we show that two other histidine kinases, CqsR (formerly known as VC1831 and VpsS, act upstream in the central QS circuit of V. cholerae to activate LuxO. V. cholerae strains expressing any one of these four receptors are QS proficient and capable of colonizing animal hosts. In contrast, mutants lacking all four receptors are phenotypically identical to LuxO-defective mutants. Importantly, these four functionally redundant receptors act together to prevent premature induction of a QS response caused by signal perturbations. We suggest that the V. cholerae QS circuit is composed of quadruple sensory inputs and has evolved to be refractory to sporadic AI level perturbations.

  17. Farnesol and Candida albicans: quorum sensing or not quorum sensing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, B.P.; Levy, N.; Meijler, M.M.; Jabra-Rizk, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) molecules function within communities of single-cell organisms to allow concerted behavior in response to changing conditions, and certain criteria have been established to determine whether a particular molecule is quorum sensing or not. Farnesol has been identified as a

  18. Quorum sensing in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Kate; Charlesworth, James C; LeBard, Rebecca; Visscher, Pieter T; Burns, Brendan P

    2013-01-29

    Microbial communication, particularly that of quorum sensing, plays an important role in regulating gene expression in a range of organisms. Although this phenomenon has been well studied in relation to, for example, virulence gene regulation, the focus of this article is to review our understanding of the role of microbial communication in extreme environments. Cell signaling regulates many important microbial processes and may play a pivotal role in driving microbial functional diversity and ultimately ecosystem function in extreme environments. Several recent studies have characterized cell signaling in modern analogs to early Earth communities (microbial mats), and characterization of cell signaling systems in these communities may provide unique insights in understanding the microbial interactions involved in function and survival in extreme environments. Cell signaling is a fundamental process that may have co-evolved with communities and environmental conditions on the early Earth. Without cell signaling, evolutionary pressures may have even resulted in the extinction rather than evolution of certain microbial groups. One of the biggest challenges in extremophile biology is understanding how and why some microbial functional groups are located where logically they would not be expected to survive, and tightly regulated communication may be key. Finally, quorum sensing has been recently identified for the first time in archaea, and thus communication at multiple levels (potentially even inter-domain) may be fundamental in extreme environments.

  19. Quorum Sensing in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Kate; Charlesworth, James C.; LeBard, Rebecca; Visscher, Pieter T.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communication, particularly that of quorum sensing, plays an important role in regulating gene expression in a range of organisms. Although this phenomenon has been well studied in relation to, for example, virulence gene regulation, the focus of this article is to review our understanding of the role of microbial communication in extreme environments. Cell signaling regulates many important microbial processes and may play a pivotal role in driving microbial functional diversity and ultimately ecosystem function in extreme environments. Several recent studies have characterized cell signaling in modern analogs to early Earth communities (microbial mats), and characterization of cell signaling systems in these communities may provide unique insights in understanding the microbial interactions involved in function and survival in extreme environments. Cell signaling is a fundamental process that may have co-evolved with communities and environmental conditions on the early Earth. Without cell signaling, evolutionary pressures may have even resulted in the extinction rather than evolution of certain microbial groups. One of the biggest challenges in extremophile biology is understanding how and why some microbial functional groups are located where logically they would not be expected to survive, and tightly regulated communication may be key. Finally, quorum sensing has been recently identified for the first time in archaea, and thus communication at multiple levels (potentially even inter-domain) may be fundamental in extreme environments. PMID:25371335

  20. Quorum sensing inhibitors disable bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    defence systems in particular innate immunity. In the biofilm mode, bacteria use cell to cell communication termed quorum-sensing (QS) to coordinate expression of virulence, tolerance towards a number of antimicrobial agents and shielding against the host defence system. Chemical biology approaches may...

  1. Cis-2-dodecenoic acid signal modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing systems and T3SS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yinyue; Boon, Calvin; Chen, Shaohua; Lim, Amy; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2013-10-18

    Cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF) is well known for its important functions in intraspecies signaling in Burkholderia cenocepacia. Previous work has also established an important role of BDSF in interspecies and inter-kingdom communications. It was identified that BDSF modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, how BDSF interferes with virulence of P. aeruginosa is still not clear. We report here that BDSF mediates the cross-talk between B. cenocepacia and P. aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing (QS) systems and type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. aeruginosa. Bioassay results revealed that exogenous addition of BDSF not only reduced the transcriptional expression of the regulator encoding gene of QS systems, i.e., lasR, pqsR, and rhlR, but also simultaneously decreased the production of QS signals including 3-oxo-C12-HSL, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and C4-HSL, consequently resulting in the down-regulation of biofilm formation and virulence factor production of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, BDSF and some of its derivatives are also capable of inhibiting T3SS of P. aeruginosa at a micromolar level. Treatment with BDSF obviously reduced the virulence of P. aeruginosa in both HeLa cell and zebrafish infection models. These results depict that BDSF modulates virulence of P. aeruginosa through interference with QS systems and T3SS.

  2. Social Evolution Selects for Redundancy in Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Tov, Eran; Bendori, Shira Omer; Valastyan, Julie; Ke, Xiaobo; Pollak, Shaul; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Bassler, Bonnie L; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of chemical communication that bacteria use to monitor cell density and coordinate cooperative behaviors. Quorum sensing relies on extracellular signal molecules and cognate receptor pairs. While a single quorum-sensing system is sufficient to probe cell density, bacteria frequently use multiple quorum-sensing systems to regulate the same cooperative behaviors. The potential benefits of these redundant network structures are not clear. Here, we combine modeling and experimental analyses of the Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing networks to show that accumulation of multiple quorum-sensing systems may be driven by a facultative cheating mechanism. We demonstrate that a strain that has acquired an additional quorum-sensing system can exploit its ancestor that possesses one fewer system, but nonetheless, resume full cooperation with its kin when it is fixed in the population. We identify the molecular network design criteria required for this advantage. Our results suggest that increased complexity in bacterial social signaling circuits can evolve without providing an adaptive advantage in a clonal population.

  3. A mathematical model and quantitative comparison of the small RNA circuit in the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, G A M; Vasquez, F Guevara; Keener, J P

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria regulate their gene expression based on the local cell-population density. The quorum sensing systems of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae are comprised of a phosphorelay cascade coupled to a small RNA (sRNA) circuit. The sRNA circuit contains multiple quorum regulated small RNA (Qrr) that regulate expression of the homologous master transcriptional regulators LuxR (in V. harveyi) and HapR (in V. cholerae). Their quorum sensing systems are topologically similar and homologous thereby making it difficult to understand why repression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. In this work we formulate and parameterize a novel mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuit. We parameterize the model by fitting it to a variety of empirical data from both species. We show that we can distinguish all of the parameters and that the parameterizations (one for each species) are robust to errors in the data. We then use our model to propose some experiments to identify and explain kinetic differences between the species. We find that V. cholerae Qrr are more abundant and more sensitive to changes in LuxO than V. harveyi Qrr and argue that this is why expression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. (paper)

  4. A mathematical model and quantitative comparison of the small RNA circuit in the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. A. M.; Guevara Vasquez, F.; Keener, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria regulate their gene expression based on the local cell-population density. The quorum sensing systems of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae are comprised of a phosphorelay cascade coupled to a small RNA (sRNA) circuit. The sRNA circuit contains multiple quorum regulated small RNA (Qrr) that regulate expression of the homologous master transcriptional regulators LuxR (in V. harveyi) and HapR (in V. cholerae). Their quorum sensing systems are topologically similar and homologous thereby making it difficult to understand why repression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. In this work we formulate and parameterize a novel mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuit. We parameterize the model by fitting it to a variety of empirical data from both species. We show that we can distinguish all of the parameters and that the parameterizations (one for each species) are robust to errors in the data. We then use our model to propose some experiments to identify and explain kinetic differences between the species. We find that V. cholerae Qrr are more abundant and more sensitive to changes in LuxO than V. harveyi Qrr and argue that this is why expression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr.

  5. Quorum sensing and policing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa social cheaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meizhen; Schaefer, Amy L; Dandekar, Ajai A; Greenberg, E Peter

    2015-02-17

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses a quorum sensing signal cascade to activate expression of dozens of genes when sufficient population densities have been reached. Quorum sensing controls production of several key virulence factors, including secreted proteases such as elastase. Cooperating groups of bacteria growing on protein are susceptible to social cheating by quorum-sensing defective mutants. A possible way to restrict cheater emergence is by policing where cooperators produce costly goods to sanction or punish cheats. The P. aeruginosa LasR-LasI quorum sensing system controls genes including those encoding proteases and also those encoding a second quorum-sensing system, the RhlR-RhlI system, which controls numerous genes including those for cyanide production. By using RhlR quorum sensing mutants and cyanide synthesis mutants, we show that cyanide production is costly and cyanide-producing cooperators use cyanide to punish LasR-null social cheaters. Cooperators are less susceptible to cyanide than are LasR mutants. These experiments demonstrate policing in P. aeruginosa, provide a mechanistic understanding of policing, and show policing involves the cascade organization of the two quorum sensing systems in this bacterium.

  6. Screening for Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors (QSI) by Use of a Novel Genetic System, the QSI Selector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Skindersoe, Mette Elena; Hentzer, Morten; Kristoffersen, Peter; Köte, Manuela; Nielsen, John; Eberl, Leo; Givskov, Michael

    2005-01-01

    With the widespread appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is an increasing demand for novel strategies to control infectious diseases. Furthermore, it has become apparent that the bacterial life style also contributes significantly to this problem. Bacteria living in the biofilm mode of growth tolerate conventional antimicrobial treatments. The discovery that many bacteria use quorum-sensing (QS) systems to coordinate virulence and biofilm development has pointed out a new, promising target for antimicrobial drugs. We constructed a collection of screening systems, QS inhibitor (QSI) selectors, which enabled us to identify a number of novel QSIs among natural and synthetic compound libraries. The two most active were garlic extract and 4-nitro-pyridine-N-oxide (4-NPO). GeneChip-based transcriptome analysis revealed that garlic extract and 4-NPO had specificity for QS-controlled virulence genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These two QSIs also significantly reduced P. aeruginosa biofilm tolerance to tobramycin treatment as well as virulence in a Caenorhabditis elegans pathogenesis model. PMID:15716452

  7. Rhodococcus erythropolis and Its γ-Lactone Catabolic Pathway: An Unusual Biocontrol System That Disrupts Pathogen Quorum Sensing Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Latour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus erythropolis is an environmental Gram-positive Actinobacterium with a versatile metabolism involved in various bioconversions and degradations. Rhodococci are best known for their great potential in numerous decontamination and industrial processes. However, they can also prevent plant disease by disrupting quorum sensing-based communication of Gram-negative soft-rot bacteria, by degrading N-acyl-homoserine lactone signaling molecules. Such biocontrol activity results partly from the action of the γ-lactone catabolic pathway. This pathway is responsible for cleaving the lactone bond of a wide range of compounds comprising a γ-butyrolactone ring coupled to an alkyl or acyl chain. The aliphatic products of this hydrolysis are then activated and enter fatty acid metabolism. This short pathway is controlled by the presence of the γ-lactone, presumably sensed by a TetR-like transcriptional regulator, rather than the presence of the pathogen or the plant-host in the environment of the Rhodococci. Both the density and biocontrol activity of R. erythropolis may be boosted in crop systems. Treatment with a cheap γ-lactone stimulator, for example, the food flavoring γ-caprolactone, induces the activity in the biocontrol agent, R. erythropolis, of the pathway degrading signaling molecules; such treatments thus promote plant protection.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing as a potential antimicrobial target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger S.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has two complete quorum-sensing systems. Both of these systems have been shown to be important for Pseudomonas virulence in multiple models of infection. Thus, these systems provide unique targets for novel antimicrobial drugs. PMID:14617745

  9. Quorum Sensing Inhibition, Relevance to Periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Yada, Sudheer; Kamalesh, B; Sonwane, Siddharth; Guptha, Indra; Swetha, R K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing helps bacteria to communicate with each other and in coordinating their behavior. Many diseases of human beings, plants, and animals are mediated by quorum sensing. Various approaches are being tried to inhibit this communication to control the diseases caused by bacteria. Periodontal pathogens also communicate through quorum sensing and new approaches to treat periodontal disease using quorum sensing inhibition need to explored.

  10. Quorum sensing inhibition, relevance to periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Sudheer; Kamalesh, B; Sonwane, Siddharth; Guptha, Indra; Swetha, R K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing helps bacteria to communicate with each other and in coordinating their behavior. Many diseases of human beings, plants, and animals are mediated by quorum sensing. Various approaches are being tried to inhibit this communication to control the diseases caused by bacteria. Periodontal pathogens also communicate through quorum sensing and new approaches to treat periodontal disease using quorum sensing inhibition need to explored.

  11. The cep quorum-sensing system of Burkholderia cepacia H111 controls biofilm formation and swarming motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, B.; Riedel, K.; Hentzer, Morten

    2001-01-01

    to rapidly colonize appropriate substrata. Evidence is provided that swarming motility of B. cepacia is quorum-sensing-regulated, possibly through the control of biosurfactant production. Complementation of the cepR mutant H111-R with different biosurfactants restored swarming motility while biofilm...

  12. Quorum sensing by peptide pheromones and two-component signal-transduction systems in Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleerebezem, Michiel; Quadri, Luis E.N.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de

    1997-01-01

    Cell-density-dependent gene expression appears to be widely spread in bacteria. This quorum-sensing phenomenon has been well established in Gram-negative bacteria, where N-acyl homoserine lactones are the diffusible communication molecules that modulate cell-density-dependent phenotypes. Similarly,

  13. Size of quorum sensing communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Sams, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Ensembles of bacteria are able to coordinate their phenotypic behavior in accordance with the size, density, and growth state of the ensemble. This is achieved through production and exchange of diffusible signal molecules in a cell–cell regulatory system termed quorum sensing. In the generic...... quorum sensor a positive feedback in the production of signal molecules defines the conditions at which the collective behavior switches on. In spite of its conceptual simplicity, a proper measure of biofilm colony ‘‘size’’ appears to be lacking. We establish that the cell density multiplied...... by a geometric factor which incorporates the boundary conditions constitutes an appropriate size measure. The geometric factor is the square of the radius for a spherical colony or a hemisphere attached to a reflecting surface. If surrounded by a rapidly exchanged medium, the geometric factor is divided by three...

  14. The Agr Quorum Sensing System Represses Persister Formation through Regulation of Phenol Soluble Modulins in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has become an increasing threat to public health. While the Agr quorum sensing (QS system is a master regulator of S. aureus virulence, its dysfunction has been frequently reported to promote bacteremia and mortality in clinical infections. Here we show that the Agr system is involved in persister formation in S. aureus. Mutation of either agrCA or agrD but not RNAIII resulted in increased persister formation of stationary phase cultures. RNA-seq analysis showed that in stationary phase AgrCA/AgrD and RNAIII mutants showed consistent up-regulation of virulence associated genes (lip and splE, etc. and down-regulation of metabolism genes (bioA and nanK, etc.. Meanwhile, though knockout of agrCA or agrD strongly repressed expression of phenol soluble modulin encoding genes psmα1-4, psmβ1-2 and phenol soluble modulins (PSM transporter encoding genes in the pmt operon, mutation of RNAIII enhanced expression of the genes. We further found that knockout of psmα1-4 or psmβ1-2 augmented persister formation and that co-overexpression of PSMαs and PSMβs reversed the effects of AgrCA mutation on persister formation. We also detected the effects on persister formation by mutations of metabolism genes (arcA, hutU, narG, nanK, etc. that are potentially regulated by Agr system. It was found that deletion of the ManNAc kinase encoding gene nanK decreased persister formation. Taken together, these results shed new light on the PSM dependent regulatory role of Agr system in persister formation and may have implications for clinical treatment of MRSA persistent infections.

  15. The CpAL Quorum Sensing System Regulates Production of Hemolysins CPA and PFO To Build Clostridium perfringens Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, Joshua R.; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains produce severe diseases, including myonecrosis and enteritis necroticans, in humans and animals. Diseases are mediated by the production of potent toxins that often damage the site of infection, e.g., skin epithelium during myonecrosis. In planktonic cultures, the regulation of important toxins, such as CPA, CPB, and PFO, is controlled by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. Strains also encode a functional LuxS/AI-2 system. Although C. perfringens strains form biofilm-like structures, the regulation of biofilm formation is poorly understood. Therefore, our studies investigated the role of CpAL and LuxS/AI-2 QS systems and of QS-regulated factors in controlling the formation of biofilms. We first demonstrate that biofilm production by reference strains differs depending on the culture medium. Increased biomass correlated with the presence of extracellular DNA in the supernatant, which was released by lysis of a fraction of the biofilm population and planktonic cells. Whereas ΔagrB mutant strains were not able to produce biofilms, a ΔluxS mutant produced wild-type levels. The transcript levels of CpAL-regulated cpa and pfoA genes, but not cpb, were upregulated in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Accordingly, Δcpa and ΔpfoA mutants, in type A (S13) or type C (CN3685) backgrounds, were unable to produce biofilms, whereas CN3685Δcpb made wild-type levels. Biofilm formation was restored in complemented Δcpa/cpa and ΔpfoA/pfoA strains. Confocal microscopy studies further detected CPA partially colocalizing with eDNA on the biofilm structure. Thus, CpAL regulates biofilm formation in C. perfringens by increasing levels of certain toxins required to build biofilms. PMID:25824838

  16. A Novel Pheromone Quorum-Sensing System Controls the Development of Natural Competence in Streptococcus thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Boutry, Céline; de Frahan, Marie Henry; Delplace, Brigitte; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Hols, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    In streptococcal species, the key step of competence development is the transcriptional induction of comX, which encodes the alternative sigma factor σX, which positively regulates genes necessary for DNA transformation. In Streptococcus species belonging to the mitis and mutans groups, induction of comX relies on the activation of a three-component system consisting of a secreted pheromone, a histidine kinase, and a response regulator. In Streptococcus thermophilus, a species belonging to the salivarius group, the oligopeptide transporter Ami is essential for comX expression under competence-inducing conditions. This suggests a different regulation pathway of competence based on the production and reimportation of a signal peptide. The objective of our work was to identify the main actors involved in the early steps of comX induction in S. thermophilus LMD-9. Using a transcriptomic approach, four highly induced early competence operons were identified. Among them, we found a Rgg-like regulator (Ster_0316) associated with a nonannotated gene encoding a 24-amino-acid hydrophobic peptide (Shp0316). Through genetic deletions, we showed that these two genes are essential for comX induction. Moreover, addition to the medium of synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal part of Shp0316 restored comX induction and transformation of a Shp0316-deficient strain. These peptides also induced competence in S. thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius strains that are poorly transformable or not transformable. Altogether, our results show that Ster_0316 and Shp0316, renamed ComRS, are the two members of a novel quorum-sensing system responsible for comX induction in species from the salivarius group, which differs from the classical phosphorelay three-component system identified previously in streptococci. PMID:20023010

  17. A novel pheromone quorum-sensing system controls the development of natural competence in Streptococcus thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Boutry, Céline; de Frahan, Marie Henry; Delplace, Brigitte; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Hols, Pascal

    2010-03-01

    In streptococcal species, the key step of competence development is the transcriptional induction of comX, which encodes the alternative sigma factor sigma(X), which positively regulates genes necessary for DNA transformation. In Streptococcus species belonging to the mitis and mutans groups, induction of comX relies on the activation of a three-component system consisting of a secreted pheromone, a histidine kinase, and a response regulator. In Streptococcus thermophilus, a species belonging to the salivarius group, the oligopeptide transporter Ami is essential for comX expression under competence-inducing conditions. This suggests a different regulation pathway of competence based on the production and reimportation of a signal peptide. The objective of our work was to identify the main actors involved in the early steps of comX induction in S. thermophilus LMD-9. Using a transcriptomic approach, four highly induced early competence operons were identified. Among them, we found a Rgg-like regulator (Ster_0316) associated with a nonannotated gene encoding a 24-amino-acid hydrophobic peptide (Shp0316). Through genetic deletions, we showed that these two genes are essential for comX induction. Moreover, addition to the medium of synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal part of Shp0316 restored comX induction and transformation of a Shp0316-deficient strain. These peptides also induced competence in S. thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius strains that are poorly transformable or not transformable. Altogether, our results show that Ster_0316 and Shp0316, renamed ComRS, are the two members of a novel quorum-sensing system responsible for comX induction in species from the salivarius group, which differs from the classical phosphorelay three-component system identified previously in streptococci.

  18. Global Analysis of Type Three Secretion System and Quorum Sensing Inhibition of Pseudomonas savastanoi by Polyphenols Extracts from Vegetable Residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Biancalani

    Full Text Available Protection of plants against bacterial diseases still mainly relies on the use of chemical pesticides, which in Europe correspond essentially to copper-based compounds. However, recently plant diseases control is oriented towards a rational use of molecules and extracts, generally with natural origin, with lower intrinsic toxicity and a reduced negative environmental impact. In this work, polyphenolic extracts from vegetable no food/feed residues of typical Mediterranean crops, as Olea europaea, Cynara scolymus, and Vitis vinifera were obtained and their inhibitory activity on the Type Three Secretion System (TTSS and the Quorum Sensing (QS of the Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. nerii strain Psn23 was assessed. Extract from green tea (Camellia sinensis was used as a positive control. Collectively, the data obtained through gfp-promoter fusion system and real-time PCR show that all the polyphenolic extracts here studied have a high inhibitory activity on both the TTSS and QS of Psn23, without any depressing effect on bacterial viability. Extracts from green tea and grape seeds were shown to be the most active. Such activity was confirmed in planta by a strong reduction in the ability of Psn23 to develop hyperplastic galls on explants from adult oleander plants, as well as to elicit hypersensitive response on tobacco. By using a newly developed Congo red assay and an ELISA test, we demonstrated that the TTSS-targeted activity of these polyphenolic extracts also affects the TTSS pilus assembly. In consideration of the potential application of polyphenolic extracts in plant protection, the absence of any toxicity of these polyphenolic compounds was also assessed. A widely and evolutionary conserved molecular target such as Ca2+-ATPase, essential for the survival of any living organism, was used for the toxicity assessment.

  19. Unsaturated Fatty Acids Affect Quorum Sensing Communication System and Inhibit Motility and Biofilm Formation of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Marion; Alexandre, Stéphane; Luizet, Jean-Baptiste; Skogman, Malena; Jouenne, Thierry; Salcedo, Suzana P.; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2018-01-01

    The increasing threat of Acinetobacter baumannii as a nosocomial pathogen is mainly due to the occurrence of multidrug-resistant strains that are associated with the real problem of its eradication from hospital wards. The particular ability of this pathogen to form biofilms contributes to its persistence, increases antibiotic resistance, and promotes persistent/device-related infections. We previously demonstrated that virstatin, which is a small organic compound known to decrease virulence of Vibrio cholera via an inhibition of T4-pili expression, displayed very promising activity to prevent A. baumannii biofilm development. Here, we examined the antibiofilm activity of mono-unsaturated chain fatty acids, palmitoleic (PoA), and myristoleic (MoA) acids, presenting similar action on V. cholerae virulence. We demonstrated that PoA and MoA (at 0.02 mg/mL) were able to decrease A. baumannii ATCC 17978 biofilm formation up to 38% and 24%, respectively, presented a biofilm dispersing effect and drastically reduced motility. We highlighted that these fatty acids decreased the expression of the regulator abaR from the LuxIR-type quorum sensing (QS) communication system AbaIR and consequently reduced the N-acyl-homoserine lactone production (AHL). This effect can be countered by addition of exogenous AHLs. Besides, fatty acids may have additional non-targeted effects, independent from QS. Atomic force microscopy experiments probed indeed that PoA and MoA could also act on the initial adhesion process in modifying the material interface properties. Evaluation of fatty acids effect on 22 clinical isolates showed a strain-dependent antibiofilm activity, which was not correlated to hydrophobicity or pellicle formation ability of the tested strains, and suggested a real diversity in cell-to-cell communication systems involved in A. baumannii biofilm formation. PMID:29320462

  20. Electronic implementation of a repressilator with quorum sensing feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward H Hellen

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamics of a synthetic genetic repressilator with quorum sensing feedback. In a basic genetic ring oscillator network in which three genes inhibit each other in unidirectional manner, an additional quorum sensing feedback loop stimulates the activity of a chosen gene providing competition between inhibitory and stimulatory activities localized in that gene. Numerical simulations show several interesting dynamics, multi-stability of limit cycle with stable steady-state, multi-stability of different stable steady-states, limit cycle with period-doubling and reverse period-doubling, and infinite period bifurcation transitions for both increasing and decreasing strength of quorum sensing feedback. We design an electronic analog of the repressilator with quorum sensing feedback and reproduce, in experiment, the numerically predicted dynamical features of the system. Noise amplification near infinite period bifurcation is also observed. An important feature of the electronic design is the accessibility and control of the important system parameters.

  1. Cell density- and quorum sensing-dependent expression of type VI secretion system 2 in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vibrio parahaemolyticus AphA and OpaR are the two master quorum sensing (QS regulators that are abundantly expressed at low cell density (LCD and high cell density (HCD, respectively, with a feature of reciprocally gradient production of them with transition between LCD and HCD. The type VI secretion system 2 (T6SS2 gene cluster can be assigned into three putative operons, namely VPA1027-1024, VPA1043-1028, and VPA1044-1046. T6SS2 contributes to adhesion of V. parahaemolyticus to host cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: OpaR box-like sequences were found within the upstream promoter regions of all the above three operons, while none of AphA box-like elements could be identified for them. The subsequent primer extension, LacZ fusion, electrophoretic mobility shift, and DNase I footprinting assays disclosed that OpaR bound to the promoter regions of these three operons to stimulate their transcription, while AphA negatively regulated their transcription most likely through acting on OpaR. This regulation led to a gradient increase of T6SS2 transcription with transition from LCD to HCD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: V. parahaemolyticus OpaR and AphA positively and negatively regulate T6SS2 expression, respectively, leading to a gradient elevation of T6SS2 expression with transition from LCD to HCD. T6SS2 genes are thus assigned as the QS regulon members in V. parahaemolyticus.

  2. Effect of low Reynolds number flow on the quorum sensing behavior of sessile bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingremeau, Francois; Minyoung, Kevin Kim; Bassler, Bonnie; Stone, Howard; Mechanical; Aerospace Engineering, Complex fluids Group Team; Molecular Biology Lab Team

    2014-11-01

    Sessile and planktonic bacteria can be sensitive to the bacteria cell density around them through a chemical mediated communication called quorum sensing. When the quorum sensing molecules reach a certain value, the metabolism of the bacteria changes. Quorum sensing is usually studied in static conditions or in well mixed environments. However, bacteria biofilms can form in porous media or in the circulatory system of an infected body: quorum sensing in such flowing environment at low Reynolds number is not well studied. Using microfluidic devices, we observe how the flow of a pure media affects quorum sensing of bacteria attached to the wall. The biofilm formation is quantified by measuring the optical density in brightfield microscopy and the quorum sensing gene expression is observed through the fluorescence of a green fluorescent protein, which is a reporter for one of the quorum sensing genes. We measured without flow the amount of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm when the quorum sensing gene expression starts. In contrast, when the media is flowing in the microchannel, the quorum sensing expression is delayed. This effect can be understood and modelled by considering the diffusion of the quorum sensing molecules in the biofilm and their convection by the flowing media.

  3. Quorum-sensing in yeast and its potential in wine making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avbelj, Martina; Zupan, Jure; Raspor, Peter

    2016-09-01

    This mini-review synthesises the present knowledge of microbial quorum-sensing, with a specific focus on quorum-sensing in yeast, and especially in wine yeast. In vine and wine ecosystems, yeast co-interact with a large variety of microorganisms, thereby affecting the fermentation process and, consequently, the flavour of the wine. The precise connections between microbial interactions and quorum-sensing remain unclear, but we describe here how and when some species start to produce quorum-sensing molecules to synchronously adapt their collective behaviour to new conditions. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the quorum-sensing molecules were identified as 2-phenylethanol and tryptophol. However, it was recently shown that also a quorum-sensing molecule formerly identified only in Candida albicans, tyrosol, appears to be regulated in S. cerevisiae according to cell density. This review describes the methods for detection and quantification of those quorum-sensing molecules, their underlying mechanisms of action, and their genetic background. It also examines the external stimuli that evoke the quorum-sensing mechanism in the wine-processing environment. The review closes with insight into the biotechnological applications that are already making use of the advantages of quorum-sensing systems and indicates the important questions that still need to be addressed in future research into quorum-sensing.

  4. Functional characterization of a three-component regulatory system involved in quorum sensing-based regulation of peptide antibiotic production in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Bettina H; Quadri, Luis E N

    2006-10-20

    Quorum sensing is a form of cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to control a wide range of physiological processes in a population density-dependent manner. Production of peptide antibiotics is one of the processes regulated by quorum sensing in several species of Gram-positive bacteria, including strains of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. This bacterium and its peptide antibiotics are of interest due to their potential applications in food preservation. The molecular bases of the quorum sensing phenomenon controlling peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum remain poorly understood. The present study was aimed at gaining a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism involved in quorum sensing-mediated regulation of peptide antibiotic (bacteriocin) production by C. maltaromaticum. We report the functional analyses of the CS (autoinducer)-CbnK (histidine protein kinase)-CbnR (response regulator) three-component regulatory system and the three regulated promoters involved in peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum LV17B. CS-CbnK-CbnR system-dependent activation of carnobacterial promoters was demonstrated in both homologous and heterologous hosts using a two-plasmid system with a beta-glucuronidase (GusA) reporter read-out. The results of our analyses support a model in which the CbnK-CbnR two-component signal transduction system is necessary and sufficient to transduce the signal of the peptide autoinducer CS into the activation of the promoters that drive the expression of the genes required for production of the carnobacterial peptide antibiotics and the immunity proteins that protect the producer bacterium. The CS-CbnK-CbnR triad forms a three-component regulatory system by which production of peptide antibiotics by C. maltaromaticum LV17B is controlled in a population density-dependent (or cell proximity-dependent) manner. This regulatory mechanism would permit the bacterial population to synchronize the production of peptide

  5. Quorum sensing and bacterial pathogenicity: From molecules to disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antariksh Deep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing in prokaryotic biology refers to the ability of a bacterium to sense information from other cells in the population when they reach a critical concentration (i.e. a Quorum and communicate with them. The "language" used for this intercellular communication is based on small, self-generated signal molecules called as autoinducers. Quorum sensing is thought to afford pathogenic bacteria a mechanism to minimize host immune responses by delaying the production of tissue-damaging virulence factors until sufficient bacteria have amassed and are prepared to overwhelm host defense mechanisms and establish infection. Quorum sensing systems are studied in a large number of gram-negative bacterial species belonging to α, β, and γ subclasses of proteobacteria. Among the pathogenic bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is perhaps the best understood in terms of the virulence factors regulated and the role the Quorum sensing plays in pathogenicity. Presently, Quorum sensing is considered as a potential novel target for antimicrobial therapy to control multi/all drug-resistant infections. This paper reviews Quorum sensing in gram positive and gram negative bacteria and its role in biofilm formation.

  6. A Mathematical Model of Quorum Sensing Induced Biofilm Detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenini, Blessing O; Hense, Burkhard A; Kuttler, Christina; Eberl, Hermann J

    2015-01-01

    Cell dispersal (or detachment) is part of the developmental cycle of microbial biofilms. It can be externally or internally induced, and manifests itself in discrete sloughing events, whereby many cells disperse in an instance, or in continuous slower dispersal of single cells. One suggested trigger of cell dispersal is quorum sensing, a cell-cell communication mechanism used to coordinate gene expression and behavior in groups based on population densities. To better understand the interplay of colony growth and cell dispersal, we develop a dynamic, spatially extended mathematical model that includes biofilm growth, production of quorum sensing molecules, cell dispersal triggered by quorum sensing molecules, and re-attachment of cells. This is a highly nonlinear system of diffusion-reaction equations that we study in computer simulations. Our results show that quorum sensing induced cell dispersal can be an efficient mechanism for bacteria to control the size of a biofilm colony, and at the same time enhance its downstream colonization potential. In fact we find that over the lifetime of a biofilm colony the majority of cells produced are lost into the aqueous phase, supporting the notion of biofilms as cell nurseries. We find that a single quorum sensing based mechanism can explain both, discrete dispersal events and continuous shedding of cells from a colony. Moreover, quorum sensing induced cell dispersal affects the structure and architecture of the biofilm, for example it might lead to the formation of hollow inner regions in a biofilm colony.

  7. Reducing Virulence and Biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Potential Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Carotenoid: Zeaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökalsın, Barış; Aksoydan, Busecan; Erman, Burak; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2017-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can regulate its virulence gene expressions by using a signal system called quorum sensing. It is known that inhibition of quorum sensing can block biofilm formation and leave the bacteria defenseless. Therefore, it is necessary to determine natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing the carotenoid zeaxanthin to reduce the expressions of P. aeruginosa virulence factors through quorum sensing inhibition. The inhibition potential of zeaxanthin was determined by in silico screening from a library of 638 lichen metabolites. Fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens, and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR assay was performed for evaluating gene expression. Results indicate that zeaxanthin is a better inhibitor than the lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid, which was previously shown to be capable of inhibiting P. aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing regulation in Yersinia pestis [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N LaRock

    Full Text Available The etiologic agent of bubonic plague, Yersinia pestis, senses self-produced, secreted chemical signals in a process named quorum sensing. Though the closely related enteric pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis uses quorum sensing system to regulate motility, the role of quorum sensing in Y. pestis has been unclear. In this study we performed transcriptional profiling experiments to identify Y. pestis quorum sensing regulated functions. Our analysis revealed that acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing controls the expression of several metabolic functions. Maltose fermentation and the glyoxylate bypass are induced by acyl-homoserine lactone signaling. This effect was observed at 30°C, indicating a potential role for quorum sensing regulation of metabolism at temperatures below the normal mammalian temperature. It is proposed that utilization of alternative carbon sources may enhance growth and/or survival during prolonged periods in natural habitats with limited nutrient sources, contributing to maintenance of plague in nature.

  9. Synthetic quorum sensing in model microcapsule colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna C.

    2017-08-01

    Biological quorum sensing refers to the ability of cells to gauge their population density and collectively initiate a new behavior once a critical density is reached. Designing synthetic materials systems that exhibit quorum sensing-like behavior could enable the fabrication of devices with both self-recognition and self-regulating functionality. Herein, we develop models for a colony of synthetic microcapsules that communicate by producing and releasing signaling molecules. Production of the chemicals is regulated by a biomimetic negative feedback loop, the “repressilator” network. Through theory and simulation, we show that the chemical behavior of such capsules is sensitive to both the density and number of capsules in the colony. For example, decreasing the spacing between a fixed number of capsules can trigger a transition in chemical activity from the steady, repressed state to large-amplitude oscillations in chemical production. Alternatively, for a fixed density, an increase in the number of capsules in the colony can also promote a transition into the oscillatory state. This configuration-dependent behavior of the capsule colony exemplifies quorum-sensing behavior. Using our theoretical model, we predict the transitions from the steady state to oscillatory behavior as a function of the colony size and capsule density.

  10. Fusaric acid and analogues as Gram-negative bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Truong Thanh; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Dao, Trong Tuan; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Givskov, Michael; Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Nielsen, John

    2017-01-27

    Taking advantage of microwave-assisted synthesis, efficient and expedite procedures for preparation of a library of fusaric acid and 39 analogues are reported. The fusaric acid analogues were tested in cell-based screening assays for inhibition of the las and rhl quorum sensing system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the lux quorum sensing system in Vibrio fischeri. Eight of the 40 compounds in the library including fusaric acid inhibited lux quorum sensing and one compound inhibited activity of the las quorum sensing system. To our delight, none of the compounds showed growth inhibitory effects in the tested concentration ranges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. 3-D Numerical Simulations of Biofilm Dynamics with Quorum Sensing in a Flow Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    bacterial systems, such as vibrio fischeri [?], where quorum sensing was first observed, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and so on. This...fraction. τ is the threshold AHL concentration locally required for quorum sensing induction to occur. The exponent n describes the degree of... Quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in vibrio chel- erae. Molecular Microbiology, 50(1):101–114, 2003. [10] Douglas M. Heithoff and Michael J

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing modulates immune responses: An updated review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Baseri-Salehi, Majid; Kheirkhah, Babak

    2017-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium which induces some complications in immunocompromised patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a quorum-sensing using bacterium which regulates its genes expression. The bacterium uses two famous pathways for quorum sensing entitled LasI/LasR and RhlI/RhlR systems. It has been documented that the bacteria which use quorum sensing are able to overcome immune responses. This review article aims to present recent information regarding the effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems on the host immune responses. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Streptococcus gordonii LuxS/autoinducer-2 quorum-sensing system modulates the dual-species biofilm formation with Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Xiaolan; Ling, Junqi

    2017-07-01

    Dental plaques are mixed-species biofilms that are related to the development of dental caries. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is an important cariogenic bacterium that forms mixed-species biofilms with Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii), an early colonizer of the tooth surface. The LuxS/autoinducer-2(AI-2) quorum sensing system is involved in the regulation of mixed-species biofilms, and AI-2 is proposed as a universal signal for the interaction between bacterial species. In this work, a S. gordonii luxS deficient strain was constructed to investigate the effect of the S. gordonii luxS gene on dual-species biofilm formed by S. mutans and S. gordonii. In addition, AI-2 was synthesized in vitro by incubating recombinant LuxS and Pfs enzymes of S. gordonii together. The effect of AI-2 on S. mutans single-species biofilm formation and cariogenic virulence gene expression were also assessed. The results showed that luxS disruption in S. gordonii altered dual-species biofilm formation, architecture, and composition, as well as the susceptibility to chlorhexidine. And the in vitro synthesized AI-2 had a concentration-dependent effect on S. mutans biofilm formation and virulence gene expression. These findings indicate that LuxS/AI-2 quorum-sensing system of S. gordonii plays a role in regulating the dual-species biofilm formation with S. mutans. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (A QSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-12-09

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10.

  15. Quorum Sensing Peptides Selectively Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Janssens, Yorick; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other by the use of signaling molecules, a process called 'quorum sensing'. One group of quorum sensing molecules includes the oligopeptides, which are mainly produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, these quorum sensing peptides were found to biologically influence mammalian cells, promoting i.a. metastasis of cancer cells. Moreover, it was found that bacteria can influence different central nervous system related disorders as well, e.g. anxiety, depression and autism. Research currently focuses on the role of bacterial metabolites in this bacteria-brain interaction, with the role of the quorum sensing peptides not yet known. Here, three chemically diverse quorum sensing peptides were investigated for their brain influx (multiple time regression technique) and efflux properties in an in vivo mouse model (ICR-CD-1) to determine blood-brain transfer properties: PhrCACET1 demonstrated comparatively a very high initial influx into the mouse brain (Kin = 20.87 μl/(g×min)), while brain penetrabilities of BIP-2 and PhrANTH2 were found to be low (Kin = 2.68 μl/(g×min)) and very low (Kin = 0.18 μl/(g×min)), respectively. All three quorum sensing peptides were metabolically stable in plasma (in vitro) during the experimental time frame and no significant brain efflux was observed. Initial tissue distribution data showed remarkably high liver accumulation of BIP-2 as well. Our results thus support the potential role of some quorum sensing peptides in different neurological disorders, thereby enlarging our knowledge about the microbiome-brain axis.

  16. Localized quorum sensing in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Mary E; Snyder, Charles E; Kopp, Nathaniel D; Velegol, Darrell

    2008-04-01

    Quorum sensing is almost always regarded as a population density effect in three-dimensional bulk samples of bacteria. Here we create two-dimensional samples of Vibrio fischeri cells adhered onto glass surfaces to examine the effect of local population densities on quorum sensing. This is done by measuring the luminescent response. The 2-D bacterial populations enable us to simultaneously account for time and distance effects on quorum sensing, which were previously very challenging to access in typical three-dimensional bulk samples. Thus, we are able to consider quorum sensing in terms of signal diffusion. A diffusion model of quorum sensing signals guides the experiments and shows that for a given cell spacing (density) and diffusion time there exists a "true quorum"- a number of cells necessary for quorum sensing. We find that quorum sensing can occur locally in 2-D surface samples and is a function of cell population density as well as signal diffusion time.

  17. Role of quorum sensing in Sinorhizobium meliloti-Alfalfa symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurich, Nataliya; González, Juan E

    2009-07-01

    The ExpR/Sin quorum-sensing system of the gram-negative soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti plays an important role in the establishment of symbiosis with its host plant Medicago sativa. A mutant unable to produce autoinducer signal molecules (sinI) is deficient in its ability to invade the host, but paradoxically, a strain lacking the quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator ExpR is as efficient as the wild type. We compared the whole-genome expression profile of the wild-type strain with strains missing one of the quorum-sensing regulatory components to identify genes controlled by the ExpR/Sin system throughout the different phases of the bacterial growth cycle, as well as in planta. Our analyses revealed that ExpR is a highly versatile regulator with a unique ability to show different regulatory capabilities in the presence or absence of an autoinducer. In addition, this study provided us with insight into the plant invasion defect displayed by the autoinducer mutant. We also discovered that the ExpR/Sin quorum-sensing system is repressed after plant invasion. Therefore, quorum sensing plays a crucial role in the regulation of many cell functions that ensures the successful invasion of the host and is inactivated once symbiosis is established.

  18. Novel linear polymers able to inhibit bacterial quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleiro, Eliana; Duarte, Ana Sofia; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Correia, António; Whitcombe, Michael J; Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Sergey A; Chianella, Iva

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial phenotypes, such as biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance and virulence expression, are associated with quorum sensing. Quorum sensing is a density-dependent regulatory system of gene expression controlled by specific signal molecules, such as N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), produced and released by bacteria. This study reports the development of linear polymers capable to attenuate quorum sensing by adsorption of AHLs. Linear polymers were synthesized using MMA as backbone monomer and methacrylic acid and itaconic acid as functional monomers. Two different quorum sensing-controlled phenotypes, Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence and Aeromonas hydrophila biofilm formation, were evaluated to test the polymers' efficiency. Results showed that both phenotypes were significantly affected by the polymers, with the itaconic acid-containing material being more effective than the methacrylic acid one. The polymer inhibitory effects were reverted by the addition of lactones, confirming attenuation of quorum sensing through sequestration of signal molecules. The polymers also showed no cytotoxicity when tested using a mammalian cell line. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Bacillus globigii cell size is influenced by variants of the quorum sensing peptide extracellular death factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Sijbrandij (T.); W.E. Kaman (Wendy); A.J.M. Ligtenberg (A. J M); K. Nazmi (Kamran); E.C.I. Veerman (Enno); F.J. Bikker (Floris)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractToxin-antitoxin modules are necessary for the mode of action of several antibiotics. One of the most studied toxin-antitoxin modules is the quorum sensing - dependent MazEF system in Escherichia coli. The quorum sensing factor in this system is called the extracellular death factor

  20. Bacillus globigii cell size is influenced by variants of the quorum sensing peptide extracellular death factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandij, T.; Kaman, W.E.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Bikker, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin modules are necessary for the mode of action of several antibiotics. One of the most studied toxin-antitoxin modules is the quorum sensing - dependent MazEF system in Escherichia coli. The quorum sensing factor in this system is called the extracellular death factor (EDF), a linear

  1. Quorum sensing system lactones do not increase invasiveness of a MexAB-OprM efflux mutant but do play a partial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Akira; Hirakata, Yoichi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Fukushima, Kazuko; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Ohno, Hideaki; Higashiyama, Yasuhito; Miyazaki, Yoshitugu; Nishide, Kiyoharu; Node, Manabu; Yamada, Yasuaki; Kohno, Shigeru; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2006-01-01

    We studied the quorum sensing (QS) system and the related homoserine lactones (HSLs) observing Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasion using the epithelial cell monolayer penetration assay model. Compared to the PAO1 wild-type, the QS mutants, DeltalasI and DeltarhlI, were compromised in their capacity to invade. The decreased invasiveness of DeltarhlI was restored by adding 100 microM exogenous C(4)-HSL. However, the decreased invasiveness of an efflux mutant, DeltamexAB-oprM, was not restored in the presence of exogenous HSLs. The QS system partially plays a role in P. aeruginosa invasion; however, C(4)-HSL and 3-O-C(12)-HSL are not the essential determinants for invasiveness for P. aeruginosa.

  2. Quorum sensing inhibitors disable bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    It is now evident that bacteria assume the biofilm mode of growth during chronic infections. The important hallmarks of biofilm infections are development of local inflammations, extreme tolerance to the action of conventional antimicrobial agents and an almost infinite capacity to evade the host...... defence systems in particular innate immunity. In the biofilm mode, bacteria use cell to cell communication termed quorum-sensing (QS) to coordinate expression of virulence, tolerance towards a number of antimicrobial agents and shielding against the host defence system. Chemical biology approaches may...

  3. Methods for Measuring the Production of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Martínez, José Luis

    2018-01-01

    One relevant aspect for understanding the bottlenecks that modulate the spread of resistance among bacterial pathogens consists in the effect that the acquisition of resistance may have on the microbial physiology . Whereas studies on the effect of acquiring resistance of bacterial growth are frequently performed, more detailed analyses aiming to understand in depth the cross talk between resistance and virulence, including bacterial communication are less frequent. The bacterial quorum sensing system, is an important intraspecific and interspecific communication system highly relevant for many physiological processes, including virulence and bacterial/host interactions. Some works have shown that the acquisition of antibiotic resistance may impair the quorum sensing response. In addition, some antibiotics as antimicrobial peptides can affect the production and accumulation of the quorum sensing signal molecules. Given the relevance that this system has in the bacterial behavior in the human host, it is important to study the effect that the acquisition of antibiotic resistance may have on the production of quorum sensing signals. In this chapter we present a set of methods for measuring quorum sensing signals based on the use of biosensor strains, either coupled to Thin Layer Chromatography or for performing automated luminometry/spectrophotometry assays. We use Pseudomonas aeruginosa as bacterial model because it has a complex quorum system than encloses different signals. Namely, P. aeruginosa quorum sensing system consists in three different interconnected regulatory networks, each one presenting a specific autoinducer molecule: the las system, which signal is N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, the rhl system, which signal is N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone and the pqs system, which signals are 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone together with its immediate precursor 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline.

  4. Relation between Expression of the las Quorum-Sensing System in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Expression of Efflux Pump and ampC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadReza Pourmand

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quorum-sensing systems regulate expression of several virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study investigated the relation between expression of the las quorum-sensing system and expression of mexY and ampC in35 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disc diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Expression of genes including lasI, lasR, mexY, ampC and ampR was assessed by real time RT-PCR.Results: Twenty eight isolates with elevated expression of mexY and ampC (compared to  P. aeruginosa PAO1 were resistance to ceftazidime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and amikacin. Also these isolates demonstrated increased expression of lasI and lasR. The remaining seven isolates showed intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin and amikacin. These seven isolates with elevated ampR expression demonstrated decreased expression of mexY, ampC, lasI and lasR.Conclusion: In contrast to previous study, current study demonstrated that the expression pattern of ampC was identical to the lasI expression pattern among clinical isolates. Furthermore according to previous study we expected that AmpR positively regulated ampC expression but in our study, some of the isolates with elevated ampR expression showed decreased ampC expression. The expression pattern of lasR and mexY was identical in all of the isolates. It seems there was a direct or indirect relation between expression of lasR and mexY expression in P. aeruginosa.

  5. Can the natural diversity of quorum-sensing advance synthetic biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, René Michele; Muller, Ryan Yue; Haynes, Karmella Ann

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-sensing networks enable bacteria to sense and respond to chemical signals produced by neighboring bacteria. They are widespread: over 100 morphologically and genetically distinct species of eubacteria are known to use quorum sensing to control gene expression. This diversity suggests the potential to use natural protein variants to engineer parallel, input-specific, cell-cell communication pathways. However, only three distinct signaling pathways, Lux, Las, and Rhl, have been adapted for and broadly used in engineered systems. The paucity of unique quorum-sensing systems and their propensity for crosstalk limits the usefulness of our current quorum-sensing toolkit. This review discusses the need for more signaling pathways, roadblocks to using multiple pathways in parallel, and strategies for expanding the quorum-sensing toolbox for synthetic biology.

  6. Quorum Sensing Communication Modules for Microbial Consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Spencer R; Hasty, Jeff

    2016-09-16

    The power of a single engineered organism is limited by its capacity for genetic modification. To circumvent the constraints of any singular microbe, a new frontier in synthetic biology is emerging: synthetic ecology, or the engineering of microbial consortia. Here we develop communication systems for such consortia in an effort to allow for complex social behavior across different members of a community. We posit that such communities will outpace monocultures in their ability to perform complicated tasks if communication among and between members of the community is well regulated. Quorum sensing was identified as the most promising candidate for precise control of engineered microbial ecosystems, due to its large diversity and established utility in synthetic biology. Through promoter and protein modification, we engineered two quorum sensing systems (rpa and tra) to add to the extensively used lux and las systems. By testing the cross-talk between all systems, we thoroughly characterized many new inducible systems for versatile control of engineered communities. Furthermore, we've identified several system pairs that exhibit useful types of orthogonality. Most notably, the tra and rpa systems were shown to have neither signal crosstalk nor promoter crosstalk for each other, making them completely orthogonal in operation. Overall, by characterizing the interactions between all four systems and their components, these circuits should lend themselves to higher-level genetic circuitry for use in microbial consortia.

  7. Qualitative and quantitative determination of quorum sensing inhibition in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise Dahl

    2011-01-01

    The formation of biofilms in conjunction with quorum sensing (QS)-regulated expression of virulence by opportunistic pathogens contributes significantly to immune evasion and tolerance to a variety of antimicrobial treatments. The present protocol describes methods to determine the in vitro...... efficacy of potential quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs). Work on Pseudomonas aeruginosa has shown that chemical blockage of QS is a promising new antimicrobial strategy. Several live bacterial reporter systems been developed to screen extracts and pure compounds for QSI activity. Here we describe the usage...

  8. The evolution of quorum sensing in bacterial biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey D Nadell

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have fascinating and diverse social lives. They display coordinated group behaviors regulated by quorum-sensing systems that detect the density of other bacteria around them. A key example of such group behavior is biofilm formation, in which communities of cells attach to a surface and envelope themselves in secreted polymers. Curiously, after reaching high cell density, some bacterial species activate polymer secretion, whereas others terminate polymer secretion. Here, we investigate this striking variation in the first evolutionary model of quorum sensing in biofilms. We use detailed individual-based simulations to investigate evolutionary competitions between strains that differ in their polymer production and quorum-sensing phenotypes. The benefit of activating polymer secretion at high cell density is relatively straightforward: secretion starts upon biofilm formation, allowing strains to push their lineages into nutrient-rich areas and suffocate neighboring cells. But why use quorum sensing to terminate polymer secretion at high cell density? We find that deactivating polymer production in biofilms can yield an advantage by redirecting resources into growth, but that this advantage occurs only in a limited time window. We predict, therefore, that down-regulation of polymer secretion at high cell density will evolve when it can coincide with dispersal events, but it will be disfavored in long-lived (chronic biofilms with sustained competition among strains. Our model suggests that the observed variation in quorum-sensing behavior can be linked to the differing requirements of bacteria in chronic versus acute biofilm infections. This is well illustrated by the case of Vibrio cholerae, which competes within biofilms by polymer secretion, terminates polymer secretion at high cell density, and induces an acute disease course that ends with mass dispersal from the host. More generally, this work shows that the balance of competition

  9. A new repertoire of informations about the quorum sensing system in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Galvão, M E M; Leite, T D S; Ribon, A O B; Araújo, E F; Vanetti, M C D

    2015-04-27

    Salmonella spp are among the main causative agents of foodborne diseases. Some phenotypes associated with increased drug resistance and virulence are regulated by quorum sensing (QS). In the present study, the autoinducer (AI)-1- and -2-mediated QS mechanisms were characterized in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 for the first time. Salmonella Enteritidis did not produce AI-1. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotides encoding the SdiA protein, the response regulator of AI-1-mediated QS, and comparative alignment of its amino acids showed that the gene and protein are conserved within the same bacterial genus. Thus, bacteria of the same genus respond to the same AIs. However, this finding did not preclude the possibility that Salmonella Enteritidis might respond to AIs released from bacteria of a different genus, which might confer a competitive advantage to this pathogen. We found that the regulation of AI-2-mediated QS in Salmonella Enteritidis is similar to that in serovar Typhimurium. The elucidation of the AI-1- and AI-2-mediated QS mechanisms in Salmonella Enteritidis will contribute to the development of new control strategies for this pathogen by indicating new targets for antimicrobial drugs.

  10. Controlling the activity of quorum sensing autoinducers with light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Berg, J. P.; Velema, W. A.; Szymanski, W.; Driessen, A. J. M.; Feringa, B. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria use a communication system, called quorum sensing (QS), to organize into communities and synchronize gene expression to promote virulence and secure survival. Here we report on a proof-of-principle for externally interfering with this bacterial communication system, using light. By

  11. Imaging N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Maria; Jakobsen, Tim Holm

    2018-01-01

    In order to study N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing in vivo, we present a protocol using an Escherichia coli strain equipped with a luxR-based monitor system, which in the presence of exogenous AHL molecules expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Lungs from mice challenged...

  12. Imaging N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise Dahl; van Gennip, Maria; Jakobsen, Tim Holm

    2011-01-01

    In order to study N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing in vivo, we present a protocol using an Escherichia coli strain equipped with a luxR-based monitor system, which in the presence of exogenous AHL molecules expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Lungs from mice challenged...

  13. The CckA-ChpT-CtrA phosphorelay system is regulated by quorum sensing and controls flagellar motility in the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Zan

    Full Text Available Bacteria respond to their environment via signal transduction pathways, often two-component type systems that function through phosphotransfer to control expression of specific genes. Phosphorelays are derived from two-component systems but are comprised of additional components. The essential cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay in Caulobacter crescentus has been well studied and is important in orchestrating the cell cycle, polar development and flagellar biogenesis. Although cckA, chpT and ctrA homologues are widespread among the Alphaproteobacteria, relatively few is known about their function in the large and ecologically significant Roseobacter clade of the Rhodobacterales. In this study the cckA-chpT-ctrA system of the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 was investigated. Our results reveal that the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes positively control flagellar biosynthesis. In contrast to C. crescentus, the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes in Ruegeria sp. KLH11 are non-essential and do not affect bacterial growth. Gene fusion and transcript analyses provide evidence for ctrA autoregulation and the control of motility-related genes. In KLH11, flagellar motility is controlled by the SsaRI system and acylhomoserine lactone (AHL quorum sensing. SsaR and long chain AHLs are required for cckA, chpT and ctrA gene expression, providing a regulatory link between flagellar locomotion and population density in KLH11.

  14. A Quorum Sensing-Disrupting Brominated Thiophenone with a Promising Therapeutic Potential to Treat Luminescent Vibriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoirdt, Tom; Benneche, Tore; Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Scheie, Anne Aamdal

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is amongst the most important bacterial pathogens in aquaculture. Novel methods to control this pathogen are needed since many strains have acquired resistance to antibiotics. We previously showed that quorum sensing-disrupting furanones are able to protect brine shrimp larvae against vibriosis. However, a major problem of these compounds is that they are toxic toward higher organisms and therefore, they are not safe to be used in aquaculture. The synthesis of brominated thiophenones, sulphur analogues of the quorum sensing-disrupting furanones, has recently been reported. In the present study, we report that these compounds block quorum sensing in V. harveyi at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Bioluminescence experiments with V. harveyi quorum sensing mutants and a fluorescence anisotropy assay indicated that the compounds disrupt quorum sensing in this bacterium by decreasing the ability of the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR to bind to its target promoter DNA. In vivo challenge tests with gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae showed that thiophenone compound TF310, (Z)-4-((5-(bromomethylene)-2-oxo-2,5-dihydrothiophen-3-yl)methoxy)-4-oxobutanoic acid, completely protected the larvae from V. harveyi BB120 when dosed to the culture water at 2.5 µM or more, whereas severe toxicity was only observed at 250 µM. This makes TF310 showing the highest therapeutic index of all quorum sensing-disrupting compounds tested thus far in our brine shrimp model system. PMID:22848604

  15. Modulation of Inter-kingdom Communication by PhcBSR Quorum Sensing System in Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotype I Strain GMI1000

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    Peng Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ralstonia solanacearum is a ubiquitous soil-borne plant pathogenic bacterium, which frequently encounters and interacts with other soil cohabitants in competition for environmental niches. Ralsolamycin, which is encoded by the rmy genes, has been characterized as a novel inter-kingdom interaction signal that induces chlamydospore development in fungi. In this study, we provide the first genetic evidence that the rmy gene expression is controlled by the PhcBSR quorum sensing (QS system in strain GMI1000. Mutation of phcB could lead to significant reduction of the expression levels of the genes involved in ralsolamycin biosynthesis. In addition, both the phcB and rmy mutants were attenuated in induction of chlamydospore formation in Fusarium oxysporum f. cubense and diminished in the ability to compete with the sugarcane pathogen Sporisorium scitamineum. Agreeable with the pattern of QS regulation, transcriptional expression analysis showed that the transcripts of the rmy genes were increased along with the increment of the bacterial population density. Taken together, the above findings provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms that the QS system involves in governing the ralsolamycin inter-kingdom signaling system.

  16. Detection of quorum-sensing-related molecules in Vibrio scophthalmi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedel Kathrin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-to-cell communication (also referred to as quorum sensing based on N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs is a widespread response to environmental change in Gram-negative bacteria. AHLs seem to be highly variable, both in terms of the acyl chain length and in the chemical structure of the radicals. Another quorum sensing pathway, the autoinducer-2-based system, is present both in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study the presence of signal molecules belonging to both quorum sensing signalling pathways was analysed in the marine symbiotic species Vibrio scophthalmi. Results Three AHL-like signal molecules were detected in V. scophthalmi supernatants with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens sensor assay. This observation was further supported by the decrease in the presence of these signal molecules after cloning and expression of lactonase AiiA from Bacillus cereus in the V. scophthalmi strains. One of the signal molecules was identified as N-(3-hydroxy dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. V. scophthalmi was also shown to carry a functional LuxS synthase. The coding sequence for a luxS-like gene was obtained showing a maximum similarity of 78% with Vibrio vulnificus. Analysis of the translated sequence revealed that the sequenced luxS gene carried the conserved domain, which is common to luxS sequences found in other species, and which is essential for LuxS enzymatic activity. Conclusion The data are consistent with the presence of quorum-sensing signal molecules from both AHL- and autoinducer 2-based quorum sensing systems in V. scophthalmi, which are homologous to others previously described in various Vibrio species. How this bacterium interacts with other bacteria and eukaryotic cells to compete ecologically with other intestinal bacteria present in the fish Scophthalmus maximus warrants further investigation.

  17. The AHL- and BDSF-dependent quorum sensing systems control specific and overlapping sets of genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111.

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    Nadine Schmid

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111 involves two signalling systems that depend on different signal molecules, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs and the diffusible signal factor cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF. Previous studies have shown that AHLs and BDSF control similar phenotypic traits, including biofilm formation, proteolytic activity and pathogenicity. In this study we mapped the BDSF stimulon by RNA-Seq and shotgun proteomics analysis. We demonstrate that a set of the identified BDSF-regulated genes or proteins are also controlled by AHLs, suggesting that the two regulons partially overlap. The detailed analysis of two mutually regulated operons, one encoding three lectins and the other one encoding the large surface protein BapA and its type I secretion machinery, revealed that both AHLs and BDSF are required for full expression, suggesting that the two signalling systems operate in parallel. In accordance with this, we show that both AHLs and BDSF are required for biofilm formation and protease production.

  18. In silico and experimental methods revealed highly diverse bacteria with quorum sensing and aromatics biodegradation systems--a potential broad application on bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yili; Zeng, Yanhua; Yu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Hao; Lin, Xiuchun

    2013-11-01

    Phylogenetic overlaps between aromatics-degrading bacteria and acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL) or autoinducer (AI) based quorum-sensing (QS) bacteria were evident in literatures; however, the diversity of bacteria with both activities had never been finely described. In-silico searching in NCBI genome database revealed that more than 11% of investigated population harbored both aromatic ring-hydroxylating-dioxygenase (RHD) gene and AHL/AI-synthetase gene. These bacteria were distributed in 10 orders, 15 families, 42 genus and 78 species. Horizontal transfers of both genes were common among them. Using enrichment and culture dependent method, 6 Sphingomonadales and 4 Rhizobiales with phenanthrene- or pyrene-degrading ability and AHL-production were isolated from marine, wetland and soil samples. Thin-layer-chromatography and gas-chromatography-mass-spectrum revealed that these Sphingomonads produced various AHL molecules. This is the first report of highly diverse bacteria that harbored both aromatics-degrading and QS systems. QS regulation may have broad impacts on aromatics biodegradation, and would be a new angle for developing bioremediation technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Methicillin resistance reduces the virulence of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by interfering with the agr quorum sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkin, Justine K; Edwards, Andrew M; Bowden, Maria G; Brown, Eric L; Pozzi, Clarissa; Waters, Elaine M; Chan, Weng C; Williams, Paul; O'Gara, James P; Massey, Ruth C

    2012-03-01

    The difficulty in successfully treating infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has led to them being referred to as highly virulent or pathogenic. In our study of one of the major healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) clones, we show that expression of the gene responsible for conferring methicillin resistance (mecA) is also directly responsible for reducing the ability of HA-MRSA to secrete cytolytic toxins. We show that resistance to methicillin induces changes in the cell wall, which affects the bacteria's agr quorum sensing system. This leads to reduced toxin expression and, as a consequence, reduced virulence in a murine model of sepsis. This diminished capacity to cause infection may explain the inability of HA-MRSA to move into the community and help us understand the recent emergence of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). CA-MRSA typically express less penicillin-binding protein 2a (encoded by mecA), allowing them to maintain full virulence and succeed in the community environment.

  20. Quorum Sensing in Marine Microbial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmelo, Laura R.

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a form of chemical communication used by certain bacteria that regulates a wide range of biogeochemically important bacterial behaviors. Although QS was first observed in a marine bacterium nearly four decades ago, only in the past decade has there been a rise in interest in the role that QS plays in the ocean. It has become clear that QS, regulated by signals such as acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) or furanosyl-borate diesters [autoinducer-2 (AI-2) molecules], is involved in important processes within the marine carbon cycle, in the health of coral reef ecosystems, and in trophic interactions between a range of eukaryotes and their bacterial associates. The most well-studied QS systems in the ocean occur in surface-attached (biofilm) communities and rely on AHL signaling. AHL-QS is highly sensitive to the chemical and biological makeup of the environment and may respond to anthropogenic change, including ocean acidification and rising sea surface temperatures.

  1. Starvation Selection Restores Elastase and Rhamnolipid Production in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Delden, Christian; Pesci, Everett C.; Pearson, James P.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    1998-01-01

    The las quorum-sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa controls the expression of elastase and rhamnolipid. We report that starvation can select a mutant producing these virulence factors in spite of a lasR deletion. Expression of the autoinducer synthase gene rhlI was increased in this suppressor mutant, suggesting compensation by the rhl system. These data show that P. aeruginosa can restore elastase and rhamnolipid production in the absence of a functional las quorum-sensing system. PMID:9712807

  2. Caffeine as a Potential Quorum Sensing Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing enables bacteria to control the gene expression in response to the cell density. It regulates a variety of bacterial physiological functions such as biofilm formation, bioluminescence, virulence factors and swarming which has been shown contribute to bacterial pathogenesis. The use of quorum sensing inhibitor would be of particular interest in treating bacterial pathogenicity and infections. In this work, we have tested caffeine as quorum sensing inhibitor by using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as a biosensor. We verified that caffeine did not degrade the N-acyl homoserine lactones tested. In this work, it is shown that caffeine could inhibit N-acyl homoserine lactone production and swarming of a human opportunistic pathogen, namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation providing evidence on the presence of anti-quorum sensing activity in caffeine. Our work will allow caffeine to be explored as anti-infective drugs.

  3. Is there a role for quorum sensing signals in bacterial biofilms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelleberg, S.; Molin, Søren

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria form multicellular biofilm communities on most surfaces. Genetic analysis of biofilm formation has led to the proposal that extracellular signals and quorum-sensing regulatory systems are essential for differentiated biofilms. Although such a model fits the concept of density-driven cell...... adaptation during the different stages of biofilm formation. Hence, differentiated biofilms may also be the net result of many independent interactions, rather than being determined by a particular global quorum sensing system....

  4. The RNPP family of quorum-sensing proteins in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Estrada, Jorge; Aceves-Diez, Angel E; Guarneros, Gabriel; de la Torre, Mayra

    2010-07-01

    Quorum sensing is one of several mechanisms that bacterial cells use to interact with each other and coordinate certain physiological processes in response to cell density. This mechanism is mediated by extracellular signaling molecules; once a critical threshold concentration has been reached, a target sensor kinase or response regulator is activated (or repressed), facilitating the expression of quorum sensing-dependent genes. Gram-positive bacteria mostly use oligo-peptides as signaling molecules. These cells have a special kind of quorum-sensing systems in which the receptor protein interacts directly with its cognate signaling peptide. The receptors are either Rap phosphatases or transcriptional regulators and integrate the protein family RNPP, from Rap, Npr, PlcR, and PrgX. These quorum-sensing systems control several microbial processes, like sporulation, virulence, biofilm formation, conjugation, and production of extracellular enzymes. Insights of the mechanism of protein-signaling peptide binding as well as the molecular interaction among receptor protein, signaling peptide, and target DNA have changed some earlier perceptions. In spite of the increased knowledge and the potential biotechnological applications of these quorum-sensing systems, few examples on engineering for biotechnological applications have been published. Real applications will arise only when researchers working in applied microbiology and biotechnology are aware of the importance of quorum-sensing systems for health and bioprocess applications.

  5. Inhibition of quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas fluorescens by cinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Dangfeng; Liu, Nan; Ma, Yan; Ding, Ting; Mei, Yongchao; Li, Jianrong

    2018-03-23

    Pseudomonas fluorescens, an important food spoiling bacteria, uses quorum sensing to control biofilm formation and motility. To date, only a few compounds targeting the LuxR-based quorum sensing system of P. fluorescens have been identified. In the present study, the quorum sensing inhibitory effect of cinnamaldehyde at sublethal concentrations was investigated in terms of inhibition of the extracellular protease, biofilm formation, and swimming and swarming motility. The total volatile basic nitrogen value was also measured to evaluate the effect of cinnamaldehyde on quality preservation of turbot fillets stored at 4 ± 1 °C for 15 days. The results showed that cinnamaldehyde significantly inhibited quorum sensing-dependent factors in P. fluorescens and extended the storage life of turbot. Unexpectedly, cinnamaldehyde did not interfere with production of AHLs (N-acylhomoserine lactones) by P. fluorescens, as shown by measurement of AHL production using GC-MS. Molecular docking analysis revealed that cinnamaldehyde can interact with the LuxR-type protein of P. fluorescens, which could constitute the molecular basis of the quorum sensing inhibition observed. These findings strongly suggest that cinnamaldehyde is a quorum sensing inhibitor with great potential for the preservation of aquatic products to guarantee food safety. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitigating Seawater Desalination Membrane Biofouling using Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Katebian, Leda

    2016-01-01

    Coastal seawater desalination using reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has the potential to alleviate water stress in arid regions. However, membrane biofouling, caused by bacterial biofilm formation, is a significant challenge for seawater desalination plants. Biofilm formation is regulated by quorum sensing (QS) pathways where bacteria secrete auto-inducer molecules to communicate with neighboring bacteria to activate biofilm formation. This research investigated the role of the QS system and t...

  7. The symbiotic biofilm of Sinorhizobium fredii SMH12, necessary for successful colonization and symbiosis of Glycine max cv Osumi, is regulated by Quorum Sensing systems and inducing flavonoids via NodD1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Pérez-Montaño

    Full Text Available Bacterial surface components, especially exopolysaccharides, in combination with bacterial Quorum Sensing signals are crucial for the formation of biofilms in most species studied so far. Biofilm formation allows soil bacteria to colonize their surrounding habitat and survive common environmental stresses such as desiccation and nutrient limitation. This mode of life is often essential for survival in bacteria of the genera Mesorhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Rhizobium. The role of biofilm formation in symbiosis has been investigated in detail for Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. However, for S. fredii this process has not been studied. In this work we have demonstrated that biofilm formation is crucial for an optimal root colonization and symbiosis between S. fredii SMH12 and Glycine max cv Osumi. In this bacterium, nod-gene inducing flavonoids and the NodD1 protein are required for the transition of the biofilm structure from monolayer to microcolony. Quorum Sensing systems are also required for the full development of both types of biofilms. In fact, both the nodD1 mutant and the lactonase strain (the lactonase enzyme prevents AHL accumulation are defective in soybean root colonization. The impairment of the lactonase strain in its colonization ability leads to a decrease in the symbiotic parameters. Interestingly, NodD1 together with flavonoids activates certain quorum sensing systems implicit in the development of the symbiotic biofilm. Thus, S. fredii SMH12 by means of a unique key molecule, the flavonoid, efficiently forms biofilm, colonizes the legume roots and activates the synthesis of Nod factors, required for successfully symbiosis.

  8. Stereochemical insignificance discovered in Acinetobacter baumannii quorum sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Garner

    Full Text Available Stereochemistry is a key aspect of molecular recognition for biological systems. As such, receptors and enzymes are often highly stereospecific, only recognizing one stereoisomer of a ligand. Recently, the quorum sensing signaling molecules used by the nosocomial opportunistic pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, were identified, and the primary signaling molecule isolated from this species was N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. A plethora of bacterial species have been demonstrated to utilize 3-hydroxy-acylhomoserine lactone autoinducers, and in virtually all cases, the (R-stereoisomer was identified as the natural ligand and exhibited greater autoinducer activity than the corresponding (S-stereoisomer. Using chemical synthesis and biochemical assays, we have uncovered a case of stereochemical insignificance in A. baumannii and provide a unique example where stereochemistry appears nonessential for acylhomoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing signaling. Based on previously reported phylogenetic studies, we suggest that A. baumannii has evolutionarily adopted this unique, yet promiscuous quorum sensing system to ensure its survival, particularly in the presence of other proteobacteria.

  9. Quorum sensing signals are produced by Aeromonas salmonicida and quorum sensing inhibitors can reduce production of a potential virulence factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Maria; Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin

    2007-01-01

    of Aeromonas salmonicida strains. All 31 typical strains were AHL producers as were 21 of 26 atypical strains, but on a strain population basis, production of virulence factors such as protease, lipase, A-layer or pigment did not correlate with the production and accumulation of AHLs in the growth medium....... Pigment production was only observed in broth under highly aerated conditions. Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) are compounds that specifically block QS systems without affecting bacterial growth and 2 such compounds, sulphur-containing AHL-analogues, reduced production of protease in a typical strain......Many pathogens control production of virulence factors by self-produced signals in a process called quorum sensing (QS). We demonstrate that acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals, which enable bacteria to express certain phenotypes in relation to cell density, are produced by a wide spectrum...

  10. Mechanisms of quorum sensing and strategies for quorum sensing disruption in aquaculture pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Chen, M; Quan, C S; Fan, S D

    2015-09-01

    In many countries, infectious diseases are a considerable threat to aquaculture. The pathogenicity of micro-organisms that infect aquaculture systems is closely related to the release of virulence factors and the formation of biofilms, both of which are regulated by quorum sensing (QS). Thus, QS disruption is a potential strategy for preventing disease in aquaculture systems. QS inhibitors (QSIs) not only inhibit the expression of virulence-associated genes but also attenuate the virulence of aquaculture pathogens. In this review, we discuss QS systems in important aquaculture pathogens and focus on the relationship between QS mechanisms and bacterial virulence in aquaculture. We further elucidate QS disruption strategies for targeting aquaculture pathogens. Four main types of QSIs that target aquaculture pathogens are discussed based on their mechanisms of action. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Fremmedlegemeinfektioner--nyt om biofilm og quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Ciofu, Oana

    2007-01-01

    . Bacteria in biofilms communicate by means of quorum sensing which activates genes for virulence factors. Biofilms can be prevented by antibiotic prophylaxis or early therapy or by quorum sensing inhibitors which make them susceptible to antibiotics and phagocytosis....

  12. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  13. Positive Autoregulation of an Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum-Sensing Circuit Synchronizes the Population Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Rebecca L; Greenberg, E Peter

    2017-07-25

    Many proteobacteria utilize acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signals. At low population densities, cells produce a basal level of signal, and when sufficient signal has accumulated in the surrounding environment, it binds to its receptor, and quorum-sensing-dependent genes can be activated. A common characteristic of acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing is that signal production is positively autoregulated. We have examined the role of positive signal autoregulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa We compared population responses and individual cell responses in populations of wild-type P. aeruginosa to responses in a strain with the signal synthase gene controlled by an arabinose-inducible promoter so that signal was produced at a constant rate per cell regardless of cell population density. At a population level, responses of the wild type and the engineered strain were indistinguishable, but the responses of individual cells in a population of the wild type showed greater synchrony than the responses of the engineered strain. Although sufficient signal is required to activate expression of quorum-sensing-regulated genes, it is not sufficient for activation of certain genes, the late genes, and their expression is delayed until other conditions are met. We found that late gene responses were reduced in the engineered strain. We conclude that positive signal autoregulation is not a required element in acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing, but it functions to enhance synchrony of the responses of individuals in a population. Synchrony might be advantageous in some situations, whereas a less coordinated quorum-sensing response might allow bet hedging and be advantageous in other situations. IMPORTANCE There are many quorum-sensing systems that involve a transcriptional activator, which responds to an acyl-homoserine lactone signal. In all of the examples studied, the gene coding for signal production is positively autoregulated by the signal, and it has even

  14. Differential Equations Models to Study Quorum Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Velázquez, Judith; Hense, Burkhard A

    2018-01-01

    Mathematical models to study quorum sensing (QS) have become an important tool to explore all aspects of this type of bacterial communication. A wide spectrum of mathematical tools and methods such as dynamical systems, stochastics, and spatial models can be employed. In this chapter, we focus on giving an overview of models consisting of differential equations (DE), which can be used to describe changing quantities, for example, the dynamics of one or more signaling molecule in time and space, often in conjunction with bacterial growth dynamics. The chapter is divided into two sections: ordinary differential equations (ODE) and partial differential equations (PDE) models of QS. Rates of change are represented mathematically by derivatives, i.e., in terms of DE. ODE models allow describing changes in one independent variable, for example, time. PDE models can be used to follow changes in more than one independent variable, for example, time and space. Both types of models often consist of systems (i.e., more than one equation) of equations, such as equations for bacterial growth and autoinducer concentration dynamics. Almost from the onset, mathematical modeling of QS using differential equations has been an interdisciplinary endeavor and many of the works we revised here will be placed into their biological context.

  15. The ppuI-rsaL-ppuR quorum-sensing system regulates cellular motility, pectate lyase activity, and virulence in potato opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas sp. StFLB209.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taro; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Someya, Nobutaka; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. StFLB209 was isolated from potato leaf as an N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-producing bacterium and showed a close phylogenetic relationship with P. cichorii, a known plant pathogen. Although there are no reports of potato disease caused by pseudomonads in Japan, StFLB209 was pathogenic to potato leaf. In this study, we reveal the complete genome sequence of StFLB209, and show that the strain possesses a ppuI-rsaL-ppuR quorum-sensing system, the sequence of which shares a high similarity with that of Pseudomonas putida. Disruption of ppuI results in a loss of AHL production as well as remarkable reduction in motility. StFLB209 possesses strong pectate lyase activity and causes maceration on potato tuber and leaf, which was slightly reduced in the ppuI mutant. These results suggest that the quorum-sensing system is well conserved between StFLB209 and P. putida and that the system is essential for motility, full pectate lyase activity, and virulence in StFLB209.

  16. The small nucleoid protein Fis is involved in Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Derrick H; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2007-02-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-cell communication that bacteria use to relay information to one another about the cell density and species composition of the bacterial community. Quorum sensing involves the production, secretion and population-wide detection of small signalling molecules called autoinducers. This process allows bacteria to synchronize group behaviours and act as multicellular units. The human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae, uses quorum sensing to co-ordinate such complex behaviours as pathogenicity and biofilm formation. The quorum-sensing circuit of V. cholerae consists of two autoinducer/sensor systems, CAI-1/CqsS and AI-2/LuxPQ, and the VarS/A-CsrA/BCD growth-phase regulatory system. Genetic analysis suggests that an additional regulatory arm involved in quorum sensing exists in V. cholerae. All of these systems channel information into the histidine phosphotransfer protein, LuxU, and/or the response regulator, LuxO. LuxO, when phosphorylated, activates the expression of four genes encoding the Qrr (quorum regulatory RNAs) small RNAs (sRNAs). The Qrr sRNAs destabilize the hapR transcript encoding the master regulator of quorum sensing, HapR. Here we identify the nucleoid protein Fis as playing a major role in the V. cholerae quorum-sensing circuit. Fis fulfils the predictions required to be the putative additional component that inputs information into the cascade: its expression is regulated in a growth phase-dependent manner; it requires LuxO but acts independently of LuxU, and it regulates all four qrr genes and, in turn, HapR by directly binding to the qrr gene promoters and modulating their expression.

  17. Why Quorum Sensing Controls Private Goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schuster

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cell communication, also termed quorum sensing (QS, is a widespread process that coordinates gene expression in bacterial populations. The generally accepted view is that QS optimizes the cell density-dependent benefit attained from cooperative behaviors, often in the form of secreted products referred to as “public goods.” This view is challenged by an increasing number of cell-associated products or “private goods” reported to be under QS-control for which a collective benefit is not apparent. A prominent example is nucleoside hydrolase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a periplasmic enzyme that catabolizes adenosine. Several recent studies have shown that private goods can function to stabilize cooperation by co-regulated public goods, seemingly explaining their control by QS. Here we argue that this property is a by-product of selection for other benefits rather than an adaptation. Emphasizing ecophysiological context, we propose alternative explanations for the QS control of private goods. We suggest that the benefit attained from private goods is associated with high cell density, either because a relevant ecological condition correlates with density, or because the private good is, directly or indirectly, involved in cooperative behavior. Our analysis helps guide a systems approach to QS, with implications for antivirulence drug design and synthetic biology.

  18. Combination Therapy Strategy of Quorum Quenching Enzyme and Quorum Sensing Inhibitor in Suppressing Multiple Quorum Sensing Pathways of P. aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fong, July; Zhang, Chaodong; Yang, Renliang

    2018-01-01

    The threat of antibiotic resistant bacteria has called for alternative antimicrobial strategies that would mitigate the increase of classical resistance mechanism. Many bacteria employ quorum sensing (QS) to govern the production of virulence factors and formation of drug-resistant biofilms....... Targeting the mechanism of QS has proven to be a functional alternative to conventional antibiotic control of infections. However, the presence of multiple QS systems in individual bacterial species poses a challenge to this approach. Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) and quorum quenching enzymes (QQE) have...

  19. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  20. A Strategy for Antagonizing Quorum Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G Chen; L Swem; D Swem; D Stauff; C OLoughlin; P Jeffrey; B Bassler; F Hughson

    2011-12-31

    Quorum-sensing bacteria communicate via small molecules called autoinducers to coordinate collective behaviors. Because quorum sensing controls virulence factor expression in many clinically relevant pathogens, membrane-permeable quorum sensing antagonists that prevent population-wide expression of virulence genes offer a potential route to novel antibacterial therapeutics. Here, we report a strategy for inhibiting quorum-sensing receptors of the widespread LuxR family. Structure-function studies with natural and synthetic ligands demonstrate that the dimeric LuxR-type transcription factor CviR from Chromobacterium violaceum is potently antagonized by molecules that bind in place of the native acylated homoserine lactone autoinducer, provided that they stabilize a closed conformation. In such conformations, each of the two DNA-binding domains interacts with the ligand-binding domain of the opposing monomer. Consequently, the DNA-binding helices are held apart by {approx}60 {angstrom}, twice the {approx}30 {angstrom} separation required for operator binding. This approach may represent a general strategy for the inhibition of multidomain proteins.

  1. luxS Mutant Regulation: Quorum Sensing Impairment or Methylation Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwei Huang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available AI-2–mediated quorum sensing has been identified in various bacteria, including both Gram-negative and Gram-positive species, and numerous phenotypes have been reported to be regulated by this mechanism, using the luxS-mutant strain. But the AI-2 production process confused this regulatory function; some considered this regulation as the result of a metabolic change, which refers to an important metabolic cycle named activated methyl cycle (AMC, caused by luxS-mutant simultaneously with the defect of AI-2. Herein we hypothesized that the quorum sensing system—not the metabolic aspect—is responsible for such a regulatory function. In this study, we constructed plasmids infused with sahH and induced protein expression in the luxS-mutant strain to make the quorum-sensing system and metabolic system independent. The biofilm-related genes were investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and the results demonstrated that the quorum-sensing completed strain restored the gene expression of the defective strain, but the metabolically completed one did not. This evidence supported our hypothesis that the autoinducer-2-mediated, quorum-sensing system, not the AMC, was responsible for luxS mutant regulation.

  2. Quorum Sensing: An Under-Explored Phenomenon in the Phylum Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkade, Ashish V; Mantri, Shailesh S; Patwekar, Umera J; Jangid, Kamlesh

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is known to play a major role in the regulation of secondary metabolite production, especially, antibiotics, and morphogenesis in the phylum Actinobacteria. Although it is one of the largest bacterial phylum, only 25 of the 342 genera have been reported to use quorum sensing. Of these, only nine have accompanying experimental evidence; the rest are only known through bioinformatic analysis of gene/genome sequences. It is evident that this important communication mechanism is not extensively explored in Actinobacteria. In this review, we summarize the different quorum sensing systems while identifying the limitations of the existing screening strategies and addressing the improvements that have taken place in this field in recent years. The γ-butyrolactone system turned out to be almost exclusively limited to this phylum. In addition, methylenomycin furans, AI-2 and other putative AHL-like signaling molecules are also reported in Actinobacteria. The lack of existing screening systems in detecting minute quantities and of a wider range of signaling molecules was a major reason behind the limited information available on quorum sensing in this phylum. However, recent improvements in screening strategies hold a promising future and are likely to increase the discovery of new signaling molecules. Further, the quorum quenching ability in many Actinobacteria has a great potential in controlling the spread of plant and animal pathogens. A systematic and coordinated effort is required to screen and exploit the enormous potential that quorum sensing in the phylum Actinobacteria has to offer for human benefit.

  3. Molecular Mechanism of Quorum-Sensing in Enterococcus faecalis: Its Role in Virulence and Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Liaqat; Goraya, Mohsan Ullah; Arafat, Yasir; Ajmal, Muhammad; Chen, Ji-Long; Yu, Daojin

    2017-05-03

    Quorum-sensing systems control major virulence determinants in Enterococcus faecalis , which causes nosocomial infections. The E . faecalis quorum-sensing systems include several virulence factors that are regulated by the cytolysin operon, which encodes the cytolysin toxin. In addition, the E . faecalis Fsr regulator system controls the expression of gelatinase, serine protease, and enterocin O16. The cytolysin and Fsr virulence factor systems are linked to enterococcal diseases that affect the health of humans and other host models. Therefore, there is substantial interest in understanding and targeting these regulatory pathways to develop novel therapies for enterococcal infection control. Quorum-sensing inhibitors could be potential therapeutic agents for attenuating the pathogenic effects of E . faecalis . Here, we discuss the regulation of cytolysin, the LuxS system, and the Fsr system, their role in E . faecalis -mediated infections, and possible therapeutic approaches to prevent E . faecalis infection.

  4. Quorum Sensing and Expression of Virulence in Pectobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Mäe

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a population density-dependent regulatory mechanism in which gene expression is coupled to the accumulation of a chemical signaling molecule. QS systems are widespread among the plant soft-rotting bacteria. In Pectobacterium carotovorum, at least two QS systems exist being specified by the nature of chemical signals involved. QS in Pectobacterium carotovorum uses N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL based, as well as autoinducer-2 (AI-2 dependent signaling systems. This review will address the importance of the QS in production of virulence factors and interaction of QS with other regulatory systems in Pectobacterium carotovorum.

  5. Glyceryl trinitrate is a novel inhibitor of quorum sensing inPseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hisham A; Shaldam, Moutaz A

    2016-12-01

    Targeting quorum sensing is an alternative approach to antibiotics.Targeting quorum sensing-regulated virulence will disarm the pathogen without exerting pressure on its growth. As a result, emergence of resistance is avoided and the immune system can easily eradicate bacteria. Investigation of the possible inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by glyceryltrinitrate. The quorum sensing inhibiting activity of glyceryl trinitrate was assessed by inhibition of violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472. Its ability to inhibit pyocyanin, protease, biofilm and tolerance to oxidative stress was evaluated. Docking study was performed to study the interference of glyceryl trinitrate with the binding of autoinducers with LasR and rhlR receptors. Glyceryl trinitrate exerted a significant biofilm inhibiting and eradicating activities. It decreased the production of quorum-sensing dependent violacein production. It significantly inhibited the production of pyocyanin and protease and diminished the tolerance against oxidative stress. Molecular docking study showed that glyceryl trinitrate interferes with the binding of autoinducers to their receptors. It could bind to Las Rand rhlr receptors with binding energy of -93.47 and -77.23, respectively. Glyceryl trinitrate can be an antivirulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa topical infections such as burn infections.

  6. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Signaling in Quorum Sensing of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussen, Anetta

    Quorum sensing (QS) is an intercellular communication system by which some bacterial cells are capable of indirectly monitoring their own population density through exchange of signal molecules. The expression of virulence factors is kept low until the population density (signal molecule...... concentration) reaches a threshold value, after which the host system is surprised by a stealth attack. The focus of this study is on the Quorum Sensing regulatory system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa called the Las system. In this thesis, two distinct methods to obtain information about the system are considered...

  7. Quorum Quenching Enzymes and Their Application in Degrading Signal Molecules to Block Quorum Sensing-Dependent Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Xianzhen Li; Xiaoyi Chen; Fang Chen; Yuxin Gao; Zhimin Yu

    2013-01-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, the available options for treating bacterial infections have become very limited, and the search for a novel general antibacterial therapy has received much greater attention. Quorum quenching can be used to control disease in a quorum sensing system by triggering the pathogenic phenotype. The interference with the quorum sensing system by the quorum quenching enzyme is a potential strategy for replacing traditional antibiotics b...

  8. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-23

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer-receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating--a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against "obligate cheaters" quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity.

  9. The effect of the chemical, biological, and physical environment on quorum sensing in structured microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horswill, Alexander R.; Stoodley, Paul; Stewart, Philip S.

    2006-01-01

    As researchers attempt to study quorum sensing in relevant clinical or environmental settings, it is apparent that many factors have the potential to affect signaling. These factors span a range of physical, chemical, and biological variables that can impact signal production, stability and distribution. Optimizing experimental systems to natural or clinical environments may be crucial for defining when and where quorum sensing occurs. These points are illustrated in our case study of S. aureus signaling in biofilms, where signal stability may be affected by the host environment. The basic signaling schemes have been worked out at the molecular level for a few of the major quorum-sensing systems. As these studies continue to refine our understanding of these mechanisms, an emerging challenge is to identify if and when the local environment can affect signaling. PMID:17047948

  10. Quorum Sensing and LuxR Solos in Photorhabdus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameyer, Sophie; Heermann, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial communication via small diffusible molecules to mediate group-coordinated behaviour is commonly referred to as 'quorum sensing'. The prototypical quorum sensing system of Gram-negative bacteria consists of a LuxI-type autoinducer synthase that produces acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signals and a LuxR-type receptor that detects the AHLs to control expression of specific genes. However, many bacteria possess LuxR homologs but lack a cognate LuxI-type AHL-synthase. Those LuxR-type receptors are designated as 'LuxR orphans' or 'solos'. Entomopathogenic bacteria of the genus Photorhabdus all harbour a large number of LuxR solos, more than any other bacteria examined so far. Two novel quorum sensing systems were found to regulate cell clumping in Photorhabdus and therefore affect pathogenicity. In Photorhabdus luminescens and Photorhabdus temperata the LuxR solo PluR senses α-pyrones named 'photopyrones' instead of AHLs, which are produced by the pyrone synthase PpyS. In contrast, Photorhabdus asymbiotica, a closely related insect and human pathogen, has the PluR homolog PauR, which senses dialkylresorcinols produced by the DarABC pathway to regulate pathogenicity. All three Photorhabdus species harbour at least one LuxR solo with an intact AHL-binding motif, which might also allow sensing of exogenous AHLs. However, the majority of the LuxR solos in all Photorhabdus species have a PAS4 signal-binding domain. These receptors are assumed to detect eukaryotic compounds and are proposed to be involved in host sensing. Overall, because of the large number of LuxR solos they encode, bacteria of the genus Photorhabdus are ideal candidates to study and to identify novel bacterial communication networks.

  11. Ultrasensitivity and noise amplification in a model of V. harveyi quorum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze ultrasensitivity in a model of Vibrio harveyi quorum sensing. We consider a feedforward model consisting of two biochemical networks per cell. The first represents the interchange of a signaling molecule (autoinducer) between the cell cytoplasm and an extracellular domain and the binding of intracellular autoinducer to cognate receptors. The unbound and bound receptors within each cell act as kinases and phosphotases, respectively, which then drive a second biochemical network consisting of a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. We ignore subsequent signaling pathways associated with gene regulation and the possible modification in the production rate of an autoinducer (positive feedback). We show how the resulting quorum sensing system exhibits ultrasensitivity with respect to changes in cell density. We also demonstrate how quorum sensing can protect against the noise amplification of fast environmental fluctuations in comparison to a single isolated cell.

  12. Exploiting Quorum Sensing To Confuse Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSarre, Breah

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell-cell communication, or quorum sensing, is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria that is used to coordinate gene expression among local populations. Its use by bacterial pathogens to regulate genes that promote invasion, defense, and spread has been particularly well documented. With the ongoing emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, there is a current need for development of alternative therapeutic strategies. An antivirulence approach by which quorum sensing is impeded has caught on as a viable means to manipulate bacterial processes, especially pathogenic traits that are harmful to human and animal health and agricultural productivity. The identification and development of chemical compounds and enzymes that facilitate quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI) by targeting signaling molecules, signal biogenesis, or signal detection are reviewed here. Overall, the evidence suggests that QSI therapy may be efficacious against some, but not necessarily all, bacterial pathogens, and several failures and ongoing concerns that may steer future studies in productive directions are discussed. Nevertheless, various QSI successes have rightfully perpetuated excitement surrounding new potential therapies, and this review highlights promising QSI leads in disrupting pathogenesis in both plants and animals. PMID:23471618

  13. Inhibition of bacterial quorum sensing by vanilla extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, J H; Rukayadi, Y; Hwang, J-K

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to search for a novel quorum sensing inhibitor and analyse its inhibitory activity. Quorum sensing inhibition was monitored using the Tn-5 mutant, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Vanilla beans (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) were extracted using 75% (v/v) aqueous methanol and added to C. violaceum CV026 cultures. Inhibitory activity was measured by quantifying violacein production using a spectrophotometer. The results have revealed that vanilla extract significantly reduced violacein production in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating inhibition of quorum sensing. Vanilla, a widely used spice and flavour, can inhibit bacterial quorum sensing. The results suggest that the intake of vanilla-containing food materials might promote human health by inhibiting quorum sensing and preventing bacterial pathogenesis. Further studies are required to isolate specific substances from vanilla extract acting as quorum sensing inhibitors.

  14. Synthesis of new 3-and 4-substituted analogues of acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing autoinducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jacob Alsbæk; Severinsen, Rune Eg; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2002-01-01

    The quorum sensing mechanism in Gram-negative bacteria uses small intercellular signal molecules, N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), to control transcription of specific genes in relation to population density. In this communication, we describe the parallel synthesis of new AHL analogues, in which...... substituents have been introduced into the 3- and 4-positions of the lactone ring. These analogues have been screened for their ability to activate and inhibit a Vibrio fischeri LuxI/LuxR-derived quorum sensing reporter system....

  15. Synthesis of furanone-based natural product analogues with quorum sensing antagonist activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmgaard, Thomas; Persson, T.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis of 5- and 3-(1'-hydroxyalkyl)-substituted 5H-furan-2-ones 4a-d and 8a-d as well as 5-alkylidene-5H-furan-2-ones 5a-d is described. A study of the structure-activity relationship of these furanone-based natural product analogues towards two different quorum sensing systems is reporte....... Although the synthesized compounds are not as potent quorum sensing inhibitors as some natural counterparts and a synthetic analogue hereof, interesting structure-activity relationships are seen....

  16. Quorum sensing inhibitory potential and molecular docking studies of sesquiterpene lactones from Vernonia blumeoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, Abubakar Babando; Koorbanally, Neil Anthony; Moodley, Brenda; Singh, Parvesh; Chenia, Hafizah Yousuf

    2016-06-01

    The increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens has focused research on the suppression of bacterial virulence via quorum sensing inhibition strategies, rather than the conventional antimicrobial approach. The anti-virulence potential of eudesmanolide sesquiterpene lactones previously isolated from Vernonia blumeoides was assessed by inhibition of quorum sensing and in silico molecular docking. Inhibition of quorum sensing-controlled violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum was quantified using violacein inhibition assays. Qualitative modulation of quorum sensing activity and signal synthesis was investigated using agar diffusion double ring assays and C. violaceum and Agrobacterium tumefaciens biosensor systems. Inhibition of violacein production was concentration-dependent, with ⩾90% inhibition being obtained with ⩾2.4 mg ml(-1) of crude extracts. Violacein inhibition was significant for the ethyl acetate extract with decreasing inhibition being observed with dichloromethane, hexane and methanol extracts. Violacein inhibition ⩾80% was obtained with 0.071 mg ml(-1) of blumeoidolide B in comparison with ⩾3.6 mg ml(-1) of blumeoidolide A. Agar diffusion double ring assays indicated that only the activity of the LuxI synthase homologue, CviI, was modulated by blumeoidolides A and B, and V. blumeoides crude extracts, suggesting that quorum sensing signal synthesis was down-regulated or competitively inhibited. Finally, molecular docking was conducted to explore the binding conformations of sesquiterpene lactones into the binding sites of quorum sensing regulator proteins, CviR and CviR'. The computed binding energy data suggested that the blumeoidolides have a tendency to inhibit both CviR and CviR' with varying binding affinities. Vernonia eudesmanolide sesquiterpene lactones have the potential to be novel therapeutic agents, which might be important in reducing virulence and pathogenicity of drug-resistant bacteria

  17. Quorum Sensing Disruption in Vibrio harveyi Bacteria by Clay Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sajo P; Scholin, Jonathon; Ching, San; Chi, Fang; Herpfer, Marc

    2018-01-10

    This work describes the use of clay minerals as catalysts for the degradation of quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-dl-homoserine lactone. Certain clay minerals as a result of their surface properties and porosity can catalytically degrade the quorum sensing molecule into smaller fragments. The disruption of quorum sensing by clay in a growing Gram-negative Vibrio harveyi bacteria culture was also studied by monitoring luminescence and population density of the bacteria, wherein quenching of bacterial quorum sensing activity was observed by means of luminescence reduction. The results of this study show that food-grade clays can be used as biocatalysts in disrupting bacterial activity in various media.

  18. Prediction by promoter logic in bacterial quorum sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Rai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quorum-sensing systems mediate chemical communication between bacterial cells, coordinating cell-density-dependent processes like biofilm formation and virulence-factor expression. In the proteobacterial LuxI/LuxR quorum sensing paradigm, a signaling molecule generated by an enzyme (LuxI diffuses between cells and allosterically stimulates a transcriptional regulator (LuxR to activate its cognate promoter (pR. By expressing either LuxI or LuxR in positive feedback from pR, these versatile systems can generate smooth (monostable or abrupt (bistable density-dependent responses to suit the ecological context. Here we combine theory and experiment to demonstrate that the promoter logic of pR - its measured activity as a function of LuxI and LuxR levels - contains all the biochemical information required to quantitatively predict the responses of such feedback loops. The interplay of promoter logic with feedback topology underlies the versatility of the LuxI/LuxR paradigm: LuxR and LuxI positive-feedback systems show dramatically different responses, while a dual positive/negative-feedback system displays synchronized oscillations. These results highlight the dual utility of promoter logic: to probe microscopic parameters and predict macroscopic phenotype.

  19. Prediction by promoter logic in bacterial quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Navneet; Anand, Rajat; Ramkumar, Krishna; Sreenivasan, Varun; Dabholkar, Sugat; Venkatesh, K V; Thattai, Mukund

    2012-01-01

    Quorum-sensing systems mediate chemical communication between bacterial cells, coordinating cell-density-dependent processes like biofilm formation and virulence-factor expression. In the proteobacterial LuxI/LuxR quorum sensing paradigm, a signaling molecule generated by an enzyme (LuxI) diffuses between cells and allosterically stimulates a transcriptional regulator (LuxR) to activate its cognate promoter (pR). By expressing either LuxI or LuxR in positive feedback from pR, these versatile systems can generate smooth (monostable) or abrupt (bistable) density-dependent responses to suit the ecological context. Here we combine theory and experiment to demonstrate that the promoter logic of pR - its measured activity as a function of LuxI and LuxR levels - contains all the biochemical information required to quantitatively predict the responses of such feedback loops. The interplay of promoter logic with feedback topology underlies the versatility of the LuxI/LuxR paradigm: LuxR and LuxI positive-feedback systems show dramatically different responses, while a dual positive/negative-feedback system displays synchronized oscillations. These results highlight the dual utility of promoter logic: to probe microscopic parameters and predict macroscopic phenotype.

  20. Quorum sensing via static coupling demonstrated by Chua's circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamical quorum sensing, the population based phenomenon, is believed to occur when the elements of a system interact via dynamic coupling. In the present work, we demonstrate an alternate scenario, involving static coupling, that could also lead to quorum sensing behavior. These static and dynamic coupling terms have already been employed by Konishi [Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos Appl. Sci. Eng.IJBEE40218-127410.1142/S0218127407018750 17, 2781 (2007)]. In our context, the coupling is defined as static or dynamic, on the basis of the relative time scales at which the surrounding dynamics and the elements' dynamics evolve. According to this, if the variation in the surrounding dynamics happens on a much larger (fast) time scale than that at which the elements' dynamics are varying (such as seconds and μs), then the coupling is considered to be static, otherwise it is considered to be dynamic. A series of experiments have been performed starting from a system of three Chua's circuits to a system of 20 Chua's circuits to study two types of quorum transitions: the emergence and the extinction of global oscillations (period-1). The numerics involving up to 100 Chua's circuits validate the experimental observations.

  1. [Screening and identification of marine fungi against bacterial quorum sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shouliang; Chang, Yajing; Deng, Suping; Wang, Qingchi; Yu, Wengong; Gong, Qianhong

    2011-09-01

    The discovery of quorum sensing (QS) system and its critical role in bacterial virulence have revealed a new way to attack pathogenic bacterium. The pathogenecity of QS deletion mutants decreases significantly. Targeting bacterial QS system is a promising therapeutic approach to control infections and anti-microbial resistance. To obtain natural QS inhibitors from marine organisms, marine fungi (69 strains) were isolated from marine mollusca, and their extracts were screened using improved QSIS2 (Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Selector 2) assay and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. To improve the efficiency of QSIS2 screening, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining method was used. Extract from strain QY013 was found to have QS inhibitory activity. Further experiment indicated that pyocyanin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAOI and violacein in C. violaceum CV026 were reduced by QY013 extract, without affecting bacterial growth. Morphological and 18S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that strain QY013 was most closely related to Penicillium species. The above results suggest that active constituents from QY013 may be used as novel antimicrobial agents against bacterial infection.

  2. Well-known quorum sensing inhibitors do not affect bacterial quorum sensing-regulated bean sprout spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, M; Rasmussen, T B; Andersen, J B; Persson, T; Nielsen, J; Givskov, M; Gram, L

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the potential of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) as food preservative agents in a food product, where bacterial spoilage is controlled by quorum sensing (QS). The effects of well-known QSI were tested on spoilage phenotypes and on QS-regulated genes of a bean sprout spoiling bacterial isolate (Pectobacterium A2JM) in laboratory substrates and in a bean sprout model system. The acylated homoserine lactones (AHL) analogues PenS-AHL and HepS-AHL decreased the specific protease activity of Pectobacterium A2JM in broth but did not reduce the expression of a QS-regulated secretion protein, and were without effect on soft rot of bean sprouts. The QSI ProS-AHL, furanone C-30, patulin, penicillic acid and 4-nitropyridine-N-oxide did not have any effect on protease activity, on gene expression or bean sprout appearance at nongrowth inhibitory concentrations. Extracts from garlic and bean sprouts induced the QS system of Pectobacterium in bean sprouts and a broth system, respectively. Among the several well-known QSI compounds, only PenS-AHL and HepS-AHL, inhibited QS-regulated protease activity of Pectobacterium A2JM in broth cultures, but had no effect on bean sprout spoilage. The QSI compounds must be selected in the specific system in which they are to function and they cannot easily be transferred from one QS system to another.

  3. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Quorum-sensing of bacteria and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoliang; Su, Mingxia

    2009-12-01

    Quorum sensing, or auto induction, as a cell density dependent signaling mechanism in many microorganisms, is triggered via auto inducers which passively diffuse across the bacterial envelope and therefore intracellulaly accumulate only at higher bacterial densities to regulate specialized processes such as genetic competence, bioluminescence, virulence and sporulation. N-acyl homoserine lactones are the most common type of signal molecules. Aquaculture is one of the fastest-growing food-producing industries, but disease outbreaks caused by pathogenic bacteria are a significant constraint on the development of the sector worldwide. Many of these pathogens have been found to be controlled by their quorum sensing systems. As there is relevance between the pathogenic bacteria's virulence factor expression and their auto inducers, quorum quenching is a new effective anti-infective strategy to control infections caused by bacterial pathogens in aquaculture. The techniques used to do this mainly include the following: (1) the inhibition of signal molecule biosynthesis, (2) blocking signal transduction, and (3) chemical inactivation and biodegradation of signal molecules. To provide a basis for finding alternative means of controlling aquatic diseases by quorum quenching instead of treatment by antibiotics and disinfectants, we will discuss the examination, purification and identification of auto inducers in this paper.

  4. Interference in Bacterial Quorum Sensing: A Biopharmaceutical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémy, Benjamin; Mion, Sonia; Plener, Laure; Elias, Mikael; Chabrière, Eric; Daudé, David

    2018-01-01

    Numerous bacteria utilize molecular communication systems referred to as quorum sensing (QS) to synchronize the expression of certain genes regulating, among other aspects, the expression of virulence factors and the synthesis of biofilm. To achieve this process, bacteria use signaling molecules, known as autoinducers (AIs), as chemical messengers to share information. Naturally occurring strategies that interfere with bacterial signaling have been extensively studied in recent years, examining their potential to control bacteria. To interfere with QS, bacteria use quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) to block the action of AIs and quorum quenching (QQ) enzymes to degrade signaling molecules. Recent studies have shown that these strategies are promising routes to decrease bacterial pathogenicity and decrease biofilms, potentially enhancing bacterial susceptibility to antimicrobial agents including antibiotics and bacteriophages. The efficacy of QSIs and QQ enzymes has been demonstrated in various animal models and are now considered in the development of new medical devices against bacterial infections, including dressings, and catheters for enlarging the therapeutic arsenal against bacteria.

  5. Interference in Bacterial Quorum Sensing: A Biopharmaceutical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Rémy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous bacteria utilize molecular communication systems referred to as quorum sensing (QS to synchronize the expression of certain genes regulating, among other aspects, the expression of virulence factors and the synthesis of biofilm. To achieve this process, bacteria use signaling molecules, known as autoinducers (AIs, as chemical messengers to share information. Naturally occurring strategies that interfere with bacterial signaling have been extensively studied in recent years, examining their potential to control bacteria. To interfere with QS, bacteria use quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs to block the action of AIs and quorum quenching (QQ enzymes to degrade signaling molecules. Recent studies have shown that these strategies are promising routes to decrease bacterial pathogenicity and decrease biofilms, potentially enhancing bacterial susceptibility to antimicrobial agents including antibiotics and bacteriophages. The efficacy of QSIs and QQ enzymes has been demonstrated in various animal models and are now considered in the development of new medical devices against bacterial infections, including dressings, and catheters for enlarging the therapeutic arsenal against bacteria.

  6. Quorum sensing - A novel target for the treatment of biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Eberl, L.; Nielsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    communication systems (quorum sensing systems) in Gram-negative bacteria which are believed to orchestrate important temporal events during the infectious process, including the production of virulence factors and the formation of biofilms, has afforded a novel opportunity to control the activity of infecting...

  7. Bacillus globigii cell size is influenced by variants of the quorum sensing peptide extracellular death factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandij, T.; Kaman, W.E.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Bikker, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin modules are necessary for the mode of action of several antibiotics. One of the most studied toxin-antitoxin modules is the quorum sensing—dependent MazEF system in Escherichia coli. The quorum sensing factor in this system is called the extracellular death factor (EDF), a linear

  8. Evaluation of anti-quorum-sensing activity of edible plants and fruits through inhibition of the N-acyl-homoserine lactone system in Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musthafa, K Syed; Ravi, A Veera; Annapoorani, A; Packiavathy, I Sybiya Vasantha; Pandian, S Karutha

    2010-01-01

    To find out an alternative strategy to antibiotic usage against bacterial infection. The purpose of this study is to describe the quorum-sensing (QS) inhibitory activity of edible plants and fruits against N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum and virulence factor expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Aqueous extracts of Ananas comosus (Bromeliaceae), Musa paradiciaca (Musaceae), Manilkara zapota (Sapotaceae) and Ocimum sanctum (Lamiaceae) were prepared and anti-QS activity of each extract was tested against AHL-mediated phenotypic expressions of C. violaceum and PAO1. Most of these extracts showed significant reduction in AHL-mediated violacein production in C. violaceum as well as pyocyanin pigment, staphylolytic protease, elastase production and biofilm formation in PAO1. However, these extracts were not inhibitory to bacterial growth, revealing that the QS inhibition by the extracts is not related to static or killing effects on the bacteria. The present study identified the anti-QS activity of A. comosus, M. paradiciaca, M. zapota and O. sanctum. An AHL-inactivating compound from these plant sources can be used as an alternative to antibiotic compounds to prevent AHL-mediated bacterial infection in higher organisms. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Impact of Environmental Cues on Staphylococcal Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R

    2016-06-10

    Staphylococci are commensal bacteria that colonize the epithelial surfaces of humans and many other mammals. These bacteria can also attach to implanted medical devices and develop surface-associated biofilm communities that resist clearance by host defenses and available chemotherapies. These communities are often associated with persistent staphylococcal infections that place a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. Understanding the regulatory program that controls staphylococcal biofilm development, as well as the environmental conditions that modulate this program, has been a focal point of research in recent years. A central regulator controlling biofilm development is a peptide quorum-sensing system, also called the accessory gene regulator or agr system. In the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, the agr system controls production of exo-toxins and exo-enzymes essential for causing infections, and simultaneously, it modulates the ability of this pathogen to attach to surfaces and develop a biofilm, or to disperse from the biofilm state. In this review, we explore advances on the interconnections between the agr quorum-sensing system and biofilm mechanisms, and topics covered include recent findings on how different environmental conditions influence quorum sensing, the impact on biofilm development, and ongoing questions and challenges in the field. As our understanding of the quorum sensing and biofilm interconnection advances, there are growing opportunities to take advantage of this knowledge and develop therapeutic approaches to control staphylococcal infections. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Glyceryl trinitrate is a novel inhibitor of quorum sensing in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Investigation of the possible inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by glyceryltrinitrate. Methods: The quorum sensing inhibiting activity of glyceryl trinitrate was assessed by inhibition of violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472. Its ability to inhibit ...

  11. Repurposing metformin as a quorum sensing inhibitor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Quorum sensing is a mechanism of intercellular communication that controls the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Inhibition of quorum sensing can disarm the virulence factors without exerting stress on bacterial growth that leads to emergence of antibiotic resistance. Objectives: ...

  12. Fremmedlegemeinfektioner--nyt om biofilm og quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Ciofu, Oana

    2007-01-01

    . Bacteria in biofilms communicate by means of quorum sensing which activates genes for virulence factors. Biofilms can be prevented by antibiotic prophylaxis or early therapy or by quorum sensing inhibitors which make them susceptible to antibiotics and phagocytosis. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov-26...

  13. Glyceryl trinitrate is a novel inhibitor of quorum sensing in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GTN could inhibit the violacein pigment production that is under quorum-sensing control in the reporter strain. Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472. This constitutes the biological evidence of the quorum sensing inhibit- ing activity of GTN. Moreover, molecular docking study showed that GTN is a competitive inhibitor ...

  14. Identification of quorum-sensing regulated proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arevalo-Ferro, C.; Hentzer, Morten; Reil, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is the major pathogen in cystic fibrosis. The bacterium utilizes two interrelated quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which rely o...

  15. Quorum sensing-controlled biofilm development in Serratia liquefaciens MG1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labbate, M.; Queek, S.Y.; Koh, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    Serratia liquefaciens MG1 contains an N-acylhomoserine lactone-mediated quorum-sensing system that is known to regulate swarming motility colonization. In this study, we describe for S. liquefaciens MG1 the development of a novel biofilm consisting of cell aggregates and differentiated cell types...

  16. Disulfide Bond-Containing Ajoene Analogues As Novel Quorum Sensing Inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fong, July; Yuan, Mingjun; Jakobsen, Tim Holm

    2017-01-01

    Since its discovery 22 years ago, the bacterial cell-to-cell communication system, termed quorum sensing (QS), has shown potential as antipathogenic target. Previous studies reported that ajoene from garlic inhibits QS in opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, screening...

  17. Quorum Sensing and Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Lung Infection of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, T.; Jensen, P.O.; Jakobsen, T.H.

    2010-01-01

    from the intermittent strains. Dominating changes are the switch to mucoidity ( alginate overproduction) and loss of epigenetic regulation of virulence such as the Quorum Sensing (QS). To elucidate the dynamics of P. aeruginosa QS systems during long term infection of the CF lung, we have investigated...

  18. Solonamide B Inhibits Quorum Sensing and Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Mediated Killing of Human Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs) to sensor...

  19. Quorum sensing inhibitors: how strong is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoirdt, Tom; Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom

    2013-12-01

    Because of its promising effect as an alternative to antibiotics, quorum sensing disruption is an intensively studied field, and there are many studies that describe the quorum sensing inhibitory activity of natural and synthetic compounds. In this opinion article, we present an overview of recent literature with respect to quorum sensing inhibitors. Most of this research is based on experiments with quorum sensing signal molecule reporter strains. However, these experiments are prone to bias due to other effects compounds may have on reporter strains. We argue that researchers should perform adequate control experiments and should carefully assess toxicity of the compounds in the bacterial species they are working with in order to confirm that what they observe really is quorum sensing inhibition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Artificially constructed quorum-sensing circuits are used for subtle control of bacterial population density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoshou Wang

    Full Text Available Vibrio fischeri is a typical quorum-sensing bacterium for which lux box, luxR, and luxI have been identified as the key elements involved in quorum sensing. To decode the quorum-sensing mechanism, an artificially constructed cell-cell communication system has been built. In brief, the system expresses several programmed cell-death BioBricks and quorum-sensing genes driven by the promoters lux pR and PlacO-1 in Escherichia coli cells. Their transformation and expression was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and sequencing. To evaluate its performance, viable cell numbers at various time periods were investigated. Our results showed that bacteria expressing killer proteins corresponding to ribosome binding site efficiency of 0.07, 0.3, 0.6, or 1.0 successfully sensed each other in a population-dependent manner and communicated with each other to subtly control their population density. This was also validated using a proposed simple mathematical model.

  1. Modulating the Global Response Regulator, LuxO ofV. choleraeQuorum Sensing System Using a Pyrazine Dicarboxylic Acid Derivative (PDCApy): An Antivirulence Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hema, M; Vasudevan, Sahana; Balamurugan, P; Adline Princy, S

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative pathogen which causes acute diarrhoeal disease, cholera by the expression of virulence genes through quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The QS circuit of V. cholerae is controlled by the global quorum regulator, LuxO, which at low cell density (LCD) state produces major virulence factors such as, toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) to mediate infection. On the contrary, at the high cell density (HCD) state the virulent genes are downregulated and the vibrios are detached from the host intestinal epithelial cells, promoted by HapA protease. Hence, targeting the global regulator LuxO would be a promising approach to modulate the QS to curtail V. cholerae pathogenesis. In our earlier studies, LuxO targeted ligand, 2,3 pyrazine dicarboxylic acid (PDCA) and its derivatives having desired pharmacophore properties were chemically synthesized and were shown to have biofilm inhibition as well as synergistic activity with the conventionally used antibiotics. In the present study, the QS modulatory effect of the PDCA derivative with pyrrolidine moiety designated as PDCA py against the V. cholerae virulence gene expression was analyzed at various growth phases. The data significantly showed a several fold reduction in the expression of the genes, tcp and ct whereas the expression of hapR was upregulated at the LCD state. In addition, PDCA py reduced the adhesion and invasion of the vibrios onto the INT407 intestinal cell lines. Collectively, our data suggest that PDCA py could be a potential QS modulator (QSM) for the antivirulence therapeutic approach.

  2. Modulating the Global Response Regulator, LuxO of V. cholerae Quorum Sensing System Using a Pyrazine Dicarboxylic Acid Derivative (PDCApy): An Antivirulence Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hema, M.; Vasudevan, Sahana; Balamurugan, P.; Adline Princy, S.

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative pathogen which causes acute diarrhoeal disease, cholera by the expression of virulence genes through quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The QS circuit of V. cholerae is controlled by the global quorum regulator, LuxO, which at low cell density (LCD) state produces major virulence factors such as, toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) to mediate infection. On the contrary, at the high cell density (HCD) state the virulent genes are downregulated and the vibrios are detached from the host intestinal epithelial cells, promoted by HapA protease. Hence, targeting the global regulator LuxO would be a promising approach to modulate the QS to curtail V. cholerae pathogenesis. In our earlier studies, LuxO targeted ligand, 2,3 pyrazine dicarboxylic acid (PDCA) and its derivatives having desired pharmacophore properties were chemically synthesized and were shown to have biofilm inhibition as well as synergistic activity with the conventionally used antibiotics. In the present study, the QS modulatory effect of the PDCA derivative with pyrrolidine moiety designated as PDCApy against the V. cholerae virulence gene expression was analyzed at various growth phases. The data significantly showed a several fold reduction in the expression of the genes, tcp and ct whereas the expression of hapR was upregulated at the LCD state. In addition, PDCApy reduced the adhesion and invasion of the vibrios onto the INT407 intestinal cell lines. Collectively, our data suggest that PDCApy could be a potential QS modulator (QSM) for the antivirulence therapeutic approach. PMID:29075619

  3. Modulating the Global Response Regulator, LuxO of V. cholerae Quorum Sensing System Using a Pyrazine Dicarboxylic Acid Derivative (PDCApy: An Antivirulence Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hema

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative pathogen which causes acute diarrhoeal disease, cholera by the expression of virulence genes through quorum sensing (QS mechanism. The QS circuit of V. cholerae is controlled by the global quorum regulator, LuxO, which at low cell density (LCD state produces major virulence factors such as, toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP and cholera toxin (CT to mediate infection. On the contrary, at the high cell density (HCD state the virulent genes are downregulated and the vibrios are detached from the host intestinal epithelial cells, promoted by HapA protease. Hence, targeting the global regulator LuxO would be a promising approach to modulate the QS to curtail V. cholerae pathogenesis. In our earlier studies, LuxO targeted ligand, 2,3 pyrazine dicarboxylic acid (PDCA and its derivatives having desired pharmacophore properties were chemically synthesized and were shown to have biofilm inhibition as well as synergistic activity with the conventionally used antibiotics. In the present study, the QS modulatory effect of the PDCA derivative with pyrrolidine moiety designated as PDCApy against the V. cholerae virulence gene expression was analyzed at various growth phases. The data significantly showed a several fold reduction in the expression of the genes, tcp and ct whereas the expression of hapR was upregulated at the LCD state. In addition, PDCApy reduced the adhesion and invasion of the vibrios onto the INT407 intestinal cell lines. Collectively, our data suggest that PDCApy could be a potential QS modulator (QSM for the antivirulence therapeutic approach.

  4. A common evolutionary pathway for maintaining quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bai-Min; Yan, Hui-Cong; Wang, Mei-Zhen; Li, Na; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2018-02-01

    In the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the synthesis and secretion of extracellular protease is a typical cooperative behavior regulated by quorum sensing. However, this type of cooperative behavior is easily exploited by other individuals who do not synthesize public goods, which is known as the "tragedy of the commons". Here P. aeruginosa was inoculated into casein media with different nitrogen salts added. In casein broth, protease (a type of public good) is necessary for bacterial growth. After 30 days of sequential transfer, some groups propagated stably and avoided "tragedy of the commons". The evolved cooperators who continued to synthesize protease were isolated from these stable groups. By comparing the characteristics of quorum sensing in these cooperators, an identical evolutionary pattern was found. A variety of cooperative behaviors regulated by quorum sensing, such as the synthesis and secretion of protease and signals, were significantly reduced during the process of evolution. Such reductions improved the efficiency of cooperation, helping to prevent cheating. In addition, the production of pyocyanin, which is regulated by the RhlIR system, increased during the process of evolution, possibly due to its role in stabilizing the cooperation. This study contributes towards our understanding of the evolution of quorum sensing of P. aeruginosa.

  5. Quorum sensing integrates environmental cues, cell density and cell history to control bacterial competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Gámez, Stefany; Sorg, Robin A; Domenech, Arnau; Kjos, Morten; Weissing, Franz J; van Doorn, G Sander; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2017-10-11

    Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes competent for genetic transformation when exposed to an autoinducer peptide known as competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). This peptide was originally described as a quorum-sensing signal, enabling individual cells to regulate competence in response to population density. However, recent studies suggest that CSP may instead serve as a probe for sensing environmental cues, such as antibiotic stress or environmental diffusion. Here, we show that competence induction can be simultaneously influenced by cell density, external pH, antibiotic-induced stress, and cell history. Our experimental data is explained by a mathematical model where the environment and cell history modify the rate at which cells produce or sense CSP. Taken together, model and experiments indicate that autoinducer concentration can function as an indicator of cell density across environmental conditions, while also incorporating information on environmental factors or cell history, allowing cells to integrate cues such as antibiotic stress into their quorum-sensing response. This unifying perspective may apply to other debated quorum-sensing systems.Peptide CSP regulates natural competence in pneumococci and has been proposed as a quorum-sensing signal or a probe for sensing environmental cues. Here, the authors show that CSP levels can indeed act as an indicator of cell density and also incorporate information on environmental factors or cell history.

  6. Switches induced by quorum sensing in a model of enzyme-loaded microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánsági, Tamás; Taylor, Annette F

    2017-03-01

    Quorum sensing refers to the ability of bacteria and other single-celled organisms to respond to changes in cell density or number with population-wide changes in behaviour. Here, simulations were performed to investigate quorum sensing in groups of diffusively coupled enzyme microparticles using a well-characterized autocatalytic reaction which raises the pH of the medium: hydrolysis of urea by urease. The enzyme urease is found in both plants and microorganisms, and has been widely exploited in engineering processes. We demonstrate how increases in group size can be used to achieve a sigmoidal switch in pH at high enzyme loading, oscillations in pH at intermediate enzyme loading and a bistable, hysteretic switch at low enzyme loading. Thus, quorum sensing can be exploited to obtain different types of response in the same system, depending on the enzyme concentration. The implications for microorganisms in colonies are discussed, and the results could help in the design of synthetic quorum sensing for biotechnology applications such as drug delivery. © 2018 The Author(s).

  7. Quorum Sensing and Quorum Quenching in the Phycosphere of Phytoplankton: a Case of Chemical Interactions in Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Jean Luc; Stien, Didier; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Lami, Raphaël

    2016-12-01

    The interactions between bacteria and phytoplankton regulate many important biogeochemical reactions in the marine environment, including those in the global carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles. At the microscopic level, it is now well established that important consortia of bacteria colonize the phycosphere, the immediate environment of phytoplankton cells. In this microscale environment, abundant bacterial cells are organized in a structured biofilm, and exchange information through the diffusion of small molecules called semiochemicals. Among these processes, quorum sensing plays a particular role as, when a sufficient abundance of cells is reached, it allows bacteria to coordinate their gene expression and physiology at the population level. In contrast, quorum quenching mechanisms are employed by many different types of microorganisms that limit the coordination of antagonistic bacteria. This review synthesizes quorum sensing and quorum quenching mechanisms evidenced to date in the phycosphere, emphasizing the implications that these signaling systems have for the regulation of bacterial communities and their activities. The diversity of chemical compounds involved in these processes is examined. We further review the bacterial functions regulated in the phycosphere by quorum sensing, which include biofilm formation, nutrient acquisition, and emission of algaecides. We also discuss quorum quenching compounds as antagonists of quorum sensing, their function in the phycosphere, and their potential biotechnological applications. Overall, the current state of the art demonstrates that quorum sensing and quorum quenching regulate a balance between a symbiotic and a parasitic way of life between bacteria and their phytoplankton host.

  8. How Quorum Sensing Connects Sporulation to Necrotrophism in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Perchat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate adaptation properties, cell fate or commitment to sporulation. The infectious cycle of Bacillus thuringiensis in the insect host is a powerful model to investigate the role of quorum sensing in natural conditions. It is tuned by communication systems regulators belonging to the RNPP family and directly regulated by re-internalized signaling peptides. One such RNPP regulator, NprR, acts in the presence of its cognate signaling peptide NprX as a transcription factor, regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of these bacteria in the insect cadaver. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of NprX and independently of its transcriptional activator function, NprR negatively controls sporulation. NprR inhibits expression of Spo0A-regulated genes by preventing the KinA-dependent phosphorylation of the phosphotransferase Spo0F, thus delaying initiation of the sporulation process. This NprR function displays striking similarities with the Rap proteins, which also belong to the RNPP family, but are devoid of DNA-binding domain and indirectly control gene expression via protein-protein interactions in Bacilli. Conservation of the Rap residues directly interacting with Spo0F further suggests a common inhibition of the sporulation phosphorelay. The crystal structure of apo NprR confirms that NprR displays a highly flexible Rap-like structure. We propose a molecular regulatory mechanism in which key residues of the bifunctional regulator NprR are directly and alternatively involved in its two functions. NprX binding switches NprR from a dimeric inhibitor of sporulation to a tetrameric transcriptional activator involved in the necrotrophic lifestyle of B. thuringiensis. NprR thus tightly coordinates sporulation and necrotrophism, ensuring survival and dissemination of the bacteria during host infection.

  9. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong-Min Ryu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90–166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90–166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90–166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL or -degrading (AiiA genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90–166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90–166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90–166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90–166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90–166.

  10. Qualitative and Quantitative Determination of Quorum Sensing Inhibition In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Alhede, Maria; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl

    2018-01-01

    The formation of biofilms in conjunction with quorum sensing (QS) regulated expression of virulence by opportunistic pathogens contributes significantly to immune evasion and tolerance to a variety of antimicrobial treatments. The present protocol describes methods to determine the in vitro...

  11. Transcriptional regulator GntR of Brucella abortus regulates cytotoxicity, induces the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and affects expression of the type IV secretion system and quorum sensing system in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shuli; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Jinliang; Xi, Li; Zhang, Junbo; Chen, Chuangfu

    2017-03-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms of Brucella are still poorly understood. GntR is a transcriptional regulator and plays an important role in the intracellular survival of Brucella. To investigate whether GntR is involved in the cytotoxicity of Brucella abortus (B. abortus), we created a 2308ΔgntR mutant of B. abortus 2308 (S2308). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxicity assays using a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) show that high-dose infection with the parental strain produces a high level of cytotoxicity to macrophages, but the 2308ΔgntR mutant exhibits a very low level of cytotoxicity, indicating that mutation of GntR impairs the cytotoxicity of B. abortus to macrophages. After the macrophages are infected with 2308ΔgntR, the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) increase and are slightly higher than that for the S2308 infected group, indicating that the 2308ΔgntR mutant could induce the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The virulence factor detection experiments indicate that genes involved in the type IV secretion system (T4SS) and quorum sensing system (QSS) are down-regulated in 2308ΔgntR. The lower levels of survival of 2308ΔgntR under various stress conditions and the increased sensitivity of 2308ΔgntR to polymyxin B suggest that GntR is a virulence factor and that deletion of gntR reduces of B. abortus to stress conditions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GntR is involved in the cytotoxicity, virulence and intracellular survival of B. abortus during its infection.

  12. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (pquorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A study on the role that quorum sensing play in antibiotic-resistant plasmid conjugative transfer in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueheng; Ma, Qingping; Su, Bingmei; Chen, Rui; Lin, Juan; Lin, Zhifen; Wang, Dali; Yu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    Horizontal genes transfer (HGT) plays an important role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment. However, the mechanisms of HGT of ARGs under the influence of antibiotics in sub-MIC remain rarely explored. Moreover, given its collective nature, HGT was considered to be relative to quorum sensing (QS) system. To investigate whether QS has any impact on horizontal gene transfer of ARGs, experiments were conducted to determine the conjugative efficiency of plasmid RP4 on Escherichia coli (E.coli) under the influences of tetracyclines (TCs), quorum sensing autoinducers (AIs) and quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs). The results indicated that the sub-MIC TCs could facilitate the conjugative transfer of RP4, a process which could be enhanced by AIs but inhibited by QSIs. This study demonstrated the roles that QS played in the dissemination of ARGs, and provided theoretical insights into the mechanism of HGT of ARGs in the environment.

  14. Realization of Morphing Logic Gates in a Repressilator with Quorum Sensing Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Vidit; Kang, Shivpal Singh; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how a genetic ring oscillator network with quorum sensing feedback can operate as a robust logic gate. Specifically we show how a range of logic functions, namely AND/NAND, OR/NOR and XOR/XNOR, can be realized by the system, thus yielding a versatile unit that can morph between different logic operations. We further demonstrate the capacity of this system to yield complementary logic operations in parallel. Our results then indicate the computing potential of this biological sy...

  15. An inhibitor of bacterial quorum sensing reduces mortalities caused by vibriosis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Maria; Buch, Christiane; Austin, B.

    2004-01-01

    -100% in challenge controls to 4-40%, in treated groups. Furanone C-30 had no effect in an immersion challenge system, probably due to a very high water exchange and a rapid dilution of furanone C-30. Growth and Survival of V. anguillarum were not affected by the concentrations of furanone C-30 used in the challenge......The fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum produces quorum sensing signal molecules, N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), which in several Gram-negative human and plant pathogenic bacteria regulate virulence factors. Expression of these factors can be blocked using specific quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs...

  16. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T) and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidans (T), the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidans (T) cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270(T) genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis.

  17. Identification of quorum-sensing regulated proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arevalo-Ferro, C.; Hentzer, Morten; Reil, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is the major pathogen in cystic fibrosis. The bacterium utilizes two interrelated quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which rely......Ap, are components of the two distinct haem-uptake systems present in P. aeruginosa. In agreement with the finding that both proteins are positively regulated by the QS cascade, we show that the lasI rhlI double mutant grows poorly with haemoglobin as the only iron source when compared with the wild type....... These results add haemoglobin utilization to the list of phenotypes controlled through QS in P. aeruginosa. The surprisingly high number of AHL-regulated proteins relative to the number of regulated genes suggests that quorum-sensing control also operates via post-transcriptional mechanisms. To strengthen...

  18. Engineered Control of Genetic Variability Reveals Interplay among Quorum Sensing, Feedback Regulation, and Biochemical Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, Yadira; Vignoni, Alejandro; Picó, Jesús

    2017-10-20

    Stochastic fluctuations in gene expression trigger both beneficial and harmful consequences for cell behavior. Therefore, achieving a desired mean protein expression level while minimizing noise is of interest in many applications, including robust protein production systems in industrial biotechnology. Here, we consider a synthetic gene circuit combining intracellular negative feedback and cell-to-cell communication based on quorum sensing. Accounting for both intrinsic and extrinsic noise, stochastic simulations allow us to analyze the capability of the circuit to reduce noise strength as a function of its parameters. We obtain mean expression levels and noise strengths for all species under different scenarios, showing good agreement with system-wide available experimental data of protein abundance and noise in Escherichia coli. Our in silico experiments, validated by preliminary in vivo results, reveal significant noise attenuation in gene expression through the interplay between quorum sensing and negative feedback and highlight the differential role that they play in regard to intrinsic and extrinsic noise.

  19. The BpeAB-OprB efflux pump of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b does not play a role in quorum sensing, virulence factor production, or extrusion of aminoglycosides but is a broad-spectrum drug efflux system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mima, Takehiko; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2010-08-01

    Most Burkholderia pseudomallei strains are intrinsically aminoglycoside resistant, mainly due to AmrAB-OprA-mediated efflux. Rare naturally occurring or genetically engineered mutants lacking this pump are aminoglycoside susceptible despite the fact that they also encode and express BpeAB-OprB, which was reported to mediate efflux of aminoglycosides in the Singapore strain KHW. To reassess the role of BpeAB-OprB in B. pseudomallei aminoglycoside resistance, we used mutants overexpressing or lacking this pump in either AmrAB-OprA-proficient or -deficient strain 1026b backgrounds. Our data show that BpeAB-OprB does not mediate efflux of aminoglycosides but is a multidrug efflux system which extrudes macrolides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, acriflavine, and, to a lesser extent, chloramphenicol. Phylogenetically, BpeAB-OprB is closely related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM, which has a similar substrate spectrum. AmrAB-OprA is most closely related to MexXY, the only P. aeruginosa efflux pump known to extrude aminoglycosides. Since BpeAB-OprB in strain KHW was also implicated in playing a major role in export of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules and in expression of diverse virulence factors, we explored whether this was also true in the strain 1026b background. The results showed that BpeAB-OprB was not required for AHL export, and mutants lacking this efflux system exhibited normal swimming motility and siderophore production, which were severely impaired in KHW bpeAB-oprB mutants. Biofilm formation was impaired in 1026b Delta(amrRAB-oprA) and Delta(amrRAB-oprA) Delta(bpeAB-oprB) mutants. At present, we do not know why our BpeAB-OprB susceptibility and virulence factor expression results with 1026b and its derivatives are different from those previously published for Singapore strain KHW.

  20. The effect of phosphate deficiency on quorum sensing signaling pathway of Sinorhizobium meliloti

    OpenAIRE

    Najmeh Pakdaman; akbar mostajeran

    2015-01-01

      Introduction : Phosphorus is one of the most essential macroelements for bacterial cells. Since phosphate (PO4-3) limitation is frequently encountered in soils, bacteria developed some mechanisms in response to this sever condition. Phosphate transporter (PstS) and proteins involved in quorum sensing (QS) signaling pathway are affected by mediating PhoB, response regulator, following phosphate starvation. QS system of Sinorhizobium meliloti composed of at least three genes of sinI (autoindu...

  1. Synthesis of furanone-based natural product analogues with quorum sensing antagonist activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmgaard, Thomas; Persson, T.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis of 5- and 3-(1'-hydroxyalkyl)-substituted 5H-furan-2-ones 4a-d and 8a-d as well as 5-alkylidene-5H-furan-2-ones 5a-d is described. A study of the structure-activity relationship of these furanone-based natural product analogues towards two different quorum sensing systems is reported...

  2. Linear peptidomimetics as potent antagonists of Staphylococcus aureus agr quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karathanasi, Georgia; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Baldry, Mara

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Increasing problems with antimicrobial resistance has prompted the development of alternative treatment strategies, including antivirulence approaches targeting virulence regulation such as the agr quorum sen......, these peptidomimetics may be valuable starting scaffolds for the development of new inhibitors of staphylococcal quorum sensing and virulence gene expression.......Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Increasing problems with antimicrobial resistance has prompted the development of alternative treatment strategies, including antivirulence approaches targeting virulence regulation such as the agr quorum...... sensing system. agr is naturally induced by cyclic auto-inducing peptides (AIPs) binding to the AgrC receptor and cyclic peptide inhibitors have been identified competing with AIP binding to AgrC. Here, we disclose that small, linear peptidomimetics can act as specific and potent inhibitors of the S...

  3. Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry for quantitative measurement of quorum sensing inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Daniel A; Zich, David B; Ettefagh, Keivan A; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R; Cech, Nadja B

    2016-08-01

    Drug resistant bacterial infections cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, and new strategies are needed for the treatment of these infections. The anti-virulence approach, which targets non-essential virulence factors in bacteria, has been proposed as one way to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. Virulence in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and many other Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is controlled by the quorum sensing system. Thus, there is excellent therapeutic potential for compounds that target this system. With this project, we have developed and validated a novel approach for measuring quorum sensing inhibition in vitro. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) was employed to directly measure one of the important outputs of the quorum sensing system in MRSA, auto-inducing peptide I (AIP I) in bacterial cultures. The method for AIP detection was validated and demonstrated limits of detection and quantification of range of 0.0035μM and 0.10μM, respectively. It was shown that the known quorum sensing inhibitor ambuic acid inhibited AIP I production by a clinically relevant strain of MRSA, with an IC50 value of 2.6±0.2μM. The new method performed similarly to previously published methods using GFP reporter assays, but has the advantage of being applicable without the need for engineering of a reporter strain. Additionally, the mass spectrometry-based method could be applicable in situations where interference by the inhibitor prevents the application of fluorescence-based methods. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Quorum-sensing-directed protein expression in Serratia proteamaculans B5a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Allan Beck; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo

    2003-01-01

    N-Acyl-L-homoserine-lactone-producing Serratia species are frequently encountered in spoiling foods of vegetable and protein origin. The role of quorum sensing in the food spoiling properties of these bacteria is currently being investigated. A set of luxR luxI homologous genes encoding a putative...... quorum sensor was identified in the N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL)-producing Serratia proteamaculans strain B5a. The 3-oxo-C6-HSL synthase SprI showed 79% similarity with Esal from Pantoea stewartii and the putative regulatory protein SprR was 86% similar to the SpnR of Serratia...... marcescens. Proteome analysis suggested that the presence of at least 39 intracellular proteins was affected by the 3-oxo-C6-HSL-based quorum sensing system. The lipB-encoded secretion system was identified as one target gene of the quorum sensing system. LipB was required for the production of extracellular...

  5. Spatial dispersal of bacterial colonies induces a dynamical transition from local to global quorum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Boedicker, James Q.

    2016-12-01

    Bacteria communicate using external chemical signals called autoinducers (AI) in a process known as quorum sensing (QS). QS efficiency is reduced by both limitations of AI diffusion and potential interference from neighboring strains. There is thus a need for predictive theories of how spatial community structure shapes information processing in complex microbial ecosystems. As a step in this direction, we apply a reaction-diffusion model to study autoinducer signaling dynamics in a single-species community as a function of the spatial distribution of colonies in the system. We predict a dynamical transition between a local quorum sensing (LQS) regime, with the AI signaling dynamics primarily controlled by the local population densities of individual colonies, and a global quorum sensing (GQS) regime, with the dynamics being dependent on collective intercolony diffusive interactions. The crossover between LQS to GQS is intimately connected to a trade-off between the signaling network's latency, or speed of activation, and its throughput, or the total spatial range over which all the components of the system communicate.

  6. Quorum sensing in CD4+ T cell homeostasis: a hypothesis and a model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso R.M. Almeida

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers is believed to be due to competition between cellular populations for a common niche of restricted size, defined by the combination of interactions and trophic factors required for cell survival. Here we propose a new mechanism: homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers could also be achieved by the ability of lymphocytes to perceive the density of their own populations. Such a mechanism would be reminiscent of the primordial quorum sensing systems used by bacteria, in which some bacteria sense the accumulation of bacterial metabolites secreted by other elements of the population, allowing them to count the number of cells present and adapt their growth accordingly. We propose that homeostasis of CD4+ T cell numbers may occur via a quorum-sensing-like mechanism, where IL-2 is produced by activated CD4+ T cells and sensed by a population of CD4+ Treg cells that expresses the high-affinity IL-2Rα-chain and can regulate the number of activated IL-2-producing CD4+ T cells and the total CD4+T cell population. In other words, CD4+ T cell populations can restrain their growth by monitoring the number of activated cells, thus preventing uncontrolled lymphocyte proliferation during immune responses. We hypothesize that malfunction of this quorum-sensing mechanism may lead to uncontrolled T cell activation and autoimmunity. Finally, we present a mathematical model that describes the role of IL-2 and quorum-sensing mechanisms in CD4+ T cell homeostasis during an immune response.

  7. Coprinopsis cinerea intracellular lactonases hydrolyze quorum sensing molecules of Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckli, Martina; Lin, Chia-Wei; Sieber, Ramon; Plaza, David F; Ohm, Robin A; Künzler, Markus

    2017-05-01

    Biofilm formation on fungal hyphae and production of antifungal molecules are strategies of bacteria in their competition with fungi for nutrients. Since these strategies are often coordinated and under control of quorum sensing by the bacteria, interference with this bacterial communication system can be used as a counter-strategy by the fungi in this competition. Hydrolysis of N-acyl-homoserine lactones (HSL), a quorum sensing molecule used by Gram-negative bacteria, by fungal cultures has been demonstrated. However, the enzymes that are responsible for this activity, have not been identified. In this study, we identified and characterized two paralogous HSL hydrolyzing enzymes from the coprophilous fungus Coprinopsis cinerea. The C. cinerea HSL lactonases belong to the metallo-β-lactamase family and show sequence homology to and a similar biochemical activity as the well characterized lactonase AiiA from Bacillus thuringiensis. We show that the fungal lactonases, similar to the bacterial enzymes, are kept intracellularly and act as a sink for the bacterial quorum sensing signals both in C. cinerea and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing C. cinerea lactonases, due to the ability of these signal molecules to diffuse over the fungal cell wall and plasma membrane. The two isogenes coding for the C. cinerea HSL lactonases are arranged in the genome as a tandem repeat and expressed preferentially in vegetative mycelium. The occurrence of orthologous genes in genomes of other basidiomycetes appears to correlate with a saprotrophic lifestyle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Global Analysis of the Burkholderia thailandensis Quorum Sensing-Controlled Regulon

    OpenAIRE

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Jacobs, Michael; Armour, Christopher D.; Radey, Mathew; Schneider, Emily; Phattarasokul, Somsak; Bunt, Richard; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis contains three acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing circuits and has two additional LuxR homologs. To identify B. thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled genes, we carried out transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of quorum sensing mutants and their parent. The analyses were grounded in the fact that we identified genes coding for factors shown previously to be regulated by quorum sensing among a larger set of quorum-controlled genes. We also found that gene...

  9. Recent progresses on AI-2 bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peng; Li, Minyong

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a communication procedure that predominates gene expression in response to cell density and fluctuations in the neighboring environment as a result of discerning molecules termed autoinducers (AIs). It has been embroiled that QS can govern bacterial behaviors such as the secretion of virulence factors, biofilm formation, bioluminescence production, conjugation, sporulation and swarming motility. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2), a QS signaling molecule brought up to be involved in interspecies communication, exists in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Therefore, novel approaches to interrupt AI-2 quorum sensing are being recognized as next generation antimicrobials. In the present review article, we summarized recent progresses on AI-2 bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors and discussed their potential as the antibacterial agents.

  10. Resilience of bacterial quorum sensing against fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emge, Philippe; Moeller, Jens; Jang, Hongchul; Rusconi, Roberto; Yawata, Yutaka; Stocker, Roman; Vogel, Viola

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a population-density dependent chemical process that enables bacteria to communicate based on the production, secretion and sensing of small inducer molecules. While recombinant constructs have been widely used to decipher the molecular details of QS, how those findings translate to natural QS systems has remained an open question. Here, we compare the activation of natural and synthetic Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasI/R QS systems in bacteria exposed to quiescent conditions and controlled flows. Quantification of QS-dependent GFP expression in suspended cultures and in surface-attached microcolonies revealed that QS onset in both systems was similar under quiescent conditions but markedly differed under flow. Moderate flow (Pe > 25) was sufficient to suppress LasI/R QS recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, whereas only high flow (Pe > 102) suppressed QS in wild-type P. aeruginosa. We suggest that this difference stems from the differential production of extracellular matrix and that the matrix confers resilience against moderate flow to QS in wild-type organisms. These results suggest that the expression of a biofilm matrix extends the environmental conditions under which QS-based cell-cell communication is effective and that findings from synthetic QS circuits cannot be directly translated to natural systems.

  11. Boolean network model of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallidis, Stylianos E; Karafyllidis, Ioannis G

    2014-09-01

    To coordinate their behavior and virulence and to synchronize attacks against their hosts, bacteria communicate by continuously producing signaling molecules (called autoinducers) and continuously monitoring the concentration of these molecules. This communication is controlled by biological circuits called quorum sensing (QS) circuits. Recently QS circuits and have been recognized as an alternative target for controlling bacterial virulence and infections without the use of antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects insects, plants, animals and humans and can cause acute infections. This bacterium has three interconnected QS circuits that form a very complex and versatile QS system, the operation of which is still under investigation. Here we use Boolean networks to model the complete QS system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and we simulate and analyze its operation in both synchronous and asynchronous modes. The state space of the QS system is constructed and it turned out to be very large, hierarchical, modular and scale-free. Furthermore, we developed a simulation tool that can simulate gene knock-outs and study their effect on the regulons controlled by the three QS circuits. The model and tools we developed will give to life scientists a deeper insight to this complex QS system.

  12. Biomimicry of quorum sensing using bacterial lifecycle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ben; Wang, Hong; Duan, Qiqi; Li, Li

    2013-01-01

    Recent microbiologic studies have shown that quorum sensing mechanisms, which serve as one of the fundamental requirements for bacterial survival, exist widely in bacterial intra- and inter-species cell-cell communication. Many simulation models, inspired by the social behavior of natural organisms, are presented to provide new approaches for solving realistic optimization problems. Most of these simulation models follow population-based modelling approaches, where all the individuals are updated according to the same rules. Therefore, it is difficult to maintain the diversity of the population. In this paper, we present a computational model termed LCM-QS, which simulates the bacterial quorum-sensing (QS) mechanism using an individual-based modelling approach under the framework of Agent-Environment-Rule (AER) scheme, i.e. bacterial lifecycle model (LCM). LCM-QS model can be classified into three main sub-models: chemotaxis with QS sub-model, reproduction and elimination sub-model and migration sub-model. The proposed model is used to not only imitate the bacterial evolution process at the single-cell level, but also concentrate on the study of bacterial macroscopic behaviour. Comparative experiments under four different scenarios have been conducted in an artificial 3-D environment with nutrients and noxious distribution. Detailed study on bacterial chemotatic processes with quorum sensing and without quorum sensing are compared. By using quorum sensing mechanisms, artificial bacteria working together can find the nutrient concentration (or global optimum) quickly in the artificial environment. Biomimicry of quorum sensing mechanisms using the lifecycle model allows the artificial bacteria endowed with the communication abilities, which are essential to obtain more valuable information to guide their search cooperatively towards the preferred nutrient concentrations. It can also provide an inspiration for designing new swarm intelligence optimization algorithms

  13. Functions and regulation of quorum-sensing in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Julien; Faure, Denis

    2014-01-01

    In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, horizontal transfer and vegetative replication of oncogenic Ti plasmids involve a cell-to-cell communication process called quorum-sensing (QS). The determinants of the QS-system belong to the LuxR/LuxI class. The LuxI-like protein TraI synthesizes N-acyl-homoserine lactone molecules which act as diffusible QS-signals. Beyond a threshold concentration, these molecules bind and activate the LuxR-like transcriptional regulator TraR, thereby initiating the QS-regulatory pathway. For the last 20 years, A. tumefaciens has stood as a prominent model in the understanding of the LuxR/LuxI type of QS systems. A number of studies also unveiled features which are unique to A. tumefaciens QS, some of them being directly related to the phytopathogenic lifestyle of the bacteria. In this review, we will present the current knowledge of QS in A. tumefaciens at both the genetic and molecular levels. We will also describe how interactions with plant host modulate the QS pathway of A. tumefaciens, and discuss what could be the advantages for the agrobacteria to use such a tightly regulated QS-system to disseminate the Ti plasmids. PMID:24550924

  14. Functions and regulation of quorum-sensing in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis eFaure

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, horizontal transfer and vegetative replication of oncogenic Ti plasmids involve a cell-to-cell communication process called quorum-sensing (QS. The determinants of the QS-system belong to the LuxR/LuxI class. The LuxI-like protein TraI synthesizes N-acyl-homoserine lactone molecules which act as diffusible QS-signals. Beyond a threshold concentration, these molecules bind and activate the LuxR-like transcriptional regulator TraR, thereby initiating the QS-regulatory pathway. For the last twenty years, A. tumefaciens has stood as a prominent model in the understanding of the LuxR/LuxI type of QS systems. A number of studies also unveiled features which are unique to A. tumefaciens QS, some of them being directly related to the phytopathogenic lifestyle of the bacteria. In this review we will present the current knowledge of QS in A. tumefaciens at both the genetic and molecular levels. We will also describe how interactions with plant host modulate the QS pathway of A. tumefaciens, and discuss what could be the advantages for the agrobacteria to use such a tightly regulated QS-system to disseminate the Ti plasmids.

  15. Quantifying the strength of quorum sensing crosstalk within microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinga Pavan T Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In multispecies microbial communities, the exchange of signals such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL enables communication within and between species of Gram-negative bacteria. This process, commonly known as quorum sensing, aids in the regulation of genes crucial for the survival of species within heterogeneous populations of microbes. Although signal exchange was studied extensively in well-mixed environments, less is known about the consequences of crosstalk in spatially distributed mixtures of species. Here, signaling dynamics were measured in a spatially distributed system containing multiple strains utilizing homologous signaling systems. Crosstalk between strains containing the lux, las and rhl AHL-receptor circuits was quantified. In a distributed population of microbes, the impact of community composition on spatio-temporal dynamics was characterized and compared to simulation results using a modified reaction-diffusion model. After introducing a single term to account for crosstalk between each pair of signals, the model was able to reproduce the activation patterns observed in experiments. We quantified the robustness of signal propagation in the presence of interacting signals, finding that signaling dynamics are largely robust to interference. The ability of several wild isolates to participate in AHL-mediated signaling was investigated, revealing distinct signatures of crosstalk for each species. Our results present a route to characterize crosstalk between species and predict systems-level signaling dynamics in multispecies communities.

  16. Computer-aided identification of recognized drugs as Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jakobsen, Tim Holm

    2009-01-01

    R, and a quorum-sensing receptor agonist. Six top-ranking compounds, all recognized drugs, were identified and tested for quorum-sensing-inhibitory activity. Three compounds, salicylic acid, nifuroxazide, and chlorzoxazone, showed significant inhibition of quorum-sensing-regulated gene expression and related...

  17. Signal Integration in Quorum Sensing Enables Cross-Species Induction of Virulence inPectobacterium wasabiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Rita S; Nadal-Jimenez, Pol; Carvalho, André F P; Vieira, Filipe J D; Xavier, Karina B

    2017-05-23

    Bacterial communities can sense their neighbors, regulating group behaviors in response to cell density and environmental changes. The diversity of signaling networks in a single species has been postulated to allow custom responses to different stimuli; however, little is known about how multiple signals are integrated and the implications of this integration in different ecological contexts. In the plant pathogen Pectobacterium wasabiae (formerly Erwinia carotovora ), two signaling networks-the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing system and the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway-control the expression of secreted plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, its major virulence determinants. We show that the AHL system controls the Gac/Rsm system by affecting the expression of the regulatory RNA RsmB. This regulation is mediated by ExpR2, the quorum-sensing receptor that responds to the P. wasabiae cognate AHL but also to AHLs produced by other bacterial species. As a consequence, this level of regulation allows P. wasabiae to bypass the Gac-dependent regulation of RsmB in the presence of exogenous AHLs or AHL-producing bacteria. We provide in vivo evidence that this pivotal role of RsmB in signal transduction is important for the ability of P. wasabiae to induce virulence in response to other AHL-producing bacteria in multispecies plant lesions. Our results suggest that the signaling architecture in P. wasabiae was coopted to prime the bacteria to eavesdrop on other bacteria and quickly join the efforts of other species, which are already exploiting host resources. IMPORTANCE Quorum-sensing mechanisms enable bacteria to communicate through small signal molecules and coordinate group behaviors. Often, bacteria have various quorum-sensing receptors and integrate information with other signal transduction pathways, presumably allowing them to respond to different ecological contexts. The plant pathogen Pectobacterium wasabiae has two N-acyl homoserine lactone

  18. Links between Anr and Quorum Sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, John H; Dolben, Emily F; Smith, T Jarrod; Bhuju, Sabin; Hogan, Deborah A

    2015-09-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transcription factor Anr controls the cellular response to low oxygen or anoxia. Anr activity is high in oxygen-limited environments, including biofilms and populations associated with chronic infections, and Anr is necessary for persistence in a model of pulmonary infection. In this study, we characterized the Anr regulon in biofilm-grown cells at 1% oxygen in the laboratory strain PAO1 and in a quorum sensing (QS)-deficient clinical isolate, J215. As expected, transcripts related to denitrification, arginine fermentation, high-affinity cytochrome oxidases, and CupA fimbriae were lower in the Δanr derivatives. In addition, we observed that transcripts associated with quorum sensing regulation, iron acquisition and storage, type VI secretion, and the catabolism of aromatic compounds were also differentially expressed in the Δanr strains. Prior reports have shown that quorum sensing-defective mutants have higher levels of denitrification, and we found that multiple Anr-regulated processes, including denitrification, were strongly inversely proportional to quorum sensing in both transcriptional and protein-based assays. We also found that in LasR-defective strains but not their LasR-intact counterparts, Anr regulated the production of the 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines, which play roles in quorum sensing and interspecies interactions. These data show that Anr was required for the expression of important metabolic pathways in low-oxygen biofilms, and they reveal an expanded and compensatory role for Anr in the regulation of virulence-related genes in quorum sensing mutants, such as those commonly isolated from infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute ocular, soft tissue, and pulmonary infections, as well as chronic infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa uses quorum sensing (QS) to regulate virulence, but mutations in the gene encoding the master regulator of QS, lasR, are frequently observed in

  19. Integration of Metabolic and Quorum Sensing Signals Governing the Decision to Cooperate in a Bacterial Social Trait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Kerry E.; Monaco, Hilary; van Ditmarsch, Dave; Deforet, Maxime; Xavier, Joao B.

    2015-01-01

    Many unicellular organisms live in multicellular communities that rely on cooperation between cells. However, cooperative traits are vulnerable to exploitation by non-cooperators (cheaters). We expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow multicellular systems to remain robust in the face of cheating by dissecting the dynamic regulation of cooperative rhamnolipids required for swarming in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We combine mathematical modeling and experiments to quantitatively characterize the integration of metabolic and population density signals (quorum sensing) governing expression of the rhamnolipid synthesis operon rhlAB. The combined computational/experimental analysis reveals that when nutrients are abundant, rhlAB promoter activity increases gradually in a density dependent way. When growth slows down due to nutrient limitation, rhlAB promoter activity can stop abruptly, decrease gradually or even increase depending on whether the growth-limiting nutrient is the carbon source, nitrogen source or iron. Starvation by specific nutrients drives growth on intracellular nutrient pools as well as the qualitative rhlAB promoter response, which itself is modulated by quorum sensing. Our quantitative analysis suggests a supply-driven activation that integrates metabolic prudence with quorum sensing in a non-digital manner and allows P. aeruginosa cells to invest in cooperation only when the population size is large enough (quorum sensing) and individual cells have enough metabolic resources to do so (metabolic prudence). Thus, the quantitative description of rhlAB regulatory dynamics brings a greater understating to the regulation required to make swarming cooperation stable. PMID:26102206

  20. Detection of quorum sensing molecules from Vibrio harveyi and use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the extraction and detection processes of quorum sensing molecules such as N-aceyl homoserine lactone compounds (AHL) from marine Vibrio harveyi. The spent culture of V. harveyi was solvent partitioned for AHL, rotary evaporated and re-suspended in 50% acetonitrile then detected with reporter ...

  1. Impact of quorum sensing on the quality of fermented foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Pernille; Jespersen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    The quality of fermented food highly dependents on the microorganisms involved, their metabolic activities and interactions. Recently, focus has been on quorum sensing (QS) being a cell density-dependent mechanism allowing adaptive responses. Specific QS molecules in prokaryotes and eukaryotes...

  2. Quorum sensing inhibitory activity of sub-inhibitory concentrations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are under the control of quorum sensing (QS) signals. Hence, interference with QS prevents its pathogenesis. Objective: The aim of the present research is to assess the influence of some β-lactam antibiotics on cell communication and the release of different ...

  3. ANTI-QUORUM SENSING ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haidari, Rwaida A; Shaaban, Mona I; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is the key regulator of virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa such as biofilm formation, motility, productions of proteases, hemolysin, pyocyanin, and toxins. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the extracts from some medicinal plants on quorum sensing and related virulence factors of P. aeruginosa . Quorum sensing inhibitory (OSI) effect of the alcohol extracts of 20 medicinal plants was evaluated by Chromobacterium violaceum reporter using agar cup diffusion method. The efficient QSI extracts were tested for their activity against biofilm synthesis, motility, and synthesis of pyocyanin from P. aeruginosa PA14. The extracts of Citrus sinensis, Laurus nobilis, Elettaria cardamomum, Allium cepa , and Coriandrum sativum exhibited potent quorum quenching effect. On the other hand, Psidium guajava and Mentha longifolia extracts showed lower QSI activity. These extracts exhibited significant elimination of pyocyanin formation and biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. In addition, they significantly inhibited twitching and swimming motilities of P. aeruginosa PA14. This study illustrated, for the first time, the importance of C. sinensis, L. nobilis, E. cardamomum, A. cepa , and C. sativum as quorum sensing inhibitors and virulence suppressors of P. aeruginosa . Thus, these plants could provide a natural source for the elimination of Pseudomonas pathogenesis.

  4. Exploring the chemical space of quorum sensing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Verbeke, Frederick; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-09-01

    Quorum sensing peptides are signalling molecules that are produced by mainly gram-positive bacteria. These peptides can exert different effects, ranging from intra- and interspecies bacterial virulence to bacterial-host interactions. To better comprehend these functional differences, we explored their chemical space, bacterial species distribution and receptor-binding properties using multivariate data analyses, with information obtained from the Quorumpeps database. The quorum sensing peptides can be categorized into three main clusters, which, in turn, can be divided into several subclusters: the classification is based on characteristic chemical properties, including peptide size/compactness, hydrophilicity/lipophilicity, cyclization and the presence of (unnatural) S-containing and aromatic amino acids. Most of the bacterial species synthesize peptides located into one cluster. However, some Streptococcus, Stapylococcus, Clostridium, Bacillus and Lactobacillus species produce peptides that are distributed over more than one cluster, with the quorum sensing peptides of Bacillus subtilis even occupying the total peptide space. The AgrC, FsrC and LamC receptors are only activated by cyclic (thio)lacton or lactam quorum sensing peptides, while the lipophilic isoprenyl-modified peptides solely bind the ComP receptor in Bacillus species. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quorum sensing-controlled gene expression in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Vos, Willem M. de

    1998-01-01

    Quorum sensing in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) involves peptides that are directly sensed by membrane-located histidine kinases, after which the signal is transmitted to an intracellular response regulator. This regulator in turn activates transcription of target genes, that commonly include the

  6. Methods to Study Solo/Orphan Quorum-Sensing Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, Vittorio; Subramoni, Sujatha; Sabag-Daigle, Anice; Ahmer, Brian M M

    2018-01-01

    LuxR solos/orphans are very widespread among Proteobacteria; however they are surprisingly understudied given that they are likely to play a major role in cell-cell communication in bacteria. Here we describe three simple methodologies/approaches that can be used in order to begin to study this subgroup of quorum sensing-related LuxR receptors.

  7. Exposure to Static Magnetic Field Stimulates Quorum Sensing Circuit in Luminescent Vibrio Strains of the Harveyi Clade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talà, Adelfia; Delle Side, Domenico; Buccolieri, Giovanni; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Velardi, Luciano; Paladini, Fabio; De Stefano, Mario; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi) and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:24960170

  8. Exposure to static magnetic field stimulates quorum sensing circuit in luminescent Vibrio strains of the Harveyi clade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelfia Talà

    Full Text Available In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule.

  9. Realization of morphing logic gates in a repressilator with quorum sensing feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Vidit; Kang, Shivpal Singh; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how a genetic ring oscillator network with quorum sensing feedback can operate as a robust logic gate. Specifically we show how a range of logic functions, namely AND/NAND, OR/NOR and XOR/XNOR, can be realized by the system, thus yielding a versatile unit that can morph between different logic operations. We further demonstrate the capacity of this system to yield complementary logic operations in parallel. Our results then indicate the computing potential of this biological system, and may lead to bio-inspired computing devices.

  10. Realization of morphing logic gates in a repressilator with quorum sensing feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Vidit; Kang, Shivpal Singh; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate how a genetic ring oscillator network with quorum sensing feedback can operate as a robust logic gate. Specifically we show how a range of logic functions, namely AND/NAND, OR/NOR and XOR/XNOR, can be realized by the system, thus yielding a versatile unit that can morph between different logic operations. We further demonstrate the capacity of this system to yield complementary logic operations in parallel. Our results then indicate the computing potential of this biological system, and may lead to bio-inspired computing devices.

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of quorum sensing for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that aim to kill or inhibit bacterial growth. A major concern with this approach is the frequently observed development of resistance to antimicrobial compounds. The discovery of bacterial-communication systems (quorum-sensing sys......Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that aim to kill or inhibit bacterial growth. A major concern with this approach is the frequently observed development of resistance to antimicrobial compounds. The discovery of bacterial-communication systems (quorum...

  12. Quorum Sensing in the Context of Food Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandamis, Panagiotis N.

    2012-01-01

    Food spoilage may be defined as a process that renders a product undesirable or unacceptable for consumption and is the outcome of the biochemical activity of a microbial community that eventually dominates according to the prevailing ecological determinants. Although limited information are reported, this activity has been attributed to quorum sensing (QS). Consequently, the potential role of cell-to-cell communication in food spoilage and food safety should be more extensively elucidated. Such information would be helpful in designing approaches for manipulating these communication systems, thereby reducing or preventing, for instance, spoilage reactions or even controlling the expression of virulence factors. Due to the many reports in the literature on the fundamental features of QS, e.g., chemistry and definitions of QS compounds, in this minireview, we only allude to the types and chemistry of QS signaling molecules per se and to the (bioassay-based) methods of their detection and quantification, avoiding extensive documentation. Conversely, we attempt to provide insights into (i) the role of QS in food spoilage, (ii) the factors that may quench the activity of QS in foods and review the potential QS inhibitors that might “mislead” the bacterial coordination of spoilage activities and thus may be used as biopreservatives, and (iii) the future experimental approaches that need to be undertaken in order to explore the “gray” or “black” areas of QS, increase our understanding of how QS affects microbial behavior in foods, and assist in finding answers as to how we can exploit QS for the benefit of food preservation and food safety. PMID:22706047

  13. Flexible dynamics of two quorum-sensing coupled repressilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellen, Edward H.; Volkov, Evgeny

    2017-02-01

    Genetic oscillators play important roles in cell life regulation. The regulatory efficiency usually depends strongly on the emergence of stable collective dynamic modes, which requires designing the interactions between genetic networks. We investigate the dynamics of two identical synthetic genetic repressilators coupled by an additional plasmid which implements quorum sensing (QS) in each network thereby supporting global coupling. In a basic genetic ring oscillator network in which three genes inhibit each other in unidirectional manner, QS stimulates the transcriptional activity of chosen genes providing for competition between inhibitory and stimulatory activities localized in those genes. The "promoter strength", the Hill cooperativity coefficient of transcription repression, and the coupling strength, i.e., parameters controlling the basic rates of genetic reactions, were chosen for extensive bifurcation analysis. The results are presented as a map of dynamic regimes. We found that the remarkable multistability of the antiphase limit cycle and stable homogeneous and inhomogeneous steady states exists over broad ranges of control parameters. We studied the antiphase limit cycle stability and the evolution of irregular oscillatory regimes in the parameter areas where the antiphase cycle loses stability. In these regions we observed developing complex oscillations, collective chaos, and multistability between regular limit cycles and complex oscillations over uncommonly large intervals of coupling strength. QS coupling stimulates the appearance of intrachaotic periodic windows with spatially symmetric and asymmetric partial limit cycles which, in turn, change the type of chaos from a simple antiphase character into chaos composed of pieces of the trajectories having alternating polarity. The very rich dynamics discovered in the system of two identical simple ring oscillators may serve as a possible background for biological phenotypic diversification, as well

  14. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltner, John B; Wolter, Daniel J; Pope, Christopher E; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E; Greenberg, E Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Déziel, Eric; Hoffman, Lucas R; Dandekar, Ajai A

    2016-10-04

    hydrogen cyanide synthases. In well-studied laboratory strains, LasR-null mutants have a quorum-sensing-deficient phenotype. Therefore, the presence of LasR variants in chronic infections has been interpreted to indicate that quorum-sensing-regulated products are not important for those infections. We report that some P. aeruginosa LasR variant clinical isolates are not LasR-null mutants, and others have uncoupled a second quorum-sensing system, the RhlR system, from LasR regulation. In these uncoupled isolates, RhlR independently activates at least some quorum-sensing-dependent genes. Our findings suggest that quorum sensing plays a role in chronic P. aeruginosa infections, despite the emergence of LasR coding variants. Copyright © 2016 Feltner et al.

  15. RpoS induces expression of the Vibrio anguillarum quorum-sensing regulator VanT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Barbara; Croxatto, Antony; Chen, Chang; Milton, Debra L

    2008-03-01

    In vibrios, regulation of the Vibrio harveyi-like LuxR transcriptional activators occurs post-transcriptionally via small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that destabilize the luxR mRNA at a low cell population, eliminating expression of LuxR. Expression of the sRNAs is modulated by the vibrio quorum-sensing phosphorelay systems. However, vanT mRNA, which encodes a LuxR homologue in Vibrio anguillarum, is abundant at low and high cell density, indicating that VanT expression may be regulated via additional mechanisms. In this study, Western analyses showed that VanT was expressed throughout growth with a peak of expression during late exponential growth. VanO induced partial destabilization of vanT mRNA via activation of at least one Qrr sRNA. Interestingly, the sigma factor RpoS significantly stabilized vanT mRNA and induced VanT expression during late exponential growth. This induction was in part due to RpoS repressing expression of Hfq, an RNA chaperone. RpoS is not part of the quorum-sensing regulatory cascade since RpoS did not regulate expression or activity of VanO, and RpoS was not regulated by VanO or VanT. VanT and RpoS were needed for survival following UV irradiation and for pigment and metalloprotease production, suggesting that RpoS works with the quorum-sensing systems to modulate expression of VanT, which regulates survival and stress responses.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, P.O.; Burmolle, M.

    2005-01-01

    to otherwise lethal doses of antibiotics and are protected from bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). P. aeruginosa controls the expression of many of its virulence factors by means of a cell-cell communication system termed quorum sensing (QS). In the present report it is demonstrated......The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant...

  17. Engineering quorum sensing signaling of Pseudomonas for enhanced wastewater treatment and electricity harvest: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yang-Chun; Wu, Xiang-Yang; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Cao, Ying-Xiu; Song, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Cell-cell communication that enables synchronized population behaviors in microbial communities dictates various biological processes. It is of great interest to unveil the underlying mechanisms of fine-tuning cell-cell communication to achieve environmental and energy applications. Pseudomonas is a ubiquitous microbe in environments that had wide applications in bioremediation and bioenergy generation. The quorum sensing (QS, a generic cell-cell communication mechanism) systems of Pseudomonas underlie the aromatics biodegradation, denitrification and electricity harvest. Here, we reviewed the recent progresses of the genetic strategies in engineering QS circuits to improve efficiency of wastewater treatment and the performance of microbial fuel cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quorum Sensing and Bacterial Social Interactions in Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yung-Hua; Tian, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Many bacteria are known to regulate their cooperative activities and physiological processes through a mechanism called quorum sensing (QS), in which bacterial cells communicate with each other by releasing, sensing and responding to small diffusible signal molecules. The ability of bacteria to communicate and behave as a group for social interactions like a multi-cellular organism has provided significant benefits to bacteria in host colonization, formation of biofilms, defense against competitors, and adaptation to changing environments. Importantly, many QS-controlled activities have been involved in the virulence and pathogenic potential of bacteria. Therefore, understanding the molecular details of quorum sensing mechanisms and their controlled social activities may open a new avenue for controlling bacterial infections. PMID:22736963

  19. Effects of quorum sensing system lasR/rhlR gene on the expression of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in tracheal intubation model rat with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-qing XIANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of lasR/rhlR gene on Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in rat tracheal intubation model with biofilm infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. aer wild strain (PAO1 and quorum sensing (QS deficient strain (ΔlasRΔrhlR. Methods  Twenty-one SD rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (7 each: ΔlasRΔrhlR-treated group, PAO1-treated group and sterile control group. Biofilms (BF were cultured in vitro, and the BF coated tube (infected respectively with Ps. aer PAO1 strain, ΔlasRΔrhlR strain, or with asepsis was inserted into the trachea to establish the rat model. The rats were sacrificed on the 7th day after intubation. Colony count of lung tissue homogenate (cfu and lung HE staining were performed, and IL-10 content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, TGF-β1 in lung tissue, and the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in lung cells were determined. Results  The bacterial counts were significantly higher in PAO1 and ΔlasRΔrhlR groups than that in sterile control group, and the counts were obviously higher in PAO1 group (10 400.00±6313.70/g lung tissue than that in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (975.00±559.97/g lung tissue, P<0.05. There was no significant pathological changes in lung tissue in sterile control group, while the bronchi and blood vessels in PAO1 group were infiltrated by a large number of inflammatory cells and complicated with alveolar septum thickening and local abscess and necrosis. The pathological changes were milder in ΔlasRΔrhlR group than in PAO1 group; the expression of Foxp3 mRNA was higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than that in sterile control group (0.65±0.32, and it was significantly higher in PAO1 group (4.62±1.07 than in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (2.15±1.43, P<0.05. The accumulated optical density value of TGF-β1 was significantly higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than in sterile control group (3721.66±1412.95, and significantly higher in PAO1 group (65 090.56±33

  20. Quorum Sensing and Synchronization in Populations of Coupled Chemical Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Annette F.; Tinsley, Mark R.; Showalter, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    Experiments and simulations of populations of coupled chemical oscillators, consisting of catalytic particles suspended in solution, provide insights into density-dependent dynamics displayed by many cellular organisms. Gradual synchronization transitions, the "switching on" of activity above a threshold number of oscillators (quorum sensing) and the formation of synchronized groups (clusters) of oscillators have been characterized. Collective behavior is driven by the response of the oscillators to chemicals emitted into the surrounding solution.

  1. Quorum sensing inhibitors from Leucetta chagosensis Dendy, 1863.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, T; Tintillier, F; Lucasson, A; Moriou, C; Bonno, E; Petek, S; Magré, K; Al Mourabit, A; Saulnier, D; Debitus, C

    2015-10-01

    Sponges are a rich source for investigation of bioactive small molecules. They have been mostly investigated for the search of new pharmacological models or therapeutic agents for the treatment of human diseases. Micro-organisms can also represent a virulent pathogen for marine invertebrates such as sponges, which need to protect themselves against these microbes. Sponges' self defence mechanisms involving dialogue molecules thus represent a pertinent research track for potent anti-infective and anti-biofilm activities such as quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs). The investigation of the QSI crude extract of Leucetta chagosensis Dendy, 1863 led to the isolation of three new alkaloids, isonaamine D, di-isonaamidine A and leucettamine D, along with the known isonaamine A and isonaamidine A. Isonaamidine A and isonaamine D were identified as inhibitors of the three quorum sensing pathways of Vibrio harveyi (CAI-1, AI-2 and harveyi auto inducer), but isonaamidine A displayed the strongest activity on AI-2 biosensor. Both compounds are new examples of natural QSIs of V. harveyi. These results outline the importance of these secondary metabolites for their producing organisms themselves in their natural environment, as well as the potential of the marine resource for aquaculture needs. A new type of quorum sensing inhibitors was isolated from the sponge Leucetta chagosensis. One of them inhibits strongly the AI-2 channel of Vibrio harveyi, a marine pathogen of special importance in aquaculture. The activity of five different related compounds, including three new natural products discovered there, was investigated leading to structure-activity relationships which are useful for the design of new quorum sensing inhibitors to control marine infectious pathogens. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. The impact of quorum sensing and swarming motility on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation is nutritionally conditional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrout, J.D.; Chopp, D.L.; Just, C.L.

    2006-01-01

    The role of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation is unclear. Some researchers have shown that quorum sensing is important for biofilm development, while others have indicated it has little or no role. In this study, the contribution of quorum sensing to biofilm development...... was found to depend upon the nutritional environment. Depending upon the carbon source, quorum-sensing mutant strains (lasIrhlI and lasRrhlR) either exhibited a pronounced defect early in biofilm formation or formed biofilms identical to the wild-type strain. Quorum sensing was then shown to exert its...... the contributions of quorum sensing and swarming motility at a key juncture early in biofilm development....

  3. Identification of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecule of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Cuiping; Lyu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Shuwen; Liu, Lu; Lu, Jing; Ma, Changlu; Lv, Jiaping

    2016-12-14

    Many bacteria in nature use quorum sensing (QS) to regulate gene expression. The quorum sensing system plays critical roles in the adaptation of bacteria to the surrounding environment. Previous studies have shown that during high-density fermentation, the autolysis of lactic acid bacteria was regulated by the QS system, and the two-component system (TCS, LBUL_RS00115/LBUL_RS00110) is involved in the autolysis of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. However, the QS signal molecule, which regulates this pathway, has not been identified. In this study, we compared the genome of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365 with the locus of seven lactobacillus QS systems; the position of the QS signal molecule of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365 was predicted by bioinformatics tool. Its function was identified by in vitro experiments. Construction of TCS mutant by gene knockout of LBUL_RS00115 confirmed that the signal molecule regulates the density of the flora by the TCS (LBUL_RS00115/LBUL_RS00110). This study indicated that quorum quenching and inhibition based on the signal molecule might serve as an approach to reduce the rate of autolysis of LAB and increase the number of live bacteria in fermentation.

  4. Response of Salmonella Typhi to bile-generated oxidative stress: implication of quorum sensing and persister cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walawalkar, Yogesh D; Vaidya, Yatindra; Nayak, Vijayashree

    2016-11-01

    Salmonella Typhi can chronically persist within the gallbladder of patients suffering from gallbladder diseases. This study, intended to improve our understanding of bacterial mechanisms underlying bile adaptation, revealed that bile, which is a bactericidal agent, led to the generation of reactive oxygen species in S Typhi. Salmonella Typhi in response showed a significant increase in the production of anti-oxidative enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase and catalase. The work reports that the quorum-sensing (QS) system of S Typhi regulates the level of these enzymes during oxidative stress. In support of these observations, the quorum-sensing mutant of S Typhi was found to be sensitive to bile with significantly lower levels of anti-oxidant enzymes compared to other clinical isolates. Furthermore the addition of exogenous cell-free extracts (CFEs) of S Typhi containing the quorum-sensing signalling molecule significantly increased the levels of these enzymes within the mutant. Interestingly the CFE addition did not significantly restore the biofilm-forming ability of the mutant strain when compared with the wild-type. In the presence of ciprofloxacin and ampicillin, S Typhi formed persister cells which increased >3-fold in the presence of bile. Thus the QS-system of S Typhi aids in oxidative stress management, and enhanced persister cell populations could assist chronic bacterial persistence within the gallbladder. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Inhibition of quorum sensing-mediated virulence in Serratia marcescens by Bacillus subtilis R-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kannan Rama; Srinivasan, Subramaniyan; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2018-04-13

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic human pathogen causing various nosocomial infections, most importantly urinary tract infections (UTIs). It exhibits increased resistance towards the conventional antibiotics. This study was aimed to evaluate the anti-virulence effect of a rhizosphere soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis strain R-18 against the uropathogen S. marcescens. First, the bacterial cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of B. subtilis strain R-18 was evaluated for its quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) potential against biomarker strain Chromobacterium violaceum and the test pathogen S. marcescens. The B. subtilis R-18 CFCS effectively inhibited the quorum sensing (QS)-mediated violacein pigment production in C. violaceum and prodigiosin pigment production in S. marcescens. Furthermore, B. subtilis R-18 CFCS was successively extracted with different solvent systems. Of these solvents, B. subtilis R-18 petroleum ether (PE) extract showed inhibition in biofilm formation, protease, lipase, and hemolysin productions in S. marcescens. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FT-IR) analysis revealed the alterations in the cellular components of bacterial cell pellets obtained from B. subtilis R-18 PE extract treated and untreated S. marcescens. The differential gene expression study further validated the downregulation of virulence-associated genes. Characterization of the active principle in B. subtilis R-18 PE extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis showed the presence of multiple compounds with therapeutic values, which could possibly reduce the QS-dependent phenotypes in S. marcescens. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Quorum Sensing Inhibition and Structure–Activity Relationships of β-Keto Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Forschner-Dancause

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional therapeutics to treat bacterial infections have given rise to multi-drug resistant pathogens, which pose a major threat to human and animal health. In several pathogens, quorum sensing (QS—a cell-cell communication system in bacteria—controls the expression of genes responsible for pathogenesis, thus representing a novel target in the fight against bacterial infections. Based on the structure of the autoinducers responsible for QS activity and other QS inhibitors, we hypothesize that β-keto esters with aryl functionality could possess anti-QS activity. A panel of nineteen β-keto ester analogs was tested for the inhibition of bioluminescence (a QS-controlled phenotype in the marine pathogen Vibrio harveyi. Initial screening demonstrated the need of a phenyl ring at the C-3 position for antagonistic activity. Further additions to the phenyl ring with 4-substituted halo groups or a 3- or 4-substituted methoxy group resulted in the most active compounds with IC50 values ranging from 23 µM to 53 µM. The compounds additionally inhibit green fluorescent protein production by E. coli JB525. Evidence is presented that aryl β-keto esters may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with N-acyl homoserine lactones for receptor binding. Expansion of the β-keto ester panel will enable us to obtain more insight into the structure–activity relationships needed to allow for the development of novel anti-virulence agents.

  7. Composition, anti-quorum sensing and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Lippia alba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Olivero-Verbel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many Gram-negative pathogens have the ability to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs as signal molecules for quorum sensing (QS. This cell-cell communication system allows them to coordinate gene expression and regulate virulence. Strategies to inhibit QS are promising for the control of infectious diseases or antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS and antibacterial potential of five essential oils isolated from Lippia alba on the Tn-5 mutant of Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria S. aureus ATCC 25923. The anti-QS activity was detected through the inhibition of the QS-controlled violacein pigment production by the sensor bacteria. Results showed that two essential oils from L. alba, one containing the greatest geranial:neral and the other the highest limonene:carvone concentrations, were the most effective QS inhibitors. Both oils also had small effects on cell growth. Moreover, the geranial/neral chemotype oil also produced the maximum zone of growth inhibition against S. aureus ATCC 25923. These data suggest essential oils from L. alba have promising properties as QS modulators, and present antibacterial activity on S. aureus.

  8. Composition, anti-quorum sensing and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Lippia alba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Barreto-Maya, Ana; Bertel-Sevilla, Angela; Stashenko, Elena E.

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens have the ability to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as signal molecules for quorum sensing (QS). This cell-cell communication system allows them to coordinate gene expression and regulate virulence. Strategies to inhibit QS are promising for the control of infectious diseases or antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) and antibacterial potential of five essential oils isolated from Lippia alba on the Tn-5 mutant of Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria S. aureus ATCC 25923. The anti-QS activity was detected through the inhibition of the QS-controlled violacein pigment production by the sensor bacteria. Results showed that two essential oils from L. alba, one containing the greatest geranial:neral and the other the highest limonene:carvone concentrations, were the most effective QS inhibitors. Both oils also had small effects on cell growth. Moreover, the geranial/neral chemotype oil also produced the maximum zone of growth inhibition against S. aureus ATCC 25923. These data suggest essential oils from L. alba have promising properties as QS modulators, and present antibacterial activity on S. aureus. PMID:25477905

  9. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieu Anh Kim Ta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS. As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented.

  10. PepO, a CovRS-controlled endopeptidase, disrupts Streptococcus pyogenes quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Reid V; Chang, Jennifer C; Federle, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a human-restricted pathogen with a capacity to both colonize asymptomatically and cause illnesses ranging from pharyngitis to necrotizing fasciitis. An understanding of how and when GAS switches between genetic programs governing these different lifestyles has remained an enduring mystery and likely requires carefully tuned environmental sensors to activate and silence genetic schemes when appropriate. Herein, we describe the relationship between the Control of Virulence (CovRS, CsrRS) two-component system and the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing pathway. We demonstrate that responses of CovRS to the stress signals Mg(2+) and a fragment of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 result in modulated activity of pheromone signaling of the Rgg2/3 pathway through a means of proteolysis of SHP peptide pheromones. This degradation is mediated by the cytoplasmic endopeptidase PepO, which is the first identified enzymatic silencer of an RRNPP-type quorum-sensing pathway. These results suggest that under conditions in which the virulence potential of GAS is elevated (i.e. enhanced virulence gene expression), cellular responses mediated by the Rgg2/3 pathway are abrogated and allow individuals to escape from group behavior. These results also indicate that Rgg2/3 signaling is instead functional during non-virulent GAS lifestyles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Quorum Sensing Activity of Serratia fonticola Strain RB-25 Isolated from an Ex-landfill Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Ee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing is a unique bacterial communication system which permits bacteria to synchronize their behaviour in accordance with the population density. The operation of this communication network involves the use of diffusible autoinducer molecules, termed N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs. Serratia spp. are well known for their use of quorum sensing to regulate the expression of various genes. In this study, we aimed to characterized the AHL production of a bacterium designated as strain RB-25 isolated from a former domestic waste landfill site. It was identified as Serratia fonticola using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis and this was confirmed by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. High resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of S. fonticola strain RB-25 spent culture supernatant indicated the existence of three AHLs namely: N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL, N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL and N-(3-oxohexanoyl homoserine-lactone (3-oxo-C6 HSL. This is the first report of the production of these AHLs in S. fonticola.

  12. DqsIR quorum sensing-mediated gene regulation of the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans in response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing; Li, Tao; Yu, Jiangliu; Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Hong; Zhao, Ye; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that AHLs can be employed by Deinococcus radiodurans, which belongs to the unique phylum Deinococcus-Thermus and is known for its cellular resistance to environmental stresses. An AHL-mediated quorum-sensing system (DqsI/DqsR) was identified in D. radiodurans. We found that under non-stress conditions, the AHL level was "shielded" by quorum quenching enzymes, whereas AHLs accumulated when D. radiodurans was exposed to oxidative stress. Upon exposure to H2 O2 , AHL synthetic enzymes (DqsI) were immediately induced, while the expression of quorum-quenching enzymes began to increase approximately 30 min after exposure to H2 O2 , as shown by time-course analyses of gene expression. Both dqsI mutant (DMDqsI) and dqsR mutant (MDqsR) were more sensitive to oxidative stress compared with the wild-type strain. Exogenous AHLs (5 μM) could completely restore the survival fraction of DMDqsI under oxidative stress. RNA-seq analysis showed that a number of genes involved in stress-response, cellular cleansing, and DNA repair had altered transcriptional levels in MDqsR. The DqsR, acting as a regulator of quorum sensing, controls gene expression along with AHLs. Hence, the DqsIR-mediated quorum sensing that mediates gene regulation is an adaptive strategy for D. radiodurans in response to oxidative stresses and is conserved in the extremophilic Deinococcus bacteria. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Prospective bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors from Indian medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, B K; Ghosh, R; Moktan, S; Ranjan, V K; Dey, P; Choudhury, D; Dutta, S; Deb, D; Das, A P; Chakraborty, R

    2017-07-01

    As virulence of many pathogenic bacteria is regulated by the phenomenon of quorum sensing (QS), the present study aimed to find the QS-inhibiting (QS-I) property (if any) in 61 Indian medicinal plants. The presence of QS-I compound in the leaf extract was evaluated by its ability to inhibit production of pigment in Chromobacterium violaceum MTCC 2656 (violacein) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 2297 (pyocyanin) or swarming of P. aeruginosa MTCC 2297. Extracts of three plants, Astilbe rivularis, Fragaria nubicola and Osbeckia nepalensis, have shown a dose-dependent inhibition of violacein production with no negative effect on bacterial growth. Inhibition of pyocyanin pigment production and swarming motility in P. aeruginosa MTCC 2297 was also shown. Based on the results obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and thin-layer chromatography-direct bioautography (TLC-DB), it was concluded that triterpenes and flavonoid compounds found in the three plant extracts could have QS-I activity. A novel alternative prospect to prevent bacterial infections without inhibiting the growth is to apply chemicals that inhibit quorum sensing mechanism of the pathogens. Antiquorum property of 61 medicinal plants was evaluated by the ability of their leaf extract(s) to inhibit production of pigment (violacein in Chromobacterium violaceum MTCC 2656, pyocyanin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 2297) or swarming in P. aeruginosa MTCC 2297. The most prospective plants (for the development of quorum sensing inhibitor), showing inhibition of violacein production without affecting bacterial growth, were Astilbe rivularis, Fragaria nubicola and Osbeckia nepalensis. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Global Analysis of the Burkholderia thailandensis Quorum Sensing-Controlled Regulon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Jacobs, Michael; Armour, Christopher D.; Radey, Mathew; Schneider, Emily; Phattarasokul, Somsak; Bunt, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis contains three acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing circuits and has two additional LuxR homologs. To identify B. thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled genes, we carried out transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of quorum sensing mutants and their parent. The analyses were grounded in the fact that we identified genes coding for factors shown previously to be regulated by quorum sensing among a larger set of quorum-controlled genes. We also found that genes coding for contact-dependent inhibition were induced by quorum sensing and confirmed that specific quorum sensing mutants had a contact-dependent inhibition defect. Additional quorum-controlled genes included those for the production of numerous secondary metabolites, an uncharacterized exopolysaccharide, and a predicted chitin-binding protein. This study provides insights into the roles of the three quorum sensing circuits in the saprophytic lifestyle of B. thailandensis, and it provides a foundation on which to build an understanding of the roles of quorum sensing in the biology of B. thailandensis and the closely related pathogenic Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. PMID:24464461

  15. A broad range quorum sensing inhibitor working through sRNA inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim H.; Warming, Anders N.; Vejborg, Rebecca M.

    2017-01-01

    that the repressing effect of ajoene on quorum sensing occurs by inhibition of small regulatory RNAs (sRNA) in P. aeruginosa as well as in Staphylococcus aureus, another important human pathogen that employs quorum sensing to control virulence gene expression. Using various reporter constructs, we found that ajoene...

  16. Gene dosage compensation calibrates four regulatory RNAs to control Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Sine L; Tu, Kimberly C; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2009-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinately regulate gene expression in response to changes in cell-population density. At the core of the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing signal transduction pathway reside four homologous small RNAs (sRNAs), named...

  17. A mathematical model of quorum sensing regulated EPS production in biofilm communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Biofilms are microbial communities encased in a layer of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The EPS matrix provides several functional purposes for the biofilm, such as protecting bacteria from environmental stresses, and providing mechanical stability. Quorum sensing is a cell-cell communication mechanism used by several bacterial taxa to coordinate gene expression and behaviour in groups, based on population densities. Model We mathematically model quorum sensing and EPS production in a growing biofilm under various environmental conditions, to study how a developing biofilm impacts quorum sensing, and conversely, how a biofilm is affected by quorum sensing-regulated EPS production. We investigate circumstances when using quorum-sensing regulated EPS production is a beneficial strategy for biofilm cells. Results We find that biofilms that use quorum sensing to induce increased EPS production do not obtain the high cell populations of low-EPS producers, but can rapidly increase their volume to parallel high-EPS producers. Quorum sensing-induced EPS production allows a biofilm to switch behaviours, from a colonization mode (with an optimized growth rate), to a protection mode. Conclusions A biofilm will benefit from using quorum sensing-induced EPS production if bacteria cells have the objective of acquiring a thick, protective layer of EPS, or if they wish to clog their environment with biomass as a means of securing nutrient supply and outcompeting other colonies in the channel, of their own or a different species. PMID:21477365

  18. Global analysis of the Burkholderia thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Jacobs, Michael; Armour, Christopher D; Radey, Mathew; Schneider, Emily; Phattarasokul, Somsak; Bunt, Richard; Greenberg, E Peter

    2014-04-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis contains three acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing circuits and has two additional LuxR homologs. To identify B. thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled genes, we carried out transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of quorum sensing mutants and their parent. The analyses were grounded in the fact that we identified genes coding for factors shown previously to be regulated by quorum sensing among a larger set of quorum-controlled genes. We also found that genes coding for contact-dependent inhibition were induced by quorum sensing and confirmed that specific quorum sensing mutants had a contact-dependent inhibition defect. Additional quorum-controlled genes included those for the production of numerous secondary metabolites, an uncharacterized exopolysaccharide, and a predicted chitin-binding protein. This study provides insights into the roles of the three quorum sensing circuits in the saprophytic lifestyle of B. thailandensis, and it provides a foundation on which to build an understanding of the roles of quorum sensing in the biology of B. thailandensis and the closely related pathogenic Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

  19. Autoinducer-2 Quorum Sensing Influences Viability of Escherichia coli O157:H7 under Osmotic and In Vitro Gastrointestinal Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjoon Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use autoinducer molecules to communicate both at intra-species and inter-species levels by quorum sensing. One such cell density-dependent signaling system is the luxS-mediated universal quorum sensing using autoinducer-2 (AI-2. Virulence of several pathogens is determined by an AI-2 system and is related to colonization and infection of the host. From this concept, numerous papers have suggested that AI-2 inhibition is an important strategy toward designing of new antimicrobial agents. However, recent studies indicate that the AI-2 system is also involved in adaptation and survival under environmental stress conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that interaction between quorum sensing and environmental conditions may be critical in influencing predicted results in a control and when combating of target pathogens. We investigated the growth of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC and its luxS-deficient (non AI-2 producing mutant strain under various stress conditions, and found significant differences in the growth rate under osmotic stress. Moreover, we could also show the impact of the AI-2 molecule on viability in the gastrointestinal tract model representing a complex environmental condition. Differences in vital responses of the strains suggest that AI-2 quorum sensing has a significant influence on the viability of EHEC under environmental stress conditions.

  20. Autoinducer-2 Quorum Sensing Influences Viability ofEscherichia coliO157:H7 under Osmotic andIn VitroGastrointestinal Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjoon; Lee, Kyuyeon; Yeo, Soyoung; Shin, Heuynkil; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria use autoinducer molecules to communicate both at intra-species and inter-species levels by quorum sensing. One such cell density-dependent signaling system is the luxS -mediated universal quorum sensing using autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Virulence of several pathogens is determined by an AI-2 system and is related to colonization and infection of the host. From this concept, numerous papers have suggested that AI-2 inhibition is an important strategy toward designing of new antimicrobial agents. However, recent studies indicate that the AI-2 system is also involved in adaptation and survival under environmental stress conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that interaction between quorum sensing and environmental conditions may be critical in influencing predicted results in a control and when combating of target pathogens. We investigated the growth of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) and its luxS -deficient (non AI-2 producing) mutant strain under various stress conditions, and found significant differences in the growth rate under osmotic stress. Moreover, we could also show the impact of the AI-2 molecule on viability in the gastrointestinal tract model representing a complex environmental condition. Differences in vital responses of the strains suggest that AI-2 quorum sensing has a significant influence on the viability of EHEC under environmental stress conditions.

  1. Bacterial Quorum Sensing: Its Role in Virulence and Possibilities for Its Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Steven T.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell–cell communication that allows bacteria to share information about cell density and adjust gene expression accordingly. This process enables bacteria to express energetically expensive processes as a collective only when the impact of those processes on the environment or on a host will be maximized. Among the many traits controlled by quorum sensing is the expression of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria. Here we review the quorum-sensing circuits of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio cholerae. We outline these canonical quorum-sensing mechanisms and how each uniquely controls virulence factor production. Additionally, we examine recent efforts to inhibit quorum sensing in these pathogens with the goal of designing novel antimicrobial therapeutics. PMID:23125205

  2. Quorum sensing determines the choice of antiphage defense strategy in Vibrio anguillarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng; Svenningsen, Sine Lo; Middelboe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    of the outcome of phage-bacterial encounters in the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum is bacterial cell-cell communication, known as quorum sensing. Specifically, V. anguillarum PF430-3 cells locked in the low-cell-density state (ΔvanT mutant) express high levels of the phage receptor OmpK, resulting in a high...... susceptibility to phage KVP40, but achieve protection from infection by enhanced biofilm formation. By contrast, cells locked in the high-cell-density state (ΔvanΟ mutant) are almost completely unsusceptible due to quorum-sensing-mediated downregulation of OmpK expression. The phenotypes of the two quorum-sensing......-acylhomoserine lactone quorum-sensing signals in the culture medium, and (iii) survives mainly by one of these two defense mechanisms, rather than by genetic mutation to phage resistance. Taken together, our results demonstrate that V. anguillarum employs quorum-sensing information to choose between two complementary...

  3. Interspecies Quorum Sensing as a Stress-Anticipation Signal in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyland-Kroghsbo, Nina Molin

    in the bacterial cell-cell communication field is why E. coli harbors SdiA, an orphan quorum sensing receptor that is activated in response to AHL quorum sensing molecules produced by other Gram-negative species. The overall aim of this PhD thesis was to investigate to what degree AHL quorum sensing signals...... are exploited by E. coli to increase its chances of surviving potential environmental threats. This thesis uncovers the first quorum sensing-regulated bacteriophage defense mechanism, which serves to protect E. coli against infection by the bacteriophage viruses λ and χ. Investigating the regulatory mechanism...... underlying the quorum sensing regulated defense mechanism, led to the discovery that AHL activates expression of cnu, encoding an Hha-family protein that interacts with the global regulatory protein H-NS, and potentially modifies its functions. Inspired by the discovery that AHL protects E. coli from...

  4. Identification of Pathways Critical to Quorum Sensing and Virulence Induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ognibene, Ted J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holtz-Morris, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Daley, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2009-02-27

    Quorum sensing is a mode of intercellular communication between bacteria that allows them to collectively regulate behavior such as virulence, sporulation, motility and biofilm formation. It is mediated by bacterially synthesized, diffusible, signaling molecules (autoinducers) that increase in concentration as a bacterial population expands until a critical threshold concentration is reached. However, in most bacterial species that produce autoinducer molecules, the physiologic concentration of these molecules is unknown. Moreover, many bacterial species, including Y. pestis, produce an array of quorum sensing molecules and the physiologic concentration of each individual type of autoinducer molecule is not known. There is a need to accurately and precisely quantitate these molecules, as it may be that different types of autoinducer molecules have different effects on virulence in the bacterium. We focused our efforts on the construction of a platform to identify and quantitate autoinducer molecules using FTICR, 14C isotope labeling and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Specifically, we focused on autoinducer-1 type molecules, acylhomoserine lactone (HSL), derived from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM).

  5. Role of Heat Shock Proteases in Quorum-Sensing-Mediated Regulation of Biofilm Formation byVibrioSpecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Jo; Jung, You-Chul; Park, Soon-Jung; Lee, Kyu-Ho

    2018-01-02

    Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is essential for the dispersal of biofilms formed by the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus CPS production is induced by the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator SmcR when biofilms mature. However, V. vulnificus biofilms formed under heat shock conditions did not exhibit the dispersion stage. Transcripts of the CPS gene cluster were at basal levels in the heat-exposed cell owing to reduced cellular levels of SmcR. At least two proteases induced by heat shock, ClpPA and Lon, were responsible for determining the instability of SmcR. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrated that SmcR levels were regulated via proteolysis by these proteases, with preferential proteolysis of monomeric SmcR. Thus, CPS production was not induced by QS when bacteria were heat treated. Further studies performed with other Vibrio species demonstrated that high temperature deactivated the QS circuits by increased proteolysis of their QS master regulators, thus resulting in alterations to the QS-regulated phenotypes, including biofilm formation. IMPORTANCE The term "quorum-sensing mechanism" is used to describe diverse bacterial cell density-dependent activities that are achieved by sensing of the signaling molecules and subsequent signal transduction to the master regulators. These well-known bacterial regulatory systems regulate the expression of diverse virulence factors and the construction of biofilms in pathogenic bacteria. There have been numerous studies designed to control bacterial quorum sensing by using small molecules to antagonize the quorum-sensing regulatory components or to interfere with the signaling molecules. In the present study, we showed that the quorum-sensing regulatory circuits of pathogenic Vibrio species were deactivated by heat shock treatment via highly increased proteolysis of the master transcription factors. Our results showed a new mode of quorum deactivation which can be achieved under conditions of high but nonlethal

  6. A cell-cell communication signal integrates quorum sensing and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jasmine; Wu, Jien; Deng, Yinyue; Wang, Jing; Wang, Chao; Wang, Jianhe; Chang, Changqing; Dong, Yihu; Williams, Paul; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2013-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses a hierarchical quorum sensing (QS) network consisting of las, pqs and rhl regulatory elements to coordinate the expression of bacterial virulence genes. However, clinical isolates frequently contain loss-of-function mutations in the central las system. This motivated us to search for a mechanism that may functionally substitute las. Here we report identification of a new QS signal, IQS. Disruption of IQS biosynthesis paralyzes the pqs and rhl QS systems and attenuates bacterial virulence. Production of IQS is tightly controlled by las under normal culture conditions but is also activated by phosphate limitation, a common stressor that bacteria encounter during infections. Thus, these results have established an integrated QS system that connects the central las system and phosphate-stress response mechanism to the downstream pqs and rhl regulatory systems. Our discovery highlights the complexity of QS signaling systems and extends the gamut of QS and stress-response mechanisms.

  7. Quorum sensing antagonism from marine organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersø, Mette Elena; Ettinger-Epstein, P.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2008-01-01

    target for the control of infectious bacteria. We present the results of screening of 284 extracts of marine organisms from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, for their inhibition of QS. Of the 284 extracts, 64 (23%) were active in a general, LuxR-derived QS screen, and of these 36 (56%) were also active...... in a specific Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS screen. Extracts of the marine sponge Luffariella variabilis proved active in both systems. The secondary metabolites manoalide, manoalide monoacetate, and secomanoalide isolated from the sponge showed strong QS inhibition of a lasB::gfp(ASV) fusion, demonstrating...... the potential for further identification of specific QS antagonists from marine organisms....

  8. A Chemical Biology Approach to Interrogate Quorum Sensing Regulated Behaviors at the Molecular and Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Colin A.; Matamouros, Susana; Niessen, Sherry; Zhu, Jie; Scolnick, Jonathan A.; Mee, Jenny M.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Miller, Samuel I.; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Small molecule probes have been employed extensively to explore biological systems and elucidate cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we utilize an inhibitor of bacterial communication to monitor changes in the proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with the aim of discovering new processes regulated by AI-2-based quorum sensing (QS), a mechanism of bacterial intracellular communication that allows for the coordination of gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. In S. typhimurium, this system regulates the uptake and catabolism of intracellular signals and has been implicated in pathogenesis, including the invasion of host epithelial cells. We demonstrate that our QS antagonist is capable of selectively inhibiting the expression of known QS-regulated proteins in S. typhimurium, thus attesting that QS inhibitors may be used to confirm proposed and elucidate previously unidentified QS pathways without relying on genetic manipulation. PMID:23890008

  9. Pseudomonas cremoricolorata Strain ND07 Produces N-acyl Homoserine Lactones as Quorum Sensing Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Yusrina Muhamad Yunos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a bacterial cell-to-cell communication system controlling QS-mediated genes which is synchronized with the population density. The regulation of specific gene activity is dependent on the signaling molecules produced, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. We report here the identification and characterization of AHLs produced by bacterial strain ND07 isolated from a Malaysian fresh water sample. Molecular identification showed that strain ND07 is clustered closely to Pseudomonas cremoricolorata. Spent culture supernatant extract of P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 activated the AHL biosensor Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Using high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, it was confirmed that P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 produced N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation on the production of C10-HSL in P. cremoricolorata strain ND07.

  10. Antibiotic-mediated selection of quorum-sensing-negative Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulander, Wilhelm Erik Axel; Varming, Anders Nissen; Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn

    2012-01-01

    -acquired S. aureus infections and suggest that the adaptability of S. aureus to antibiotics involves the agr locus. IMPORTANCE: Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently isolated pathogen in intensive care units and a common cause of nosocomial infections, resulting in a high degree of morbidity......Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal that at times turns into a serious bacterial pathogen causing life-threatening infections. For the delicate control of virulence, S. aureus employs the agr quorum-sensing system that, via the intracellular effector molecule RNAIII, regulates virulence gene...... increases the agr-mediated fitness cost by inducing the expression of RNAIII. Thus, the extensive use of antibiotics in hospitals may explain why agr-negative variants are frequently isolated from hospital-acquired S. aureus infections but rarely found among community-acquired S. aureus strains. Importantly...

  11. Identification of four new agr quorum sensing-interfering cyclodepsipeptides from a marine Photobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaerulff, Louise; Nielsen, Anita; Mansson, Maria; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O; Ingmer, Hanne; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H

    2013-12-12

    During our search for new natural products from the marine environment, we discovered a wide range of cyclic peptides from a marine Photobacterium, closely related to P. halotolerans. The chemical fingerprint of the bacterium showed primarily non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-like compounds, including the known pyrrothine antibiotic holomycin and a wide range of peptides, from diketopiperazines to cyclodepsipeptides of 500-900 Da. Purification of components from the pellet fraction led to the isolation and structure elucidation of four new cyclodepsipeptides, ngercheumicin F, G, H, and I. The ngercheumicins interfered with expression of virulence genes known to be controlled by the agr quorum sensing system of Staphylococcus aureus, although to a lesser extent than the previously described solonamides from the same strain of Photobacterium.

  12. Identification of Four New agr Quorum Sensing-Interfering Cyclodepsipeptides from a Marine Photobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Kjaerulff

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During our search for new natural products from the marine environment, we discovered a wide range of cyclic peptides from a marine Photobacterium, closely related to P. halotolerans. The chemical fingerprint of the bacterium showed primarily non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS-like compounds, including the known pyrrothine antibiotic holomycin and a wide range of peptides, from diketopiperazines to cyclodepsipeptides of 500–900 Da. Purification of components from the pellet fraction led to the isolation and structure elucidation of four new cyclodepsipeptides, ngercheumicin F, G, H, and I. The ngercheumicins interfered with expression of virulence genes known to be controlled by the agr quorum sensing system of Staphylococcus aureus, although to a lesser extent than the previously described solonamides from the same strain of Photobacterium.

  13. Signal Integration in Quorum Sensing Enables Cross-Species Induction of Virulence in Pectobacterium wasabiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita S. Valente

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities can sense their neighbors, regulating group behaviors in response to cell density and environmental changes. The diversity of signaling networks in a single species has been postulated to allow custom responses to different stimuli; however, little is known about how multiple signals are integrated and the implications of this integration in different ecological contexts. In the plant pathogen Pectobacterium wasabiae (formerly Erwinia carotovora, two signaling networks—the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL quorum-sensing system and the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway—control the expression of secreted plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, its major virulence determinants. We show that the AHL system controls the Gac/Rsm system by affecting the expression of the regulatory RNA RsmB. This regulation is mediated by ExpR2, the quorum-sensing receptor that responds to the P. wasabiae cognate AHL but also to AHLs produced by other bacterial species. As a consequence, this level of regulation allows P. wasabiae to bypass the Gac-dependent regulation of RsmB in the presence of exogenous AHLs or AHL-producing bacteria. We provide in vivo evidence that this pivotal role of RsmB in signal transduction is important for the ability of P. wasabiae to induce virulence in response to other AHL-producing bacteria in multispecies plant lesions. Our results suggest that the signaling architecture in P. wasabiae was coopted to prime the bacteria to eavesdrop on other bacteria and quickly join the efforts of other species, which are already exploiting host resources.

  14. Quorum Sensing Activity of Enterobacter asburiae Isolated from Lettuce Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial communication or quorum sensing (QS is achieved via sensing of QS signaling molecules consisting of oligopeptides in Gram-positive bacteria and N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL in most Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, Enterobacteriaceae isolates from Batavia lettuce were screened for AHL production. Enterobacter asburiae, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS was found to produce short chain AHLs. High resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS analysis of the E. asburiae spent supernatant confirmed the production of N-butanoyl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL and N–hexanoyl homoserine lactone (C6-HSL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of AHL production by E. asburiae.

  15. Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum Sensing in the Roseobacter Clade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Zan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Roseobacter clade are ecologically important and numerically abundant in coastal environments and can associate with marine invertebrates and nutrient-rich marine snow or organic particles, on which quorum sensing (QS may play an important role. In this review, we summarize current research progress on roseobacterial acyl-homoserine lactone-based QS, particularly focusing on three relatively well-studied representatives, Phaeobacter inhibens DSM17395, the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 and the dinoflagellate symbiont Dinoroseobacter shibae. Bioinformatic survey of luxI homologues revealed that over 80% of available roseobacterial genomes encode at least one luxI homologue, reflecting the significance of QS controlled regulatory pathways in adapting to the relevant marine environments. We also discuss several areas that warrant further investigation, including studies on the ecological role of these diverse QS pathways in natural environments.

  16. Quorum sensing inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus from Italian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quave, Cassandra L; Plano, Lisa R W; Bennett, Bradley C

    2011-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality estimates due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections continue to rise. Therapeutic options are limited by antibiotic resistance. Anti-pathogenic compounds, which inhibit quorum sensing (QS) pathways, may be a useful alternative to antibiotics. Staphylococcal QS is encoded by the AGR locus and is responsible for the production of δ-hemolysin. Quantification of δ-hemolysin found in culture supernatants permits the analysis of AGR activity at the translational rather than transcriptional level. We employed reversed phase high performance chromatographic (RP-HPLC) techniques to investigate the anti-QS activity of 168 extracts from 104 Italian plants through quantification of δ-hemolysin. Extracts from three medicinal plants (Ballota nigra, Castanea sativa, and Sambucus ebulus) exhibited a dose-dependent response in the production of δ-hemolysin, indicating anti-QS activity in a pathogenic MRSA isolate. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. A quorum-sensing-induced bacteriophage defense mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyland-Kroghsbo, Nina Molin; Mærkedahl, Rasmus Baadsgaard; Svenningsen, Sine

    2013-01-01

    hypothesize that some bacteria have additionally evolved the abilities to estimate the risk of phage infection and to adjust their strategies accordingly. One risk parameter is the density of the bacterial population. Hence, quorum sensing, i.e., the ability to regulate gene expression according to population...... of uninfected survivor cells after a potent attack by virulent phages. Notably, this mechanism may apply to a broader range of phages, as AHLs also reduce the risk of ¿ phage infection through a different receptor. IMPORTANCE To enable the successful manipulation of bacterial populations, a comprehensive...... understanding of the factors that naturally shape microbial communities is required. One of the key factors in this context is the interactions between bacteria and the most abundant biological entities on Earth, namely, the bacteriophages that prey on bacteria. This proof-of-principle study shows that quorum...

  18. Quorum Sensing Activity of Hafnia alvei Isolated from Packed Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yi Tan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a mechanism adopted by bacteria to regulate expression of genes according to population density. N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs are a type of QS signalling molecules commonly found in Gram-negative bacteria which have been reported to play a role in microbial spoilage of foods and pathogenesis. In this study, we isolated an AHL-producing Hafnia alvei strain (FB1 from spherical fish pastes. Analysis via high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS on extracts from the spent supernatant of H. alvei FB1 revealed the existence of two short chain AHLs: N-(3-oxohexanoyl homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL and N-(3-oxo- octanoyl homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8-HSL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the production of AHLs, especially 3-oxo-C8-HSL, by H. alvei.

  19. Type 2 quorum sensing monitoring, inhibition and biofilm formation in marine microrganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaqat, Iram; Bachmann, Robert Thomas; Edyvean, Robert G J

    2014-03-01

    The quorum sensing (QS) dependent behaviour of micro-organisms, in particular expression of virulence genes, biofilm formation and dispersal, have provided impetus for investigating practical approaches to interfere with microbial QS. This study tests Halomonas pacifica and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, two halophilic marine micro-organism, for their AI-2 dependent QS signalling and the effect of two well-known quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs), patulin and penicillic acid, on biofilm formation. We report, for the first time, the successful amplification of a putative luxS gene in H. pacifica using degenerated primers and AI-2 dependent QS as well as inhibition using QSIs. Penicillic acid had a strong inhibitory effect on AI-2 induction of H. pacifica at non-growth inhibitory concentrations, while patulin has an adverse effect only at the highest concentration (25 μM). QSIs effect on biofilm forming capability was isolate specific, with maximum inhibition at 25 μM of patulin in H. pacifica. In M. hydrocarbonoclasticus, no adverse effects were noted at any tested concentration of either QSIs. Detection of bioluminescence and the presence of a putative luxS gene provide biochemical and genetic evidence for the production of a signalling molecule(s) which is the essential first step in characterizing H. pacifica QS. This study highlights the importance of AI-2 dependent QS in a marine setting, not previously reported. It further suggests that QSI compounds must be selected in the specific system in which they are to function, and they cannot easily be transferred from one QS system to another.

  20. Autoinducer-2 Quorum Sensing Contributes to Regulation of Microcin PDI in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yeh Lu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Escherichia coli quorum sensing (QS signal molecule, autoinducer-2 (AI-2, reaches its maximum concentration during mid-to-late growth phase after which it quickly degrades during stationary phase. This pattern of AI-2 concentration coincides with the up- then down-regulation of a recently described microcin PDI (mccPDI effector protein (McpM. To determine if there is a functional relationship between these systems, a prototypical mccPDI-expressing strain of E. coli 25 was used to generate ΔluxS, ΔlsrACDBFG (Δlsr, and ΔlsrR mutant strains that are deficient in AI-2 production, transportation, and AI-2 transport regulation, respectively. Trans-complementation, RT-qPCR, and western blot assays were used to detect changes of microcin expression and synthesis under co-culture and monoculture conditions. Compared to the wild-type strain, the AI-2-deficient strain (ΔluxS and -uptake negative strain (Δlsr were >1,000-fold less inhibitory to susceptible bacteria (P < 0.05. With in trans complementation of luxS, the AI-2 deficient mutant reduced the susceptible E. coli population by 4-log, which was within 1-log of the wild-type phenotype. RT-qPCR and western blot results for the AI-2 deficient E. coli 25 showed a 5-fold reduction in mcpM transcription with an average 2-h delay in McpM synthesis. Furthermore, overexpression of sRNA micC and micF (both involved in porin protein regulation was correlated with mcpM regulation, consistent with a possible link between QS and mcpM regulation. This is the direct first evidence that microcin regulation can be linked to quorum sensing in a Gram-negative bacterium.

  1. Switch of SpnR function from activating to inhibiting quorum sensing by its exogenous addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Yuriko; Kato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Serratia marcescens AS-1 produces the N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6HSL) receptor SpnR, a homologue of LuxR from Vibrio fischeri, which activates pig clusters to produce the antibacterial prodigiosin. In this study, we attempted to artificially regulate quorum sensing (QS) by changing the role of SpnR in N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated QS. SpnR was obtained as a fusion protein tagged with maltose-binding protein (MBP) from overexpression in Escherichia coli, and its specific affinity to C6HSL was demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance analysis and AHL-bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Prodigiosin production was effectively inhibited by externally added MBP-SpnR in both wild-type AS-1 and the AHL synthase-defective mutant AS-1(ΔspnI). For the mutant, the induced amount of prodigiosin was drastically reduced to approximately 4% with the addition of 18 μM MBP-SpnR to the liquid medium, indicating 81% trapping of C6HSL. A system for inhibiting QS can be constructed by adding exogenous AHL receptor to the culture broth to keep the concentration of free AHL low, whereas intracellular SpnR naturally functions as the activator in response to QS. - Highlights: • Quorum sensing (QS) regulates the expression of some bacterial genes. • We added an AHL receptor to culture media to inhibit QS in Serratia marcescens AS-1. • The exogenous receptor effectively bound C6HSL and inhibited QS. • This approach can be used to artificially regulate AHL-mediated QS.

  2. Switch of SpnR function from activating to inhibiting quorum sensing by its exogenous addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Yuriko [Department of Innovation Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kato, Norihiro, E-mail: katon@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    The opportunistic human pathogen Serratia marcescens AS-1 produces the N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6HSL) receptor SpnR, a homologue of LuxR from Vibrio fischeri, which activates pig clusters to produce the antibacterial prodigiosin. In this study, we attempted to artificially regulate quorum sensing (QS) by changing the role of SpnR in N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated QS. SpnR was obtained as a fusion protein tagged with maltose-binding protein (MBP) from overexpression in Escherichia coli, and its specific affinity to C6HSL was demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance analysis and AHL-bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Prodigiosin production was effectively inhibited by externally added MBP-SpnR in both wild-type AS-1 and the AHL synthase-defective mutant AS-1(ΔspnI). For the mutant, the induced amount of prodigiosin was drastically reduced to approximately 4% with the addition of 18 μM MBP-SpnR to the liquid medium, indicating 81% trapping of C6HSL. A system for inhibiting QS can be constructed by adding exogenous AHL receptor to the culture broth to keep the concentration of free AHL low, whereas intracellular SpnR naturally functions as the activator in response to QS. - Highlights: • Quorum sensing (QS) regulates the expression of some bacterial genes. • We added an AHL receptor to culture media to inhibit QS in Serratia marcescens AS-1. • The exogenous receptor effectively bound C6HSL and inhibited QS. • This approach can be used to artificially regulate AHL-mediated QS.

  3. Bacteria clustering by polymers induces the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Leong T.; Xue, Xuan; Sui, Cheng; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I.; Halliday, Nigel; Winzer, Klaus; Howdle, Steven M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Krasnogor, Natalio; Alexander, Cameron

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria deploy a range of chemistries to regulate their behaviour and respond to their environment. Quorum sensing is one method by which bacteria use chemical reactions to modulate pre-infection behaviour such as surface attachment. Polymers that can interfere with bacterial adhesion or the chemical reactions used for quorum sensing are therefore a potential means to control bacterial population responses. Here, we report how polymeric ‘bacteria sequestrants’, designed to bind to bacteria through electrostatic interactions and therefore inhibit bacterial adhesion to surfaces, induce the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes as a consequence of cell clustering. A combination of polymer and analytical chemistry, biological assays and computational modelling has been used to characterize the feedback between bacteria clustering and quorum sensing signalling. We have also derived design principles and chemical strategies for controlling bacterial behaviour at the population level.

  4. Peptides as Quorum Sensing Molecules: Measurement Techniques and Obtained LevelsIn vitroandIn vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Frederick; De Craemer, Severine; Debunne, Nathan; Janssens, Yorick; Wynendaele, Evelien; Van de Wiele, Christophe; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2017-01-01

    The expression of certain bacterial genes is regulated in a cell-density dependent way, a phenomenon called quorum sensing. Both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria use this type of communication, though the signal molecules (auto-inducers) used by them differ between both groups: Gram-negative bacteria use predominantly N -acyl homoserine lacton (AHL) molecules (autoinducer-1, AI-1) while Gram-positive bacteria use mainly peptides (autoinducer peptides, AIP or quorum sensing peptides). These quorum sensing molecules are not only involved in the inter-microbial communication, but can also possibly cross-talk directly or indirectly with their host. This review summarizes the currently applied analytical approaches for quorum sensing identification and quantification with additionally summarizing the experimentally found in vivo concentrations of these molecules in humans.

  5. Quorum Sensing Gene Regulation by LuxR/HapR Master Regulators in Vibrios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Alyssa S; Chaparian, Ryan R; van Kessel, Julia C

    2017-10-01

    The coordination of group behaviors in bacteria is accomplished via the cell-cell signaling process called quorum sensing. Vibrios have historically been models for studying bacterial communication due to the diverse and remarkable behaviors controlled by quorum sensing in these bacteria, including bioluminescence, type III and type VI secretion, biofilm formation, and motility. Here, we discuss the Vibrio LuxR/HapR family of proteins, the master global transcription factors that direct downstream gene expression in response to changes in cell density. These proteins are structurally similar to TetR transcription factors but exhibit distinct biochemical and genetic features from TetR that determine their regulatory influence on the quorum sensing gene network. We review here the gene groups regulated by LuxR/HapR and quorum sensing and explore the targets that are common and unique among Vibrio species. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Modulating Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing-controlled communication using autoinducer-loaded nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hoang D; Spiegel, Alina C; Hurley, Amanda; Perez, Lark J; Maisel, Katharina; Ensign, Laura M; Hanes, Justin; Bassler, Bonnie L; Semmelhack, Martin F; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-04-08

    The rise of bacterial antibiotic resistance has created a demand for alternatives to traditional antibiotics. Attractive possibilities include pro- and anti-quorum sensing therapies that function by modulating bacterial chemical communication circuits. We report the use of Flash NanoPrecipitation to deliver the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing signal CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one) in a water dispersible form as nanoparticles. The particles activate V. cholerae quorum-sensing responses 5 orders of magnitude higher than does the identically administered free CAI-1 and are diffusive across in vivo delivery barriers such as intestinal mucus. This work highlights the promise of combining quorum-sensing strategies with drug delivery approaches for the development of next-generation medicines.

  7. Quorum sensing inhibition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: new insights through network mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Martín; Jorge, Paula; Pérez Rodríguez, Gael; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Lourenço, Anália

    2017-02-01

    Quorum sensing plays a pivotal role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa's virulence. This paper reviews experimental results on antimicrobial strategies based on quorum sensing inhibition and discusses current targets in the regulatory network that determines P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and virulence. A bioinformatics framework combining literature mining with information from biomedical ontologies and curated databases was used to create a knowledge network of potential anti-quorum sensing agents for P. aeruginosa. A total of 110 scientific articles, corresponding to 1,004 annotations, were so far included in the network and are analysed in this work. Information on the most studied agents, QS targets and methods is detailed. This knowledge network offers a unique view of existing strategies for quorum sensing inhibition and their main regulatory targets and may be used to readily access otherwise scattered information and to help generate new testable hypotheses. This knowledge network is publicly available at http://pcquorum.org/ .

  8. Synthesis of (R)-norbgugaine and its potential as quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Majik, M.S.; Naik, D.; Bhat, C.; Tilve, S.; Tilvi, S.; DeSouza, L.

    and cat hydrogenation as the key steps and its biological studies are reported for the first time. The synthesized norbgugaine was evaluated for inhibition of quorum sensing mediated virulence factors (motility, biofilm formation, pyocyanin pigmentation...

  9. Transition to quorum sensing in an Agrobacterium population: A stochastic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Goryachev

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the intracellular molecular machinery that is responsible for the complex collective behavior of multicellular populations is an exigent problem of modern biology. Quorum sensing, which allows bacteria to activate genetic programs cooperatively, provides an instructive and tractable example illuminating the causal relationships between the molecular organization of gene networks and the complex phenotypes they control. In this work we--to our knowledge for the first time--present a detailed model of the population-wide transition to quorum sensing using the example of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We construct a model describing the Ti plasmid quorum-sensing gene network and demonstrate that it behaves as an "on-off" gene expression switch that is robust to molecular noise and that activates the plasmid conjugation program in response to the increase in autoinducer concentration. This intracellular model is then incorporated into an agent-based stochastic population model that also describes bacterial motion, cell division, and chemical communication. Simulating the transition to quorum sensing in a liquid medium and biofilm, we explain the experimentally observed gradual manifestation of the quorum-sensing phenotype by showing that the transition of individual model cells into the "on" state is spread stochastically over a broad range of autoinducer concentrations. At the same time, the population-averaged values of critical autoinducer concentration and the threshold population density are shown to be robust to variability between individual cells, predictable and specific to particular growth conditions. Our modeling approach connects intracellular and population scales of the quorum-sensing phenomenon and provides plausible answers to the long-standing questions regarding the ecological and evolutionary significance of the phenomenon. Thus, we demonstrate that the transition to quorum sensing requires a much higher threshold

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa with lasI quorum-sensing deficiency during corneal infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, H.; Bandara, R.; Conibear, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    in lasI, lasR, or rhlR were investigated in the study. METHODS: The possession of the quorum-sensing genes lasI, lasR, rhlI, rhlR, and the quorum-sensing controlled genes lasB, aprA, and rhlAB in the clinical isolates were determined by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot hybridization...

  11. Flavonoids Suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Allosteric Inhibition of Quorum-sensing Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Mukherjee, Sampriti; McCready, Amelia R.; Cong, Jian-Ping; Aquino, Christopher J.; Kim, Hahn; Henke, Brad R.; Smith, Chari D.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-cell communication that bacteria use to regulate collective behaviors. Quorum sensing depends on the production, detection, and group-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. In many bacterial species, quorum sensing controls virulence factor production. Thus, disrupting quorum sensing is considered a promising strategy to combat bacterial pathogenicity. Several members of a family of naturally produced plant metabolites called flavonoids inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by an unknown mechanism. Here, we explore this family of molecules further, and we demonstrate that flavonoids specifically inhibit quorum sensing via antagonism of the autoinducer-binding receptors, LasR and RhlR. Structure-activity relationship analyses demonstrate that the presence of two hydroxyl moieties in the flavone A-ring backbone are essential for potent inhibition of LasR/RhlR. Biochemical analyses reveal that the flavonoids function non-competitively to prevent LasR/RhlR DNA binding. Administration of the flavonoids to P. aeruginosa alters transcription of quorum sensing-controlled target promoters and suppresses virulence factor production, confirming their potential as anti-infectives that do not function by traditional bacteriocidal or bacteriostatic mechanisms. PMID:28119451

  12. Death and Survival in Streptococcus mutans: Differing Outcomes of a Quorum-Sensing Signalling Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent eLeung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are considered ‘social’ organisms able to communicate with one another using small hormone-like molecules (pheromones in a process called quorum-sensing. These signalling molecules increase in concentration as a function of bacterial cell density. For most human pathogens, quorum-sensing is critical for virulence and biofilm formation, and the opportunity to interfere with bacterial quorum-sensing could provide a sophisticated means for manipulating the composition of pathogenic biofilms, and possibly eradicating the infection. Streptococcus mutans is a well-characterized resident of the dental plaque biofilm, and is the major pathogen of dental caries (tooth decay. In S. mutans, its CSP quorum-sensing signalling peptide does not act as a classical quorum-sensing signal by accumulating passively in proportion to cell density. In fact, particular stresses such as those encountered in the oral cavity, induces the production of the CSP pheromone, suggesting that the pheromone most probably functions as a stress-inducible alarmone by triggering the signalling to the bacterial population to initiate an adaptive response that results in different phenotypic outcomes. This mini-review discusses two different CSP-induced phenotypes, bacterial ‘suicide’ and dormancy, and the underlying mechanisms by which S. mutans utilizes the same quorum-sensing signalling peptide to regulate two opposite phenotypes.

  13. Flavonoids SuppressPseudomonas aeruginosaVirulence through Allosteric Inhibition of Quorum-sensing Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowski, Jon E; Mukherjee, Sampriti; McCready, Amelia R; Cong, Jian-Ping; Aquino, Christopher J; Kim, Hahn; Henke, Brad R; Smith, Chari D; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2017-03-10

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-cell communication that bacteria use to regulate collective behaviors. Quorum sensing depends on the production, detection, and group-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. In many bacterial species, quorum sensing controls virulence factor production. Thus, disrupting quorum sensing is considered a promising strategy to combat bacterial pathogenicity. Several members of a family of naturally produced plant metabolites called flavonoids inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by an unknown mechanism. Here, we explore this family of molecules further, and we demonstrate that flavonoids specifically inhibit quorum sensing via antagonism of the autoinducer-binding receptors, LasR and RhlR. Structure-activity relationship analyses demonstrate that the presence of two hydroxyl moieties in the flavone A-ring backbone are essential for potent inhibition of LasR/RhlR. Biochemical analyses reveal that the flavonoids function non-competitively to prevent LasR/RhlR DNA binding. Administration of the flavonoids to P. aeruginosa alters transcription of quorum sensing-controlled target promoters and suppresses virulence factor production, confirming their potential as anti-infectives that do not function by traditional bacteriocidal or bacteriostatic mechanisms. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Quorum-sensing control of antibiotic resistance stabilizes cooperation in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kara C; Benomar, Saida; Camuy-Vélez, Lennel A; Nasseri, Ellen B; Wang, Xiaofei; Neuenswander, Benjamin; Chandler, Josephine R

    2018-01-26

    Many Proteobacteria use quorum sensing to regulate production of public goods, such as antimicrobials and proteases, that are shared among members of a community. Public goods are vulnerable to exploitation by cheaters, such as quorum sensing-defective mutants. Quorum sensing- regulated private goods, goods that benefit only producing cells, can prevent the emergence of cheaters under certain growth conditions. Previously, we developed a laboratory co-culture model to investigate the importance of quorum-regulated antimicrobials during interspecies competition. In our model, Burkholderia thailandensis and Chromobacterium violaceum each use quorum sensing-controlled antimicrobials to inhibit the other species' growth. Here, we show that C. violaceum uses quorum sensing to increase resistance to bactobolin, a B. thailandensis antibiotic, by increasing transcription of a putative antibiotic efflux pump. We demonstrate conditions where C. violaceum quorum-defective cheaters emerge and show that in these conditions, bactobolin restrains cheaters. We also demonstrate that bactobolin restrains quorum-defective mutants in our co-culture model, and the increase in antimicrobial-producing cooperators drives the C. violaceum population to become more competitive. Our results describe a mechanism of cheater restraint involving quorum control of efflux pumps and demonstrate that interspecies competition can reinforce cooperative behaviors by placing constraints on quorum sensing-defective mutants.

  15. The hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 produces a biosurfactant that interferes with quorum sensing of fish pathogens by signal hijacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibacache-Quiroga, C; Ojeda, J; Espinoza-Vergara, G; Olivero, P; Cuellar, M; Dinamarca, M A

    2013-07-01

    Biosurfactants are produced by hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria in response to the presence of water-insoluble hydrocarbons. This is believed to facilitate the uptake of hydrocarbons by bacteria. However, these diffusible amphiphilic surface-active molecules are involved in several other biological functions such as microbial competition and intra- or inter-species communication. We report the isolation and characterization of a marine bacterial strain identified as Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1, which can grow using the sulfur-containing heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene (DBT). As with DBT, when the isolated strain is grown in the presence of a microbial competitor, it produces a biosurfactant. Because the obtained biosurfactant was formed by hydroxy fatty acids and extracellular lipidic structures were observed during bacterial growth, we investigated whether the biosurfactant at its critical micelle concentration can interfere with bacterial communication systems such as quorum sensing. We focused on Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, a fish pathogen whose virulence relies on quorum sensing signals. Using biosensors for quorum sensing based on Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio anguillarum, we showed that when the purified biosurfactant was mixed with N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by A. salmonicida, quorum sensing was inhibited, although bacterial growth was not affected. In addition, the transcriptional activities of A. salmonicida virulence genes that are controlled by quorum sensing were repressed by both the purified biosurfactant and the growth in the presence of Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1. We propose that the biosurfactant, or the lipid structures interact with the N-acyl homoserine lactones, inhibiting their function. This could be used as a strategy to interfere with the quorum sensing systems of bacterial fish pathogens, which represents an attractive alternative to classical antimicrobial therapies in fish aquaculture. © 2013

  16. The hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 produces a biosurfactant that interferes with quorum sensing of fish pathogens by signal hijacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibacache-Quiroga, C; Ojeda, J; Espinoza-Vergara, G; Olivero, P; Cuellar, M; Dinamarca, M A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Biosurfactants are produced by hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria in response to the presence of water-insoluble hydrocarbons. This is believed to facilitate the uptake of hydrocarbons by bacteria. However, these diffusible amphiphilic surface-active molecules are involved in several other biological functions such as microbial competition and intra-or inter-species communication. We report the isolation and characterization of a marine bacterial strain identified as Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1, which can grow using the sulfur-containing heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene (DBT). As with DBT, when the isolated strain is grown in the presence of a microbial competitor, it produces a biosurfactant. Because the obtained biosurfactant was formed by hydroxy fatty acids and extracellular lipidic structures were observed during bacterial growth, we investigated whether the biosurfactant at its critical micelle concentration can interfere with bacterial communication systems such as quorum sensing. We focused on Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, a fish pathogen whose virulence relies on quorum sensing signals. Using biosensors for quorum sensing based on Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio anguillarum, we showed that when the purified biosurfactant was mixed with N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by A. salmonicida, quorum sensing was inhibited, although bacterial growth was not affected. In addition, the transcriptional activities of A. salmonicida virulence genes that are controlled by quorum sensing were repressed by both the purified biosurfactant and the growth in the presence of Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1. We propose that the biosurfactant, or the lipid structures interact with the N-acyl homoserine lactones, inhibiting their function. This could be used as a strategy to interfere with the quorum sensing systems of bacterial fish pathogens, which represents an attractive alternative to classical antimicrobial therapies in fish

  17. Quorum-sensing and cheating in bacterial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popat, Roman; Crusz, Shanika A.; Messina, Marco; Williams, Paul; West, Stuart A.; Diggle, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    The idea from human societies that self-interest can lead to a breakdown of cooperation at the group level is sometimes termed the public goods dilemma. We tested this idea in the opportunistic bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, by examining the influence of putative cheats that do not cooperate via cell-to-cell signalling (quorum-sensing, QS). We found that: (i) QS cheating occurs in biofilm populations owing to exploitation of QS-regulated public goods; (ii) the thickness and density of biofilms was reduced by the presence of non-cooperative cheats; (iii) population growth was reduced by the presence of cheats, and this reduction was greater in biofilms than in planktonic populations; (iv) the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics was increased by the presence of cheats; and (v) coercing cooperator cells to increase their level of cooperation decreases the extent to which the presence of cheats reduces population productivity. Our results provide clear support that conflict over public goods reduces population fitness in bacterial biofilms, and that this effect is greater than in planktonic populations. Finally, we discuss the clinical implications that arise from altering the susceptibility to antibiotics. PMID:23034707

  18. Bacterial biofilms and quorum sensing: fidelity in bioremediation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangwani, Neelam; Kumari, Supriya; Das, Surajit

    Increased contamination of the environment with toxic pollutants has paved the way for efficient strategies which can be implemented for environmental restoration. The major problem with conventional methods used for cleaning of pollutants is inefficiency and high economic costs. Bioremediation is a growing technology having advanced potential of cleaning pollutants. Biofilm formed by various micro-organisms potentially provide a suitable microenvironment for efficient bioremediation processes. High cell density and stress resistance properties of the biofilm environment provide opportunities for efficient metabolism of number of hydrophobic and toxic compounds. Bacterial biofilm formation is often regulated by quorum sensing (QS) which is a population density-based cell-cell communication process via signaling molecules. Numerous signaling molecules such as acyl homoserine lactones, peptides, autoinducer-2, diffusion signaling factors, and α-hydroxyketones have been studied in bacteria. Genetic alteration of QS machinery can be useful to modulate vital characters valuable for environmental applications such as biofilm formation, biosurfactant production, exopolysaccharide synthesis, horizontal gene transfer, catabolic gene expression, motility, and chemotaxis. These qualities are imperative for bacteria during degradation or detoxification of any pollutant. QS signals can be used for the fabrication of engineered biofilms with enhanced degradation kinetics. This review discusses the connection between QS and biofilm formation by bacteria in relation to bioremediation technology.

  19. Bacterial quorum sensing and nitrogen cycling in rhizosphere soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Lindow, S.E.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-10-01

    Plant photosynthate fuels carbon-limited microbial growth and activity, resulting in increased rhizosphere nitrogen (N)-mineralization. Most soil organic N is macromolecular (chitin, protein, nucleotides); enzymatic depolymerization is likely rate-limiting for plant N accumulation. Analyzing Avena (wild oat) planted in microcosms containing sieved field soil, we observed increased rhizosphere chitinase and protease specific activities, bacterial cell densities, and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) compared to bulk soil. Low-molecular weight DON (<3000 Da) was undetectable in bulk soil but comprised 15% of rhizosphere DON. Extracellular enzyme production in many bacteria requires quorum sensing (QS), cell-density dependent group behavior. Because proteobacteria are considered major rhizosphere colonizers, we assayed the proteobacterial QS signals acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), which were significantly increased in the rhizosphere. To investigate the linkage between soil signaling and N cycling, we characterized 533 bacterial isolates from Avena rhizosphere: 24% had chitinase or protease activity and AHL production; disruption of QS in 7 of 8 eight isolates disrupted enzyme activity. Many {alpha}-Proteobacteria were newly found with QS-controlled extracellular enzyme activity. Enhanced specific activities of N-cycling enzymes accompanied by bacterial density-dependent behaviors in rhizosphere soil gives rise to the hypothesis that QS could be a control point in the complex process of rhizosphere N-mineralization.

  20. Proteomics of the bacterial cross-talk by quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria; Calasso, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Words such as language and behavior are frequently used to depict "quorum sensing" (QS) in the literature. Simplifying the concept, language and cross-talk between bacteria, and between bacteria and animal or plants hosts determine the behavior (e.g., beneficial or pathogenic effects). Genomics and transcriptomics were the principal approaches used to study the multiple mechanisms of QS. Nevertheless, sequencing of genomes paved the way for another approach which consists on comparative and functional proteomics. This review aims at describing how the proteomic dictionary translates: (i) the languages (N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones, AHL; autoinducing peptide, AIP; autoinducer-2, AI-2) used by bacteria to communicate; (ii) signals of QS which induce various phenotypes (e.g., virulence, biofilm maturation); (iii) cross-talk between lactic acid bacteria within various food ecosystems (e.g. sourdough and fermented milk); (iv) probiotic messages at intra- and inter-species and interkingdom levels; and (v) words for quorum quenching (QQ). Proteomics is an indispensible discipline to elucidate the mechanisms of regulation of the multitude of language signals which diffuse through different microbial communities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Recent Advances in Ligand and Structure Based Screening of Potent Quorum Sensing Inhibitors Against Antibiotic Resistance Induced Bacterial Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sisir

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat in the treatment of bacterial diseases. Bacterial invasion and its virulence can cause damage to the host cells via quorum sensing mechanism which is responsible for the intercellular communication among bacteria that regulates expression of many genes. Quorum sensing (QS) differentially expresses specific sets of genes which may produce resistance. Researchers have been devoted to develop more potent compounds against bacterial resistant quorum sensing inhibitors. A number of anti-quorum sensing approaches have been documented to screen potent inhibitors against quorum sensing induced bacterial virulence. Experimental screening of a large chemical compound library against a quorum sensing biological target is an established technology for lead identification but it is expensive, laborious and time consuming. Therefore, computer-aided high throughput ligand and structure based virtual screening are most effective pharmacoinformatic tools prior to experiment in this context. Ligand based screening includes quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) and pharmacophore generation whereas techniques of structure based virtual screening include molecular docking. The study in this direction can increase the findings of hit rates and decrease cost of drug design and development by producing potent natural as well as synthetic anti-quorum sensing compounds. Most recent patent coverage on ligand and structure based design of novel bioactive quorum sensing inhibitors has been presented here. The paper has also critically reviewed the screening and design of potent quorum sensing inhibitor leads that would help in patenting novel leads active against bacterial virulence and minimizing antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens.

  2. Non-native acylated homoserine lactones reveal that LuxIR quorum sensing promotes symbiont stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Sarah V; Schwartzman, Julia A; Ho, Jessica S; Geske, Grant D; Blackwell, Helen E; Ruby, Edward G

    2014-08-01

    Quorum sensing, a group behaviour coordinated by a diffusible pheromone signal and a cognate receptor, is typical of bacteria that form symbioses with plants and animals. LuxIR-type N-acyl L-homoserine (AHL) quorum sensing is common in Gram-negative Proteobacteria, and many members of this group have additional quorum-sensing networks. The bioluminescent symbiont Vibrio fischeri encodes two AHL signal synthases: AinS and LuxI. AinS-dependent quorum sensing converges with LuxI-dependent quorum sensing at the LuxR regulatory element. Both AinS- and LuxI-mediated signalling are required for efficient and persistent colonization of the squid host, Euprymna scolopes. The basis of the mutualism is symbiont bioluminescence, which is regulated by both LuxI- and AinS-dependent quorum sensing, and is essential for maintaining a colonization of the host. Here, we used chemical and genetic approaches to probe the dynamics of LuxI- and AinS-mediated regulation of bioluminescence during symbiosis. We demonstrate that both native AHLs and non-native AHL analogues can be used to non-invasively and specifically modulate induction of symbiotic bioluminescence via LuxI-dependent quorum sensing. Our data suggest that the first day of colonization, during which symbiont bioluminescence is induced by LuxIR, is a critical period that determines the stability of the V. fischeri population once symbiosis is established. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Study of the major essential oil compounds of Coriandrum sativum against Acinetobacter baumannii and the effect of linalool on adhesion, biofilms and quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Susana; Duarte, Andreia; Sousa, Sónia; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that has the ability to adhere to surfaces in the hospital environment and to form biofilms which are increasingly resistant to antimicrobial agents. The aim of this work was to study the antimicrobial activity of the major oil compounds of Coriandrum sativum against A. baumannii. The effect of linalool on planktonic cells and biofilms of A. baumannii on different surfaces, as well as its effect on adhesion and quorum sensing was evaluated. From all the compounds evaluated, linalool was the compound with the best antibacterial activity, with minimum inhibitory concentration values between 2 and 8 μl ml(-1). Linalool also inhibited biofilm formation and dispersed established biofilms of A. baumannii, changed the adhesion of A. baumannii to surfaces and interfered with the quorum- sensing system. Thus, linalool could be a promising antimicrobial agent for controlling planktonic cells and biofilms of A. baumannii.

  4. Flavones as Quorum Sensing Inhibitors Identified by a Newly Optimized Screening Platform Using Chromobacterium violaceum as Reporter Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogman, Malena E; Kanerva, Sonja; Manner, Suvi; Vuorela, Pia M; Fallarero, Adyary

    2016-09-10

    Quorum sensing (QS) is the process by which bacteria produce and detect signal molecules to coordinate their collective behavior. This intercellular communication is a relevant target for anti-biofilm therapies. Here we have optimized a screening-applicable assay to search for new quorum sensing inhibitors from natural compound libraries. In this system, QS is correlated with the production of violacein, which is directly controlled by the LuxI/LuxR system in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 31532. The parallel use of C. violaceum Tn5-mutant CV026, which depends on auto-inducer addition, allows simultaneous discrimination of compounds that act as quenchers of the AHL signal (quorum quenchers). The incorporation of a redox stain into the platform allowed further distinction between QS inhibitors, quorum quenchers and antibacterial compounds. A pilot screening was performed with 465 natural and synthetic flavonoids. All the most active compounds were flavones and they displayed potencies (IC50) in the range of 3.69 to 23.35 μM. These leads were particularly promising as they inhibited the transition from microcolonies into mature biofilms from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. This approach can be very effective in identifying new antimicrobials posing lesser risks of resistance.

  5. The phosphotransferase VanU represses expression of four qrr genes antagonizing VanO-mediated quorum-sensing regulation in Vibrio anguillarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Barbara; Lindell, Kristoffer; El Qaidi, Samir; Hjerde, Erik; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Milton, Debra L

    2011-12-01

    Vibrio anguillarum utilizes quorum sensing to regulate stress responses required for survival in the aquatic environment. Like other Vibrio species, V. anguillarum contains the gene qrr1, which encodes the ancestral quorum regulatory RNA Qrr1, and phosphorelay quorum-sensing systems that modulate the expression of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that destabilize mRNA encoding the transcriptional regulator VanT. In this study, three additional Qrr sRNAs were identified. All four sRNAs were positively regulated by σ(54) and the σ(54)-dependent response regulator VanO, and showed a redundant activity. The Qrr sRNAs, together with the RNA chaperone Hfq, destabilized vanT mRNA and modulated expression of VanT-regulated genes. Unexpectedly, expression of all four qrr genes peaked at high cell density, and exogenously added N-acylhomoserine lactone molecules induced expression of the qrr genes at low cell density. The phosphotransferase VanU, which phosphorylates and activates VanO, repressed expression of the Qrr sRNAs and stabilized vanT mRNA. A model is presented proposing that VanU acts as a branch point, aiding cross-regulation between two independent phosphorelay systems that activate or repress expression of the Qrr sRNAs, giving flexibility and precision in modulating VanT expression and inducing a quorum-sensing response to stresses found in a constantly changing aquatic environment.

  6. Auto Poisoning of the Respiratory Chain by a Quorum Sensing Regulated Molecule Favors Biofilm Formation and Antibiotic Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Ronen; Que, Yok Ai; Maura, Damien; Strobel, Benjamin; Majcherczyk, Paul Anthony; Hopper, Laura Rose; Wilbur, David J.; Hreha, Teri N.; Barquera, Blanca; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial programmed cell death and quorum sensing are direct examples of prokaryote group behaviors, wherein cells coordinate their actions to function cooperatively like one organism for the benefit of the whole culture. We demonstrate here that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), a Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing -regulated low-molecular-weight excreted molecule, and triggers autolysis by self-perturbing the electron transfer reactions of the cytochrome bc1 complex. HQNO induces specific self-poisoning by disrupting the flow of electrons through the respiratory chain at the cytochrome bc1 complex, causing a leak of reducing equivalents to O2 whereby electrons that would normally be passed to cytochrome c are donated directly to O2. The subsequent mass production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduces membrane potential and disrupts membrane integrity, causing bacterial cell autolysis and DNA release. DNA subsequently promotes biofilm formation and increases antibiotic tolerance to beta-lactams, suggesting that HQNO-dependent cell autolysis is advantageous to the bacterial populations. These data both identify a new programmed cell death system, and a novel role for HQNO as a critical-inducer of biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. This newly identified pathway suggests intriguing mechanistic similarities with the initial mitochondrial-mediated steps of eukaryotic apoptosis. PMID:26776731

  7. Cross-Species Comparison of the Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei Quorum-Sensing Regulons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Armour, Christopher D.; Radey, Matthew C.; Bunt, Richard; Hayden, Hillary S.; Bydalek, Ryland

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei (the Bptm group) are close relatives with very different lifestyles: B. pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen, B. thailandensis is a nonpathogenic saprophyte, and B. mallei is a host-restricted pathogen. The acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing (QS) systems of these three species show a high level of conservation. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to define the quorum-sensing regulon in each species, and we performed a cross-species analysis of the QS-controlled orthologs. Our analysis revealed a core set of QS-regulated genes in all three species, as well as QS-controlled factors shared by only two species or unique to a given species. This global survey of the QS regulons of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and B. mallei serves as a platform for predicting which QS-controlled processes might be important in different bacterial niches and contribute to the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. PMID:25182491

  8. Effects of allicin on the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofinm and the production of quorum-sensing controlled virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihua, Lin; Jianhuit, Wang; Jialini, Yu; Yayin, Li; Guanxin, Liu

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial pathogen is reputed for its resistance to multiple antibiotics, and this property is strongly associated with the development of biofilms. Bacterial biofilms form by aggregation of microorganisms on a solid surface and secretion of an extracellular polysaccharide substances that acts as a physical protection barrier for the encased bacteria. In addition, the P aeruginosa quorum-sensing system contributes to antibiotic resistance by regulating the expression of several virulence factors, including exotoxin A, elastase, pyoverdin and rhamnolipid. The organosulfur compound allicin, derived from garlic, has been shown to inhibit both surface-adherence of bacteria and production of virulence factors. In this study, the effects of allicin on P aeruginosa biofilm formation and the production of quorum-sensing controlled virulence factors were investigated. The results demonstrated that allicin could inhibit early bacterial adhesion, reduce EPS secretion, and down-regulate virulence factors' production. Collectively, these findings suggest the potential of allicin as a therapeutic agent for controlling P aeruginosa biofilm.

  9. Quorum-Sensing Kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Symphony of ARO Genes and Aromatic Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avbelj, Martina; Zupan, Jure; Kranjc, Luka; Raspor, Peter

    2015-09-30

    The kinetics of quorum sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied using a mini-fermentation platform. The quorum-sensing molecules were monitored using our previous HPLC approach that is here supported by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the quorum-sensing genes. We thus initially confirm correlations between peak production rates of the monitored quorum-sensing molecules 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol and peak expression of the genes responsible for their synthesis: ARO8, ARO9, and ARO10. This confirms the accuracy of our previously implemented kinetic model, thus favoring its use in further studies in this field. We also show that the quorum-sensing kinetics are precisely dependent on the population growth phase and that tyrosol production is also regulated by cell concentration, which has not been reported previously. Additionally, we show that during wine fermentation, ethanol stress reduces the production of 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol, which opens new challenges in the control of wine fermentation.

  10. Repurposing metformin as a quorum sensing inhibitor inPseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hisham A; Elsherbini, Ahmed M; Shaldam, Moutaz A

    2017-09-01

    Quorum sensing is a mechanism of intercellular communication that controls the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Inhibition of quorum sensing can disarm the virulence factors without exerting stress on bacterial growth that leads to emergence of antibiotic resistance. Finding a new quorum sensing inhibitor and determining its inhibitory activities against virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Quorum sensing was evaluated by estimation of violacein production by Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Molecular docking was used to investigate the possible binding of metformin to LasR and rhlR receptors. The inhibition of pyocyanin, hemolysin, protease, elastase in addition to swimming and twitching motilities, biofilm formation and resistance to oxidative stress by metformin was also assessed. Metformin significantly reduced the production of violacein pigment. Significant inhibition of pyocyanin, hemolysin, protease and elastase was achieved. Metformin markedly decreased biofilm formation, swimming and twitching motilities and increased the sensitivity to oxidative stress. In the molecular docking study, metformin could bind to LasR by hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction and to rhlR by hydrogen bonding only. Metformin can act as a quorum sensing inhibitor and virulence inhibiting agent that may be useful in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

  11. Production of quorum-sensing signals by bacteria in the coral mucus layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Kuang, Weiqi; Long, Lijuan; Zhang, Si

    2017-12-01

    Quorum sensing is an integral part of bacterial communication and interaction, but has not been well characterized in coral mucus microbiota. In this study, of 61 coral mucus isolates, five alphaproteobacteria and one Vibrio species were found to produce N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL), a quorum-sensing signal in bacteria. Eight gammaproteobacteria isolates were found to produce autoinducer-2 (AI-2) quorum-sensing signals along with two actinobacteria of the genus Rothia. Coral mucus is rich in the antioxidant dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), the concentration of which has been found to increase under heat stress. Neither AHL nor AI-2 activity was induced by DMSP in those coral mucus isolates that did not initially produce quorum-sensing signals. However, the AI-2 activities of one Rothia isolate (SCSIO 13017) from coral mucus and of Vibrio shilonii (DSM 13774 isolated from a bleached coral) were found to increase in response to 5 μM DMSP but decreased in response to 50 μM DMSP for the first time. These findings suggest that the production of quorum-sensing signals in the coral mucus microbiota may play a role in structuring the surface microbial community as they respond to environmental stress.

  12. Quorum sensing: a non-conventional target for antibiotic discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Varsha; Mahajan, Girish

    2013-10-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is known to regulate different functions viz. pathogenesis, biofilm formation, and host colonization, along with other functions by regulating bacterial virulence determinants. Therefore, QS is deemed to be an interesting target to modulate pathogenesis. Also, there have been global reports of continuous emergence of antibiotic-resistant microbes; hence, an alternative treatment that compliments antibiotic activity is highly desirable. One such approach is to look for QS inhibitors, which can quench the virulence phenotypes exerted by pathogenic bacteria and compliment antibiotic treatment. In the present study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain was used as the model organism which produces three pigments viz. pyocyanin, pyoverdin and pyorubin. Pyocyanin synthesis is reported to be QS dependent and is one of the virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. Hence, we envisage inhibition of pyocyanin pigment would indicate QS inhibition (QSI). Auto-inducers like N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL/3-oxo-C12-HSL) and N-butyryl-L- homoserine lactone (BHL/C4-HSL) were used to enhance the pyocyanin pigment production by the model strain at different doses and time points. BHL, at 25 microM was found to be a better inducer of pyocyanin. Tannic acid (TA) was tested to suppress this pigment synthesis and it was found to be effective when assessed at different time points. About 5.12 mg/mL TA was found to be the optimum concentration at which pyocyanin was inhibited by 77.3%. Thus, we confirm that TA can be used as a QSI, either in its purest form or in the crude form found in various plant species, and could be considered for development to compliment antibiotic therapy.

  13. Classroom Activities to Engage Students and Promote Critical Thinking about Genetic Regulation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Aebli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We developed an interactive activity to mimic bacterial quorum sensing, and a classroom worksheet to promote critical thinking about genetic regulation of the lux operon. The interactive quorum sensing activity engages students and provides a direct visualization of how population density functions to influence light production in bacteria. The worksheet activity consists of practice problems that require students to apply basic knowledge of the lux operon in order to make predictions about genetic complementation experiments, and students must evaluate how genetic mutations in the lux operon affect gene expression and overall phenotype. The worksheet promotes critical thinking and problem solving skills, and emphasizes the roles of diffusible signaling molecules, regulatory proteins, and structural proteins in quorum sensing.

  14. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, Kathrin; Rasmussen, Thomas B

    2002-01-01

    Novel molecular tools have been constructed which allow for in situ detection of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The reporter responds to AHL activation of LasR by expression of an unstable version of the green-fluorescent protein (Gfp...... macroalga Delisea pulchra, is capable of interfering with AHL-mediated quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa. It is demonstrated that the furanone compound specifically represses expression of a PlasB-gfp reporter fusion without affecting growth or protein synthesis. In addition, it reduces the production...... of important virulence factors, indicating a general effect on target genes of the las quorum sensing circuit. The furanone was applied to P. aeruginosa biofilms established in biofilm flow chambers. The Gfp-based analysis reveals that the compound penetrates microcolonies and blocks cell signalling and quorum...

  15. Ecological feedback in quorum-sensing microbial populations can induce heterogeneous production of autoinducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias; Knebel, Johannes; Lechner, Matthias; Pickl, Peter; Frey, Erwin

    2017-07-25

    Autoinducers are small signaling molecules that mediate intercellular communication in microbial populations and trigger coordinated gene expression via 'quorum sensing'. Elucidating the mechanisms that control autoinducer production is, thus, pertinent to understanding collective microbial behavior, such as virulence and bioluminescence. Recent experiments have shown a heterogeneous promoter activity of autoinducer synthase genes, suggesting that some of the isogenic cells in a population might produce autoinducers, whereas others might not. However, the mechanism underlying this phenotypic heterogeneity in quorum-sensing microbial populations has remained elusive. In our theoretical model, cells synthesize and secrete autoinducers into the environment, up-regulate their production in this self-shaped environment, and non-producers replicate faster than producers. We show that the coupling between ecological and population dynamics through quorum sensing can induce phenotypic heterogeneity in microbial populations, suggesting an alternative mechanism to stochastic gene expression in bistable gene regulatory circuits.

  16. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Quorum Sensing-Regulated Luminescence of Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Addie; Hagen, Steve; Son, Minjun

    2015-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism by which bacteria communicate through the secretion and detection of extracellular signaling molecules known as autoinducers. This research focuses on the quorum sensing regulated bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri, a marine bacterium that lives in symbiosis with certain fish and squid species. Previous studies of V. harveyi, a close relative of V. fisheri, indicate that a strong magnetic field has a positive effect on V.harveyi bioluminescence. However the effect of magnetic fields on quorum sensing-regulated luminescence is in general poorly understood. We grew V. fischeri in solid and liquid growth media, subject to strong static magnetic fields, and imaged the bioluminescence over a period of forty-eight hours. Luminescence patterns were analyzed in both the spatial and time dimensions. We find no indication that a magnetic field influences Vibrio fischeri luminescence either positively or negatively. This research was funded by the Grant Number NSF DMR-1156737.

  17. An inhibitor of bacterial quorum sensing reduces mortalities caused by vibriosis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Maria; Buch, Christiane; Austin, B.

    2004-01-01

    The fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum produces quorum sensing signal molecules, N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), which in several Gram-negative human and plant pathogenic bacteria regulate virulence factors. Expression of these factors can be blocked using specific quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs...

  18. Agaricus Blazei Hot Water Extract Shows Anti Quorum Sensing Activity in the Nosocomial Human PathogenPseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokovic, M.; Ciric, A.; Glamoclija, J.; Nicolic, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    The edible mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill is known to induce protective immunomodulatory action against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study we report potential anti-quorum sensing properties of A. blazei hot water extract. Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence,

  19. Mapping quorum sensing onto neural networks to understand collective decision making in heterogeneous microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Boedicker, James Q.

    2017-08-01

    Microbial communities frequently communicate via quorum sensing (QS), where cells produce, secrete, and respond to a threshold level of an autoinducer (AI) molecule, thereby modulating gene expression. However, the biology of QS remains incompletely understood in heterogeneous communities, where variant bacterial strains possess distinct QS systems that produce chemically unique AIs. AI molecules bind to ‘cognate’ receptors, but also to ‘non-cognate’ receptors found in other strains, resulting in inter-strain crosstalk. Understanding these interactions is a prerequisite for deciphering the consequences of crosstalk in real ecosystems, where multiple AIs are regularly present in the same environment. As a step towards this goal, we map crosstalk in a heterogeneous community of variant QS strains onto an artificial neural network model. This formulation allows us to systematically analyze how crosstalk regulates the community’s capacity for flexible decision making, as quantified by the Boltzmann entropy of all QS gene expression states of the system. In a mean-field limit of complete cross-inhibition between variant strains, the model is exactly solvable, allowing for an analytical formula for the number of variants that maximize capacity as a function of signal kinetics and activation parameters. An analysis of previous experimental results on the Staphylococcus aureus two-component Agr system indicates that the observed combination of variant numbers, gene expression rates and threshold concentrations lies near this critical regime of parameter space where capacity peaks. The results are suggestive of a potential evolutionary driving force for diversification in certain QS systems.

  20. Quorum sensing in Acinetobacter: with special emphasis on antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and quorum quenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Subhadra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter is an important nosocomial, opportunistic human pathogen that is gradually gaining more attention as a major health threat worldwide. Quorum sensing (QS is a cell-cell communication system in which specific signaling molecules called autoinducers accumulate in the medium as the population density grows and control various physiological processes including production of virulence factors, biofilm and development of antibiotic resistance. The complex QS machinery in Acinetobacter is mediated by a two-component system which is homologous to the typical LuxI/LuxR system found in Gram-negative bacteria. This cell signaling system comprises of a sensor protein that functions as autoinducer synthase and a receptor protein which binds to the signal molecules, acyl homoserine lactones inducing a cascade of reactions. Lately, disruption of QS has emerged as an anti-virulence strategy with great therapeutic potential. Here, we depict the current understanding of the existing QS network in Acinetobacter and describe important anti-virulent strategies developed in order to effectively tackle this pathogen. In addition, the prospects of quorum quenching to control Acinetobacter infections is also been discussed.

  1. Quorum Sensing in Populations of Spatially Extended Chaotic Oscillators Coupled Indirectly via a Heterogeneous Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing-Wei; Cao, Xiao-Zhi; Fu, Chenbo

    2017-12-01

    Many biological and chemical systems could be modeled by a population of oscillators coupled indirectly via a dynamical environment. Essentially, the environment by which the individual element communicates with each other is heterogeneous. Nevertheless, most of previous works considered the homogeneous case only. Here we investigated the dynamical behaviors in a population of spatially distributed chaotic oscillators immersed in a heterogeneous environment. Various dynamical synchronization states (such as oscillation death, phase synchronization, and complete synchronized oscillation) as well as their transitions were explored. In particular, we uncovered a non-traditional quorum sensing transition: increasing the population density leaded to a transition from oscillation death to synchronized oscillation at first, but further increasing the density resulted in degeneration from complete synchronization to phase synchronization or even from phase synchronization to desynchronization. The underlying mechanism of this finding was attributed to the dual roles played by the population density. What's more, by treating the environment as another component of the oscillator, the full system was then effectively equivalent to a locally coupled system. This fact allowed us to utilize the master stability functions approach to predict the occurrence of complete synchronization oscillation, which agreed with that from the direct numerical integration of the system. The potential candidates for the experimental realization of our model were also discussed.

  2. Coumarin: a novel player in microbial quorum sensing and biofilm formation inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reen, F Jerry; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; Parages, María L; O Gara, Fergal

    2018-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat worldwide, causing serious problems in the treatment of microbial infections. The discovery and development of new drugs is urgently needed to overcome this problem which has greatly undermined the clinical effectiveness of conventional antibiotics. An intricate cell-cell communication system termed quorum sensing (QS) and the coordinated multicellular behaviour of biofilm formation have both been identified as promising targets for the treatment and clinical management of microbial infections. QS systems allow bacteria to adapt rapidly to harsh conditions, and are known to promote the formation of antibiotic tolerant biofilm communities. It is well known that biofilm is a recalcitrant mode of growth and it also increases bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics. The pharmacological properties of coumarins have been well described, and these have included several that possess antimicrobial properties. More recently, reports have highlighted the potential role of coumarins as alternative therapeutic strategies based on their ability to block the QS signalling systems and to inhibit the formation of biofilms in clinically relevant pathogens. In addition to human infections, coumarins have also been found to be effective in controlling plant pathogens, infections in aquaculture, food spoilage and in reducing biofouling caused by eukaryotic organisms. Thus, the coumarin class of small molecule natural product are emerging as a promising strategy to combat bacterial infections in the new era of antimicrobial resistance.

  3. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, K.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2002-01-01

    macroalga Delisea pulchra, is capable of interfering with AHL-mediated quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa. It is demonstrated that the furanone compound specifically represses expression of a PlasB-gfp reporter fusion without affecting growth or protein synthesis. In addition, it reduces the production...... of important virulence factors, indicating a general effect on target genes of the las quorum sensing circuit. The furanone was applied to P. aeruginosa biofilms established in biofilm flow chambers. The Gfp-based analysis reveals that the compound penetrates microcolonies and blocks cell signalling and quorum...

  4. Dynamical quorum sensing and clustering dynamics in a population of spatially distributed active rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2013-02-01

    A model of clustering dynamics is proposed for a population of spatially distributed active rotators. A transition from excitable to oscillatory dynamics is induced by the increase of the local density of active rotators. It is interpreted as dynamical quorum sensing. In the oscillation regime, phase waves propagate without decay, which generates an effectively long-range interaction in the clustering dynamics. The clustering process becomes facilitated and only one dominant cluster appears rapidly as a result of the dynamical quorum sensing. An exact localized solution is found to a simplified model equation, and the competitive dynamics between two localized states is studied numerically.

  5. Quorum sensing signal molecules (acylated homoserine lactones) in Gram-negative fish pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nielsen, K.F.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the production of quorum sensing signals (specifically acylated homoserine lactones, AHLs) among a selection of strains of Gram-negative fish bacterial pathogens. These signals are involved in the regulation of virulence factors in some human....... In conclusion, the production of quorum sensing signals, AHLs, is common among the strains that we examined. If the AHL molecules regulate the expression of the virulence phenotype in these bacteria, as shown to occur in some bacterial pathogens, novel disease control measures may be developed by blocking AHL...

  6. Quorum Sensing Regulation of Competence and Bacteriocins in Streptococcus pneumoniae and mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Erin; Federle, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans have both evolved complex quorum sensing (QS) systems that regulate the production of bacteriocins and the entry into the competent state, a requirement for natural transformation. Natural transformation provides bacteria with a mechanism to repair damaged genes or as a source of new advantageous traits. In S. pneumoniae, the competence pathway is controlled by the two-component signal transduction pathway ComCDE, which directly regulates SigX, the alternative sigma factor required for the initiation into competence. Over the past two decades, effectors of cellular killing (i.e., fratricides) have been recognized as important targets of the pneumococcal competence QS pathway. Recently, direct interactions between the ComCDE and the paralogous BlpRH pathway, regulating bacteriocin production, were identified, further strengthening the interconnections between these two QS systems. Interestingly, a similar theme is being revealed in S. mutans, the primary etiological agent of dental caries. This review compares the relationship between the bacteriocin and the competence QS pathways in both S. pneumoniae and S. mutans, and hopes to provide clues to regulatory pathways across the genus Streptococcus as a potential tool to efficiently investigate putative competence pathways in nontransformable streptococci. PMID:28067778

  7. Exploiting Quorum Sensing Interfering Strategies in Gram-Negative Bacteria for the Enhancement of Environmental Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Chenghua

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread intercellular form of communication to coordinate physiological processes and cooperative activities of bacteria at the population level, and it depends on the production, secretion, and detection of small diffusible autoinducers, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), auto-inducing oligo-peptides (AIPs) and autoinducer 2. In this review, the function of QS autoinducers of gram-negative bacteria in different aspects of wastewater treatment systems is examined. Based on research primarily performed over the past 10 years, QS involvement in the formation of biofilm and aerobic granules and changes of the microbial community and degradation/transformation pathways is discussed. In particular, the QS pathway in the role of bacterial infections and disease prevention in aquaculture is addressed. Interference of QS autoinducer-regulated pathways is considered potential treatment for a variety of environmentally related problems. This review is expected to serve as a stepping stone for further study and development strategies based on the mediation of QS-regulated pathways to enhance applications in both wastewater treatment systems and aquaculture.

  8. Quorum sensing communication between bacteria and human cells: signals, targets and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eHolm

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Both direct and long-range interactions between pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria and their eukaryotic hosts are important in the outcome of infections. For cell-to-cell communication, these bacteria employ the quorum sensing (QS system to pass on information of the density of the bacterial population and collectively switch on virulence factor production, biofilm formation and resistance development. Thus, QS allows bacteria to behave as a community to perform tasks which would be impossible for individual cells, e.g. to overcome defense and immune systems and establish infections in higher organisms. This review highlights these aspects of QS and our own recent research on how P.aeruginosa communicates with human cells using the small QS signal molecules N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL. We focus on how this conversation changes the behavior and function of neutrophils, macrophages and epithelial cells and on how the signaling machinery in human cells responsible for the recognition of AHL. Understanding the bacteria-host relationships at both cellular and molecular levels is essential for the identification of new targets and for the development of novel strategies to fight bacterial infections in the future.

  9. Solonamide B inhibits quorum sensing and reduces Staphylococcus aureus mediated killing of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O; Novick, Richard P; Frees, Dorte; Frøkiær, Hanne; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA)-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs) to sensor histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like α-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs). Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of α-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and AgrA controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  10. Solonamide B inhibits quorum sensing and reduces Staphylococcus aureus mediated killing of human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Nielsen

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs to sensor histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like α-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs. Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of α-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and AgrA controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  11. Exploiting quorum sensing interfering strategies in gram-negative bacteria for the enhancement of environmental applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei eZhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a widespread intercellular form of communication to coordinate physiological processes and cooperative activities of bacteria at the population level, and it depends on the production, secretion, and detection of small diffusible autoinducers, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs, auto-inducing oligo-peptides (AIPs and autoinducer 2. In this review, the function of QS autoinducers of gram-negative bacteria in different aspects of wastewater treatment systems is examined. Based on research primarily performed over the past ten years, QS involvement in the formation of biofilm and aerobic granules and changes of the microbial community and degradation/transformation pathways is discussed. In particular, the QS pathway in the role of bacterial infections and disease prevention in aquaculture is addressed. Interference of QS autoinducer-regulated pathways is considered potential treatment for a variety of environmentally related problems. This review is expected to serve as a stepping stone for further study and development strategies based on the mediation of QS-regulated pathways to enhance applications in both wastewater treatment systems and aquaculture.

  12. AHL-type quorum sensing and its regulation on symplasmata formation in Pantoea agglomerans YS19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Wu, Suisui; Wang, Jieru; Feng, Yongjun

    2015-05-01

    Pantoea agglomerans YS19, an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium isolated from rice, is characterized by the formation of multicellular aggregate structure called symplasmata, which not only bestow the strong stress-resistance of the bacterium, but also contribute to the specific adaptation in the endophyte-host association. Acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), as the important signal molecule in the quorum sensing (QS) system of gram-negative bacteria, were demonstrated to regulate motility, cell-aggregation, and other bacterial behaviors. Here, the production of AHL by P. agglomerans YS19 and its regulation on the symplasmata formation were studied. It was revealed that the production of AHL by YS19 was initiated at the exponential growth stage and from then on, reached the peak values at the stationary growth stage in LB medium. The AHL was identified as N-3-oxooctanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OOHL) by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. The AHL synthesis gene pagI and receptor gene pagR in YS19 were cloned and phylogenetic analysis showed that they were high conservative among strains in species of P. agglomerans. It was revealed that AHL promoted the bacterial growth and symplasmata formation of YS19. Meanwhile, the colonization ability and growth-promoting effect of YS19 on the host plant were also enhanced by AHL. These results strongly suggest the pleiotropic effects of the AHL-type QS system in endophytic life of the strain. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Exploiting Quorum Sensing Interfering Strategies in Gram-Negative Bacteria for the Enhancement of Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Chenghua

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread intercellular form of communication to coordinate physiological processes and cooperative activities of bacteria at the population level, and it depends on the production, secretion, and detection of small diffusible autoinducers, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), auto-inducing oligo-peptides (AIPs) and autoinducer 2. In this review, the function of QS autoinducers of gram-negative bacteria in different aspects of wastewater treatment systems is examined. Based on research primarily performed over the past 10 years, QS involvement in the formation of biofilm and aerobic granules and changes of the microbial community and degradation/transformation pathways is discussed. In particular, the QS pathway in the role of bacterial infections and disease prevention in aquaculture is addressed. Interference of QS autoinducer-regulated pathways is considered potential treatment for a variety of environmentally related problems. This review is expected to serve as a stepping stone for further study and development strategies based on the mediation of QS-regulated pathways to enhance applications in both wastewater treatment systems and aquaculture. PMID:26779175

  14. Surface enhanced Raman scattering for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, Will; Bhattacharjee, Arunima; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, Mahsa; Lu, Ying; Hochbaum, Allon; Capolino, Filippo; Whiteson, Katrine; Ragan, Regina

    2015-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a biofilm forming bacterium, commonly affects cystic fibrosis, burn victims, and immunocompromised patients. PA produces pyocyanin, an aromatic, redox active, secondary metabolite as part of its quorum sensing signaling system activated during biofilm formation. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors composed of Au nanospheres chemically assembled into clusters on diblock copolymer templates were fabricated and the ability to detect pyocyanin to monitor biofilm formation was investigated. Electromagnetic full wave simulations of clusters observed in scanning electron microcopy images show that the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength is 696 nm for a dimer with a gap spacing of 1 nm in an average dielectric environment of the polymer and analyte; the local electric field enhancement is on the order of 400 at resonance, relative to free space. SERS data acquired at 785 nm excitation from a monolayer of benzenethiol on fabricated samples was compared with Raman data of pure benzenethiol and enhancement factors as large as 8×109 were calculated that are consistent with simulated field enhancements. Using this system, the limit of detection of pyocyanin in pure gradients was determined to be 10 parts per billion. In SERS data of the supernatant from the time dependent growth of PA shaking cultures, pyocyanin vibrational modes were clearly observable during the logarithmic growth phase corresponding to activation of genes related to biofilm formation. These results pave the way for the use of SERS sensors for the early detection of biofilm formation, leading to reduced healthcare costs and better patient outcomes.

  15. Bioinformatic Prediction of Gene Functions Regulated by Quorum Sensing in the Bioleaching Bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Banderas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans oxidizes sulfide ores and promotes metal solubilization. The efficiency of this process depends on the attachment of cells to surfaces, a process regulated by quorum sensing (QS cell-to-cell signalling in many Gram-negative bacteria. At. ferrooxidans has a functional QS system and the presence of AHLs enhances its attachment to pyrite. However, direct targets of the QS transcription factor AfeR remain unknown. In this study, a bioinformatic approach was used to infer possible AfeR direct targets based on the particular palindromic features of the AfeR binding site. A set of Hidden Markov Models designed to maintain palindromic regions and vary non-palindromic regions was used to screen for putative binding sites. By annotating the context of each predicted binding site (PBS, we classified them according to their positional coherence relative to other putative genomic structures such as start codons, RNA polymerase promoter elements and intergenic regions. We further used the Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation algorithm (MEME to further filter out low homology PBSs. In summary, 75 target-genes were identified, 34 of which have a higher confidence level. Among the identified genes, we found afeR itself, zwf, genes encoding glycosyltransferase activities, metallo-beta lactamases, and active transport-related proteins. Glycosyltransferases and Zwf (Glucose 6-phosphate-1-dehydrogenase might be directly involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis and attachment to minerals by At. ferrooxidans cells during the bioleaching process.

  16. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuella Nóbrega Dourado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol, respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones and plant exudates (including ethanol in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF, adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss, to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU. Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization, which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction.

  17. Andrographolide interferes quorum sensing to reduce cell damage caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xun; Zhang, Li-Yan; Wu, Shuai-Cheng; Xia, Fang; Fu, Yun-Xing; Wu, Yong-Li; Leng, Chun-Qing; Yi, Peng-Fei; Shen, Hai-Qing; Wei, Xu-Bin; Fu, Ben-Dong

    2014-12-05

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) induce septicemia in chickens by invading type II pneumocytes to breach the blood-air barrier. The virulence of APEC can be regulated by quorum sensing (QS). Andrographolide is a QS inhibitor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Therefore, we investigate whether andrographolide inhibits the injury of chicken type II pneumocytes by avian pathogenic E. coli O78 (APEC-O78) by disrupting the bacterial QS system. The results showed that sub-MIC of andrographolide significantly reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), F-actin cytoskeleton polymerization, and the degree of the adherence to chicken type II pneumocytes induced by APEC-O78. Further, we found that andrographolide significantly decreased the autoinducer-2 (AI-2) activity and the expression of virulence factors of APEC-O78. These results suggest that andrographolide reduce the pathogenicity of APEC-O78 in chicken type II pneumocytes by interfering QS and decreasing virulence. These results provide new evidence for colibacillosis prevention methods in chickens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Epigallocatechin gallate from Camellia sinensis L. (Kuntze is a potential quorum sensing inhibitor in Chromobacterium violaceum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joemar C. Taganna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem on the widespread occurrence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria calls for novel methods of control of bacterial activity. One of the new viable alternatives to antibiotics is the use of substances that inhibit quorum sensing (QS – a bacterial communication system that has been known to regulate the expression of virulence genes during infection. In this study, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG from green tea, Camellia sinensis L. (Kuntze was tested for its ability to inhibit QS in a test organism, Chromobacterium violaceum. This microorganism produces a violet-colored substance, violacein, through QS. This study aimed to detect inhibition of QS-regulated violacein production in C. violaceum by EGCG and to determine the dynamics of QS inhibition relative to the concentration of EGCG. The effect of increasing concentration of EGCG on both violacein production and cell density of treated and untreated C. violaceum was determined in a 96-well-microplate format and read at 570nm and 620nm for violacein production and growth, respectively. The results show that addition of EGCG increased the growth of the organism while there is concentration-dependent decrease in the QS-controlled production of violacein. This study thus establishes that EGCG is a potential QS inhibitor and can be further studied and developed for its use as an anti-pathogenic but non-toxic drug.

  19. Quorum sensing molecules production by nosocomial and soil isolates Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdönmez, Demet; Rad, Abbas Yousefi; Aksöz, Nilüfer

    2017-12-01

    Acinetobacter species remain alive in hospitals on various surfaces, both dry and moist, forming an important source of hospital infections. These bacteria are naturally resistant to many antibiotic classes. Although the role of the quorum sensing system in regulating the virulence factors of Acinetobacter species has not been fully elucidated, it has been reported that they play a role in bacterial biofilm formation. The biofilm formation helps them to survive under unfavorable growth conditions and antimicrobial treatments. It is based on the accumulation of bacterial communication signal molecules in the area. In this study, we compared the bacterial signal molecules of 50 nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii strain and 20 A. baumannii strain isolated from soil. The signal molecules were detected by the biosensor bacteria (Chromobacterium violaceum 026, Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL1) and their separation was determined by thin-layer chromatography. As a result, it has been found that soil-borne isolates can produce 3-oxo-C8-AHL and C8-AHL, whereas nosocomial-derived isolates can produce long-chain signals such as C10-AHL, C12-AHL, C14-AHL and C16-AHL. According to these results, it is possible to understand that these signal molecules are found in the infection caused by A. baumannii. The inhibition of this signaling molecules in a communication could use to prevent multiple antibiotic resistance of these bacteria.

  20. Chemical probes of quorum sensing: from compound development to biological discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Michael A.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can utilize chemical signals to coordinate the expression of group-beneficial behaviors in a method of cell–cell communication called quorum sensing (QS). The discovery that QS controls the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation in many common pathogens has driven an explosion of research aimed at both deepening our fundamental understanding of these regulatory networks and developing chemical agents that can attenuate QS signaling. The inherently chemical nature of QS makes studying these pathways with small molecule tools a complementary approach to traditional microbiology techniques. Indeed, chemical tools are beginning to yield new insights into QS regulation and provide novel strategies to inhibit QS. Here, we review the most recent advances in the development of chemical probes of QS systems in Gram-negative bacteria, with an emphasis on the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We first describe reports of novel small molecule modulators of QS receptors and QS signal synthases. Next, in several case studies, we showcase how chemical tools have been deployed to reveal new knowledge of QS biology and outline lessons for how researchers might best target QS to combat bacterial virulence. To close, we detail the outstanding challenges in the field and suggest strategies to overcome these issues. PMID:27268906

  1. Synthetic Quorum Sensing and Induced Aggregation in Model Microcapsule Colonies with Repressilator Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Henry; Yashin, Victor; Balazs, Anna

    We model a system of synthetic microcapsules that communicate chemically by releasing nanoparticles or signaling molecules. These signaling species bind to receptors on the shells of capsules and modulate the target shell's permeability, thereby controlling nanoparticle release from the target capsule. Using the repressilator regulatory network motif, whereby three species suppress the production of the next in a cyclic fashion, we show that large amplitude oscillations in nanoparticle release can emerge when many capsules are close together. This exemplifies quorum sensing, which is the ability of cells to gauge their population density and collectively initiate a new behavior once a critical density is reached. We present a physically realizable model in which the oscillations exhibited in crowded populations induce aggregation of the microcapsules, mimicking complex biological behavior of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum with only simple, synthetic components. We also show that the clusters can be dispersed and reformed repeatedly and controllably by addition of chemical stimuli, demonstrating possible applications in creating reconfigurable or programmable materials.

  2. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Bogas, Andrea Cristina; Pomini, Armando M.; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Marsaioli, Anita J.; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically) with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules) and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol), respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones) and plant exudates (including ethanol) in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF), adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss), to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS) and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU). Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization), which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction. PMID:24688531

  3. Detection of Quorum Sensing Molecules and Biofilm Formation in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J Shiva; Umesha, S; Prasad, K Shiva; Niranjana, P

    2016-03-01

    Many bacteria use small diffusible signaling molecules to communicate each other termed as quorum sensing (QS). Most Gram-negative bacteria use acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) as QS signal molecules. Using these signaling molecules, bacteria are able to express specific genes in response to population density. This work aimed to detect the production of QS signal molecules and biofilm formation in Ralstonia solanacearum isolated from various diseased tomato plants with symptoms of bacterial wilt. A total of 30 R. solanacearum strains were investigated for the production of QS signal molecules using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 (pZLR4) biosensor systems. All 30 bacterial isolates from various bacterial wilt-affected tomato plants produced AHL molecules that induced the biosensor. The microtiter plate assay demonstrated that of the 30 bacterial isolates, 60 % formed biofilm, among which four isolates exhibited a higher degree of biofilm formation. The biofilm-inducing factor was purified from these four culture supernatants. The structure of the responsible molecule was solved using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy and was determined to be 2-hydroxy-4-((methylamino)(phenyl)methyl) cyclopentanone (HMCP), which was confirmed by chemical synthesis and NMR. The Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis showed well-developed biofilm architecture of bacteria when treated with HMCP. The knowledge we obtained from this study will be useful for further researcher on the role of HMCP molecule in biofilm formation.

  4. The transcriptional regulator CzcR modulates antibiotic resistance and quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieppois, Guennaëlle; Ducret, Véréna; Caille, Olivier; Perron, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to zinc, cadmium and cobalt by way of the CzcRS two-component system. In presence of these metals the regulatory protein CzcR induces the expression of the CzcCBA efflux pump, expelling and thereby inducing resistance to Zn, Cd and Co. Importantly, CzcR co-regulates carbapenem antibiotic resistance by repressing the expression of the OprD porin, the route of entry for these antibiotics. This unexpected co-regulation led us to address the role of CzcR in other cellular processes unrelated to the metal response. We found that CzcR affected the expression of numerous genes directly involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa even in the absence of the inducible metals. Notably the full expression of quorum sensing 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL autoinducer molecules is impaired in the absence of CzcR. In agreement with this, the virulence of the czcRS deletion mutant is affected in a C. elegans animal killing assay. Additionally, chromosome immunoprecipitation experiments allowed us to localize CzcR on the promoter of several regulated genes, suggesting a direct control of target genes such as oprD, phzA1 and lasI. All together our data identify CzcR as a novel regulator involved in the control of several key genes for P. aeruginosa virulence processes.

  5. The transcriptional regulator CzcR modulates antibiotic resistance and quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guennaëlle Dieppois

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to zinc, cadmium and cobalt by way of the CzcRS two-component system. In presence of these metals the regulatory protein CzcR induces the expression of the CzcCBA efflux pump, expelling and thereby inducing resistance to Zn, Cd and Co. Importantly, CzcR co-regulates carbapenem antibiotic resistance by repressing the expression of the OprD porin, the route of entry for these antibiotics. This unexpected co-regulation led us to address the role of CzcR in other cellular processes unrelated to the metal response. We found that CzcR affected the expression of numerous genes directly involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa even in the absence of the inducible metals. Notably the full expression of quorum sensing 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL autoinducer molecules is impaired in the absence of CzcR. In agreement with this, the virulence of the czcRS deletion mutant is affected in a C. elegans animal killing assay. Additionally, chromosome immunoprecipitation experiments allowed us to localize CzcR on the promoter of several regulated genes, suggesting a direct control of target genes such as oprD, phzA1 and lasI. All together our data identify CzcR as a novel regulator involved in the control of several key genes for P. aeruginosa virulence processes.

  6. Quorum Sensing Activity of a Kluyvera sp. Isolated from a Malaysian Waterfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Yusrina Muhamad Yunos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In many species of bacteria, the quorum sensing mechanism is used as a unique communication system which allows them to regulate gene expression and behavior in accordance with their population density. N-Acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs are known as diffusible autoinducer molecules involved in this communication network. This finding aimed to characterize the production of AHL of a bacterial strain ND04 isolated from a Malaysian waterfall. Strain ND04 was identified as Kluyvera sp. as confirmed by molecular analysis of its 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence. Kluyvera sp. is closely related to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 was used as a biosensor to detect the production of AHL by strain ND04. High resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of strain ND04 showed our isolate produced two AHLs which are N-(3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6 HSL and N-3-oxo-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8 HSL.

  7. Effect of certain natural products and organic solvents on quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Vimla; Gosai, Haren; Raval, Shreya; Kothari, Vijay

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effect of seed extracts of Pongamia pinnata, Pyrus pyrifolia, and Manilkara hexandra, bacterial pigment prodigiosin, and three organic solvents (ethanol, methanol, and dimethylsulfoxide), on quorum sensing (QS) in Chromobacterium violaceum (C. violaceum). C. violaceum was challenged with plant extracts prepared by microwave assisted extraction method, prodigiosin, and organic solvents. Effect of these test substances on C. violaceum growth, and quorum sensing regulated pigment (violacein) production was studied by broth dilution assay. High performance liquid chromatography was also applied to generate chromatographic fingerprint of the active extracts. Effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration level of the antibiotic streptomycin on quorum sensing regulated pigment production was also studied. Pongamia pinnata seed extracts and prodigiosin were found to possess anti-QS, and Manilkara hexandra and Pyrus pyrifolia seed extracts to possess QS-enhancing effect in C. violaceum. Dimethylsulfoxide was found to enhance violacein production, whereas ethanol and methanol reduced violacein production in C. violaceum. Streptomycin at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration level was able to significantly arrest QS-regulated pigment production in C. violaceum and Serratia marcescens. Prodigiosin and the seed extracts used in this study could affect quorum sensing in C. violaceum to a notable extent. Results of this study also emphasize the importance of inclusion of appropriate solvent controls (negative controls) in bioassays designed for screening of antimicrobial and/or anti-QS compounds. Antipathogenic potential of low concentrations of streptomycin was also demonstrated. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vibrio vulnificus produces quorum sensing signals of the AHL-class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiente, E.; Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is an aquatic pathogenic bacterium that can cause vibriosis in humans and fish. The species is subdivided into three biotypes with the fish-virulent strains belonging to biotype 2. The quorum sensing (QS) phenomenon mediated by furanosyl borate diester or autoinducer 2 (AI-2) has...

  9. A Mathematical model to investigate quorum sensing regulation and its heterogenecity in pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a plant-pathogen, which through quorum sensing (QS), controls virulence. In this paper, by means of mathematical modeling, we investigate QS of this bacterium when living on leaf surfaces. We extend an existing stochastic model for the formation of Pseudomonas s...

  10. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly toleran...

  11. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant...

  12. Going beyond the Control of Quorum-Sensing to Combat Biofilm Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf-Rainer Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most bacteria attach to surfaces where they form a biofilm, cells embedded in a complex matrix of polymers. Cells in biofilms are much better protected against noxious agents than free-living cells. As a consequence it is very difficult to control pathogens with antibiotics in biofilm infections and novel targets are urgently needed. One approach aims at the communication between cells to form and to maintain a biofilm, a process called quorum-sensing. Water soluble small-sized molecules mediate this process and a number of antagonists of these compounds have been found. In this review natural compounds and synthetic drugs which do not interfere with the classical quorum-sensing compounds are discussed. For some of these compounds the targets are still not known, but others interfere with the formation of exopolysaccharides, virulence factors, or cell wall synthesis or they start an internal program of biofilm dispersal. Some of their targets are more conserved among pathogens than the receptors for quorum sensing autoinducers mediating quorum-sensing, enabling a broader application of the drug. The broad spectrum of mechanisms, the diversity of bioactive compounds, their activity against several targets, and the conservation of some targets among bacterial pathogens are promising aspects for several clinical applications of this type of biofilm-controlling compound in the future.

  13. Choosing an appropriate infection model to study quorum sensing inhibition in Pseudomonas infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Evelina; Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria, although considered for decades to be antisocial organisms whose sole purpose is to find nutrients and multiply are, in fact, highly communicative organisms. Referred to as quorum sensing, cell-to-cell communication mechanisms have been adopted by bacteria in order to co-ordinate their

  14. Quorum sensing integrates environmental cues, cell density and cell history to control bacterial competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Gámez, Stefany; Sorg, Robin A; Domenech, Arnau; Kjos, Morten; Weissing, Franz J; van Doorn, G Sander; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes competent for genetic transformation when exposed to an autoinducer peptide known as competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). This peptide was originally described as a quorum-sensing signal, enabling individual cells to regulate competence in response to population

  15. Surface-Attached Molecules Control Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Zhao, Aishan; Wang, Ashley; Brown, Zachary Z.; Muir, Tom W.; Stone, Howard A.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria use a process called quorum sensing to communicate and orchestrate collective behaviors including virulence factor secretion and biofilm formation. Quorum sensing relies on production, release, accumulation, and population-wide detection of signal molecules called autoinducers. Here, we develop concepts to coat surfaces with quorum-sensing-manipulation molecules as a method to control collective behaviors. We probe this strategy using Staphylococcus aureus. Pro- and anti-quorum-sensing molecules can be covalently attached to surfaces using click chemistry, where they retain their abilities to influence bacterial behaviors. We investigate key features of the compounds, linkers, and surfaces necessary to appropriately position molecules to interact with cognate receptors, and the ability of modified surfaces to resist long-term storage, repeated infections, host plasma components, and flow-generated stresses. Our studies highlight how this surface approach can be used to make colonization-resistant materials against S. aureus and other pathogens and how the approach can be adapted to promote beneficial behaviors of bacteria on surfaces. PMID:28530651

  16. Melnikov method to a bacteria-immunity model with bacterial quorum sensing mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhonghua [School of Sciences, Xi' an University of Science and Technology, Xi' an 710054 (China)], E-mail: wwwzhonghua@sohu.com; Peng Jigen [Research Center for Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhang Juan [Department of Mathematics, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2009-04-15

    A bacteria-immunity model with bacterial quorum sensing is formulated, which describes the competition between bacteria and immune cells. After periodic perturbation and a series of coordinate transformations, the model is brought into a standard form, and which is amenable to Melnikov method. By the method, the existences of chaotic motion and homoclinic bifurcations are proved.

  17. Kinetic Model for Signal Binding to the Quorum Sensing Regulator LasR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussen, Anetta; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    of the active LasR quorum-sensing regulator was studied in an Escherichia coli background as a function of signal molecule concentration. The functional activity of the regulator was monitored via a GFP reporter fusion to lasB expressed from the native lasB promoter. The new data shows that the active form...

  18. Ligand Binding Kinetics of the Quorum Sensing Regulator PqsR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Martin; Hodgkinson, James T.; Gross, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal (PQS) is a quorum sensing molecule that plays an important role in regulating the virulence of this organism. We have purified the ligand binding domain of the receptor PqsRLBD for PQS and have used Förster resonance energy transfer fluorimetry...

  19. Protoanemonin: a natural quorum sensing inhibitor that selectively activates iron starvation response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazzini, R.A.; Skindersoe, M.; Bielecki, M.; Puchalka, J.; Givskov, M.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria employ cell-to-cell communication mediated by N-acyl homoserine lactones (quorum sensing) to control expression of a wide range of genes including, but not limited to, genes encoding virulence factors. Outside the laboratory, the bacteria live in complex communities where

  20. In vitro screens for quorum sensing inhibitors and in vivo confirmation of their effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; van Gennip, Maria; Jakobsen, Tim H

    2010-01-01

    This article will introduce the reader to protocols intended for (i) identification of quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors (QSIs), (ii) characterization of these compounds in vitro and (iii) evaluation of these compounds in animal models. Traditional antimicrobial drugs are designed against planktonic...

  1. How Delisea pulchra furanones affect quorum sensing and swarming motility in Serratia liquefaciens MG1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Manefield, M.; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2000-01-01

    Halogenated furanones produced by the benthic marine macroalga Delisea pulchra inhibit swarming motility of Serratia liquefaciens MG1. This study demonstrates that exogenously added furanones control transcription of the quorum sensing regulated gene swrA in competition with the cognate signal...

  2. The quorum sensing transcriptional regulator TraR has separate binding sites for DNA and the anti-activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zhida; Fuqua, Clay [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 212 S. Hawthorne Dr. Simon Hall 400A, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Chen, Lingling, E-mail: linchen@indiana.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 212 S. Hawthorne Dr. Simon Hall 400A, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quorum sensing transcription factor TraR is inhibited by forming TraR-TraM complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K213 is a key DNA binding residue, but not involved in interaction with TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraM-interacting TraR residues did not affect DNA-binding of TraR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraR residues reduced the TraR-TraM interaction more than those of TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR is driven by thermodynamics. -- Abstract: Quorum sensing represents a mechanism by which bacteria control their genetic behaviors via diffusible signals that reflect their population density. TraR, a quorum sensing transcriptional activator in the Rhizobiaceae family, is regulated negatively by the anti-activator TraM via formation of a TraR-TraM heterocomplex. Prior structural analysis suggests that TraM and DNA bind to TraR in distinct sites. Here we combined isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) to investigate roles of TraR residues from Rhizobium sp. NGR234 in binding of both TraM and DNA. We found that K213A mutation of TraR{sub NGR} abolished DNA binding, however, did not alter TraM binding. Mutations of TraM-interfacing TraR{sub NGR} residues decreased the TraR-TraM interaction, but did not affect the DNA-binding activity of TraR{sub NGR}. Thus, our biochemical studies support the independent binding sites on TraR for TraM and DNA. We also found that point mutations in TraR{sub NGR} appeared to decrease the TraR-TraM interaction more effectively than those in TraM{sub NGR}, consistent with structural observations that individual TraR{sub NGR} residues contact with more TraM{sub NGR} residues than each TraM{sub NGR} residues with TraR{sub NGR} residues. Finally, we showed that TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR was driven thermodynamically. We discussed subtle mechanistic differences in Tra

  3. Quorum Sensing Determines the Choice of Antiphage Defense Strategy in Vibrio anguillarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Demeng; Svenningsen, Sine Lo; Middelboe, Mathias

    2015-06-16

    Selection for phage resistance is a key driver of bacterial diversity and evolution, and phage-host interactions may therefore have strong influence on the genetic and functional dynamics of bacterial communities. In this study, we found that an important, but so far largely overlooked, determinant of the outcome of phage-bacterial encounters in the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum is bacterial cell-cell communication, known as quorum sensing. Specifically, V. anguillarum PF430-3 cells locked in the low-cell-density state (ΔvanT mutant) express high levels of the phage receptor OmpK, resulting in a high susceptibility to phage KVP40, but achieve protection from infection by enhanced biofilm formation. By contrast, cells locked in the high-cell-density state (ΔvanΟ mutant) are almost completely unsusceptible due to quorum-sensing-mediated downregulation of OmpK expression. The phenotypes of the two quorum-sensing mutant strains are accurately reflected in the behavior of wild-type V. anguillarum, which (i) displays increased OmpK expression in aggregated cells compared to free-living variants in the same culture, (ii) displays a clear inverse correlation between ompK mRNA levels and the concentration of N-acylhomoserine lactone quorum-sensing signals in the culture medium, and (iii) survives mainly by one of these two defense mechanisms, rather than by genetic mutation to phage resistance. Taken together, our results demonstrate that V. anguillarum employs quorum-sensing information to choose between two complementary antiphage defense strategies. Further, the prevalence of nonmutational defense mechanisms in strain PF430-3 suggests highly flexible adaptations to KVP40 phage infection pressure, possibly allowing the long-term coexistence of phage and host. Comprehensive knowledge on bacterial antiphage strategies and their regulation is essential for understanding the role of phages as drivers of bacterial evolution and diversity. In an applied context

  4. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-05

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Quorum sensing in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. achromogenes and the effect of the autoinducer synthase AsaI on bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwenteit, Johanna; Gram, Lone; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative fish pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida possesses the LuxIRtype quorum sensing (QS) system, termed AsaIR. In this study the role of QS in A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes virulence and pigment production was investigated. Five wild-type Asa strains induced the N......Ideficient mutant was 20-fold higher than that of the isogenic wt strain and the mean day to death of the mutant was significantly prolonged. Furthermore, the expression of two virulence factors (a toxic protease, AsaP1, and a cytotoxic factor) and a brown pigment were reduced in the mutant. AsaP1 productionwas...... virulence in fish and QS has not previously been associated with A. salmonicida infections in fish. Furthermore, AsaP1 production has not previously been shown to be QS regulated. The simplicity of the A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes LuxIR-type QS system and the observation that synthetic QSI can inhibit...

  6. A medicinal herb Cassia alata attenuates quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, P D; Vasavi, H S; Vipin, C; Saptami, K; Arun, A B

    2017-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been shown to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis in many bacteria, and attenuation of QS is one of the targets of antimicrobial therapy with particular interest in combating drug resistance. This study reports the QS inhibitory activity of metabolites from Cassia alata L. (Ca. alata), an important medicinal herb widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. For investigating the QS inhibition (QSI), the potential of Ca. alata L., initially, metabolites of the leaves extracted using ethanol was tested against biosensor strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and C. violaceum wild-type strains. Furthermore, a purified fraction rich in flavonoids (F-AF) was used for establishing QSI activity by studying the inhibition of violacein production in C. violaceum, and QS controlled virulence and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The study results showed 50% inhibition of violacein production in C. violaceum at 0·05 mg ml -1 concentration of F-AF. In P. aeruginosa PAO1, it inhibited the tested virulence factors and biofilm formation significantly. The F-AF contained major flavonoids namely, quercetin, quercetrin and kaempferol displaying QSI activity individually against the test organisms. Present study demonstrates the quorum sensing inhibitory activity of metabolites from Cassia alata, an important medicinal herb which is commonly used worldwide in the treatment of infections caused by microorganisms. An extract prepared from the leaves of the plant showed activity against quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and was also effective against attenuating the quorum sensing controlled virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Activity is attributed to the rich flavonoid composition of the plant. Results of the present investigation throw an insight into the possibility of developing drug formulations using the isolated compounds against infections caused by quorum sensing-mediated pathogenicity of bacteria

  7. Bacterial quorum sensing and the role of algae in bacterial diseases control in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Wiyoto

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial disease is one of the most common diseases in aquaculture practices which have a significant impact. Several researches noted that pathogenicity of a certain bacteria can be determined by its quorum sensing activity. Quorum sensing is a communication process of a certain bacteria with the same or different species of bacteria which involves the releasing and capturing of signal molecule to and from the environment. This activity will activate a certain target gene which further resulted in the expression of a phenotype by the bacteria. With regard to this characteristic, one of the methods to control bacterial diseases is by quorum sensing disruption. Several species of algae, both micro and macro, have been found to be able to intervense bacterial quorum sensing and thus can be used as an alternative in bacterial disease control.    Key words: quorum sensing, bacterial disease, aquaculture, algae  Abstrak Penyakit bakteri adalah salah satu penyakit yang paling umum dalam akuakultur dengan dampak yang cukup signifikan. Beberapa penelitian menunjukkan bahwa tingkat patogenitas suatu bakteri salah satunya ditentukan oleh aktivitas kuorum sensing bakteri. Kuorum sensing bakteri merupakan suatu proses komunikasi yang dilakukan oleh bakteri dengan bakteri lainnya baik yang sejenis maupun berlainan jenis yang berupa pelepasan dan penangkapan molekul sinyal menuju dan dari lingkungan sekitar bakteri tersebut. Aktivitas inilah yang akan menentukan ekspresi suatu gen target seperti patogenitas, sehingga salah satu metode yang dapat digunakan dalam mengendalikan penyakit yang disebabkan oleh bakteri adalah dengan mengganggu aktivitas kuorum sensing bakteri. Beberapa jenis alga, baik mikro maupun makro, diketahui dapat mengintervensi aktivitas kuorum sensing, dan dapat menjadi salah satu alternatif bagi pengendalian penyakit bakterial. Kata-kata kunci: kuorum sensing, penyakit bakterial, akuakultur, alga

  8. Rational design and synthesis of new quorum-sensing inhibitors derived from acylated homoserine lactones and natural products from garlic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, T.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Skindersoe, M.

    2005-01-01

    with similarity both to sulfides 10a-s and to bioactive structures from garlic. Design and biological screening of all compounds presented in this work targeted inhibition of quorum-sensing comprising competitive inhibition of transcriptional regulators LuxR and LasR. The design was based on critical interactions...... within the binding-site and structural motifs in molecular components isolated from garlic, 7 and 8, shown to be quorum-sensing inhibitors but not antibiotics. A potent quorum-sensing inhibitor N-(heptylsulfanylacetyl)-L-homoserine lactone (10c) was identified. Together with data collected for the other...

  9. Quorum Sensing and the Use of Quorum Quenchers as Natural Biocides to Inhibit Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Scarascia, Giantommaso

    2016-12-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are one of the main protagonist groups of biocorrosion in the seawater environment. Given their principal role in biocorrosion, it remains a crucial task to develop strategies to reduce the abundance of SRBs. Conventional approaches include the use of biocides and antibiotics, which can impose health, safety, and environmental concerns. This review examines an alternative approach to this problem. This is achieved by reviewing the role of quorum sensing (QS) in SRB populations and its impact on the biofilm formation process. Genome databases of SRBs are mined to look for putative QS systems and homologous protein sequences representative of autoinducer receptors or synthases. Subsequently, this review puts forward the potential use of quorum quenchers as natural biocides against SRBs and outlines the potential strategies for the implementation of this approach.

  10. Regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Regulator VqsR▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luen-Luen; Malone, Jane E.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other to regulate cell density-dependent gene expression via a quorum-sensing (QS) cascade. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two known QS systems, las and rhl, control the expression of many factors that relate to virulence, pathogenicity, and biofilm development. Microarray studies of the las and rhl regulons led to our hypothesis that a complicated hierarchy in the QS regulon is composed of multiple transcriptional regulators. Here, we examined a QS-regulated gene, vqsR, which encodes a probable transcriptional regulator with a putative 20-bp operator sequence (las box) upstream. The transcriptional start site for vqsR was determined. The vqsR promoter was identified by examining a series of vqsR promoter-lacZ fusions. In addition, an Escherichia coli system where either LasR or RhlR protein was expressed from a plasmid indicated that the las system was the dominant regulator for vqsR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrate that purified LasR protein binds directly to the vqsR promoter in the presence of 3O-C12-HSL. Point mutational analysis of the vqsR las box suggests that positions 3 and 18 in the las box are important for vqsR transcription, as assayed with a series of vqsRp-lacZ fusions. EMSA also shows that positions 3 and 18 are important for binding between the vqsR promoter and LasR. Our results demonstrate that the las system directly regulates vqsR, and certain nucleotides in the las box are crucial for LasR binding and activation of the vqsR promoter. PMID:17449616

  11. Microbial communication, cooperation and cheating: quorum sensing drives the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czárán, Tamás; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    2009-08-17

    An increasing body of empirical evidence suggests that cooperation among clone-mates is common in bacteria. Bacterial cooperation may take the form of the excretion of "public goods": exoproducts such as virulence factors, exoenzymes or components of the matrix in biofilms, to yield significant benefit for individuals joining in the common effort of producing them. Supposedly in order to spare unnecessary costs when the population is too sparse to supply the sufficient exoproduct level, many bacteria have evolved a simple chemical communication system called quorum sensing (QS), to "measure" the population density of clone-mates in their close neighborhood. Cooperation genes are expressed only above a threshold rate of QS signal molecule re-capture, i.e., above the local quorum of cooperators. The cooperative population is exposed to exploitation by cheaters, i.e., mutants who contribute less or nil to the effort but fully enjoy the benefits of cooperation. The communication system is also vulnerable to a different type of cheaters ("Liars") who may produce the QS signal but not the exoproduct, thus ruining the reliability of the signal. Since there is no reason to assume that such cheaters cannot evolve and invade the populations of honestly signaling cooperators, the empirical fact of the existence of both bacterial cooperation and the associated QS communication system seems puzzling. Using a stochastic cellular automaton approach and allowing mutations in an initially non-cooperating, non-communicating strain we show that both cooperation and the associated communication system can evolve, spread and remain persistent. The QS genes help cooperative behavior to invade the population, and vice versa; cooperation and communication might have evolved synergistically in bacteria. Moreover, in good agreement with the empirical data recently available, this synergism opens up a remarkably rich repertoire of social interactions in which cheating and exploitation are

  12. Antimicrobial and anti-Quorum Sensing activities of selected medicinal plants of Ethiopia: Implication for development of potent antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacha, Ketema; Tariku, Yinebeb; Gebreyesus, Fisseha; Zerihun, Shibru; Mohammed, Ali; Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Schmitz, Ruth A; Mulat, Mulugeta

    2016-07-11

    Traditional medicinal plants have been used as an alternative medicine in many parts of the world, including Ethiopia. There are many documented scientific reports on antimicrobial activities of the same. To our knowledge, however, there is no report on the anti-Quorum Sensing (Quorum Quenching, QQ) potential of traditional Ethiopian medicinal plants. As many of the opportunistic pathogenic bacteria depend on Quorum Sensing (QS) systems to coordinate their virulence expression, interference with QS could be a novel approach to control bacterial infections. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate selected medicinal plants from Ethiopia for their antimicrobial activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens; and to assess the interference of these plant extracts with QS of bacteria. Antimicrobial activities of plant extracts (oil, resins and crude extracts) were evaluated following standard agar diffusion technique. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of potent extracts were determined using 96 well micro-titer plates and optical densities were measured using an ELISA Microplate reader. Interference with Quorum Sensing activities of extracts was determined using the recently established E. coli based reporter strain AI1-QQ.1 and signaling molecule N-(ß-ketocaproyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). Petroleum ether extract of seed of Nigella sativa exhibited the highest activity against both the laboratory isolated Bacillus cereus [inhibition zone (IZ), 44 ± 0.31 mm] and B. cereus ATCC 10987 (IZ, 40 ± 2.33 mm). Similarly, oil extract from mature ripe fruit husk of Aframomum corrorima and mature unripe fruit of A. corrorima revealed promising activities against Candida albicans ATCC 90028 (IZ, 35 ± 1.52 mm) and Staphylococcus aureus DSM 346 (IZ, 25 ± 1.32 mm), respectively. Antimicrobial activities of oil extract from husk of A. corrorima and petroleum ether extract of seed of N. sativa were significantly higher than that of

  13. Rapid Detection of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa by PCR Method Using Specific Primers of Quorum Sensing LasI gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Aghamollaei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that due to having intrinsic and acquired resistance to common antibiotics, mortality due to infections is very common. Therefore, early and accurate identification of bacteria could be effective in controlling infections and deaths. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a rapid method with high sensitivity and specificity based on polymerase chain reaction using gene-specific primers quorum sensing LasI system for detection of bacteria. Methods: In this study, the comparison between the results of culture and PCR for the diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical samples and other bacterial species were carried out. 40 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from isolated clinical specimens were identified and confirmed by biochemical tests. LasI gene specific primers were designed using bioinformatics analysis. Sequence of this gene was amplified techniques after extraction of bacterial genome. The specificity of PCR tests with DNA from of different species, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae were evaluated. A different dilution of the bacterial genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used in PCR to evaluate the sensitivity of primer. Data were analyzed by t-test Results: The results indicated that the PCR test result was positive for all strains of P. aeruginosa isolates however, PCR test results were negative for the four other bacteria. Even at 10-5 Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome concentration, PCR test was positive for all isolated strains Conclusion: This study showed that the primers designed for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using PCR, had higher sensitivity and specificity compared to previous methods. Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PCR, Quorum sensing, LasI

  14. Quorum sensing coordinates brute force and stealth modes of infection in the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS in vitro controls production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs and other virulence factors in the soft rotting enterobacterial plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba. Here, we demonstrate the genome-wide regulatory role of QS in vivo during the Pba-potato interaction, using a Pba-specific microarray. We show that 26% of the Pba genome exhibited differential transcription in a QS (expI- mutant, compared to the wild-type, suggesting that QS may make a greater contribution to pathogenesis than previously thought. We identify novel components of the QS regulon, including the Type I and II secretion systems, which are involved in the secretion of PCWDEs; a novel Type VI secretion system (T6SS and its predicted substrates Hcp and VgrG; more than 70 known or putative regulators, some of which have been demonstrated to control pathogenesis and, remarkably, the Type III secretion system and associated effector proteins, and coronafacoyl-amide conjugates, both of which play roles in the manipulation of plant defences. We show that the T6SS and a novel potential regulator, VirS, are required for full virulence in Pba, and propose a model placing QS at the apex of a regulatory hierarchy controlling the later stages of disease progression in Pba. Our findings indicate that QS is a master regulator of phytopathogenesis, controlling multiple other regulators that, in turn, co-ordinately regulate genes associated with manipulation of host defences in concert with the destructive arsenal of PCWDEs that manifest the soft rot disease phenotype.

  15. Interference of quorum sensing in urinary pathogen Serratia marcescens by Anethum graveolens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salini, Ramesh; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2015-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic turned obligate pathogen frequently associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) and are multidrug resistant at most instances. Quorum sensing (QS) system, a population-dependent global regulatory system, controls the pathogenesis machinery of S. marcescens as it does in other pathogens. In the present study, methanol extract of a common herb and spice, Anethum graveolens (AGME) was assessed for its anti-QS potential against the clinical isolate of S. marcescens. AGME notably reduced the biofilm formation and QS-dependent virulence factors production in a concentration-dependent manner (64-1024 μg mL(-1)). The light and confocal microscopic images clearly evidenced the antibiofilm activity of AGME (256 μg mL(-1)) at its minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration. Besides, in support of biochemical assays, the expression analysis of QS-regulated genes fimC, bsmA and flhD which are crucial for initial adhesion and motility confirmed their downregulation upon exposure to AGME. LC-MS analysis of AGME revealed 3-O-methyl ellagic acid (3-O-ME) as one of its active principles having nearly similar antibiofilm activity and a reduced inhibition of prodigiosin (27%) and protease (15%) compared to AGME [prodigiosin (47%) and protease (50%)]. UFLC analysis revealed that 0.355 mg g(-1) of 3-O-ME was present in the AGME. AGME and the 3-O-ME significantly interfered the QS system of a QS model strain S. marcescens MG1 and its mutant S. marcescens MG44 which in turn corroborates the anti-QS mechanism of AGME. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus autoinducer-2 quorum sensing decreases biofilm formation in an icaR-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Dan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that causes biofilm-associated infection in humans. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2, a quorum-sensing (QS signal for interspecies communication, has a wide range of regulatory functions in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, but its exact role in biofilm formation in S. aureus remains unclear. Results Here we demonstrate that mutation of the AI-2 synthase gene luxS in S. aureus RN6390B results in increased biofilm formation compared with the wild-type (WT strain under static, flowing and anaerobic conditions and in a mouse model. Addition of the chemically synthesized AI-2 precursor in the luxS mutation strain (ΔluxS restored the WT phenotype. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that AI-2 activated the transcription of icaR, a repressor of the ica operon, and subsequently a decreased level of icaA transcription, which was presumably the main reason why luxS mutation influences biofilm formation. Furthermore, we compared the roles of the agr-mediated QS system and the LuxS/AI-2 QS system in the regulation of biofilm formation using the ΔluxS strain, RN6911 and the Δagr ΔluxS strain. Our data indicate a cumulative effect of the two QS systems on the regulation of biofilm formation in S. aureus. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that AI-2 can decrease biofilm formation in S. aureus via an icaR-activation pathway. This study may provide clues for therapy in S. aureus biofilm-associated infection.

  17. Long-Chain 4-Aminoquinolines as Quorum Sensing Inhibitors in Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, Ivana; Šegan, Sandra; Andrić, Filip; Zlatović, Mario; Moric, Ivana; Opsenica, Dejan M; Senerovic, Lidija

    2017-05-19

    Antibiotic resistance has become a serious global threat to public health; therefore, improved strategies and structurally novel antimicrobials are urgently needed to combat infectious diseases. Here we report a new type of highly potent 4-aminoquinoline derivatives as quorum sensing inhibitors in Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, exhibiting weak bactericidal activities (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 400 μM). Through detailed structure-activity study, we have identified 7-Cl and 7-CF 3 substituted N-dodecylamino-4-aminoquinolines (5 and 10) as biofilm formation inhibitors with 50% biofilm inhibition at 69 μM and 63 μM in S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa, respectively. These two compounds, 5 and 10, are the first quinoline derivatives with anti-biofilm formation activity reported in S. marcescens. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis identified structural descriptors such as Wiener indices, hyper-distance-path index (HDPI), mean topological charge (MTC), topological charge index (TCI), and log D(o/w) exp as the most influential in biofilm inhibition in this bacterial species. Derivative 10 is one of the most potent quinoline type inhibitors of pyocyanin production described so far (IC 50 = 2.5 μM). While we have demonstrated that 5 and 10 act as Pseudomonas quinolone system (PQS) antagonists, the mechanism of inhibition of S. marcescens biofilm formation with these compounds remains open since signaling similar to P. aeruginosa PQS system has not yet been described in Serratia and activity of these compounds on acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signaling has not been detected. Our data show that 7-Cl and 7-CF 3 substituted N-dodecylamino-4-aminoquinolines present the promising scaffolds for developing antivirulence and anti-biofilm formation agents against multidrug-resistant bacterial species.

  18. QsrO a novel regulator of quorum-sensing and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo Köhler

    Full Text Available In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the production of many secreted virulence factors is controlled by a quorum-sensing (QS circuit, constituted of transcriptional activators (LasR, RhlR, PqsR and their cognate signaling molecules (3-oxo-C12-HSL, C4-HSL, PQS. QS is a cooperative behavior that is beneficial to a population but can be exploited by "QS-cheaters", individuals which do not respond to the QS-signal, but can use public goods produced by QS-cooperators. In order to identify QS-deficient clones we designed a genetic screening based on a lasB-lacZ fusion. We isolated one clone (PT1617 deficient in QS-dependent gene expression and virulence factor production despite wild type lasR, rhlR and pqsR alleles. Whole genome sequencing of PT1617 revealed a 3,552 bp deletion encompassing ORFs PA2228-PA2229-PA2230 and the pslA gene. However, complementation of PT1617 by plasmid-encoded copies of these ORFs, did not restore QS. Unexpectedly, gene expression levels of ORFs PA2228, PA2227 (vqsM and PA2222, located adjacent to the deletion, were 10 to 100 fold higher in mutant PT1617 than in PAO1. When expressed from a constitutive promoter on a plasmid, PA2226, alone was found to be sufficient to confer a QS-negative phenotype on PAO1 as well as on PA14. Co-expression of PA2226 and PA2225 in PAO1 further prevented induction of the type III secretion system. In summary, we have identified a novel genetic locus including ORF2226 termed qsrO (QS-repressing ORF, capable of down-regulating all three known QS-systems in P. aeruginosa.

  19. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy.

  20. Chitosan nanoparticles enhances the anti-quorum sensing activity of kaempferol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilk, Sedef; Sağlam, Necdet; Özgen, Mustafa; Korkusuz, Feza

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density dependent expression of species in bacteria mediated by compounds called autoinducers (AI). Several processes responsible for successful establishment of bacterial infection are mediated by QS. Inhibition of QS is therefore being considered as a new target for antimicrobial chemotherapy. Flavonoid compounds are strong antioxidant and antimicrobial agents but their applications are limited due to their poor dissolution and bioavailability. Our objective was to investigate the effect of kaempferol loaded chitosan nanoparticles on modulating QS mediated by AI in model bioassay test systems. For this purpose, kaempferol loaded nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized in terms of hydrodynamic diameter, hydrogen bonding, amorphous transformation and antioxidant activity. QS inhibition in time dependent manner of nanoparticles was measured in violacein pigment producing using the biosensor strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 mediated by AI known as acylated homoserine lactone (AHL). Our results indicated that the average kaempferol loaded chitosan/TPP nanoparticle size and zeta potential were 192.27±13.6nm and +35mV, respectively. The loading and encapsulation efficiency of kaempferol into chitosan/TPP nanoparticles presented higher values between 78 and 93%. Kaempferol loaded chitosan/TPP nanoparticle during the 30 storage days significantly inhibited the production of violacein pigment in Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. The observation that kaempferol encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles can inhibit QS related processes opens up an exciting new strategy for antimicrobial chemotherapy as stable QS-based anti-biofilm agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Agaricus Blazei Hot Water Extract Shows Anti Quorum Sensing Activity in the Nosocomial Human Pathogen Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Soković; Ana Ćirić; Jasmina Glamočlija; Miloš Nikolić; Leo J. L. D. van Griensven

    2014-01-01

    The edible mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill is known to induce protective immunomodulatory action against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study we report potential anti-quorum sensing properties of A. blazei hot water extract. Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence, biofilm formation and survival of many pathogenic bacteria, including the Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and is considered as a novel and promising target for anti-infectious agents. In thi...

  2. Secondary metabolites produced by marine streptomyces as antibiofilm and quorum-sensing inhibitor of uropathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Khansa Mohammed; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-03-01

    Quorum-sensing regulates bacterial biofilm formation and virulence factors, thereby making it an interesting target for attenuating pathogens. In this study, we investigated anti-biofilm and anti-quorum-sensing compounds from secondary metabolites of halophiles marine streptomyces against urinary catheter biofilm forming Proteus mirabilis without effect on growth viability. A total of 40 actinomycetes were isolated from samples collected from different places in Iraq including marine sediments and soil samples. Fifteen isolates identified as streptomyces and their supernatant screened as anti-quorum-sensing by inhibiting quorum-sensing regulated prodigiosin biosynthesis of Serratia marcescens strain Smj-11 as a reporter strain. Isolate Sediment Lake Iraq (sdLi) showed potential anti-quorum-sensing activity. Out of 35 clinical isolates obtained from Urinary catheter used by patient at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, 22 isolates were characterized and identified as Proteus mirabilis. Isolate Urinary Catheter B4 (UCB4) showed the highest biofilm formation with highest resistance to used antibiotic and was chosen for further studies. Ethyl acetate secondary metabolites extract was produced from sdLi isolate. First, we determined the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of sdLi crude extract against UCB4 isolate, and all further experiments used concentrations below the MIC. Tests of subinhibitory concentrations of sdLi crude extract showed good inhibition against UCB4 isolate biofilm formation on urinary catheter and cover glass using Scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy respectively. The influence of sub-MIC of sdLi crude extract was also found to attenuate the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent factors such as hemolysin activity, urease activity, pH value, and motility of UCB4 isolate. Evidence is presented that these nontoxic secondary metabolites may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with quorum-sensing signals

  3. Non-ribosomal Peptide Synthases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Play a Role in Cyclodipeptide Biosynthesis, Quorum-Sensing Regulation, and Root Development in a Plant Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Omar; Ortíz-Castro, Randy; Díaz-Pérez, César; Díaz-Pérez, Alma L; Magaña-Dueñas, Viridiana; López-Bucio, José; Campos-García, Jesús

    2017-04-01

    Diverse molecules mediate cross-kingdom communication between bacteria and their eukaryotic partners and determine pathogenic or symbiotic relationships. N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone-dependent quorum-sensing signaling represses the biosynthesis of bacterial cyclodipeptides (CDPs) that act as auxin signal mimics in the host plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this work, we performed bioinformatics, biochemical, and plant growth analyses to identify non-ribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are involved in CDP synthesis. A reverse genetics strategy allowed the identification of the genes encoding putative multi-modular-NRPS (MM-NRPS). Mutations in these genes affected the synthesis of the CDPs cyclo(L-Pro-L-Val), cyclo(L-Pro-L-Leu), and cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr), while showing wild-type-like levels of virulence factors, such as violacein, elastase, and pyocyanin. When analyzing the bioactivity of purified, naturally produced CDPs, it was found that cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo(L-Pro-L-Val) were capable of antagonizing quorum-sensing-LasR (QS-LasR)-dependent signaling in a contrasting manner in the cell-free supernatants of the selected NRPS mutants, which showed QS induction. Using a bacteria-plant interaction system, we further show that the pvdJ, ambB, and pchE P. aeruginosa mutants failed to repress primary root growth, but improved root branching in A. thaliana seedlings. These results indicated that the CDP production in P. aeruginosa depended on the functional MM-NRPS, which influences quorum-sensing of bacteria and plays a role in root architecture remodeling.

  4. Quercetin Sensitizes Fluconazole-Resistant Candida albicans To Induce Apoptotic Cell Death by Modulating Quorum Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, B. N.; Upreti, D. K.; Singh, B. R.; Pandey, G.; Verma, S.; Roy, S.; Naqvi, A. H.; Rawat, A. K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates group behaviors of Candida albicans such as biofilm, hyphal growth, and virulence factors. The sesquiterpene alcohol farnesol, a QS molecule produced by C. albicans, is known to regulate the expression of virulence weapons of this fungus. Fluconazole (FCZ) is a broad-spectrum antifungal drug that is used for the treatment of C. albicans infections. While FCZ can be cytotoxic at high concentrations, our results show that at much lower concentrations, quercetin (QC...

  5. The role of quorum sensing in the pathogenicity of the cunning aggressor Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2007-01-01

    that bacteria preferentially live in communities in the form of primitive organisms in which the behavior of individual cells is coordinated by cell-cell communication, known as quorum sensing (QS). Bacteria use QS for regulation of the processes involved in their interaction with each other, their environment...... in the protective mechanisms of P. aeruginosa and show how disruption of the QS can be used as an approach to control this cunning aggressor....

  6. Imidazolines as Non-Classical Bioisosteres of N-Acyl homoserine lactones and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Montenegro-Sustaita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of selected 2-substituted imidazolines were synthesized in moderate to excellent yields by a modification of protocols reported in the literature. They were evaluated as potential non-classical bioisosteres of AHL with the aim of counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Imidazolines 18a, 18e and 18f at various concentrations reduced the violacein production by Chromobacterium violaceum, suggesting an anti-quorum sensing profile against Gram-negative bacteria. Imidazoline 18b did not affect the production of violacein, but had a bacteriostatic effect at 100 µM and a bactericidal effect at 1 mM. Imidazoline 18a bearing a hexyl phenoxy moiety was the most active compound of the series, rendering a 72% inhibitory effect of quorum sensing at 100 µM. Imidazoline 18f bearing a phenyl nonamide substituent presented an inhibitory effect on quorum sensing at a very low concentration (1 nM, with a reduction percentage of 28%. This compound showed an irregular performance, decreasing inhibition at concentrations higher than 10 µM, until reaching 100 µM, at which concentration it increased the inhibitory effect with a 49% reduction percentage. When evaluated on Serratia marcescens, compound 18f inhibited the production of prodigiosin by 40% at 100 μM.

  7. Quality evaluation of synthetic quorum sensing peptides used in R&D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Verbeke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are becoming an important class of molecules in the pharmaceutical field. Closely related peptide-impurities in peptides are inherent to the synthesis approach and have demonstrated to potentially mask biomedical experimental results. Quorum sensing peptides are attracting high interest in R&D and therefore a representative set of quorum sensing peptides, with a requested purity of at least 95.0%, was evaluated for their purity and nature of related impurities. In-house quality control (QC revealed a large discrepancy between the purity levels as stated on the supplier׳s certificate of analysis and our QC results. By using our QC analysis flowchart, we demonstrated that only 44.0% of the peptides met the required purity. The main compound of one sample was even found to have a different structure compared to the desired peptide. We also found that the majority of the related impurities were lacking amino acid(s in the desired peptide sequence. Relying on the certificates of analysis as provided by the supplier might have serious consequences for peptide research, and peptide-researchers should implement and maintain a thorough in-house QC. Keywords: Quorum sensing peptides, Quality, Impurity profiling

  8. Control of the pollution of antibiotic resistance genes in soils by quorum sensing inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bai-Min; Zhang, Kun; Shen, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Mei-Zhen; Shentu, Jia-Li; Li, Na

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether pollution from antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) could be affected by bacterial quorum sensing, the oxytetracycline (OTC)-containing manure was fertilized to establish the ARG-polluted soil environment. Under long-term OTC stress, substantial ARGs in the range from 10 -4 to 10 -3 RG/16S rRNA (resistance genes/16S rRNA) were detected in the antibiotics control (AC) group, in which OTC-containing manure was fertilized. Meanwhile, 10 -6 RG/16S rRNA was detected in biological control (BC) group, in which non-OTC-containing manure was fertilized. Subsequently, two typical quorum sensing inhibitors, 4-nitropyridine N-oxide (4-NPO) and 3,4-dibromo-2H-furan-5-one (DBF), were used to treat the ARG-polluted soils. These two groups called 4-NPO treatments (NT) and DBF treatments (FT), respectively. There were no significant differences in bacterial growth and OTC degradation in NT and FT groups, compared to AC group. However, acyl-homoserine lactones such as C 4 -HSL, C 6 -HSL, and C 8 -HSL decreased significantly in both NT and FT groups, compared to AC group. Meanwhile, the abundance of most ARGs decreased dramatically. In FT group, the concentrations of tet(L) and tet(Q) were below the detection limits. It was demonstrated that quorum sensing inhibition could be an effective way to prevent and control the pollution of ARGs in soil.

  9. Choosing an Appropriate Infection Model to Study Quorum Sensing Inhibition in Pseudomonas Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelina Papaioannou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, although considered for decades to be antisocial organisms whose sole purpose is to find nutrients and multiply are, in fact, highly communicative organisms. Referred to as quorum sensing, cell-to-cell communication mechanisms have been adopted by bacteria in order to co-ordinate their gene expression. By behaving as a community rather than as individuals, bacteria can simultaneously switch on their virulence factor production and establish successful infections in eukaryotes. Understanding pathogen-host interactions requires the use of infection models. As the use of rodents is limited, for ethical considerations and the high costs associated with their use, alternative models based on invertebrates have been developed. Invertebrate models have the benefits of low handling costs, limited space requirements and rapid generation of results. This review presents examples of such models available for studying the pathogenicity of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quorum sensing interference, known as quorum quenching, suggests a promising disease-control strategy since quorum-quenching mechanisms appear to play important roles in microbe-microbe and host-pathogen interactions. Examples of natural and synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors and their potential as antimicrobials in Pseudomonas-related infections are discussed in the second part of this review.

  10. Quorum sensing influences phage infection efficiency via affecting cell population and physiological state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xuying; Sun, Qinghui; Yang, Baixue; Pan, Xuewei; He, Yang; Yang, Hongjiang

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial growth phase has been reported affecting phage infection. To underpin the related mechanism, infection efficiency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage K5 is characterized. When infecting the logarithmic cells, phage K5 produced significantly more infection centers than the stationary cells, well concordant with the viable cell ratio in the different growth phases. Additionally, the burst size decreased dramatically in the stationary cells, implying that the physiological state of the viable cells contributed to the productivity of phage K5, and it was consistent with the expression variation of the phage RNA polymerase. Quorum sensing inhibitor penicillic acid was applied and could significantly improve the viable cell proportion and the infection center numbers, but had less effect on the corresponding burst sizes. Moreover, the effect of penicillic acid and the quorum sensing regulator mutants on the production of phage C11 was also analyzed. Taken together, our data suggest that quorum sensing is involved in the defense of phage K5 infection by influencing the viable cell population and their physiological state, and it is an efficient and intrinsic pathway allowing bacteria to resist phage attacks in natural environment. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. KARAKTERISASI BAKTERI ANTI QUORUM SENSING (AQS SEBAGAI PENGHAMBAT VIRULENSI PENYAKIT PADA IKAN LELE DUMBO (Clarias gariepinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessy Novita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Penyakit bakterial adalah salah satu penyebab kerugian besar di bidang akuakultur. Faktor virulensi bakteri penyakit umumnya diekspresikan oleh gen-gen virulen yang diregulasi dengan sistem Quorum Sensing. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mendapatkan isolat bakteri yang memiliki potensi sebagai Anti Quorum Sensing (AQS yang dapat menghambat faktor virulensi bakteri patogen penyebab penyakit pada ikan lele dumbo (Clarias gariepinus. Isolasi bakteri dilakukan dari sedimen, organ pencernaan dan air kolam ikan lele dumbo dari Parung, Ciampea, dan Gunung Sindur, Bogor, Jawa Barat. Sebanyak 347 isolat bakteri berhasil diisolasi, dan sebanyak 68 (19% isolat di antaranya mempunyai aktivitas AQS dengan empat isolat yang berpotensi sebagai bakteri AQS yaitu: TS 1 dan TS 2, TA 23, dan TY 33. Empat isolat tersebut teridentifikasi berdasarkan sekuen 16S rRNA sebagai Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Lysinnibacillus sphaericus, Lysinnibacillus fusiformis, dan Bacillus cereus dengan persentase kemiripan masing-masing 93%, 99%, dan 100%. Berdasarkan analisa gen AHL (Acyl Homoserine Lactone laktonase (aiiA, keempat isolat tersebut menghasilkan enzim AHL. Hasil studi ini menunjukkan bahwa isolat bakteri hasil isolasi dari kolam ikan lele dumbo dapat menghambat mekanisme Quorum Sensing bakteri patogen ikan dengan mendegradasi autoinduser-nya yang berupa AHL.

  12. The influence of quorum sensing in compartment II of the MELiSSA loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condori, Sandra; Mastroleo, Felice; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) has been conceived as a 5 compartments microorganisms and higher plants recycling system for long haul space flights. Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H colonizes compartment II. Previous work reported that continuous culture of the bacterium in a photobioreactor could lead to thick biofilm formation, leading to bioreactor arrest. Our aim is to investigate the unknown quorum sensing (QS) system of R. rubrum S1H, specifically under MELiSSA relevant culture conditions meaning light anaerobic (LAN) and using acetate as carbon source. In that purpose an autoinducer synthase gene (Rru_A3396) knockout mutant was constructed by allelic exchange generating strain M68. In addition phenotypic comparison between wild type (WT) and M68 was performed. Results of thin layer chromatography assay where Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 have been used as reporter strain showed that WT produces acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) from C4 to C12 acyl carbon chain length; however, in M68 no AHLs were detected confirming that gene Rru_A3396 (named rruI) encodes an autoinducer synthase. Interestingly under a low shear or static environment M68 showed cell aggregation similar as reported in a closely related bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (cerI mutant). In contrast to WT, M68 did not form biofilm and exhibited a decreased motility and pigment content. M68 vs wild type transcriptomics results showed that 326 genes were statistically significant differentially expressed. Downregulation of genes related to photosynthesis e.g., reaction center subunits, light harvesting complex and photosynthetic assembly proteins was observed. Similar results were obtained for preliminary proteomic analysis. Results obtained showed that in R. rubrum S1H the AHL-based QS system regulates almost 8% of the genome which is linked to biofilm formation among other biological processes described above. Since strain M68 could not be used in compartment II due to its less

  13. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Quorum Sensing with Special Reference to Use of Quorum Quenching Bacteria in Membrane Biofouling Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Diby

    2014-01-01

    Membrane biofouling remains a severe problem to be addressed in wastewater treatment systems affecting reactor performance and economy. The finding that many wastewater bacteria rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing to synchronize their activities essential for biofilm formations; the quenching bacterial quorum sensing suggests a promising approach for control of membrane biofouling. A variety of quorum quenching compounds of both synthetic and natural origin have been identified and found effective in inhibition of membrane biofouling with much less environmental impact than traditional antimicrobials. Work over the past few years has demonstrated that enzymatic quorum quenching mechanisms are widely conserved in several prokaryotic organisms and can be utilized as a potent tool for inhibition of membrane biofouling. Such naturally occurring bacterial quorum quenching mechanisms also play important roles in microbe-microbe interactions and have been used to develop sustainable nonantibiotic antifouling strategies. Advances in membrane fabrication and bacteria entrapment techniques have allowed the implication of such quorum quenching bacteria for better design of membrane bioreactor with improved antibiofouling efficacies. In view of this, the present paper is designed to review and discuss the recent developments in control of membrane biofouling with special emphasis on quorum quenching bacteria that are applied in membrane bioreactors. PMID:25147787

  14. Evaluation of three plant extracts against biofilm formation and expression of quorum sensing regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasizade, Vajihe; Dehghan, Parichehr; Sichani, Maryam Mohammadi; Shahanipoor, Kahin; Jafari, Reyhaneh; Yousefian, Rozita

    2017-03-01

    Following the increasing antibiotic resistance of pathogenic bacteria, the use of medicinal herbs as antibacterial agents has attracted growing attention. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human opportunistic pathogen that uses quorum sensing for regulating virulence gene expression (pyocyanin, protease, and elastase production and biofilm formation). This study examined the anti-quorum sensing activity of Quercus infectoria, Zataria multiflora and Trachyspermum copticum extracts on standard P. aeruginosa strain. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Q. infectoria, Z. multiflora and T. copticum extracts for standard P. aeruginosa strain was determined through micro dilution. Microtiter plates were used to evaluate the anti-quorum sensing effects of the three extracts (at a sub-MIC concentration) on pyocyanin, protease, and elastase production and biofilm formation. The acetone extract of Q. infectoria showed the highest anti-quorum sensing activity and reduced the pyocyanin, protease, and elastase production and biofilm formation by 89.1%, 78%, 73.3%, and 70.1%, respectively. The corresponding values were 88.2%, 72.1%, 69%, and 61.1% for the methanol extract of Z. multiflora and 70.6%, 63.42%, 60.1%, and 59.1% for the methanol extract of T. copticum. Considering the high anti-quorum sensing activity of the studied extracts, especially the acetone extract of Q. infectoria, these herbs can be used as antipathogenic drugs.

  15. RpoN Regulates Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Modulating the PqsR Quorum Sensing Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhao; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yicai; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chew, Su Chuen; Chua, Song Lin; Wang, Ke; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2015-11-30

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN regulates many cell functions, such as motility, quorum sensing, and virulence in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa often evolves rpoN-negative variants during the chronic infection in cystic fibrosis patients. It is unclear how RpoN interacts with other regulatory mechanisms to control virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this study, we show that RpoN modulates the function of PqsR, a quorum sensing receptor regulating production of virulence factors including the phenazine pyocyanin. The ∆rpoN mutant is able to synthesize 4-quinolone signal molecule HHQ but unable to activate PqsR and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (pqs) quorum sensing. The ∆rpoN mutant produces minimal level of pyocyanin and is unable to produce the anti-staphylococcal agents. Providing pqsR in trans in the ∆rpoN mutant restores its pqs quorum sensing and virulence factor production to the wild-type level. Our study provides evidence that RpoN has a regulatory effect on P. aeruginosa virulence through modulating the function of the PqsR quorum sensing regulator.

  16. Coral-associated bacteria, quorum sensing disrupters, and the regulation of biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Karina; Pavlov, Valentina; Marks, Robert S; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Marine biofouling, the settlement of microorganisms and macroorganisms on structures submerged in seawater, although economically detrimental, is a successful strategy for survival in hostile environments, where coordinated bacterial communities establish biofilms via the regulation of quorum sensing (QS) communication systems. The inhibition of QS activity among bacteria isolated from different coral species was investigated to gain further insight into its potency in the attenuation, or even the prevention, of undesirable biofouling on marine organisms. It is hypothesized that coral mucus/microorganism interactions are competitive, suggesting that the dominant communities secrete QS disruptive compounds. One hundred and twenty bacterial isolates were collected from healthy coral species and screened for their ability to inhibit QS using three bioreporter strains. Approximately 12, 11, and 24% of the isolates exhibited anti-QS activity against Escherichia coli pSB1075, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens KYC55 indicator strains, respectively. Isolates with positive activity against the bioluminescent monitor strains were scanned via a cytotoxic/genotoxic, E. coli TV1061 and DPD2794 antimicrobial panel. Isolates detected by C. violaceum CV026 and A. tumefaciens KYC55 reporter strains were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of these reporter strains, which were found to be unaffected. Tests of the Favia sp. coral isolate Fav 2-50-7 (>98% similarity to Vibrio harveyi) for its ability to attenuate the formation of biofilm showed extensive inhibitory activity against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. To ascertain the stability and general structure of the active compound, cell-free culture supernatants exposed to an increasing temperature gradient or to digestion by proteinase K, were shown to maintain potent QS attenuation and the ability to inhibit the growth of biofilms. Mass spectrometry confirmed

  17. The effect of phosphate deficiency on quorum sensing signaling pathway of Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Pakdaman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : Phosphorus is one of the most essential macroelements for bacterial cells. Since phosphate (PO4-3 limitation is frequently encountered in soils, bacteria developed some mechanisms in response to this sever condition. Phosphate transporter (PstS and proteins involved in quorum sensing (QS signaling pathway are affected by mediating PhoB, response regulator, following phosphate starvation. QS system of Sinorhizobium meliloti composed of at least three genes of sinI (autoinducer synthase, sinR and expR (autoinducer activated receptor which involved in its free living and symbiotic functions .   Materials and method s: The optical density (OD600 of different S. meliloti transformed strains carrying pLK004 (a pstS promoter-egfp fusion, pLK64 (a sinI promoter-egfp fusion, pLK65 (a sinR promoter-egfp fusion, pLK66 (an expR promoter-egfp fusion and control (promoterless-egfp fusion plasmids were read under different phosphate concentrations of 0.1 (phosphate deficiency, 0.5 and 2 mM (sufficient phosphate at several time points of 16, 24 and 40h. The promoter activity of different genes of pstS, sinI, sinR and expR were measured as emitted fluorescence per bacterial cell density (OD600 under different phosphate concentrations .   Results : By reducing phosphate concentration in the medium, the growth rate of transformed bacteria decreased, especially at 40h. The promoter activity of pstS, sinI and sinR, but not expR, genes was activated following phosphate starvation .   Discussion and conclusion : S. meliloti can upregulate PstS to partly compensate phosphate deficiency in the environment. The gene of sinR is also activated in a PhoB dependent manner as phosphate starvation is encountered. SinR is the activator of sinI, so the upregulation of QS pathway under phosphate deficiency may be facilitate free living and symbiotic bacterial functions .

  18. Airway Epithelial Cell Integrity Protects from Cytotoxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Davide; Köhler, Thilo; Bacchetta, Marc; Saab, Joanna Bou; Frieden, Maud; van Delden, Christian; Chanson, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Cell-to-cell communication via gap junctions regulates airway epithelial cell homeostasis and maintains the epithelium host defense. Quorum-sensing molecules produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinate the expression of virulence factors by this respiratory pathogen. These bacterial signals may also incidentally modulate mammalian airway epithelial cell responses to the pathogen, a process called interkingdom signaling. We investigated the interactions between the P. aeruginosa N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C12) quorum-sensing molecule and human airway epithelial cell gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). C12 degradation and its effects on cells were monitored in various airway epithelial cell models grown under nonpolarized and polarized conditions. Its concentration was further monitored in daily tracheal aspirates of colonized intubated patients. C12 rapidly altered epithelial integrity and decreased GJIC in nonpolarized airway epithelial cells, whereas other quorum-sensing molecules had no effect. The effects of C12 were dependent on [Ca(2+)]i and could be prevented by inhibitors of Src tyrosine family and Rho-associated protein kinases. In contrast, polarized airway cells grown on Transwell filters were protected from C12 except when undergoing repair after wounding. In vivo during colonization of intubated patients, C12 did not accumulate, but it paralleled bacterial densities. In vitro C12 degradation, a reaction catalyzed by intracellular paraoxonase 2 (PON2), was impaired in nonpolarized cells, whereas PON2 expression was increased during epithelial polarization. The cytotoxicity of C12 on nonpolarized epithelial cells, combined with its impaired degradation allowing its accumulation, provides an additional pathogenic mechanism for P. aeruginosa infections.

  19. Collective Behavior of Quorum-Sensing Run-and-Tumble Particles under Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Markus; Heinß, Nike; Schmid, Friederike; Speck, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    We study a generic model for quorum-sensing bacteria in circular confinement. Every bacterium produces signaling molecules, the local concentration of which triggers a response when a certain threshold is reached. If this response lowers the motility, then an aggregation of bacteria occurs which differs fundamentally from standard motility-induced phase separation due to the long-ranged nature of the concentration of signal molecules. We analyze this phenomenon analytically and by numerical simulations employing two different protocols leading to stationary cluster and ring morphologies, respectively.

  20. Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon- Natural Food Sourcewith Anti-Quorum Sensing Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Li; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Various parts of Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon are used as food sources by Malaysians. The purpose of this study is to examine the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) properties of P. nigrum, P. betle and G. gnemon extracts. The hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of these plants were assessed in bioassays involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, Escherichia coli [pSB401], E. coli [pSB1075] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. It was found that the extracts of these three plants ha...

  1. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, K.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2002-01-01

    Novel molecular tools have been constructed which allow for in situ detection of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The reporter responds to AHL activation of LasR lay expression of an unstable version of the green-fluorescent protein (Gfp)...... sensing in most biofilm cells. The compound did not affect initial attachment to the abiotic substratum. It does, however, affect the architecture of the biofilm and enhances the process of bacterial detachment, leading to a loss of bacterial biomass from the substratum....

  2. Post-secretional activation of Protease IV by quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Jungmin; Li, Xi-Hui; Kim, Soo-Kyong; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Protease IV (PIV), a key virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a secreted lysyl-endopeptidase whose expression is induced by quorum sensing (QS). We found that PIV expressed in QS mutant has severe reduction of activity in culture supernatant (CS), even though it is overexpressed to high level. PIV purified from the QS mutant (M-PIV) had much lower activity than the PIV purified from wild type (P-PIV). We found that the propeptide cleaved from prepro-PIV was co-purified with M-PIV, bu...

  3. Discovery of a quorum sensing modulator pharmacophore by 3D small-molecule microarray screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsden, David M; Nicholson, Rebecca L; Skindersoe, Mette E

    2010-01-01

    The screening of large arrays of drug-like small-molecules was traditionally a time consuming and resource intensive task. New methodology developed within our laboratories provides an attractive low cost, 3D microarray-assisted screening platform that could be used to rapidly assay thousands of ......-pyridine pharmacophore were found to be potent inhibitors of N-acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL) mediated quorum sensing phenotypes in Serratia (IC(50) = ~5 µM) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IC(50) = 10-20 µM)....

  4. Modulation of quorum sensing controlled behaviour of bacteria by growing seedling, seed and seedling extracts of leguminous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Qaseem; Zahin, Maryam; Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2010-06-01

    Effect of growing seedling, seeds and seedlings extracts from seven leguminous plants (Pisum sativum, Vigna radiata, Vigna mungo, Cajanus cajan, Lentil culinaris, Cicer arietinum and Trigonella foenum graecum) were screened for their ability to influence quorum sensing controlled pigment production in Chromobacterium violaceum indicator strains (CV12472 and CVO26). Germinating seedling and seedling extracts of only P. sativum (pea) showed inhibition of violacein production. Interestingly, the T. foenum graecum (fenugreek) seed extracts enhances the pigment production. Quorum sensing regulated swarming motility in Pseudomonas aerugionsa PAO1 was reduced by pea seedling extract while enhanced by the fenugreek seed extracts. These findings suggest that plant metabolites of some legumes interact actively with bacterial quorum sensing and could modulate its associated functions.

  5. Attenuation of adhesion, quorum sensing and biofilm mediated virulence of carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli by selected natural plant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Pallavi; Chawla, Raman; Tanwar, Ankit; Chakotiya, Ankita Singh; Narula, Alka; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The multi-drug resistance offered by Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli (Family: Enterobacteriaceae; Class: Gammaproteobacteria) against third line antibiotics can be attributed towards its ability to develop biofilm. Such process involves adhesion and quorum-sensing induced colonization leading to biomass development. The present study explored the anti-adhesion, anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm potential of 05 pre-standardized potent herbals. Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) exhibited maximum potential in all these activities i.e. 91.3% ± 0.05% (Anti-adhesion), 96.06% ± 0.05% (Anti-Quorum sensing) and 51.3% ± 0.07% (Anti-Biofilm formation) respectively. Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) showed both anti-adhesion (84.1% ± 0.03%) and anti-quorum sensing (90.0%) potential while Holarrhena antidysenterica (PTRC-8111-A) showed only anti-quorum sensing potential as compared to standards/antibiotics. These findings were in line with the molecular docking analysis of phytoligands against Lux S and Pilin receptors. Furthermore, the pairwise correlation analysis of the tested activities with qualitative, quantitative and bioactivity functional descriptors revealed that an increased content of alkaloid, moderate content of flavonoids and decreased content of tannins supported all the three activities. In addition, nitric oxide and superoxide scavenging activity were found to be correlated with anti-quorum sensing activity. The findings indicated clearly that B. aristata (Family: Berberidaceae) and C. sinensis (Family: Theaceae) were potent herbal leads with significant therapeutic potential which further needs to be explored at pre-clinical level in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Escherichia coli Quorum-Sensing EDF, A Peptide Generated by Novel Multiple Distinct Mechanisms and Regulated by trans-Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eshcerichia coli mazEF is a stress-induced toxin-antitoxin module mediating cell death and requiring a quorum-sensing (QS extracellular death factor (EDF, the pentapeptide NNWNN. Here we uncovered several distinct molecular mechanisms involved in its generation from the zwf mRNA encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. In particular, we show that, under stress conditions, the endoribonuclease MazF cleaves specific ACA sites, thereby generating a leaderless zwf mRNA which is truncated 30 codons after the EDF-encoding region. Since the nascent ribosome peptide exit tunnel can accommodate up to 40 amino acids, this arrangement allows the localization of the EDF residues inside the tunnel when the ribosome is stalled at the truncation site. Moreover, ribosome stalling activates the trans-translation system, which provides a means for the involvement of ClpPX in EDF generation. Furthermore, the trans-translation is described as a regulatory system that attenuated the generation of EDF, leading to low levels of EDF in the single cell. Therefore, the threshold EDF molecule concentration required is achieved only by the whole population, as expected for QS.

  7. Shoot the Message, Not the Messenger—Combating Pathogenic Virulence in Plants by Inhibiting Quorum Sensing Mediated Signaling Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Alagarasan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunity, virulence, biofilm formation, and survival in the host environment are regulated by the versatile nature of density dependent microbial cell signaling, also called quorum sensing (QS. The QS molecules can associate with host plant tissues and, at times, cause a change in its gene expression at the downstream level through inter-kingdom cross talking. Progress in controlling QS through fungicide/bactericide in pathogenic microscopic organisms has lead to a rise of antibiotic resistance pathogens. Here, we review the application of selective quorum quenching (QQ endophytes to control phytopathogens that are shared by most, if not all, terrestrial plant species as well as aquatic plants. Allowing the plants to posses endophytic colonies through biotization will be an additional and a sustainable encompassing methodology resulting in attenuated virulence rather than killing the pathogens. Furthermore, the introduced endophytes could serve as a potential biofertilizer and bioprotection agent, which in turn increases the PAMP- triggered immunity and hormonal systemic acquired resistance (SAR in plants through SA-JA-ET signaling systems. This paper discusses major challenges imposed by QS and QQ application in biotechnology.

  8. Biosynthesis of Glycomonoterpenes to Attenuate Quorum Sensing Associated Virulence in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Amrita; Joshi-Navre, Kasturi; Mukherji, Ruchira; Prabhune, Asmita

    2017-04-01

    The acquisition of multidrug resistance in bacteria has become a bigger threat of late, mainly due to the bacterial signaling phenomenon, quorum sensing (QS). QS, among a population of bacteria, initiates the formation of biofilms and offers myriad advantages to bacteria. Burgeoning antibiotic resistance in biofilm-producing bacteria has motivated efforts toward finding new alternatives to these traditional antimicrobials. In the present study, we report the increased solubility and additional quorum quenching as well as biofilm disruption activity of glyco-derivatives of monoterpenes (citral and citronellal). Glycomonoterpenes of citral and citronellal were synthesized via conjugation of the monoterpenes with glucose by the non-pathogenic yeast Candida bombicola (ATCC 22214). Structural elucidation of newly synthesized glycomonoterpenes showed that one synthesized using citronellal contains three major lactonic forms with molecular weight 492.43, 473.47, and 330.39 Da whereas the one produced using citral has an acidic form with molecular weight 389.33 and 346.23 Da. The glycomonoterpenes were able to individually inhibit QS, mediated through various medium-chain and long-chain N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). These new compounds are interesting additions to the known range of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) and could be further explored for potential clinical applications.

  9. EFFECTS OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AS BACTERIAL EFFLUX PUMP INHIBITORS ON QUORUM SENSING REGULATED BEHAVIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aybey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic drugs are known to have antimicrobial activity against several groups of microorganisms. The antidepressant agents such as duloxetine, paroxetine, hydroxyzine and venlafaxine are shown to act as efflux pump inhibitors in bacterial cells. In order to the investigation of the effects of psychotropic drugs were determined for clinically significant pathogens by using standart broth microdillusion method. The anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS activity of psychotropic drugs was tested against four test pathogens using the agar well diffusion method. All drugs showed strong inhibitory effect on the growth of S. typhimurium. Additionally, quorum sensing-regulated behaviors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production were investigated. Most effective drugs on swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production, respectively, were paroxetine and duloxetine; duloxetine; hydroxyzine and venlafaxine; paroxetine and venlafaxine; venlafaxine. Accordingly, psychotropic drugs were shown strongly anti-QS activity by acting as bacterial efflux pump inhibitors and effection on motility and alkaline protease production of P. aeruginosa.

  10. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas El Sahili

    Full Text Available Quorum-quenching (QQ are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL. Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated.

  11. Bacterial Quorum Sensing Inhibition Activity of the Traditional Chinese Herbs, Ficus carica L. and Perilla frutescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shiwei; Li, Hui; Zhou, Wanlong; Liu, Ao; Zhu, Hu

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), as the basis of bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising approach to reduce the incidence of multidrug resistance. The objective of this study was to search for novel quorum sensing inhibitors from plants and control detrimental infections. The crude extracts of Ficus carica and Perilla frutescens were examined for their anti-QS properties. Powdered plant samples were treated sequentially with organic solvents of increasing polarity. The extracts of each solvent were concentrated in vacuo to give crude extracts and tested against Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 especially. Anti-QS activity was measured by quantifying violacein production and swarming motility. All extracts of these two plants display anti-QS ability. Interestingly, the extract of F. carica with dichloromethane and of P. frutescens with MeOH exhibited the most pronounced inhibition of QS activity. These two plants can offer bioactive natural products with potential for attenuating pathogens. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Towards Predictive Modeling of Information Processing in Microbial Ecosystems With Quorum-Sensing Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Boedicker, James

    Bacteria communicate using external chemical signals in a process known as quorum sensing. However, the efficiency of this communication is reduced by both limitations on the rate of diffusion over long distances and potential interference from neighboring strains. Therefore, having a framework to quantitatively predict how spatial structure and biodiversity shape information processing in bacterial colonies is important, both for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of natural microbial ecosystems, and for the rational design of synthetic ecosystems with desired computational properties. As a first step towards these goals, we implement a reaction-diffusion model to study the dynamics of a LuxI/LuxR quorum sensing circuit in a growing bacterial population. The spatiotemporal concentration profile of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules is analyzed, and used to define a measure of physical and functional signaling network connectivity. From this, we systematically investigate how different initial distributions of bacterial populations influence the subsequent efficiency of collective long-range signal propagation in the population. We compare our results with known experimental data, and discuss limitations and extensions to our modeling framework.-/abstract-

  13. A quorum-sensing factor in vegetative Dictyostelium discoideum cells revealed by quantitative migration analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Golé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many cells communicate through the production of diffusible signaling molecules that accumulate and once a critical concentration has been reached, can activate or repress a number of target genes in a process termed quorum sensing (QS. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, QS plays an important role during development. However little is known about its effect on cell migration especially in the growth phase. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To investigate the role of cell density on cell migration in the growth phase, we use multisite timelapse microscopy and automated cell tracking. This analysis reveals a high heterogeneity within a given cell population, and the necessity to use large data sets to draw reliable conclusions on cell motion. In average, motion is persistent for short periods of time (t ≤ 5 min, but normal diffusive behavior is recovered over longer time periods. The persistence times are positively correlated with the migrated distances. Interestingly, the migrated distance decreases as well with cell density. The adaptation of cell migration to cell density highlights the role of a secreted quorum sensing factor (QSF on cell migration. Using a simple model describing the balance between the rate of QSF generation and the rate of QSF dilution, we were able to gather all experimental results into a single master curve, showing a sharp cell transition between high and low motile behaviors with increasing QSF. CONCLUSION: This study unambiguously demonstrates the central role played by QSF on amoeboid motion in the growth phase.

  14. New bicyclic brominated furanones as potent autoinducer-2 quorum-sensing inhibitors against bacterial biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Su; Ryu, Eun-Ju; Li, Linzi; Choi, Bong-Kyu; Kim, B Moon

    2017-09-08

    Bacterial behaviors such as virulence factor secretion and biofilm formation are critical for survival, and are effectively regulated through quorum sensing, a mechanism of intra- and interspecies communication in response to changes in cell density and species complexity. Many bacterial species colonize host tissues and form a defensive structure called a biofilm, which can be the basis of inflammatory diseases. Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the periodontium, is caused by subgingival biofilms related to periodontopathogens. In particular, Fusobacterium nucleatum is a major co-aggregation bridge organism in the formation and growth of subgingival biofilms, linking the early and late colonizers in periodontal biofilms. According to our previous study, the intergeneric quorum-sensing signal molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2) of F. nucleatum plays a key role in intra- and interspecies interactions of periodontopathogens, and may be a good target for periodontal biofilm inhibition. Recently, brominated furanones produced by the macroalga Delisea pulchra were shown to inhibit biofilm formation via AI-2, and have been investigated toward the goal of increasing the inhibition effect. In this study, we describe the synthesis of new bromofuranone analogs, i.e., 3-(dibromomethylene)isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one derivatives, and demonstrate their inhibitory activities against biofilm formation by periodontopathogens, including F. nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Inactivation of bacterial quorum sensing signals N-acyl homoserine lactones is widespread in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguina, Ana Carolina Del V; Nieto, Carolina; Pajot, Hipólito M; Bertini, Elisa V; Mac Cormack, Walter; Castellanos de Figueroa, Lucía I; Nieto-Peñalver, Carlos G

    2018-01-01

    The inactivation of quorum sensing signals, a phenomenon known as quorum quenching, has been described in diverse microorganisms, though it remains almost unexplored in yeasts. Beyond the well-known properties of these microorganisms for the industry or as eukaryotic models, the role of yeasts in soil or in the inner tissues of a plant is largely unknown. In this report, the wider survey of quorum quenching activities in yeasts isolated from Antarctic soil and the inner tissues of sugarcane, a tropical crop, is presented. Results show that, independently of their niche, quorum quenching activities are broadly present in unicellular fungi. Although yeasts showing a broad range of quorum quenching activity are present in the two niches, at the same time specific AHL inactivation profiles can also be found. Furthermore, yeasts from both sampling sites show quorum quenching activities compatible with lactonase-like and acylase-like inactivations of AHLs. Interestingly, the characterization of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa 7Apo1 showed that the presence of a particular AHL does not interfere with the quenching of a second molecule. Evidence suggests that yeasts could play a role in the modulation of the quorum sensing activity of bacteria. The relationship among phylogeny, sampling sites and yeast quorum quenching activities of the isolates is analyzed. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional marine metagenomic screening for anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Karin; Golberg, Karina; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Marks, Robert; Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication process, entails the production of signaling molecules that enable synchronized gene expression in microbial communities to regulate myriad microbial functions, including biofilm formation. QS disruption may constitute an innovative approach to the design of novel antifouling and anti-biofilm agents. To identify novel quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI), 2,500 environmental bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from uncultured marine planktonic bacteria were screened for QSI activity using soft agar overlaid with wild type Chromobacterium violaceum as an indicator. Of the BAC library clones, 7% showed high QSI activity (>40%) against the indicator bacterium, suggesting that QSI is common in the marine environment. The most active compound, eluted from BAC clone 14-A5, disrupted QS signaling pathways and reduced biofilm formation in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. The mass spectra of the active BAC clone (14-A5) that had been visualized by thin layer chromatography was dominated by a m/z peak of 362.1.

  17. Quorum sensing is a language of chemical signals and plays an ecological role in algal-bacterial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Lyu, Yihua; Richlen, Mindy; Anderson, Donald M; Cai, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    Algae are ubiquitous in the marine environment, and the ways in which they interact with bacteria are of particular interest in marine ecology field. The interactions between primary producers and bacteria impact the physiology of both partners, alter the chemistry of their environment, and shape microbial diversity. Although algal-bacterial interactions are well known and studied, information regarding the chemical-ecological role of this relationship remains limited, particularly with respect to quorum sensing (QS), which is a system of stimuli and response correlated to population density. In the microbial biosphere, QS is pivotal in driving community structure and regulating behavioral ecology, including biofilm formation, virulence, antibiotic resistance, swarming motility, and secondary metabolite production. Many marine habitats, such as the phycosphere, harbour diverse populations of microorganisms and various signal languages (such as QS-based autoinducers). QS-mediated interactions widely influence algal-bacterial symbiotic relationships, which in turn determine community organization, population structure, and ecosystem functioning. Understanding infochemicals-mediated ecological processes may shed light on the symbiotic interactions between algae host and associated microbes. In this review, we summarize current achievements about how QS modulates microbial behavior, affects symbiotic relationships, and regulates phytoplankton chemical ecological processes. Additionally, we present an overview of QS-modulated co-evolutionary relationships between algae and bacterioplankton, and consider the potential applications and future perspectives of QS.

  18. Star Anise (Illicium verum Hook. f.) as Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Formation Inhibitor on Foodborne Bacteria: Study in Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Ramim Tanver; Lou, Zaixiang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Fuhao; Timilsena, Yakindra Prasad; Zhang, Caili; Zhang, Yi; Bakry, Amr M

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) systems to communicate with each other and regulate microbial group behavior, such as the secretion of virulence factors, including biofilm formation. In order to explore safe, edible agents, the potential of star anise (SA) as an anti-QS and antibiofilm agent and its possible application in milk safety were investigated. Staphylococcus aureus , Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and biosensor strain Chromobacterium violaceum were selected as test strains for QS, biofilm, and exopolysaccharide assays. The percent acidities and total plate counts were determined to evaluate the quality of biofilm-inoculated and noninoculated milk. The yield of SA extraction was 25.90% ± 0.2% (w/w). At sub-MIC, SA extract did not show any effect on bacterial growth. The production of violacein was inhibited by 89% by SA extract. The extract also inhibited the formation of biofilm by up to 87% in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition rates of 70.45%, 42.82%, and 35.66% were found for exopolysaccharide production. The swarming motility of S. aureus was reduced by about 95.9% by SA extract. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis confirmed that the development of biofilm architecture was hampered. It was found that SA extract could delay the spoilage of milk. In the endeavor to avoid drug resistance, pathogenesis, and resistance to biocides while improving food safety and avoiding health hazard issues arising from synthetic chemicals, SA extract could be used as a potential QS and biofilm inhibitor.

  19. The small RNA ReaL: a novel regulatory element embedded in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carloni, Sara; Macchi, Raffaella; Sattin, Sara; Ferrara, Silvia; Bertoni, Giovanni

    2017-10-01

    The small RNA ReaL of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been characterized. Our results indicate that ReaL contributes to P. aeruginosa virulence. In the Galleria mellonella infection model, reaL gene deletion resulted in decreased virulence, while ReaL overexpression resulted in a hyper-virulent phenotype. We also demonstrate that ReaL is embedded in the P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS) with the role of linking las to pqs systems. We show that ReaL is negatively regulated by the las regulator LasR and impacts positively the synthesis of the pqs quinolone signal PQS by a positive post-transcriptional effect on the pqsC gene. Perturbations of ReaL levels affect pyocyanin synthesis, biofilm formation and swarming motility, processes that are known to be influenced by PQS synthesis. In addition to being regulated by LasR, ReaL is also responding to infection relevant cues that P. aeruginosa can experience in mammalian hosts such as temperature and oxygen availability. Furthermore, ReaL shows a growth phase-dependent pattern of expression, being up-regulated in stationary phase, due to the activity of the alternative σ factor RpoS. Together, these regulations of ReaL expression are expected to contribute to the fine co-modulation of PQS synthesis and, ultimately, virulence. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The role of quorum sensing signalling in EPS production and the assembly of a sludge community into aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuan Hao; Koh, Kai Shyang; Xie, Chao; Tay, Martin; Zhou, Yan; Williams, Rohan; Ng, Wun Jern; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) signalling has been extensively studied in single species populations. However, the ecological role of QS in complex, multi-species communities, particularly in the context of community assembly, has neither been experimentally explored nor theoretically addressed. Here, we performed a long-term bioreactor ecology study to address the links between QS, organization and composition of complex microbial communities. The conversion of floccular biomass to highly structured granules was found to be non-random, but strongly and positively correlated with N-acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL)-mediated QS. Specific AHLs were elevated up to 100-fold and were strongly associated with the initiation of granulation. Similarly, the levels of particular AHLs decreased markedly during the granular disintegration phase. Metadata analysis indicated that granulation was accompanied by changes in extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production and AHL add-back studies also resulted in increased EPS synthesis. In contrast to the commonly reported nanomolar to micromolar signal concentrations in pure culture laboratory systems, QS signalling in the granulation ecosystem occurred at picomolar to nanomolar concentrations of AHLs. Given that low concentrations of AHLs quantified in this study were sufficient to activate AHL bioreporters in situ in complex granular communities, AHL mediated QS may be a common feature in many natural and engineered ecosystems, where it coordinates community behaviour.

  1. In Silico Evaluation of the Impacts of Quorum Sensing Inhibition (QSI) on Strain Competition and Development of QSI Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guopeng; Lo, Chieh; Walsh, Connor; Hiller, N. Luisa; Marculescu, Radu

    2016-10-01

    As understanding of bacterial regulatory systems and pathogenesis continues to increase, QSI has been a major focus of research. However, recent studies have shown that mechanisms of resistance to quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors (QSIs) exist, calling into question their clinical value. We propose a computational framework that considers bacteria genotypes relative to QS genes and QS-regulated products including private, quasi-public, and public goods according to their impacts on bacterial fitness. Our results show (1) QSI resistance spreads when QS positively regulates the expression of private or quasi-public goods. (2) Resistance to drugs targeting secreted compounds downstream of QS for a mix of private, public, and quasi-public goods also spreads. (3) Changing the micro-environment during treatment with QSIs may decrease the spread of resistance. At fundamental-level, our simulation framework allows us to directly quantify cell-cell interactions and biofilm dynamics. Practically, the model provides a valuable tool for the study of QSI-based therapies, and the simulations reveal experimental paths that may guide QSI-based therapies in a manner that avoids or decreases the spread of QSI resistance.

  2. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling.

  3. Isolation and molecular characterization of biofouling bacteria and profiling of quorum sensing signal molecules from membrane bioreactor activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-02-04

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling.

  4. Quorum sensing influences growth and photosynthetic membrane production in high-cell-density cultivations of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carius, Lisa; Carius, Anke B; McIntosh, Matthew; Grammel, Hartmut

    2013-08-08

    The facultative anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum exhibits versatile metabolic activity allowing the adaptation to rapidly changing growth conditions in its natural habitat, the microaerobic and anoxic zones of stagnant waters. The microaerobic growth mode is of special interest as it allows the high-level expression of photosynthetic membranes when grown on succinate and fructose in the dark, which could significantly simplify the industrial production of compounds associated with PM formation. However, recently we showed that PM synthesis is no longer inducible when R. rubrum cultures are grown to high cell densities under aerobic conditions. In addition a reduction of the growth rate and the continued accumulation of precursor molecules for bacteriochlorophyll synthesis were observed under high cell densities conditions. In the present work, we demonstrate that the cell density-dependent effects are reversible if the culture supernatant is replaced by fresh medium. We identified six N-acylhomoserine lactones and show that four of them are produced in varying amounts according to the growth phase and the applied growth conditions. Further, we demonstrate that N-acylhomoserine lactones and tetrapyrrole compounds released into the growth medium affect the growth rate and PM expression in high cell density cultures. In summary, we provide evidence that R. rubrum possesses a Lux-type quorum sensing system which influences the biosynthesis of PM and the growth rate and is thus likely to be involved in the phenotypes of high cell density cultures and the rapid adaptation to changing environmental conditions.

  5. Quorum Sensing in Bacillus thuringiensis Is Required for Completion of a Full Infectious Cycle in the Insect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Slamti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS is a biological process commonly described as allowing bacteria belonging to a same pherotype to coordinate gene expression to cell density. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication mainly relies on cytoplasmic sensors regulated by secreted and re-imported signaling peptides. The Bacillus quorum sensors Rap, NprR, and PlcR were previously identified as the first members of a new protein family called RNPP. Except for the Rap proteins, these RNPP regulators are transcription factors that directly regulate gene expression. QS regulates important biological functions in bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group. PlcR was first characterized as the main regulator of virulence in B. thuringiensis and B. cereus. More recently, the PlcR-like regulator PlcRa was characterized for its role in cysteine metabolism and in resistance to oxidative stress. The NprR regulator controls the necrotrophic properties allowing the bacteria to survive in the infected host. The Rap proteins negatively affect sporulation via their interaction with a phosphorelay protein involved in the activation of Spo0A, the master regulator of this differentiation pathway. In this review we aim at providing a complete picture of the QS systems that are sequentially activated during the lifecycle of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis in an insect model of infection.

  6. Attenuation of quorum sensing controlled virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by pentacyclic triterpenes, betulin and betulinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumari, Jobina; Borkotoky, Subhomoi; Murali, Ayaluru; Suchiang, Kitlangki; Mohanty, Saswat Kumar; Busi, Siddhardha

    2018-03-08

    The production of virulence determinants and biofilm formation in numerous pathogens is regulated by the cell-density-dependent phenomenon, Quorum sensing (QS). The QS system in multidrug resistant opportunistic pathogen, P. aeruginosa constitutes of three main regulatory circuits namely Las, Rhl, and Pqs which are closely linked to its pathogenicity and establishment of chronic infections. In spite intensive antibiotic therapy, P. aeruginosa continue to be an important cause of nosocomial infections and also the major cause of mortality in Cystic Fibrosis patients with 80% of the adults suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Hence, targeting QS circuit offers an effective intervention to the ever increasing problem of drug resistant pathogens. In the present study, the pentacyclic triterpenes i.e. Betulin (BT) and Betulinic acid (BA) exhibited significant attenuation in production of QS-regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa, at the sub-lethal concentration. The test compound remarkably interfered in initial stages of biofilm development by decreasing the exopolysaccharide production and cell surface hydrophobicity. Based on the in vivo studies, the test compounds notably enhanced the survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, molecular docking analysis revealed that BT and BA can act as a strong competitive inhibitor for QS receptors, LasR and RhlR. The findings suggest that BT and BA can serve as potential anti-infectives in the controlling chronic infection of P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quorum sensing is a language of chemical signals and plays an ecological role in algal-bacterial interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Lyu, Yihua; Richlen, Mindy; Anderson, Donald M.; Cai, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    Algae are ubiquitous in the marine environment, and the ways in which they interact with bacteria are of particular interest in marine ecology field. The interactions between primary producers and bacteria impact the physiology of both partners, alter the chemistry of their environment, and shape microbial diversity. Although algal-bacterial interactions are well known and studied, information regarding the chemical-ecological role of this relationship remains limited, particularly with respect to quorum sensing (QS), which is a system of stimuli and response correlated to population density. In the microbial biosphere, QS is pivotal in driving community structure and regulating behavioral ecology, including biofilm formation, virulence, antibiotic resistance, swarming motility, and secondary metabolite production. Many marine habitats, such as the phycosphere, harbour diverse populations of microorganisms and various signal languages (such as QS-based autoinducers). QS-mediated interactions widely influence algal-bacterial symbiotic relationships, which in turn determine community organization, population structure, and ecosystem functioning. Understanding infochemicals-mediated ecological processes may shed light on the symbiotic interactions between algae host and associated microbes. In this review, we summarize current achievements about how QS modulates microbial behavior, affects symbiotic relationships, and regulates phytoplankton chemical ecological processes. Additionally, we present an overview of QS-modulated co-evolutionary relationships between algae and bacterioplankton, and consider the potential applications and future perspectives of QS. PMID:28966438

  8. Anti-Quorum Sensing Potential of Potato Rhizospheric Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleh Sobhanipour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria is becoming a serious problem. The rise of multiresistance strains has forced the pharmaceutical industry to come up with new generation of more effective and potent antibiotics, therefore creating development of antivirulence compounds. Due to extensive usage of cell-to-cell bacterial communication (QS systems to monitor the production of virulence factors, disruption of QS system results in creation of a promising strategy for the control of bacterial infection. Numerous natural quorum quenching (QQ agents have been identified. In addition, many microorganisms are capable of producing smaller molecular QS inhibitors and/or macromolecular QQ enzymes. In present survey, anti QS activity of 1280 rhizosphere bacteria was assessed using the Pectobacterium carotovorum as AHL-donor and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as biosensor system. The results showed that 61 strains had highly AHL-degrading activity. Both Lux I and Lux R activity were affected by some isolates, suggesting that the rhizobacteria target both QS signal and receptor. These soil microorganisms with their anti-QS activity have the potential to be novel therapeutic agents for reducing virulence and pathogenicity of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

  9. Regulation of Yersina pestis Virulence by AI-2 Mediated Quorum Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segelke, B; Hok, S; Lao, V; Corzett, M; Garcia, E

    2010-03-29

    The proposed research was motivated by an interest in understanding Y. pestis virulence mechanisms and bacteria cell-cell communication. It is expected that a greater understanding of virulence mechanisms will ultimately lead to biothreat countermeasures and novel therapeutics. Y. pestis is the etiological agent of plague, the most devastating disease in human history. Y. pestis infection has a high mortality rate and a short incubation before mortality. There is no widely available and effective vaccine for Y. pestis and multi-drug resistant strains are emerging. Y. pestis is a recognized biothreat agent based on the wide distribution of the bacteria in research laboratories around the world and on the knowledge that methods exist to produce and aerosolize large amounts of bacteria. We hypothesized that cell-cell communication via signaling molecules, or quorum sensing, by Y. pestis is important for the regulation of virulence factor gene expression during host invasion, though a causative link had never been established. Quorum sensing is a mode of intercellular communication which enables orchestration of gene expression for many bacteria as a function of population density and available evidence suggests there may be a link between quorum sensing and regulation of Y. pesits virulence. Several pathogenic bacteria have been shown to regulate expression of virulence factor genes, including genes encoding type III secretion, via quorum sensing. The Y. pestis genome encodes several cell-cell signaling pathways and the interaction of at least three of these are thought to be involved in one or more modes of host invasion. Furthermore, Y. pestis gene expression array studies carried out at LLNL have established a correlation between expression of known virulence factors and genes involved in processing of the AI-2 quorum sensing signal. This was a basic research project that was intended to provide new insights into bacterial intercellular communication and how it is

  10. Quorum sensing Inhibitors as anti-pathogenic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2006-01-01

    as well as elevated tolerance to the activity of the innate immune system. Gram-negative bacteria commonly use N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) as QS signal molecules. The use of signal molecule based drugs to attenuate bacterial pathogenecity rather than bacterial growth is attractive for several reasons......, particularly considering the emergence of increasingly antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Compounds capable of this type of interference have been termed anti-pathogenic drugs. A large variety of synthetic AHL analogues and natural products libraries have been screened and a number of QS inhibitors (QSI) have been...

  11. quorum sensing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kannappan

    2012-10-02

    Oct 2, 2012 ... optically through fiber optics. (McDougall et al., 1994). Prophylatic treatment of furanone against Vibrio harveyi in the experimental conditions of larviculture of Penaeus monodon. 25 L aquarium glass tanks were washed with 1% KMN04 solution. The tanks were filled with 10 L of 20 ppt seawater (Tank 1).

  12. Quorum Sensing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to the host organism and are added as dietary supplements in health-promoting food. Cultures of Bacillus subtilis, for example, have been used to treat dysentery ... worker that found a poor site will wait longer than one that encountered a good site. New ants visiting the site make their own assessment and return. They will ...

  13. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to N-hexanoyl-DL-homoserine-lactone, a bacterial quorum sensing molecule produced in the rhizosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    von Rad, U.; Klein, I.; Dobrev, Petre; Kottová, Jana; Zažímalová, Eva; Fekete, A.; Hartmann, A.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Durner, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 229, č. 1 (2008), s. 73-85 ISSN 0032-0935 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Quorum sensing * Plant defense * Plant hormones * Rhizosphere Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.088, year: 2008

  14. Synthetic furanones inhibit quorum-sensing and enhance bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.; Hentzer, Morten

    2004-01-01

    lung infection by targeting bacterial quorum-sensing without directly killing bacteria or inhibiting their growth. Methods: Study I. Mice with Escherichia coli MT102 [luxR-PluxI-gfp(ASV)] lung infection were injected intravenously with N-acyl homoserine lactones with or without furanones to test...

  15. The effect of burdock leaf fraction on adhesion, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Z; Wang, H; Tang, Y; Chen, X

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a fraction of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) leaf on the initial adhesion, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antibiofilm activity of the burdock leaf fraction was studied by the method of crystal violet staining. When the concentration of the burdock leaf fraction was 2·0 mg ml -1 , the inhibition rates on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa were 100%. The burdock leaf fraction was found to inhibit the formation of biofilm by reducing bacterial surface hydrophobicity, decreasing bacterial aggregation ability and inhibiting swarming motility. Interestingly, the burdock leaf fraction inhibited the secretion of quorum-sensing (QS) signalling molecule 3-oxo-C12-HSL and interfered quorum sensing. Moreover, the QS-regulated pyocyanin and elastase were also inhibited. Chemical composition analysis by UPLC-MS showed 11 active compounds in the burdock leaf fraction. The burdock leaf fraction significantly inhibited the formation of biofilm and quorum sensing, as well as significantly decreased the content of virulence factors. This study introduces a natural and effective bacterial biofilm inhibitor, which could also significantly decrease the content of virulence factors and the drug resistance of P. aeruginosa. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in a Gram Positive Pathogen by Linear Imprinted Copolymers with anti-Infective Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motib, Anfal; Guerreiro, Antonio; Al-Bayati, Firas; Piletska, Elena; Manzoor, Irfan; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kadam, Anagha; Kuipers, Oscar; Hiller, Luisa; Cowen, Todd; Piletsky, Sergey; Andrew, Peter; Yesilkaya, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe the development, characterization and biological testing of a new type of linear molecularly imprinted polymer (LMIP) designed to act as anti-infective by blocking the quorum sensing (QS) mechanism and so preventing virulence of the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. The LMIP is

  17. Genomic Insights of Pectobacterium carotovorum Strain M022 Quorum-Sensing Activity through Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Tan, Wen-Si

    2015-02-12

    Pectobacterium carotovorum is known to cause serious damage to various major crops worldwide. Here, we report the draft genome of Pectobacterium carotovorum strain M022, a freshwater isolate from a Malaysian waterfall, which has been reported as a plant pathogen and is able to communicate with N-acylhomoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing. Copyright © 2015 Chan and Tan.

  18. Evolution of Microbial Quorum Sensing to Human Global Quorum Sensing: An Insight into How Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Might Be Linked to the Global Metabolic Disease Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2016-06-15

    The first anaerobic organism extracted energy for survival and reproduction from its source of nutrients, with the genetic means to ensure protection of its individual genome but also its species survival. While it had a means to communicate with its community via simple secreted molecules ("quorum sensing"), the eventual shift to an aerobic environment led to multi-cellular metazoan organisms, with evolutionary-selected genes to form extracellular matrices, stem cells, stem cell niches, and a family of gap junction or "connexin" genes. These germinal and somatic stem cells responded to extracellular signals that triggered intra-cellular signaling to regulate specific genes out of the total genome. These extra-cellular induced intra-cellular signals also modulated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in order to regulate the new cellular functions of symmetrical and asymmetrical cell division, cell differentiation, modes of cell death, and senescence. Within the hierarchical and cybernetic concepts, differentiated by neurons organized in the brain of the Homo sapiens, the conscious mind led to language, abstract ideas, technology, myth-making, scientific reasoning, and moral decision-making, i.e., the creation of culture. Over thousands of years, this has created the current collision between biological and cultural evolution, leading to the global "metabolic disease" crisis.

  19. Quorum sensing inhibitory potential and in silico molecular docking of flavonoids and novel terpenoids from Senegalia nigrescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodede, Olusola; Shaik, Shakira; Chenia, Hafizah; Singh, Parvesh; Moodley, Roshila

    2018-04-24

    Senegalia nigrescens is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of dysentery and convulsions. This study was aimed at identifying bioactive compounds from S. nigrescens and carrying out in vitro and in silico anti-quorum sensing studies on the compounds. Extracts of S. nigrescens were chromatographed repeatedly. The isolated compounds were characterised using NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The anti-quorum sensing potential of S. nigrescens crude extracts and selected phytochemicals was quantified using Chromobacterium violaceum quorum sensing-controlled violacein inhibition assays. Qualitative modulation of quorum sensing activity and signal synthesis was investigated using agar diffusion double ring assays and C. violaceum. Molecular docking was conducted to explore the binding conformations of ent-kaurene diterpenes and flavonoids into the binding sites of quorum sensing regulator proteins, CviR and CviR'. Phytochemical investigation of S. nigrescens resulted in the isolation of a new ent-kaurene diterpenoid (ent-kaur-15-en-18,20-diol) alongside ent-kaur-15-en-18-ol, being isolated for the first time from a plant species. Other compounds isolated included 30-hydroxylup-20(29)-en-3β-ol, 3β-hydroxy-20(29)-en-lupan-30-al, lupeol, stigmasterol, a long chain alcohol (tetracosan-1-ol) and three flavonoids (melanoxetin, quercetin and quercetin-3-O-methyl ether). Structures of isolated compounds were elucidated using different spectroscopic techniques including 1D and 2D NMR. Inhibition of violacein production was concentration-dependent, with 56.52% inhibition being obtained with 200 µg of quercetin-3-O-methyl ether, while 53.38% inhibition was obtained with 600 µg of quercetin. Agar diffusion double ring assays indicated CviI synthase/CviR receptor modulation by S. nigrescens phytochemicals, suggesting that quorum signal synthesis was down-regulated and/or targeting binding of signal to the receptor. The computed binding energy data suggested

  20. The involvement of bacterial quorum sensing in the spoilage of refrigerated Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Suqin; Wu, Haohao; Zeng, Mingyong; Liu, Zunying; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-02

    Quorum-sensing signals in refrigerated shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) undergoing spoilage were examined using bioreporter assays, thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the results revealed the presence of three types of autoinducers including acetylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) (i.e., N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone, N-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone and N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone), autoinducer-2, and cyclic dipeptides (i.e., cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu), cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe)). Autoinducer-2, rather than any AHL, was detected in extracts from pure cultures of the specific spoilage organisms (SSO), i.e., Shewanella putrefaciens (SS01) and Shewanella baltica (SA02). As for the cyclic peptides, only SA02 was determined to produce cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu). According to the transcription levels of LuxR (the master quorum-sensing regulator) in the SSO in response to exogenous autoinducers, the SSO could sense AHLs and cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu), rather than autoinducer-2, cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe). In accordance with the results of LuxR expression, the production of biofilm matrixes and extracellular proteases in the SSO was regulated by exogenous AHLs and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu), rather than 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (the autoinducer-2 precursor), cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe). Exogenous N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu) increased the growth rates and population percentages of the SSO in shrimp samples under refrigerated storage, and interestingly, exogenous 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione also increased the population percentages of the SSO in vivo by inhibiting the growth of the competing bacteria. However, according to the levels of TVB-N and the volatile organic components in the shrimp samples, exogenous 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione did not accelerate the shrimp spoilage process as N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu) did. In summary, our results suggest that

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel acyclic and cyclic glyoxamide based derivatives as bacterial quorum sensing and biofilm inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizalapur, Shashidhar; Kimyon, Onder; Yee, Eugene; Bhadbhade, Mohan M; Manefield, Mike; Willcox, Mark; Black, David StC; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-07-21

    Bacteria regulate the expression of various virulence factors and processes such as biofilm formation through a chemically-mediated communication mechanism called quorum sensing. Bacterial biofilms contribute to antimicrobial resistance as they can protect bacteria embedded in their matrix from the effects of antibiotics. Thus, developing novel quorum sensing inhibitors, which can inhibit biofilm formation, is a viable strategy to combat antimicrobial resistance. We report herein the synthesis of novel acyclic and cyclic glyoxamide derivatives via ring-opening reactions of N-acylisatins. These compounds were evaluated for their quorum sensing inhibition activity against P. aeruginosa MH602 and E. coli MT102. Compounds 20, 21 and 30 displayed the greatest quorum sensing inhibition activity against P. aeruginosa MH602, with 71.5%, 71.5%, and 74% inhibition, respectively, at 250 μM. Compounds 18, 20 and 21 exhibited the greatest QSI activity against E. coli MT102, with 71.5%, 72.1% and 73.5% quorum sensing inhibition activity, respectively. In addition, the biofilm inhibition activity was also investigated against P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 250 μM. The glyoxamide compounds 16, 18 and 19 exhibited 71.2%, 66.9%, and 66.5% inhibition of P. aeruginosa biofilms, respectively; whereas compounds 12, 20, and 22 showed the greatest inhibitory activity against E. coli biofilms with 87.9%, 90.8% and 89.5%, respectively. Finally, the determination of the in vitro toxicity against human MRC-5 lung fibroblast cells revealed that these novel glyoxamide compounds are non-toxic to human cells.

  2. Recent Advances in the Study of Marine Microbial Biofilm: From the Involvement of Quorum Sensing in Its Production up to Biotechnological Application of the Polysaccharide Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Di Donato

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review will explore the most relevant findings on marine microbial biofilm, with particular attention towards its polysaccharide fraction, namely exopolysaccharide (EPS. EPSs of microbial origin are ubiquitous in nature, possess unique properties and can be isolated from the bacteria living in a variety of habitats, including fresh water or marine environments, extreme environments or different soil ecosystems. These biopolymers have many application in the field of biotechnology. Several studies showed that the biofilm formation is closely related to quorum sensing (QS systems, which is a mechanism relying on the production of small molecules defined as “autoinducers” that bacteria release in the surrounding environment where they accumulate. In this review, the involvement of microbial chemical communication, by QS mechanism, in the formation of marine biofilm will also be discussed.

  3. Quorum-Sensing Blockade As A Strategy for Enhancing Host Defences Against Bacterial Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2007-01-01

    is likely to increase the susceptibility of the infecting organism to host defences and its clearance from the host. The use of QS signal blockers to attenuate bacterial pathogenicity, rather than bacterial growth, is therefore highly attractive, particularly with respect to the emergence of multi......Conventional antibiotics target the growth and the basal life processes of bacteria leading to growth arrest and cell death. The selective force that is inherently linked to this mode of action eventually selects out antibiotic-resistant variants. The most obvious alternative to antibiotic......-mediated killing or growth inhibition would be to attenuate the bacteria with respect to pathogenicity. The realization that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a number of other pathogens, controls much of their virulence arsenal by means of extracellular signal molecules in a process denoted quorum sensing (QS) gave...

  4. Regulating the quorum sensing signalling circuit to control bacterial virulence: in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafyllidis, I G

    2011-03-01

    Pathogenic bacteria employ a communication mechanism, known as quorum sensing (QS), to obtain information about their cell density and to synchronise their behaviour. Most bacteria species use QS signalling circuits to optimise the secretion of virulence factors that damage their host. Recently, QS has been recognised as a target for antimicrobial drugs that can control bacterial infections. Here the QS process is modelled as a state transition graph with transitions depending on the diffusion and local concentration of the QS molecules (autoinducers). Based on this model a simulation tool has been developed to simulate the QS process in both open and confined spaces. Using this simulation tool a number of numerical experiments has been carried out with various strategies of QS circuit regulation. The results of these experiments showed that regulation of the QS signalling circuit can lead to significantly reduced bacterial virulence.

  5. Dynamics and Mechanism of A Quorum Sensing Network Regulated by Small RNAs in Vibrio Harveyi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jianwei

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) has attracted much interests and it is an important process of cell communication. Recently, Bassler et al. studied the phenomena of QS regulated by small RNAs and the experimental data showed that small RNAs played important role in the QS of Vibrio harveyi and it can permit the fine-tuning of gene regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. According to Michaelis-Menten kinetics and mass action law in this paper, we construct a mathematical model to investigate the mechanism induced QS by coexist of small RNA and signal molecular (AI) and show that there are periodic oscillation when the time delay and Hill coefficient exceed a critical value and the periodic oscillation produces the change of concentration and induces QS. These results are fit to the experimental results. In the meanwhile, we also get some theoretical value of Hopf Bifurcation on time decay. In addition, we also find this network is robust against noise. (general)

  6. Dynamics and Mechanism of A Quorum Sensing Network Regulated by Small RNAs in Vibrio Harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian-Wei

    2011-03-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) has attracted much interests and it is an important process of cell communication. Recently, Bassler et al. studied the phenomena of QS regulated by small RNAs and the experimental data showed that small RNAs played important role in the QS of Vibrio harveyi and it can permit the fine-tuning of gene regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. According to Michaelis—Menten kinetics and mass action law in this paper, we construct a mathematical model to investigate the mechanism induced QS by coexist of small RNA and signal molecular (AI) and show that there are periodic oscillation when the time delay and Hill coefficient exceed a critical value and the periodic oscillation produces the change of concentration and induces QS. These results are fit to the experimental results. In the meanwhile, we also get some theoretical value of Hopf Bifurcation on time deday. In addition, we also find this network is robust against noise.

  7. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in Multidrug Resistant Clinical Isolate Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Proteobacteria communicate via production followed by response of quorum sensing molecules, namely, N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. These molecules consist of a lactone moiety with N-acyl side chain with various chain lengths and degrees of saturation at C-3 position. AHL-dependent QS is often associated with regulation of diverse bacterial phenotypes including the expression of virulence factors. With the use of biosensor and high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, the AHL production of clinical isolate A. baumannii 4KT was studied. Production of short chain AHL, namely, N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL and N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL, was detected.

  8. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A S; Joergensen, B; Bjarnsholt, T

    2010-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is widely used for debridement of chronic infected wounds; however, for wounds harbouring specific bacteria limited effect or failure of the treatment has been described. Here we studied the survival of Lucilia sericata maggots encountering Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa DeltalasR rhlR (DeltaRR) QS-deficient mutant in different concentrations. Maggots were killed...... for the presence of QS inhibitors; only high doses of ES showed inhibition of QS in P. aeruginosa. Thus P. aeruginosa was shown to be toxic to L. sericata maggots. This, coupled to the preferential feeding by the maggots and reduced ingestion of P. aeruginosa, could explain MDT failure in wounds colonized by P...

  9. Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon- Natural Food Sources with Anti-Quorum Sensing Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li Ying; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Various parts of Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon are used as food sources by Malaysians. The purpose of this study is to examine the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) properties of P. nigrum, P. betle and G. gnemon extracts. The hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of these plants were assessed in bioassays involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, Escherichia coli [pSB401], E. coli [pSB1075] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. It was found that the extracts of these three plants have anti-QS ability. Interestingly, the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts from P. betle showed the most potent anti-QS activity as judged by the bioassays. Since there is a variety of plants that serve as food sources in Malaysia that have yet to be tested for anti-QS activity, future work should focus on identification of these plants and isolation of the anti-QS compounds. PMID:23519352

  10. Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon- Natural Food Sourcewith Anti-Quorum Sensing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ying Tan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Various parts of Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon are used as food sources by Malaysians. The purpose of this study is to examine the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS properties of P. nigrum, P. betle and G. gnemon extracts. The hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of these plants were assessed in bioassays involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, Escherichia coli [pSB401], E. coli [pSB1075] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. It was found that the extracts of these three plants have anti-QS ability. Interestingly, the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts from P. betle showed the most potent anti-QS activity as judged by the bioassays. Since there is a variety of plants that serve as food sources in Malaysia that have yet to be tested for anti-QS activity, future work should focus on identification of these plants and isolation of the anti-QS compounds.

  11. Quorum-sensing-directed protein expression in Serratia proteamaculans B5a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Allan Beck; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo

    2003-01-01

    N-Acyl-L-homoserine-lactone-producing Serratia species are frequently encountered in spoiling foods of vegetable and protein origin. The role of quorum sensing in the food spoiling properties of these bacteria is currently being investigated. A set of luxR luxI homologous genes encoding a putative...... quorum sensor was identified in the N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL)-producing Serratia proteamaculans strain B5a. The 3-oxo-C6-HSL synthase SprI showed 79% similarity with Esal from Pantoea stewartii and the putative regulatory protein SprR was 86% similar to the SpnR of Serratia...

  12. Chitinolytic activity in Chromobacterium violaceum: substrate analysis and regulation by quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, L S; Winson, M K; Thompson, J M; Haran, S; Bycroft, B W; Chet, I; Williams, P; Stewart, G S

    1998-09-01

    Quorum sensing control mediated by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules has been established as a key feature of the regulation of exoenzyme production in many gram-negative bacteria. In Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 31532 a number of phenotypic characteristics, including production of the purple pigment violacein, hydrogen cyanide, antibiotics, and exoproteases are known to be regulated by the endogenous AHL N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (HHL). In this study we show that C. violaceum produces a set of chitinolytic enzymes whose production is regulated by HHL. The chitinolytic activity was induced in strains grown in the presence of chitin as the sole carbon source and quantitated in the secreted proteins by using p-nitrophenol analogs of disaccharide, trisaccharide, and tetrasaccharide oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine. By using 4-methylumbelliferyl analogs of the same oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine as substrates for proteins separated and renatured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, at least six enzymes were detected: a chitobiase with high specificity to a dimeric substrate of 87 kDa, two N-acetylglucosaminidases with apparent molecular masses of 162 and 133 kDa, two endochitinases of 108 and 67 kDa, and a chitobiosidase of 56 kDa. In addition, two unidentified bands of >205 kDa were found where a tetrameric chitin derivative was used as a substrate. A pleiotropic mini-Tn5 mutant of C. violaceum (CV026) that is defective in HHL production and other quorum-sensing-regulated factors was also found to be completely deficient in chitinolytic activity. Growth of this mutant on minimal medium with chitin supplemented with culture supernatant from the C. violaceum wild-type strain or 10 microM synthetic HHL restored chitinase production to the level shown by the parental strain. These results constitute the most complete evidence so far for regulation of chitinolytic activity by AHL signaling in a gram-negative bacterium.

  13. Terpenoids from Platostoma rotundifolium (Briq.) A. J. Paton Alter the Expression of Quorum Sensing-Related Virulence Factors and the Formation of Biofilm in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Ngezahayo, Jérémie; Pottier, Laurent; Oliveira Ribeiro, Sofia; Souard, Florence; Hari, Léonard; Stévigny, Caroline; El Jaziri, Mondher; Duez, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Platostoma rotundifolium (Briq.) A. J. Paton aerial parts are widely used in Burundi traditional medicine to treat infectious diseases. In order to investigate their probable antibacterial activities, crude extracts from P. rotundifolium were assessed for their bactericidal and anti-virulence properties against an opportunistic bacterial model, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Whereas none of the tested extracts exert bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal proprieties, the ethyl acetate and dichloromethane extracts exhibit anti-virulence properties against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 characterized by an alteration in quorum sensing gene expression and biofilm formation without affecting bacterial viability. Bioguided fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract led to the isolation of major anti-virulence compounds that were identified from nuclear magnetic resonance and high-resolution molecular spectroscopy spectra as cassipourol, β-sitosterol and α-amyrin. Globally, cassipourol and β-sitosterol inhibit quorum sensing-regulated and -regulatory genes expression in las and rhl systems without affecting the global regulators gacA and vfr, whereas α-amyrin had no effect on the expression of these genes. These terpenoids disrupt the formation of biofilms at concentrations down to 12.5, 50 and 50 µM for cassipourol, β-sitosterol and α-amyrin, respectively. Moreover, these terpenoids reduce the production of total exopolysaccharides and promote flagella-dependent motilities (swimming and swarming). The isolated terpenoids exert a wide range of inhibition processes, suggesting a complex mechanism of action targeting P. aeruginosa virulence mechanisms which support the wide anti-infectious use of this plant species in traditional Burundian medicine. PMID:28613253

  14. Inter-kingdom Signaling by the Legionella Quorum Sensing Molecule LAI-1 Modulates Cell Migration through an IQGAP1-Cdc42-ARHGEF9-Dependent Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Simon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Small molecule signaling promotes the communication between bacteria as well as between bacteria and eukaryotes. The opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila employs LAI-1 (3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one for bacterial cell-cell communication. LAI-1 is produced and detected by the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing system, which regulates a variety of processes including natural competence for DNA uptake and pathogen-host cell interactions. In this study, we analyze the role of LAI-1 in inter-kingdom signaling. L. pneumophila lacking the autoinducer synthase LqsA no longer impeded the migration of infected cells, and the defect was complemented by plasmid-borne lqsA. Synthetic LAI-1 dose-dependently inhibited cell migration, without affecting bacterial uptake or cytotoxicity. The forward migration index but not the velocity of LAI-1-treated cells was reduced, and the cell cytoskeleton appeared destabilized. LAI-1-dependent inhibition of cell migration involved the scaffold protein IQGAP1, the small GTPase Cdc42 as well as the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF9, but not other modulators of Cdc42, or RhoA, Rac1 or Ran GTPase. Upon treatment with LAI-1, Cdc42 was inactivated and IQGAP1 redistributed to the cell cortex regardless of whether Cdc42 was present or not. Furthermore, LAI-1 reversed the inhibition of cell migration by L. pneumophila, suggesting that the compound and the bacteria antagonistically target host signaling pathway(s. Collectively, the results indicate that the L. pneumophila quorum sensing compound LAI-1 modulates migration of eukaryotic cells through a signaling pathway involving IQGAP1, Cdc42 and ARHGEF9.

  15. Periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis y su relación con la expresión de quorum sensing Periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and its relation to quorum sensing expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Díaz Caballero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Los mecanismos de señalización bacteriana desempeñan un papel fundamental en el establecimiento y progresión de la enfermedad periodontal. Dadas estas circunstancias es crucial profundizar en el entendimiento de estos mecanismos para intentar proveer estrategias terapéuticas novedosas. El presente artículo de revisión, de carácter narrativo, tiene como objetivo conducir un análisis crítico de la evidencia disponible sobre la influencia de Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg y expresión de quorum sensing (Qs en enfermedad periodontal. Se realizó una búsqueda a través de bases de datos como Ovid (MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Hinari. El conocimiento actual de estos mecanismos ofrece la posibilidad de desarrollar nuevos y profundos estudios (teóricos y experimentales sobre la expresión del QS en pacientes con enfermedad periodontal y permitirá un novedoso campo de investigación con el que no se cuenta en la actualidad. Desde su descubrimiento, el QS se vislumbra como un espacio de investigación valioso en el cual se debe insistir de manera permanente. La anterior evidencia permite concluir que a través de la regulación de la expresión de determinados genes en bacterias como la PG, se puede efectuar la inhibición de la formación de las biopelículas que tiene efectos directos e indirectos sobre el desarrollo de la enfermedad periodontal.The bacterial signaling mechanisms play a key role in the establishment and progression of periodontal disease. Due to these circumstances it is crucial to deepen in the understanding of these mechanisms to try to provide novel therapeutic strategies. The objective of present narrative literature review was to make a critical analyze of the available evidence on the influence of Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG and the quorum sensing expression in periodontal disease. Using the Ovid (MEDLINE ScienceDirect, Hinari database we made a search. The current knowledge of these mechanisms offers the possibility of

  16. Plant phenolic acids affect the virulence of Pectobacterium aroidearum and P. carotovorum ssp. brasiliense via quorum sensing regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yariv, Shaked; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have reported effects of the plant phenolic acids cinnamic acid (CA) and salicylic acid (SA) on the virulence of soft rot enterobacteria. However, the mechanisms involved in these processes are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated whether CA and SA interfere with the quorum sensing (QS) system of two Pectobacterium species, P. aroidearum and P. carotovorum ssp. brasiliense, which are known to produce N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) QS signals. Our results clearly indicate that both phenolic compounds affect the QS machinery of the two species, consequently altering the expression of bacterial virulence factors. Although, in control treatments, the expression of QS-related genes increased over time, the exposure of bacteria to non-lethal concentrations of CA or SA inhibited the expression of QS genes, including expI, expR, PC1_1442 (luxR transcriptional regulator) and luxS (a component of the AI-2 system). Other virulence genes known to be regulated by the QS system, such as pecS, pel, peh and yheO, were also down-regulated relative to the control. In agreement with the low levels of expression of expI and expR, CA and SA also reduced the level of the AHL signal. The effects of CA and SA on AHL signalling were confirmed in compensation assays, in which exogenous application of N-(β-ketocaproyl)-l-homoserine lactone (eAHL) led to the recovery of the reduction in virulence caused by the two phenolic acids. Collectively, the results of gene expression studies, bioluminescence assays, virulence assays and compensation assays with eAHL clearly support a mechanism by which CA and SA interfere with Pectobacterium virulence via the QS machinery. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  17. Structural and Molecular Mechanism of CdpR Involved in Quorum-Sensing and Bacterial Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingru Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although quorum-sensing (QS systems are important regulators of virulence gene expression in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, their detailed regulatory mechanisms have not been fully characterized. Here, we show that deletion of PA2588 resulted in increased production of pyocyanin and biofilm, as well as enhanced pathogenicity in a mouse model. To gain insights into the function of PA2588, we performed a ChIP-seq assay and identified 28 targets of PA2588, including the intergenic region between PA2588 and pqsH, which encodes the key synthase of Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS. Though the C-terminal domain was similar to DNA-binding regions of other AraC family members, structural studies revealed that PA2588 has a novel fold at the N-terminal region (NTR, and its C-terminal HTH (helix-turn-helix domain is also unique in DNA recognition. We also demonstrated that the adaptor protein ClpS, an essential regulator of ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, directly interacted with PA2588 before delivering CdpR to ClpAP for degradation. We named PA2588 as CdpR (ClpAP-degradation and pathogenicity Regulator. Moreover, deletion of clpP or clpS/clpA promotes bacterial survival in a mouse model of acute pneumonia infection. Taken together, this study uncovered that CdpR is an important QS regulator, which can interact with the ClpAS-P system to regulate the expression of virulence factors and pathogenicity.

  18. Revealing strategies of quorum sensing in Azospirillum brasilense strains Ab-V5 and Ab-V6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Josiane; Abrantes, Julia Laura Fernandes; Del Cerro, Pablo; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Ollero, Francisco Javier; Megías, Manuel; Hungria, Mariangela

    2018-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is an important plant-growth promoting bacterium (PGPB) that requires several critical steps for root colonization, including biofilm and exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis and cell motility. In several bacteria these mechanisms are mediated by quorum sensing (QS) systems that regulate the expression of specific genes mediated by the autoinducers N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). We investigated QS mechanisms in strains Ab-V5 and Ab-V6 of A. brasilense, which are broadly used in commercial inoculants in Brazil. Neither of these strains carries a luxI gene, but there are several luxR solos that might perceive AHL molecules. By adding external AHLs we verified that biofilm and EPS production and cell motility (swimming and swarming) were regulated via QS in Ab-V5, but not in Ab-V6. Differences were observed not only between strains, but also in the specificity of LuxR-type receptors to AHL molecules. However, Ab-V6 was outstanding in indole acetic acid (IAA) synthesis and this molecule might mimic AHL signals. We also applied the quorum quenching (QQ) strategy, obtaining transconjugants of Ab-V5 and Ab-V6 carrying a plasmid with acyl-homoserine lactonase. When maize (Zea mays L.) was inoculated with the wild-type and transconjugant strains, plant growth was decreased with the transconjugant of Ab-V5-confirming the importance of an AHL-mediated QS system-but did not affect plant growth promotion by Ab-V6.

  19. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factor Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by Ayurveda Spice Clove (Syzygium Aromaticum Bud Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing controls the virulence determinants in most proteobacteria. In this work, the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of an Ayurveda spice, namely clove (Syzygium aromaticum, shown anti-quorum sensing activity. Hexane and methanol extracts of clove inhibited the response of C. violaceum CV026 to exogenously supplied N‑hexanoylhomoserine lactone, in turn preventing violacein production. Chloroform and methanol extracts of clove significantly reduced bioluminescence production by E. coli [pSB1075] grown in the presence of N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. We demonstrated that clove extract inhibited quorum sensing-regulated phenotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, including expression of lecA::lux (by hexane extract, swarming (maximum inhibition by methanol extract, pyocyanin (maximum inhibition by hexane extract. This study shows that the presence of natural compounds that exhibit anti-quorum sensing activity in the clove extracts may be useful as the lead of anti-infective drugs.

  20. Leaf Extracts of Mangifera indica L. Inhibit Quorum Sensing – Regulated Production of Virulence Factors and Biofilm in Test Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a global gene regulatory mechanism in bacteria for various traits including virulence factors. Disabling QS system with anti-infective agent is considered as a potential strategy to prevent bacterial infection. Mangifera indica L. (mango has been shown to possess various biological activities including anti-QS. This study investigates the efficacy of leaf extracts on QS-regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram negative pathogens. Mango leaf (ML extract was tested for QS inhibition and QS-regulated virulence factors using various indicator strains. It was further correlated with the biofilm inhibition and confirmed by electron microscopy. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. In vitro evaluation of anti-QS activity of ML extracts against Chromobacterium violaceum revealed promising dose-dependent interference in violacein production, by methanol extract. QS inhibitory activity is also demonstrated by reduction in elastase (76%, total protease (56%, pyocyanin (89%, chitinase (55%, exopolysaccharide production (58% and swarming motility (74% in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 800 μg/ml concentration. Biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was reduced considerably (36–82% over control. The inhibition of biofilm was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, ML extracts significantly reduced mortality of Caenorhabditis elegans pre-infected with PAO1 at the tested concentration. Phytochemical analysis of active extracts revealed very high content of phenolics in methanol extract and a total of 14 compounds were detected by GC-MS and UPLC. These findings suggest that phytochemicals from the ML could provide bioactive anti-infective and needs further investigation to isolate and uncover their therapeutic efficacy.

  1. Quorum sensing negatively regulates multinucleate cell formation during intracellular growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei in macrophage-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Horton

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative environmental bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis, a potentially fatal, acute or chronic disease endemic in the tropics. Acyl homoserine lactone (AHL-mediated quorum sensing and signalling have been associated with virulence and biofilm formation in numerous bacterial pathogens. In the canonical acyl-homoserine lactone signalling paradigm, AHLs are detected by a response regulator. B. pseudomallei encodes three AHL synthases, encoded by bpsI1, bpsI2 and bpsI3, and five regulator genes. In this study, we mutated the B. pseudomallei AHL synthases individually and in double and triple combination. Five AHLs were detected and quantified by tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The major AHLs produced were N-octanoylhomoserine lactone and N-(3-hydroxy-decanoylhomoserine lactone, the expression of which depended on bpsI1 and bpsI2, respectively. B. pseudomallei infection of macrophage cells causes cell fusion, leading to multinucleated cells (3 or more nuclei per cell. A triple mutant defective in production of all three AHL synthases was associated with a striking phenotype of massively enhanced host cellular fusion in macrophages. However, neither abrogation of host cell fusion, achieved by mutation of bimA or hcp1, nor enhancement of fusion altered intracellular replication of B. pseudomallei. Furthermore, when tested in murine models of acute melioidosis the AHL synthase mutants were not attenuated for virulence. Collectively, this study identifies important new aspects of the genetic basis of AHL synthesis in B. pseudomallei and the roles of these AHLs in systemic infection and in cell fusion in macrophages for this important human pathogen.

  2. Leaf Extracts of Mangifera indica L. Inhibit Quorum Sensing – Regulated Production of Virulence Factors and Biofilm in Test Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Fohad M.; Ahmad, Iqbal; Al-thubiani, Abdullah S.; Abulreesh, Hussein H.; AlHazza, Ibrahim M.; Aqil, Farrukh

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a global gene regulatory mechanism in bacteria for various traits including virulence factors. Disabling QS system with anti-infective agent is considered as a potential strategy to prevent bacterial infection. Mangifera indica L. (mango) has been shown to possess various biological activities including anti-QS. This study investigates the efficacy of leaf extracts on QS-regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram negative pathogens. Mango leaf (ML) extract was tested for QS inhibition and QS-regulated virulence factors using various indicator strains. It was further correlated with the biofilm inhibition and confirmed by electron microscopy. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. In vitro evaluation of anti-QS activity of ML extracts against Chromobacterium violaceum revealed promising dose-dependent interference in violacein production, by methanol extract. QS inhibitory activity is also demonstrated by reduction in elastase (76%), total protease (56%), pyocyanin (89%), chitinase (55%), exopolysaccharide production (58%) and swarming motility (74%) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 800 μg/ml concentration. Biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was reduced considerably (36–82%) over control. The inhibition of biofilm was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, ML extracts significantly reduced mortality of Caenorhabditis elegans pre-infected with PAO1 at the tested concentration. Phytochemical analysis of active extracts revealed very high content of phenolics in methanol extract and a total of 14 compounds were detected by GC-MS and UPLC. These findings suggest that phytochemicals from the ML could provide bioactive anti-infective and needs further investigation to isolate and uncover their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28484444

  3. Honaucins A–C, Potent Inhibitors of Eukaryotic Inflammation and Bacterial Quorum Sensing: Synthetic Derivatives and Structure-Activity Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hyukjae; Mascuch, Samantha J.; Villa, Francisco A.; Byrum, Tara; Teasdale, Margaret E.; Smith, Jennifer E.; Preskitt, Linda B.; Rowley, David C.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Honaucins A–C were isolated from the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya crossbyana which was found overgrowing corals on the Hawaiian coast. Honaucin A consists of (S)-3-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone and 4-chlorocrotonic acid which are connected via an ester linkage. Honaucin A and its two natural analogs exhibit potent inhibition of bioluminescence, a quorum sensing-dependent phenotype, in Vibrio harveyi BB120 as well as of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitric oxide production in the murine macrophage ce...

  4. The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and reduces bacterial biofilm formation at sub-lethal concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A Burt

    Full Text Available The formation of biofilm by bacteria confers resistance to biocides and presents problems in medical and veterinary clinical settings. Here we report the effect of carvacrol, one of the major antimicrobial components of oregano oil, on the formation of biofilms and its activity on existing biofilms. Assays were carried out in polystyrene microplates to observe (a the effect of 0-0.8 mM carvacrol on the formation of biofilms by selected bacterial pathogens over 24 h and (b the effect of 0-8 mM carvacrol on the stability of pre-formed biofilms. Carvacrol was able to inhibit the formation of biofilms of Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium DT104, and Staphylococcus aureus 0074, while it showed no effect on formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (field isolate biofilms. This inhibitory effect of carvacrol was observed at sub-lethal concentrations (<0.5 mM where no effect was seen on total bacterial numbers, indicating that carvacrol's bactericidal effect was not causing the observed inhibition of biofilm formation. In contrast, carvacrol had (up to 8 mM very little or no activity against existing biofilms of the bacteria described, showing that formation of the biofilm also confers protection against this compound. Since quorum sensing is an essential part of biofilm formation, the effect of carvacrol on quorum sensing of C. violaceum was also studied. Sub-MIC concentrations of carvacrol reduced expression of cviI (a gene coding for the N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone synthase, production of violacein (pigmentation and chitinase activity (both regulated by quorum sensing at concentrations coinciding with carvacrol's inhibiting effect on biofilm formation. These results indicate that carvacrol's activity in inhibition of biofilm formation may be related to the disruption of quorum sensing.

  5. Beneficial effects of bacteria-plant communication based on quorum sensing molecules of the N-acyl homoserine lactone group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, Adam; Schenk, Sebastian T; Hartmann, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms play a crucial role in the proper performance and ecological fitness of bacterial populations. Many key physiological processes are regulated in a QS-dependent manner by auto-inducers, like the N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) in numerous Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, also the interaction between bacteria and eukaryotic hosts can be regulated by AHLs. Those mechanisms gained much attention, because of the positive effects of different AHL molecules on plants. This positive impact ranges from growth promotion to induced resistance and is quite contrasting to the rather negative effects observed in the interactions between bacterial AHL molecules and animals. Only very recently, we began to understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning plant responses to AHL molecules. In this review, we gathered the latest information in this research field. The first part gives an overview of the bacterial aspects of quorum sensing. Later we focus on the impact of AHLs on plant growth and AHL-priming, as one of the most understood phenomena in respect to the inter-kingdom interactions based on AHL-quorum sensing molecules. Finally, we discuss the potential benefits of the understanding of bacteria-plant interaction for the future agricultural applications.

  6. The quorum-sensing effect of aerobic granules on bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, and sludge granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ting-ting; Yu, Han-qing; Li, Xiao-yan

    2010-10-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) through signal chemical molecules is known to be essential to bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. In this study, the QS ability of aerobic granules--a special form of biofilms used for biological wastewater treatment--was investigated and compared with that of conventional activated sludge flocs. A novel sectional membrane bioreactor was used together with a flow-cell to evaluate the possible influence of signal chemicals produced by the source sludge on the growth mode of bacterial cells. The results demonstrate the apparent production of QS chemicals from granules and its impact on initial cell attachment and granule formation. When granules were used as the signal-producing biomass, the attached-growth mode was dominant for the free cells, and the biofilm formation rate in the flow-cell was about ten times faster than in cases which used activated sludge as the signal source biomass. In addition, the intracellular extract from mature granules significantly accelerated the sludge granulation process. It is argued that the production and expression of QS signal chemicals from granules and granule precursors might have induced the gene expression of bacteria in suspension for attached growth rather than suspended growth, leading to granule formation and its stable structure.

  7. Aspergillus Oxylipin Signaling and Quorum Sensing Pathways Depend on G Protein-Coupled Receptors

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    Katharyn J. Affeldt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxylipins regulate Aspergillus development and mycotoxin production and are also involved in Aspergillus quorum sensing mechanisms. Despite extensive knowledge of how these oxylipins are synthesized and what processes they regulate, nothing is known about how these signals are detected and transmitted by the fungus. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR have been speculated to be involved as they are known oxylipin receptors in mammals, and many putative GPCRs have been identified in the Aspergilli. Here, we present evidence that oxylipins stimulate a burst in cAMP in A. nidulans, and that loss of an A. nidulans GPCR, gprD, prevents this cAMP accumulation. A. flavus undergoes an oxylipin-mediated developmental shift when grown at different densities, and this regulates spore, sclerotial and aflatoxin production. A. flavus encodes two putative GprD homologs, GprC and GprD, and we demonstrate here that they are required to transition to a high-density development state, as well as to respond to spent medium of a high-density culture. The finding of GPCRs that regulate production of survival structures (sclerotia, inoculum (spores and aflatoxin holds promise for future development of anti-fungal therapeutics.

  8. Aspergillus oxylipin signaling and quorum sensing pathways depend on g protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affeldt, Katharyn J; Brodhagen, Marion; Keller, Nancy P

    2012-09-01

    Oxylipins regulate Aspergillus development and mycotoxin production and are also involved in Aspergillus quorum sensing mechanisms. Despite extensive knowledge of how these oxylipins are synthesized and what processes they regulate, nothing is known about how these signals are detected and transmitted by the fungus. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) have been speculated to be involved as they are known oxylipin receptors in mammals, and many putative GPCRs have been identified in the Aspergilli. Here, we present evidence that oxylipins stimulate a burst in cAMP in A. nidulans, and that loss of an A. nidulans GPCR, gprD, prevents this cAMP accumulation. A. flavus undergoes an oxylipin-mediated developmental shift when grown at different densities, and this regulates spore, sclerotial and aflatoxin production. A. flavus encodes two putative GprD homologs, GprC and GprD, and we demonstrate here that they are required to transition to a high-density development state, as well as to respond to spent medium of a high-density culture. The finding of GPCRs that regulate production of survival structures (sclerotia), inoculum (spores) and aflatoxin holds promise for future development of anti-fungal therapeutics.

  9. Chemical composition and disruption of quorum sensing signaling in geographically diverse United States propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savka, Michael A; Dailey, Lucas; Popova, Milena; Mihaylova, Ralitsa; Merritt, Benjamin; Masek, Marissa; Le, Phuong; Nor, Sharifah Radziah Mat; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hudson, André O; Bankova, Vassya

    2015-01-01

    Propolis or bee glue has been used for centuries for various purposes and is especially important in human health due to many of its biological and pharmacological properties. In this work we showed quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity of ten geographically distinct propolis samples from the United States using the acyl-homoserine lactone- (AHL-) dependent Chromobacterium violaceum strain CV026. Based on GC-MS chemical profiling the propolis samples can be classified into several groups that are as follows: (1) rich in cinnamic acid derivatives, (2) rich in flavonoids, and (3) rich in triterpenes. An in-depth analysis of the propolis from North Carolina led to the isolation and identification of a triterpenic acid that was recently isolated from Hondurian propolis (Central America) and ethyl ether of p-coumaric alcohol not previously identified in bee propolis. QSI activity was also observed in the second group US propolis samples which contained the flavonoid pinocembrin in addition to other flavonoid compounds. The discovery of compounds that are involved in QSI activity has the potential to facilitate studies that may lead to the development of antivirulence therapies that can be complementary and/or alternative treatments against antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens and/or emerging pathogens that have yet to be identified.

  10. Organ-level quorum sensing directs regeneration in hair stem cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Lei; Plikus, Maksim V.; Jiang, Ting Xin; Murray, Philip J.; Ramos, Raul; Guerrero-Juarez, Christian F.; Hughes, Michael W; Lee, Oscar K.; Shi, Songtao; Widelitz, Randall B.; Lander, Arthur D.; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Coordinated organ behavior is crucial for an effective response to environmental stimuli. By studying regeneration of hair follicles in response to patterned hair removal, we demonstrate that organ-level quorum sensing allows coordinated responses to skin injury. Removing hair at different densities leads to a regeneration of up to 5 times more neighboring, unplucked resting hairs, indicating activation of a collective decision-making process. Through data modeling, the range of the quorum signal was estimated to be on the order of 1 mm, greater than expected for a diffusible molecular cue. Molecular and genetic analysis uncovered a two-step mechanism, where release of CCL2 from injured hairs leads to recruitment of TNF-α secreting macrophages, which accumulate and signal to both plucked and unplucked follicles. By coupling immune response with regeneration, this mechanism allows skin to respond predictively to distress, disregarding mild injury, while meeting stronger injury with full-scale cooperative activation of stem cells. PMID:25860610

  11. Microbial interactions during sugar cane must fermentation for bioethanol production: does quorum sensing play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brexó, Ramon Peres; Sant'Ana, Anderson de Souza

    2018-03-01

    Microbial interactions represent important modulatory role in the dynamics of biological processes. During bioethanol production from sugar cane must, the presence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and wild yeasts is inevitable as they originate from the raw material and industrial environment. Increasing the concentration of ethanol, organic acids, and other extracellular metabolites in the fermentation must are revealed as wise strategies for survival by certain microorganisms. Despite this, the co-existence of LAB and yeasts in the fermentation vat and production of compounds such as organic acids and other extracellular metabolites result in reduction in the final yield of the bioethanol production process. In addition to the competition for nutrients, reduction of cellular viability of yeast strain responsible for fermentation, flocculation, biofilm formation, and changes in cell morphology are listed as important factors for reductions in productivity. Although these consequences are scientifically well established, there is still a gap about the physiological and molecular mechanisms governing these interactions. This review aims to discuss the potential occurrence of quorum sensing mechanisms between bacteria (mainly LAB) and yeasts and to highlight how the understanding of such mechanisms can result in very relevant and useful tools to benefit the biofuels industry and other sectors of biotechnology in which bacteria and yeast may co-exist in fermentation processes.

  12. Inhibition of Bacterial Quorum Sensing by Extracts from Aquatic Fungi: First Report from Marine Endophytes

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    Alberto J. Martín-Rodríguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In our search for quorum-sensing (QS disrupting molecules, 75 fungal isolates were recovered from reef organisms (endophytes, saline lakes and mangrove rhizosphere. Their QS inhibitory activity was evaluated in Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26. Four strains of endophytic fungi stood out for their potent activity at concentrations from 500 to 50 μg mL−1. The molecular characterization, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region sequences (ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 between the rRNA of 18S and 28S, identified these strains as belonging to four genera: Sarocladium (LAEE06, Fusarium (LAEE13, Epicoccum (LAEE14, and Khuskia (LAEE21. Interestingly, three came from coral species and two of them came from the same organism, the coral Diploria strigosa. Metabolic profiles obtained by Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS suggest that a combination of fungal secondary metabolites and fatty acids could be the responsible for the observed activities. The LC-HRMS analysis also revealed the presence of potentially new secondary metabolites. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of QS inhibition by marine endophytic fungi.

  13. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Padrig B.; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Elliott, Christopher T.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30–60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27242335

  14. Production, detection and application perspectives of quorum sensing autoinducer-2 in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Quan, Chunshan; Jin, Liming; Chen, Ming

    2018-02-20

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a major signal molecule in bacterial quorum sensing (QS) besides N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs or AI-1). AI-2 mediated QS pathways have been proved to regulate gene expression and physiological behaviors of bacteria in either intraspecies or interspecies communication. Recent reviews have mainly summarized AI-2 structures, AI-2 mediated QS pathways and the role of AI-2 in gene regulation, etc. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of AI-2 production, detection and applications. Firstly, intracellular AI-2 synthetic routes were outlined and environmental influences on AI-2 production were focused. Furthermore, recent advances in AI-2 detection and quantification were elucidated from an overall perspective. An in-depth understanding of mechanisms and features of various detection methods may facilitate development of new technologies aimed at signal molecule detection. Finally, utilization of AI-2 mediated QS in health improvement, water treatment and drug production indicate promising and extensive application perspectives of QS strategies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbial inhibition of oral epithelial wound recovery: potential role for quorum sensing molecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ryck, Tine; Vanlancker, Eline; Grootaert, Charlotte; Roman, Bart I; De Coen, Laurens M; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Stevens, Christian V; Bracke, Marc; Van de Wiele, Tom; Vanhoecke, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Awareness of the impact of microbiota in both health and disease is growing. Using a new in vitro oral mucosa co-culture model, we recently showed a clear inhibition of epithelial wound healing in the presence of an oral microbial community. In this paper, we have used the same model in combination with specific oral microbial species to obtain a better insight into the role of the oral microbiota in wound healing. Monocultures of Klebsiella oxytoca and Lactobacillus salivarius significantly inhibited wound healing with ~20%, whereas Streptococcus mitis and S. oralis enhanced the healing process with ~15% in 24 h. Yet, neither S. oralis or S. mitis were able to counteract the inhibitory effects from K. oxytoca on wound healing. Other tested microbial species had no effect on wound healing. Apart from this species-dependency, the inhibitory effect on wound healing depended on a microbial threshold concentration. Further mechanistic experiments with K. oxytoca excluded different microbial factors and hypothesized that quorum sensing molecules might play a role in the inter-kingdom signalling during wound healing. These results are important for the development of new strategies for the management of (infected) wounds and ulcerations.

  16. Dynamics of AHL mediated quorum sensing under flow and non-flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Andrea; Megerle, Judith A.; Kuttler, Christina; Müller, Johannes; Aguilar, Claudio; Eberl, Leo; Hense, Burkhard A.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2012-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the capability of microbes to communicate with each other by the aid of small molecules. Here we investigate the dynamics of QS-regulated gene expression induced by acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in Pseudomonas putida IsoF containing a green fluorescent protein-based AHL reporter. The fluorescence time course of individual colonies is monitored following the external addition of a defined AHL concentration to cells which had previously reached the QS-inactive state in AHL-free medium. Using a microfluidic setup the experiment is performed both under flow and non-flow conditions. We find that without supplying external AHL gene expression is induced without flow while flow suppresses the induction. Both without and with flow, at a low AHL concentration the fluorescence onset is significantly delayed while fluorescence starts to increase directly upon the addition of AHL at a high concentration. The differences between no flow and flow can be accounted for using a two-compartment model. This indicates AHL accumulation in a volume which is not affected by the flow. The experiments furthermore show significant cell-to-cell and colony-to-colony variability which is discussed in the context of a compartmentalized QS mechanism.

  17. Inhibition of bacterial quorum sensing by extracts from aquatic fungi: first report from marine endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Alberto J; Reyes, Fernando; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Yépez, Juan; León-Barrios, Milagros; Couttolenc, Alan; Espinoza, César; Trigos, Angel; Martín, Víctor S; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J

    2014-11-19

    In our search for quorum-sensing (QS) disrupting molecules, 75 fungal isolates were recovered from reef organisms (endophytes), saline lakes and mangrove rhizosphere. Their QS inhibitory activity was evaluated in Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26. Four strains of endophytic fungi stood out for their potent activity at concentrations from 500 to 50 μg mL-1. The molecular characterization, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences (ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) between the rRNA of 18S and 28S, identified these strains as belonging to four genera: Sarocladium (LAEE06), Fusarium (LAEE13), Epicoccum (LAEE14), and Khuskia (LAEE21). Interestingly, three came from coral species and two of them came from the same organism, the coral Diploria strigosa. Metabolic profiles obtained by Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS) suggest that a combination of fungal secondary metabolites and fatty acids could be the responsible for the observed activities. The LC-HRMS analysis also revealed the presence of potentially new secondary metabolites. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of QS inhibition by marine endophytic fungi.

  18. Quercetin Influences Quorum Sensing in Food Borne Bacteria: In-Vitro and In-Silico Evidence.

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    Venkadesaperumal Gopu

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS plays a vital role in regulating the virulence factor of many food borne pathogens, which causes severe public health risk. Therefore, interrupting the QS signaling pathway may be an attractive strategy to combat microbial infections. In the current study QS inhibitory activity of quercetin and its anti-biofilm property was assessed against food-borne pathogens using a bio-sensor strain. In addition in-silico techniques like molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies were applied to screen the quercetin's potentiality as QS inhibitor. Quercetin (80 μg/ml showed the significant reduction in QS-dependent phenotypes like violacein production, biofilm formation, exopolysaccharide (EPS production, motility and alginate production in a concentration-dependent manner. Synergistic activity of conventional antibiotics with quercetin enhanced the susceptibility of all tested pathogens. Furthermore, Molecular docking analysis revealed that quercetin binds more rigidly with LasR receptor protein than the signaling compound with docking score of -9.17 Kcal/mol. Molecular dynamics simulation predicted that QS inhibitory activity of quercetin occurs through the conformational changes between the receptor and quercetin complex. Above findings suggest that quercetin can act as a competitive inhibitor for signaling compound towards LasR receptor pathway and can serve as a novel QS-based antibacterial/anti-biofilm drug to manage food-borne pathogens.

  19. Bioactive proteins from Solanaceae as quorum sensing inhibitors against virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Tamboli, Ekant; Acharya, Aurovind; Kumarasamy, Chellan; Mala, Kanchana; Raman, Pachaiappan

    2015-06-01

    Cell-to-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS) is a generic event in bacteria that is used to coordinate gene expression among local populations. The phenomenon of QS depends on the fact that presence of sufficient bacteria ascertains a threshold level of autoinducer concentration that allows bacteria to sense a critical cell mass and to activate or repress target genes. Thus, QS has been an attractive target for the development of anti-infective strategies that are not based on the use of antibiotics. Several anti-QS approaches have been demonstrated including natural products from plant-based secondary metabolites. However, the role of plant bioactive proteins as an anti-QS peptide is yet to be deciphered. Against a backdrop of ever-increasing antibiotic resistant pathogens, there is a strong need for development of alternative therapeutic strategies. Thus, our hypothesis is that bioactive proteins from the plant family Solanaceae are quorum quenching molecules that can be exploited to develop a therapeutic strategy against virulence. We presume that bioactive proteins will inactivate or inhibit or degrade QS signals from bacteria to prevent cell-to-cell communication and thus inhibit development of virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further, the use of proteins as quorum quenchers will delay the bacteria to develop resistance against these quenching molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome sequence of Enterobacter sp. ST3, a quorum sensing bacterium associated with marine dinoflagellate

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    Jin Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phycosphere environment is a typical marine niche, harbor diverse populations of microorganisms, which are thought to play a critical role in algae host and influence mutualistic and competitive interactions. Understanding quorum sensing-based acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL language may shed light on the interaction between algal-associated microbial communities in the native environment. In this work, we isolated an epidermal bacterium (was tentatively named Enterobacter sp. ST3, and deposited in SOA China, the number is MCCC1K02277-ST3 from the marine dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea, and found it has the ability to produce short-chain AHL signal. In order to better understand its communication information at molecular level, the genomic map was investigated. The genome size was determined to be 4.81 Mb with a G + C content of 55.59%, comprising 6 scaffolds of 75 contigs containing 4647 protein-coding genes. The functional proteins were predicted, and 3534 proteins were assigned to COG functional categories. An AHL-relating gene, LuxR, was found in upstream position at contig 1. This genome data may provide clues to increase understanding of the chemical characterization and ecological behavior of strain ST3 in the phycosphere microenvironment.

  1. A quorum sensing small volatile molecule promotes antibiotic tolerance in bacteria.

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    Yok-Ai Que

    Full Text Available Bacteria can be refractory to antibiotics due to a sub-population of dormant cells, called persisters that are highly tolerant to antibiotic exposure. The low frequency and transience of the antibiotic tolerant "persister" trait has complicated elucidation of the mechanism that controls antibiotic tolerance. In this study, we show that 2' Amino-acetophenone (2-AA, a poorly studied but diagnostically important small, volatile molecule produced by the recalcitrant gram-negative human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, promotes antibiotic tolerance in response to quorum-sensing (QS signaling. Our results show that 2-AA mediated persister cell accumulation occurs via alteration of the expression of genes involved in the translational capacity of the cell, including almost all ribosomal protein genes and other translation-related factors. That 2-AA promotes persisters formation also in other emerging multi-drug resistant pathogens, including the non 2-AA producer Acinetobacter baumannii implies that 2-AA may play an important role in the ability of gram-negative bacteria to tolerate antibiotic treatments in polymicrobial infections. Given that the synthesis, excretion and uptake of QS small molecules is a common hallmark of prokaryotes, together with the fact that the translational machinery is highly conserved, we posit that modulation of the translational capacity of the cell via QS molecules, may be a general, widely distributed mechanism that promotes antibiotic tolerance among prokaryotes.

  2. The LuxS based quorum sensing governs lactose induced biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis

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    Danielle eDuanis-Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus species present a major concern in the dairy industry as they can form biofilms in pipelines and on surfaces of equipment and machinery used in the entire line of production. These biofilms represent a continuous hygienic problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is apparently dependent on LuxS quorum sensing (QS by Autoinducer-2 (AI-2. However, the link between sensing environmental cues and AI-2 induced biofilm formation remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of lactose, the primary sugar in milk, on biofilm formation by B. subtilis and its possible link to QS processes. Our phenotypic analysis shows that lactose induces formation of biofilm bundles as well as formation of colony type biofilms. Furthermore, using reporter strain assays, we observed an increase in AI-2 production by B. subtilis in response to lactose in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, we found that expression of eps and tapA operons, responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis in B. subtilis, were notably up-regulated in response to lactose. Importantly, we also observed that LuxS is essential for B. subtilis biofilm formation in the presence of lactose. Overall, our results suggest that lactose may induce biofilm formation by B. subtilis through the LuxS pathway.

  3. Modeling the role of quorum sensing in interspecies competition in biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Avaneesh V.; Wingreen, Ned S.; Borenstein, David B.

    Bacteria grow on surfaces in complex immobile communities known as biofilms, composed of cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. Within biofilms, bacteria often communicate, cooperate, and compete within their own species and with other species using Quorum Sensing (QS). QS refers to the process by which bacteria produce, secrete, and subsequently detect small molecules called autoinducers as a way to assess the local population density of their species, or of other species. QS is known to regulate the production of extracellular matrix. We investigated the possible benefit of QS in regulating matrix production to best gain access to a nutrient that diffuses from a source positioned away from the surface on which the biofilm grows. We employed Agent-Based Modeling (ABM), a form of simulation that allows cells to modify their behavior based on local inputs, e.g. nutrient and QS concentrations. We first determined the optimal fixed strategies (that do not use QS) for pairwise competitions, and then demonstrated that simple QS-based strategies can be superior to any fixed strategy. In nature, species can compete by sensing and/or interfering with each other's QS signals, and we explore approaches for targeting specific species via QS-interference. A.V.N. and N.S.W. contributed equally to this project.

  4. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

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    Wai-Leung Ng

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives.

  5. Evidence for Autoinduction and Quorum Sensing in White Band Disease-Causing Microbes on Acropora cervicornis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certner, Rebecca H.; Vollmer, Steven V.

    2015-06-01

    Coral reefs have entered a state of global decline party due to an increasing incidence of coral disease. However, the diversity and complexity of coral-associated bacterial communities has made identifying the mechanisms underlying disease transmission and progression extremely difficult. This study explores the effects of coral cell-free culture fluid (CFCF) and autoinducer (a quorum sensing signaling molecule) on coral-associated bacterial growth and on coral tissue loss respectively. All experiments were conducted using the endangered Caribbean coral Acropora cervicornis. Coral-associated microbes were grown on selective media infused with CFCF derived from healthy and white band disease-infected A. cervicornis. Exposure to diseased CFCF increased proliferation of Cytophaga-Flavobacterium spp. while exposure to healthy CFCF inhibited growth of this group. Exposure to either CFCF did not significantly affect Vibrio spp. growth. In order to test whether disease symptoms can be induced in healthy corals, A. cervicornis was exposed to bacterial assemblages supplemented with exogenous, purified autoinducer. Incubation with autoinducer resulted in complete tissue loss in all corals tested in less than one week. These findings indicate that white band disease in A. cervicornis may be caused by opportunistic pathogenesis of resident microbes.

  6. Quorum-quenching limits quorum-sensing exploitation by signal-negative invaders

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    Tannières, Mélanie; Lang, Julien; Barnier, Claudie; Shykoff, Jacqui A.; Faure, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Some bacteria produce and perceive quorum-sensing (QS) signals that coordinate several behaviours, including the costly processes that are exoenzyme production and plasmid transfer. In the case of plasmid transfer, the emergence of QS signal-altered invaders and their policing are poorly documented. In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the virulence Ti-plasmid encodes both synthesis and sensing of QS-signals, which promote its transfer from a donor to a recipient cell. Here, we reported that QS-altered A. tumefaciens mutants arose during experimental evolution. All showed improved growth compared to their ancestor. Genome sequencing revealed that, though some had lost the Ti-plasmid, most were defective for QS-signal synthesis and Ti-plasmid conjugation (traR mutations) and one exhibited a QS-signal exploitation behaviour, using signal produced by other cells to enhance its own Ti-plasmid transfer. We explored mechanisms that can limit this QS-hijacking. We showed that the A. tumefaciens capacity to inactivate QS-signals by expressing QS-degrading enzyme could attenuate dissemination of the QS signal-negative Ti-plasmids. This work shows that enzymatic QS-disruption whether encoded by the QS-producing Ti-plasmid itself, by a companion plasmid in the same donor cells, or by one in the recipient cells, in all cases can serve as a mechanism for controlling QS exploitation by QS signal-negative mutants.

  7. The presence and role of bacterial quorum sensing in activated sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Grace; Kimyon, Onder; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Manefield, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Summary Activated sludge used for wastewater treatment globally is composed of a high‐density microbial community of great biotechnological significance. In this study the presence and purpose of quorum sensing via N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactones (AHLs) in activated sludge was explored. The presence of N‐heptanoyl‐l‐homoserine lactone in organic extracts of sludge was demonstrated along with activation of a LuxR‐based AHL monitor strain deployed in sludge, indicating AHL‐mediated gene expression is active in sludge flocculates but not in the bulk aqueous phase. Bacterial isolates from activated sludge were screened for AHL production and expression of phenotypes commonly but not exclusively regulated by AHL‐mediated gene transcription. N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactone and exoenzyme production were frequently observed among the isolates. N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactone addition to sludge upregulated chitinase activity and an AHL‐ and chitinase‐producing isolate closely related to Aeromonas hydrophila was shown to respond to AHL addition with upregulation of chitinase activity. N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactones produced by this strain were identified and genes ahyI/R and chiA, encoding AHL production and response and chitinase activity respectively, were sequenced. These experiments provide insight into the relationship between AHL‐mediated gene expression and exoenzyme activity in activated sludge and may ultimately create opportunities to improve sludge performance. PMID:22583685

  8. Post-secretional activation of Protease IV by quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungmin; Li, Xi-Hui; Kim, Soo-Kyong; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-06-30

    Protease IV (PIV), a key virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a secreted lysyl-endopeptidase whose expression is induced by quorum sensing (QS). We found that PIV expressed in QS mutant has severe reduction of activity in culture supernatant (CS), even though it is overexpressed to high level. PIV purified from the QS mutant (M-PIV) had much lower activity than the PIV purified from wild type (P-PIV). We found that the propeptide cleaved from prepro-PIV was co-purified with M-PIV, but never with P-PIV. Since the activity of M-PIV was restored by adding the CS of QS-positive and PIV-deficient strain, we hypothesized that the propeptide binds to and inhibits PIV, and is degraded to activate PIV by a QS-dependent factor. In fact, the CS of the QS-positive and PIV-deficient strain was able to degrade the propeptide. Since the responsible factor should be a QS-dependently expressed extracellular protease, we tested QS-dependent proteases of P. aeruginosa and found that LasB (elastase) can degrade the propeptide and activate M-PIV. We purified the propeptide of PIV and confirmed that the propeptide can bind to and inhibit PIV. We suggest that PIV is post-secretionally activated through the extracellular degradation of the propeptide by LasB, a QS-dependent protease.

  9. Cross-kingdom signalling: exploitation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by the green seaweed Ulva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint, Ian; Tait, Karen; Wheeler, Glen

    2007-07-29

    The green seaweed Ulva has been shown to detect signal molecules produced by bacteria. Biofilms that release N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) attract zoospores--the motile reproductive stages of Ulva. The evidence for AHL involvement is based on several independent lines of evidence, including the observation that zoospores are attracted to wild-type bacteria that produce AHLs but are not attracted to mutants that do not produce signal molecules. Synthetic AHL also attracts zoospores and the attraction is lost in the presence of autoinducer inactivation (AiiA) protein. The mechanism of attraction is not chemotactic but involves chemokinesis. When zoospores detect AHLs, the swimming rate is reduced and this results in accumulation of cells at the source of the AHL. It has been demonstrated that the detection of AHLs results in calcium influx into the zoospore. This is the first example of a calcium signalling event in a eukaryote in response to bacterial quorum sensing molecules. The role of AHLs in the ecology of Ulva is discussed. It is probable that AHLs act as cues for the settlement of zoospores, rather than being directly involved as a signalling mechanism.

  10. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

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    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B; Christophersen, Lars; Calum, Henrik; Hentzer, Morten; Hougen, Hans-Petter; Rygaard, Jørgen; Moser, Claus; Eberl, Leo; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael

    2005-12-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant to otherwise lethal doses of antibiotics, and protects against the bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). It has been previously demonstrated that QS is inhibited by garlic extract. In this study, the synergistic effects of garlic and tobramycin, and PMNs activities have been evaluated. P. aeruginosa was grown in vitro in continuous-culture once-through flow chambers with and without garlic extract. The garlic-treated biofilms were susceptible to both tobramycin and PMN grazing. Furthermore, the PMNs showed an increase in respiratory burst activation, when incubated with the garlic-treated biofilm. Garlic extract was administered as treatment for a mouse pulmonary infection model. Mice were treated with garlic extract or placebo for 7 days, with the initial 2 days being prophylactic before P. aeruginosa was instilled in the left lung of the mice. Bacteriology, mortality, histopathology and cytokine production were used as indicators. The garlic treatment initially provoked a higher degree of inflammation, and significantly improved clearing of the infecting bacteria. The results indicate that a QS-inhibitory extract of garlic renders P. aeruginosa sensitive to tobramycin, respiratory burst and phagocytosis by PMNs, as well as leading to an improved outcome of pulmonary infections.

  11. Chemical Composition and Disruption of Quorum Sensing Signaling in Geographically Diverse United States Propolis

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    Michael A. Savka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis or bee glue has been used for centuries for various purposes and is especially important in human health due to many of its biological and pharmacological properties. In this work we showed quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI activity of ten geographically distinct propolis samples from the United States using the acyl-homoserine lactone- (AHL- dependent Chromobacterium violaceum strain CV026. Based on GC-MS chemical profiling the propolis samples can be classified into several groups that are as follows: (1 rich in cinnamic acid derivatives, (2 rich in flavonoids, and (3 rich in triterpenes. An in-depth analysis of the propolis from North Carolina led to the isolation and identification of a triterpenic acid that was recently isolated from Hondurian propolis (Central America and ethyl ether of p-coumaric alcohol not previously identified in bee propolis. QSI activity was also observed in the second group US propolis samples which contained the flavonoid pinocembrin in addition to other flavonoid compounds. The discovery of compounds that are involved in QSI activity has the potential to facilitate studies that may lead to the development of antivirulence therapies that can be complementary and/or alternative treatments against antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens and/or emerging pathogens that have yet to be identified.

  12. Identification of anti-virulence compounds that disrupt quorum-sensing regulated acute and persistent pathogenicity.

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    Melissa Starkey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Etiological agents of acute, persistent, or relapsing clinical infections are often refractory to antibiotics due to multidrug resistance and/or antibiotic tolerance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes recalcitrant and severe acute chronic and persistent human infections. Here, we target the MvfR-regulated P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS virulence pathway to isolate robust molecules that specifically inhibit infection without affecting bacterial growth or viability to mitigate selective resistance. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen (HTS and structure-activity relationship (SAR analysis, we identify compounds that block the synthesis of both pro-persistence and pro-acute MvfR-dependent signaling molecules. These compounds, which share a benzamide-benzimidazole backbone and are unrelated to previous MvfR-regulon inhibitors, bind the global virulence QS transcriptional regulator, MvfR (PqsR; inhibit the MvfR regulon in multi-drug resistant isolates; are active against P. aeruginosa acute and persistent murine infections; and do not perturb bacterial growth. In addition, they are the first compounds identified to reduce the formation of antibiotic-tolerant persister cells. As such, these molecules provide for the development of next-generation clinical therapeutics to more effectively treat refractory and deleterious bacterial-human infections.

  13. Evolutionary theory of bacterial quorum sensing: when is a signal not a signal?

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    Diggle, Stephen P; Gardner, Andy; West, Stuart A; Griffin, Ashleigh S

    2007-07-29

    The term quorum sensing (QS) is used to describe the communication between bacterial cells, whereby a coordinated population response is controlled by diffusible molecules produced by individuals. QS has not only been described between cells of the same species (intraspecies), but also between species (interspecies) and between bacteria and higher organisms (inter-kingdom). The fact that QS-based communication appears to be widespread among microbes is strange, considering that explaining both cooperation and communication are two of the greatest problems in evolutionary biology. From an evolutionary perspective, intraspecies signalling can be explained using models such as kin selection, but when communication is described between species, it is more difficult to explain. It is probable that in many cases this involves QS molecules being used as 'cues' by other species as a guide to future action or as manipulating molecules whereby one species will 'coerce' a response from another. In these cases, the usage of QS molecules cannot be described as signalling. This review seeks to integrate the evolutionary literature on animal signalling with the microbiological literature on QS, and asks whether QS within bacteria is true signalling or whether these molecules are also used as cues or for the coercion of other cells.

  14. Methanol Extract from Anogeissus leiocarpus (DC) Guill. et Perr. (Combretaceae) Stem Bark Quenches the Quorum Sensing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

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    Ouedraogo, Vincent; Kiendrebeogo, Martin

    2016-10-06

    Background: Due to its extensive arsenal of virulence factors and inherent resistance to antibiotics, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a threat particularly in immunocompromised patients. Considering the central role of quorum sensing in the production of virulence factors, inhibition of bacterial communication mechanism constitute an opportunity to attenuate pathogenicity of bacteria resistant to available antibiotics. Our study aimed to assess the anti-quorum sensing activity of Anogeissus leiocarpus , traditionally used in Burkina Faso, for the treatment of infected burn wounds. Methods: Investigations were carried out on methanol extract from A. leiocarpus stem bark. The reporter strains Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and P. aeruginosa PAO1 derivatives were used to evidence any interference with the bacterial quorum sensing and expression of related genes. P. aeruginosa PAO1 was used to measure the impact on pyocyanin production. Results: At a sub-inhibitory concentration (100 µg/mL), A. leiocarpus methanol extract quenched the quorum sensing mechanism of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by down-streaming the rhlR gene, with a subsequent reduction of pyocyanin production. Moreover, the antioxidant polyphenols evidenced are able to reduce the oxidative stress induced by pyocyanin. Conclusion: The antioxidant and anti-quorum sensing activities of A. leiocarpus stem bark could justify its traditional use in the treatment of infected burn wounds.

  15. Mucoidy, quorum sensing, mismatch repair and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis chronic airways infections.

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    Sofía Feliziani

    Full Text Available Survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF chronic infections is based on a genetic adaptation process consisting of mutations in specific genes, which can produce advantageous phenotypic switches and ensure its persistence in the lung. Among these, mutations inactivating the regulators MucA (alginate biosynthesis, LasR (quorum sensing and MexZ (multidrug-efflux pump MexXY are the most frequently observed, with those inactivating the DNA mismatch repair system (MRS being also highly prevalent in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, leading to hypermutator phenotypes that could contribute to this adaptive mutagenesis by virtue of an increased mutation rate. Here, we characterized the mutations found in the mucA, lasR, mexZ and MRS genes in P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from Argentinean CF patients, and analyzed the potential association of mucA, lasR and mexZ mutagenesis with MRS