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Sample records for splicing mutation generating

  1. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation...... to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  2. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer

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    Reyka G. Jayasinghe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. : Jayasinghe et al. identify nearly 2,000 splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs from over 8,000 tumor samples across 33 cancer types. They provide a more accurate interpretation of previously mis-annotated mutations, highlighting the importance of integrating data types to understand the functional and the clinical implications of splicing mutations in human disease. Keywords: splicing, RNA, mutations of clinical relevance

  3. A donor splice site mutation in CISD2 generates multiple truncated, non-functional isoforms in Wolfram syndrome type 2 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Monica; La Sala, Lucia; Rondinelli, Maurizio; Errichiello, Edoardo; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Puca, Annibale Alessandro; Genovese, Stefano; Ceriello, Antonio

    2017-12-13

    Mutations in the gene that encodes CDGSH iron sulfur domain 2 (CISD2) are causative of Wolfram syndrome type 2 (WFS2), a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, peptic ulcer bleeding and defective platelet aggregation. Four mutations in the CISD2 gene have been reported. Among these mutations, the homozygous c.103 + 1G > A substitution was identified in the donor splice site of intron 1 in two Italian sisters and was predicted to cause a exon 1 to be skipped. Here, we employed molecular assays to characterize the c.103 + 1G > A mutation using the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). 5'-RACE coupled with RT-PCR were used to analyse the effect of the c.103 + 1G > A mutation on mRNA splicing. Western blot analysis was used to analyse the consequences of the CISD2 mutation on the encoded protein. We demonstrated that the c.103 + 1G > A mutation functionally impaired mRNA splicing, producing multiple splice variants characterized by the whole or partial absence of exon 1, which introduced amino acid changes and a premature stop. The affected mRNAs resulted in either predicted targets for nonsense mRNA decay (NMD) or non-functional isoforms. We concluded that the c.103 + 1G > A mutation resulted in the loss of functional CISD2 protein in the two Italian WFS2 patients.

  4. Splice site mutations in the ATP7A gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Skjørringe

    Full Text Available Menkes disease (MD is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12 mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations identified in 12 patients with milder phenotypes were predicted to have no significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the presence of wild-type transcript in 7 out of 9 patients investigated in vivo. Both the in silico predictions and the in vivo results support the hypothesis previously suggested by us and others, that the presence of some wild-type transcript is correlated to a milder phenotype.

  5. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of RB1 mRNA from blood leukocytes of patients with retinoblastoma identified the effects of mutations involving consensus splice site, exonic substitution and whole-exon deletions identified in genomic DNA of these patients. In addition, this study identified mutations in cases in which no mutations were detectable ...

  6. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

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    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  7. A novel splicing mutation in the V2 vasopressin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Siggaard, C; Herlin, Troels

    2000-01-01

    as clinical investigations comprising a fluid deprivation test and a 1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin (dDAVP) infusion test in the study subject and his mother. We found a highly unusual, novel, de novo 1447A-->C point mutation (gDNA), involving the invariable splice acceptor of the second intron...... of the gene in both the affected male (hemizygous) and his mother (heterozygous). This mutation is likely to cause aberrant splicing of the terminal intron of the gene, leading to a non-functional AVP receptor. The clinical studies were consistent with such a hypothesis, as the affected subject had a severe...

  8. Developmental regulation of tau splicing is disrupted in stem cell-derived neurons from frontotemporal dementia patients with the 10 + 16 splice-site mutation in MAPT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Teresa; Preza, Elisavet; Mahoney, Colin J; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Ryan, Natalie S; Morris, Huw R; Arber, Charles; Devine, Michael J; Houlden, Henry; Warner, Thomas T; Bushell, Trevor J; Zagnoni, Michele; Kunath, Tilo; Livesey, Frederick J; Fox, Nick C; Rossor, Martin N; Hardy, John; Wray, Selina

    2015-09-15

    The alternative splicing of the tau gene, MAPT, generates six protein isoforms in the adult human central nervous system (CNS). Tau splicing is developmentally regulated and dysregulated in disease. Mutations in MAPT that alter tau splicing cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with tau pathology, providing evidence for a causal link between altered tau splicing and disease. The use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons has revolutionized the way we model neurological disease in vitro. However, as most tau mutations are located within or around the alternatively spliced exon 10, it is important that iPSC-neurons splice tau appropriately in order to be used as disease models. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and splicing of tau in iPSC-derived cortical neurons from control patients and FTD patients with the 10 + 16 intronic mutation in MAPT. We show that control neurons only express the fetal tau isoform (0N3R), even at extended time points of 100 days in vitro. Neurons from FTD patients with the 10 + 16 mutation in MAPT express both 0N3R and 0N4R tau isoforms, demonstrating that this mutation overrides the developmental regulation of exon 10 inclusion in our in vitro model. Further, at extended time points of 365 days in vitro, we observe a switch in tau splicing to include six tau isoforms as seen in the adult human CNS. Our results demonstrate the importance of neuronal maturity for use in in vitro modeling and provide a system that will be important for understanding the functional consequences of altered tau splicing. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . [Parsam VL, Ali MJ, Honavar SG, Vemuganti GK and Kannabiran C 2011 Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in retinoblastoma. J. Biosci. 36 281–287] DOI 10.1007/s12038-011-9062-9. 1. Introduction.

  10. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of RB1 mRNA from blood leukocytes of patients with retinoblastoma identified the effects of mutations involving consensus splice site, .... bilateral Rb. Genomic DNA analysis from peripheral blood was as described by Parsam .... the patterns are not always the same in different studies (Klutz et al. 2002; Taylor et al.

  11. A splicing mutation in the DMD gene detected by next-generation sequencing and confirmed by mRNA and protein analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucher Boulez, Florence; Menassa, Rita; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Manel, Véronique; Mallet-Motak, Delphine; Morel, Yves; Michel-Calemard, Laurence

    2015-08-25

    Dystrophinopathies, either the severe Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) or the milder Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD), are X-linked recessive disorders caused by mutations in the DMD gene. DMD is one of the longest human genes. Large deletions or duplications account for 60-80% of the mutations. Remaining anomalies consist in point mutations or small rearrangements. Routinely, the molecular diagnosis is done by a Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) or array Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH), followed, if negative, by Sanger sequencing of all exons. In this study, massive parallel sequencing (MPS) or next generation sequencing (NGS) was used to make a rapid and costless molecular diagnosis in a young boy suspected of DMD. A small deletion: NM_004006.2:c.2803+5_2803+8del was identified. The diagnosis was performed in one single manipulation and within a week. The consequence of this intronic mutation is a skipping of exon 21 confirmed by mRNA and protein analysis. NGS appears to be an efficient new strategy in DMD molecular diagnosis. It highlights the major evolution of the diagnostic strategy towards high throughput technologies, where bioinformatics analysis becomes the real challenge for variations detection. This is the first study reporting in vivo impact of this intronic mutation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Interplay between DMD Point Mutations and Splicing Signals in Dystrophinopathy Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Mateu, Jonàs; González-Quereda, Lidia; Rodríguez, Maria José; Verdura, Edgard; Lázaro, Kira; Jou, Cristina; Nascimento, Andrés; Jiménez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Colomer, Jaume; Monges, Soledad; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Foncuberta, Maria Eugenia; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; Molano, Jesús; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2013-01-01

    DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements. PMID:23536893

  13. Interplay between DMD point mutations and splicing signals in Dystrophinopathy phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonàs Juan-Mateu

    Full Text Available DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements.

  14. Exonic Splicing Mutations Are More Prevalent than Currently Estimated and Can Be Predicted by Using In Silico Tools.

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    Omar Soukarieh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a causal mutation is essential for molecular diagnosis and clinical management of many genetic disorders. However, even if next-generation exome sequencing has greatly improved the detection of nucleotide changes, the biological interpretation of most exonic variants remains challenging. Moreover, particular attention is typically given to protein-coding changes often neglecting the potential impact of exonic variants on RNA splicing. Here, we used the exon 10 of MLH1, a gene implicated in hereditary cancer, as a model system to assess the prevalence of RNA splicing mutations among all single-nucleotide variants identified in a given exon. We performed comprehensive minigene assays and analyzed patient's RNA when available. Our study revealed a staggering number of splicing mutations in MLH1 exon 10 (77% of the 22 analyzed variants, including mutations directly affecting splice sites and, particularly, mutations altering potential splicing regulatory elements (ESRs. We then used this thoroughly characterized dataset, together with experimental data derived from previous studies on BRCA1, BRCA2, CFTR and NF1, to evaluate the predictive power of 3 in silico approaches recently described as promising tools for pinpointing ESR-mutations. Our results indicate that ΔtESRseq and ΔHZEI-based approaches not only discriminate which variants affect splicing, but also predict the direction and severity of the induced splicing defects. In contrast, the ΔΨ-based approach did not show a compelling predictive power. Our data indicates that exonic splicing mutations are more prevalent than currently appreciated and that they can now be predicted by using bioinformatics methods. These findings have implications for all genetically-caused diseases.

  15. Somatic Mutational Landscape of Splicing Factor Genes and Their Functional Consequences across 33 Cancer Types

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    Michael Seiler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Hotspot mutations in splicing factor genes have been recently reported at high frequency in hematological malignancies, suggesting the importance of RNA splicing in cancer. We analyzed whole-exome sequencing data across 33 tumor types in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, and we identified 119 splicing factor genes with significant non-silent mutation patterns, including mutation over-representation, recurrent loss of function (tumor suppressor-like, or hotspot mutation profile (oncogene-like. Furthermore, RNA sequencing analysis revealed altered splicing events associated with selected splicing factor mutations. In addition, we were able to identify common gene pathway profiles associated with the presence of these mutations. Our analysis suggests that somatic alteration of genes involved in the RNA-splicing process is common in cancer and may represent an underappreciated hallmark of tumorigenesis. : Seiler et al. report that 119 splicing factor genes carry putative driver mutations over 33 tumor types in TCGA. The most common mutations appear to be mutually exclusive and are associated with lineage-independent altered splicing. Samples with these mutations show deregulation of cell-autonomous pathways and immune infiltration. Keywords: splicing, SF3B1, U2AF1, SRSF2, RBM10, FUBP1, cancer, mutation

  16. Characterization of a splicing mutation in group A xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satokata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Miura, Naoyuki; Miyamoto, Iwai; Okada, Yoshio; Satoh, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Seiji

    1990-01-01

    The molecular basis of group A xeroderma pigmentosum (WP) was investigated by comparison of the nucleotide sequences of multiple clones of the XP group A complementing gene (XPAC) from a patient with group A XP with that of a normal gene. The clones showed a G → C substitution at the 3' splice acceptor site of intron 3, which altered the obligatory AG acceptor dinucleotide to AC. Nucleotide sequencing of cDNAs amplified by the polymerase chain reaction revealed that this single base substitution abolishes the canonical 3' splice site, thus creating two abnormally spliced mRNA forms. The larger form is identical with normal mRNA except for a dinucleotide deletion at the 5' end of exon 4. This deletion results in a frameshift with premature translation termination in exon 4. The smaller form has a deletion of the entire exon 3 and the dinucleotide at the 5' end of exon 4. The result of a transfection study provided additional evidence that this single base substitution is the disease-causing mutation. This single base substitution creates a new cleavage site for the restriction nuclease AlwNI. Analysis of AlwNI restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a high frequency of this mutation in Japanese patients with group A XP: 16 of 21 unrelated Japanese patients were homozygous and 4 were heterozygous for this mutation. However, 11 Caucasians and 2 Blacks with group A XP did not have this mutant allele. The polymorphic AlwNI restriction fragments are concluded to be useful for diagnosis of group A XP in Japanese subjects, including prenatal cases and carriers

  17. A novel 5' ATRX mutation with splicing consequences in acquired alpha thalassemia-myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Maria E; Thurmes, Paul J; Hoyer, James D; Steensma, David P

    2005-11-01

    Acquired alpha thalassemia (hemoglobin H (HbH) disease) is a rare complication of neoplastic chronic myeloid disorders, especially myelodysplastic syndrome. Acquired HbH has recently been associated with mutations in an X-linked gene, ATRX, previously linked to inherited ATR-X syndrome (alpha thalassemia-retardation-X linked). A Swiss man with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia complicated by various autoimmune disorders and by strikingly microcytic, hypochromic anemia was analyzed for the presence of acquired HbH. After HbH detection, we sought an underlying genetic cause. We used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography to screen for an ATRX mutation, and measured ATRX expression by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The patient had 50% HbH-containing cells on supravital staining. Marrow karyotype and the alpha globin cluster were normal. A clonally-restricted ATRX point mutation was detected in the conserved splice donor motif in intron 4 (IVS 4 +2 T-->C). Plasmid vector cloning of patient ATRX cDNA demonstrated both exon 4 skipping and partial intron retention with activation of a cryptic splice site, both outcomes resulting in frameshifts with premature stop codon generation in exon 5 and near-decimation of ATRX expression in myeloid cells. Normal exon 6 alternative splicing was retained. Intronic ATRX mutations with splicing consequences, uncommon in inherited ATR-X syndrome because of their devastating effect on expression of functional protein, should be routinely sought when undertaking molecular analysis of acquired HbH disease. Detection of an acquired ATRX mutation can help support clonality in karyotypically normal ambiguous myeloid disorders with HbH.

  18. Recurrent Hyperparathyroidism Due to a Novel CDC73 Splice Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattangady, Namita Ganesh; Wilson, Tremika Le-Shan; Miller, Barbra Sue; Lerario, Antonio Marcondes; Giordano, Thomas James; Choksi, Palak; Else, Tobias

    2017-08-01

    The recognition of hereditary causes of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is important because clinical care and surveillance differ significantly between sporadic and hereditary pHPT. In addition, the increasing number of genetic tests poses a challenge to classify mutations as benign or pathogenic. Functional work-up of variants remains a mainstay to provide evidence for pathogenicity. We describe a 52-year-old male patient with recurrent pHPT since age 35 years. Despite several neck surgeries with complete parathyroidectomy, he experienced persistent pHPT, necessitating repeated surgery for a forearm autotransplant, which finally resulted in unmeasurable parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Genetic testing revealed a new CDC73 variant (c.238-8G>A [IVS2-8G>A]), initially classified as a variant of uncertain significance. Parathyroid tissue from the initial surgeries showed loss of heterozygosity. Using an RT-PCR approach, we show that the mutation leads to the use of a cryptic splice site in peripheral mononuclear cells. In addition, a minigene approach confirms the use of the cryptic splice site in a heterologous cell system. The novel c.238-8G>A CDC73 variant activates a cryptic splice site, and the functional data provided justify the classification as a likely pathogenic variant. Our results underscore the importance of functional work-up for variant classification in the absence of other available data, such as presence in disease-specific databases, other syndromic clinical findings, or family history. In addition, the presented case exemplifies the importance to consider a hereditary condition in young patients with pHPT, particularly those with multi-gland involvement. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Functional Characterization of NIPBL Physiological Splice Variants and Eight Splicing Mutations in Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

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    María E. Teresa-Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, growth retardation, cognitive impairment, limb defects, hirsutism, and multisystem involvement. Mutations in five genes encoding structural components (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21 or functionally associated factors (NIPBL, HDAC8 of the cohesin complex have been found in patients with CdLS. In about 60% of the patients, mutations in NIPBL could be identified. Interestingly, 17% of them are predicted to change normal splicing, however, detailed molecular investigations are often missing. Here, we report the first systematic study of the physiological splicing of the NIPBL gene, that would reveal the identification of four new splicing isoforms ΔE10, ΔE12, ΔE33,34, and B’. Furthermore, we have investigated nine mutations affecting splice-sites in the NIPBL gene identified in twelve CdLS patients. All mutations have been examined on the DNA and RNA level, as well as by in silico analyses. Although patients with mutations affecting NIPBL splicing show a broad clinical variability, the more severe phenotypes seem to be associated with aberrant transcripts resulting in a shift of the reading frame.

  20. Molecular analyses of novel ASAH1 mutations causing Farber lipogranulomatosis: analyses of exonic splicing enhancer inactivating mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, M D; Chaudhary, A K; Kiran, M; Reddy, V; Nagarajaram, H A; Dalal, A; Bashyam, L; Suri, D; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Kabra, M; Puri, R D; RamaDevi, R; Kapoor, S; Danda, S

    2014-12-01

    Farber lipogranulomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the ASAH1 gene. In the largest ever study, we identified and characterized ASAH1 mutations from 11 independent Farber disease (FD) families. A total of 13 different mutations were identified including 1 splice, 1 polypyrimidine tract (PPT) deletion and 11 missense mutations. Eleven mutations were exclusive to the Indian population. The IVS6+4A>G splice and IVS5-16delTTTTC PPT deletion mutations resulted in skipping of exon 6 precluding thereby the region responsible for cleavage of enzyme precursor. A missense mutation (p.V198A) resulted in skipping of exon 8 due to inactivation of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) element. This is the first report of mutations affecting PPT and ESE in the ASAH1 gene resulting in FD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Novel mutations affecting LRP5 splicing in patients with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, C M; Chung, B D; Susic, M; Prescott, T; Semler, O; Fiskerstrand, T; D'Eufemia, P; Castori, M; Pekkinen, M; Sochett, E; Cole, W G; Netzer, C; Mäkitie, O

    2011-08-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma sydrome (OPPG) is an autosomal recessive disorder with early-onset severe osteoporosis and blindness, caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Heterozygous carriers exhibit a milder bone phenotype. Only a few splice mutations in LRP5 have been published. We present clinical and genetic data for four patients with novel LRP5 mutations, three of which affect splicing. Patients were evaluated clinically and by radiography and bone densitometry. Genetic screening of LRP5 was performed on the basis of the clinical diagnosis of OPPG. Splice aberrances were confirmed by cDNA sequencing or exon trapping. The effect of one splice mutation on LRP5 protein function was studied. A novel splice-site mutation c.1584+4A>T abolished the donor splice site of exon 7 and activated a cryptic splice site, which led to an in-frame insertion of 21 amino acids (p.E528_V529ins21). Functional studies revealed severely impaired signal transduction presumably caused by defective intracellular transport of the mutated receptor. Exon trapping was used on two samples to confirm that splice-site mutations c.4112-2A>G and c.1015+1G>T caused splicing-out of exons 20 and 5, respectively. One patient carried a homozygous deletion of exon 4 causing the loss of exons 4 and 5, as demonstrated by cDNA analysis. Our results broaden the spectrum of mutations in LRP5 and provide the first functional data on splice aberrations.

  2. TCOF1 mutation database: novel mutation in the alternatively spliced exon 6A and update in mutation nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splendore, Alessandra; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Masotti, Cibele; Morganti, Lucas S C; Passos-Bueno, M Rita

    2005-05-01

    Recently, a novel exon was described in TCOF1 that, although alternatively spliced, is included in the major protein isoform. In addition, most published mutations in this gene do not conform to current mutation nomenclature guidelines. Given these observations, we developed an online database of TCOF1 mutations in which all the reported mutations are renamed according to standard recommendations and in reference to the genomic and novel cDNA reference sequences (www.genoma.ib.usp.br/TCOF1_database). We also report in this work: 1) results of the first screening for large deletions in TCOF1 by Southern blot in patients without mutation detected by direct sequencing; 2) the identification of the first pathogenic mutation in the newly described exon 6A; and 3) statistical analysis of pathogenic mutations and polymorphism distribution throughout the gene.

  3. Splicing Express: a software suite for alternative splicing analysis using next-generation sequencing data

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    Jose E. Kroll

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Motivation. Alternative splicing events (ASEs are prevalent in the transcriptome of eukaryotic species and are known to influence many biological phenomena. The identification and quantification of these events are crucial for a better understanding of biological processes. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have allowed deep characterization of transcriptomes and made it possible to address these issues. ASEs analysis, however, represents a challenging task especially when many different samples need to be compared. Some popular tools for the analysis of ASEs are known to report thousands of events without annotations and/or graphical representations. A new tool for the identification and visualization of ASEs is here described, which can be used by biologists without a solid bioinformatics background.Results. A software suite named Splicing Express was created to perform ASEs analysis from transcriptome sequencing data derived from next-generation DNA sequencing platforms. Its major goal is to serve the needs of biomedical researchers who do not have bioinformatics skills. Splicing Express performs automatic annotation of transcriptome data (GTF files using gene coordinates available from the UCSC genome browser and allows the analysis of data from all available species. The identification of ASEs is done by a known algorithm previously implemented in another tool named Splooce. As a final result, Splicing Express creates a set of HTML files composed of graphics and tables designed to describe the expression profile of ASEs among all analyzed samples. By using RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map and the Rat Body Map, we show that Splicing Express is able to perform all tasks in a straightforward way, identifying well-known specific events.Availability and Implementation.Splicing Express is written in Perl and is suitable to run only in UNIX-like systems. More details can be found at: http://www.bioinformatics-brazil.org/splicingexpress.

  4. Features of 5'-splice-site efficiency derived from disease-causing mutations and comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Xavier; Olson, Andrew J; Rao, Atmakuri R

    2008-01-01

    Many human diseases, including Fanconi anemia, hemophilia B, neurofibromatosis, and phenylketonuria, can be caused by 5'-splice-site (5'ss) mutations that are not predicted to disrupt splicing, according to position weight matrices. By using comparative genomics, we identify pairwise dependencies...

  5. Cryptic splice activation but not exon skipping is observed in minigene assays of dystrophin c.9361+1G>A mutation identified by NGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niba, Emma Tabe Eko; Nishida, Atsushi; Tran, Van Khanh; Vu, Dung Chi; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Awano, Hiroyuki; Lee, Tomoko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Hisahide; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2017-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) discloses nucleotide changes in the genome. Mutations at splicing regulatory elements are expected to cause splicing errors, such as exon skipping, cryptic splice site activation, partial exon loss or intron retention. In dystrophinopathy patients, prediction of splicing outcomes is essential to determine the phenotype: either severe Duchenne or mild Becker muscular dystrophy, based on the reading frame rule. In a Vietnamese patient, NGS identified a c.9361+1G>A mutation in the dystrophin gene and an additional DNA variation of A>G at +117 bases in intron 64. To ascertain the consequences of these DNA changes on dystrophin splicing, minigene constructs were prepared inserting dystrophin exon 64 plus various lengths of intron 64. Exon 64 skipping was observed in the minigene construct with 160 nucleotide (nt) of intron 64 sequence with both c.9361+1A and +117G. In contrast, minigene constructs with larger flanking intronic domains resulted in cryptic splice site activation rather than exon skipping. Meanwhile, the cryptic splice site activation was induced even in +117G when intron 64 was elongated to 272 nt and longer. It was expected that cryptic splice site activation is an in vivo splicing outcome.

  6. Splicing Express: a software suite for alternative splicing analysis using next-generation sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Kroll, Jose E.; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; de Souza, Sandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation. Alternative splicing events (ASEs) are prevalent in the transcriptome of eukaryotic species and are known to influence many biological phenomena. The identification and quantification of these events are crucial for a better understanding of biological processes. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have allowed deep characterization of transcriptomes and made it possible to address these issues. ASEs analysis, however, represents a challenging task especially when many dif...

  7. A missense mutation (Q279R) in the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene, responsible for hereditary tyrosinemia, acts as a splicing mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreumont, N; Poudrier, J A; Bergeron, A; Levy, H L; Baklouti, F; Tanguay, R M

    2001-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type I, the most severe disease of the tyrosine catabolic pathway is caused by a deficiency in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). A patient showing few of the symptoms associated with the disease, was found to be a compound heterozygote for a splice mutation, IVS6-1g->t, and a putative missense mutation, Q279R. Analysis of FAH expression in liver sections obtained after resection for hepatocellular carcinoma revealed a mosaic pattern of expression. No FAH was found in tumor regions while a healthy region contained enzyme-expressing nodules. Analysis of DNA from a FAH expressing region showed that the expression of the protein was due to correction of the Q279R mutation. RT-PCR was used to assess if Q279R RNA was produced in the liver cells and in fibroblasts from the patient. Normal mRNA was found in the liver region where the mutation had reverted while splicing intermediates were found in non-expressing regions suggesting that the Q279R mutation acted as a splicing mutation in vivo. Sequence of transcripts showed skipping of exon 8 alone or together with exon 9. Using minigenes in transfection assays, the Q279R mutation was shown to induce skipping of exon 9 when placed in a constitutive splicing environment. These data suggest that the putative missense mutation Q279R in the FAH gene acts as a splicing mutation in vivo. Moreover FAH expression can be partially restored in certain liver cells as a result of a reversion of the Q279R mutation and expansion of the corrected cells.

  8. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome.

  9. Depletion of somatic mutations in splicing-associated sequences in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Laurence D; Batada, Nizar N

    2017-11-07

    An important goal of cancer genomics is to identify systematically cancer-causing mutations. A common approach is to identify sites with high ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations; however, if synonymous mutations are under purifying selection, this methodology leads to identification of false-positive mutations. Here, using synonymous somatic mutations (SSMs) identified in over 4000 tumours across 15 different cancer types, we sought to test this assumption by focusing on coding regions required for splicing. Exon flanks, which are enriched for sequences required for splicing fidelity, have ~ 17% lower SSM density compared to exonic cores, even after excluding canonical splice sites. While it is impossible to eliminate a mutation bias of unknown cause, multiple lines of evidence support a purifying selection model above a mutational bias explanation. The flank/core difference is not explained by skewed nucleotide content, replication timing, nucleosome occupancy or deficiency in mismatch repair. The depletion is not seen in tumour suppressors, consistent with their role in positive tumour selection, but is otherwise observed in cancer-associated and non-cancer genes, both essential and non-essential. Consistent with a role in splicing modulation, exonic splice enhancers have a lower SSM density before and after controlling for nucleotide composition; moreover, flanks at the 5' end of the exons have significantly lower SSM density than at the 3' end. These results suggest that the observable mutational spectrum of cancer genomes is not simply a product of various mutational processes and positive selection, but might also be shaped by negative selection.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis and a donor splice site mutation in fibrillin in a family with Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, M.; Vandemark, N.; Wang, M.; Han, J.; Rao, V.H. (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (United States)); Velinov, M.; Tsipouras, P. (Univ. of Connecticut Health Sciences Center, Farmington (United States)); Wargowski, D.; Becker, J.; Robertson, W.; Droste, S. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The Marfan syndrome, an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder, is manifested by abnormalities in the cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. Recently, fibrillin, an elastic-associated microfibrillar glycoprotein, has been linked to the Marfan syndrome, and fibrillin mutations in affected individuals have been documented. In this study, genetic linkage analysis with fibrillin-specific markers was used to establish the prenatal diagnosis in an 11-wk-gestation fetus in a four-generation Marfan kindred. At birth, skeletal changes suggestive of the Marfan syndrome were observed. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of the fibrillin gene mRNA detected a deletion of 123 bp in one allele in affected relatives. This deletion corresponds to an exon encoding an epidermal growth factor-like motif. Examination of genomic DNA showed a G[yields]C transversion at the +1 consensus donor splice site. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Genome and transcriptome sequencing of lung cancers reveal diverse mutational and splicing events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Lee, William; Jiang, Zhaoshi; Chen, Zhongqiang; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Haverty, Peter M; Gnad, Florian; Guan, Yinghui; Gilbert, Houston N; Stinson, Jeremy; Klijn, Christiaan; Guillory, Joseph; Bhatt, Deepali; Vartanian, Steffan; Walter, Kimberly; Chan, Jocelyn; Holcomb, Thomas; Dijkgraaf, Peter; Johnson, Stephanie; Koeman, Julie; Minna, John D; Gazdar, Adi F; Stern, Howard M; Hoeflich, Klaus P; Wu, Thomas D; Settleman, Jeff; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Gentleman, Robert C; Neve, Richard M; Stokoe, David; Modrusan, Zora; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Shames, David S; Zhang, Zemin

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease in terms of both underlying genetic lesions and response to therapeutic treatments. We performed deep whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing on 19 lung cancer cell lines and three lung tumor/normal pairs. Overall, our data show that cell line models exhibit similar mutation spectra to human tumor samples. Smoker and never-smoker cancer samples exhibit distinguishable patterns of mutations. A number of epigenetic regulators, including KDM6A, ASH1L, SMARCA4, and ATAD2, are frequently altered by mutations or copy number changes. A systematic survey of splice-site mutations identified 106 splice site mutations associated with cancer specific aberrant splicing, including mutations in several known cancer-related genes. RAC1b, an isoform of the RAC1 GTPase that includes one additional exon, was found to be preferentially up-regulated in lung cancer. We further show that its expression is significantly associated with sensitivity to a MAP2K (MEK) inhibitor PD-0325901. Taken together, these data present a comprehensive genomic landscape of a large number of lung cancer samples and further demonstrate that cancer-specific alternative splicing is a widespread phenomenon that has potential utility as therapeutic biomarkers. The detailed characterizations of the lung cancer cell lines also provide genomic context to the vast amount of experimental data gathered for these lines over the decades, and represent highly valuable resources for cancer biology.

  12. Two novel splicing mutations in the SLC45A2 gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism Type IV by unmasking cryptic splice sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straniero, Letizia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Soldà, Giulia; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Andreucci, Elena; Bargiacchi, Sara; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Asselta, Rosanna; Primignani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type IV (OCA4) is one of the four commonly recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the SLC45A2 gene. Here, we investigated the genetic basis of OCA4 in an Italian child. The mutational screening of the SLC45A2 gene identified two novel potentially pathogenic splicing mutations: a synonymous transition (c.888G>A) involving the last nucleotide of exon 3 and a single-nucleotide insertion (c.1156+2dupT) within the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of intron 5. As computer-assisted analysis for mutant splice-site prediction was not conclusive, we investigated the effects on pre-mRNA splicing of these two variants by using an in vitro minigene approach. Production of mutant transcripts in HeLa cells demonstrated that both mutations cause the almost complete abolishment of the physiologic donor splice site, with the concomitant unmasking of cryptic donor splice sites. To our knowledge, this work represents the first in-depth molecular characterization of splicing defects in a OCA4 patient.

  13. A Missense Mutation (Q279R) in the Fumarylacetoacetate Hydrolase Gene, Responsible for Hereditary Tyrosinemia, Acts as a Splicing Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Dreumont, Natacha; Poudrier, Jacques A; Bergeron, Anne; Baklouti, Faouzi; Tanguay, Robert M; Levy, Harvey Louis

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background Tyrosinemia type I, the most severe disease of the tyrosine catabolic pathway is caused by a deficiency in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). A patient showing few of the symptoms associated with the disease, was found to be a compound heterozygote for a splice mutation, IVS6-1g->t, and a putative missense mutation, Q279R. Analysis of FAH expression in liver sections obtained after resection for hepatocellular carcinoma revealed a mosaic pattern of expression. No FAH was...

  14. Analysis of 30 putative BRCA1 splicing mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families identifies exonic splice site mutations that escape in silico prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wappenschmidt

    Full Text Available Screening for pathogenic mutations in breast and ovarian cancer genes such as BRCA1/2, CHEK2 and RAD51C is common practice for individuals from high-risk families. However, test results may be ambiguous due to the presence of unclassified variants (UCV in the concurrent absence of clearly cancer-predisposing mutations. Especially the presence of intronic or exonic variants within these genes that possibly affect proper pre-mRNA processing poses a challenge as their functional implications are not immediately apparent. Therefore, it appears necessary to characterize potential splicing UCV and to develop appropriate classification tools. We investigated 30 distinct BRCA1 variants, both intronic and exonic, regarding their spliceogenic potential by commonly used in silico prediction algorithms (HSF, MaxEntScan along with in vitro transcript analyses. A total of 25 variants were identified spliceogenic, either causing/enhancing exon skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites, or both. Except from a single intronic variant causing minor effects on BRCA1 pre-mRNA processing in our analyses, 23 out of 24 intronic variants were correctly predicted by MaxEntScan, while HSF was less accurate in this cohort. Among the 6 exonic variants analyzed, 4 severely impair correct pre-mRNA processing, while the remaining two have partial effects. In contrast to the intronic alterations investigated, only half of the spliceogenic exonic variants were correctly predicted by HSF and/or MaxEntScan. These data support the idea that exonic splicing mutations are commonly disease-causing and concurrently prone to escape in silico prediction, hence necessitating experimental in vitro splicing analysis.

  15. A novel RNA-splicing mutation in TRAPPC2 gene causing X-linked ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    large Chinese family with SEDT and identified a novel RNA- splicing mutation in the TRAPPC2 gene. Materials and methods. Patients. The proband of this family is 38-year-old man who sought medical attention because of chronic pain in weight-bearing joints. The proband's height is 135 cm and his arm span is 155 cm.

  16. Ab initio prediction of mutation-induced cryptic splice-site activation and exon skipping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Divina, Petr; Kvitkovicova, Andrea; Buratti, E.; Vorechovsky, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2009), s. 759-765 ISSN 1018-4813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : mutation * cryptic splice site * exon skipping Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.564, year: 2009

  17. Intronic PAH gene mutations cause a splicing defect by a novel mechanism involving U1snRNP binding downstream of the 5' splice site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Pizarro, Ainhoa; Dembic, Maja; Pérez, Belén

    2018-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), one of the most common inherited diseases of amino acid metabolism, is caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Recently, PAH exon 11 was identified as a vulnerable exon due to a weak 3' splice site, with different exonic mutations affecting exon 11...

  18. Endogenous Multiple Exon Skipping and Back-Splicing at the DMD Mutation Hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kameyama, Toshiki; Saito, Takashi; Masuda, Satoru; Tanihata, Jun; Nagata, Tetsuya; Mayeda, Akila; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2016-10-13

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscular disorder. It was reported that multiple exon skipping (MES), targeting exon 45-55 of the DMD gene, might improve patients' symptoms because patients who have a genomic deletion of all these exons showed very mild symptoms. Thus, exon 45-55 skipping treatments for DMD have been proposed as a potential clinical cure. Herein, we detected the expression of endogenous exons 44-56 connected mRNA transcript of the DMD using total RNAs derived from human normal skeletal muscle by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and identified a total of eight types of MES products around the hotspot. Surprisingly, the 5' splice sites of recently reported post-transcriptional introns (remaining introns after co-transcriptional splicing) act as splicing donor sites for MESs. We also tested exon combinations to generate DMD circular RNAs (circRNAs) and determined the preferential splice sites of back-splicing, which are involved not only in circRNA generation, but also in MESs. Our results fit the current circRNA-generation model, suggesting that upstream post-transcriptional introns trigger MES and generate circRNA because its existence is critical for the intra-intronic interaction or for extremely distal splicing.

  19. Novel aberrant splicings caused by a splice site mutation (IVS1a+5g>a) in F7 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiulan; Wu, Wenman; Fu, Qihua; Wang, Xuefeng; Hu, Yiqun; Wang, Hongli; Wang, Zhenyi

    2005-06-01

    Low FVII coagulant activity (FVII:C 8.2%) and antigen level (FVII:Ag 34.1%) in a 46-year-old Chinese male led to a diagnosis of coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified in his F 7 gene:a G to A transition in the 5' donor splice site of intron 1a (IVS1a+5g>a) and a T to G transition at the nucleotide position 10961 in exon 8, resulting in a His to Gln substitution at amino acid residue 348. An analysis of ectopic transcripts of F7 in the leukocytes of the patient reveals that the mutation (IVS1a+5g>a) is associated with two novel aberrant patterns of splicing. The predominant alternative transcript removes exon 2, but retains intron 3, which shifts the reading frame and predicts a premature translation termination at the nucleotide positions 2-4 in intron 3. The minor alternative transcript skips both exon 2 and exon 3 (FVII Delta 2, 3), leading to an in-frame deletion of the propeptide and gamma-carboxylated glutamic acid (Gla) domains of mature FVII protein. In vitro expression studies of the alternative transcript FVII Delta 2,3 by transient transfection of HEK 293 cells with PcDNA 3.1(-) expression vector showed that although the mutant protein could be secreted, no pro-coagulation activity was detected. The coexistence of the two abnormal transcripts and a heterozygous mutation His348Gln, explained the patient's phenotype.

  20. Splice, insertion-deletion and nonsense mutations that perturb the phenylalanine hydroxylase transcript cause phenylketonuria in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, Murali D; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Kiran, Manjari; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A; Devi, Radha Rama; Ranganath, Prajnya; Dalal, Ashwin; Bashyam, Leena; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Muranjan, Mamta; Puri, Ratna D; Verma, Ishwar C; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kadandale, Jayarama S

    2014-03-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by mutational inactivation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Missense mutations are the most common PAH mutation type detected in PKU patients worldwide. We performed PAH mutation analysis in 27 suspected Indian PKU families (including 7 from our previous study) followed by structure and function analysis of specific missense and splice/insertion-deletion/nonsense mutations, respectively. Of the 27 families, disease-causing mutations were detected in 25. A total of 20 different mutations were identified of which 7 "unique" mutations accounted for 13 of 25 mutation positive families. The unique mutations detected exclusively in Indian PKU patients included three recurrent mutations detected in three families each. The 20 mutations included only 5 missense mutations in addition to 5 splice, 4 each nonsense and insertion-deletion mutations, a silent variant in coding region and a 3'UTR mutation. One deletion and two nonsense mutations were characterized to confirm significant reduction in mutant transcript levels possibly through activation of nonsense mediated decay. All missense mutations affected conserved amino acid residues and sequence and structure analysis suggested significant perturbations in the enzyme activity of respective mutant proteins. This is probably the first report of identification of a significantly low proportion of missense PAH mutations from PKU families and together with the presence of a high proportion of splice, insertion-deletion, and nonsense mutations, points to a unique PAH mutation profile in Indian PKU patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. IVS8+1 DelG, a Novel Splice Site Mutation Causing DFNA5 Deafness in a Chinese Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Yang, Mei-Na; Shen, Xiao-Fei; Wei, Qin-Jun; Yao, Jun; Lu, Ya-Jie; Cao, Xin; Xing, Guang-Qian

    2015-09-20

    Nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL) is highly heterogeneous, in which more than 90 causative genes have currently been identified. DFNA5 is one of the deafness genes that known to cause autosomal dominant NSHL. Until date, only five DFNA5 mutations have been described in eight families worldwide. In this study, we reported the identification of a novel pathogenic mutation causing DFNA5 deafness in a five-generation Chinese family. After detailed clinical evaluations of this family, the genomic DNA of three affected individuals was selected for targeted exome sequencing of 101 known deafness genes, as well as mitochondrial DNA and microRNA regions. Co-segregation analysis between the hearing loss and the candidate variant was confirmed in available family members by direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Sanger sequencing. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was performed to investigate the potential effect of the pathogenic mutation on messenger RNA splicing. Clinical evaluations revealed a similar deafness phenotype in this family to that of previously reported DFNA5 families with autosomal dominant, late-onset hearing loss. Molecular analysis identified a novel splice site mutation in DFNA5 intron 8 (IVS8+1 delG). The mutation segregated with the hearing loss of the family and was absent in 120 unrelated control DNA samples of Chinese origin. RT-PCR showed skipping of exon 8 in the mutant transcript. We identified a novel DFNA5 mutation IVS8+1 delG in a Chinese family which led to skipping of exon 8. This is the sixth DFNA5 mutation relates to hearing loss and the second one in DFNA5 intron 8. Our findings provide further support to the hypothesis that the DFNA5-associated hearing loss represents a mechanism of gain-of-function.

  2. Identification of a novel splice-site mutation in MIP in a Chinese congenital cataract family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin; Jin, Chongfei; Wang, Wei; Tang, Xiajing; Shentu, Xingchao; Wu, Renyi; Wang, Yao; Xia, Kun; Yao, Ke

    2009-01-01

    To map the locus and identify the gene causing autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC) with "snail-like" phenotype in a large Chinese family. Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were conducted on family members and documented by slit lamp photography. Linkage analysis was performed with an initial 41 microsatellite markers, then 3 additional markers flanking the major intrinsic protein (MIP) gene. Mutations were screened by DNA sequencing and verified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Significant two-point LOD scores were obtained at 5 markers flanking MIP with the highest 3.08 (theta=0.00) at marker D12S1632. Mutation screening of MIP identified a heterozygous G>A transition at the acceptor splice site of intron 3 (IVS3 -1 G>A), abolishing a BstSF I restriction site in one allele of all the affected individuals. We identified a novel splice-site mutation (IVS3 -1 G>A in MIP) in a Chinese ADCC family. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an acceptor splice-site mutation in human genes associated with ADCC.

  3. Features generated for computational splice-site prediction correspond to functional elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbur W John

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate selection of splice sites during the splicing of precursors to messenger RNA requires both relatively well-characterized signals at the splice sites and auxiliary signals in the adjacent exons and introns. We previously described a feature generation algorithm (FGA that is capable of achieving high classification accuracy on human 3' splice sites. In this paper, we extend the splice-site prediction to 5' splice sites and explore the generated features for biologically meaningful splicing signals. Results We present examples from the observed features that correspond to known signals, both core signals (including the branch site and pyrimidine tract and auxiliary signals (including GGG triplets and exon splicing enhancers. We present evidence that features identified by FGA include splicing signals not found by other methods. Conclusion Our generated features capture known biological signals in the expected sequence interval flanking splice sites. The method can be easily applied to other species and to similar classification problems, such as tissue-specific regulatory elements, polyadenylation sites, promoters, etc.

  4. Transcript specificity in yeast pre-mRNA splicing revealed by mutations in core spliceosomal components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Pleiss

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate expression of most eukaryotic genes requires the removal of introns from their pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs, a process catalyzed by the spliceosome. In higher eukaryotes a large family of auxiliary factors known as SR proteins can improve the splicing efficiency of transcripts containing suboptimal splice sites by interacting with distinct sequences present in those pre-mRNAs. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks functional equivalents of most of these factors; thus, it has been unclear whether the spliceosome could effectively distinguish among transcripts. To address this question, we have used a microarray-based approach to examine the effects of mutations in 18 highly conserved core components of the spliceosomal machinery. The kinetic profiles reveal clear differences in the splicing defects of particular pre-mRNA substrates. Most notably, the behaviors of ribosomal protein gene transcripts are generally distinct from other intron-containing transcripts in response to several spliceosomal mutations. However, dramatically different behaviors can be seen for some pairs of transcripts encoding ribosomal protein gene paralogs, suggesting that the spliceosome can readily distinguish between otherwise highly similar pre-mRNAs. The ability of the spliceosome to distinguish among its different substrates may therefore offer an important opportunity for yeast to regulate gene expression in a transcript-dependent fashion. Given the high level of conservation of core spliceosomal components across eukaryotes, we expect that these results will significantly impact our understanding of how regulated splicing is controlled in higher eukaryotes as well.

  5. Functional characterization of two novel splicing mutations in the OCA2 gene associated with oculocutaneous albinism type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Straniero, Letizia; Asselta, Rosanna; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Soldà, Giulia; Primignani, Paola

    2014-03-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type II (OCA2) is one of the four commonly-recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the OCA2 gene. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of OCA2 in two siblings and one unrelated patient. The mutational screening of the OCA2 gene identified two hitherto-unknown putative splicing mutations. The first one (c.1503+5G>A), identified in an Italian proband and her affected sibling, lies in the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of OCA2 intron 14 (IVS14+5G>A), in compound heterozygosity with a frameshift mutation, c.1450_1451insCTGCCCTGACA, which is predicted to determine the premature termination of the polypeptide chain (p.I484Tfs*19). In-silico prediction of the effect of the IVS14+5G>A mutation on splicing showed a score reduction for the mutant splice site and indicated the possible activation of a newly-created deep-intronic acceptor splice site. The second mutation is a synonymous transition (c.2139G>A, p.K713K) involving the last nucleotide of exon 20. This mutation was found in a young African albino patient in compound heterozygosity with a previously-reported OCA2 missense mutation (p.T404M). In-silico analysis predicted that the mutant c.2139G>A allele would result in the abolition of the splice donor site. The effects on splicing of these two novel mutations were investigated using an in-vitro hybrid-minigene approach that led to the demonstration of the causal role of the two mutations and to the identification of aberrant transcript variants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An Analysis of the Sensitivity of Proteogenomic Mapping of Somatic Mutations and Novel Splicing Events in Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggles, Kelly V.; Tang, Zuojian; Wang, Xuya; Grover, Himanshu; Askenazi, Manor; Teubl, Jennifer; Cao, Song; McLellan, Michael D.; Clauser, Karl R.; Tabb, David L.; Mertins, Philipp; Slebos, Robbert; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Li, Shunqiang; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Xie, Ling; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Sun, Shisheng; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Perou, Charles M.; Chen, Xian; Davies, Sherri R.; Maher, Christopher A.; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Rodland, Karen D.; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Ding, Li; Townsend, R. Reid; Rodriguez, Henry; Chan, Daniel; Smith, Richard D.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Carr, Steven A.; Payne, Samuel; Ellis, Matthew J.; Fenyő, David

    2015-12-02

    Improvements in mass spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing provide a new opportunity to determine whether polymorphisms, mutations and splice variants identified in cancer cells are translated. Herein we therefore describe a proteogenomic data integration tool (QUILTS) and illustrate its application to whole genome, transcriptome and global MS peptide sequence datasets generated from a pair of luminal and basal-like breast cancer patient derived xenografts (PDX). The sensitivity of proteogenomic analysis for singe nucleotide variant (SNV) expression and novel splice junction (NSJ) detection was probed using multiple MS/MS process replicates. Despite over thirty sample replicates, only about 10% of all SNV (somatic and germline) were detected by both DNA and RNA sequencing were observed as peptides. An even smaller proportion of peptides corresponding to NSJ observed by RNA sequencing were detected (<0.1%). Peptides mapping to DNA-detected SNV without a detectable mRNA transcript were also observed demonstrating the transcriptome coverage was also incomplete (~80%). In contrast to germ-line variants, somatic variants were less likely to be detected at the peptide level in the basal-like tumor than the luminal tumor raising the possibility of differential translation or protein degradation effects. In conclusion, the QUILTS program integrates DNA, RNA and peptide sequencing to assess the degree to which somatic mutations are translated and therefore biologically active. By identifying gaps in sequence coverage QUILTS benchmarks current technology and assesses progress towards whole cancer proteome and transcriptome analysis.

  7. The rare nonsense mutation in p53 triggers alternative splicing to produce a protein capable of inducing apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny M Makarov

    Full Text Available P53 protein is more frequently mutated in human tumours compared with the other proteins. While the majority of the p53 mutations, especially within its DNA-binding domain, lead to the loss of the wild-type function, there are accumulating data demonstrating that the p53 mutants gain tumour promoting activities; the latter triggers a revitalised interest in functional analysis of the p53 mutants. A systematic screening for p53 mutations in surgical materials from patients with glioma revealed a 378C>G mutation that creates a stop codon at the position of amino acid residue 126. The mutation eliminates the recognition site for the restriction endonuclease Sca I that allowed us to carry out RFLP analysis of DNA extracted from the clinical samples and suggests that this mutation is more frequent than is documented in the p53 databases. Both the ECV-304 and EJ cell lines, that probably originate from the bladder carcinoma T24 cell line, were confirmed to contain the homozygous 378C>G mutation but were shown to produce the p53 protein of expected full-length size detected by Western blotting. We provide evidence that the 378C>G mutation generates an alternative 3' splice site (ss which is more often used instead of the authentic upstream 3' ss, driving the production of mRNA encoding the protein with the single amino acid deletion (p53ΔY126. Using endogenous expression, we demonstrated that the p53ΔY126 protein is nearly as active as the wild type protein in inducing the p21/Waf1 expression and apoptosis.

  8. A novel AVPR2 splice site mutation leads to partial X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in two brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Adams, David; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Ramnitz, Mary Scott; Raygada, Margarita; Golas, Gretchen; Faucz, Fabio R; Nilsson, Ola; Nella, Aikaterini A; Dileepan, Kavitha; Lodish, Maya; Lee, Paul; Tifft, Cynthia; Markello, Thomas; Gahl, William; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI, OMIM#304800) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin (AVP, OMIM*192340) receptor type 2 (AVPR2, OMIM*300538) gene. A 20-month-old boy and his 8-year-old brother presented with polyuria, polydipsia, and failure to thrive. Both boys demonstrated partial DDAVP (1-desamino-8-D AVP or desmopressin) responses; thus, NDI diagnosis was delayed. While routine sequencing of AVPR2 showed a potential splice site variant, it was not until exome sequencing confirmed the AVPR2 splice site variant and did not reveal any more likely candidates that the patients' diagnosis was made and proper treatment was instituted. Both patients were hemizygous for two AVPR2 variants predicted in silico to affect AVPR2 messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. A minigene assay revealed that the novel AVPR2 c.276A>G mutation creates a novel splice acceptor site leading to 5' truncation of AVPR2 exon 2 in HEK293 human kidney cells. Both patients have been treated with high-dose DDAVP with a remarkable improvement of their symptoms and accelerated linear growth and weight gain. We present here a unique case of partial X-linked NDI due to an AVPR2 splice site mutation; patients with diabetes insipidus of unknown etiology may harbor splice site mutations that are initially underestimated in their pathogenicity on sequence analysis. • X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by AVPR2 mutations, and disease severity can vary depending on the functional effect of the mutation. What is New: • We demonstrate here that a splice site mutation in AVPR2 leads to partial X-linked NDI in two brothers. • Treatment with high-dose DDAVP led to improvement of polyuria and polydipsia, weight gain, and growth.

  9. BAP1 missense mutation c.2054 A>T (p.E685V completely disrupts normal splicing through creation of a novel 5' splice site in a human mesothelioma cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianne Morrison

    Full Text Available BAP1 is a tumor suppressor gene that is lost or deleted in diverse cancers, including uveal mela¬noma, malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM, clear cell renal carcinoma, and cholangiocarcinoma. Recently, BAP1 germline mutations have been reported in families with combinations of these same cancers. A particular challenge for mutation screening is the classification of non-truncating BAP1 sequence variants because it is not known whether these subtle changes can affect the protein function sufficiently to predispose to cancer development. Here we report mRNA splicing analysis on a homozygous substitution mutation, BAP1 c. 2054 A&T (p.Glu685Val, identified in an MPM cell line derived from a mesothelioma patient. The mutation occurred at the 3rd nucleotide from the 3' end of exon 16. RT-PCR, cloning and subsequent sequencing revealed several aberrant splicing products not observed in the controls: 1 a 4 bp deletion at the end of exon 16 in all clones derived from the major splicing product. The BAP1 c. 2054 A&T mutation introduced a new 5' splice site (GU, which resulted in the deletion of 4 base pairs and presumably protein truncation; 2 a variety of alternative splicing products that led to retention of different introns: introns 14-16; introns 15-16; intron 14 and intron 16; 3 partial intron 14 and 15 retentions caused by activation of alternative 3' splice acceptor sites (AG in the introns. Taken together, we were unable to detect any correctly spliced mRNA transcripts in this cell line. These results suggest that aberrant splicing caused by this mutation is quite efficient as it completely abolishes normal splicing through creation of a novel 5' splice site and activation of cryptic splice sites. These data support the conclusion that BAP1 c.2054 A&T (p.E685V variant is a pathogenic mutation and contributes to MPM through disruption of normal splicing.

  10. A novel splicing mutation in COL1A1 gene caused type I osteogenesis imperfecta in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Zhang, Yuhui; Long, Zhigao; Zhao, Ding; Guo, Zhenxin; Xue, Jinjie; Xie, Zhiguo; Xiong, Zhimin; Xu, Xiaojuan; Su, Wei; Wang, Bing; Xia, Kun; Hu, Zhengmao

    2012-07-10

    Osteogenesis imperfect (OI) is a heritable connective tissue disorder with bone fragility as a cardinal manifestation, accompanied by short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hyperlaxity of ligaments and skin, blue sclerae and hearing loss. Dominant form of OI is caused by mutations in the type I procollagen genes, COL1A1/A2. Here we identified a novel splicing mutation c.3207+1G>A (GenBank ID: JQ236861) in the COL1A1 gene that caused type I OI in a Chinese family. RNA splicing analysis proved that this mutation created a new splicing site at c.3200, and then led to frameshift. This result further enriched the mutation spectrum of type I procollagen genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutations in the human adenosine deaminase gene that affect protein structure and RNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akeson, A.L.; Wiginton, D.A.; States, C.J.; Perme, C.M.; Dusing, M.R.; Hutton, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is one cause of the genetic disease severe combined immunodeficiency. To identify mutations responsible for ADA deficiency, the authors synthesized cDNAs to ADA mRNAs from two cell lines, GM2756 and GM2825A, derived from ADA-deficient immunodeficient patients. Sequence analysis of GM2756 cDNA clones revealed a different point mutation in each allele that causes amino acid changes of alanine to valine and arginine to histidine. One allele of GM2825A also has a point mutation that causes an alanine to valine substitution. The other allele of GM2825A was found to produce an mRNA in which exon 4 had been spliced out but had no other detrimental mutations. S1 nuclease mapping of GM2825A mRNA showed equal abundance of the full-length ADA mRNA and the ADA mRNA that was missing exon 4. Several of the ADA cDNA clones extended 5' of the major initiation start site, indicating multiple start sites for ADA transcription. The point mutations in GM2756 and GM2825A and the absence of exon 4 in GM2825A appear to be directly responsible for the ADA deficiency. Comparison of a number of normal and mutant ADA cDNA sequences showed a number of changes in the third base of codons. These change do not affect the amino acid sequence. Analyses of ADA cDNAs from different cell lines detected aberrant RNA species that either included intron 7 or excluded exon 7. Their presence is a result of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and is not related to mutations that cause ADA deficiency

  12. Developmental splicing deregulation in leukodystrophies related to EIF2B mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélia Huyghe

    Full Text Available Leukodystrophies (LD are rare inherited disorders that primarily affect the white matter (WM of the central nervous system. The large heterogeneity of LD results from the diversity of the genetically determined defects that interfere with glial cells functions. Astrocytes have been identified as the primary target of LD with cystic myelin breakdown including those related to mutations in the ubiquitous translation initiation factor eIF2B. EIF2B is involved in global protein synthesis and its regulation under normal and stress conditions. Little is known about how eIF2B mutations have a major effect on WM. We performed a transcriptomic analysis using fibroblasts of 10 eIF2B-mutated patients with a severe phenotype and 10 age matched patients with other types of LD in comparison to control fibroblasts. ANOVA was used to identify genes that were statistically significantly differentially expressed at basal state and after ER-stress. The pattern of differentially expressed genes between basal state and ER-stress did not differ significantly among each of the three conditions. However, 70 genes were specifically differentially expressed in eIF2B-mutated fibroblasts whatever the stress conditions tested compared to controls, 96% being under-expressed. Most of these genes were involved in mRNA regulation and mitochondrial metabolism. The 13 most representative genes, including genes belonging to the Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (HNRNP family, described as regulators of splicing events and stability of mRNA, were dysregulated during the development of eIF2B-mutated brains. HNRNPH1, F and C mRNA were over-expressed in foetus but under-expressed in children and adult brains. The abnormal regulation of HNRNP expression in the brain of eIF2B-mutated patients was concomitant with splicing dysregulation of the main genes involved in glial maturation such as PLP1 for oligodendrocytes and GFAP in astrocytes. These findings demonstrate a developmental

  13. SQSTM1 splice site mutation in distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucelli, Robert C; Arhzaouy, Khalid; Pestronk, Alan; Pittman, Sara K; Rojas, Luisa; Sue, Carolyn M; Evilä, Anni; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne; Harms, Matthew B; Weihl, Conrad C

    2015-08-25

    To identify the genetic etiology and characterize the clinicopathologic features of a novel distal myopathy. We performed whole-exome sequencing on a family with an autosomal dominant distal myopathy and targeted exome sequencing in 1 patient with sporadic distal myopathy, both with rimmed vacuolar pathology. We also evaluated the pathogenicity of identified mutations using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and expression studies. Sequencing identified a likely pathogenic c.1165+1 G>A splice donor variant in SQSTM1 in the affected members of 1 family and in an unrelated patient with sporadic distal myopathy. Affected patients had late-onset distal lower extremity weakness, myopathic features on EMG, and muscle pathology demonstrating rimmed vacuoles with both TAR DNA-binding protein 43 and SQSTM1 inclusions. The c.1165+1 G>A SQSTM1 variant results in the expression of 2 alternatively spliced SQSTM1 proteins: 1 lacking the C-terminal PEST2 domain and another lacking the C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, both of which have distinct patterns of cellular and skeletal muscle localization. SQSTM1 is an autophagic adaptor that shuttles aggregated and ubiquitinated proteins to the autophagosome for degradation via its C-terminal UBA domain. Similar to mutations in VCP, dominantly inherited mutations in SQSTM1 are now associated with rimmed vacuolar myopathy, Paget disease of bone, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and frontotemporal dementia. Our data further suggest a pathogenic connection between the disparate phenotypes. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Splice site mutations in mismatch repair genes and risk of cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that splice site variations in MSH2 and MLH1 are associated with increased risk of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and of cancer in general in the general population. In a cohort of 154 HNPCC patients with sequenced MSH2 and MLH1, we identified four pos......-related cancers and of all cancers combined in the general population. These findings are novel and important in the counseling of HNPCC patients and their relatives.......We tested the hypothesis that splice site variations in MSH2 and MLH1 are associated with increased risk of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and of cancer in general in the general population. In a cohort of 154 HNPCC patients with sequenced MSH2 and MLH1, we identified four...... possible splice-site mutations, which we subsequently genotyped in more than 9,000 individuals from the general population. Allele frequencies in the general population were 0 % for 942+3A>T in MSH2, 0.05 % for 307-19A>G, 0.005 % for 1,667+(2-8)del(taaatca);ins(attt), and 4.4 % for 1039-8T>A in MLH1. Odds...

  15. A BRCA2 mutation incorrectly mapped in the original BRCA2 reference sequence, is a common West Danish founder mutation disrupting mRNA splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Vogel, Ida

    2011-01-01

    Inherited mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The authors have identified a mutation in BRCA2, 7845+1G>A (c.7617+1G>A), not previously regarded as deleterious because of incorrect mapping of the splice junction in the originally...... published genomic reference sequence. This reference sequence is generally used in many laboratories and it maps the mutation 16 base pairs inside intron 15. However, according to the recent reference sequences the mutation is located in the consensus donor splice sequence. By reverse transcriptase analysis......, loss of exon 15 in the final transcript interrupting the open reading frame was demonstrated. Furthermore, the mutation segregates with a cancer phenotype in 18 Danish families. By genetic analysis of more than 3,500 Danish breast/ovarian cancer risk families, the mutation was identified as the most...

  16. Pancreatic α-cell hyperplasia and hyperglucagonemia due to a glucagon receptor splice mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Larger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon stimulates hepatic glucose production by activating specific glucagon receptors in the liver, which in turn increase hepatic glycogenolysis as well as gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis from amino acids. Conversely, glucagon secretion is regulated by concentrations of glucose and amino acids. Disruption of glucagon signaling in rodents results in grossly elevated circulating glucagon levels but no hypoglycemia. Here, we describe a patient carrying a homozygous G to A substitution in the invariant AG dinucleotide found in a 3′ mRNA splice junction of the glucagon receptor gene. Loss of the splice site acceptor consensus sequence results in the deletion of 70 nucleotides encoded by exon 9, which introduces a frame shift and an early termination signal in the receptor mRNA sequence. The mutated receptor neither bound 125I-labeled glucagon nor induced cAMP production upon stimulation with up to 1 μM glucagon. Despite the mutation, the only obvious pathophysiological trait was hyperglucagonemia, hyperaminoacidemia and massive hyperplasia of the pancreatic α-cells assessed by histology. Our case supports the notion of a hepato–pancreatic feedback system, which upon disruption leads to hyperglucagonemia and α-cell hyperplasia, as well as elevated plasma amino acid levels. Together with the glucagon-induced hypoaminoacidemia in glucagonoma patients, our case supports recent suggestions that amino acids may provide the feedback link between the liver and the pancreatic α-cells.

  17. A pan-cancer analysis of transcriptome changes associated with somatic mutations in U2AF1 reveals commonly altered splicing events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela N Brooks

    Full Text Available Although recurrent somatic mutations in the splicing factor U2AF1 (also known as U2AF35 have been identified in multiple cancer types, the effects of these mutations on the cancer transcriptome have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we identified splicing alterations associated with U2AF1 mutations across distinct cancers using DNA and RNA sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Using RNA-Seq data from 182 lung adenocarcinomas and 167 acute myeloid leukemias (AML, in which U2AF1 is somatically mutated in 3-4% of cases, we identified 131 and 369 splicing alterations, respectively, that were significantly associated with U2AF1 mutation. Of these, 30 splicing alterations were statistically significant in both lung adenocarcinoma and AML, including three genes in the Cancer Gene Census, CTNNB1, CHCHD7, and PICALM. Cell line experiments expressing U2AF1 S34F in HeLa cells and in 293T cells provide further support that these altered splicing events are caused by U2AF1 mutation. Consistent with the function of U2AF1 in 3' splice site recognition, we found that S34F/Y mutations cause preferences for CAG over UAG 3' splice site sequences. This report demonstrates consistent effects of U2AF1 mutation on splicing in distinct cancer cell types.

  18. Seemingly neutral polymorphic variants may confer immunity to splicing-inactivating mutations: a synonymous SNP in exon 5 of MCAD protects from deleterious mutations in a flanking exonic splicing enhancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karsten Bork; Sørensen, Suzette; Cartegni, Luca

    2007-01-01

    The idea that point mutations in exons may affect splicing is intriguing and adds an additional layer of complexity when evaluating their possible effects. Even in the best-studied examples, the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we use patient cells, model minigenes, and in vit...

  19. An ENU mutagenesis screen in zebrafish for visual system mutants identifies a novel splice-acceptor site mutation in patched2 that results in Colobomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwoon; Cox, Ben D; Daly, Christina M S; Lee, Chanjae; Nuckels, Richard J; Tittle, Rachel K; Uribe, Rosa A; Gross, Jeffrey M

    2012-12-13

    To identify recessive mutations affecting development and/or maintenance of the zebrafish visual system. A three-generation ENU (N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea)-based forward genetic screen was performed. F3 embryos were screened visually from 1 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf) for ocular abnormalities, and 5 dpf embryos were fixed and processed for cryosectioning, after which eye sections were screened for defects in cellular organization within the retina, lens, and cornea. A combination of PCR and DNA sequencing, in situ hybridization, and pharmacological treatments were used to clone and characterize a coloboma mutant. A total of 126 F2 families were screened, and, from these, 18 recessive mutations were identified that affected eye development. Phenotypes included lens malformations and cataracts, photoreceptor defects, oculocutaneous albinism, microphthalmia, and colobomas. Analysis of one such coloboma mutant, uta(1), identified a splice-acceptor mutation in the patched2 gene that resulted in an in-frame deletion of 19 amino acids that are predicted to contribute to the first extracellular loop of Patched2. ptch2(uta1) mutants possessed elevated Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activity, and blocking the Hh pathway with cyclopamine prevented colobomas in ptch2(uta1) mutant embryos. We have identified 18 recessive mutations affecting development of the zebrafish visual system and we have characterized a novel splice-acceptor site mutation in patched2 that results in enhanced Hh pathway activity and colobomas.

  20. A novel splice mutation in the TP53 gene associated with Leydig cell tumor and primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecher, Chalotte Willemann; Grønbaek, Kirsten; Hasle, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    A 20-month-old boy presented with precocious puberty due to a Leydig cell tumor, and at the age of 6 years with a primitive neuroectodermal brain-tumor (PNET). A novel splice site mutation of the TP53-gene, likely to be associated with a nonfunctional protein, was found in the proband, his father...

  1. MET exon 14 juxtamembrane splicing mutations: clinical and therapeutical perspectives for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, Sara; Gkountakos, Anastasios; Carbognin, Luisa; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-01-01

    The MET proto-oncogene plays crucial roles in cell growth and proliferation, survival and apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion, potentially conditioning the development and progression of the carcinogenesis process. The MET-associated aberrant signaling could be triggered by a variety of mechanisms, such as mutations, gene amplification, increased gene copy number and Met/HGF protein expression. Among the various MET alterations, MET exon 14 splicing abnormalities, causing the loss of the Met juxtamembrane (JM) domain, recently emerged as a new potential oncogenic driver and have been identified and validated across different cancer and histology subtypes. Moreover, this aberration was found to be mutually exclusive with other recognized drivers, thus strongly nominating its potential oncogenic role. Recently, the clinical activity of anti-Met-targeted therapy was demonstrated particularly in patients harboring MET exon 14 skipping lung cancer, resulting in a renewed enthusiasm to further test MET precision therapy in prospective trials. In this review, the key preclinical and clinical data regarding MET exon 14 skipping splicing variants as an actionable genomic aberration in cancer are described, and the perspectives deriving from the validation of such alteration as a potential target, which may further allow driving the therapeutic approach in this molecularly selected patients’ subgroup, are explored. PMID:28164087

  2. The connection between splicing and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrow, Anabella; Kornblihtt, Alberto Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a crucial mechanism for generating protein diversity. Different splice variants of a given protein can display different and even antagonistic biological functions. Therefore, appropriate control of their synthesis is required to assure the complex orchestration of cellular processes within multicellular organisms. Mutations in cisacting splicing elements or changes in the activity of regulatory proteins that compromise the accuracy of either constitutive or alternativ...

  3. A Novel SLC27A4 Splice Acceptor Site Mutation in Great Danes with Ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Julia; Wöhlke, Anne; Mischke, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Annalena; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Küch, Eva-Maria; Naim, Hassan Y; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    Ichthyoses are a group of various different types of hereditary disorders affecting skin cornification. They are characterized by hyperkeratoses of different severity levels and are associated with a dry and scaling skin. Genome-wide association analysis of nine affected and 13 unaffected Great Danes revealed a genome-wide significant peak on chromosome 9 at 57-58 Mb in the region of SLC27A4. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA of SLC27A4 revealed the non-synonymous SNV SLC27A4:g.8684G>A in perfect association with ichthyosis-affection in Great Danes. The mutant transcript of SLC27A4 showed an in-frame loss of 54 base pairs in exon 8 probably induced by a new splice acceptor site motif created by the mutated A- allele of the SNV. Genotyping 413 controls from 35 different breeds of dogs and seven wolves revealed that this mutation could not be found in other populations except in Great Danes. Affected dogs revealed high amounts of mutant transcript but only low levels of the wild type transcript. Targeted analyses of SLC27A4 protein from skin tissues of three affected and two unaffected Great Danes indicated a markedly reduced or not detectable wild type and truncated protein levels in affected dogs but a high expression of wild type SLC27A4 protein in unaffected controls. Our data provide evidence of a new splice acceptor site creating SNV that results in a reduction or loss of intact SLC27A4 protein and probably explains the severe skin phenotype in Great Danes. Genetic testing will allow selective breeding to prevent ichthyosis-affected puppies in the future.

  4. A Novel SLC27A4 Splice Acceptor Site Mutation in Great Danes with Ichthyosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Metzger

    Full Text Available Ichthyoses are a group of various different types of hereditary disorders affecting skin cornification. They are characterized by hyperkeratoses of different severity levels and are associated with a dry and scaling skin. Genome-wide association analysis of nine affected and 13 unaffected Great Danes revealed a genome-wide significant peak on chromosome 9 at 57-58 Mb in the region of SLC27A4. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA of SLC27A4 revealed the non-synonymous SNV SLC27A4:g.8684G>A in perfect association with ichthyosis-affection in Great Danes. The mutant transcript of SLC27A4 showed an in-frame loss of 54 base pairs in exon 8 probably induced by a new splice acceptor site motif created by the mutated A- allele of the SNV. Genotyping 413 controls from 35 different breeds of dogs and seven wolves revealed that this mutation could not be found in other populations except in Great Danes. Affected dogs revealed high amounts of mutant transcript but only low levels of the wild type transcript. Targeted analyses of SLC27A4 protein from skin tissues of three affected and two unaffected Great Danes indicated a markedly reduced or not detectable wild type and truncated protein levels in affected dogs but a high expression of wild type SLC27A4 protein in unaffected controls. Our data provide evidence of a new splice acceptor site creating SNV that results in a reduction or loss of intact SLC27A4 protein and probably explains the severe skin phenotype in Great Danes. Genetic testing will allow selective breeding to prevent ichthyosis-affected puppies in the future.

  5. Transcriptome sequencing reveals potential mechanism of cryptic 3' splice site selection in SF3B1-mutated cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher DeBoever

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the splicing factor SF3B1 are found in several cancer types and have been associated with various splicing defects. Using transcriptome sequencing data from chronic lymphocytic leukemia, breast cancer and uveal melanoma tumor samples, we show that hundreds of cryptic 3' splice sites (3'SSs are used in cancers with SF3B1 mutations. We define the necessary sequence context for the observed cryptic 3' SSs and propose that cryptic 3'SS selection is a result of SF3B1 mutations causing a shift in the sterically protected region downstream of the branch point. While most cryptic 3'SSs are present at low frequency (<10% relative to nearby canonical 3'SSs, we identified ten genes that preferred out-of-frame cryptic 3'SSs. We show that cancers with mutations in the SF3B1 HEAT 5-9 repeats use cryptic 3'SSs downstream of the branch point and provide both a mechanistic model consistent with published experimental data and affected targets that will guide further research into the oncogenic effects of SF3B1 mutation.

  6. Early-onset encephalopathy with epilepsy associated with a novel splice site mutation in SMC1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Nicolas; Lebon, Sébastien; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Billuart, Pierre; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    We report on the clinical and molecular characterization of a female patient with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, who was found to carry a de novo novel splice site mutation in SMC1A. This girl shared some morphologic and anthropometric traits described in patients with clinical diagnosis of Cornelia de Lange syndrome and with SMC1A mutation but also has severe encephalopathy with early-onset epilepsy. In addition, she had midline hand stereotypies and scoliosis leading to the misdiagnosis of a Rett overlap syndrome. Molecular studies found a novel de novo splice site mutation (c.1911 + 1G > T) in SMC1A. This novel splice mutation was associated with an aberrantly processed mRNA that included intron 11 of the gene. Moreover, quantitative approach by RT-PCR showed a severe reduction of the SMC1A transcript suggesting that this aberrant transcript may be unstable and degraded. Taken together, our data suggest that the phenotype may be due to a loss-of-function of SMC1A in this patient. Our findings suggest that loss-of-function mutations of SMC1A may be associated with early-onset encephalopathy with epilepsy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Mutations in SNRPB, encoding components of the core splicing machinery, cause cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacrot, Séverine; Doyard, Mathilde; Huber, Céline; Alibeu, Olivier; Feldhahn, Niklas; Lehalle, Daphné; Lacombe, Didier; Marlin, Sandrine; Nitschke, Patrick; Petit, Florence; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2015-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a developmental disorder characterized by the association of Pierre Robin sequence and posterior rib defects. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in five unrelated CCMS patients revealed five heterozygous variants in the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides B and B1 (SNRPB) gene. This gene includes three transcripts, namely transcripts 1 and 2, encoding components of the core spliceosomal machinery (SmB' and SmB) and transcript 3 undergoing nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. All variants were located in the premature termination codon (PTC)-introducing alternative exon of transcript 3. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in transcript 3 levels in leukocytes of CCMS individuals compared to controls. We conclude that CCMS is due to heterozygous mutations in SNRPB, enhancing inclusion of a SNRPB PTC-introducing alternative exon, and show that this developmental disease is caused by defects in the splicing machinery. Our finding confirms the report of SNRPB mutations in CCMS patients by Lynch et al. (2014) and further extends the clinical and molecular observations. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Novel pre-mRNA splicing of intronically integrated HBV generates oncogenic chimera in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Wong, John K L; Choi, Shing-Wan; Sze, Karen M F; Ho, Daniel W H; Chan, Lo-Kong; Lee, Joyce M F; Man, Kwan; Cherny, Stacey; Yang, Wan-Ling; Wong, Chun-Ming; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ng, Irene O L

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) integration is common in HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and may play an important pathogenic role through the production of chimeric HBV-human transcripts. We aimed to screen the transcriptome for HBV integrations in HCCs. Transcriptome sequencing was performed on paired HBV-associated HCCs and corresponding non-tumorous liver tissues to identify viral-human chimeric sites. Validation was further performed in an expanded cohort of human HCCs. Here we report the discovery of a novel pre-mRNA splicing mechanism in generating HBV-human chimeric protein. This mechanism was exemplified by the formation of a recurrent HBV-cyclin A2 (CCNA2) chimeric transcript (A2S), as detected in 12.5% (6 of 48) of HCC patients, but in none of the 22 non-HCC HBV-associated cirrhotic liver samples examined. Upon the integration of HBV into the intron of the CCNA2 gene, the mammalian splicing machinery utilized the foreign splice sites at 282nt. and 458nt. of the HBV genome to generate a pseudo-exon, forming an in-frame chimeric fusion with CCNA2. The A2S chimeric protein gained a non-degradable property and promoted cell cycle progression, demonstrating its potential oncogenic functions. A pre-mRNA splicing mechanism is involved in the formation of HBV-human chimeric proteins. This represents a novel and possibly common mechanism underlying the formation of HBV-human chimeric transcripts from intronically integrated HBV genome with functional impact. HBV is involved in the mammalian pre-mRNA splicing machinery in the generation of potential tumorigenic HBV-human chimeras. This study also provided insight on the impact of intronic HBV integration with the gain of splice sites in the development of HBV-associated HCC. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An exon skipping-associated nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene uncovers a complex interplay between multiple antagonistic splicing elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disset, A; Bourgeois, C F; Benmalek, N; Claustres, M; Stevenin, J; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2006-03-15

    A nonsense mutation c.4250T>A (p.Leu1417X) in the dystrophin gene of a patient with an intermediate phenotype of muscular dystrophy induces partial in-frame skipping of exon 31. On the basis of UV cross-linking assays and pull-down analysis, we present evidence that the skipping of this exon is because of the creation of an exonic splicing silencer, which acts as a highly specific binding site (UAGACA) for a known repressor protein, hnRNP A1. Recombinant hnRNP A1 represses exon inclusion both in vitro and in vivo upon transient transfection of C2C12 cells with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) minigenes carrying the c.4250T>A mutation. Furthermore, we identified a downstream splicing enhancer in the central region of exon 31. This region functions as a Tra2beta-dependent exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in vitro when inserted into a heterologous splicing reporter, and deletion of the ESE showed that incorporation of exon 31 depends on the Tra2beta-dependent enhancer both in the wild-type and mutant context. We conclude that dystrophin exon 31 contains juxtaposed sequence motifs that collaborate to regulate exon usage. This is the first elucidation of the molecular mechanism leading to exon skipping in the dystrophin gene and allowing the occurrence of a milder phenotype than the expected DMD phenotype. The knowledge of which cis-acting sequence within an exon is important for its definition will be essential for the alternative gene therapy approaches based on modulation of splicing to bypass DMD-causing mutations in the endogenous dystrophin gene.

  10. A splice site mutation in laminin-α2 results in a severe muscular dystrophy and growth abnormalities in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A Gupta

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. In patients, muscle weakness is usually present at or shortly after birth and is progressive in nature. Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A is a form of CMD caused by a defect in the laminin-α2 gene (LAMA2. Laminin-α2 is an extracellular matrix protein that interacts with the dystrophin-dystroglycan (DGC complex in membranes providing stability to muscle fibers. In an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen to develop zebrafish models of neuromuscular diseases, we identified a mutant fish that exhibits severe muscular dystrophy early in development. Genetic mapping identified a splice site mutation in the lama2 gene. This splice site is highly conserved in humans and this mutation results in mis-splicing of RNA and a loss of protein function. Homozygous lama2 mutant zebrafish, designated lama2(cl501/cl501, exhibited reduced motor function and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and died at 8-15 days post fertilization. The skeletal muscles exhibited damaged myosepta and detachment of myofibers in the affected fish. Laminin-α2 deficiency also resulted in growth defects in the brain and eye of the mutant fish. This laminin-α2 deficient mutant fish represents a novel disease model to develop therapies for modulating splicing defects in congenital muscular dystrophies and to restore the muscle function in human patients with CMD.

  11. A family with attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis due to a mutation in the alternatively spliced region of APC exon 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J; Simms, L A; Tarish, J; Buttenshaw, R; Knight, N; Anderson, G J; Bell, A; Leggett, B

    1998-01-01

    A family is presented with attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis of variable phenotype. The clinical features range from sparse right-sided polyposis and cancer in the proximal colon at the age of 34 to pan-colonic polyposis and cancer at the age of 68. Rectal sparing is common to all affected members. Heteroduplex analysis detected bands of altered mobility in exon 9 of the APC gene in all affected family members. Subsequently, a frameshift mutation was found in the alternatively spliced region of exon 9 at codon 398 which resulted in a stop signal 4 codons downstream. Alternatively spliced transcripts that delete the mutation were readily amplified from normal colonic mucosa and therefore create a mechanism for the attenuated phenotype seen in this family.

  12. A Novel Splicing Mutation of KIT Results in Piebaldism and Auburn Hair Color in a Chinese Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-jia Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development, which is mostly caused by KIT gene. The key characteristics of piebaldism include localized poliosis, congenital leukoderma, and other variable manifestations. The previous study has illustrated that the homogeneous MC1R (a gene which is associated with the hair color variant (p.I120T coordinating with KIT mutation may lead to auburn hair color and piebaldism. In this study, we have investigated a Chinese family with piebaldism and auburn hair color; the mutation screening of KIT and MC1R genes identified that only a splicing mutation (c. 2484+1G>A of KIT gene cosegregated with the auburn hair color and piebaldism. The data of this study and others suggests that the KIT mutation may causes of the auburn hair color in the piebaldism patients.

  13. A novel splicing silencer generated by DMD exon 45 deletion junction could explain upstream exon 44 skipping that modifies dystrophinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwianingsih, Ery Kus; Malueka, Rusdy Ghazali; Nishida, Atsushi; Itoh, Kyoko; Lee, Tomoko; Yagi, Mariko; Iijima, Kazumoto; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2014-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a progressive muscle-wasting disease, is mostly caused by exon deletion mutations in the DMD gene. The reading frame rule explains that out-of-frame deletions lead to muscle dystrophin deficiency in DMD. In outliers to this rule, deletion junction sequences have never previously been explored as splicing modulators. In a Japanese case, we identified a single exon 45 deletion in the patient's DMD gene, indicating out-of-frame mutation. However, immunohistochemical examination disclosed weak dystrophin signals in his muscle. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of DMD exons 42 to 47 revealed a major normally spliced product with exon 45 deletion and an additional in-frame product with deletion of both exons 44 and 45, indicating upstream exon 44 skipping. We considered the latter to underlie the observed dystrophin expression. Remarkably, the junction sequence cloned by PCR walking abolished the splicing enhancer activity of the upstream intron in a chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA in vitro splicing. Furthermore, antisense oligonucleotides directed against the junction site counteracted this effect. These indicated that the junction sequence was a splicing silencer that induced upstream exon 44 skipping. It was strongly suggested that creation of splicing regulator is a modifier of dystrophinopathy.

  14. A splice acceptor mutation in C. elegans daf-19/Rfx disrupts functional specialization of male-specific ciliated neurons but does not affect ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kristen L; Rowneki, Mazhgan; Killian, Darrell J

    2015-04-01

    RFX transcription factors are master regulators of ciliogenesis in diverse animal species. The sole Caenorhabditis elegans RFX homolog, DAF-19, plays at least two roles in the formation of functional cilia. The DAF-19(C) isoform is required for ciliogenesis and the DAF-19(M) isoform is required for the functional specialization of a subset of male-specific ciliated neurons called PKD neurons. Here we report the identification of a novel mutation, daf-19(sm129), which disrupts the functional specification of PKD neurons and thus suggests that daf-19m activity is compromised. However, ciliogenesis is not disrupted in daf-19(sm129) mutants suggesting that daf-19c activity is retained. The sm129 mutation disrupts a splice acceptor site adjacent to an exon common to the daf-19c and daf-19m isoforms resulting in aberrant splicing in a proportion of transcripts. While aberrant splicing of daf-19c to upstream cryptic sites results in in-frame and functional products, a large proportion of daf-19m mRNAs include the entire upstream intron, which introduces a frameshift and stop codons. At least 15% of disease-causing mutations affect splicing of the gene bearing the mutation, thus it is important to understand the consequences of splice site mutations on gene function. However, predicting the effects of a splice site mutation remains difficult and experimental determination is still required. Using daf-19(sm129) as a model, our results suggest that this problem is exacerbated when a splice acceptor mutation is used by multiple isoforms of the same gene because the effects on each isoform can be dramatically different. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Altered Pre-mRNA Splicing Caused by a Novel Intronic Mutation c.1443+5G>A in the Dihydropyrimidinase (DPYS) Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yoko; Meijer, Judith; Zhang, Chunhua; Wang, Xu; Kondo, Tomomi; Ito, Tetsuya; Dobritzsch, Doreen; Van Kuilenburg, André B P

    2016-01-12

    Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the DPYS gene. Patients present with highly elevated levels of dihydrouracil and dihydrothymine in their urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The analysis of the effect of mutations in DPYS on pre-mRNA splicing is hampered by the fact that DHP is primarily expressed in liver and kidney cells. The minigene approach can detect mRNA splicing aberrations using cells that do not express the endogenous mRNA. We have used a minigene-based approach to analyze the effects of a presumptive pre-mRNA splicing mutation in two newly identified Chinese pediatric patients with DHP deficiency. Mutation analysis of DPYS showed that both patients were compound heterozygous for a novel intronic mutation c.1443+5G>A in intron 8 and a previously described missense mutation c.1001A>G (p.Q334R) in exon 6. Wild-type and the mutated minigene constructs, containing exons 7, 8 and 9 of DPYS, yielded different splicing products after expression in HEK293 cells. The c.1443+5G>A mutation resulted in altered pre-mRNA splicing of the DPYS minigene construct with full skipping of exon 8. Analysis of the DHP crystal structure showed that the deletion of exon 8 severely affects folding, stability and homooligomerization of the enzyme as well as disruption of the catalytic site. Thus, the analysis suggests that the c.1443+5G>A mutation results in aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding DHP, underlying the DHP deficiency in two unrelated Chinese patients.

  16. Altered Pre-mRNA Splicing Caused by a Novel Intronic Mutation c.1443+5G>A in the Dihydropyrimidinase (DPYS Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the DPYS gene. Patients present with highly elevated levels of dihydrouracil and dihydrothymine in their urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The analysis of the effect of mutations in DPYS on pre-mRNA splicing is hampered by the fact that DHP is primarily expressed in liver and kidney cells. The minigene approach can detect mRNA splicing aberrations using cells that do not express the endogenous mRNA. We have used a minigene-based approach to analyze the effects of a presumptive pre-mRNA splicing mutation in two newly identified Chinese pediatric patients with DHP deficiency. Mutation analysis of DPYS showed that both patients were compound heterozygous for a novel intronic mutation c.1443+5G>A in intron 8 and a previously described missense mutation c.1001A>G (p.Q334R in exon 6. Wild-type and the mutated minigene constructs, containing exons 7, 8 and 9 of DPYS, yielded different splicing products after expression in HEK293 cells. The c.1443+5G>A mutation resulted in altered pre-mRNA splicing of the DPYS minigene construct with full skipping of exon 8. Analysis of the DHP crystal structure showed that the deletion of exon 8 severely affects folding, stability and homooligomerization of the enzyme as well as disruption of the catalytic site. Thus, the analysis suggests that the c.1443+5G>A mutation results in aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding DHP, underlying the DHP deficiency in two unrelated Chinese patients.

  17. Identification of a 5' splice site mutation in the RPGR gene in a family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dry, K. L.; Manson, F. D.; Lennon, A.; Bergen, A. A.; van Dorp, D. B.; Wright, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    We have identified a novel RPGR gene mutation in a large Dutch family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3). In affected members, a G-->T transversion was found at position +1 of the 5' splice site of intron 5 of the RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) gene. Analysis of this mutation at

  18. Data in support of a functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Matos

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of these data and further extensive experiments into the analysis of these three mutations and also into the methodology applied to correct one of them can be found in “Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II” Matos et al. (2015 [1].

  19. Heat-shrinkable splicing materials for Class 1E wire and cable systems in nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Katsue; Maruyama, Masahiro; Kanno, Mikio; Ohya, Shingo; Nagakawa, Seiji; Sugimori, Mikihiro

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the shapes of heat-shrinkable splicing materials (cable sleeve and breakout, and round end cap) made of polyolefine resin, their application to cable splicing, and the properties of the materials as well as of the splice using them. Particularly, the report features introduction of their properties as determined by tests under the same conditions as used in Japan in qualifying tests on wires and cables for nuclear power generating stations. The heat-shrinkable splicing materials proved to be equal in properties to flame-retardant cables for nuclear power plants when tested for oxygen index and subjected to a vertical flame test on ''insulated wire'' and a vertical tray flame test on the cable splice. It was also confirmed that Class 1E cable using these splicing materials could stand the most rigorous environmental test in Japan. Therefore they can be used for splicing Class 1E wires and cables and the splice formed with them can be regarded as Class 1E specified in IEEE Std. 383. (author)

  20. Mutational analyses on X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy reveal a novel cryptic splicing and three missense mutations in the ABCD1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kun-Long; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Keng, Wee Teik; Chen, Hui-Ju; Liang, Jao-Shwann; Ngu, Lock Hock; Lu, Jyh-Feng

    2013-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by a defective peroxisomal membrane transporter, ABCD1, responsible for transporting very-long-chain fatty acid substrate into peroxisomes for degradation. The main biochemical defect, which is also one of the major diagnostic hallmarks, of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is the accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids in all tissues and body fluids. Direct and reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reactions followed by DNA sequencing-based mutational analyses were performed on one Taiwanese and three Malaysian X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy families. A novel splicing donor site mutation (c.1272+1g>a) was identified in a Taiwanese X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patient, resulting in a deletion of 121 bp and a premature stop codon (p.Val425fs*92) in messenger-RNA transcript. This deletion is caused by the activation of a cryptic splicing donor site in exon 4 of the ABCD1 gene, which is consistent with the prediction by several online algorithms. In addition, three previously described missense mutations (c.965T>C, c.1978C>T, and c.2006A>G), leading to aberrant ABCD1 of p.Leu322Pro, p.Arg660Trp, and p.His669Arg, were also identified in Malaysian probands. This is the first report to unveil unequivocally that cryptic splicing-induced aberrant messenger-RNA carrying an internal frameshift deletion results from an intronic mutation in the ABCD1 gene. Furthermore, a polymorphism in intron 9 (c.1992-32c/t; refSNP: rs4898368) of the ABCD1 gene was commonly observed in both Taiwanese and Malaysian populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. RNA Splicing: Regulation and Dysregulation in the Heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M. G.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Creemers, Esther E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA splicing represents a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate multiple functional RNAs or proteins from a single transcript. The evolution of RNA splicing is a prime example of the Darwinian function follows form concept. A mutation that leads to a new mRNA (form) that encodes for a new

  2. Neonatal Marfan Syndrome: Report of a Case with an Inherited Splicing Mutation outside the Neonatal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gloan, Laurianne; Hauet, Quentin; David, Albert; Hanna, Nadine; Arfeuille, Chloé; Arnaud, Pauline; Boileau, Catherine; Romefort, Bénédicte; Benbrik, Nadir; Gournay, Véronique; Joram, Nicolas; Baron, Olivier; Isidor, Bertrand

    2016-02-01

    We report a child and her mother affected by Marfan syndrome. The child presented with a phenotype of neonatal Marfan syndrome, revealed by acute and refractory heart failure, finally leading to death within the first 4 months of life. Her mother had a common clinical presentation. Genetic analysis revealed an inherited FBN1 mutation. This intronic mutation (c.6163+3_6163+6del), undescribed to date, leads to exon 49 skipping, corresponding to in-frame deletion of 42 amino acids (p.Ile2014_Asp2055del). FBN1 next-generation sequencing did not show any argument for mosaicism. Association in the same family of severe neonatal and classical Marfan syndrome illustrates the intrafamilial phenotype variability.

  3. Zebrafish usp39 mutation leads to rb1 mRNA splicing defect and pituitary lineage expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesenia Ríos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor function is associated with human malignancies. Molecular and genetic mechanisms responsible for tumorigenic Rb downregulation are not fully defined. Through a forward genetic screen and positional cloning, we identified and characterized a zebrafish ubiquitin specific peptidase 39 (usp39 mutation, the yeast and human homolog of which encodes a component of RNA splicing machinery. Zebrafish usp39 mutants exhibit microcephaly and adenohypophyseal cell lineage expansion without apparent changes in major hypothalamic hormonal and regulatory signals. Gene expression profiling of usp39 mutants revealed decreased rb1 and increased e2f4, rbl2 (p130, and cdkn1a (p21 expression. Rb1 mRNA overexpression, or antisense morpholino knockdown of e2f4, partially reversed embryonic pituitary expansion in usp39 mutants. Analysis of pre-mRNA splicing status of critical cell cycle regulators showed misspliced Rb1 pre-mRNA resulting in a premature stop codon. These studies unravel a novel mechanism for rb1 regulation by a neuronal mRNA splicing factor, usp39. Zebrafish usp39 regulates embryonic pituitary homeostasis by targeting rb1 and e2f4 expression, respectively, contributing to increased adenohypophyseal sensitivity to these altered cell cycle regulators. These results provide a mechanism for dysregulated rb1 and e2f4 pathways that may result in pituitary tumorigenesis.

  4. Dwarfism with joint laxity in Friesian horses is associated with a splice site mutation in B4GALT7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leegwater, Peter A; Vos-Loohuis, Manon; Ducro, Bart J; Boegheim, Iris J; van Steenbeek, Frank G; Nijman, Isaac J; Monroe, Glen R; Bastiaansen, John W M; Dibbits, Bert W; van de Goor, Leanne H; Hellinga, Ids; Back, Willem; Schurink, Anouk

    2016-10-28

    Inbreeding and population bottlenecks in the ancestry of Friesian horses has led to health issues such as dwarfism. The limbs of dwarfs are short and the ribs are protruding inwards at the costochondral junction, while the head and back appear normal. A striking feature of the condition is the flexor tendon laxity that leads to hyperextension of the fetlock joints. The growth plates of dwarfs display disorganized and thickened chondrocyte columns. The aim of this study was to identify the gene defect that causes the recessively inherited trait in Friesian horses to understand the disease process at the molecular level. We have localized the genetic cause of the dwarfism phenotype by a genome wide approach to a 3 Mb region on the p-arm of equine chromosome 14. The DNA of two dwarfs and one control Friesian horse was sequenced completely and we identified the missense mutation ECA14:g.4535550C > T that cosegregated with the phenotype in all Friesians analyzed. The mutation leads to the amino acid substitution p.(Arg17Lys) of xylosylprotein beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 encoded by B4GALT7. The protein is one of the enzymes that synthesize the tetrasaccharide linker between protein and glycosaminoglycan moieties of proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. The mutation not only affects a conserved arginine codon but also the last nucleotide of the first exon of the gene and we show that it impedes splicing of the primary transcript in cultured fibroblasts from a heterozygous horse. As a result, the level of B4GALT7 mRNA in fibroblasts from a dwarf is only 2 % compared to normal levels. Mutations in B4GALT7 in humans are associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome progeroid type 1 and Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome. Growth retardation and ligamentous laxity are common manifestations of these syndromes. We suggest that the identified mutation of equine B4GALT7 leads to the typical dwarfism phenotype in Friesian horses due to deficient splicing of transcripts of

  5. Zinc-induced modulation of SRSF6 activity alters Bim splicing to promote generation of the most potent apoptotic isoform BimS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hirokazu; Takeda, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Furuya, Keisuke; Hirose, Kazuya; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2013-07-01

    Bim is a member of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family of proteins. Bim gene undergoes alternative splicing to produce three predominant splicing variants (BimEL, BimL and BimS). The smallest variant BimS is the most potent inducer of apoptosis. Zinc (Zn(2+)) has been reported to stimulate apoptosis in various cell types. In this study, we examined whether Zn(2+) affects the expression of Bim in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Zn(2+) triggered alterations in Bim splicing and induced preferential generation of BimS, but not BimEL and BimL, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Other metals (cadmium, cobalt and copper) and stresses (oxidative, endoplasmic reticulum and genotoxic stresses) had little or no effect on the expression of BimS. To address the mechanism of Zn(2+)-induced preferential generation of BimS, which lacks exon 4, we developed a Bim mini-gene construct. Deletion analysis using the Bim mini-gene revealed that predicted binding sites of the SR protein SRSF6, also known as SRp55, are located in the intronic region adjacent to exon 4. We also found that mutations in the predicted SRSF6-binding sites abolished generation of BimS mRNA from the mutated Bim mini-gene. In addition, a UV cross-linking assay followed by Western blotting showed that SRSF6 directly bound to the predicted binding site and Zn(2+) suppressed this binding. Moreover, Zn(2+) stimulated SRSF6 hyper-phosphorylation. TG003, a cdc2-like kinase inhibitor, partially prevented Zn(2+)-induced generation of BimS and SRSF6 hyper-phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that Zn(2+) inhibits the activity of SRSF6 and promotes elimination of exon 4, leading to preferential generation of BimS. © 2013 FEBS.

  6. Comparative in vitro and in silico analyses of variants in splicing regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and characterization of novel pathogenic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Mara; De Vecchi, Giovanna; Caleca, Laura; Foglia, Claudia; Ripamonti, Carla B; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Varesco, Liliana; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Several unclassified variants (UVs) have been identified in splicing regions of disease-associated genes and their characterization as pathogenic mutations or benign polymorphisms is crucial for the understanding of their role in disease development. In this study, 24 UVs located at BRCA1 and BRCA2 splice sites were characterized by transcripts analysis. These results were used to evaluate the ability of nine bioinformatics programs in predicting genetic variants causing aberrant splicing (spliceogenic variants) and the nature of aberrant transcripts. Eleven variants in BRCA1 and 8 in BRCA2, including 8 not previously characterized at transcript level, were ascertained to affect mRNA splicing. Of these, 16 led to the synthesis of aberrant transcripts containing premature termination codons (PTCs), 2 to the up-regulation of naturally occurring alternative transcripts containing PTCs, and one to an in-frame deletion within the region coding for the DNA binding domain of BRCA2, causing the loss of the ability to bind the partner protein DSS1 and ssDNA. For each computational program, we evaluated the rate of non-informative analyses, i.e. those that did not recognize the natural splice sites in the wild-type sequence, and the rate of false positive predictions, i.e., variants incorrectly classified as spliceogenic, as a measure of their specificity, under conditions setting sensitivity of predictions to 100%. The programs that performed better were Human Splicing Finder and Automated Splice Site Analyses, both exhibiting 100% informativeness and specificity. For 10 mutations the activation of cryptic splice sites was observed, but we were unable to derive simple criteria to select, among the different cryptic sites predicted by the bioinformatics analyses, those actually used. Consistent with previous reports, our study provides evidences that in silico tools can be used for selecting splice site variants for in vitro analyses. However, the latter remain mandatory for

  7. Deep intronic mis-splicing mutation in JAK3 gene underlies T-B+NK- severe combined immunodeficiency phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepensky, Polina; Keller, Baerbel; Shamriz, Oded; NaserEddin, Adeeb; Rumman, Nisreen; Weintraub, Michael; Warnatz, Klaus; Elpeleg, Orly; Barak, Yaacov

    2016-02-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous diseases caused by an early block in T cell differentiation and present with life threatening infections, often within the first year of life. Janus kinase (JAK)3 gene mutations have been found to cause autosomal recessive T-B+ SCID phenotype. In this study we describe three patients with a novel deep intronic mis-splicing mutation in JAK3 as a cause of T-B+NK- SCID highlighting the need for careful evaluation of intronic regulatory elements of known genes associated with clearly defined clinical phenotypes. We present the cases and discuss the current literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel BTK gene mutation creates a de-novo splice site in an X-linked agammaglobulinemia patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chear, Chai Teng; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Mohamed, Sharifah Adlena Syed; Dhaliwal, Jasbir Singh

    2015-04-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), encoded by the BTK gene, is a cytoplasmic protein critical in B cell development. Mutations in the BTK gene cause X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), a primary immunodeficiency with characteristically low or absent B cells and antibodies. This report describes a five year-old boy who presented with otitis externa, arthritis, reduced immunoglobulins and no B cells. Flow cytometry showed undetectable monocyte BTK expression. Sequencing revealed a novel mutation at exon 13 of the BTK gene which created a de novo splice site with a proximal 5 nucleotide loss resulting in a truncated BTK protein. The patient still suffered from ear infection despite intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy. In this study, mosaicism was seen only in the mother's genomic DNA. These results suggest that a combination of flow cytometry and BTK gene analysis is important for XLA diagnosis and carrier screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with lethal cardiac valvular dystrophy in males carrying a novel splice mutation in FLNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritelli, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Carini, Giulia; Cinquina, Valeria; Chiarelli, Nicola; Majore, Silvia; Colombi, Marina; Castori, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Filamin A is an X-linked, ubiquitous actin-binding protein whose mutations are associated to multiple disorders with limited genotype-phenotype correlations. While gain-of-function mutations cause various bone dysplasias, loss-of-function variants are the most common cause of periventricular nodular heterotopias with variable soft connective tissue involvement, as well as X-linked cardiac valvular dystrophy (XCVD). The term "Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) with periventricular heterotopias" has been used in females with neurological, cardiovascular, integument and joint manifestations, but this nosology is still a matter of debate. We report the clinical and molecular update of an Italian family with an X-linked recessive soft connective tissue disorder and which was described, in 1975, as the first example of EDS type V of the Berlin nosology. The cutaneous phenotype of the index patient was close to classical EDS and all males died for a lethal cardiac valvular dystrophy. Whole exome sequencing identified the novel c.1829-1G>C splice variation in FLNA in two affected cousins. The nucleotide change was predicted to abolish the canonical splice acceptor site of exon 13 and to activate a cryptic acceptor site 15 bp downstream, leading to in frame deletion of five amino acid residues (p.Phe611_Gly615del). The predicted in frame deletion clusters with all the mutations previously identified in XCVD and falls within the N-terminus rod 1 domain of filamin A. Our findings expand the male-specific phenotype of FLNA mutations that now includes classical-like EDS with lethal cardiac valvular dystrophy, and offer further insights for the genotype-phenotype correlations within this spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Alternative Splicing Generates Different 5′ UTRs in OCT4B Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Poursani, Ensieh M.; Mehravar, Majid; Shahryari, Alireza; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Mohammad Soltani, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Background: The human OCT4 gene, responsible for pluripotency and self-renewal of Embryonic Stem (ES) and Embryonic Carcinoma (EC) cells, can generate several transcripts (OCT4A, OCT4B-variant 2, OCT4B-variant 3, OCT4B-variant 5, OCT4B1, OCT4 B2 and OCT4B3) by alternative splicing and alternative promoters. OCT4A that is responsible for ES and EC cell stemness properties is transcribed from a promoter upstream of Exon1a in those cells. The OCT4B group variants (OCT4B-variant2, OCT4B-variant3,...

  11. Splice-site mutations cause Rrp6-mediated nuclear retention of the unspliced RNAs and transcriptional down-regulation of the splicing-defective genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea B Eberle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic cells have developed surveillance mechanisms to prevent the expression of aberrant transcripts. An early surveillance checkpoint acts at the transcription site and prevents the release of mRNAs that carry processing defects. The exosome subunit Rrp6 is required for this checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but it is not known whether Rrp6 also plays a role in mRNA surveillance in higher eukaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed an in vivo system to study nuclear mRNA surveillance in Drosophila melanogaster. We have produced S2 cells that express a human beta-globin gene with mutated splice sites in intron 2 (mut beta-globin. The transcripts encoded by the mut beta-globin gene are normally spliced at intron 1 but retain intron 2. The levels of the mut beta-globin transcripts are much lower than those of wild type (wt ss-globin mRNAs transcribed from the same promoter. We have compared the expression of the mut and wt beta-globin genes to investigate the mechanisms that down-regulate the production of defective mRNAs. Both wt and mut beta-globin transcripts are processed at the 3', but the mut beta-globin transcripts are less efficiently cleaved than the wt transcripts. Moreover, the mut beta-globin transcripts are less efficiently released from the transcription site, as shown by FISH, and this defect is restored by depletion of Rrp6 by RNAi. Furthermore, transcription of the mut beta-globin gene is significantly impaired as revealed by ChIP experiments that measure the association of the RNA polymerase II with the transcribed genes. We have also shown that the mut beta-globin gene shows reduced levels of H3K4me3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that there are at least two surveillance responses that operate cotranscriptionally in insect cells and probably in all metazoans. One response requires Rrp6 and results in the inefficient release of defective mRNAs from the transcription site. The

  12. ISVASE: identification of sequence variant associated with splicing event using RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljohi, Hasan Awad; Liu, Wanfei; Lin, Qiang; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian

    2017-06-28

    Exon recognition and splicing precisely and efficiently by spliceosome is the key to generate mature mRNAs. About one third or a half of disease-related mutations affect RNA splicing. Software PVAAS has been developed to identify variants associated with aberrant splicing by directly using RNA-seq data. However, it bases on the assumption that annotated splicing site is normal splicing, which is not true in fact. We develop the ISVASE, a tool for specifically identifying sequence variants associated with splicing events (SVASE) by using RNA-seq data. Comparing with PVAAS, our tool has several advantages, such as multi-pass stringent rule-dependent filters and statistical filters, only using split-reads, independent sequence variant identification in each part of splicing (junction), sequence variant detection for both of known and novel splicing event, additional exon-exon junction shift event detection if known splicing events provided, splicing signal evaluation, known DNA mutation and/or RNA editing data supported, higher precision and consistency, and short running time. Using a realistic RNA-seq dataset, we performed a case study to illustrate the functionality and effectiveness of our method. Moreover, the output of SVASEs can be used for downstream analysis such as splicing regulatory element study and sequence variant functional analysis. ISVASE is useful for researchers interested in sequence variants (DNA mutation and/or RNA editing) associated with splicing events. The package is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/isvase/ .

  13. A five' splice-region G → C mutation in exon 1 of the human β-globin gene inhibits pre-mRNA splicing: A mechanism for β+-thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidaud, M.; Vidaud, D.; Amselem, S.; Rosa, J.; Goossens, M.; Gattoni, R.; Stevenin, J.; Chibani, J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have characterized a Mediterranean β-thalassemia allele containing a sequence change at codon 30 that alters both β-globin pre-mRNA splicing and the structure of the homoglobin product. Presumably, this G → C transversion at position -1 of intron 1 reduces severely the utilization of the normal 5' splice site since the level of the Arg → Thr mutant hemoglobin (designated hemoglobin Kairouan) found in the erythrocytes of the patient is very low (2% of total hemoglobin). Since no natural mutations of the guanine located at position -1 of the CAG/GTAAGT consensus sequence had been isolated previously. They investigated the role of this nucleotide in the constitution of an active 5' splice site by studying the splicing of the pre-mRNA in cell-free extracts. They demonstrate that correct splicing of the mutant pre-mRNA is 98% inhibited. Their results provide further insights into the mechanisms of pre-mRNA maturation by revealing that the last residue of the exon plays a role at least equivalent to that of the intron residue at position +5

  14. Novel FGFR1 mutations in Kallmann syndrome and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: evidence for the involvement of an alternatively spliced isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Catarina; Bastos, Margarida; Pignatelli, Duarte; Borges, Teresa; Aragüés, José M; Fonseca, Fernando; Pereira, Bernardo D; Socorro, Sílvia; Lemos, Manuel C

    2015-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) mutations and their predicted functional consequences in patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). Cross-sectional study. Multicentric. Fifty unrelated patients with IHH (21 with Kallmann syndrome and 29 with normosmic IHH). None. Patients were screened for mutations in FGFR1. The functional consequences of mutations were predicted by in silico structural and conservation analysis. Heterozygous FGFR1 mutations were identified in six (12%) kindreds. These consisted of frameshift mutations (p.Pro33-Alafs*17 and p.Tyr654*) and missense mutations in the signal peptide (p.Trp4Cys), in the D1 extracellular domain (p.Ser96Cys) and in the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain (p.Met719Val). A missense mutation was identified in the alternatively spliced exon 8A (p.Ala353Thr) that exclusively affects the D3 extracellular domain of FGFR1 isoform IIIb. Structure-based and sequence-based prediction methods and the absence of these variants in 200 normal controls were all consistent with a critical role for the mutations in the activity of the receptor. Oligogenic inheritance (FGFR1/CHD7/PROKR2) was found in one patient. Two FGFR1 isoforms, IIIb and IIIc, result from alternative splicing of exons 8A and 8B, respectively. Loss-of-function of isoform IIIc is a cause of IHH, whereas isoform IIIb is thought to be redundant. Ours is the first report of normosmic IHH associated with a mutation in the alternatively spliced exon 8A and suggests that this disorder can be caused by defects in either of the two alternatively spliced FGFR1 isoforms. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel splice-site mutation in ADAMTS17 in an Indian family with Weill-Marchesani syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mohd Hussain; Bhat, Vishwanath; Shetty, Jyoti S; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a rare connective tissue disorder, characterized by short stature, microspherophakic lens, and stubby hands and feet (brachydactyly). WMS is caused by mutations in the FBN1, ADAMTS10, and LTBP2 genes. Mutations in the LTBP2 and ADAMTS17 genes cause a WMS-like syndrome, in which the affected individuals show major features of WMS but do not display brachydactyly and joint stiffness. The main purpose of our study was to determine the genetic cause of WMS in an Indian family. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was used to identify the genetic cause of WMS in the family. The cosegregation of the mutation was determined with Sanger sequencing. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis was used to assess the effect of a splice-site mutation on splicing of the ADAMTS17 transcript. The WES analysis identified a homozygous novel splice-site mutation c.873+1G>T in a known WMS-like syndrome gene, ADAMTS17, in the family. RT-PCR analysis in the patient showed that exon 5 was skipped, which resulted in the deletion of 28 amino acids in the ADAMTS17 protein. The mutation in the WMS-like syndrome gene ADAMTS17 also causes WMS in an Indian family. The present study will be helpful in genetic diagnosis of this family and increases the number of mutations of this gene to six.

  16. Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutations of SNRNP200 Enhance Cryptic Splice-Site Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvačková, Zuzana; Matějů, Daniel; Staněk, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 3 (2014), s. 308-317 ISSN 1059-7794 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP301/12/P425; GA ČR GAP302/11/1910; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Retinitis pigmentosa * pre-mRNA splicing * fidelity Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.144, year: 2014

  17. Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutations of SNRNP200 Enhance Cryptic Splice-Site Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvačková, Zuzana; Matějů, Daniel; Staněk, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 3 (2014), s. 308-317 ISSN 1059-7794 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP301/12/P425; GA ČR GAP302/11/1910; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Retinitis pigmentosa * pre-mRNA splicing * fidelity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.144, year: 2014

  18. Revealing the Determinants of Widespread Alternative Splicing Perturbation in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly appreciated that alternative splicing plays a key role in generating functional specificity and diversity in cancer. However, the mechanisms by which cancer mutations perturb splicing remain unknown. Here, we developed a network-based strategy, DrAS-Net, to investigate more than 2.5 million variants across cancer types and link somatic mutations with cancer-specific splicing events. We identified more than 40,000 driver variant candidates and their 80,000 putative splicing targets deregulated in 33 cancer types and inferred their functional impact. Strikingly, tumors with splicing perturbations show reduced expression of immune system-related genes and increased expression of cell proliferation markers. Tumors harboring different mutations in the same gene often exhibit distinct splicing perturbations. Further stratification of 10,000 patients based on their mutation-splicing relationships identifies subtypes with distinct clinical features, including survival rates. Our work reveals how single-nucleotide changes can alter the repertoires of splicing isoforms, providing insights into oncogenic mechanisms for precision medicine.

  19. Clinical, in silico, and experimental evidence for pathogenicity of two novel splice site mutations in the SH3TC2 gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laššuthová, P.; Gregor, Martin; Sarnová, Lenka; Machalová, Eliška; Sedláček, Radislav; Seeman, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 26, 3-4 (2012), s. 413-420 ISSN 0167-7063 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/10/2044 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : exon trapping * peripheral neuropathy * SH3TC2 gene * splice site mutation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.159, year: 2012

  20. Multipotent genetic suppression of retrotransposon-induced mutations by Nxf1 through fine-tuning of alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Concepcion

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellular gene expression machinery has coevolved with molecular parasites, such as viruses and transposons, which rely on host cells for their expression and reproduction. We previously reported that a wild-derived allele of mouse Nxf1 (Tap, a key component of the host mRNA nuclear export machinery, suppresses two endogenous retrovirus-induced mutations and shows suggestive evidence of positive selection. Here we show that Nxf1(CAST suppresses a specific and frequent class of intracisternal A particle (IAP-induced mutations, including Ap3d1(mh2J, a model for Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, and Atcay(hes, an orthologous gene model for Cayman ataxia, among others. The molecular phenotype of suppression includes approximately two-fold increase in the level of correctly-spliced mRNA and a decrease in mutant-specific, alternatively-processed RNA accumulating from the inserted allele. Insertional mutations involving ETn and LINE elements are not suppressed, demonstrating a high degree of specificity to this suppression mechanism. These results implicate Nxf1 in some instances of pre-mRNA processing, demonstrate the useful range of Nxf1(CAST alleles for manipulating existing mouse models of disease, and specifically imply a low functional threshold for therapeutic benefit in Cayman ataxia.

  1. Splicing mutation in the ATR-X gene can lead to a dysmorphic mental retardation phenotype without {alpha}-thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villard, L.; Lossi, A.M.; Fontes, M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    We have previously reported the isolation of a gene from Xq13 that codes for a putative regulator of transcription (XNP) and has now been shown to be the gene involved in the X-linked {alpha}-thalassemia with mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome. The widespread expression and numerous domains present in the putative protein suggest that this gene could be involved in other phenotypes. The predominant expression of the gene in the developing brain, as well as its association with neuron differentiation, indicates that mutations of this gene might result in a mental retardation (MR) phenotype. In this paper we present a family with a splice junction mutation in XNP that results in the skipping of an exon and in the introduction of a stop codon in the middle of the XNP-coding sequence. Only the abnormal transcript is expressed in two first cousins presenting the classic ATR-X phenotype (with {alpha}-thalassemia and HbH inclusions). In a distant cousin presenting a similar dysmorphic MR phenotype but not having thalassemia, {approximately}30% of the XNP transcripts are normal. These data demonstrate that the mode of action of the XNP gene product on globin expression is distinct from its mode of action in brain development and facial morphogenesis and suggest that other dysmorphic mental retardation phenotypes, such as Juberg-Marsidi or some sporadic cases of Coffin-Lowry, could be due to mutations in XNP. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. A spontaneous Fatp4/Scl27a4 splice site mutation in a new murine model for congenital ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianning; Koster, Maranke I; Harrison, Wilbur; Moran, Jennifer L; Beier, David R; Roop, Dennis R; Overbeek, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital ichthyoses are life-threatening conditions in humans. We describe here the identification and molecular characterization of a novel recessive mutation in mice that results in newborn lethality with severe congenital lamellar ichthyosis. Mutant newborns have a taut, shiny, non-expandable epidermis that resembles cornified manifestations of autosomal-recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans. The skin is stretched so tightly that the newborn mice are immobilized. The genetic defect was mapped to a region near the proximal end of chromosome 2 by SNP analysis, suggesting Fatp4/Slc27a4 as a candidate gene. FATP4 mutations in humans cause ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS), and mutations of Fatp4 in mice have previously been found to cause a phenotype that resembles human congenital ichthyoses. Characterization of the Fatp4 cDNA revealed a fusion of exon 8 to exon 10, with deletion of exon 9. Genomic sequencing identified an A to T mutation in the splice donor sequence at the 3'-end of exon 9. Loss of exon 9 results in a frame shift mutation upstream from the conserved very long-chain acyl-CoA synthase (VLACS) domain. Histological studies revealed that the mutant mice have defects in keratinocyte differentiation, along with hyperproliferation of the stratum basale of the epidermis, a hyperkeratotic stratum corneum, and reduced numbers of secondary hair follicles. Since Fatp4 protein is present primarily at the stratum granulosum and the stratum spinosum, the hyperproliferation and the alterations in hair follicle induction suggest that very long chain fatty acids, in addition to being required for normal cornification, may influence signals from the stratum corneum to the basal cells that help to orchestrate normal skin differentiation.

  3. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia caused by a novel splicing mutation in the gene for the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alexis A; Reyes, M Loreto; Carvajal, Cristian A; Tobar, Jaime A; Mosso, Lorena M; Baquedano, Paulina; Solar, Antonieta; Venegas, Alejandro; Fardella, Carlos E

    2004-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays a crucial role in the transport of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane, facilitating its conversion to pregnenolone by cytochrome P450scc. Its essential role in steroidogenesis was demonstrated after observing that StAR gene mutations gave rise to a potentially lethal disease named congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, in which virtually no steroids are produced. We report here a 2-month-old female patient, karyotype 46XY, who presented with growth failure, convulsions, dehydration, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hypotension, and severe hyperpigmentation suggestive of adrenal insufficiency. Serum cortisol, 17OH-progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, testosterone, 17OH-pregnenolone, and aldosterone levels were undetectable in the presence of high ACTH and plasma renin activity levels. Immunohistochemical analysis of testis tissues revealed the absence of StAR protein. Molecular analysis of StAR gene demonstrated a homozygous G to T mutation within the splice donor site of exon 1 (IVS1 + 1G>T). Her parents and one brother were heterozygous for this mutation. In vitro analysis of the mutation was performed in COS cells transfected with minigenes coding regions spanning exon-intron 1 to 3 carrying the mutant and the wild-type sequences. RT-PCR analyses of the mutant gene showed an abnormal mRNA transcript of 2430 bp (normal size 433 bp). Sequence analysis of the mutant mRNA demonstrated the retention of intron 1. Immunolocalization of the StAR minigene product detected the peptide in the mitochondria of COS cells transfected with the wild-type minigene but not in those transfected with the mutant minigene. We conclude that this mutation gives rise to a truncated StAR protein, which lacks an important N-terminal region and the entire lipid transfer domain.

  4. Alternative splicing in the human cytochrome P450IIB6 gene generates a high level of aberrant messages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, J.S.; McLaren, A.W.; Wolf, C.R. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, Edinburgh (England))

    1989-10-25

    Polymorphisms within the human cytochrome P450 system can have severe clinical consequences and have been associated with adverse drug side effects and susceptibility to environmentally linked disease such as cancer. Aberrant splicing of cytochrome P450 mRNA has been proposed as a potential mechanism for these polymorphisms. The authors have isolated aberrantly, as well as normally, spliced mRNAs (cDNAs) from the human P450IIB6 gene which either contain part of intron 5 and lack exon 8 or which contain a 58-bp fragment (exon 8A) instead of exon 8. Sequence analysis of the P450IIB6 gene demonstrates the presence of cryptic splice sites in intron 8 which will account for the generation of exon 8A. The mRNAs were therefore generated by alternative splicing. These data gain significance as the mRNAs will not encode a functional P450 enzyme and appear to represent a high proportion of the P450IIB6 mRNA population. Analysis of mRNA from fifteen individual human livers and cDNA libraries constructed from a variety of human tissues using the polymerase chain reaction shows that the aberrant splicing occurs in all cells and all individuals tested. This suggests a high level of infidelity in the processing of P450IIB6 mRNAs and demonstrates that the presence of abnormal transcripts does not imply the presence of a functionally inactive gene.

  5. Splice mutations preserve myophosphorylase activity that ameliorates the phenotype in McArdle disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Duno, Morten; Schwartz, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Over 100 mutations in the myophosphorylase gene, which cause McArdle disease, are known. All these mutations have resulted in a complete block of muscle glycogenolysis, and accordingly, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been identified in this condition. We evaluated physiologic and genetic f...

  6. Becker muscular dystrophy due to an intronic splicing mutation inducing a dual dystrophin transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todeschini, Alice; Gualandi, Francesca; Trabanelli, Cecilia; Armaroli, Annarita; Ravani, Anna; Fanin, Marina; Rota, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Pegoraro, Elena; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2016-10-01

    We describe a 29-year-old patient who complained of left thigh muscle weakness since he was 23 and of moderate proximal weakness of both lower limbs with difficulty in climbing stairs and running since he was 27. Mild weakness of iliopsoas and quadriceps muscles and muscle atrophy of both the distal forearm and thigh were observed upon clinical examination. He harboured a novel c.1150-3C>G substitution in the DMD gene, affecting the intron 10 acceptor splice site and causing exon 11 skipping and an out-of-frame transcript. However, protein of normal molecular weight but in reduced amounts was observed on Western Blot analysis. Reverse transcription analysis on muscle RNA showed production, via alternative splicing, of a transcript missing exon 11 as well as a low abundant full-length transcript which is enough to avoid the severe Duchenne phenotype. Our study showed that a reduced amount of full length dystrophin leads to a mild form of Becker muscular dystrophy. These results confirm earlier findings that low amounts of dystrophin can be associated with a milder phenotype, which is promising for therapies aiming at dystrophin restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific heterozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Schmid, Benjamin; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2016-01-01

    have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into one of the alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3....

  8. Clinical and genetic studies in a family with a new splice-site mutation in the choroideremia gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contestabile, Maria T; Piane, Maria; Cascone, Nikhil C; Pasquale, Nadia; Ciarnella, Angela; Recupero, Santi M; Chessa, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    To describe the clinical and molecular findings of an Italian family with a new mutation in the choroideremia (CHM) gene. We performed a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, macular optical coherence tomography, perimetry, electroretinography, and fluorescein angiography in an Italian family. The clinical diagnosis was supported by western blot analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with CHM and carriers, using a monoclonal antibody against the 415 C-terminal amino acids of Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1). Sequencing of the CHM gene was undertaken on genomic DNA from affected men and carriers; the RNA transcript was analyzed with reverse transcriptase-PCR. The affected men showed a variability in the rate of visual change and in the degree of clinical and functional ophthalmologic involvement, mainly age-related, while the women displayed aspecific areas of chorioretinal degeneration. Western blot did not show a detectable amount of normal REP-1 protein in affected men who were hemizygous for a novel mutation, c.819+2T>A at the donor splicing site of intron 6 of the CHM gene; the mutation was confirmed in heterozygosity in the carriers. Western blot of the REP-1 protein confirmed the clinical diagnosis, and molecular analysis showed the new in-frame mutation, c.819+2T>A, leading to loss of function of the REP-1 protein. These results emphasize the value of a diagnostic approach that correlates genetic and ophthalmologic data for identifying carriers in families with CHM. An early diagnosis might be crucial for genetic counseling of this type of progressive and still untreatable disease.

  9. New splicing mutation in the choline kinase beta (CHKB) gene causing a muscular dystrophy detected by whole-exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jorge; Negrão, Luís; Fineza, Isabel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Gonçalves, Ana Rita; Froufe, Hugo; Egas, Conceição; Santos, Rosário; Sousa, Mário

    2015-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a group of hereditary muscle disorders that include two particularly heterogeneous subgroups: limb-girdle MD and congenital MD, linked to 52 different genes (seven common to both subgroups). Massive parallel sequencing technology may avoid the usual stepwise gene-by-gene analysis. We report the whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis of a patient with childhood-onset progressive MD, also presenting mental retardation and dilated cardiomyopathy. Conventional sequencing had excluded eight candidate genes. WES of the trio (patient and parents) was performed using the ion proton sequencing system. Data analysis resorted to filtering steps using the GEMINI software revealed a novel silent variant in the choline kinase beta (CHKB) gene. Inspection of sequence alignments ultimately identified the causal variant (CHKB:c.1031+3G>C). This splice site mutation was confirmed using Sanger sequencing and its effect was further evaluated with gene expression analysis. On reassessment of the muscle biopsy, typical abnormal mitochondrial oxidative changes were observed. Mutations in CHKB have been shown to cause phosphatidylcholine deficiency in myofibers, causing a rare form of CMD (only 21 patients reported). Notwithstanding interpretative difficulties that need to be overcome before the integration of WES in the diagnostic workflow, this work corroborates its utility in solving cases from highly heterogeneous groups of diseases, in which conventional diagnostic approaches fail to provide a definitive diagnosis.

  10. Urogenital and caudal dysgenesis in adrenocortical dysplasia (acd) mice is caused by a splicing mutation in a novel telomeric regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Catherine E; Hutz, Janna E; Else, Tobias; Adamska, Maja; Shah, Sonalee P; Kent, Amy E; Howes, John M; Beamer, Wesley G; Hammer, Gary D

    2005-01-01

    Adrenocortical dysplasia (acd) is a spontaneous autosomal recessive mouse mutant with developmental defects in organs derived from the urogenital ridge. In surviving adult mutants, adrenocortical dysplasia and hypofunction are predominant features. Adults are infertile due to lack of mature germ cells, and 50% develop hydronephrosis due to ureteral hyperplasia. We report the identification of a splice donor mutation in a novel gene, which is the mouse ortholog of a newly discovered telomeric regulator. This gene (Acd) has recently been characterized as a novel component of the TRF1 protein complex that controls telomere elongation by telomerase. Characterization of Acd transcripts in mutant animals reveals two abnormal transcripts, consistent with a splicing defect. Expression of a wild-type Acd transgene in acd mutants rescues the observed phenotype. Most mutants die within 1-2 days of life on the original genetic background. Analysis of these mutant embryos reveals variable, yet striking defects in caudal specification, limb patterning and axial skeleton formation. In the tail bud, reduced expression of Wnt3a and Dll1 correlates with phenotypic severity of caudal regression. In the limbs, expression of Fgf8 is expanded in the dorsal-ventral axis of the apical ectodermal ridge and shortened in the anterior-posterior axis, consistent with the observed loss of anterior digits in older embryos. The axial skeleton of mutant embryos shows abnormal vertebral fusions in cervical, lumbar and caudal regions. This is the first report to show that a telomeric regulator is required for proper urogenital ridge differentiation, axial skeleton specification and limb patterning in mice.

  11. Deep sequence analysis of non-small cell lung cancer: Integrated analysis of gene expression, alternative splicing, and single nucleotide variations in lung adenocarcinomas with and without oncogenic KRAS mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna R Kalari

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available KRAS mutations are highly prevalent in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and tumors harboring these mutations tend to be aggressive and resistant to chemotherapy. We used next-generation sequencing technology to identify pathways that are specifically altered in lung tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Paired-end RNA-sequencing of 15 primary lung adenocarcinoma tumors (8 harboring mutant KRAS and 7 with wild-type KRAS were performed. Sequences were mapped to the human genome, and genomic features, including differentially expressed genes, alternate splicing isoforms and single nucleotide variants, were determined for tumors with and without KRAS mutation using a variety of computational methods. Network analysis was carried out on genes showing differential expression (374 genes, alternate splicing (259 genes and SNV-related changes (65 genes in NSCLC tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Genes exhibiting two or more connections from the lung adenocarcinoma network were used to carry out integrated pathway analysis. The most significant signaling pathways identified through this analysis were the NFkB, ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. A 27 gene mutant KRAS-specific sub network was extracted based on gene-gene connections within the integrated network, and interrogated for druggable targets. Our results confirm previous evidence that mutant KRAS tumors exhibit activated NFkB, ERK1/2 and AKT pathways and may be preferentially sensitive to target therapeutics toward these pathways. In addition, our analysis indicates novel, previously unappreciated links between mutant KRAS and the TNFR and PPARγ signaling pathways, suggesting that targeted PPARγ antagonists and TNFR inhibitors may be useful therapeutic strategies for treatment of mutant KRAS lung tumors. Our study is the first to integrate genomic features from RNA-Seq data from NSCLC and to define a first draft genomic landscape model that is unique to tumors with oncogenic KRAS mutations.

  12. Deep Sequence Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Integrated Analysis of Gene Expression, Alternative Splicing, and Single Nucleotide Variations in Lung Adenocarcinomas with and without Oncogenic KRAS Mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalari, Krishna R.; Rossell, David; Necela, Brian M.; Asmann, Yan W.; Nair, Asha

    2012-01-01

    KRAS mutations are highly prevalent in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and tumors harboring these mutations tend to be aggressive and resistant to chemotherapy. We used next-generation sequencing technology to identify pathways that are specifically altered in lung tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Paired-end RNA-sequencing of 15 primary lung adenocarcinoma tumors (8 harboring mutant KRAS and 7 with wild-type KRAS) were performed. Sequences were mapped to the human genome, and genomic features, including differentially expressed genes, alternate splicing isoforms and single nucleotide variants, were determined for tumors with and without KRAS mutation using a variety of computational methods. Network analysis was carried out on genes showing differential expression (374 genes), alternate splicing (259 genes), and SNV-related changes (65 genes) in NSCLC tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Genes exhibiting two or more connections from the lung adenocarcinoma network were used to carry out integrated pathway analysis. The most significant signaling pathways identified through this analysis were the NFκB, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways. A 27 gene mutant KRAS-specific sub network was extracted based on gene–gene connections from the integrated network, and interrogated for druggable targets. Our results confirm previous evidence that mutant KRAS tumors exhibit activated NFκB, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways and may be preferentially sensitive to target therapeutics toward these pathways. In addition, our analysis indicates novel, previously unappreciated links between mutant KRAS and the TNFR and PPARγ signaling pathways, suggesting that targeted PPARγ antagonists and TNFR inhibitors may be useful therapeutic strategies for treatment of mutant KRAS lung tumors. Our study is the first to integrate genomic features from RNA-Seq data from NSCLC and to define a first draft genomic landscape model that is unique to tumors with oncogenic KRAS mutations.

  13. A cryptic BAP1 splice mutation in a family with uveal and cutaneous melanoma, and paraganglioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, K.; Choi, J.; Chung, J.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Inactivating germ line BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1) mutations have recently been reported in families with uveal or cutaneous malignant melanoma (UMM, CMM), mesothelioma, and meningioma. Although apparently predisposing to a wide range of tumors, the exact tumor spectrum associated with germ...

  14. Splicing mutation in Sbf1 causes nonsyndromic male infertility in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liška, F.; Chylíková, B.; Janků, M.; Šeda, Ondřej; Vernerová, Z.; Pravenec, Michal; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 152, č. 3 (2016), s. 215-223 ISSN 1470-1626 R&D Projects: GA CR(CZ) GA16-06548S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : Sbf1 (SET binding factor 1) gene mutation * male infertility * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.100, year: 2016

  15. Mild recessive epidermolytic hyperkeratosis associated with a novel keratin 10 donor splice-site mutation in a family of Norfolk terrier dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credille, K M; Barnhart, K F; Minor, J S; Dunstan, R W

    2005-07-01

    Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis in humans is caused by dominant-negative mutations in suprabasal epidermal keratins 1 and 10. However, spontaneous keratin mutations have not been confirmed in a species other than human. To describe an autosomal recessive, mild, nonpalmar/plantar epidermolytic ichthyosis segregating in an extended pedigree of Norfolk terrier dogs due to a splice-site mutation in the gene encoding keratin 10 (KRT10). Dogs were evaluated clinically, and skin samples were examined by light and electron microscopy. Genomic DNA samples and cDNA from skin RNA were sequenced and defined a mutation in KRT10. Consequences of the mutation were evaluated by assessing protein expression with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and gene expression with real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction). Adult dogs with the disease had generalized, pigmented hyperkeratosis with epidermal fragility. Light microscopic examination defined epidermolysis with hyperkeratosis; ultrastructural changes included a decrease in tonofilaments and abnormal filament aggregation in upper spinous and granular layer keratinocytes. Affected dogs were homozygous for a single base GT-->TT change in the consensus donor splice site of intron 5 in KRT10. Keratin 10 protein was not detected with immunoblotting in affected dogs. Heterozygous dogs were normal based on clinical and histological appearance and keratin 10 protein expression. The mutation caused activation of at least three cryptic or alternative splice sites. Use of the cryptic sites resulted in transcripts containing premature termination codons. One transcript could result in shortening of the proximal portion of the 2B domain before the stutter region. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated a significant decrease in KRT10 mRNA levels in affected dogs compared with wild-type dogs. This disease is the first confirmed spontaneous keratin mutation in a nonhuman species and is the first reported recessive form

  16. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S

    2008-01-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian...... DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent...... cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor...

  17. Novel exonic mutation inducing aberrant splicing in the IL10RA gene and resulting in infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Tadahiro; Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Takaki, Yugo; Eda, Keisuke; Mitsuyama, Keiichi; Ishimura, Masataka; Takada, Hidetoshi; Shouval, Dror S; Griffith, Alexandra E; Snapper, Scott B; Yamashita, Yushiro; Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-01-28

    Although deleterious mutations in interleukin-10 and its receptor molecules cause severe infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease, there are no reports of mutations affecting this signaling pathway in Japanese patients. Here we report a novel exonic mutation in the IL10RA gene that caused unique splicing aberrations in a Japanese patient with infantile-onset of inflammatory bowel disease in association with immune thrombocytopenic purpura and a transient clinical syndrome mimicking juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. A Japanese boy, who was the first child of non-consanguineous healthy parents, developed bloody diarrhea, perianal fistula, and folliculitis in early infancy and was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. He also developed immune thrombocytopenic purpura and transient features mimicking juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. The patient failed to respond to various treatments, including elemental diet, salazosulfapyridine, metronidazole, corticosteroid, infliximab, and adalimumab. We identified a novel mutation (c.537G > A, p.T179T) in exon 4 of the IL10RA gene causing unique splicing aberrations and resulting in lack of signaling through the interleukin-10 receptor. At 21 months of age, the patient underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and achieved clinical remission. We describe a novel exonic mutation in the IL10RA gene resulting in infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease. This mutation might also be involved in his early-onset hematologic disorders. Physicians should be familiar with the clinical phenotype of IL-10 signaling defects in order to enable prompt diagnosis at an early age and referral for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  18. Identification of new splice sites used for generation of rev transcripts in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C primary isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Delgado

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 primary transcript undergoes a complex splicing process by which more than 40 different spliced RNAs are generated. One of the factors contributing to HIV-1 splicing complexity is the multiplicity of 3' splice sites (3'ss used for generation of rev RNAs, with two 3'ss, A4a and A4b, being most commonly used, a third site, A4c, used less frequently, and two additional sites, A4d and A4e, reported in only two and one isolates, respectively. HIV-1 splicing has been analyzed mostly in subtype B isolates, and data on other group M clades are lacking. Here we examine splice site usage in three primary isolates of subtype C, the most prevalent clade in the HIV-1 pandemic, by using an in vitro infection assay of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral spliced RNAs were identified by RT-PCR amplification using a fluorescently-labeled primer and software analyses and by cloning and sequencing the amplified products. The results revealed that splice site usage for generation of rev transcripts in subtype C differs from that reported for subtype B, with most rev RNAs using two previously unreported 3'ss, one located 7 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4a, designated A4f, preferentially used by two isolates, and another located 14 nucleotides upstream of 3'ss A4c, designated A4g, preferentially used by the third isolate. A new 5' splice site, designated D2a, was also identified in one virus. Usage of the newly identified splice sites is consistent with sequence features commonly found in subtype C viruses. These results show that splice site usage may differ between HIV-1 subtypes.

  19. In vivo mutation of pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prpf8) affects transcript splicing, cell survival and myeloid differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Keightley, Maria-Cristina; Crowhurst, Meredith O.; Layton, Judith E.; Beilharz, Traude; Markmiller, Sebastian; Varma, Sony; Hogan, Benjamin M.; de Jong-Curtain, Tanya A.; Heath, Joan K.; Lieschke, Graham J.

    2013-01-01

    Mutated spliceosome components are recurrently being associated with perturbed tissue development and disease pathogenesis. Cephalophŏnus (cph), is a zebrafish mutant carrying an early premature STOP codon in the spliceosome component Prpf8 (pre-mRNA processing factor 8). Cph initially develops normally, but then develops widespread cell death, especially in neurons, and is embryonic lethal. Cph mutants accumulate aberrantly spliced transcripts retaining both U2- and U12-type introns. Within ...

  20. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E

    2016-01-01

    identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting...

  1. Differential splicing in mouse thymus generates two forms of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyen, N; d'Andon, M F; Bentolila, L A; Nguyen, Q T; Rougeon, F

    1993-01-01

    A new form of TdT mRNA has been identified by screening a mouse thymus cDNA library. It contains an open reading frame of 1527 base pairs corresponding to a protein containing 509 aminoacids, whereas the previously identified mouse TdT mRNA is composed of 1587 base pairs and encodes a protein of 529 aminoacids. Analysis of a mouse genomic clone containing the 3' portion of the TdT gene shows that these twenty additional aminoacids are encoded by an additional exon located between exons X and XI. Both forms of TdT mRNA are present in the thymus and could be generated by alternative splicing. The cDNA reported here corresponds to the major form of TdT mRNA in Balb/c mice and closely resembles human and bovine TdT cDNA. Expression of this cDNA in mammalian cells shows that it encodes a functional protein capable of catalysing N region insertions at the recombination junction of an episomic recombination substrate. Images PMID:8464703

  2. A novel splice site mutation in the dentin sialophosphoprotein gene in a Chinese family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haoyang; Hou Yanning; Cui Yingxia; Huang Yufeng; Shi Yichao; Xia Xinyi; Lu Hongyong; Wang Yunhua; Li Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-four individuals were investigated that spanned six generations in a Chinese family affected with an apparently autosomal dominant form of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II, OMIM 125490). All affected individuals presented with typical, clinical and radiographic features of DGI-II, but without bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. To investigate the mutated molecule, a positional candidate approach was used to determine the mutated gene in this family. Genomic DNA was obtained from 24 affected individuals, 18 unaffected relatives of the family and 50 controls. Haplotype analysis was performed using leukocyte DNA for 6 short tandem repeat (STR) markers present in chromosome 4 (D4S1534, GATA62A11, DSPP, DMP1, SPP1 and D4S1563). In the critical region between D4S1534 and DMP1, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (OMIM *125485) was considered as the strongest candidate gene. The first four exons and exon/intron boundaries of the gene were analyzed using DNA from 24 affected individuals and 18 unaffected relatives of the same family. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous deletion mutation in intron 2 (at positions -3 to -25), which resulted in a frameshift mutation, that changed the acceptor site sequence from CAG to AAG (IVS2-3C→A) and may also have disrupted the branch point consensus sequence in intron 2. The mutation was found in the 24 affected individuals, but not in the 18 unaffected relatives and 50 controls. The deletion was identified by allele-specific sequencing and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis. We conclude that the heterozygous deletion mutation contributed to the pathogenesis of DGI-II

  3. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi (Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Type test of Class 1E electric cables, field splices, and connections for nuclear power generating stations - 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard provides direction for establishing type tests which may be used in qualifying Class 1E electric cables, field splices, and other connections for service in nuclear power generating stations. General guidelines for qualifications are given in IEEE Std 323-1974, Standard for Qualifying Class 1E Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations. Categories of cables covered are those used for power control and instrumentation services. Though intended primarily to pertain to cable for field installation, this guide may also be used for the qualification of internal wiring of manufactured devices

  5. X-linked Alport syndrome associated with a synonymous p.Gly292Gly mutation alters the splicing donor site of the type IV collagen alpha chain 5 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xue Jun; Nozu, Kandai; Eguchi, Aya; Nozu, Yoshimi; Morisada, Naoya; Shono, Akemi; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Shima, Yuko; Nakanishi, Koichi; Vorechovsky, Igor; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-10-01

    X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) is a progressive hereditary nephropathy caused by mutations in the type IV collagen alpha chain 5 gene (COL4A5). Although many COL4A5 mutations have previously been identified, pathogenic synonymous mutations have not yet been described. A family with XLAS underwent mutational analyses of COL4A5 by PCR and direct sequencing, as well as transcript analysis of potential splice site mutations. In silico analysis was also conducted to predict the disruption of splicing factor binding sites. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of kidney biopsies was used to detect α2 and α5 chain expression. We identified a hemizygous point mutation, c.876A>T, in exon 15 of COL4A5 in the proband and his brother, which is predicted to result in a synonymous amino acid change, p.(Gly292Gly). Transcript analysis showed that this mutation potentially altered splicing because it disrupted the splicing factor binding site. The kidney biopsy of the proband showed lamellation of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), while IHC revealed negative α5(IV) staining in the GBM and Bowman's capsule, which is typical of XLAS. This is the first report of a synonymous COL4A5 substitution being responsible for XLAS. Our findings suggest that transcript analysis should be conducted for the future correct assessment of silent mutations.

  6. Alternative splicing of exon 17 and a missense mutation in exon 20 of the insulin receptor gene in two brothers with a novel syndrome of insulin resistance (congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorwerk, P; Christoffersen, C T; Müller, J

    1999-01-01

    to be compound heterozygotes for mutations in the IR gene. The maternal allele was alternatively spliced in exon 17 due to a point mutation in the -1 donor splice site of the exon. The abnormal skipping of exon 17 shifts the amino acid reading frame and leads to a truncated IR, missing the entire tyrosine kinase......The insulin receptor (IR) in two brothers with a rare syndrome of congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) associated with diabetes and severe insulin resistance was studied. By direct sequencing of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes both patients were found...... domain. In the correct spliced variant, the point mutation is silent and results in a normally translated IR. The paternal allele carries a missense mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain. All three cDNA variants were present in the lymphocytes of the patients. Purified IR from 293 cells overexpressing...

  7. Discovery of candidate disease genes in ENU-induced mouse mutants by large-scale sequencing, including a splice-site mutation in nucleoredoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa K Boles

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000 annotated exons and boundaries from over 900 genes in 41 recessive mutant mouse lines that were isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutation screen targeted to mouse Chromosome 11. Fifty-nine sequence variants were identified in 55 genes from 31 mutant lines. 39% of the lesions lie in coding sequences and create primarily missense mutations. The other 61% lie in noncoding regions, many of them in highly conserved sequences. A lesion in the perinatal lethal line l11Jus13 alters a consensus splice site of nucleoredoxin (Nxn, inserting 10 amino acids into the resulting protein. We conclude that point mutations can be accurately and sensitively recovered by large-scale sequencing, and that conserved noncoding regions should be included for disease mutation identification. Only seven of the candidate genes we report have been previously targeted by mutation in mice or rats, showing that despite ongoing efforts to functionally annotate genes in the mammalian genome, an enormous gap remains between phenotype and function. Our data show that the classical positional mapping approach of disease mutation identification can be extended to large target regions using high-throughput sequencing.

  8. Aberrant and alternative splicing in skeletal system disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xin; Tang, Liling

    2013-10-01

    The main function of skeletal system is to support the body and help movement. A variety of factors can lead to skeletal system disease, including age, exercise, and of course genetic makeup and expression. Pre-mRNA splicing plays a crucial role in gene expression, by creating multiple protein variants with different biological functions. The recent studies show that several skeletal system diseases are related to pre-mRNA splicing. This review focuses on the relationship between pre-mRNA splicing and skeletal system disease. On the one hand, splice site mutation that leads to aberrant splicing often causes genetic skeletal system disease, like COL1A1, SEDL and LRP5. On the other hand, alternative splicing without genomic mutation may generate some marker protein isoforms, for example, FN, VEGF and CD44. Therefore, understanding the relationship between pre-mRNA splicing and skeletal system disease will aid in uncovering the mechanism of disease and contribute to the future development of gene therapy. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Homozygosity for the common GAA gene splice site mutation c.-32-13T>G in Pompe disease is associated with the classical adult phenotypical spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Olimpia; Thieme, Andrea; Claeys, Kristl G; Wenninger, Stephan; Kley, Rudolf A; Kuhn, Marius; Lukacs, Zoltan; Deschauer, Marcus; Gaeta, Michele; Toscano, Antonio; Gläser, Dieter; Schoser, Benedikt

    2015-09-01

    Homozygosity for the common Caucasian splice site mutation c.-32-13T>G in intron 1 of the GAA gene is rather rare in Pompe patients. We report on the clinical, biochemical, morphological, muscle imaging, and genetic findings of six adult Pompe patients from five unrelated families with the c.-32-13T>G GAA gene mutation in homozygous state. All patients had decreased GAA activity and elevated creatine kinase levels. Five patients, aged between 43 and 61 years (median 53 years), initially presented with myalgia, hyperCKaemia, and/or exercise induced fatigue at an age of onset (12-55 years). All but one had proximal lower limb weakness combined with axial weakness and moderate respiratory insufficiency; the sixth patient presented with hyperCKaemia only. Muscle biopsies showed PAS-positive vacuolar myopathy with lysosomal changes and reduced GAA activity. Muscle MRI of lower limb muscles revealed a moderate adipose substitution of the gluteal muscles, biceps femoris and slight fatty infiltration of all thigh muscles. One MRI of the respiratory muscles revealed a diaphragmatic atrophy with unilateral diaphragm elevation. So, the common Caucasian, so called mild, splice site mutation c.-32-13T>G in intron 1 of the GAA gene in a homozygote status reflects the full adult Pompe disease phenotype severity spectrum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In vivo mutation of pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prpf8) affects transcript splicing, cell survival and myeloid differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, Maria-Cristina; Crowhurst, Meredith O.; Layton, Judith E.; Beilharz, Traude; Markmiller, Sebastian; Varma, Sony; Hogan, Benjamin M.; de Jong-Curtain, Tanya A.; Heath, Joan K.; Lieschke, Graham J.

    2013-01-01

    Mutated spliceosome components are recurrently being associated with perturbed tissue development and disease pathogenesis. Cephalophŏnus (cph), is a zebrafish mutant carrying an early premature STOP codon in the spliceosome component Prpf8 (pre-mRNA processing factor 8). Cph initially develops normally, but then develops widespread cell death, especially in neurons, and is embryonic lethal. Cph mutants accumulate aberrantly spliced transcripts retaining both U2- and U12-type introns. Within early haematopoeisis, myeloid differentiation is impaired suggesting Prpf8 is required for haematopoietic development. Cph provides an animal model for zygotic PRPF8 dysfunction diseases and for evaluating therapeutic interventions. PMID:23714367

  11. Mutations in matrix and SP1 repair the packaging specificity of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 mutant by reducing the association of Gag with spliced viral RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristic Natalia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The viral genome of HIV-1 contains several secondary structures that are important for regulating viral replication. The stem-loop 1 (SL1 sequence in the 5' untranslated region directs HIV-1 genomic RNA dimerization and packaging into the virion. Without SL1, HIV-1 cannot replicate in human T cell lines. The replication restriction phenotype in the SL1 deletion mutant appears to be multifactorial, with defects in viral RNA dimerization and packaging in producer cells as well as in reverse transcription of the viral RNA in infected cells. In this study, we sought to characterize SL1 mutant replication restrictions and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of compensation in revertants. Results HIV-1 lacking SL1 (NLΔSL1 did not replicate in PM-1 cells until two independent non-synonymous mutations emerged: G913A in the matrix domain (E42K on day 18 postinfection and C1907T in the SP1 domain (P10L on day 11 postinfection. NLΔSL1 revertants carrying either compensatory mutation showed enhanced infectivity in PM-1 cells. The SL1 revertants produced significantly more infectious particles per nanogram of p24 than did NLΔSL1. The SL1 deletion mutant packaged less HIV-1 genomic RNA and more cellular RNA, particularly signal recognition particle RNA, in the virion than the wild-type. NLΔSL1 also packaged 3- to 4-fold more spliced HIV mRNA into the virion, potentially interfering with infectious virus production. In contrast, both revertants encapsidated 2.5- to 5-fold less of these HIV-1 mRNA species. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of RNA cross-linked with Gag in formaldehyde-fixed cells demonstrated that the compensatory mutations reduced the association between Gag and spliced HIV-1 RNA, thereby effectively preventing these RNAs from being packaged into the virion. The reduction of spliced viral RNA in the virion may have a major role in facilitating infectious virus production, thus restoring the infectivity of NLΔSL1

  12. Generation of Chimeric RNAs by cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jian-Shu; Jing, Xiao-Yan; Du, Xin; Yang, Xiu-Qin

    2018-02-20

    Chimeric RNA molecules, possessing exons from two or more independent genes, are traditionally believed to be produced by chromosome rearrangement. However, recent studies revealed that cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis- SAGe) is one of the major mechanisms underlying the formation of chimeric RNAs. cis-SAGe refers to intergenic splicing of directly adjacent genes with the same transcriptional orientation, resulting in read-through transcripts, termed chimeric RNAs, which contain sequences from two or more parental genes. cis-SAGe was first identified in tumor cells, since then its potential in carcinogenesis has attracted extensive attention. More and more scientists are focusing on it. With the development of research, cis-SAGe was found to be ubiquitous in various normal tissues, and might make a crucial contribution to the formation of novel genes in the evolution of genomes. In this review, we summarize the splicing pattern, expression characteristics, possible mechanisms, and significance of cis-SAGe in mammals. This review will be helpful for general understanding of the current status and development tendency of cis-SAGe.

  13. A short in-frame deletion in NTRK1 tyrosine kinase domain caused by a novel splice site mutation in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arístegui Javier

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by the lack of reaction to noxious stimuli and anhidrosis. It is caused by mutations in the NTRK1 gene, which encodes the high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor I for Neurotrophic Growth Factor (NGF. Case Presentation We present the case of a female patient diagnosed with CIPA at the age of 8 months. The patient is currently 6 years old and her psychomotor development conforms to her age (RMN, SPECT and psychological study are in the range of normality. PCR amplification of DNA, followed by direct sequencing, was used to investigate the presence of NTRK1 gene mutations. Reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR amplification of RNA, followed by cloning and sequencing of isolated RT-PCR products was used to characterize the effect of the mutations on NTRK1 mRNA splicing. The clinical diagnosis of CIPA was confirmed by the detection of two splice-site mutations in NTRK1, revealing that the patient was a compound heterozygote at this gene. One of these alterations, c.574+1G>A, is located at the splice donor site of intron 5. We also found a second mutation, c.2206-2 A>G, not previously reported in the literature, which is located at the splice acceptor site of intron 16. Each parent was confirmed to be a carrier for one of the mutations by DNA sequencing analysis. It has been proposed that the c.574+1G>A mutation would cause exon 5 skipping during NTRK1 mRNA splicing. We could confirm this prediction and, more importantly, we provide evidence that the novel c.2206-2A>G mutation also disrupts normal NTRK1 splicing, leading to the use of an alternative splice acceptor site within exon 17. As a consequence, this mutation would result in the production of a mutant NTRK1 protein with a seven aminoacid in-frame deletion in its tyrosine kinase domain. Conclusions We present the first description of a CIPA-associated NTRK1 mutation

  14. Characterization of the Wilson disease gene: Genomic organization; alternative splicing; structure/function predictions; and population frequencies of disease-specific mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrukhin, K.; Chernov, I.; Ross, B.M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Wilson disease (WD) gene has recently been identified as a putative copper-transporting ATPase with high amino acid similarity with the Menkes disease (MNK) gene. We have further characterized the WD gene by extending the 5{prime}-coding and non-coding DNA sequence and elucidating the intron/exon structure and genomic organization. Analysis of RNA transcripts from liver, brain, kidney and placenta reveals extensive alternative splicing which may provide a mechanism to regulate the quantity of functional protein product. Comparative sequence analysis shows that WD and MNK belong to the sub-family of heavy metal-transporting ATPases with several characterizing features which include unique amino acid motifs and distinct N-terminal and C-terminal transmembrane structure. Our data indicate that the 600 amino acid metal binding portion of the WD and MNK proteins was formed by gene duplication events and splicing of the 6 metal binding domain segment to a common ancestral protein. We have raised a WD-specific anti-peptide antibody to the N-terminal region and are beginning to explore the cellular and intracellular location of the WD protein. The metal-binding segment of the WD protein has been expressed in E. coli and metal binding assays are underway to characterize this aspect of the protein`s function. We have identified numerous disease-specific mutations and developed a rapid {open_quotes}reverse dot blot{close_quotes} screening protocol to determine mutation frequencies in different populations. The most common mutation disrupts the characteristic SEHP motif and accounts for more than 40% of WD cases in North American, Russian, and Swedish populations. This mutation has not been observed in our limited Sicilian sample.

  15. The prevalent deep intronic c. 639+919 G>A GLA mutation causes pseudoexon activation and Fabry disease by abolishing the binding of hnRNPA1 and hnRNP A2/B1 to a splicing silencer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palhais, Bruno; Dembic, Maja; Sabaratnam, Rugivan

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive inborn disorder of the glycosphingolipid metabolism, caused by total or partial deficiency of the lysosomal α-galactosidase A enzyme due to mutations in the GLA gene. The prevalent c.639+919 G>A mutation in GLA leads to pathogenic insertion of a 57bp...... oligonucleotide (SSO) mediated blocking of the pseudoexon 3'ss and 5'ss effectively restores normal GLA splicing. This indicates that SSO based splicing correction may be a therapeutic alternative in the treatment of Fabry disease....

  16. Alternative splicing of exon 17 and a missense mutation in exon 20 of the insulin receptor gene in two brothers with a novel syndrome of insulin resistance (congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorwerk, P; Christoffersen, C T; Müller, J

    1999-01-01

    to be compound heterozygotes for mutations in the IR gene. The maternal allele was alternatively spliced in exon 17 due to a point mutation in the -1 donor splice site of the exon. The abnormal skipping of exon 17 shifts the amino acid reading frame and leads to a truncated IR, missing the entire tyrosine kinase......The insulin receptor (IR) in two brothers with a rare syndrome of congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) associated with diabetes and severe insulin resistance was studied. By direct sequencing of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes both patients were found...

  17. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B on chromosome 3 (FTD3, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III. We have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into both alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3.

  18. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Schmid, Benjamin; Nielsen, Troels T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B) on chromosome 3 (FTD3), a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III). ...... have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into both alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3....

  19. A novel SLC25A20 splicing mutation in patients of different ethnic origin with neonatally lethal carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Stanley H; Pitt, James J; Boneh, Avihu; Dweikat, Imad; Zater, Mokhtar; Meiner, Vardiella; Gutman, Alisa; Brivet, Michèle

    2006-12-01

    Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) deficiency is a rare disorder of fatty acid oxidation associated with high mortality. Two female newborns of different ethnic origin (the first Anglo-Celtic and the second Palestinian Arab) both died after sudden collapse on day 2 of life. Both had elevated bloodspot long-chain acylcarnitines consistent with either CACT or carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT2) deficiency; the latter was excluded by demonstrating normal CPT2 activity in fibroblasts. Direct sequencing of all SLC25A20 (CACT) gene exons and exon-intron boundaries revealed that Patient 1 was compound heterozygous for a novel c.609-3c>g (IVS6-3c>g) mutation on the paternal allele and a previously described c.326delG mutation on the maternal allele. Patient 2 was homozygous for the same, novel c.609-3c>g mutation. Previously reported SLC25A20 mutations have been almost exclusively confined to a single family or ethnic group. Analysis of fibroblast cDNA by RT-PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis and sequencing of extracted bands showed that both mutations produce aberrant splicing. c.609-3C>G results in exon 7 skipping leading to a frameshift with premature termination seven amino acids downstream. c.326delG was confirmed to produce skipping of exons 3 or 3 plus 4. CACT activity in both patients' fibroblasts was near-zero. For both families, prenatal diagnosis of an unaffected fetus was performed by mutation analysis on CVS tissue in a subsequent pregnancy. Due to the urgency of prenatal diagnosis in the second family, molecular diagnosis was performed prior to demonstration of CACT enzyme deficiency, illustrating that mutation analysis is a rapid and reliable approach to first-line diagnosis of CACT deficiency.

  20. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd 2+ uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance

  1. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting, E-mail: qixiaoting@cnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  2. Using a minigene approach to characterize a novel splice site mutation in human F7 gene causing inherited factor VII deficiency in a Chinese pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T; Wang, X; Ding, Q; Fu, Q; Dai, J; Lu, Y; Xi, X; Wang, H

    2009-11-01

    Factor VII deficiency which transmitted as an autosomal recessive disorder is a rare haemorrhagic condition. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular genetic defect and determine its functional consequences in a Chinese pedigree with FVII deficiency. The proband was diagnosed as inherited coagulation FVII deficiency by reduced plasma levels of FVII activity (4.4%) and antigen (38.5%). All nine exons and their flanking sequence of F7 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the proband and the PCR products were directly sequenced. The compound heterozygous mutations of F7 (NM_000131.3) c.572-1G>A and F7 (NM_000131.3) c.1165T>G; p.Cys389Gly were identified in the proband's F7 gene. To investigate the splicing patterns associated with F7 c.572-1G>A, ectopic transcripts in leucocytes of the proband were analyzed. F7 minigenes, spanning from intron 4 to intron 7 and carrying either an A or a G at position -1 of intron 5, were constructed and transiently transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, followed by RT-PCR analysis. The aberrant transcripts from the F7 c.572-1G>A mutant allele were not detected by ectopic transcription study. Sequencing of the RT-PCR products from the mutant transfectant demonstrated the production of an erroneously spliced mRNA with exon 6 skipping, whereas a normal splicing occurred in the wide type transfectant. The aberrant mRNA produced from the F7 c.572-1G>A mutant allele is responsible for the factor VII deficiency in this pedigree.

  3. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy.

  4. A unique LAMB3 splice-site mutation with founder effect from the Balkans causes lethal epidermolysis bullosa in several European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, B; Silló, P; Mazán, M; Pintér, D; Medvecz, M; Has, C; Castiglia, D; Petit, F; Charlesworth, A; Hatvani, Zs; Pamjav, H; Kárpáti, S

    2016-10-01

    We have encountered repeated cases of recessive lethal generalized severe (Herlitz-type) junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB gen sev) in infants born to Hungarian Roma parents residing in a small region of Hungary. To identify the disease-causing mutation and to investigate the genetic background of its unique carrier group. The LAMB3 gene was analysed in peripheral-blood genomic DNA samples, and the pathological consequences of the lethal defect were confirmed by cutaneous LAMB3cDNA sequencing. A median joining haplotype network within the Y chromosome H1a-M82 haplogroup of individuals from the community was constructed, and LAMB3 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns were also determined. An unconventional intronic splice-site mutation (LAMB3, c.1133-22G>A) was identified. Thirty of 64 voluntarily screened Roma from the closed community carried the mutation, but none of the 306 Roma from other regions of the country did. The age of the mutation was estimated to be 548 ± 222 years. Within the last year, more patients with JEB gen sev carrying the same unusual mutation have been identified in three unrelated families, all immigrants from the Balkans. Two were compound heterozygous newborns, in Germany and Italy, and one homozygous newborn died in France. Only the French family recognized their Roma background. LAMB3SNP haplotyping confirmed the link between the apparently unrelated Hungarian, German and Italian male cases, but could not verify the same background in the female newborn from France. The estimated age of the mutation corresponds to the time period when Roma were wandering in the Balkans. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Familial isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease associated with a novel low penetrance PRKAR1A gene splice site mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr, Helen L; Metherell, Louise A; Dias, Renuka

    2010-01-01

    Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is associated with inactivating germline protein kinase A regulatory subunit type 1-alpha (PRKAR1A) mutations and loss of heterozygosity at the 17q22-24 locus in approximately 50% patients. PRKAR1A mutations are observed in both isolated PP...... PPNAD (iPPNAD) and Carney complex (CNC). Most mutations result in a functionally null-allele and exhibit high penetrance. We genotyped members of an extended family for a novel PRKAR1A mutation and undertook detailed phenotyping for CNC in the affected individuals....

  6. The proper splicing of RNAi factors is critical for pericentric heterochromatin assembly in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P Kallgren

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin preferentially assembles at repetitive DNA elements, playing roles in transcriptional silencing, recombination suppression, and chromosome segregation. The RNAi machinery is required for heterochromatin assembly in a diverse range of organisms. In fission yeast, RNA splicing factors are also required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly, and a prevailing model is that splicing factors provide a platform for siRNA generation independently of their splicing activity. Here, by screening the fission yeast deletion library, we discovered four novel splicing factors that are required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly. Sequencing total cellular RNAs from the strongest of these mutants, cwf14Δ, showed intron retention in mRNAs of several RNAi factors. Moreover, introducing cDNA versions of RNAi factors significantly restored pericentric heterochromatin in splicing mutants. We also found that mutations of splicing factors resulted in defective telomeric heterochromatin assembly and mis-splicing the mRNA of shelterin component Tpz1, and that replacement of tpz1+ with its cDNA partially rescued heterochromatin defects at telomeres in splicing mutants. Thus, proper splicing of RNAi and shelterin factors contributes to heterochromatin assembly at pericentric regions and telomeres.

  7. Generation and Characterization of a Transgenic Mouse Carrying a Functional Human β-Globin Gene with the IVSI-6 Thalassemia Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Irene; Lampronti, Ilaria; Salvatori, Francesca; Fabbri, Enrica; Zuccato, Cristina; Cosenza, Lucia C.; Montagner, Giulia; Borgatti, Monica; Altruda, Fiorella; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Carandina, Gianni; Aiello, Vincenzo; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models that carry mutations causing thalassemia represent a suitable tool to test in vivo new mutation-specific therapeutic approaches. Transgenic mice carrying the β-globin IVSI-6 mutation (the most frequent in Middle-Eastern regions and recurrent in Italy and Greece) are, at present, not available. We report the production and characterization of a transgenic mouse line (TG-β-IVSI-6) carrying the IVSI-6 thalassemia point mutation within the human β-globin gene. In the TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse (a) the transgenic integration region is located in mouse chromosome 7; (b) the expression of the transgene is tissue specific; (c) as expected, normally spliced human β-globin mRNA is produced, giving rise to β-globin production and formation of a human-mouse tetrameric chimeric hemoglobin mu α-globin2/hu β-globin2 and, more importantly, (d) the aberrant β-globin-IVSI-6 RNAs are present in blood cells. The TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse reproduces the molecular features of IVSI-6 β-thalassemia and might be used as an in vivo model to characterize the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the cryptic sites responsible for the generation of aberrantly spliced β-globin RNA sequences, caused by the IVSI-6 mutation. These experiments are expected to be crucial for the development of a personalized therapy for β-thalassemia. PMID:26097845

  8. Single base mutation in the pro. alpha. 2(I) collagen gene that causes efficient splicing of RNA from exon 27 to exon 29 and synthesis of a shortened but in-frame pro. alpha. 2(I) chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, G.; Prockop, D.J. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Previous observations demonstrated that a lethal variant of osteogenesis imperfecta had two altered alleles for pro{alpha}2(I) chains of type I procollagen. One mutation produced a nonfunctioning allele in that there was synthesis of mRNA but no detectable synthesis of pro{alpha}2(I) chains from the allele. The mutation in the other allele caused synthesis of shortened pro{alpha}2(I) chains that lacked most or all of the 18 amino acids encoded by exon 28. Subclones of the pro{alpha}2(I) gene were prepared from the proband's DNA and the DNA sequence was determined for a 582-base-pair (bp) region that extended from the last 30 bp of intervening sequence 26 to the first 26 bp of intervening sequence 29. Data from six independent subclones demonstrated that all had the same sequence as a previously isolated normal clone for the pro{alpha}2(I) gene except that four subclones had a single base mutation at the 3{prime} end of intervening sequence 27. The mutation was a substitution of guanine for adenine that changed the universal consensus sequence for the 3{prime} splicing site of RNA from -AG- to -GG-. S1 nuclease experiments demonstrated that about half the pro{alpha}2(I) mRNA in the proband's fibroblasts was abnormally spliced and that the major species of abnormal pro{alpha}2(I) mRNA was completely spliced from the last codon of exon 27 to the first codon of exon 29. The mutation is apparently unique among RNA splicing mutations of mammalian systems in producing a shortened polypeptide chain that is in-frame in terms of coding sequences, that is used in the subunit assembly of a protein, and that contributes to a lethal phenotype.

  9. A synonymous mutation in TCOF1 causes Treacher Collins syndrome due to mis-splicing of a constitutive exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaya, D; Katsanis, S H; Hefferon, T W; Audlin, S; Mendelsohn, N J; Roggenbuck, J; Cutting, G R

    2009-08-01

    Interpretation of the pathogenicity of sequence alterations in disease-associated genes is challenging. This is especially true for novel alterations that lack obvious functional consequences. We report here on a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) found to carry a previously reported mutation, c.122C > T, which predicts p.A41V, and a novel synonymous mutation, c.3612A > C. Pedigree analysis showed that the c.122C > T mutation segregated with normal phenotypes in multiple family members while the c.3612A > C was de novo in the patient. Analysis of TCOF1 RNA in lymphocytes showed a transcript missing exon 22. These results show that TCS in the patient is due to haploinsufficiency of TCOF1 caused by the synonymous de novo c.3612A > C mutation. This study highlights the importance of clinical and pedigree evaluation in the interpretation of known and novel sequence alterations. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. A novel Bruton's tyrosine kinase gene (BTK) invariant splice site mutation in a Malaysian family with X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chear, Chai Teng; Gill, Harvindar Kaur; Ramly, Nazatul Haslina; Dhaliwal, Jasbir Singh; Bujang, Noraini; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin

    2013-12-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. These mutations cause defects in early B cell development. A patient with no circulating B cells and low serum immunoglobulin isotypes was studied as were his mother and sister. Monocyte BTK protein expression was evaluated by flow cytometry. The mutation was determined using PCR and followed by sequencing. Flow cytometry showed the patient lacked BTK protein expression in his monocytes while the mother and sister had 62% and 40% of the monocytes showing BTK protein expressions respectively. The patient had a novel base substitution in the first nucleotide of intron 9 in the BTK gene, and the mutation was IVS9+1Gagammaglobulinemia and may be used for subsequent genetic counseling, carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis.

  11. A novel splice-site mutation in ATP6V0A4 gene in two brothers with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-10

    Dec 10, 2014 ... ral hearing loss (SNHL) observed in patients with mutations in the ATP6V1B1 gene (Vargas-Poussou et al. 2006). Indeed,. Stover et al. (2002) demonstrated that young adult patients with ATP6V0A4 mutations could develop a mild SNHL in the long term (Stover et al. 2002). Some dRTA patients without. ∗.

  12. Alternative splicing and tissue-specific elastin misassembly act as biological modifiers of human elastin gene frameshift mutations associated with dominant cutis laxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, Hideki; Hirano, Eiichi; Knutsen, Russell H; Shifren, Adrian; Wagenseil, Jessica E; Ciliberto, Christopher; Kozel, Beth A; Urban, Zsolt; Davis, Elaine C; Broekelmann, Thomas J; Mecham, Robert P

    2012-06-22

    Elastin is the extracellular matrix protein in vertebrates that provides elastic recoil to blood vessels, the lung, and skin. Because the elastin gene has undergone significant changes in the primate lineage, modeling elastin diseases in non-human animals can be problematic. To investigate the pathophysiology underlying a class of elastin gene mutations leading to autosomal dominant cutis laxa, we engineered a cutis laxa mutation (single base deletion) into the human elastin gene contained in a bacterial artificial chromosome. When expressed as a transgene in mice, mutant elastin was incorporated into elastic fibers in the skin and lung with adverse effects on tissue function. In contrast, only low levels of mutant protein incorporated into aortic elastin, which explains why the vasculature is relatively unaffected in this disease. RNA stability studies found that alternative exon splicing acts as a modifier of disease severity by influencing the spectrum of mutant transcripts that survive nonsense-mediated decay. Our results confirm the critical role of the C-terminal region of tropoelastin in elastic fiber assembly and suggest tissue-specific differences in the elastin assembly pathway.

  13. Alternative Splicing and Tissue-specific Elastin Misassembly Act as Biological Modifiers of Human Elastin Gene Frameshift Mutations Associated with Dominant Cutis Laxa*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, Hideki; Hirano, Eiichi; Knutsen, Russell H.; Shifren, Adrian; Wagenseil, Jessica E.; Ciliberto, Christopher; Kozel, Beth A.; Urban, Zsolt; Davis, Elaine C.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Elastin is the extracellular matrix protein in vertebrates that provides elastic recoil to blood vessels, the lung, and skin. Because the elastin gene has undergone significant changes in the primate lineage, modeling elastin diseases in non-human animals can be problematic. To investigate the pathophysiology underlying a class of elastin gene mutations leading to autosomal dominant cutis laxa, we engineered a cutis laxa mutation (single base deletion) into the human elastin gene contained in a bacterial artificial chromosome. When expressed as a transgene in mice, mutant elastin was incorporated into elastic fibers in the skin and lung with adverse effects on tissue function. In contrast, only low levels of mutant protein incorporated into aortic elastin, which explains why the vasculature is relatively unaffected in this disease. RNA stability studies found that alternative exon splicing acts as a modifier of disease severity by influencing the spectrum of mutant transcripts that survive nonsense-mediated decay. Our results confirm the critical role of the C-terminal region of tropoelastin in elastic fiber assembly and suggest tissue-specific differences in the elastin assembly pathway. PMID:22573328

  14. Structural Learning of Attack Vectors for Generating Mutated XSS Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsun Wang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Web applications suffer from cross-site scripting (XSS attacks that resulting from incomplete or incorrect input sanitization. Learning the structure of attack vectors could enrich the variety of manifestations in generated XSS attacks. In this study, we focus on generating more threatening XSS attacks for the state-of-the-art detection approaches that can find potential XSS vulnerabilities in Web applications, and propose a mechanism for structural learning of attack vectors with the aim of generating mutated XSS attacks in a fully automatic way. Mutated XSS attack generation depends on the analysis of attack vectors and the structural learning mechanism. For the kernel of the learning mechanism, we use a Hidden Markov model (HMM as the structure of the attack vector model to capture the implicit manner of the attack vector, and this manner is benefited from the syntax meanings that are labeled by the proposed tokenizing mechanism. Bayes theorem is used to determine the number of hidden states in the model for generalizing the structure model. The paper has the contributions as following: (1 automatically learn the structure of attack vectors from practical data analysis to modeling a structure model of attack vectors, (2 mimic the manners and the elements of attack vectors to extend the ability of testing tool for identifying XSS vulnerabilities, (3 be helpful to verify the flaws of blacklist sanitization procedures of Web applications. We evaluated the proposed mechanism by Burp Intruder with a dataset collected from public XSS archives. The results show that mutated XSS attack generation can identify potential vulnerabilities.

  15. Analysis of RNA splicing defects in PITX2 mutants supports a gene dosage model of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semina Elena V

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS is associated with mutations in the PITX2 gene that encodes a homeobox transcription factor. Several intronic PITX2 mutations have been reported in Axenfeld-Rieger patients but their effects on gene expression have not been tested. Methods We present two new families with recurrent PITX2 intronic mutations and use PITX2c minigenes and transfected cells to address the hypothesis that intronic mutations effect RNA splicing. Three PITX2 mutations have been analyzed: a G>T mutation within the AG 3' splice site (ss junction associated with exon 4 (IVS4-1G>T, a G>C mutation at position +5 of the 5' (ss of exon 4 (IVS4+5G>C, and a previously reported A>G substitution at position -11 of 3'ss of exon 5 (IVS5-11A>G. Results Mutation IVS4+5G>C showed 71% retention of the intron between exons 4 and 5, and poorly expressed protein. Wild-type protein levels were proportionally expressed from correctly spliced mRNA. The G>T mutation within the exon 4 AG 3'ss junction shifted splicing exclusively to a new AG and resulted in a severely truncated, poorly expressed protein. Finally, the A>G substitution at position -11 of the 3'ss of exon 5 shifted splicing exclusively to a newly created upstream AG and resulted in generation of a protein with a truncated homeodomain. Conclusion This is the first direct evidence to support aberrant RNA splicing as the mechanism underlying the disorder in some patients and suggests that the magnitude of the splicing defect may contribute to the variability of ARS phenotypes, in support of a gene dosage model of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

  16. Lethal autosomal recessive epidermolytic ichthyosis due to a novel donor splice-site mutation in KRT10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covaciu, C; Castori, M; De Luca, N; Ghirri, P; Nannipieri, A; Ragone, G; Zambruno, G; Castiglia, D

    2010-06-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI; MIM 113800), previously named bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma or epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, is a rare and clinically variable defect of cornification characterized by generalized erythema, erosions, scaling and easily breaking blisters that become less frequent later in life while hyperkeratosis increases. EI is caused by dominant mutations in either KRT1 or KRT10, encoding keratin 1 (K1) and keratin 10 (K10), respectively. Usually, mutations are missense substitutions into the highly conserved α-helical rod domains of the proteins. However, three inbred pedigrees in which EI is transmitted as a recessive trait due to KRT10 null mutations have been described. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. The Cancer Exome Generated by Alternative mRNA Splicing Dilutes Predicted HLA Class I Epitope Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes...... is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based...... on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I...

  18. Asymptomatic parental mosaicism for osteogenesis imperfect associated with a new splice site mutation in COL1A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anja Lisbeth; Dunø, Morten; Johnsen, Iben Birgit Gade

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta may result from asymptomatic parental mosaicism. A previously unreported mutation in COL1A2 leads to recurrent cases of fetal osteogenesis imperfecta Sillence type IIA, which emphasizes the importance of clinical and genetic evaluation of mosaicism...

  19. Identification of a novel EYA1 splice-site mutation in a Danish branchio-oto-renal syndrome family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann Marie; Tümer, Zeynep; Tommerup, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by variable clinical manifestations including branchial fistulae, preauricular pits, ear malformations, hearing impairment, and renal anomalies. BOR is caused by mutations in the genes EYA1 and SIX1. A Danish BOR fa...

  20. Treacher Collins syndrome may result from insertions, deletions or splicing mutations, which introduce a termination codon into the gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, A. J.; Dixon, J.; Loftus, S. K.; Edwards, S.; Wasmuth, J. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; Dixon, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Recently, the Treacher Collins syndrome gene (TCOF1) has been positionally cloned and a series of five mutations within the coding sequence

  1. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable - Molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard

    2012-01-01

    In about 20-30% of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients, phenylalanine (Phe) levels can be controlled by cofactor 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) administration. The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype has a predictive value concerning BH(4)-response and therefore a correct assessment of the mutation...

  2. XLA patients with BTK splice-site mutations produce low levels of wild-type BTK transcripts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, J.G.; Bruin-Versteeg, S. de; Hartwig, N.G.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Gerritsen, E.J.; Bernatowska, E.; Lierde, S. van; Groot, R. de; Dongen, J.J.M. van

    2002-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia is caused by mutations in the BTK gene, which result in a precursor B-cell differentiation arrest in the bone marrow and the absence of or strongly reduced B lymphocytes in blood. We identified a patient with a mild clinical phenotype, low numbers of B lymphocytes, and a

  3. Asymptomatic parental mosaicism for osteogenesis imperfecta associated with a new splice site mutation in COL1A2

    OpenAIRE

    Frederiksen, Anja Lisbeth; Duno, Morten; Johnsen, Iben B. G.; Nielsen, Morten Frost; Kr?ig?rd, Anne Bruun

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Recurrent lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta may result from asymptomatic parental mosaicism. A previously unreported mutation in COL1A2 leads to recurrent cases of fetal osteogenesis imperfecta Sillence type IIA, which emphasizes the importance of clinical and genetic evaluation of mosaicism in asymptomatic parents as verified mosaicism highly increases recurrence risk.

  4. The Cancer Exome Generated by Alternative mRNA Splicing Dilutes Predicted HLA Class I Epitope Density

    OpenAIRE

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette V.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Brunak, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the c...

  5. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  6. Clinical Expression and New SPINK5 Splicing Defects in Netherton Syndrome : Unmasking a Frequent Founder Synonymous Mutation and Unconventional Intronic Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Lacaze-Buzy, Laetitia; Furio, Laetitia; Tron, Elodie; Valari, Manthoula; Van der Wier, Gerda; Bodemer, Christine; Bygum, Anette; Bursztejn, Anne-Claire; Gaitanis, George; Paradisi, Mauro; Stratigos, Alexander; Weibel, Lisa; Deraison, Celine; Hovnanian, Alain

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe skin disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 (serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5) encoding the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI (lympho-epithelial Kazal type-related inhibitor). Here, we disclose new SPINK5 defects in 12 patients, who presented a

  7. An RNA-splicing mutation (G{sup +51VS20}) in the Type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Weis, M.A.; Eyre, D.R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Gruber, H.E.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal {alpha}1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G{yields}T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U{sub 1} small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to {alpha}1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that {alpha}-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of {alpha}1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A splicing mutation in the novel mitochondrial protein DNAJC11 causes motor neuron pathology associated with cristae disorganization, and lymphoid abnormalities in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotis Ioakeimidis

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial structure and function is emerging as a major contributor to neuromuscular disease, highlighting the need for the complete elucidation of the underlying molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms. Following a forward genetics approach with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-mediated random mutagenesis, we identified a novel mouse model of autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by a splice-site hypomorphic mutation in a novel gene of unknown function, DnaJC11. Recent findings have demonstrated that DNAJC11 protein co-immunoprecipitates with proteins of the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial cristae and cristae junctions. Homozygous mutant mice developed locomotion defects, muscle weakness, spasticity, limb tremor, leucopenia, thymic and splenic hypoplasia, general wasting and early lethality. Neuropathological analysis showed severe vacuolation of the motor neurons in the spinal cord, originating from dilatations of the endoplasmic reticulum and notably from mitochondria that had lost their proper inner membrane organization. The causal role of the identified mutation in DnaJC11 was verified in rescue experiments by overexpressing the human ortholog. The full length 63 kDa isoform of human DNAJC11 was shown to localize in the periphery of the mitochondrial outer membrane whereas putative additional isoforms displayed differential submitochondrial localization. Moreover, we showed that DNAJC11 is assembled in a high molecular weight complex, similarly to mitofilin and that downregulation of mitofilin or SAM50 affected the levels of DNAJC11 in HeLa cells. Our findings provide the first mouse mutant for a putative MICOS protein and establish a link between DNAJC11 and neuromuscular diseases.

  9. A splicing mutation in the novel mitochondrial protein DNAJC11 causes motor neuron pathology associated with cristae disorganization, and lymphoid abnormalities in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioakeimidis, Fotis; Ott, Christine; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Violitzi, Foteini; Rinotas, Vagelis; Makrinou, Eleni; Eliopoulos, Elias; Fasseas, Costas; Kollias, George; Douni, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial structure and function is emerging as a major contributor to neuromuscular disease, highlighting the need for the complete elucidation of the underlying molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms. Following a forward genetics approach with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mediated random mutagenesis, we identified a novel mouse model of autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by a splice-site hypomorphic mutation in a novel gene of unknown function, DnaJC11. Recent findings have demonstrated that DNAJC11 protein co-immunoprecipitates with proteins of the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial cristae and cristae junctions. Homozygous mutant mice developed locomotion defects, muscle weakness, spasticity, limb tremor, leucopenia, thymic and splenic hypoplasia, general wasting and early lethality. Neuropathological analysis showed severe vacuolation of the motor neurons in the spinal cord, originating from dilatations of the endoplasmic reticulum and notably from mitochondria that had lost their proper inner membrane organization. The causal role of the identified mutation in DnaJC11 was verified in rescue experiments by overexpressing the human ortholog. The full length 63 kDa isoform of human DNAJC11 was shown to localize in the periphery of the mitochondrial outer membrane whereas putative additional isoforms displayed differential submitochondrial localization. Moreover, we showed that DNAJC11 is assembled in a high molecular weight complex, similarly to mitofilin and that downregulation of mitofilin or SAM50 affected the levels of DNAJC11 in HeLa cells. Our findings provide the first mouse mutant for a putative MICOS protein and establish a link between DNAJC11 and neuromuscular diseases.

  10. IEEE Std 383-1974: IEEE standard for type test of Class IE electric cables, field splices, and connections for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This standard provides direction for establishing type tests which may be used in qualifying Class 1E electric cables, field splices, and other connections for service in nuclear power generating stations. General guidelines for qualifications are given in IEEE Std 323-1974, Standard for Qualifying Class IE Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations. Categories of cables covered are those used for power control and instrumentation services. Though intended primarily to pertain to cable for field installation, this guide may also be used for the qualification of internal wiring of manufactured devices. This guide does not cover cables for service within the reactor vessel

  11. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens, mice (Mus musculus, fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans to further investigate this phenomenon. Results We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. Conclusion All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures.

  12. The cancer exome generated by alternative mRNA splicing dilutes predicted HLA class I epitope density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette V; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Brunak, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I supertype representatives consistently found to contain fewer predicted epitopes compared to normal tissue. We observed a significant difference in amino acid composition between protein sequences associated with normal versus cancer tissue, as transcripts found in cancer are enriched with hydrophilic amino acids. This variation contributes to the observed significant lower likelihood of cancer-specific peptides to be predicted epitopes compared to peptides found in normal tissue.

  13. The cancer exome generated by alternative mRNA splicing dilutes predicted HLA class I epitope density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stranzl

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I supertype representatives consistently found to contain fewer predicted epitopes compared to normal tissue. We observed a significant difference in amino acid composition between protein sequences associated with normal versus cancer tissue, as transcripts found in cancer are enriched with hydrophilic amino acids. This variation contributes to the observed significant lower likelihood of cancer-specific peptides to be predicted epitopes compared to peptides found in normal tissue.

  14. Novel forms of Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2: Generation by alternative translation initiation and mRNA splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Daniel J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor (PITX gene family, particularly PITX1 and PITX2, play important roles in normal development and in differentiated cell functions. Three major isoforms of PITX2 were previously reported to be produced through both alternative mRNA splicing (PITX2A and PITX2B and alternative promoter usage (PITX2C. The proteins derived from these mRNAs contain identical homeodomain and carboxyl termini. Differences in the amino-termini of the proteins may confer functional differences in some contexts. Results Here, we report the identification of two novel PITX2 isoforms. First, we demonstrate that the Pitx2c mRNA generates two protein products, PITX2Cα and PITX2Cβ, via alternative translation initiation. Second, we identified a novel mRNA splice variant, Pitx2b2, which uses the same 5' splice donor in intron 2 as Pitx2b (hereafter referred to as Pitx2b1, but employs an alternative 3' splice acceptor, leading to an in-frame deletion of 39 base pairs relative to Pitx2b1. Pitx2b2 mRNA is expressed in both murine and human pituitary. The data show that in a murine gonadotrope cell line and adult murine pituitary what was previously thought to be PITX2B1 is actually PITX2Cβ, or perhaps PITX2B2. PITX2B1 is expressed at lower levels than previously thought. PITX2Cβ and PITX2B2 activate gonadotrope-specific gene promoter-reporters similarly to known PITX2 isoforms. Conclusion We have identified and characterized two novel isoforms of PITX2, generated by alternative translation initiation (PITX2Cβ and alternative mRNA splicing (PITX2B2. These proteins show similar DNA binding and trans-activation functions as other PITX2 isoforms in vitro, though their conservation across species suggests that they may play distinct, as yet unidentified, roles in vivo.

  15. Genomic HEXploring allows landscaping of novel potential splicing regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkelenz, Steffen; Theiss, Stephan; Otte, Marianne; Widera, Marek; Peter, Jan Otto; Schaal, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Effective splice site selection is critically controlled by flanking splicing regulatory elements (SREs) that can enhance or repress splice site use. Although several computational algorithms currently identify a multitude of potential SRE motifs, their predictive power with respect to mutation effects is limited. Following a RESCUE-type approach, we defined a hexamer-based 'HEXplorer score' as average Z-score of all six hexamers overlapping with a given nucleotide in an arbitrary genomic sequence. Plotted along genomic regions, HEXplorer score profiles varied slowly in the vicinity of splice sites. They reflected the respective splice enhancing and silencing properties of splice site neighborhoods beyond the identification of single dedicated SRE motifs. In particular, HEXplorer score differences between mutant and reference sequences faithfully represented exonic mutation effects on splice site usage. Using the HIV-1 pre-mRNA as a model system highly dependent on SREs, we found an excellent correlation in 29 mutations between splicing activity and HEXplorer score. We successfully predicted and confirmed five novel SREs and optimized mutations inactivating a known silencer. The HEXplorer score allowed landscaping of splicing regulatory regions, provided a quantitative measure of mutation effects on splice enhancing and silencing properties and permitted calculation of the mutationally most effective nucleotide. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Overcoming imatinib resistance conferred by the BIM deletion polymorphism in chronic myeloid leukemia with splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Bhadra, Malini; Sinnakannu, Joanna Rajeswary; Yue, Wan Lin; Tan, Cheryl Weiqi; Rigo, Frank; Ong, S.Tiong; Roca, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Many tyrosine kinase-driven cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are characterized by high response rates to specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) like imatinib. In East Asians, primary imatinib resistance is caused by a deletion polymorphism in Intron 2 of the BIM gene, whose product is required for TKI-induced apoptosis. The deletion biases BIM splicing from exon 4 to exon 3, generating splice isoforms lacking the exon 4-encoded pro-apoptotic BH3 domain, which impairs the ability of TKIs to induce apoptosis. We sought to identify splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that block exon 3 but enhance exon 4 splicing, and thereby resensitize BIM deletion-containing cancers to imatinib. First, we mapped multiple cis-acting splicing elements around BIM exon 3 by minigene mutations, and found an exonic splicing enhancer acting via SRSF1. Second, by a systematic ASO walk, we isolated ASOs that corrected the aberrant BIM splicing. Eight of 67 ASOs increased exon 4 levels in BIM deletion-containing cells, and restored imatinib-induced apoptosis and TKI sensitivity. This proof-of-principle study proves that resistant CML cells by BIM deletion polymorphism can be resensitized to imatinib via splice-switching BIM ASOs. Future optimizations might yield a therapeutic ASO as precision-medicine adjuvant treatment for BIM-polymorphism-associated TKI-resistant CML and other cancers. PMID:29100409

  17. Overcoming imatinib resistance conferred by the BIM deletion polymorphism in chronic myeloid leukemia with splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Bhadra, Malini; Sinnakannu, Joanna Rajeswary; Yue, Wan Lin; Tan, Cheryl Weiqi; Rigo, Frank; Ong, S Tiong; Roca, Xavier

    2017-09-29

    Many tyrosine kinase-driven cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are characterized by high response rates to specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) like imatinib. In East Asians, primary imatinib resistance is caused by a deletion polymorphism in Intron 2 of the BIM gene, whose product is required for TKI-induced apoptosis. The deletion biases BIM splicing from exon 4 to exon 3, generating splice isoforms lacking the exon 4-encoded pro-apoptotic BH3 domain, which impairs the ability of TKIs to induce apoptosis. We sought to identify splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that block exon 3 but enhance exon 4 splicing, and thereby resensitize BIM deletion-containing cancers to imatinib. First, we mapped multiple cis -acting splicing elements around BIM exon 3 by minigene mutations, and found an exonic splicing enhancer acting via SRSF1. Second, by a systematic ASO walk, we isolated ASOs that corrected the aberrant BIM splicing. Eight of 67 ASOs increased exon 4 levels in BIM deletion-containing cells, and restored imatinib-induced apoptosis and TKI sensitivity. This proof-of-principle study proves that resistant CML cells by BIM deletion polymorphism can be resensitized to imatinib via splice-switching BIM ASOs. Future optimizations might yield a therapeutic ASO as precision-medicine adjuvant treatment for BIM -polymorphism-associated TKI-resistant CML and other cancers.

  18. Reversion of the Arabidopsis rpn12a-1 exon-trap mutation by an intragenic suppressor that weakens the chimeric 5’ splice site [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/18y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Kurepa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Arabidopsis 26S proteasome mutant rpn12a-1, an exon-trap T-DNA is inserted 531 base pairs downstream of the RPN12a STOP codon. We have previously shown that this insertion activates a STOP codon-associated latent 5' splice site that competes with the polyadenylation signal during processing of the pre-mRNA. As a result of this dual input from splicing and polyadenylation in the rpn12a-1 mutant, two RPN12a transcripts are produced and they encode the wild-type RPN12a and a chimeric RPN12a-NPTII protein. Both proteins form complexes with other proteasome subunits leading to the formation of wild-type and mutant proteasome versions. The net result of this heterogeneity of proteasome particles is a reduction of total cellular proteasome activity. One of the consequences of reduced proteasomal activity is decreased sensitivity to the major plant hormone cytokinin. Methods: We performed ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of rpn12a-1 and isolated revertants with wild-type cytokinin sensitivity. Results: We describe the isolation and analyses of suppressor of rpn12a-1 (sor1. The sor1 mutation is intragenic and located at the fifth position of the chimeric intron. This mutation weakens the activated 5' splice site associated with the STOP codon and tilts the processing of the RPN12a mRNA back towards polyadenylation. Conclusions: These results validate our earlier interpretation of the unusual nature of the rpn12a-1 mutation. Furthermore, the data show that optimal 26S proteasome activity requires RPN12a accumulation beyond a critical threshold. Finally, this finding reinforces our previous conclusion that proteasome function is critical for the cytokinin-dependent regulation of plant growth.

  19. Regular languages, regular grammars and automata in splicing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Jan, Nurhidaya; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    Splicing system is known as a mathematical model that initiates the connection between the study of DNA molecules and formal language theory. In splicing systems, languages called splicing languages refer to the set of double-stranded DNA molecules that may arise from an initial set of DNA molecules in the presence of restriction enzymes and ligase. In this paper, some splicing languages resulted from their respective splicing systems are shown. Since all splicing languages are regular, languages which result from the splicing systems can be further investigated using grammars and automata in the field of formal language theory. The splicing language can be written in the form of regular languages generated by grammar. Besides that, splicing systems can be accepted by automata. In this research, two restriction enzymes are used in splicing systems namely BfuCI and NcoI.

  20. A novel 'splice site' HCN4 Gene mutation, c.1737+1 G>T, causes familial bradycardia, reduced heart rate response, impaired chronotropic competence and increased short-term heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, Lidia; Csányi, Beáta; Ördög, Balázs; Kákonyi, Kornél; Tringer, Annamária; Kiss, Orsolya; Orosz, Andrea; Sághy, László; Nagy, István; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Rudas, László; Széll, Márta; Varró, András; Forster, Tamás; Sepp, Róbert

    2017-08-15

    The most important molecular determinant of heart rate regulation in sino-atrial pacemaker cells includes hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, the major isoform of which is encoded by the HCN4 gene. Mutations affecting the HCN4 gene are associated primarily with sick sinus syndrome. A novel c.1737+1 G>T 'splice-site' HCN4 mutation was identified in a large family with familial bradycardia which co-segregated with the disease providing a two-point LOD score of 4.87. Twelve out of the 22 investigated family members [4 males, 8 females average age 36 (SD 6) years] were considered as clinically affected (heart rateheart rates [62 (SD 8) vs. 73 (SD 8) bpm, p=0.0168) were significantly lower in carriers on 24-hour Holter recordings. Under maximum exercise test carriers achieved significantly lower heart rates than non-carrier family members, and percent heart rate reserve and percent corrected heart rate reserve were significantly lower in carriers. Applying rigorous criteria for chronotropic incompetence a higher number of carriers exhibited chronotropic incompetence. Parameters, characterizing short-term variability of heart rate (i.e. rMSSD and pNN50%) were increased in carrier family members, even after normalization for heart rate, in the 24-hour ECG recordings with the same relative increase in 5-minute recordings. The identified novel 'splice site' HCN4 gene mutation, c.1737+1 G>T, causes familial bradycardia and leads to reduced heart rate response, impaired chronotropic competence and increased short-term heart rate variability in the mutation carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of a 12.5 Mb Homozygous Region Reveals ANO10 Mutations in Patients with Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Sascha; Hoischen, Alexander; Meijer, Rowdy P.P.; Gilissen, Christian; Neveling, Kornelia; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Brouwer, Arjan; Koenig, Michel; Anheim, Mathieu; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Todorovic, Slobodanka; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Lochmüller, Hanns; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril; David, Albert; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Kremer, Berry; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.C.; Schijvenaars, Mascha M.V.A.P.; Heister, Angelien; Kwint, Michael; Arts, Peer; van der Wijst, Jenny; Veltman, Joris; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Knoers, Nine

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations provide incomplete coverage for genotyping of patients. By combining SNP array-based linkage analysis and targeted resequencing of relevant sequences in the linkage interval with the use of next-generation sequencing technology, we identified a mutation in a gene and have shown its association with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia. In a Dutch consanguineous family with three affected siblings a homozygous 12.5 Mb region on chromosome 3 was targeted by array-based sequence capture. Prioritization of all detected sequence variants led to four candidate genes, one of which contained a variant with a high base pair conservation score (phyloP score: 5.26). This variant was a leucine-to-arginine substitution in the DUF 590 domain of a 16K transmembrane protein, a putative calcium-activated chloride channel encoded by anoctamin 10 (ANO10). The analysis of ANO10 by Sanger sequencing revealed three additional mutations: a homozygous mutation (c.1150_1151del [p.Leu384fs]) in a Serbian family and a compound-heterozygous splice-site mutation (c.1476+1G>T) and a frameshift mutation (c.1604del [p.Leu535X]) in a French family. This illustrates the power of using initial homozygosity mapping with next-generation sequencing technology to identify genes involved in autosomal-recessive diseases. Moreover, identifying a putative calcium-dependent chloride channel involved in cerebellar ataxia adds another pathway to the list of pathophysiological mechanisms that may cause cerebellar ataxia. PMID:21092923

  2. SKIP is a component of the spliceosome linking alternative splicing and the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-08-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5' and 3' splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level.

  3. Familial mild hyperglycemia associated with a novel ABCC8-V84I mutation within three generations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonsorcikova, Lucie; Vaxillaire, Martine; Pruhova, Stepanka

    2011-01-01

    of the young genes (MODY1-4 and 6), we identified a novel ABCC8 V84I mutation, which segregated with autosomal dominant transmission of mild hyperglycemia within three generations. This mutation that is located in a conserved area of transmembrane domain TMD0 seems to be a rare cause of clinical phenotype...

  4. Stalled replication forks generate a distinct mutational signature in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B.; Liberti, Sascha E.; Vogel, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells acquire genome alterations during the act of DNA replication. This leads to mutation accumulation and somatic cell mosaicism in multicellular organisms, and is also implicated as an underlying cause of aging and tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms of DNA replication-associ...

  5. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The somatic FAH C.1061C>A change counteracts the frequent FAH c.1062+5G>A mutation and permits U1snRNA-based splicing correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalet, Daniela; Sacchetto, Claudia; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko; van de Graaf, Stan F J; Balestra, Dario

    2018-03-01

    In tyrosinaemia type 1(HT1), a mosaic pattern of fumarylacetoacetase (FAH) immunopositive or immunonegative nodules in liver tissue has been reported in many patients. This aspect is generally explained by a spontaneous reversion of the mutation into a normal genotype. In one HT1 patient carrying the frequent FAH c.1062+5G>A mutation, a second somatic change (c.1061C>A) has been reported in the same allele, and found in immunopositive nodules. Here, we demonstrated that the c.1062+5G>A prevents usage of the exon 12 5' splice site (ss), even when forced by an engineered U1snRNA specifically designed on the FAH 5'ss to strengthen its recognition. Noticeably the new somatic c.1061C>A change, in linkage with the c.1062+5G>A mutation, partially rescues the defective 5'ss and is associated to trace level (~5%) of correct transcripts. Interestingly, this combined genetic condition strongly favored the rescue by the engineered U1snRNA, with correct transcripts reaching up to 60%. Altogether, these findings elucidate the molecular basis of HT1 caused by the frequent FAH c.1062+5G>A mutation, and demonstrate the compensatory effect of the c.1061C>A change in promoting exon definition, thus unraveling a rare mechanism leading to FAH immune-reactive mosaicism.

  7. Splicing of goose parvovirus pre-mRNA influences cytoplasmic translation of the processed mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Long; Pintel, David J., E-mail: pinteld@missouri.edu

    2012-04-25

    Translation of goose parvovirus (GPV) 72 kDa Rep 1 is initiated from unspliced P9-generated mRNAs in ORF1 from the first in-frame AUG (537 AUG); however, this AUG is bypassed in spliced P9-generated RNA: translation of the 52 kDa Rep 2 protein from spliced RNA is initiated in ORF2 at the next AUG downstream (650 AUG). Usage of the 537 AUG was restored in spliced RNA when the GPV intron was replaced with a chimeric SV40 intron, or following specific mutations of the GPV intron which did not appear in the final spliced mRNA. Additionally, 650 AUG usage was gained in unspliced RNA when the GPV intron splice sites were debilitated. Splicing-dependent regulation of translation initiation was mediated in cis by GPV RNA surrounding the target AUGs. Thus, nuclear RNA processing of GPV P9-generated pre-mRNAs has a complex, but significant, effect on alternative translation initiation of the GPV Rep proteins.

  8. Profiling of Somatic Mutations in Phaeochromocytoma and Paraganglioma by Targeted Next Generation Sequencing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luchetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At least 12 genes (FH, HIF2A, MAX, NF1, RET, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, TMEM127, and VHL have been implicated in inherited predisposition to phaeochromocytoma (PCC, paraganglioma (PGL, or head and neck paraganglioma (HNPGL and a germline mutation may be detected in more than 30% of cases. Knowledge of somatic mutations contributing to PCC/PGL/HNPGL pathogenesis has received less attention though mutations in HRAS, HIF2A, NF1, RET, and VHL have been reported. To further elucidate the role of somatic mutation in PCC/PGL/HNPGL tumourigenesis, we employed a next generation sequencing strategy to analyse “mutation hotspots” in 50 human cancer genes. Mutations were identified for HRAS (c.37G>C; p.G13R and c.182A>G; p.Q61R in 7.1% (6/85; for BRAF (c.1799T>A; p.V600E in 1.2% (1/85 of tumours; and for TP53 (c.1010G>A; p.R337H in 2.35% (2/85 of cases. Twenty-one tumours harboured mutations in inherited PCC/PGL/HNPGL genes and no HRAS, BRAF, or TP53 mutations occurred in this group. Combining our data with previous reports of HRAS mutations in PCC/PGL we find that the mean frequency of HRAS/BRAF mutations in sporadic PCC/PGL is 8.9% (24/269 and in PCC/PGL with an inherited gene mutation 0% (0/148 suggesting that HRAS/BRAF mutations and inherited PCC/PGL genes mutations might be mutually exclusive. We report the first evidence for BRAF mutations in the pathogenesis of PCC/PGL/HNPGL.

  9. Double-target Antisense U1snRNAs Correct Mis-splicing Due to c.639+861C>T and c.639+919G>A GLA Deep Intronic Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Ferri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A enzyme, which is encoded by the GLA gene. GLA transcription in humans produces a major mRNA encoding α-Gal A and a minor mRNA of unknown function, which retains a 57-nucleotide-long cryptic exon between exons 4 and 5, bearing a premature termination codon. NM_000169.2:c.639+861C>T and NM_000169.2:c.639+919G>A GLA deep intronic mutations have been described to cause Fabry disease by inducing overexpression of the alternatively spliced mRNA, along with a dramatic decrease in the major one. Here, we built a wild-type GLA minigene and two minigenes that carry mutations c.639+861C>T and c.639+919G>A. Once transfected into cells, the minigenes recapitulate the molecular patterns observed in patients, at the mRNA, protein, and enzymatic level. We constructed a set of specific double-target U1asRNAs to correct c.639+861C>T and c.639+919G>A GLA mutations. Efficacy of U1asRNAs in inducing the skipping of the cryptic exon was evaluated upon their transient co-transfection with the minigenes in COS-1 cells, by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, western blot analysis, and α-Gal A enzyme assay. We identified a set of U1asRNAs that efficiently restored α-Gal A enzyme activity and the correct splicing pathways in reporter minigenes. We also identified a unique U1asRNA correcting both mutations as efficently as the mutation-specific U1asRNAs. Our study proves that an exon skipping-based approach recovering α-Gal A activity in the c.639+861C>T and c.639+919G>A GLA mutations is active.

  10. Splicing defects in ABCD1 gene leading to both exon skipping and partial intron retention in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy Tunisian patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallabi, Fakhri; Hadj Salem, Ikhlass; Ben Chehida, Amel; Ben Salah, Ghada; Ben Turkia, Hadhami; Tebib, Neji; Keskes, Leila; Kamoun, Hassen

    2015-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and adrenal cortex secondary to mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes a peroxisomal membrane protein: the adrenoleukodystrophy protein. The disease is characterized by high concentrations of very long-chain fatty acids in plasma, adrenal, testicular and nervous tissues. Various types of mutations have been identified in the ABCD1 gene: point mutations, insertions, and deletions. To date, more than 40 point mutations have been reported at the splice junctions of the ABCD1 gene; only few functional studies have been performed to explore these types of mutations. In this study, we have identified de novo splice site mutation c.1780+2T>G in ABCD1 gene in an X-ALD Tunisian patient. Sequencing analysis of cDNA showed a minor transcript lacking exon 7 and a major transcript with a partial intron 7 retention due to activation of a new intronic cryptic splice site. Both outcomes lead to frameshifts with premature stop codon generation in exon 8 and intron 7 respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the current study demonstrates that a single splicing mutation affects the ABCD1 transcripts and the ALDP protein function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Common Genetic Variation That Modulates Alternative Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, Jeremy; Campino, Susana; Rowlands, Kate; Chan, Man-Suen; Copley, Richard R; Taylor, Martin S; Rockett, Kirk; Elvidge, Gareth; Keating, Brendan; Knight, Julian; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein function. Several disease states have been associated with rare genetic variants that affect splicing patterns. Conversely, splicing efficiency of some genes is known to vary between individuals without apparent ill effects. What is not clear is whether commonly observed phenotypic variation in splicing patterns, and hence potential variation in protein function, is to a significant extent determined by nat...

  12. Auxiliary splice factor U2AF26 and transcription factor Gfi1 cooperate directly in regulating CD45 alternative splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyd, F.; Dam, G.B. ten; Moroy, T.

    2006-01-01

    By alternative splicing, different isoforms of the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are generated that either enhance or limit T cell receptor signaling. We report here that CD45 alternative splicing is regulated by cooperative action of the splice factor U2AF26 and the transcription factor

  13. ALS-causing P56S mutation and splicing variation on the hVAPB MSP domain transform its β-sandwich fold into lipid-interacting helical conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Haina; Wang, Wei; Song, Jianxing

    2013-02-15

    P56S mutation on VAPB MSP domain causes a familial ALS, characteristic of severe aggregation both in vivo and in vitro. We previously showed that P56S rendered the MSP domain to be predominantly disordered in water. Unexpectedly, here we reveal that P56S-MSP transforms into a highly helical conformation in a membrane environment. This chameleon transformation is shared by a splicing variant VAPB-3 with a truncated MSP domain, which is also highly disordered and buffer insoluble as demonstrated here by NMR. Our discovery provides a mechanism for ALS-causing VAPB mutants/variants to gain novel functions such as to mediate ER structure before significant accumulation of aggregates occurs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Homologous SV40 RNA trans-splicing: Special case or prime example of viral RNA trans-splicing?

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    Sushmita Poddar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To date the Simian Virus 40 (SV40 is the only proven example of a virus that recruits the mechanism of RNA trans-splicing to diversify its sequences and gene products. Thereby, two identical viral transcripts are efficiently joined by homologous trans-splicing triggering the formation of a highly transforming 100 kDa super T antigen. Sequences of other viruses including HIV-1 and the human adenovirus type 5 were reported to be involved in heterologous trans-splicing towards cellular or viral sequences but the meaning of these events remains unclear. We computationally and experimentally investigated molecular features associated with viral RNA trans-splicing and identified a common pattern: Viral RNA trans-splicing occurs between strong cryptic or regular viral splice sites and strong regular or cryptic splice sites of the trans-splice partner sequences. The majority of these splice sites are supported by exonic splice enhancers. Splice sites that could compete with the trans-splicing sites for cis-splice reactions are weaker or inexistent. Finally, all but one of the trans-splice reactions seem to be facilitated by one or more complementary binding domains of 11 to 16 nucleotides in length which, however occur with a statistical probability close to one for the given length of the involved sequences. The chimeric RNAs generated via heterologous viral RNA trans-splicing either did not lead to fusion proteins or led to proteins of unknown function. Our data suggest that distinct viral RNAs are highly susceptible to trans-splicing and that heterologous viral trans-splicing, unlike homologous SV40 trans-splicing, represents a chance event.

  15. Human Prolactin Point Mutations and Their Projected Effect on Vasoinhibin Generation and Vasoinhibin-Related Diseases

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    Jakob Triebel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA dysregulation of the generation of vasoinhibin hormones by proteolytic cleavage of prolactin (PRL has been brought into context with diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, preeclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and peripartum cardiomyopathy. Factors governing vasoinhibin generation are incompletely characterized, and the composition of vasoinhibin isoforms in human tissues or compartments, such as the circulation, is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the possible contribution of PRL point mutations to the generation of vasoinhibins as well as to project their role in vasoinhibin-related diseases.MethodsProlactin sequences, point mutations, and substrate specificity information about the PRL cleaving enzymes cathepsin D, matrix metalloproteinases 8 and 13, and bone-morphogenetic protein 1 were retrieved from public databases. The consequences of point mutations in regard to their possible effect on vasoinhibin levels were projected on the basis of a score indicating the suitability of a particular sequence for enzymatic cleavage that result in vasoinhibin generation. The relative abundance and type of vasoinhibin isoforms were estimated by comparing the relative cleavage efficiency of vasoinhibin-generating enzymes.ResultsSix point mutations leading to amino acid substitutions in vasoinhibin-generating cleavage sites were found and projected to either facilitate or inhibit vasoinhibin generation. Four mutations affecting vasoinhibin generation in cancer tissues were found. The most likely composition of the relative abundance of vasoinhibin isoforms is projected to be 15 > 17.2 > 16.8 > 17.7 > 18 kDa vasoinhibin.ConclusionProlactin point mutations are likely to influence vasoinhibin levels by affecting the proteolysis efficiency of vasoinhibin-generating enzymes and should be monitored in patients with vasoinhibin-related diseases. Attempts to characterize vasoinhibin-related diseases

  16. A founder synonymous COL7A1 mutation in three Danish families with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa identifies exonic regulatory sequences required for exon 87 splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Covaciu, C; Grosso, F; Pisaneschi, E

    2011-01-01

    shoulders. DEB-Pr is caused by either dominant (DDEB-Pr) or recessive mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen (COLVII). The full spectrum of COL7A1 mutations in DEB-Pr remains elusive and the genotype-phenotype correlation is largely incomplete. Here, we report and functionally characterize...

  17. The BRCA1-Δ11q Alternative Splice Isoform Bypasses Germline Mutations and Promotes Therapeutic Resistance to PARP Inhibition and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yifan; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Cruz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancer patients harboring BRCA1/2 germline mutations have clinically benefitted from therapy with PARP inhibitor (PARPi) or platinum compounds, but acquired resistance limits clinical impact. In this study, we investigated the impact of mutations on BRCA1 isoform expression and...

  18. Altered Pre-mRNA Splicing Caused by a Novel Intronic Mutation c.1443+5G>A in the Dihydropyrimidinase (DPYS) Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakajima, Yoko; Meijer, Judith; Zhang, Chunhua; Wang, Xu; Kondo, Tomomi; Ito, Tetsuya; Dobritzsch, Doreen; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.

    2016-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the DPYS gene. Patients present with highly elevated levels of dihydrouracil and dihydrothymine in their urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The analysis of the effect of mutations in DPYS on pre-mRNA

  19. Generation of mutation hotspots in ageing bacterial colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekowska, Agnieszka; Wendel, Sofie; Nørholm, Morten

    How do ageing bacterial colonies generate adaptive mutants? Over a period of two months, we isolated on ageing colonies outgrowing mutants able to use a new carbon source, and sequenced their genomes. This allowed us to uncover exquisite details on the molecular mechanism behind their adaptation:...

  20. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

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    Michael V Zaragoza

    Full Text Available The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10 with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85% located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51% variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  1. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380

  2. tRNA splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Abelson, John; Trotta, Christopher R.; Li, Hong

    1998-01-01

    Introns interrupt the continuity of many eukaryal genes, and therefore their removal by splicing is a crucial step in gene expression. Interestingly, even within Eukarya there are at least four splicing mechanisms. mRNA splicing in the nucleus takes place in two phosphotransfer reactions on a complex and dynamic machine, the spliceosome. This reaction is related in mechanism to the two self-splicing mechanisms for Group 1 and Group 2 introns. In fact the Group 2 introns are spliced by an iden...

  3. Common Mitochondrial DNA Mutations generated through DNA-mediated Charge Transport#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Edward J.; Davis, Molly L.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2009-01-01

    Mutation sites that arise in human mitochondrial DNA as a result of oxidation by a rhodium photooxidant have been identified. HeLa cells were incubated with [Rh(phi)2bpy]Cl3 (phi = 9,10-phenanthrenequinone diimine), an intercalating photooxidant, to allow the complex to enter the cell and bind mitochondrial DNA. Photoexcitation of DNA-bound [Rh(phi)2bpy]3+ can promote the oxidation of guanine from a distance through DNA-mediated charge transport. After two rounds of photolysis and growth of cells incubated with the rhodium complex, DNA mutations in a portion of the mitochondrial genome were assessed via manual sequencing. The mutational pattern is consistent with dG to dT transversions in the repetitive guanine tracts. Significantly, the mutational pattern found overlaps oxidative damage hot spots seen previously. These mutations are found within conserved sequence block II, a critical regulatory element involved in DNA replication, and these have been identified as sites of low oxidation potential to which oxidative damage is funneled. Based upon this mutational analysis and its correspondence to sites of long range oxidative damage, we infer a critical role for DNA charge transport in generating these mutations and, thus, in regulating mitochondrial DNA replication under oxidative stress. PMID:19128037

  4. Mutation Detection in Patients with Retinal Dystrophies Using Targeted Next Generation Sequencing.

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    Nicole Weisschuh

    Full Text Available Retinal dystrophies (RD constitute a group of blinding diseases that are characterized by clinical variability and pronounced genetic heterogeneity. The different nonsyndromic and syndromic forms of RD can be attributed to mutations in more than 200 genes. Consequently, next generation sequencing (NGS technologies are among the most promising approaches to identify mutations in RD. We screened a large cohort of patients comprising 89 independent cases and families with various subforms of RD applying different NGS platforms. While mutation screening in 50 cases was performed using a RD gene capture panel, 47 cases were analyzed using whole exome sequencing. One family was analyzed using whole genome sequencing. A detection rate of 61% was achieved including mutations in 34 known and two novel RD genes. A total of 69 distinct mutations were identified, including 39 novel mutations. Notably, genetic findings in several families were not consistent with the initial clinical diagnosis. Clinical reassessment resulted in refinement of the clinical diagnosis in some of these families and confirmed the broad clinical spectrum associated with mutations in RD genes.

  5. Hepatosplenomegalic lipidosis: what unless Gaucher? Adult cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) with anemia, mesenteric lipodystrophy, increased plasma chitotriosidase activity and a homozygous lysosomal acid lipase -1 exon 8 splice junction mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Dahl, S; Harzer, K; Rolfs, A; Albrecht, B; Niederau, C; Vogt, C; van Weely, S; Aerts, J; Müller, G; Häussinger, D

    1999-10-01

    A 36-year-old woman was admitted for hepatosplenomegaly and anemia. Bone marrow cytology showed "sea-blue histiocytes", vacuolated macrophages and plasma cells. As primary liver disease, malignancy or hematologic disorders were excluded, and plasma chitotriosidase activity was increased 27-fold over control, the presence of a lysosomal storage disease was suspected. Biochemical analysis of skin fibroblasts revealed normal glucocerebrosidase and sphingomyelinase activity, but lipid analysis showed a more than 15-fold accumulation of cholesterol esters within the cells. The activity of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) in fibroblast homogenates was decreased to 12% of control subjects. Mutational analysis of the patient's blood showed the homozygous G-->A mutation at position -1 of the exon 8 splice donor site (E8SJM-allele) known for adult cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD); the polymorphic background was that of the complex haplotype -6Thr, 2Gly, 894 G-->A. Based on clinical, laboratory, cytological and and biochemical findings, CESD can clearly be separated from other more frequent inherited lysosomal storage diseases, e.g. atypical forms of Gaucher disease.

  6. VEGF Spliced Variants: Possible Role of Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy

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    Caroline Hilmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis has been targeted in retinopathies, psoriasis, and a variety of cancers (colon, breast, lung, and kidney. Among these tumour types, clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs are the most vascularized tumours due to mutations of the von Hippel Lindau gene resulting in HIF-1 alpha stabilisation and overexpression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. Surgical nephrectomy remains the most efficient curative treatment for patients with noninvasive disease, while VEGF targeting has resulted in varying degrees of success for treating metastatic disease. VEGF pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing generating pro-angiogenic isoforms. However, the recent identification of novel splice variants of VEGF with anti-angiogenic properties has provided some insight for the lack of current treatment efficacy. Here we discuss an explanation for the relapse to anti-angiogenesis treatment as being due to either an initial or acquired resistance to the therapy. We also discuss targeting angiogenesis via SR (serine/arginine-rich proteins implicated in VEGF splicing.

  7. Alternative mRNA Splicing in the Pathogenesis of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming Wong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative mRNA splicing is an important mechanism in expansion of proteome diversity by production of multiple protein isoforms. However, emerging evidence indicates that only a limited number of annotated protein isoforms by alternative splicing are detected, and the coding sequence of alternative splice variants usually is only slightly different from that of the canonical sequence. Nevertheless, mis-splicing is associated with a large array of human diseases. Previous reviews mainly focused on hereditary and somatic mutations in cis-acting RNA sequence elements and trans-acting splicing factors. The importance of environmental perturbations contributed to mis-splicing is not assessed. As significant changes in exon skipping and splicing factors expression levels are observed with diet-induced obesity, this review focuses on several well-known alternatively spliced metabolic factors and discusses recent advances in the regulation of the expressions of splice variants under the pathophysiological conditions of obesity. The potential of targeting the alternative mRNA mis-splicing for obesity-associated diseases therapies will also be discussed.

  8. Mutation Detection in Patients with Retinal Dystrophies Using Targeted Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisschuh, Nicole; Mayer, Anja K; Strom, Tim M

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) constitute a group of blinding diseases that are characterized by clinical variability and pronounced genetic heterogeneity. The different nonsyndromic and syndromic forms of RD can be attributed to mutations in more than 200 genes. Consequently, next generation sequencin...

  9. Next-generation sequencing reveals DGUOK mutations in adult patients with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garone, Caterina; Bordoni, Andreina; Gutierrez Rios, Purificacion; Calvo, Sarah E.; Ripolone, Michela; Ranieri, Michela; Rizzuti, Mafalda; Villa, Luisa; Magri, Francesca; Corti, Stefania; Bresolin, Nereo; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Moggio, Maurizio; DiMauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo P.; Sciacco, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders still remains elusive in a large proportion of patients, but advances in next generation sequencing are significantly improving our chances to detect mutations even in sporadic patients. Syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions are caused by different molecular defects resulting in a wide spectrum of predominantly adult-onset clinical presentations, ranging from progressive external ophthalmoplegia to multi-systemic disorders of variable severity. The mutations underlying these conditions remain undisclosed in half of the affected subjects. We applied next-generation sequencing of known mitochondrial targets (MitoExome) to probands presenting with adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy and harbouring mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions in skeletal muscle. We identified autosomal recessive mutations in the DGUOK gene (encoding mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase), which has previously been associated with an infantile hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial DNA depletion. Mutations in DGUOK occurred in five independent subjects, representing 5.6% of our cohort of patients with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions, and impaired both muscle DGUOK activity and protein stability. Clinical presentations were variable, including mitochondrial myopathy with or without progressive external ophthalmoplegia, recurrent rhabdomyolysis in a young female who had received a liver transplant at 9 months of age and adult-onset lower motor neuron syndrome with mild cognitive impairment. These findings reinforce the concept that mutations in genes involved in deoxyribonucleotide metabolism can cause diverse clinical phenotypes and suggest that DGUOK should be screened in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. PMID:23043144

  10. Identification of a putative Crf splice variant and generation of recombinant antibodies for the specific detection of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Schütte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aspergillus fumigatus is a common airborne fungal pathogen for humans. It frequently causes an invasive aspergillosis (IA in immunocompromised patients with poor prognosis. Potent antifungal drugs are very expensive and cause serious adverse effects. Their correct application requires an early and specific diagnosis of IA, which is still not properly achievable. This work aims to a specific detection of A. fumigatus by immunofluorescence and the generation of recombinant antibodies for the detection of A. fumigatus by ELISA. RESULTS: The A. fumigatus antigen Crf2 was isolated from a human patient with proven IA. It is a novel variant of a group of surface proteins (Crf1, Asp f9, Asp f16 which belong to the glycosylhydrolase family. Single chain fragment variables (scFvs were obtained by phage display from a human naive antibody gene library and an immune antibody gene library generated from a macaque immunized with recombinant Crf2. Two different selection strategies were performed and shown to influence the selection of scFvs recognizing the Crf2 antigen in its native conformation. Using these antibodies, Crf2 was localized in growing hyphae of A. fumigatus but not in spores. In addition, the antibodies allowed differentiation between A. fumigatus and related Aspergillus species or Candida albicans by immunofluorescence microscopy. The scFv antibody clones were further characterized for their affinity, the nature of their epitope, their serum stability and their detection limit of Crf2 in human serum. CONCLUSION: Crf2 and the corresponding recombinant antibodies offer a novel approach for the early diagnostics of IA caused by A. fumigatus.

  11. Clinical significance of intronic variants in BRAF inhibitor resistant melanomas with altered BRAF transcript splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Pupo, Gulietta M.; Boyd, Suzanah C.; Fung, Carina; Carlino, Matteo S.; Menzies, Alexander M.; Pedersen, Bernadette; Johansson, Peter; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Kefford, Richard F.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Long, Georgina V.; Rizos, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Alternate BRAF splicing is the most common mechanism of acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitor treatment in melanoma. Recently, alternate BRAF exon 4?8 splicing was shown to involve an intronic mutation, located 51 nucleotides upstream of BRAF exon 9 within a predicted splicing branch point. This intronic mutation was identified in a single cell line but has not been examined in vivo. Herein we demonstrate that in three melanomas biopsied from patients with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibito...

  12. Generation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Wolfram Syndrome Type 2 Patients Bearing the c.103 + 1G>A CISD2 Mutation for Disease Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Spada, Alberto; Ntai, Aikaterini; Genovese, Stefano; Rondinelli, Maurizio; De Blasio, Pasquale; Biunno, Ida

    2018-02-15

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare autosomal premature aging syndrome that shows signs of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness in addition to central nervous system and endocrine complications. The frequent form of WFS type 1 (WFS1) harbors causative mutations in the WFS1 gene, whereas the rare form or WFS type 2 (WFS2) involves CISD2. Mutations in these two genes are recognized by a subset of variable clinical symptoms and a set of overlapping features. In this study, we report on the generation of stable human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from primary fibroblasts of a previously reported Italian family with CISD2 mutation (c.103 + 1G>A), occurring in the consensus intron 1 splicing site in two sisters, deleting the first exon of the transcript. The generated hiPSCs provide a cell model system to study the mutation's role in the multisystemic clinical disorders previously described and test eventual drug effects on the specific and associated clinical phenotype.

  13. Severe subacute GM2 gangliosidosis caused by an apparently silent HEXA mutation (V324V) that results in aberrant splicing and reduced HEXA mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklow, Brandy A; Ivanovich, Jennifer L; Plews, Margot M; Salo, Timothy J; Noetzel, Michael J; Lueder, Gregg T; Cartegni, Luca; Kaback, Michael M; Sandhoff, Konrad; Steiner, Robert D; Triggs-Raine, Barbara L

    2004-06-01

    We have characterized the molecular basis of beta-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency in a patient ascertained through an ophthalmologic examination that revealed cherry red spots on his retina. The absence of neurological deficit in this child until 3 3/4 years of age indicated residual HEX A must be present. Three HEXA mutations, 10T > C (S4P) and 972T > A (V324V) on the maternal allele, and 1A > T (M1L) on the paternal allele were identified. The effects of the amino acid substitutions on HEX A expressed in COS-7 cells were analyzed; as expected, no HEX A activity was associated with the M1L mutation but surprisingly, the S4P mutation resulted in 59% of the HEX A activity expressed by the wild type cDNA. The effect of the S4P change was much less than that of another HEXA mutation, G269S, associated with an adult onset form of G(M2) gangliosidosis. This indicated that the S4P change was not the cause of disease and suggested that one of the mutations on the maternal allele, 10T > C or 972T > A, had its effect at the mRNA level. This was confirmed by Northern blot analysis that showed only 7% of the normal level of HEXA mRNA in proband fibroblasts. Analysis of the residual mRNA by RT/PCR and sequencing revealed normal transcripts from both the maternal and paternal allele, as well as a low abundance aberrant transcript from the maternal allele. Sequencing of this aberrant transcript revealed a new exon 8 donor site created by the 972T > A mutation that resulted in a 17 bp deletion and destabilization of the resulting abnormal transcript. The remaining normal mRNA produced from the 972T > A allele must account for the delayed onset of clinical symptoms in this child. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Alternative splicing of beta-galactosidase mRNA generates the classic lysosomal enzyme and a beta-galactosidase-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreau, H; Galjart, N J; Gillemans, N; Willemsen, R; van der Horst, G T; d'Azzo, A

    1989-12-05

    We have isolated two cDNAs encoding human lysosomal beta-galactosidase, the enzyme deficient in GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome, and a beta-galactosidase-related protein. In total RNA from normal fibroblasts a major mRNA of about 2.5 kilobases (kb) is recognized by cDNA probes. A minor transcript of about 2.0 kb is visible only in immunoselected polysomal RNA. A heterogeneous pattern of expression of the 2.5-kb beta-galactosidase transcript is observed in fibroblasts from different GM1-gangliosidosis patients. The nucleotide sequences of the two cDNAs are extensively colinear. However, the short cDNA misses two noncontiguous protein-encoding regions (1 and 2) present in the long cDNA. The exclusion of region 1 in the short molecule introduces a frameshift in its 3'-flanking sequence, which is restored by the exclusion of region 2. These findings imply the existence of two mRNA templates, which are read in a different frame only in the nucleotide stretch between regions 1 and 2. Sequence analysis of genomic exons of the beta-galactosidase gene shows that the short mRNA is generated by alternative splicing. The long and short cDNAs direct the synthesis in COS-1 cells of beta-galactosidase polypeptides of 85 and 68 kDa, respectively. Only the long protein is catalytically active under the assay conditions used, and it is capable of correcting beta-galactosidase activity after endocytosis by GM1-gangliosidosis fibroblasts. The subcellular localization of cDNA-encoded beta-galactosidase and beta-galactosidase-related proteins is different.

  15. Novel mutation in the 5' splice site of exon 4 of the TCOF1 gene in the patient with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalek, Bozena; Wisniewski, Slawomir A; Wojcicki, Piotr; Kobus, Kazimierz; Trzeciak, Wieslaw H

    2003-12-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene. This gene encodes a serine/alanine-rich protein called treacle. The structure of the entire TCOF1 gene was investigated in a patient with TCS. We detected a novel deletion (376delAAGGTGAGTGGGACTGCC) spanning 3 bp of exon 4 and 15 bp of the adjacent intronic sequence. This mutation causes premature termination of translation, resulting in a truncated protein devoid of nucleolar localization signal, and potential phosphorylation sites. Real-time PCR analysis showed different melting temperatures of the amplified fragment containing normal allele and that harboring the 18 bp deletion, thus providing a rapid screening assay for this and other deletions of the TCOF1 gene. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Next Generation Sequencing approach to molecular diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; identification of a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh-Vesal, Reza; Teymoori, Atieh; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Hosseini, Forough Sadat

    2018-02-20

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD; MIM 310200) is one of the most common and severe type of hereditary muscular dystrophies. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The dystrophin gene is associated with X-linked recessive Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. This disease occurs almost exclusively in males. The clinical symptoms of muscle weakness usually begin at childhood. The main symptoms of this disorder are gradually muscular weakness. The affected patients have inability to standing up and walking. Death is usually due to respiratory infection or cardiomyopathy. In this article, we have reported the discovery of a new nonsense mutation that creates abnormal stop codon in the dystrophin gene. This mutation was detected using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technique. The subject was a 17-year-old male with muscular dystrophy that who was suspected of having DMD. He was referred to Hakim medical genetics center of Neyshabur, IRAN. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. spliceR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Porse, Bo Torben; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq data is currently underutilized, in part because it is difficult to predict the functional impact of alternate transcription events. Recent software improvements in full-length transcript deconvolution prompted us to develop spliceR, an R package for classification of alternative splicing...

  18. Alternative splicing of the cardiac sodium channel creates multiple variants of mutant T1620K channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Walzik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing creates several Na(v1.5 transcripts in the mammalian myocardium and in various other tissues including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells as well as neuronal stem cell lines. In total nine Na(v1.5 splice variants have been discovered. Four of them, namely Na(v1.5a, Na(v1.5c, Na(v1.5d, and Na(v1.5e, generate functional channels in heterologous expression systems. The significance of alternatively spliced transcripts for cardiac excitation, in particular their role in SCN5A channelopathies, is less well understood. In the present study, we systematically investigated electrophysiological properties of mutant T1620K channels in the background of all known functional Na(v1.5 splice variants in HEK293 cells. This mutation has been previously associated with two distinct cardiac excitation disorders: with long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3 and isolated cardiac conduction disease (CCD. When investigating the effect of the T1620K mutation, we noticed similar channel defects in the background of hNa(v1.5, hNa(v1.5a, and hNa(v1.5c. In contrast, the hNa(v1.5d background produced differential effects: In the mutant channel, some gain-of-function features did not emerge, whereas loss-of-function became more pronounced. In case of hNa(v1.5e, the neonatal variant of hNa(v1.5, both the splice variant itself as well as the corresponding mutant channel showed electrophysiological properties that were distinct from the wild-type and mutant reference channels, hNa(v1.5 and T1620K, respectively. In conclusion, our data show that alternative splicing is a mechanism capable of generating a variety of functionally distinct wild-type and mutant hNa(v1.5 channels. Thus, the cellular splicing machinery is a potential player affecting genotype-phenotype correlations in SCN5A channelopathies.

  19. Unexpected allelic heterogeneity and spectrum of mutations in Fowler syndrome revealed by next-generation exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Emilie; Albrecht, Steffen; Ha, Kevin C H; Jacob, Karine; Bolduc, Nathalie; Polychronakos, Constantin; Dechelotte, Pierre; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada

    2010-08-01

    Protein coding genes constitute approximately 1% of the human genome but harbor 85% of the mutations with large effects on disease-related traits. Therefore, efficient strategies for selectively sequencing complete coding regions (i.e., "whole exome") have the potential to contribute our understanding of human diseases. We used a method for whole-exome sequencing coupling Agilent whole-exome capture to the Illumina DNA-sequencing platform, and investigated two unrelated fetuses from nonconsanguineous families with Fowler Syndrome (FS), a stereotyped phenotype lethal disease. We report novel germline mutations in feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular-receptor-family member 2, FLVCR2, which has recently been shown to cause FS. Using this technology, we identified three types of genetic abnormalities: point-mutations, insertions-deletions, and intronic splice-site changes (first pathogenic report using this technology), in the fetuses who both were compound heterozygotes for the disease. Although revealing a high level of allelic heterogeneity and mutational spectrum in FS, this study further illustrates the successful application of whole-exome sequencing to uncover genetic defects in rare Mendelian disorders. Of importance, we show that we can identify genes underlying rare, monogenic and recessive diseases using a limited number of patients (n=2), in the absence of shared genetic heritage and in the presence of allelic heterogeneity.

  20. Generation and Characterization of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Patients with mtDNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, Riikka H; Suomalainen, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from patient cells has revolutionized disease modeling in recent years. One research area, where disease models have previously been scarce, is disorders with mutations in mitochondrial DNA. These are a common cause for human disease and often cause very tissue specific phenotypes with vast clinical heterogeneity. iPS technology has now opened up new possibilities for mechanistic studies of these diseases.

  1. Alternative Splicing in Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengming Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS occurs widely in plants and can provide the main source of transcriptome and proteome diversity in an organism. AS functions in a range of physiological processes, including plant disease resistance, but its biological roles and functional mechanisms remain poorly understood. Many plant disease resistance (R genes undergo AS, and several R genes require alternatively spliced transcripts to produce R proteins that can specifically recognize pathogen invasion. In the finely-tuned process of R protein activation, the truncated isoforms generated by AS may participate in plant disease resistance either by suppressing the negative regulation of initiation of immunity, or by directly engaging in effector-triggered signaling. Although emerging research has shown the functional significance of AS in plant biotic stress responses, many aspects of this topic remain to be understood. Several interesting issues surrounding the AS of R genes, especially regarding its functional roles and regulation, will require innovative techniques and additional research to unravel.

  2. Designing Efficient Double RNA trans-Splicing Molecules for Targeted RNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttner, Clemens; Murauer, Eva M.; Hainzl, Stefan; Kocher, Thomas; Neumayer, Anna; Reichelt, Julia; Bauer, Johann W.; Koller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing is a promising tool for mRNA modification in a diversity of genetic disorders. In particular, the substitution of internal exons of a gene by combining 3′ and 5′ RNA trans-splicing seems to be an elegant way to modify especially large pre-mRNAs. Here we discuss a robust method for designing double RNA trans-splicing molecules (dRTM). We demonstrate how the technique can be implemented in an endogenous setting, using COL7A1, the gene encoding type VII collagen, as a target. An RTM screening system was developed with the aim of testing the replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons, harbouring a homozygous mutation, with the wild-type version. The most efficient RTMs from a pool of randomly generated variants were selected via our fluorescence-based screening system and adapted for use in an in vitro disease model system. Transduction of type VII collagen-deficient keratinocytes with the selected dRTM led to accurate replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons resulting in a restored wild-type RNA sequence. This is the first study demonstrating specific exon replacement by double RNA trans-splicing within an endogenous transcript in cultured cells, corroborating the utility of this technology for mRNA repair in a variety of genetic disorders. PMID:27669223

  3. Case Report Identification of a novel SLC45A2 mutation in albinism by targeted next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, J J; Xue, J F; Xue, H Q; Guo, Y Y; Liu, Y; Ouyang, N

    2016-09-19

    Albinism is a diverse group of hypopigmentary disorders caused by multiple-genetic defects. The genetic diagnosis of patients affected with albinism by Sanger sequencing is often complex, expensive, and time-consuming. In this study, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing to screen for 16 genes in a patient with albinism, and identified 21 genetic variants, including 19 known single nucleotide polymorphisms, one novel missense mutation (c.1456 G>A), and one disease-causing mutation (c.478 G>C). The novel mutation was not observed in 100 controls, and was predicted to be a damaging mutation by SIFT and Polyphen. Thus, we identified a novel mutation in SLC45A2 in a Chinese family, expanding the mutational spectrum of albinism. Our results also demonstrate that targeted next-generation sequencing is an effective genetic test for albinism.

  4. Abnormalities in alternative splicing of angiogenesis-related genes and their role in HIV-related cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mthembu NN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonkululeko N Mthembu,1 Zukile Mbita,2 Rodney Hull,1 Zodwa Dlamini1 1Research, Innovation and Engagements, Mangosuthu University of Technology, Durban, 2Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Limpopo, Sovenga, South Africa Abstract: Alternative splicing of mRNA leads to an increase in proteome biodiversity by allowing the generation of multiple mRNAs, coding for multiple protein isoforms of various structural and functional properties from a single primary pre-mRNA transcript. The protein isoforms produced are tightly regulated in normal development but are mostly deregulated in various cancers. In HIV-infected individuals with AIDS, there is an increase in aberrant alternative splicing, resulting in an increase in HIV/AIDS-related cancers, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and cervical cancer. This aberrant splicing leads to abnormal production of protein and is caused by mutations in cis-acting elements or trans-acting factors in angiogenesis-related genes. Restoring the normal regulation of alternative splicing of angiogenic genes would alter the expression of protein isoforms and may confer normal cell physiology in patients with these cancers. This review highlights the abnormalities in alternative splicing of angiogenesis-related genes and their implication in HIV/AIDS-related cancers. This allows us to gain an insight into the pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS-related cancer and in turn elucidate the therapeutic potential of alternatively spliced genes in HIV/AIDS-related malignancies. Keywords: vascular endothelial growth factor, oncogenic viruses, hypoxia induced factor 1, Kaposi’s sarcoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, therapies targeting alternative splicing

  5. De Novo Mutations in SON Disrupt RNA Splicing of Genes Essential for Brain Development and Metabolism, Causing an Intellectual-Disability Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, J.-H. (Jung-Hyun); Shinde, D.N. (Deepali N.); M.R.F. Reijnders (Margot R.F.); Hauser, N.S. (Natalie S.); Belmonte, R.L. (Rebecca L.); Wilson, G.R. (Gregory R.); Bosch, D.G.M. (Daniëlle G.M.); Bubulya, P.A. (Paula A.); V. Shashi (Vandana); Petrovski, S. (Slavé); Stone, J.K. (Joshua K.); Park, E.Y. (Eun Young); J.A. Veltman (Joris); Sinnema, M. (Margje); C. Stumpel (Connie); J. Draaisma (Jos); J. Nicolai (Joost); H.G. Yntema; Lindstrom, K. (Kristin); B. de Vries (Boukje); Jewett, T. (Tamison); Santoro, S.L. (Stephanie L.); J. Vogt (Julie); Bachman, K.K. (Kristine K.); Seeley, A.H. (Andrea ); Krokosky, A. (Alyson); Turner, C. (Clesson); Rohena, L. (Luis); Hempel, M. (Maja); Kortüm, F. (Fanny); Lessel, D. (Davor); Neu, A. (Axel); T.M. Strom (Tim); D. Wieczorek (Dagmar); Bramswig, N. (Nuria); Laccone, F.A. (Franco A.); Behunova, J. (Jana); Rehder, H. (Helga); Gordon, C.T. (Christopher T.); M. Rio (Marlène); Romana, S. (Serge); Tang, S. (Sha); El-Khechen, D. (Dima); M.T. Cho (Megan T.); McWalter, K. (Kirsty); Douglas, G. (Ganka); Baskin, B. (Berivan); Begtrup, A. (Amber); Funari, T. (Tara); Schoch, K. (Kelly); Stegmann, A.P.A. (Alexander P.A.); S.J. Stevens; Zhang, D.-E. (Dong-Er); Traver, D. (David); Yao, X. (Xu); D.G. MacArthur (Daniel G.); H.G. Brunner; G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); R.H. Myers (Richard); Owen, L.B. (Laurie B.); Lim, S.-T. (Ssang-Taek); Stachura, D.L. (David L.); L.E.L.M. Vissers; Ahn, E.-Y.E. (Eun-Young Erin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe overall understanding of the molecular etiologies of intellectual disability (ID) and developmental delay (DD) is increasing as next-generation sequencing technologies identify genetic variants in individuals with such disorders. However, detailed analyses conclusively confirming

  6. Mechanism of alternative splicing and its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Jing; Huang, B O; Xu, Yan-Mei; Li, Jing; Huang, Lin-Feng; Lin, Jin; Zhang, Jing; Min, Qing-Hua; Yang, Wei-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-03-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is an essential mechanism to increase the complexity of gene expression, and it plays an important role in cellular differentiation and organism development. Regulation of alternative splicing is a complicated process in which numerous interacting components are at work, including cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors, and is further guided by the functional coupling between transcription and splicing. Additional molecular features, such as chromatin structure, RNA structure and alternative transcription initiation or alternative transcription termination, collaborate with these basic components to generate the protein diversity due to alternative splicing. All these factors contributing to this one fundamental biological process add up to a mechanism that is critical to the proper functioning of cells. Any corruption of the process may lead to disruption of normal cellular function and the eventuality of disease. Cancer is one of those diseases, where alternative splicing may be the basis for the identification of novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, as well as new strategies for therapy. Thus, an in-depth understanding of alternative splicing regulation has the potential not only to elucidate fundamental biological principles, but to provide solutions for various diseases.

  7. Performance of amplicon-based next generation DNA sequencing for diagnostic gene mutation profiling in oncopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Daoud; Snijders, Peter J F; Meijer, Gerrit A; Doeleman, Marije W; van Moorsel, Marinda I H; van Essen, Hendrik F; Eijk, Paul P; Grünberg, Katrien; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Thunnissen, Erik; Verheul, Henk M; Smit, Egbert F; Ylstra, Bauke; Heideman, Daniëlle A M

    2014-10-01

    Next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) holds promise for diagnostic applications, yet implementation in routine molecular pathology practice requires performance evaluation on DNA derived from routine formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens. The current study presents a comprehensive analysis of TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel-based NGS using a MiSeq Personal sequencer (TSACP-MiSeq-NGS) for somatic mutation profiling. TSACP-MiSeq-NGS (testing 212 hotspot mutation amplicons of 48 genes) and a data analysis pipeline were evaluated in a retrospective learning/test set approach (n = 58/n = 45 FFPE-tumor DNA samples) against 'gold standard' high-resolution-melting (HRM)-sequencing for the genes KRAS, EGFR, BRAF and PIK3CA. Next, the performance of the validated test algorithm was assessed in an independent, prospective cohort of FFPE-tumor DNA samples (n = 75). In the learning set, a number of minimum parameter settings was defined to decide whether a FFPE-DNA sample is qualified for TSACP-MiSeq-NGS and for calling mutations. The resulting test algorithm revealed 82% (37/45) compliance to the quality criteria and 95% (35/37) concordant assay findings for KRAS, EGFR, BRAF and PIK3CA with HRM-sequencing (kappa = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.81-1.03) in the test set. Subsequent application of the validated test algorithm to the prospective cohort yielded a success rate of 84% (63/75), and a high concordance with HRM-sequencing (95% (60/63); kappa = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.84-1.01). TSACP-MiSeq-NGS detected 77 mutations in 29 additional genes. TSACP-MiSeq-NGS is suitable for diagnostic gene mutation profiling in oncopathology.

  8. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia contains heterogeneous genetic mutations by next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Andrés E.; Hu, Zhihong; Routbort, Mark J.; Patel, Keyur P.; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Loghavi, Sanam; Zuo, Zhuang; Yin, C. Cameron; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Wang, Sa A.; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Ok, Chi Young

    2018-01-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is an uncommon manifestation of acute leukemia. The aim of this study is to further characterize the genetic landscape of de novo cases of MPAL that fulfill the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification criteria for this entity. We identified 14 cases examined by next generation sequencing (NGS) using 28 (n = 10), 53 (n = 3) or 81 (n = 1) gene panels: 7 cases with a B-cell/myeloid (B/My) immunophenotype, 6 T-cell/myeloid (T/My) immunophenotype, and 1 B-cell/T-cell (B/T) immunophenotype. A total of 25 distinct mutations were identified in 15 different genes in 9/14 (64%) patients. FLT3-ITD was the only recurrent mutation in 2 patients. B/My MPAL cases less commonly harbored mutations compared with T/My MPAL cases (43% vs. 100%, p = 0.07). In contrast, B/My MPALs more commonly showed a complex karyotype compared to T/My MPALs (71% vs. 17%, p = 0.1). With NGS and karyotype combined, most (93%) MPAL cases had mutations or cytogenetic abnormalities. With a median follow-up of 12.5 months, there were no significant differences in median overall survival (OS) between patients with B/My or T/My MPAL (17.8 and 6.5 months, respectively, p = 0.81) or between patients with MPAL with versus without gene mutations (6.5 and 13.3 months, respectively, p = 0.86). Our data suggest that the distinguishing cases of MPAL according to immunophenotype has value because the underlying mechanisms of leukemogenesis might differ between B/My and T/My MPAL. PMID:29492206

  9. [c.2381-3T>C mutation of DMD gene: a rare SNP without significant pathogenicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuanlong; Yang, Yuan

    2015-02-01

    To clarify the nature of a DMD splice acceptor mutation c.2381-3T>C. Genomic DNA was extracted from 5 members of a family affected with DMD. For an obligatory carrier, after excluding gross deletion and duplication of the DMD gene with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) method, all coding and splice site sequences of the DMD gene were analyzed with Next Generation Sequencing followed by confirmation with targeted Sanger sequencing. Mutations of the carrier were detected in other 4 members. For the splice site mutation, mini-gene was constructed and expressed in vitro to detect the number of transcript and cDNA sequence. A known nonsense mutation (c.8038C>T, p.Arg2680Ter) was identified in the carrier, her sister and the mother. The rest 4 members, except for the mother from the first generation, have all carried the c.2381-3T>C mutation. The latter has been described as a splice site mutation to cause DMD. One of 135 male adults without DMD was also detected to have carried the c.2381-3T>C mutation. No additional transcript was produced by the mini-genes containing c.2381-3T>C mutation. The c.8038C>T(p.Arg2680Ter)mutation of DMD gene probably underlies the disease in this family. The presence of the c.2381-3T>C mutation in a asymptomatic male and a non-DMD male control, together with the normal in vitro expression of the mini-gene carrying the c.2381-3T>C, strongly suggested that the c.2381-3T>C mutation collected in the Human Gene Mutation Database is a rare SNP without significant pathogenicity.

  10. Quantitative regulation of alternative splicing in evolution and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob L; Roy, Scott W

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a widespread mechanism with an important role in increasing transcriptome and proteome diversity by generating multiple different products from the same gene. Evolutionary studies of AS have focused primarily on the conservation of alternatively spliced sequences or o...

  11. Multiset splicing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassow, Jürgen; Vaszil, György

    2004-01-01

    We consider splicing systems reflecting two important aspects of the behaviour of DNA molecules in nature or in laboratory experiments which so far have not been studied in the literature. We examine the effect of splicing rules applied to finite multisets of words using sequential and different types of parallel derivation strategies and compare the sets of words or sets of multisets which can be obtained.

  12. Generation of heritable germline mutations in the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Au, Lauren Yun Cook; Douglah, Deema; Chong, Abigail; White, Bradley J; Ferree, Patrick M; Akbari, Omar S

    2017-04-19

    The revolutionary RNA-guided endonuclease CRISPR/Cas9 system has proven to be a powerful tool for gene editing in a plethora of organisms. Here, utilizing this system we developed an efficient protocol for the generation of heritable germline mutations in the parasitoid jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, a rising insect model organism for the study of evolution, development of axis pattern formation, venom production, haplo-diploid sex determination, and host-symbiont interactions. To establish CRISPR-directed gene editing in N. vitripennis, we targeted a conserved eye pigmentation gene cinnabar, generating several independent heritable germline mutations in this gene. Briefly, to generate these mutants, we developed a protocol to efficiently collect N. vitripennis eggs from a parasitized flesh fly pupa, Sarcophaga bullata, inject these eggs with Cas9/guide RNA mixtures, and transfer injected eggs back into the host to continue development. We also describe a flow for screening mutants and establishing stable mutant strains through genetic crosses. Overall, our results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool for genome manipulation in N. vitripennis, with strong potential for expansion to target critical genes, thus allowing for the investigation of several important biological phenomena in this organism.

  13. Novel Alternative Splice Variants of Mouse Cdk5rap2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Kraemer

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a pronounced reduction of brain volume and intellectual disability. A current model for the microcephaly phenotype invokes a stem cell proliferation and differentiation defect, which has moved the disease into the spotlight of stem cell biology and neurodevelopmental science. Homozygous mutations of the Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2 gene CDK5RAP2 are one genetic cause of MCPH. To further characterize the pathomechanism underlying MCPH, we generated a conditional Cdk5rap2 LoxP/hCMV Cre mutant mouse. Further analysis, initiated on account of a lack of a microcephaly phenotype in these mutant mice, revealed the presence of previously unknown splice variants of the Cdk5rap2 gene that are at least in part accountable for the lack of microcephaly in the mice.

  14. Mutation detection with next-generation resequencing through a mediator genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omri Wurtzel

    Full Text Available The affordability of next generation sequencing (NGS is transforming the field of mutation analysis in bacteria. The genetic basis for phenotype alteration can be identified directly by sequencing the entire genome of the mutant and comparing it to the wild-type (WT genome, thus identifying acquired mutations. A major limitation for this approach is the need for an a-priori sequenced reference genome for the WT organism, as the short reads of most current NGS approaches usually prohibit de-novo genome assembly. To overcome this limitation we propose a general framework that utilizes the genome of relative organisms as mediators for comparing WT and mutant bacteria. Under this framework, both mutant and WT genomes are sequenced with NGS, and the short sequencing reads are mapped to the mediator genome. Variations between the mutant and the mediator that recur in the WT are ignored, thus pinpointing the differences between the mutant and the WT. To validate this approach we sequenced the genome of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J, an obligatory bacterial predator, and its prey-independent mutant, and compared both to the mediator species Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100. Although the mutant and the mediator sequences differed in more than 28,000 nucleotide positions, our approach enabled pinpointing the single causative mutation. Experimental validation in 53 additional mutants further established the implicated gene. Our approach extends the applicability of NGS-based mutant analyses beyond the domain of available reference genomes.

  15. Mutation Detection with Next-Generation Resequencing through a Mediator Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtzel, Omri; Dori-Bachash, Mally; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Sorek, Rotem; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2010-12-31

    The affordability of next generation sequencing (NGS) is transforming the field of mutation analysis in bacteria. The genetic basis for phenotype alteration can be identified directly by sequencing the entire genome of the mutant and comparing it to the wild-type (WT) genome, thus identifying acquired mutations. A major limitation for this approach is the need for an a-priori sequenced reference genome for the WT organism, as the short reads of most current NGS approaches usually prohibit de-novo genome assembly. To overcome this limitation we propose a general framework that utilizes the genome of relative organisms as mediators for comparing WT and mutant bacteria. Under this framework, both mutant and WT genomes are sequenced with NGS, and the short sequencing reads are mapped to the mediator genome. Variations between the mutant and the mediator that recur in the WT are ignored, thus pinpointing the differences between the mutant and the WT. To validate this approach we sequenced the genome of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J, an obligatory bacterial predator, and its prey-independent mutant, and compared both to the mediator species Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100. Although the mutant and the mediator sequences differed in more than 28,000 nucleotide positions, our approach enabled pinpointing the single causative mutation. Experimental validation in 53 additional mutants further established the implicated gene. Our approach extends the applicability of NGS-based mutant analyses beyond the domain of available reference genomes.

  16. Spontaneous mutations in the flhD operon generate motility heterogeneity in Escherichia coli biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Shelley M; Sayler, Joseph; Scarberry, Nicholas; Schroeder, Meredith; Lynnes, Ty; Prüß, Birgit M

    2016-11-08

    :1, and 1:10. After 3 weeks, biofilm of the mixed cultures contained up to five times more biomass than biofilm of each of the individual strains. Mutations in the flhD operon can exert positive or negative effects on motility, depending on the site of the mutation. We believe that this is a mechanism to generate motility heterogeneity within E. coli biofilm, which may help to maintain biofilm biomass over extended periods of time.

  17. Variables that influence BRAF mutation probability: A next-generation sequencing, non-interventional investigation of BRAFV600 mutation status in melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Gaiser

    Full Text Available The incidence of melanoma, particularly in older patients, has steadily increased over the past few decades. Activating mutations of BRAF, the majority occurring in BRAFV600, are frequently detected in melanoma; however, the prognostic significance remains unclear. This study aimed to define the probability and distribution of BRAFV600 mutations, and the clinico-pathological factors that may affect BRAF mutation status, in patients with advanced melanoma using next-generation sequencing.This was a non-interventional, retrospective study of BRAF mutation testing at two German centers, in Heidelberg and Tübingen. Archival tumor samples from patients with histologically confirmed melanoma (stage IIIB, IIIC, IV were analyzed using PCR amplification and deep sequencing. Clinical, histological, and mutation data were collected. The statistical influence of patient- and tumor-related characteristics on BRAFV600 mutation status was assessed using multiple logistic regression (MLR and a prediction profiler.BRAFV600 mutation status was assessed in 453 samples. Mutations were detected in 57.6% of patients (n = 261, with 48.1% (n = 102 at the Heidelberg site and 66.0% (n = 159 at the Tübingen site. The decreasing influence of increasing age on mutation probability was quantified. A main effects MLR model identified age (p = 0.0001, center (p = 0.0004, and melanoma subtype (p = 0.014 as significantly influencing BRAFV600 mutation probability; ultraviolet (UV exposure showed a statistical trend (p = 0.1419. An interaction model of age versus other variables showed that center (p<0.0001 and melanoma subtype (p = 0.0038 significantly influenced BRAF mutation probability; age had a statistically significant effect only as part of an interaction with both UV exposure (p = 0.0110 and melanoma subtype (p = 0.0134.This exploratory study highlights that testing center, melanoma subtype, and age in combination with UV exposure and melanoma subtype significantly

  18. Identification of common genetic variation that modulates alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Hull

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein function. Several disease states have been associated with rare genetic variants that affect splicing patterns. Conversely, splicing efficiency of some genes is known to vary between individuals without apparent ill effects. What is not clear is whether commonly observed phenotypic variation in splicing patterns, and hence potential variation in protein function, is to a significant extent determined by naturally occurring DNA sequence variation and in particular by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In this study, we surveyed the splicing patterns of 250 exons in 22 individuals who had been previously genotyped by the International HapMap Project. We identified 70 simple cassette exon alternative splicing events in our experimental system; for six of these, we detected consistent differences in splicing pattern between individuals, with a highly significant association between splice phenotype and neighbouring SNPs. Remarkably, for five out of six of these events, the strongest correlation was found with the SNP closest to the intron-exon boundary, although the distance between these SNPs and the intron-exon boundary ranged from 2 bp to greater than 1,000 bp. Two of these SNPs were further investigated using a minigene splicing system, and in each case the SNPs were found to exert cis-acting effects on exon splicing efficiency in vitro. The functional consequences of these SNPs could not be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms. Our findings suggest that phenotypic variation in splicing patterns is determined by the presence of SNPs within flanking introns or exons. Effects on splicing may represent an important mechanism by which SNPs influence gene function.

  19. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bonomi, Serena; Gallo, Stefania; Catillo, Morena; Pignataro, Daniela; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Ghigna, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer ...

  20. Novel forms of Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2): Generation by alternative translation initiation and mRNA splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard Daniel J; Hjalt Tord A; Lamba Pankaj

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Members of the Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor (PITX) gene family, particularly PITX1 and PITX2, play important roles in normal development and in differentiated cell functions. Three major isoforms of PITX2 were previously reported to be produced through both alternative mRNA splicing (PITX2A and PITX2B) and alternative promoter usage (PITX2C). The proteins derived from these mRNAs contain identical homeodomain and carboxyl termini. Differences in the amino-t...

  1. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Research on mutation generation in higher plants with heavy ions at NIRS-HIMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, M.; Watanabe, S.; Watanabe, M.; Toguri, T.; Furusawa, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Plants are closely related to medical treatment in medicine, foods, herbs and medical care by gardening. Ion beams have much higher linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness than those of gamma rays and X-rays. Ion beams are supposed to be useful as new mutagen to obtain novel mutants with superior characteristics in higher plants. In this study, the influence of heavy ions irradiation on bud growth was examined in carnation and the mutation generation was inspected in babies' breath. The growth of carnation buds began to decrease at 10 Gy and the median growth dose was estimated at 35 Gy for 290 Mev/u carbon ion beams. Mutants with petaloid leaves were observed in babies' breath by the irradiation of 290 Mev/u carbon ion beams at 20Gy. We will examine the mutation rates and spectrum for 290 MeV/u carbon, 400 MeV/u neon and 500 MeV/u argon ion beams to find optimum use of the beams in plant breeding. The efficient system to generate useful mutants using heavy ions at NIRS-HIMAC will be developed in higher plants. (author)

  3. An engineered U1 small nuclear RNA rescues splicing-defective coagulation F7 gene expression in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, D; Faella, A; Margaritis, P; Cavallari, N; Pagani, F; Bernardi, F; Arruda, V R; Pinotti, M

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNA U1 (U1snRNA) to rescue pre-mRNA splicing impaired by mutations makes it an attractive therapeutic molecule. Coagulation factor deficiencies due to splicing mutations are relatively frequent and could therefore benefit from this strategy. However, the effects of U1snRNAs in vivo remain unknown. Objectives To assess the rescue of the F7 c.859+5G>A splicing mutation (FVII+5A), causing severe human factor VII (hFVII) deficiency, by the modified U1snRNA+5a (U1+5a) in a murine model. Methods Mice expressing the human F7 c.859+5G>A mutant were generated following liver-directed expression by plasmid or recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector administration. The rescue of the splice-site defective pre-mRNA by U1+5a was monitored in liver and plasma through hFVII-specific assays. Results Injection of plasmids encoding the U1+5a rescued plasma hFVII levels, which increased from undetectable to ∼8.5% of those obtained with the wild-type hFVII plasmid control. To assess long-term effects, mice were injected with low and high doses of two AAV vectors encoding the FVII+5A splice site mutant as template to be corrected by U1+5a. This strategy resulted in hFVII plasma levels of 3.9 ± 0.8 or 23.3 ± 5.1 ng mL−1 in a dose-dependent manner, corresponding in patients to circulating FVII levels of ∼1–4.5% of normal. Moreover, in both experimental models, we also detected correctly spliced hFVII transcripts and hFVII-positive cells in liver cells. Conclusions Here we provide the first in vivo proof-of-principle of the rescue of the expression of a splicing-defective F7 mutant by U1snRNAs, thus highlighting their therapeutic potential in coagulation disorders. PMID:24738135

  4. An engineered U1 small nuclear RNA rescues splicing defective coagulation F7 gene expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, D; Faella, A; Margaritis, P; Cavallari, N; Pagani, F; Bernardi, F; Arruda, V R; Pinotti, M

    2014-02-01

    The ability of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNA U1 (U1snRNA) to rescue pre-mRNA splicing impaired by mutations makes it an attractive therapeutic molecule. Coagulation factor deficiencies due to splicing mutations are relatively frequent and could therefore benefit from this strategy. However, the effects of U1snRNAs in vivo remain unknown. To assess the rescue of the F7 c.859+5G>A splicing mutation (FVII+5A), causing severe human factor VII (hFVII) deficiency, by the modified U1snRNA+5a (U1+5a) in a murine model. Mice expressing the human F7 c.859+5G>A mutant were generated following liver-directed expression by plasmid or recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector administration. The rescue of the splice-site defective pre-mRNA by U1+5a was monitored in liver and plasma through hFVII-specific assays. Injection of plasmids encoding the U1+5a rescued plasma hFVII levels, which increased from undetectable to ~8.5% of those obtained with the wild-type hFVII plasmid control. To assess long-term effects, mice were injected with low and high doses of two AAV vectors encoding the FVII+5A splice site mutant as template to be corrected by U1+5a. This strategy resulted in hFVII plasma levels of 3.9 ± 0.8 or 23.3 ± 5.1 ng mL⁻¹ in a dose-dependent manner, corresponding in patients to circulating FVII levels of ~1-4.5% of normal. Moreover, in both experimental models, we also detected correctly spliced hFVII transcripts and hFVII-positive cells in liver cells. Here we provide the first in vivo proof of-principle of the rescue of the expression of a splicing-defective F7 mutant by U1snRNAs, thus highlighting their therapeutic potential in coagulation disorders.

  5. The Application of Next-Generation Sequencing for Mutation Detection in Autosomal-Dominant Hereditary Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, Nicolas; Röthlisberger, Benno; Ludin, Katja; Schlegel, Christoph; Lalwani, Anil K

    2017-07-01

    Identification of the causative mutation using next-generation sequencing in autosomal-dominant hereditary hearing impairment, as mutation analysis in hereditary hearing impairment by classic genetic methods, is hindered by the high heterogeneity of the disease. Two Swiss families with autosomal-dominant hereditary hearing impairment. Amplified DNA libraries for next-generation sequencing were constructed from extracted genomic DNA, derived from peripheral blood, and enriched by a custom-made sequence capture library. Validated, pooled libraries were sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq instrument, 300 cycles and paired-end sequencing. Technical data analysis was performed with SeqMonk, variant analysis with GeneTalk or VariantStudio. The detection of mutations in genes related to hearing loss by next-generation sequencing was subsequently confirmed using specific polymerase-chain-reaction and Sanger sequencing. Mutation detection in hearing-loss-related genes. The first family harbored the mutation c.5383+5delGTGA in the TECTA-gene. In the second family, a novel mutation c.2614-2625delCATGGCGCCGTG in the WFS1-gene and a second mutation TCOF1-c.1028G>A were identified. Next-generation sequencing successfully identified the causative mutation in families with autosomal-dominant hereditary hearing impairment. The results helped to clarify the pathogenic role of a known mutation and led to the detection of a novel one. NGS represents a feasible approach with great potential future in the diagnostics of hereditary hearing impairment, even in smaller labs.

  6. First report of a novel LMNA mutation in a Chinese family with limb ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-12

    shown in figure 3), including 36 mis- sense mutations, 13 truncated mutations and four splicing mutations. Mutation p.W520R reported in this study is a novel finding. The correlation between the phenotypes and localiza-.

  7. Evaluation of yield in Gamma Radiated Lines Selected from Mutated Generations of Mungbean (Vigna radiata)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aye Thandar; Phyu Hnin Htike; Myo Myint

    2010-12-01

    The induced mutation through different gamma radiation frequencies 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 450 and 500Gy in mungbean was studied for yield components in M3 generation. A Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) was employed with three replications in this experiment. The data collected from M3 generation were subjected to statistical analysis with the help of Excel (Microsoft office 2007) and for pairs wise comparison of groups was by SPSS program.In primary yield components, there were no significant difference in M3 generation of pods per plant, pod length and seeds per pod except 100 seeds weight. The plant treated with 250 Gy and 400Gy exploited the maximum value of one hundred seeds weight and yield per plant , respectively. Although there was no significant difference in secondary yield components; 50% flowering days, 50% maturity days and plant height in this generation, highest plant height at 200Gy and early flowering and maturity at 300Gy were obserded. The selection of individual plants in the M3 generation was carried out for high yield. In mutant selection, 250Gy and 400Gy revealed relatively more number of plants having good characters such as more number of pods per plant and longer pod length but not in other treatments and control.

  8. Universal Alternative Splicing of Noncoding Exons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deveson, Ira W; Brunck, Marion E; Blackburn, James

    2018-01-01

    The human transcriptome is so large, diverse, and dynamic that, even after a decade of investigation by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we have yet to resolve its true dimensions. RNA-seq suffers from an expression-dependent bias that impedes characterization of low-abundance transcripts. We performed......, indicative of regulation by a deeply conserved splicing code. We propose that noncoding exons are functionally modular, with alternative splicing generating an enormous repertoire of potential regulatory RNAs and a rich transcriptional reservoir for gene evolution....

  9. Identification of a candidate mutation in the COL1A2 gene of a Chow Chow with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, E M; Doan, R; Pool, R R; Porter, B F; Bannasch, D L; Dindot, S V

    2017-09-19

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disease that occurs in humans and animals. Individuals with OI exhibit signs of extreme bone fragility and osteopenia with frequent fractures and perinatal lethality in severe cases. In this study, we report the clinical diagnosis of OI in a dog and the use targeted next-generation sequencing to identify a candidate autosomal dominant mutation in the COL1A2 gene. A five-month old male Chow Chow was examined with a fractured left humerus and resolving, bilateral femoral fractures. Radiographs revealed generalized osteopenia and bilateral humeral, radial, and femoral fractures. Targeted next-generation sequencing of genes associated with OI in humans (COL1A1, COL1A2, LEPRE1, SERPINH1, and CRTAP) revealed a G>A heterozygous mutation in the splice donor site of exon 18 of the COL1A2 gene (c.936+1G>A). The splice donor mutation was not detected among 91 control dogs representing 21 breeds. A comparative analysis of exon 18 and the exon-intron junction further showed that the mutated splice donor site is conserved among vertebrates. Altogether, these findings reveal a candidate autosomal splice donor site mutation causing OI in an individual Chow Chow. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Identification of a disease-causing mutation in a Chinese patient with retinitis pigmentosa by targeted next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Jianping; Guo, Xueqin; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    disease-causing mutations. Sanger sequencing was performed on all subjects to confirm the candidate mutations and assess cosegregation within the family. Results: Clinical examinations of the proband showed typical characteristics of RP. Three candidate heterozygous mutations in 3 genes associated with RP...... were detected in the proband by targeted NGS. The 3 mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and the deletion (c.357_358delAA) in PRPF31 was shown to cosegregate with RP phenotype in 7 affected family members, but not in 3 unaffected family members. Conclusions: The deletion (c.357_358del......Purpose: To identify disease-causing mutations in a Chinese patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods: A detailed clinical examination was performed on the proband. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) combined with bioinformatics analysis was performed on the proband to detect candidate...

  11. A method of predicting changes in human gene splicing induced by genetic variants in context of cis-acting elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Chindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic variants and mutations disrupting canonical splicing isoforms are among the leading causes of human hereditary disorders. While there is a substantial evidence of aberrant splicing causing Mendelian diseases, the implication of such events in multi-genic disorders is yet to be well understood. We have developed a new tool (SpliceScan II for predicting the effects of genetic variants on splicing and cis-regulatory elements. The novel Bayesian non-canonical 5'GC splice site (SS sensor used in our tool allows inference on non-canonical exons. Results Our tool performed favorably when compared with the existing methods in the context of genes linked to the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. SpliceScan II was able to predict more aberrant splicing isoforms triggered by the mutations, as documented in DBASS5 and DBASS3 aberrant splicing databases, than other existing methods. Detrimental effects behind some of the polymorphic variations previously associated with Alzheimer's and breast cancer could be explained by changes in predicted splicing patterns. Conclusions We have developed SpliceScan II, an effective and sensitive tool for predicting the detrimental effects of genomic variants on splicing leading to Mendelian and complex hereditary disorders. The method could potentially be used to screen resequenced patient DNA to identify de novo mutations and polymorphic variants that could contribute to a genetic disorder.

  12. Rapid screening of yeast mutants with reporters identifies new splicing phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreumont, Natacha; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear precursor mRNA splicing requires the stepwise assembly of a large complex, the spliceosome. Recent large-scale analyses, including purification of splicing complexes, high-throughput genetic screens and interactomic studies, have linked numerous factors to this dynamic process, including a well-defined core conserved from yeast to human. Intriguingly, despite extensive studies, no splicing defects were reported for some of the corresponding yeast mutants. To resolve this paradox, we screened a collection of viable yeast strains carrying mutations in splicing-related factors with a set of reporters including artificial constructs carrying competing splice sites. Previous analyses have indeed demonstrated that this strategy identifies yeast factors able to regulate alternative splicing and whose properties are conserved in human cells. The method, sensitive to subtle defects, revealed new splicing phenotypes for most analyzed factors such as the Urn1 protein. Interestingly, a mutant of PRP8 specifically lacking an N-terminal proline-rich region stimulated the splicing of a reporter containing competing branchpoint/3' splice site regions. Thus, using appropriate reporters, yeast can be used to quickly delineate the effect of various factors on splicing and identify those with the propensity to regulate alternative splicing events. © 2013 FEBS.

  13. A 5' splice site enhances the recruitment of basal transcription initiation factors in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Kahns, Søren; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Transcription and pre-mRNA splicing are interdependent events. Although mechanisms governing the effects of transcription on splicing are becoming increasingly clear, the means by which splicing affects transcription remain elusive. Using cell lines stably expressing HIV-1 or β-globin mRNAs, harb...... a promoter-proximal 5′ splice site via its U1 snRNA interaction can feed back to stimulate transcription initiation by enhancing preinitiation complex assembly.......Transcription and pre-mRNA splicing are interdependent events. Although mechanisms governing the effects of transcription on splicing are becoming increasingly clear, the means by which splicing affects transcription remain elusive. Using cell lines stably expressing HIV-1 or β-globin mRNAs......, harboring wild-type or various 5′ splice site mutations, we demonstrate a strong positive correlation between splicing efficiency and transcription activity. Interestingly, a 5′ splice site can stimulate transcription even in the absence of splicing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show enhanced...

  14. Minor class splicing shapes the zebrafish transcriptome during development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markmiller, Sebastian; Cloonan, Nicole; Lardelli, Rea M

    2014-01-01

    Minor class or U12-type splicing is a highly conserved process required to remove a minute fraction of introns from human pre-mRNAs. Defects in this splicing pathway have recently been linked to human disease, including a severe developmental disorder encompassing brain and skeletal abnormalities...... known as Taybi-Linder syndrome or microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism 1, and a hereditary intestinal polyposis condition, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Although a key mechanism for regulating gene expression, the impact of impaired U12-type splicing on the transcriptome is unknown. Here, we...... as the U11/U12 di-snRNP 65-kDa protein, a unique component of the U12-type spliceosome. The biochemical impact of the mutation in clbn is the formation of aberrant U11- and U12-containing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins that impair the efficiency of U12-type splicing. Using RNA sequencing and microarrays...

  15. The neurogenetics of alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Celine K; Black, Douglas L; Zheng, Sika

    2016-05-01

    Alternative precursor-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in mammals and is controlled by specialized RNA-binding proteins. The misregulation of splicing is implicated in multiple neurological disorders. We describe recent mouse genetic studies of alternative splicing that reveal its critical role in both neuronal development and the function of mature neurons. We discuss the challenges in understanding the extensive genetic programmes controlled by proteins that regulate splicing, both during development and in the adult brain.

  16. Alternative Splicing in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pio, Ruben; Montuenga, Luis M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Alterations in alternative splicing affect essential biologic processes and are the basis for a number of pathologic conditions, including cancer. In this review we will summarize the evidence supporting the relevance of alternative splicing in lung cancer. An example that illustrates this relevance is the altered balance between Bcl-xL and Bcl-xS, two splice variants of the apoptosis regulator Bcl-x. Splice modifications in cancer-related genes can be associated ...

  17. Splice Variants of the Human ZC3H14 Gene Generate Multiple Isoforms of a Zinc Finger Polyadenosine RNA Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sara W.; Apponi, Luciano H.; Cornejo, Omar E.; Kitchen, Chad M.; Valentini, Sandro R.; Pavlath, Grace K.; Dunham, Christine M.; Corbett, Anita H.

    2009-01-01

    The human ZC3H14 gene encodes an evolutionarily conserved Cys3His zinc finger protein that binds specifically to polyadenosine RNA and is thus postulated to modulate post-transcriptional gene expression. Expressed sequence tag data predicts multiple splice variants of both human and mouse ZC3H14. Analysis of ZC3H14 expression in both human cell lines and mouse tissues confirms the presence of multiple alternatively spliced transcripts. Although all of these transcripts encode protein isoforms that contain the conserved C-terminal zinc finger domain, suggesting that they could all bind to polyadenosine RNA, they differ in other functionally important domains. Most of the alternative transcripts encode closely related proteins (termed isoform 1, 2, 3, and 3short) that differ primarily in the inclusion of three small exons, 9, 10, and 11, resulting in predicted protein isoforms ranging from 82 to 64 kDa. Each of these closely related isoforms contains predicted classical nuclear localization signals (cNLS) within exons 7 and 11. Consistent with the presence of these putative nuclear targeting signals, these ZC3H14 isoforms are all localized to the nucleus. In contrast, an additional transcript encodes a smaller protein (34 kDa) with an alternative first exon (isoform 4). Consistent with the absence of the predicted cNLS motifs located in exons 7 and 11, ZC3H14 isoform 4 is localized to the cytoplasm. Both EST data and experimental data suggest that this variant is enriched in testes and brain. Using an antibody that detects endogenous ZC3H14 isoforms 1-3 reveals localization of these isoforms to nuclear speckles. These speckles co-localize with the splicing factor, SC35, suggesting a role for nuclear ZC3H14 in mRNA processing. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiple transcripts encoding several ZC3H14 isoforms exist in vivo. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic ZC3H14 isoforms could have distinct effects on gene expression mediated by the common Cys3His zinc

  18. Long QT syndrome and left ventricular noncompaction in 4 family members across 2 generations with KCNQ1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbanda, Mira; Hunter, Amanda; Tennant, Stephen; Moore, David; Curtis, Stephanie; Hancox, Jules C; Murday, Victoria

    2017-05-01

    The association of long QT syndrome and left ventricular noncompaction is uncommon, with only a handful of previous reports, and only one reported case in association with a mutation in KCNQ1. Here we present genetic and phenotypic data for 4 family members across 2 generations who all have evidence of prolonged QT interval and left ventricular noncompaction in association with a pathogenic mutation in KCNQ1, and discuss the potential mechanisms of this association. In conclusion, we suggest that it may be helpful to consider looking for mutations in KCNQ1 in similar patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of HIV-1 splicing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, N.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) produces a single primary RNA transcript. The full-length transcript functions as RNA genome that is packaged into virions and as mRNA for translation of the Gag and Pol proteins. HIV-1 RNA contains several splice donor (5’splice site; 5’ss) and splice

  20. A study of alternative splicing in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Gilchrist, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since at least half of the genes in mammalian genomes are subjected to alternative splicing, alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays an important contribution to the complexity of the mammalian proteome. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) provide evidence of a great number of possible...... alternative isoforms. With the EST resource for the domestic pig now containing more than one million porcine ESTs, it is possible to identify alternative splice forms of the individual transcripts in this species from the EST data with some confidence. RESULTS: The pig EST data generated by the Sino...... transcripts with expression patterns matching those of the EST data. The remaining four genes had tissue-restricted expression of alternative spliced transcripts. Five out of the 16 splice events that were experimentally verified were found to be putative pig specific. CONCLUSIONS: In accordance with human...

  1. Clinical presentation and molecular identification of four uncommon alpha globin variants in Thailand. Initiation codon mutation of α2-globin Gene (HBA2:c.1delA), donor splice site mutation of α1-globin gene (IVSI-1, HBA1:c.95 + 1G>A), hemoglobin Queens Park/Chao Pra Ya (HBA1:c.98T>A) and hemoglobin Westmead (HBA2:c.369C>G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viprakasit, Vip; Ekwattanakit, Supachai; Chalaow, Nipon; Riolueang, Suchada; Wijit, Sirirat; Tanyut, Porntep; Chat-Uthai, Nunthawut; Tachavanich, Kalaya

    2014-01-01

    Alpha thalassemia is the most common genetic disease in the world with the prevalence of carriers ranging from 5-50% in several populations. Coinheritance of two defective α-globin genes usually gives rise to a symptomatic condition, hemoglobin (Hb) H disease. Previously, it has been suggested from several studies in different populations that nondeletional Hb H disease (--/α(T)α or --/αα(T)) is generally more severe than the deletional type (--/-α). In this report, we describe four rare nondeletional α-thalassemia mutations in Thai individuals, including initiation codon mutation (HBA2:c.1delA), donor splice site mutation (IVSI-1, HBA1:c.95 + 1G>A), Hb Queens Park (HBA1:c.98T>A) [α32(B13)Met>Lys], and Hb Westmead (HBA2:c.369C>G) [α122(H5)His>Gln]. Interactions of the first three mutations with the α(0)-thalassemia resulted in nondeletional Hb H disease; however, their clinical presentations were rather mild and some were detected accidentally. This suggests that a genotype-phenotype correlation of α-thalassemia syndrome might be more heterogeneous and so the type of mutation does not simply imply the prediction of the resulting phenotype. Our data will be of use in future genetic counseling of such conditions that are increasingly identified thanks to the improvement of molecular analysis in routine laboratories. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. ASpedia: a comprehensive encyclopedia of human alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyung, Daejin; Kim, Jihyun; Cho, Soo Young; Park, Charny

    2018-01-04

    Alternative splicing confers the human genome complexity by increasing the diversity of expressed mRNAs. Hundreds or thousands of splicing regions have been identified through differential alternative splicing analysis of high-throughput datasets. However, it is hard to explain the functional impact of each splicing event. Protein domain formation and nonsense-mediated decay are considered the main functional features of splicing. However, other functional features such as miRNA target sites, phosphorylation sites and single-nucleotide variations are directly affected by alternative splicing and affect downstream function. Hence, we established ASpedia: a comprehensive database for human alternative splicing annotation, which encompasses a range of functions, from genomic annotation to isoform-specific function (ASpedia, http://combio.snu.ac.kr/aspedia). The database provides three features: (i) genomic annotation extracted from DNA, RNA and proteins; (ii) transcription and regulation elements analyzed from next-generation sequencing datasets; and (iii) isoform-specific functions collected from known and published datasets. The ASpedia web application includes three components: an annotation database, a retrieval system and a browser specialized in the identification of human alternative splicing events. The retrieval system supports multiple AS event searches resulting from high-throughput analysis and the AS browser comprises genome tracks. Thus, ASpedia facilitates the systemic annotation of the functional impacts of multiple AS events. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Where splicing joins chromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2011), s. 182-188 ISSN 1949-1034 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0424; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromatin * exon * alternative splicing * transcription * snRNP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. Expressiveness of basic Splice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. van de Pol (Jaco)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe study a simple software architecture, in which application processes are coordinated by writing into and reading from a global set. This architecture underlies Splice, which is developed and used at the company Hollandse Signaalapparaten. Our approach is distinguished by viewing the

  5. Clinical relevance of sensitive and quantitative STAT3 mutation analysis using next-generation sequencing in T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Larsen, Martin; Rewes, Annika

    2014-01-01

    -LGL patients. A total of 15 mutations, including 2 new mutations (G618R and K658R), were detected in 12 patients (75%), with mutation levels ranging from 2.5% to 45.6% mutation-positive alleles. Next-generation sequencing detected 50% more mutations than Sanger sequencing. Blood samples from 20 healthy blood......, therefore, represents a promising marker in T-LGL diagnostics. We developed a new quantitative next-generation sequencing assay that allows sensitive analysis of the STAT3 gene. The assay was used to study the utility of STAT3 mutation analysis as a diagnostic tool in T-LGL. The study included 16 T...... donors all tested negative, thus demonstrating the specificity of the assay. The results also indicated that mutation levels in blood and bone marrow are not systematically different, and next-generation sequencing-based STAT3 mutation analysis represents a sensitive method for monitoring residual...

  6. Stochastic principles governing alternative splicing of RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Jianfei Hu; Eli Boritz; William Wylie; Daniel C Douek

    2017-01-01

    Author summary Alternative RNA splicing within eukaryotic cells enables each gene to generate multiple different mature transcripts which further encode proteins with distinct or even opposing functions. The relative frequencies of the transcript isoforms generated by a particular gene are essential to the maintenance of normal cellular physiology; however, the underlying mechanisms and principles that govern these frequencies are unknown. We analyzed the frequency distribution of all transcr...

  7. Oriented scanning is the leading mechanism underlying 5' splice site selection in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Borensztajn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Splice site selection is a key element of pre-mRNA splicing. Although it is known to involve specific recognition of short consensus sequences by the splicing machinery, the mechanisms by which 5' splice sites are accurately identified remain controversial and incompletely resolved. The human F7 gene contains in its seventh intron (IVS7 a 37-bp VNTR minisatellite whose first element spans the exon7-IVS7 boundary. As a consequence, the IVS7 authentic donor splice site is followed by several cryptic splice sites identical in sequence, referred to as 5' pseudo-sites, which normally remain silent. This region, therefore, provides a remarkable model to decipher the mechanism underlying 5' splice site selection in mammals. We previously suggested a model for splice site selection that, in the presence of consecutive splice consensus sequences, would stimulate exclusively the selection of the most upstream 5' splice site, rather than repressing the 3' following pseudo-sites. In the present study, we provide experimental support to this hypothesis by using a mutational approach involving a panel of 50 mutant and wild-type F7 constructs expressed in various cell types. We demonstrate that the F7 IVS7 5' pseudo-sites are functional, but do not compete with the authentic donor splice site. Moreover, we show that the selection of the 5' splice site follows a scanning-type mechanism, precluding competition with other functional 5' pseudo-sites available on immediate sequence context downstream of the activated one. In addition, 5' pseudo-sites with an increased complementarity to U1snRNA up to 91% do not compete with the identified scanning mechanism. Altogether, these findings, which unveil a cell type-independent 5'-3'-oriented scanning process for accurate recognition of the authentic 5' splice site, reconciliate apparently contradictory observations by establishing a hierarchy of competitiveness among the determinants involved in 5' splice site selection.

  8. Trans-Splicing Improvement by the Combined Application of Antisense Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Koller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing has become an emergent tool for the repair of mutated pre-mRNAs in the treatment of genetic diseases. RNA trans-splicing molecules (RTMs are designed to induce a specific trans-splicing reaction via a binding domain for a respective target pre-mRNA region. A previously established reporter-based screening system allows us to analyze the impact of various factors on the RTM trans-splicing efficiency in vitro. Using this system, we are further able to investigate the potential of antisense RNAs (AS RNAs, presuming to improve the trans-splicing efficiency of a selected RTM, specific for intron 102 of COL7A1. Mutations in the COL7A1 gene underlie the dystrophic subtype of the skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa (DEB. We have shown that co-transfections of the RTM and a selected AS RNA, interfering with competitive splicing elements on a COL7A1-minigene (COL7A1-MG, lead to a significant increase of the RNA trans-splicing efficiency. Thereby, accurate trans-splicing between the RTM and the COL7A1-MG is represented by the restoration of full-length green fluorescent protein GFP on mRNA and protein level. This mechanism can be crucial for the improvement of an RTM-mediated correction, especially in cases where a high trans-splicing efficiency is required.

  9. Detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in Japanese population using next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirotsu, Yosuke; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Ikuko; Amemiya, Kenji; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Omata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two main breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, and their genetic testing has been used to evaluate the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). While several studies have reported the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Japanese populations, there is insufficient information about deleterious mutations compared with western countries. Moreover, because many rare variants are found in BRCA1 and BRCA2, both of which encode large proteins, it is difficult to sequence all coding regions using the Sanger method for mutation detection. In this study, therefore, we performed next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of the entire coding regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 135 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients. Deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were detected in 10 patients (7.4%) by NGS analysis. Of these, one mutation in BRCA1 and two in BRCA2 had not been reported previously. Furthermore, a BRCA2 mutation found in a proband was also identified in two unaffected relatives. These data suggest the utility of screening BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations by NGS in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25802882

  10. Global identification of hnRNP A1 binding sites for SSO-based splicing modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Gitte H; Doktor, Thomas K; Borch-Jensen, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    for this deregulation by blocking other SREs with splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs). However, the location and sequence of most SREs are not well known. RESULTS: Here, we used individual-nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to establish an in vivo binding map for the key splicing...... regulatory factor hnRNP A1 and to generate an hnRNP A1 consensus binding motif. We find that hnRNP A1 binding in proximal introns may be important for repressing exons. We show that inclusion of the alternative cassette exon 3 in SKA2 can be significantly increased by SSO-based treatment which blocks an iCLIP......-identified hnRNP A1 binding site immediately downstream of the 5' splice site. Because pseudoexons are well suited as models for constitutive exons which have been inactivated by pathogenic mutations in SREs, we used a pseudoexon in MTRR as a model and showed that an iCLIP-identified hnRNP A1 binding site...

  11. Reliable Detection of Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Colorectal Cancers Using Mutational Load in Next-Generation Sequencing Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Zsofia K.; Battaglin, Francesca; Middha, Sumit; Hechtman, Jaclyn F.; Tran, Christina; Cercek, Andrea; Yaeger, Rona; Segal, Neil H.; Varghese, Anna M.; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane L.; Kemeny, Nancy E.; Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; Ashraf, Asad; Weiser, Martin R.; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Robson, Mark E.; Offit, Kenneth; Arcila, Maria E.; Berger, Michael F.; Shia, Jinru; Solit, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Tumor screening for Lynch syndrome is recommended in all or most patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). In metastatic CRC, sequencing of RAS/BRAF is necessary to guide clinical management. We hypothesized that a next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel that identifies RAS/BRAF and other actionable mutations could also reliably identify tumors with DNA mismatch repair protein deficiency (MMR-D) on the basis of increased mutational load. Methods We identified all CRCs that underwent genomic mutation profiling with a custom NGS assay (MSK-IMPACT) between March 2014 and July 2015. Tumor mutational load, with exclusion of copy number changes, was determined for each case and compared with MMR status as determined by routine immunohistochemistry. Results Tumors from 224 patients with unique CRC analyzed for MMR status also underwent MSK-IMPACT. Thirteen percent (n = 28) exhibited MMR-D by immunohistochemistry. Using the 341-gene assay, 100% of the 193 tumors with 150 mutations each. Each of these tumors harbored the P286R hotspot POLE mutation consistent with the ultramutator phenotype. Among MMR-D tumors, the median number of mutations was 50 (range, 20 to 90) compared with six (range, 0 to 17) in MMR-proficient/POLE wild-type tumors (P < .001). With a mutational load cutoff of ≥ 20 and < 150 for MMR-D detection, sensitivity and specificity were both 1.0 (95% CI, 0.93 to 1.0). Conclusion A cutoff for mutational load can be identified via multigene NGS tumor profiling, which provides a highly accurate means of screening for MMR-D in the same assay that is used for tumor genotyping. PMID:27022117

  12. Alternative REST Splicing Underappreciated

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guo-Lin; Miller, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    As a major orchestrator of the cellular epigenome, the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) can either repress or activate thousands of genes depending on cellular context, suggesting a highly context-dependent REST function tuned by environmental cues. While REST shows cell-type non-selective active transcription, an N-terminal REST4 isoform caused by alternative splicing - inclusion of an extra exon (N3c) which introduces a pre-mature stop codon - has been implicated in...

  13. Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: CERS3 mutations identified by a next generation sequencing panel targeting ichthyosis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssefian, Leila; Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Saeidian, Amir Hossein; Sotoudeh, Soheila; Mahmoudi, Hamidreza; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Adams, Rebecca; Ghanadan, Alireza; Zeinali, Sirous; Fortina, Paolo; Uitto, Jouni

    2017-11-01

    There are at least 38 mutant genes known to be associated with the ichthyosis phenotypes, and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a specific subgroup caused by mutations in 13 different genes. Mutations in some of these genes, such as CERS3 with only two previous reports, are rare. In this study, we identified mutations in candidate genes in consanguineous families with ARCI with a next generation sequencing (NGS) array that incorporates 38 ichthyosis associated genes. We applied this sequencing array to DNA from 140 ichthyosis families with high prevalence of consanguinity. Among these patients we identified six distinct, previously unreported mutations in CERS3 in six Iranian families. These mutations in each family co-segregated with the ichthyosis phenotype. The patients demonstrated collodion membrane at birth, acrogeria, generalized scaling, and hyperlinearity of the palms and soles. The presence of a significant percentage of CERS3 mutations in our cohort depicts a marked difference between the etiology of ichthyoses in genetically poorly characterized regions and well-characterized western populations. Also, it shows that rare alleles are more prevalent in the gene pool of consanguineous populations and emphasizes the importance of these population studies for better understanding of ichthyosis pathogenesis.

  14. Conjugation between quinolone-susceptible bacteria can generate mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region, inducing quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Silva, Carolina Fávero da; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2015-02-01

    Quinolones are an important group of antibacterial agents that can inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activity. DNA gyrase is responsible for maintaining bacteria in a negatively supercoiled state, being composed of subunits A and B. Topoisomerase IV is a homologue of DNA gyrase and consists of two subunits codified by the parC and parE genes. Mutations in gyrA and gyrB of DNA gyrase may confer resistance to quinolones, and the majority of resistant strains show mutations between positions 67 and 106 of gyrA, a region denoted the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). The most frequent substitutions occur at positions 83 and 87, but little is known about the mechanisms promoting appearance of mutations in the QRDR. The present study proposes that some mutations in the QRDR could be generated as a result of the natural mechanism of conjugation between bacteria in their natural habitat. This event was observed following conjugation in vitro of two different isolates of quinolone-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which transferred plasmids of different molecular weights to a recipient strain of Escherichia coli (HB101), also quinolone-susceptible, generating two different transconjugants that presented mutations in DNA gyrase and acquisition of resistance to all quinolones tested. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of next generation sequencing technologies in comparison to current diagnostic gold standards for BRAF, EGFR and KRAS mutational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Clare M; McArt, Darragh G; Mills, Ken; Catherwood, Mark A; Maxwell, Perry; Waugh, David J; Hamilton, Peter; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has the potential of becoming an important tool in clinical diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making in oncology owing to its enhanced sensitivity in DNA mutation detection, fast-turnaround of samples in comparison to current gold standard methods and the potential to sequence a large number of cancer-driving genes at the one time. We aim to test the diagnostic accuracy of current NGS technology in the analysis of mutations that represent current standard-of-care, and its reliability to generate concomitant information on other key genes in human oncogenesis. Thirteen clinical samples (8 lung adenocarcinomas, 3 colon carcinomas and 2 malignant melanomas) already genotyped for EGFR, KRAS and BRAF mutations by current standard-of-care methods (Sanger Sequencing and q-PCR), were analysed for detection of mutations in the same three genes using two NGS platforms and an additional 43 genes with one of these platforms. The results were analysed using closed platform-specific proprietary bioinformatics software as well as open third party applications. Our results indicate that the existing format of the NGS technology performed well in detecting the clinically relevant mutations stated above but may not be reliable for a broader unsupervised analysis of the wider genome in its current design. Our study represents a diagnostically lead validation of the major strengths and weaknesses of this technology before consideration for diagnostic use.

  16. The neurogenetics of alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Vuong, Celine K.; Black, Douglas L.; Zheng, Sika

    2016-01-01

    Alternative precursor-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in mammals and is controlled by specialized RNA-binding proteins. The misregulation of splicing is implicated in multiple neurological disorders. We describe recent mouse genetic studies of alternative splicing that reveal its critical role in both neuronal development and the function of mature neurons. We discuss the challenges in understanding the extensive genetic programmes controlled by proteins that r...

  17. Work organization for splice consolidation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F

    2011-01-01

    The Splices Task Force has worked in 2010 to prepare the necessary interventions for 7 TeV operation. The design solution for consolidating the main interconnection splices is well advanced. The required activities to implement it are described, highlighting working assumptions, missing resources and schedule considerations. Progress has also been made in assessing other splices, 6 kA praying hands and corrector circuits: results and ongoing work are presented, highlighting priorities for the remaining work.

  18. Global Splicing Pattern Reversion during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Ohta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates multiple transcripts from a single gene, and cell-type-specific splicing profiles are important for the properties and functions of the cells. Recently, somatic cells have been shown to undergo dedifferentiation after the forced expression of transcription factors. However, it remains unclear whether somatic cell splicing is reorganized during reprogramming. Here, by combining deep sequencing with high-throughput absolute qRT-PCR, we show that somatic splicing profiles revert to pluripotent ones during reprogramming. Remarkably, the splicing pattern in pluripotent stem cells resembles that in testes, and the regulatory regions have specific characteristics in length and sequence. Furthermore, our siRNA screen has identified RNA-binding proteins that regulate splicing events in iPSCs. We have then demonstrated that two of the RNA-binding proteins, U2af1 and Srsf3, play a role in somatic cell reprogramming. Our results indicate that the drastic alteration in splicing represents part of the molecular network involved in the reprogramming process.

  19. Identification of novel mutations responsible for resistance to MK-2048, a second-generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Magen, Tamara; Sloan, Richard D; Donahue, Daniel A; Kuhl, Björn D; Zabeida, Alexandra; Xu, Hongtao; Oliveira, Maureen; Hazuda, Daria J; Wainberg, Mark A

    2010-09-01

    MK-2048 represents a prototype second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) developed with the goal of retaining activity against viruses containing mutations associated with resistance to first-generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). Here, we report the identification of mutations (G118R and E138K) which confer resistance to MK-2048 and not to RAL or EVG. These mutations were selected in vitro and confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis. G118R, which appeared first in cell culture, conferred low levels of resistance to MK-2048. G118R also reduced viral replication capacity to approximately 1% that of the isogenic wild-type (wt) virus. The subsequent selection of E138K partially restored replication capacity to approximately 13% of wt levels and increased resistance to MK-2048 to approximately 8-fold. Viruses containing G118R and E138K remained largely susceptible to both RAL and EVG, suggesting a unique interaction between this second-generation INSTI and the enzyme may be defined by these residues as a potential basis for the increased intrinsic affinity and longer "off" rate of MK-2048. In silico structural analysis suggests that the introduction of a positively charged arginine at position 118, near the catalytic amino acid 116, might decrease Mg(2+) binding, compromising enzyme function and thus leading to the significant reduction in both integration and viral replication capacity observed with these mutations.

  20. Identification of Novel Mutations Responsible for Resistance to MK-2048, a Second-Generation HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Magen, Tamara; Sloan, Richard D.; Donahue, Daniel A.; Kuhl, Björn D.; Zabeida, Alexandra; Xu, Hongtao; Oliveira, Maureen; Hazuda, Daria J.; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    MK-2048 represents a prototype second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) developed with the goal of retaining activity against viruses containing mutations associated with resistance to first-generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). Here, we report the identification of mutations (G118R and E138K) which confer resistance to MK-2048 and not to RAL or EVG. These mutations were selected in vitro and confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis. G118R, which appeared first in cell culture, conferred low levels of resistance to MK-2048. G118R also reduced viral replication capacity to approximately 1% that of the isogenic wild-type (wt) virus. The subsequent selection of E138K partially restored replication capacity to ≈13% of wt levels and increased resistance to MK-2048 to ≈8-fold. Viruses containing G118R and E138K remained largely susceptible to both RAL and EVG, suggesting a unique interaction between this second-generation INSTI and the enzyme may be defined by these residues as a potential basis for the increased intrinsic affinity and longer “off” rate of MK-2048. In silico structural analysis suggests that the introduction of a positively charged arginine at position 118, near the catalytic amino acid 116, might decrease Mg2+ binding, compromising enzyme function and thus leading to the significant reduction in both integration and viral replication capacity observed with these mutations. PMID:20610719

  1. Reprogramming the Dynamin 2 mRNA by Spliceosome-mediated RNA Trans-splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Trochet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamin 2 (DNM2 is a large GTPase, ubiquitously expressed, involved in membrane trafficking and regulation of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. DNM2 mutations cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy which is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and histopathological features including nuclear centralization in absence of regeneration. No curative treatment is currently available for the DNM2-related autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy. In order to develop therapeutic strategy, we evaluated here the potential of Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing technology to reprogram the Dnm2-mRNA in vitro and in vivo in mice. We show that classical 3′-trans-splicing strategy cannot be considered as accurate therapeutic strategy regarding toxicity of the pre-trans-splicing molecules leading to low rate of trans-splicing in vivo. Thus, we tested alternative strategies devoted to prevent this toxicity and enhance frequency of trans-splicing events. We succeeded to overcome the toxicity through a 5′-trans-splicing strategy which also allows detection of trans-splicing events at mRNA and protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing strategy may be used to reprogram mutated Dnm2-mRNA but highlight the potential toxicity linked to the molecular tools which have to be carefully investigated during preclinical development.

  2. Functional diversity of human basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TCF4 isoforms generated by alternative 5' exon usage and splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Sepp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factor 4 (TCF4 alias ITF2, E2-2, ME2 or SEF2 is a ubiquitous class A basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box DNA sequences (CANNTG. While involved in the development and functioning of many different cell types, recent studies point to important roles for TCF4 in the nervous system. Specifically, human TCF4 gene is implicated in susceptibility to schizophrenia and TCF4 haploinsufficiency is the cause of the Pitt-Hopkins mental retardation syndrome. However, the structure, expression and coding potential of the human TCF4 gene have not been described in detail. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we used human tissue samples to characterize human TCF4 gene structure and TCF4 expression at mRNA and protein level. We report that although widely expressed, human TCF4 mRNA expression is particularly high in the brain. We demonstrate that usage of numerous 5' exons of the human TCF4 gene potentially yields in TCF4 protein isoforms with 18 different N-termini. In addition, the diversity of isoforms is increased by alternative splicing of several internal exons. For functional characterization of TCF4 isoforms, we overexpressed individual isoforms in cultured human cells. Our analysis revealed that subcellular distribution of TCF4 isoforms is differentially regulated: Some isoforms contain a bipartite nuclear localization signal and are exclusively nuclear, whereas distribution of other isoforms relies on heterodimerization partners. Furthermore, the ability of different TCF4 isoforms to regulate E-box controlled reporter gene transcription is varied depending on whether one or both of the two TCF4 transcription activation domains are present in the protein. Both TCF4 activation domains are able to activate transcription independently, but act synergistically in combination. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, in this study we have described the inter-tissue variability of TCF4 expression in human and provided evidence

  3. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing.

  4. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar P, Pavan; Franklin, Sarah; Emechebe, Uchenna; Hu, Hao; Moore, Barry; Lehman, Chris; Yandell, Mark; Moon, Anne M

    2014-03-01

    TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing.

  5. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  6. Combined mutation and copy-number variation detection by targeted next-generation sequencing in uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Kyra N; van Poppelen, Natasha M; Vaarwater, Jolanda; Verdijk, Robert; van Marion, Ronald; Kalirai, Helen; Coupland, Sarah E; Thornton, Sophie; Farquhar, Neil; Dubbink, Hendrikus-Jan; Paridaens, Dion; de Klein, Annelies; Kiliç, Emine

    2018-01-12

    Uveal melanoma is a highly aggressive cancer of the eye, in which nearly 50% of the patients die from metastasis. It is the most common type of primary eye cancer in adults. Chromosome and mutation status have been shown to correlate with the disease-free survival. Loss of chromosome 3 and inactivating mutations in BAP1, which is located on chromosome 3, are strongly associated with 'high-risk' tumors that metastasize early. Other genes often involved in uveal melanoma are SF3B1 and EIF1AX, which are found to be mutated in intermediate- and low-risk tumors, respectively. To obtain genetic information of all genes in one test, we developed a targeted sequencing method that can detect mutations in uveal melanoma genes and chromosomal anomalies in chromosome 1, 3, and 8. With as little as 10 ng DNA, we obtained enough coverage on all genes to detect mutations, such as substitutions, deletions, and insertions. These results were validated with Sanger sequencing in 28 samples. In >90% of the cases, the BAP1 mutation status corresponded to the BAP1 immunohistochemistry. The results obtained in the Ion Torrent single-nucleotide polymorphism assay were confirmed with several other techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and Illumina SNP array. By validating our assay in 27 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and 43 fresh uveal melanomas, we show that mutations and chromosome status can reliably be obtained using targeted next-generation sequencing. Implementing this technique as a diagnostic pathology application for uveal melanoma will allow prediction of the patients' metastatic risk and potentially assess eligibility for new therapies.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 12 January 2018; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.187.

  7. Novel female-specific trans-spliced and alternative splice forms of dsx in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jianping; Xu, Hanfu; Wang, Feng; Ma, Sanyuan; Zha, Xingfu; Guo, Huizhen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2013-02-15

    The Bombyx mori doublesex gene (Bmdsx) plays an important role in somatic sexual development. Its pre-mRNA splices in a sex-specific manner to generate two female-specific and one male-specific splice forms. The present study investigated six novel dsx variants generated by trans-splicing between female dsx transcripts and two additional novel genes, dsr1 and dsr2. Expression analysis indicated that Bmdsx-dsr1 represented splicing noise, whereas dsr2, which trans-spliced with dsx to generate five variants, regulated the expression of the female-specific B. mori dsx transcript Bmdsx(F)s. We unexpectedly found a novel exon 2n insertion during Bmdsx transcription, which did not influence the validity of the novel protein, BmDSX(F3). Ectopic expression of BmDSX(F3) repressed the pheromone-binding protein gene and the testis-specific gene A2 in males, and activated of the storage protein 1 gene. Our findings suggest that trans-splicing is a novel regulatory function of Bmdsx, which participates in female sexual development by regulating the expression of three BmDSX(F) proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutation analysis in a family with oculocutaneous albinism manifesting in the same generation of three branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preising, Markus N; Forster, Hedwig; Tan, H; Lorenz, Birgit; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Plomp, Astrid S

    2007-10-02

    To elucidate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism with variable expressivity in a family from The Netherlands in which no consanguinity was reported. Three affected family members were screened for mutations in tyrosinase (TYR) and the pink-eye-dilution gene (P) by using SSCP. The melanocortin receptor gene (MC1R) and amplimers of P showing an aberrant banding pattern in SSCP were analyzed by direct sequencing. All participants underwent ophthalmologic examination including funduscopy, and visually evoked potentials were recorded in two cases. The pedigree had three branches A, B, and C. We identified three mutations in P (V443I, N476S, C793F) that cause a compound heterozygous situation in cases from branch A (N476S/C793F) and B (V443I/C793F), who showed oculocutaneous albinism. Hair and skin color followed the light Nordic complexion that was also present in other affected and unaffected members of this family. Descendants of branches A and B showed light complexion with iris translucency and peripheral fundus hypopigmentation independent from the genotype identified. A single descendant had red hair, carrying a well known compound MC1R mutation combination for red hair color and a single heterozygous P mutation. P mutations underlie oculocutaneous albinism in this family. Two known mutations in MC1R caused red hair color in one family member. No modifier effect of MC1R on P mutations could be deduced from the results of this study.

  9. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy.

  10. A statistical framework for genome-wide discovery of biomarker splice variations with GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ryo; Numata, Kazuyuki; Imoto, Seiya; Nagasaki, Masao; Doi, Atsushi; Ueno, Kazuko; Miyano, Satoru

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important regulatory mechanism that generates multiple mRNA transcripts which are transcribed into functionally diverse proteins. According to the current studies, aberrant transcripts due to splicing mutations are known to cause for 15% of genetic diseases. Therefore understanding regulatory mechanism of alternative splicing is essential for identifying potential biomarkers for several types of human diseases. Most recently, advent of GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array enables us to measure genome-wide expression profiles of over one million exons. With this new microarray platform, analysis of functional gene expressions could be extended to detect not only differentially expressed genes, but also a set of specific-splicing events that are differentially observed between one or more experimental conditions, e.g. tumor or normal control cells. In this study, we address the statistical problems to identify differentially observed splicing variations from exon expression profiles. The proposed method is organized according to the following process: (1) Data preprocessing for removing systematic biases from the probe intensities. (2) Whole transcript analysis with the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to identify a set of loci that cause the alternative splicing-related to a certain disease. We test the proposed statistical approach on exon expression profiles of colorectal carcinoma. The applicability is verified and discussed in relation to the existing biological knowledge. This paper intends to highlight the potential role of statistical analysis of all exon microarray data. Our work is an important first step toward development of more advanced statistical technology. Supplementary information and materials are available from http://bonsai.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~yoshidar/IBSB2006_ExonArray.htm.

  11. MED12 exon 2 mutations in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Satoi; Maeda, Ichiro; Fukuda, Takayo; Wu, Wenwen; Hayami, Ryosuke; Kojima, Yasuyuki; Tsugawa, Ko-ichiro; Ohta, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    Exon 2 of MED12, a subunit of the transcriptional mediator complex, has been frequently mutated in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas; however, it has been rarely mutated in other tumors. Although the mutations were also found in uterine leiomyosarcomas, the frequency was significantly lower than in uterine leiomyomas. Here, we examined the MED12 mutation in phyllodes tumors, another biphasic tumor with epithelial and stromal components related to breast fibroadenomas. Mutations in MED12 exon 2 were analyzed in nine fibroadenomas and eleven phyllodes tumors via Sanger sequencing. A panel of cancer- and sarcoma-related genes was also analyzed using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing. Six mutations in fibroadenomas, including those previously reported (6/9, 67%), and five mutations in phyllodes tumors (5/11, 45%) were observed. Three mutations in the phyllodes tumors were missense mutations at Gly44, which is common in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas. In addition, two deletion mutations (in-frame c.133-144del12 and loss of splice acceptor c.100-68-137del106) were observed in the phyllodes tumors. No other recurrent mutation was observed with next-generation sequencing. Frequent mutations in MED12 exon 2 in the phyllodes tumors suggest that it may share genetic etiology with uterine leiomyoma, a subgroup of uterine leiomyosarcomas and breast fibroadenoma

  12. Ethyl methane sulfonate induced mutations in M2 generation and physiological variations in M1 generation of peppers (Capsicum annuum L.

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    Mohamed Hamed Arisha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to enhance genetic variability in peppers (Capsicum annuum, cv B12 using ethyl methansulphonate (EMS. Exposure to an EMS concentration of 0.6%, v/v for 12 hours was used to mutagenize 2000 seeds for the first generation (M1. It was observed that the growth behaviors including plant height, flowering date and number of seeds per first fruit were different in the M1 generation than in wild type plants. In addition one phenotypic mutation (leaf shape and plant architecture was observed during the M1 generation. During the seedling stage in the M2 generation, the observed changes were in the form of slow growth or chlorophyll defect (e.g., albino, pale green and yellow seedlings. At maturity, there were three kinds of phenotypic mutations observed in three different families of the mutant population. The first observed change was a plant with yellow leaf color, and the leaves of this mutant plant contained 62.19% less chlorophyll a and 64.06% less chlorophyll b as compared to the wild-type. The second mutation resulted in one dwarf plant with a very short stature (6 cm, compact internodes and the leaves and stem were rough and thick. The third type of mutation occurred in four plants and resulted in the leaves of these plants being very thick and longer than those of wild type plants. Furthermore, anatomical observations of the leaf blade section of this mutant plant type contained more xylem and collenchyma tissue in the leaf midrib of the mutant plant than wild type. In addition, its leaf blade contained thicker palisade and spongy tissue than the wild type.

  13. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette Balle; Lund, Anders H; Kunder, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    to be associated with specific tumor diagnoses or individual viral mutants. CONCLUSION: We present here the first example of a doubly spliced transcript within the group of gammaretroviruses, and we show that mutation of the alternative splice sites that define this novel RNA product change the oncogenic potential......) and histiocytic sarcoma. Interestingly, a broader spectrum of diagnoses was made from the two single splice-site mutants than from as well the wild-type as the double splice-site mutant. Both single- and double-spliced transcripts are produced in vivo using the SA' and/or the SD' sites, but the mechanisms......BACKGROUND: Mutations of an alternative splice donor site located within the gag region has previously been shown to broaden the pathogenic potential of the T-lymphomagenic gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus, while the equivalent mutations in the erythroleukemia inducing Friend murine...

  14. Minor class splicing shapes the zebrafish transcriptome during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markmiller, Sebastian; Cloonan, Nicole; Lardelli, Rea M; Doggett, Karen; Keightley, Maria-Cristina; Boglev, Yeliz; Trotter, Andrew J; Ng, Annie Y; Wilkins, Simon J; Verkade, Heather; Ober, Elke A; Field, Holly A; Grimmond, Sean M; Lieschke, Graham J; Stainier, Didier Y R; Heath, Joan K

    2014-02-25

    Minor class or U12-type splicing is a highly conserved process required to remove a minute fraction of introns from human pre-mRNAs. Defects in this splicing pathway have recently been linked to human disease, including a severe developmental disorder encompassing brain and skeletal abnormalities known as Taybi-Linder syndrome or microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism 1, and a hereditary intestinal polyposis condition, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Although a key mechanism for regulating gene expression, the impact of impaired U12-type splicing on the transcriptome is unknown. Here, we describe a unique zebrafish mutant, caliban (clbn), with arrested development of the digestive organs caused by an ethylnitrosourea-induced recessive lethal point mutation in the rnpc3 [RNA-binding region (RNP1, RRM) containing 3] gene. rnpc3 encodes the zebrafish ortholog of human RNPC3, also known as the U11/U12 di-snRNP 65-kDa protein, a unique component of the U12-type spliceosome. The biochemical impact of the mutation in clbn is the formation of aberrant U11- and U12-containing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins that impair the efficiency of U12-type splicing. Using RNA sequencing and microarrays, we show that multiple genes involved in various steps of mRNA processing, including transcription, splicing, and nuclear export are disrupted in clbn, either through intron retention or differential gene expression. Thus, clbn provides a useful and specific model of aberrant U12-type splicing in vivo. Analysis of its transcriptome reveals efficient mRNA processing as a critical process for the growth and proliferation of cells during vertebrate development.

  15. Eradication of T315I mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia without third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venton, Geoffroy; Colle, Julien; Mercier, Cedric; Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Ciccolini, Joseph; Ivanov, Vadim; Suchon, Pierre; Sebahoun, Gerard; Beaufils, Nathalie; Gabert, Jean; Hadjaj, Djamal; Costello, Regis

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient bearing a T315I-mutant chronic myeloid leukemia resistant to nilotinib, successfully treated with omacetaxine and then with dasatinib. After 9 months of nilotinib, the patient achieved a major molecular response but relapsed 3 months later due to the T315I mutation. Because third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor was not available and the patient refused bone marrow transplantation, he received two cycles of omacetaxine. This treatment had been stopped after two cycles because of clinical intolerance, but a major molecular response and total disappearance of the T315I clone was obtained. Treatment with dasatinib was then started and after 34-month follow-up the patient is still in major molecular response, thus suggesting that eradication of the T315I mutation could be achieved without third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  16. Identification of a pathogenic FTO mutation by next-generation sequencing in a newborn with growth retardation and developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Hussein; Zhang, Dong; McMurray, Fiona; Yu, Andrea; Luco, Stephanie M; Vanstone, Jason; Jarinova, Olga; Carson, Nancy; Wickens, James; Shishodia, Shifali; Choi, Hwanho; McDonough, Michael A; Schofield, Christopher J; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Dyment, David A; Armour, Christine M

    2016-03-01

    A homozygous loss-of-function mutation p.(Arg316Gln) in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene, which encodes for an iron and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenase, was previously identified in a large family in which nine affected individuals present with a lethal syndrome characterised by growth retardation and multiple malformations. To date, no other pathogenic mutation in FTO has been identified as a cause of multiple congenital malformations. We investigated a 21-month-old girl who presented distinctive facial features, failure to thrive, global developmental delay, left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy, reduced vision and bilateral hearing loss. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing of 4813 clinically relevant genes in the patient and her parents. We identified a novel FTO homozygous missense mutation (c.956C>T; p.(Ser319Phe)) in the affected individual. This mutation affects a highly conserved residue located in the same functional domain as the previously characterised mutation p.(Arg316Gln). Biochemical studies reveal that p.(Ser319Phe) FTO has reduced 2-oxoglutarate turnover and N-methyl-nucleoside demethylase activity. Our findings are consistent with previous reports that homozygous mutations in FTO can lead to rare growth retardation and developmental delay syndrome, and further support the proposal that FTO plays an important role in early development of human central nervous and cardiovascular systems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Splice-correcting oligonucleotides restore BTK function in X-linked agammaglobulinemia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestas, Burcu; Moreno, Pedro M D; Blomberg, K Emelie M

    2014-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency that results from mutations within the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Many XLA-associated mutations affect splicing of BTK pre-mRNA and severely impair B cell development. Here, we assessed the potential of antisense...

  18. Validation of ambiguous MLPA results by targeted next-generation sequencing discloses a nonsense mutation in the DMD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niba, Emma Tabe Eko; Tran, Van Khanh; Tuan-Pham, Le Anh; Vu, Dung Chi; Nguyen, Ngoc Khanh; Ta, Van Thanh; Tran, Thinh Huy; Lee, Tomoko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2014-09-25

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common inherited muscular disease and caused by mutations in the DMD gene on the X-chromosome. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) is recognized as a convenient and reliable technique to detect exon deletion/duplication mutations in the DMD gene. Here, we applied targeted semi-conductor next-generation sequencing to clarify the cause of ambiguous MLPA results. Targeted semi-conductor next-generation sequencing was carried out using the Inherited Disease Panel (IDP) on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). MLPA analysis disclosed unclassifiable relative peak ratio of exon 18 in a DMD boy. His female cousin was indicated to have exon 18 deletion in one allele. To validate these incompatible results, targeted next-generation sequencing was conducted. A nucleotide change, C.2227 C>T creating a premature stop codon, was in exon 18. Concomitantly, both C and T nucleotides were identified in his cousin's genome. Ambiguous values of the relative peak ratio in MLPA were considered due to the one nucleotide mismatch between the genomic sequence and the probe used in MLPA. Analysis using IDP on PGM disclosed a nonsense mutation in the DMD gene as a cause of ambiguous results of MLPA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of a splice array experiment elucidates roles of chromatin elongation factor Spt4-5 in splicing.

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    Yuanyuan Xiao

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Splicing is an important process for regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, and it has important functional links to other steps of gene expression. Two examples of these linkages include Ceg1, a component of the mRNA capping enzyme, and the chromatin elongation factors Spt4-5, both of which have recently been shown to play a role in the normal splicing of several genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a genomic approach to characterize the roles of Spt4-5 in splicing, we used splicing-sensitive DNA microarrays to identify specific sets of genes that are mis-spliced in ceg1, spt4, and spt5 mutants. In the context of a complex, nested, experimental design featuring 22 dye-swap array hybridizations, comprising both biological and technical replicates, we applied five appropriate statistical models for assessing differential expression between wild-type and the mutants. To refine selection of differential expression genes, we then used a robust model-synthesizing approach, Differential Expression via Distance Synthesis, to integrate all five models. The resultant list of differentially expressed genes was then further analyzed with regard to select attributes: we found that highly transcribed genes with long introns were most sensitive to spt mutations. QPCR confirmation of differential expression was established for the limited number of genes evaluated. In this paper, we showcase splicing array technology, as well as powerful, yet general, statistical methodology for assessing differential expression, in the context of a real, complex experimental design. Our results suggest that the Spt4-Spt5 complex may help coordinate splicing with transcription under conditions that present kinetic challenges to spliceosome assembly or function.

  20. Mastermind mutations generate a unique constellation of midline cells within the Drosophila CNS.

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    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Notch pathway functions repeatedly during the development of the central nervous system in metazoan organisms to control cell fate and regulate cell proliferation and asymmetric cell divisions. Within the Drosophila midline cell lineage, which bisects the two symmetrical halves of the central nervous system, Notch is required for initial cell specification and subsequent differentiation of many midline lineages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we provide the first description of the role of the Notch co-factor, mastermind, in the central nervous system midline of Drosophila. Overall, zygotic mastermind mutations cause an increase in midline cell number and decrease in midline cell diversity. Compared to mutations in other components of the Notch signaling pathway, such as Notch itself and Delta, zygotic mutations in mastermind cause the production of a unique constellation of midline cell types. The major difference is that midline glia form normally in zygotic mastermind mutants, but not in Notch and Delta mutants. Moreover, during late embryogenesis, extra anterior midline glia survive in zygotic mastermind mutants compared to wild type embryos. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is an example of a mutation in a signaling pathway cofactor producing a distinct central nervous system phenotype compared to mutations in major components of the pathway.

  1. Intronic Alus influence alternative splicing.

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    Galit Lev-Maor

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Examination of the human transcriptome reveals higher levels of RNA editing than in any other organism tested to date. This is indicative of extensive double-stranded RNA (dsRNA formation within the human transcriptome. Most of the editing sites are located in the primate-specific retrotransposed element called Alu. A large fraction of Alus are found in intronic sequences, implying extensive Alu-Alu dsRNA formation in mRNA precursors. Yet, the effect of these intronic Alus on splicing of the flanking exons is largely unknown. Here, we show that more Alus flank alternatively spliced exons than constitutively spliced ones; this is especially notable for those exons that have changed their mode of splicing from constitutive to alternative during human evolution. This implies that Alu insertions may change the mode of splicing of the flanking exons. Indeed, we demonstrate experimentally that two Alu elements that were inserted into an intron in opposite orientation undergo base-pairing, as evident by RNA editing, and affect the splicing patterns of a downstream exon, shifting it from constitutive to alternative. Our results indicate the importance of intronic Alus in influencing the splicing of flanking exons, further emphasizing the role of Alus in shaping of the human transcriptome.

  2. Width of gene expression profile drives alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wegmann

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates an enormous amount of functional and proteomic diversity in metazoan organisms. This process is probably central to the macromolecular and cellular complexity of higher eukaryotes. While most studies have focused on the molecular mechanism triggering and controlling alternative splicing, as well as on its incidence in different species, its maintenance and evolution within populations has been little investigated. Here, we propose to address these questions by comparing the structural characteristics as well as the functional and transcriptional profiles of genes with monomorphic or polymorphic splicing, referred to as MS and PS genes, respectively. We find that MS and PS genes differ particularly in the number of tissues and cell types where they are expressed.We find a striking deficit of PS genes on the sex chromosomes, particularly on the Y chromosome where it is shown not to be due to the observed lower breadth of expression of genes on that chromosome. The development of a simple model of evolution of cis-regulated alternative splicing leads to predictions in agreement with these observations. It further predicts the conditions for the emergence and the maintenance of cis-regulated alternative splicing, which are both favored by the tissue specific expression of splicing variants. We finally propose that the width of the gene expression profile is an essential factor for the acquisition of new transcript isoforms that could later be maintained by a new form of balancing selection.

  3. Cell-Type-Specific Splicing of Piezo2 Regulates Mechanotransduction

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    Marcin Szczot

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Piezo2 is a mechanically activated ion channel required for touch discrimination, vibration detection, and proprioception. Here, we discovered that Piezo2 is extensively spliced, producing different Piezo2 isoforms with distinct properties. Sensory neurons from both mice and humans express a large repertoire of Piezo2 variants, whereas non-neuronal tissues express predominantly a single isoform. Notably, even within sensory ganglia, we demonstrate the splicing of Piezo2 to be cell type specific. Biophysical characterization revealed substantial differences in ion permeability, sensitivity to calcium modulation, and inactivation kinetics among Piezo2 splice variants. Together, our results describe, at the molecular level, a potential mechanism by which transduction is tuned, permitting the detection of a variety of mechanosensory stimuli. : Szczot et al. find that the mechanoreceptor Piezo2 is extensively alternatively spliced, generating multiple distinct isoforms. Their findings indicate that these splice products have specific tissue and cell type expression patterns and exhibit differences in receptor properties. Keywords: Piezo, touch, sensation, ion-channel, splicing

  4. Highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer mutations using single molecule, third generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Russo

    2015-12-01

    We present the first study that applies the high read accuracy and depth of single molecule, real time, circular consensus sequencing (SMRT-CCS to the detection of mutations in stool DNA in order to provide a non-invasive, sensitive and accurate test for CRC. In stool DNA isolated from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, we are able to detect mutations at frequencies below 0.5% with no false positives. This approach establishes a foundation for a non-invasive, highly sensitive assay to screen the population for CRC and the early stage adenomas that lead to CRC.

  5. The Number of Point Mutations in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer Embryonic Stem Cells Depends on the Method and Somatic Cell Type Used for Their Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Ryoko; Mizutani, Eiji; Hoki, Yuko; Sunayama, Misato; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Kasama, Yasuji; Nakamura, Miki; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Abe, Masumi

    2017-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine but point mutations have been identified in these cells and have raised serious concerns about their safe use. We generated nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (ntESCs) from both mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs) and by whole genome sequencing found fewer mutations compared with iPSCs generated by retroviral gene transduction. Furthermore, TTF-derived ntESCs showed only a very small number of point mutations, approximately 80% less than the number observed in iPSCs generated using retrovirus. Base substitution profile analysis confirmed this greatly reduced number of point mutations. The point mutations in iPSCs are therefore not a Yamanaka factor-specific phenomenon but are intrinsic to genome reprogramming. Moreover, the dramatic reduction in point mutations in ntESCs suggests that most are not essential for genome reprogramming. Our results suggest that it is feasible to reduce the point mutation frequency in iPSCs by optimizing various genome reprogramming conditions. We conducted whole genome sequencing of ntES cells derived from MEFs or TTFs. We thereby succeeded in establishing TTF-derived ntES cell lines with far fewer point mutations. Base substitution profile analysis of these clones also indicated a reduced point mutation frequency, moving from a transversion-predominance to a transition-predominance. Stem Cells 2017;35:1189-1196. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  6. Segregation and recessive deficit of visible macro mutation in M3 generation of x-irradiated rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, J.L.; Kwon, S.H.

    1979-01-01

    In order to obtain fundamental information for mutation breeding of cereal crops, segregation and recessive deficit in M 3 generation of short culm, early and late heading mutant lines were investigated in rice. About 32% of the total mutant lines selected from M 2 generation was segregated in M 3 generation, and among them segregated lines of short culm, early and late heading mutant lines were 31, 22, and 43%, respectively. Average segregation ratio in M 3 segregating lines of short culm mutants was 0.17, indicating considerable recessive deficit of mutant from the expected ratio of 0.25, and the tendency of segregation ratio of M 3 was not in confirmity with the trend of M 2 generation. The ratio of fixed lines vs segregating lines in M 2 basis was deviated from the expected ratio of 1 : 2 with the deficit or excessive. (author)

  7. [Study of gene mutation in 62 hemophilia A children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q; Liu, A G; Zhang, L Q; Zhang, A; Wang, Y Q; Wang, S M; Lu, Y J; Wang, X

    2017-11-02

    Objective: To analyze the mutation type of FⅧ gene in children with hemophilia A and to explore the relationship among hemophilia gene mutation spectrum, gene mutation and clinical phenotype. Method: Sixty-two children with hemophilia A from Department of Pediatric Hematology, Tongji Hospital of Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology between January 2015 and March 2017 were enrolled. All patients were male, aged from 4 months to 7 years and F Ⅷ activity ranged 0.2%-11.0%. Fifty cases had severe, 10 cases had moderate and 2 cases had mild hemophilia A. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood in hemophilia A children and the target gene fragment was amplified by PCR, in combination with the second generation sequencing, 22 and 1 introns were detected. Negative cases were detected by the second generation sequencing and results were compared with those of the international FⅧ gene mutation database. Result: There were 20 cases (32%) of intron 22 inversion, 2 cases (3%) of intron 1 inversion, 18 cases (29%) of missense mutation, 5 cases (8%) of nonsense mutation, 7 cases (11%) of deletion mutation, 1 case(2%)of splice site mutation, 2 cases (3%) of large fragment deletion and 1 case of insertion mutation (2%). No mutation was detected in 2 cases (3%), and 4 cases (7%) failed to amplify. The correlation between phenotype and genotype showed that the most common gene mutation in severe hemophilia A was intron 22 inversion (20 cases), accounting for 40% of severe patients, followed by 11 cases of missense mutation (22%). The most common mutation in moderate hemophilia A was missense mutation (6 cases), accounting for 60% of moderate patients. Conclusion: The most frequent mutation type in hemophilia A was intron 22 inversion, followed by missense mutation, again for missing mutation. The relationship between phenotype and genotype: the most frequent gene mutation in severe hemophilia A is intron 22 inversion, followed by missense

  8. Interplay between estrogen receptor and AKT in estradiol-induced alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Song, Eun-Kyung; Collins, Nikail R; Uversky, Vladimir N; Dunker, A Keith; O'Malley, Bert W; Geistlinger, Tim R; Carroll, Jason S; Brown, Myles; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2013-06-11

    Alternative splicing is critical for generating complex proteomes in response to extracellular signals. Nuclear receptors including estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and their ligands promote alternative splicing. The endogenous targets of ERα:estradiol (E2)-mediated alternative splicing and the influence of extracellular kinases that phosphorylate ERα on E2-induced splicing are unknown. MCF-7 and its anti-estrogen derivatives were used for the majority of the assays. CD44 mini gene was used to measure the effect of E2 and AKT on alternative splicing. ExonHit array analysis was performed to identify E2 and AKT-regulated endogenous alternatively spliced apoptosis-related genes. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to verify alternative splicing. ERα binding to alternatively spliced genes was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation-ELISA and Annexin V labeling assays were done to measure cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. We identified the targets of E2-induced alternative splicing and deconstructed some of the mechanisms surrounding E2-induced splicing by combining splice array with ERα cistrome and gene expression array. E2-induced alternatively spliced genes fall into at least two subgroups: coupled to E2-regulated transcription and ERα binding to the gene without an effect on rate of transcription. Further, AKT, which phosphorylates both ERα and splicing factors, influenced ERα:E2 dependent splicing in a gene-specific manner. Genes that are alternatively spliced include FAS/CD95, FGFR2, and AXIN-1. E2 increased the expression of FGFR2 C1 isoform but reduced C3 isoform at mRNA level. E2-induced alternative splicing of FAS and FGFR2 in MCF-7 cells correlated with resistance to FAS activation-induced apoptosis and response to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), respectively. Resistance of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to the anti-estrogen tamoxifen was associated with ER

  9. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

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    Ronghui Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies.

  10. Spliceman2: a computational web server that predicts defects in pre-mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygan, Kamil Jan; Sanford, Clayton Hendrick; Fairbrother, William Guy

    2017-09-15

    Most pre-mRNA transcripts in eukaryotic cells must undergo splicing to remove introns and join exons, and splicing elements present a large mutational target for disease-causing mutations. Splicing elements are strongly position dependent with respect to the transcript annotations. In 2012, we presented Spliceman, an online tool that used positional dependence to predict how likely distant mutations around annotated splice sites were to disrupt splicing. Here, we present an improved version of the previous tool that will be more useful for predicting the likelihood of splicing mutations. We have added industry-standard input options (i.e. Spliceman now accepts variant call format files), which allow much larger inputs than previously available. The tool also can visualize the locations-within exons and introns-of sequence variants to be analyzed and the predicted effects on splicing of the pre-mRNA transcript. In addition, Spliceman2 integrates with RNAcompete motif libraries to provide a prediction of which trans -acting factors binding sites are disrupted/created and links out to the UCSC genome browser. In summary, the new features in Spliceman2 will allow scientists and physicians to better understand the effects of single nucleotide variations on splicing. Freely available on the web at http://fairbrother.biomed.brown.edu/spliceman2 . Website implemented in PHP framework-Laravel 5, PostgreSQL, Apache, and Perl, with all major browsers supported. william_fairbrother@brown.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Splice of photonic crystal fibres by use of double phase-conjugate mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yusuke; Okamoto, Atsushi; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Hayano, Yutaka

    2007-05-01

    We present a novel splicing method for photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) with a double phase-conjugate mirror (DPCM). The DPCM is an optical device with photorefractive crystal (PRC) which generates phase-conjugate beams easily. In this report, we experimentally measure the splice losses of the DPCM for transverse PCF offset. We numerically estimate the splice losses in the case that butt coupled PCFs without DPCM. Comparing the experimental and numerical values of the splice loss of PCFs, we discuss the tolerance of the DPCM for the PCF displacement. Also, we discuss the causes of loss inside the DPCM module.

  12. Mutation analysis in a family with oculocutaneous albinism manifesting in the same generation of three branches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preising, Markus N.; Forster, Hedwig; Tan, H.; Lorenz, Birgit; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Plomp, Astrid S.

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism with variable expressivity in a family from The Netherlands in which no consanguinity was reported. Three affected family members were screened for mutations in tyrosinase (TYR) and the pink-eye-dilution gene (P) by using SSCP. The

  13. cis-Acting and trans-acting modulation of equine infectious anemia virus alternative RNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Huey-Jane; Baker, Carl C.; Princler, Gerald L.; Derse, David

    2004-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus distantly related to HIV-1, encodes regulatory proteins, EIAV Tat (ETat) and Rev (ERev), from a four-exon mRNA. Exon 3 of the tat/rev mRNA contains a 30-nucleotide purine-rich element (PRE) which binds both ERev and SF2/ASF, a member of the SR family of RNA splicing factors. To better understand the role of this element in the regulation of EIAV pre-mRNA splicing, we quantified the effects of mutation or deletion of the PRE on exon 3 splicing in vitro and on alternative splicing in vivo. We also determined the branch point elements upstream of exons 3 and 4. In vitro splicing of exon 3 to exon 4 was not affected by mutation of the PRE, and addition of purified SR proteins enhanced splicing independently of the PRE. In vitro splicing of exon 2 to exon 3 was dependent on the PRE; under conditions of excess SR proteins, either the PRE or the 5' splice site of exon 3 was sufficient to activate splicing. We applied isoform-specific primers in real-time RT-PCR reactions to quantitatively analyze alternative splicing in cells transfected with rev-minus EIAV provirus constructs. In the context of provirus with wild-type exon 3, greater than 80% of the viral mRNAs were multiply spliced, and of these, less than 1% excluded exon 3. Deletion of the PRE resulted in a decrease in the relative amount of multiply spliced mRNA to about 40% of the total and approximately 39% of the viral mRNA excluded exon 3. Ectopic expression of ERev caused a decrease in the relative amount of multiply spliced mRNA to approximately 50% of the total and increased mRNAs that excluded exon 3 to about 4%. Over-expression of SF2/ASF in cells transfected with wild-type provirus constructs inhibited splicing but did not significantly alter exon 3 skipping

  14. Random Splicing of Several Exons Caused by a Single Base Change in the Target Exon of CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Gene Knockout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Kapahnke

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-associated sequence 9 (CRISPR/Cas9 system is widely used for genome editing purposes as it facilitates an efficient knockout of a specific gene in, e.g. cultured cells. Targeted double-strand breaks are introduced to the target sequence of the guide RNAs, which activates the cellular DNA repair mechanism for non-homologous-end-joining, resulting in unprecise repair and introduction of small deletions or insertions. Due to this, sequence alterations in the coding region of the target gene frequently cause frame-shift mutations, facilitating degradation of the mRNA. We here show that such CRISPR/Cas9-mediated alterations in the target exon may also result in altered splicing of the respective pre-mRNA, most likely due to mutations of splice-regulatory sequences. Using the human FLOT-1 gene as an example, we demonstrate that such altered splicing products also give rise to aberrant protein products. These may potentially function as dominant-negative proteins and thus interfere with the interpretation of the data generated with these cell lines. Since most researchers only control the consequences of CRISPR knockout at genomic and protein level, our data should encourage to also check the alterations at the mRNA level.

  15. Somatic mutation profiles of MSI and MSS colorectal cancer identified by whole exome next generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Timmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is with approximately 1 million cases the third most common cancer worldwide. Extensive research is ongoing to decipher the underlying genetic patterns with the hope to improve early cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this direction, the recent progress in next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the field of cancer genomics. However, one caveat of these studies remains the large amount of genetic variations identified and their interpretation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the first work on whole exome NGS of primary colon cancers. We performed 454 whole exome pyrosequencing of tumor as well as adjacent not affected normal colonic tissue from microsatellite stable (MSS and microsatellite instable (MSI colon cancer patients and identified more than 50,000 small nucleotide variations for each tissue. According to predictions based on MSS and MSI pathomechanisms we identified eight times more somatic non-synonymous variations in MSI cancers than in MSS and we were able to reproduce the result in four additional CRCs. Our bioinformatics filtering approach narrowed down the rate of most significant mutations to 359 for MSI and 45 for MSS CRCs with predicted altered protein functions. In both CRCs, MSI and MSS, we found somatic mutations in the intracellular kinase domain of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A, BMPR1A, a gene where so far germline mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome, and show that the mutations functionally impair the protein function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that with deep sequencing of tumor exomes one may be able to predict the microsatellite status of CRC and in addition identify potentially clinically relevant mutations.

  16. DNA computing based on splicing: universality results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuhaj-Varjú, E; Freund, R; Kari, L; Păun, G

    1996-01-01

    The paper extends some of the most recently obtained results on the computational universality of specific variants of H systems (e.g. with regular sets of rules) and proves that we can construct universal computers based on various types of H systems with a finite set of splicing rules as well as a finite set of axioms, i.e. we show the theoretical possibility to design programmable universal DNA computers based on the splicing operation. For H systems working in the multiset style (where the numbers of copies of all available strings are counted) we elaborate how a Turing machine computing a partial recursive function can be simulated by an equivalent H system computing the same function; in that way, from a universal Turning machine we obtain a universal H system. Considering H systems as language generating devices we have to add various simple control mechanisms (checking the presence/absence of certain symbols in the spliced strings) to systems with a finite set of splicing rules as well as with a finite set of axioms in order to obtain the full computational power, i.e. to get a characterization of the family of recursively enumerable languages. We also introduce test tube systems, where several H systems work in parallel in their tubes and from time to time the contents of each tube are redistributed to all tubes according to certain separation conditions. By the construction of universal test tube systems we show that also such systems could serve as the theoretical basis for the development of biological (DNA) computers.

  17. Maxillary carcinosarcoma: Identification of a novel MET mutation in both carcinomatous and sarcomatous components through next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Mizuo; Saito, Yuki; Morikawa, Teppei; Omura, Go; Kobayashi, Kenya; Akashi, Ken; Yoshida, Masafumi; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Chisato; Fukayama, Masashi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Asakage, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    Carcinosarcoma is a rare tumor with biphasic growth of the carcinomatous and sarcomatous components. Prognosis is generally poor and characterization of the molecular mechanisms may provide information for the development of novel antitumor agents and biomarkers. We present the case of 66-year-old man with a complaint of nasal obstruction. He was diagnosed with maxillary carcinosarcoma and coexisting papilloma. He underwent multimodal treatment but died of uncontrolled local disease 10 months after the initial presentation. Genetic testing using next-generation sequencing (NGS) revealed that both the carcinomatous and sarcomatous components carried a somatic mutation in the conserved domain of the mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) proto-oncogene. Our observation highlighted the importance of the MET gene in the oncogenesis of maxillary carcinosarcoma and is indicative of the common clonal origin of both malignant components. This suggested a possibility of treating MET mutation-positive carcinosarcomas with c-MET inhibitors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Prenatal diagnosis and molecular genetic analysis of short rib-polydactyly syndrome type III (Verma-Naumoff in a second-trimester fetus with a homozygous splice site mutation in intron 4 in the NEK1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Polydactyly, micromelia, metaphyseal spurs, widened humeral metaphyses, and shortened ribs can be prominent prenatal ultrasound findings of SRPS III. The present case provides evidence for a correlation of a mutation in the NEK1 gene with SRPS III.

  19. Pre-mRNA splicing is a determinant of histone H3K36 methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soojin; Kim, Hyunmin; Fong, Nova; Erickson, Benjamin; Bentley, David L

    2011-08-16

    A chromatin code appears to mark introns and exons with distinct patterns of nucleosome enrichment and histone methylation. We investigated whether a causal relationship exists between splicing and chromatin modification by asking whether splice-site mutations affect the methylation of histone H3K36. Deletions of the 3' splice site in intron 2 or in both introns 1 and 2 of an integrated β-globin reporter gene caused a shift in relative distribution of H3K36 trimethylation away from 5' ends and toward 3' ends. The effects of splice-site mutations correlated with enhanced retention of a U5 snRNP subunit on transcription complexes downstream of the gene. In contrast, a poly(A) site mutation did not affect H3K36 methylation. Similarly, global inhibition of splicing by spliceostatin A caused a rapid repositioning of H3K36me3 away from 5' ends in favor of 3' ends. These results suggest that the cotranscriptional splicing apparatus influences establishment of normal patterns of histone modification.

  20. EFFECT OF GAMMA RADIATION OF MACRO MUTATIONS, EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY UNDER M2 GENERATION IN PEA (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind KUMAR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was undertaken to study the spectrum of macro mutants, effectiveness and efficiency of different doses of gamma rays in pea variety (Arkel. The seeds were treated with gamma rays viz., 00kR (dry control, 05kR, 10kR, 15kR, 20kR, 25kR, 30kR, 35kR, 40kR (dry seeds and presoaked seeds of the same was exposed to 00kR (wet control, 05kR, 10kR, 15kR, 20kR (kilo Roentgen biological damage was calculated in M1 and M2 generation based on lethality (L and pollen sterility. The irradiated seeds were sown in the M1 field their respective controls and harvested in bulk to raise the M2 generation in Randomized Block Design (RBD with three replications. The spectrum of macro mutants i.e., plant stature (tall, dwarf, small dwarf, maturity (early, late, pod shape (bold, long, short, seed colour (brown, light white, light green and seed shape (small, bold, wrinkled were observed in M2 generation. The usefulness of any mutagen in plant breeding depends not only on its effectiveness but also upon if efficiency. Mutagenic effectiveness is a measure of the frequency of mutations induced by unit mutagen dose, whereas mutagenic efficiency is measure of proportion of mutations in relation of undesirable changes like lethality and sterility are used for gamma rays. A result of the indicated positive relationship in M2 generation with macro mutation, effectiveness and efficiency was found to be highest at lowest doses.

  1. Next generation sequencing improves the accuracy of KRAS mutation analysis in endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration pancreatic lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario de Biase

    Full Text Available The use of endoscopic ultrasonography has allowed for improved detection and pathologic analysis of fine needle aspirate material for pancreatic lesion diagnosis. The molecular analysis of KRAS has further improved the clinical sensitivity of preoperative analysis. For this reason, the use of highly analytical sensitive and specific molecular tests in the analysis of material from fine needle aspirate specimens has become of great importance. In the present study, 60 specimens from endoscopic ultrasonography fine needle aspirate were analyzed for KRAS exon 2 and exon 3 mutations, using three different techniques: Sanger sequencing, allele specific locked nucleic acid PCR and Next Generation sequencing (454 GS-Junior, Roche. Moreover, KRAS was also tested in wild-type samples, starting from DNA obtained from cytological smears after pathological evaluation. Sanger sequencing showed a clinical sensitivity for the detection of the KRAS mutation of 42.1%, allele specific locked nucleic acid of 52.8% and Next Generation of 73.7%. In two wild-type cases the re-sequencing starting from selected material allowed to detect a KRAS mutation, increasing the clinical sensitivity of next generation sequencing to 78.95%. The present study demonstrated that the performance of molecular analysis could be improved by using highly analytical sensitive techniques. The Next Generation Sequencing allowed to increase the clinical sensitivity of the test without decreasing the specificity of the analysis. Moreover we observed that it could be useful to repeat the analysis starting from selectable material, such as cytological smears to avoid false negative results.

  2. Handbook of knotting and splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Hasluck, Paul N

    2005-01-01

    Clearly written and amply illustrated with 208 figures, this classic guide ranges from simple and useful knots to complex varieties. Additional topics include rope splicing, working cordage, hammock making, more.

  3. Mutational Profiling of Therapy-related Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia by Next Generation Sequencing, a Comparison with de novo Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ok, Chi Young; Patel, Keyur P.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Routbort, Mark J.; Fu, Bin; Tang, Guilin; Goswami, Maitrayee; Singh, Rajesh; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Pierce, Sherry A.; Young, Ken H.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Wang, Sa A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we used a next generation sequencing-based approach to profile gene mutations in therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes (t-MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML); and compared these findings with de novo MDS/AML. Consecutive bone marrow samples of 498 patients, including 70 therapy-related (28 MDS and 42 AML) and 428 de novo (147 MDS and 281 AML) were analyzed using a modified-TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel (Illumina) covering mutation hotspots of 53 genes. Overall, mutation(s...

  4. Congenital muscular dystrophy with fatty liver and infantile-onset cataract caused by TRAPPC11 mutations: broadening of the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wen-Chen; Zhu, Wenhua; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Noguchi, Satoru; Sacher, Michael; Ogawa, Megumu; Shih, Hsiang-Hung; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Nishino, Ichizo

    2015-01-01

    Transport protein particle (TRAPP) is a multiprotein complex involved in endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi trafficking. Zebrafish with a mutation in the TRAPPC11 orthologue showed hepatomegaly with steatosis and defects in visual system development. In humans, TRAPPC11 mutations have been reported in only three families showing limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) or myopathy with movement disorders and intellectual disability. We screened muscular dystrophy genes using next-generation sequencing and performed associated molecular and biochemical analyses in a patient with fatty liver and cataract in addition to infantile-onset muscle weakness. We identified the first Asian patient with TRAPPC11 mutations. Muscle pathology demonstrated typical dystrophic changes and liver biopsy revealed steatosis. The patient carried compound heterozygous mutations of a previously reported missense and a novel splice-site mutation. The splice-site change produced two aberrantly-spliced transcripts that were both predicted to result in translational frameshift and truncated proteins. Full-length TRAPPC11 protein was undetectable on immunoblotting. This report widens the phenotype of TRAPPC11-opathy as the patient showed the following: (1) congenital muscular dystrophy phenotype rather than LGMD; (2) steatosis and infantile-onset cataract, both not observed in previously reported patients; but (3) no ataxia or abnormal movement, clearly indicating that TRAPPC11 plays a physiological role in multiple tissues in human.

  5. Identification of a breast cancer family double heterozygote for RAD51C and BRCA2 gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has entered routine genetic testing of hereditary breast cancer. It has provided the opportunity to screen multiple genes simultaneously, and consequently has identified new complex genotypes. Here we report the first identification of a woman double heterozygote...... for mutations in the RAD51C and BRCA2 genes. The RAD51C missense mutation p.Arg258His has previously been identified in a homozygous state in a patient with Fanconi anemia. This mutation is known to affect the DNA repair function of the RAD51C protein. The BRCA2 p.Leu3216Leu synonymous mutation has not been...... described before and mini-gene splicing experiments revealed that the mutation results in skipping of exon 26 containing a part of the DNA-binding domain. We conclude that the woman has two potential disease-causing mutations and that predictive testing of family members should include both the RAD51C...

  6. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia: Mutation Analysis by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najim Ameziane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is a rare genetic instability syndrome characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure, and a high cancer risk. Fifteen genetic subtypes have been distinguished. The majority of patients (≈85% belong to the subtypes A (≈60%, C (≈15% or G (≈10%, while a minority (≈15% is distributed over the remaining 12 subtypes. All subtypes seem to fit within the “classical” FA phenotype, except for D1 and N patients, who have more severe clinical symptoms. Since FA patients need special clinical management, the diagnosis should be firmly established, to exclude conditions with overlapping phenotypes. A valid FA diagnosis requires the detection of pathogenic mutations in a FA gene and/or a positive result from a chromosomal breakage test. Identification of the pathogenic mutations is also important for adequate genetic counselling and to facilitate prenatal or preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Here we describe and validate a comprehensive protocol for the molecular diagnosis of FA, based on massively parallel sequencing. We used this approach to identify BRCA2, FANCD2, FANCI and FANCL mutations in novel unclassified FA patients.

  7. Targeted next generation sequencing identifies clinically actionable mutations in patients with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeck, William R; Parker, Joel; Carson, Craig C; Shields, Janiel M; Sambade, Maria J; Peters, Eldon C; Burd, Christin E; Thomas, Nancy E; Chiang, Derek Y; Liu, Wenjin; Eberhard, David A; Ollila, David; Grilley-Olson, Juneko; Moschos, Stergios; Neil Hayes, D; Sharpless, Norman E

    2014-07-01

    Somatic sequencing of cancers has produced new insight into tumorigenesis, tumor heterogeneity, and disease progression, but the vast majority of genetic events identified are of indeterminate clinical significance. Here, we describe a NextGen sequencing approach to fully analyzing 248 genes, including all those of known clinical significance in melanoma. This strategy features solution capture of DNA followed by multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing and was evaluated in 31 melanoma cell lines and 18 tumor tissues from patients with metastatic melanoma. Mutations in melanoma cell lines correlated with their sensitivity to corresponding small molecule inhibitors, confirming, for example, lapatinib sensitivity in ERBB4 mutant lines and identifying a novel activating mutation of BRAF. The latter event would not have been identified by clinical sequencing and was associated with responsiveness to a BRAF kinase inhibitor. This approach identified focal copy number changes of PTEN not found by standard methods, such as comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Actionable mutations were found in 89% of the tumor tissues analyzed, 56% of which would not be identified by standard-of-care approaches. This work shows that targeted sequencing is an attractive approach for clinical use in melanoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. NSD1 mutations generate a genome-wide DNA methylation signature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Choufani, S

    2015-12-22

    Sotos syndrome (SS) represents an important human model system for the study of epigenetic regulation; it is an overgrowth\\/intellectual disability syndrome caused by mutations in a histone methyltransferase, NSD1. As layered epigenetic modifications are often interdependent, we propose that pathogenic NSD1 mutations have a genome-wide impact on the most stable epigenetic mark, DNA methylation (DNAm). By interrogating DNAm in SS patients, we identify a genome-wide, highly significant NSD1(+\\/-)-specific signature that differentiates pathogenic NSD1 mutations from controls, benign NSD1 variants and the clinically overlapping Weaver syndrome. Validation studies of independent cohorts of SS and controls assigned 100% of these samples correctly. This highly specific and sensitive NSD1(+\\/-) signature encompasses genes that function in cellular morphogenesis and neuronal differentiation, reflecting cardinal features of the SS phenotype. The identification of SS-specific genome-wide DNAm alterations will facilitate both the elucidation of the molecular pathophysiology of SS and the development of improved diagnostic testing.

  9. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H. [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine and Science (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  10. An integrated inspection of the somatic mutations in a lung squamous cell carcinoma using next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy F Stead

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the lung kills over 350,000 people annually worldwide, and is the main lung cancer histotype with no targeted treatments. High-coverage whole-genome sequencing of the other main subtypes, small-cell and adenocarcinoma, gave insights into carcinogenic mechanisms and disease etiology. The genomic complexity within the lung SCC subtype, as revealed by The Cancer Genome Atlas, means this subtype is likely to benefit from a more integrated approach in which the transcriptional consequences of somatic mutations are simultaneously inspected. Here we present such an approach: the integrated analysis of deep sequencing data from both the whole genome and whole transcriptome (coding and non-coding of LUDLU-1, a SCC lung cell line. Our results show that LUDLU-1 lacks the mutational signature that has been previously associated with tobacco exposure in other lung cancer subtypes, and suggests that DNA-repair efficiency is adversely affected; LUDLU-1 contains somatic mutations in TP53 and BRCA2, allelic imbalance in the expression of two cancer-associated BRCA1 germline polymorphisms and reduced transcription of a potentially endogenous PARP2 inhibitor. Functional assays were performed and compared with a control lung cancer cell line. LUDLU-1 did not exhibit radiosensitisation or an increase in sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. However, LUDLU-1 did exhibit small but significant differences with respect to cisplatin sensitivity. Our research shows how integrated analyses of high-throughput data can generate hypotheses to be tested in the lab.

  11. Beta-Binomial Model for the Detection of Rare Mutations in Pooled Next-Generation Sequencing Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakaitiene, Audrone; Avino, Mariano; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2017-04-01

    Against diminishing costs, next-generation sequencing (NGS) still remains expensive for studies with a large number of individuals. As cost saving, sequencing genome of pools containing multiple samples might be used. Currently, there are many software available for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Sensitivity and specificity depend on the model used and data analyzed, indicating that all software have space for improvement. We use beta-binomial model to detect rare mutations in untagged pooled NGS experiments. We propose a multireference framework for pooled data with ability being specific up to two patients affected by neuromuscular disorders (NMD). We assessed the results comparing with The Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK), CRISP, SNVer, and FreeBayes. Our results show that the multireference approach applying beta-binomial model is accurate in predicting rare mutations at 0.01 fraction. Finally, we explored the concordance of mutations between the model and software, checking their involvement in any NMD-related gene. We detected seven novel SNPs, for which the functional analysis produced enriched terms related to locomotion and musculature.

  12. The Utility of Next-Generation Sequencing in Gene Discovery for Mutation-Negative Patients with Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Wendy Anne; Christodoulou, John

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare, severe disorder of neuronal plasticity that predominantly affects girls. Girls with RTT usually appear asymptomatic in the first 6–18 months of life, but gradually develop severe motor, cognitive, and behavioral abnormalities that persist for life. A predominance of neuronal and synaptic dysfunction, with altered excitatory–inhibitory neuronal synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, are overarching features of RTT in children and in mouse models. Over 90% of patients with classical RTT have mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding (MECP2) gene, while other genes, including cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5), Forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1), myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C), and transcription factor 4 (TCF4), have been associated with phenotypes overlapping with RTT. However, there remain a proportion of patients who carry a clinical diagnosis of RTT, but who are mutation negative. In recent years, next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized approaches to genetic studies, making whole-exome and even whole-genome sequencing possible strategies for the detection of rare and de novo mutations, aiding the discovery of novel disease genes. Here, we review the recent progress that is emerging in identifying pathogenic variations, specifically from exome sequencing in RTT patients, and emphasize the need for the use of this technology to identify known and new disease genes in RTT patients. PMID:26236194

  13. Splice-correcting oligonucleotides restore BTK function in X-linked agammaglobulinemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestas, Burcu; Moreno, Pedro M D; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Mohammad, Dara K; Saleh, Amer F; Sutlu, Tolga; Nordin, Joel Z; Guterstam, Peter; Gustafsson, Manuela O; Kharazi, Shabnam; Piątosa, Barbara; Roberts, Thomas C; Behlke, Mark A; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J; Lundin, Karin E; El Andaloussi, Samir; Månsson, Robert; Berglöf, Anna; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C I Edvard

    2014-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency that results from mutations within the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Many XLA-associated mutations affect splicing of BTK pre-mRNA and severely impair B cell development. Here, we assessed the potential of antisense, splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) targeting mutated BTK transcripts for treating XLA. Both the SCO structural design and chemical properties were optimized using 2'-O-methyl, locked nucleic acid, or phosphorodiamidate morpholino backbones. In order to have access to an animal model of XLA, we engineered a transgenic mouse that harbors a BAC with an authentic, mutated, splice-defective human BTK gene. BTK transgenic mice were bred onto a Btk knockout background to avoid interference of the orthologous mouse protein. Using this model, we determined that BTK-specific SCOs are able to correct aberrantly spliced BTK in B lymphocytes, including pro-B cells. Correction of BTK mRNA restored expression of functional protein, as shown both by enhanced lymphocyte survival and reestablished BTK activation upon B cell receptor stimulation. Furthermore, SCO treatment corrected splicing and restored BTK expression in primary cells from patients with XLA. Together, our data demonstrate that SCOs can restore BTK function and that BTK-targeting SCOs have potential as personalized medicine in patients with XLA.

  14. Pitfalls of improperly procured adjacent non-neoplastic tissue for somatic mutation analysis using next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid adoption of next-generation sequencing provides an efficient system for detecting somatic alterations in neoplasms. The detection of such alterations requires a matched non-neoplastic sample for adequate filtering of non-somatic events such as germline polymorphisms. Non-neoplastic tissue adjacent to the excised neoplasm is often used for this purpose as it is simultaneously collected and generally contains the same tissue type as the neoplasm. Following NGS analysis, we and others have frequently observed low-level somatic mutations in these non-neoplastic tissues, which may impose additional challenges to somatic mutation detection as it complicates germline variant filtering. Methods We hypothesized that the low-level somatic mutation observed in non-neoplastic tissues may be entirely or partially caused by inadvertent contamination by neoplastic cells during the surgical pathology gross assessment or tissue procurement process. To test this hypothesis, we applied a systematic protocol designed to collect multiple grossly non-neoplastic tissues using different methods surrounding each single neoplasm. The procedure was applied in two breast cancer lumpectomy specimens. In each case, all samples were first sequenced by whole-exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in the neoplasm and determine their presence in the adjacent non-neoplastic tissues. We then generated ultra-deep coverage using targeted sequencing to assess the levels of contamination in non-neoplastic tissue samples collected under different conditions. Results Contamination levels in non-neoplastic tissues ranged up to 3.5 and 20.9 % respectively in the two cases tested, with consistent pattern correlated with the manner of grossing and procurement. By carefully controlling the conditions of various steps during this process, we were able to eliminate any detectable contamination in both patients. Conclusion The results demonstrated that the

  15. Ire1 Has Distinct Catalytic Mechanisms for XBP1/HAC1 Splicing and RIDD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvin B. Tam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An evolutionarily conserved unfolded protein response (UPR component, IRE1, cleaves XBP1/HAC1 introns in order to generate spliced mRNAs that are translated into potent transcription factors. IRE1 also cleaves endoplasmic-reticulum-associated RNAs leading to their decay, an activity termed regulated IRE1-dependent decay (RIDD; however, the mechanism by which IRE1 differentiates intron cleavage from RIDD is not well understood. Using in vitro experiments, we found that IRE1 has two different modes of action: XBP1/HAC1 is cleaved by IRE1 subunits acting cooperatively within IRE1 oligomers, whereas a single subunit of IRE1 performs RIDD without cooperativity. Furthermore, these distinct activities can be separated by complementation of catalytically inactive IRE1 RNase and mutations at oligomerization interfaces. Using an IRE1 RNase inhibitor, STF-083010, selective inhibition of XBP1 splicing indicates that XBP1 promotes cell survival, whereas RIDD leads to cell death, revealing modulation of IRE1 activities as a drug-development strategy.

  16. Dystrophin rescue by trans-splicing: a strategy for DMD genotypes not eligible for exon skipping approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorain, Stéphanie; Peccate, Cécile; Le Hir, Maëva; Griffith, Graziella; Philippi, Susanne; Précigout, Guillaume; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Jollet, Arnaud; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis

    2013-01-01

    RNA-based therapeutic approaches using splice-switching oligonucleotides have been successfully applied to rescue dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) preclinical models and are currently being evaluated in DMD patients. Although the modular structure of dystrophin protein tolerates internal deletions, many mutations that affect nondispensable domains of the protein require further strategies. Among these, trans-splicing technology is particularly attractive, as it allows the replacement of any mutated exon by its normal version as well as introducing missing exons or correcting duplication mutations. We have applied such a strategy in vitro by using cotransfection of pre–trans-splicing molecule (PTM) constructs along with a reporter minigene containing part of the dystrophin gene harboring the stop-codon mutation found in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Optimization of the different functional domains of the PTMs allowed achieving accurate and efficient trans-splicing of up to 30% of the transcript encoded by the cotransfected minigene. Optimized parameters included mRNA stabilization, choice of splice site sequence, inclusion of exon splice enhancers and artificial intronic sequence. Intramuscular delivery of adeno-associated virus vectors expressing PTMs allowed detectable levels of dystrophin in mdx and mdx4Cv, illustrating that a given PTM can be suitable for a variety of mutations. PMID:23861443

  17. Drug resistance and BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia from the imatinib to the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor era: The main changes are in the type of mutations, but not in the frequency of mutation involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soverini, Simona; De Benedittis, Caterina; Papayannidis, Cristina; Paolini, Stefania; Venturi, Claudia; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Luppi, Mario; Bresciani, Paola; Salvucci, Marzia; Russo, Domenico; Sica, Simona; Orlandi, Ester; Intermesoli, Tamara; Gozzini, Antonella; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Pane, Fabrizio; Baccarani, Michele; Cavo, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    Patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) frequently relapse on imatinib with acquisition of BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations. To analyze the changes that second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have brought in mutation frequency and type, a database review was undertaken of the results of all the BCR-ABL KD mutation analyses performed in the authors' laboratory from January 2004 to January 2013. Interrogation of the database retrieved 450 mutation analyses in 272 patients with Ph+ ALL. Prescreening of samples was performed with denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (D-HPLC), followed by direct sequencing of D-HPLC-positive cases. BCR-ABL KD mutations were detected in 70% of imatinib-resistant patients, with T315I, E255K, and Y253H mutations accounting for 75% of cases. Seventy-eight percent of the patients reported to be resistant to second-generation TKIs after imatinib failure were positive for mutations, and 58% of them had multiple mutations. Analysis of patients relapsing on dasatinib revealed a newly acquired T315I mutation in almost two-thirds of the cases. Direct sequencing detected no mutations at diagnosis, even in patients who relapsed after a few months. Second-generation TKIs ensure a more rapid debulking of the leukemic clone and have much fewer insensitive mutations, but long-term disease control remains a problem, and the T315I mutation is revealed to be an even more frequent enemy. BCR-ABL KD mutation screening of patients with Ph+ ALL who are receiving imatinib or second-generation TKIs would be a precious ally for timely treatment optimization. In contrast, the clinical usefulness of conventional direct sequencing at diagnosis seems to be very low. American Cancer Society. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  18. The emergence of alternative 3' and 5' splice site exons from constitutive exons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Koren

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative 3' and 5' splice site (ss events constitute a significant part of all alternative splicing events. These events were also found to be related to several aberrant splicing diseases. However, only few of the characteristics that distinguish these events from alternative cassette exons are known currently. In this study, we compared the characteristics of constitutive exons, alternative cassette exons, and alternative 3'ss and 5'ss exons. The results revealed that alternative 3'ss and 5'ss exons are an intermediate state between constitutive and alternative cassette exons, where the constitutive side resembles constitutive exons, and the alternative side resembles alternative cassette exons. The results also show that alternative 3'ss and 5'ss exons exhibit low levels of symmetry (frame-preserving, similar to constitutive exons, whereas the sequence between the two alternative splice sites shows high symmetry levels, similar to alternative cassette exons. In addition, flanking intronic conservation analysis revealed that exons whose alternative splice sites are at least nine nucleotides apart show a high conservation level, indicating intronic participation in the regulation of their splicing, whereas exons whose alternative splice sites are fewer than nine nucleotides apart show a low conservation level. Further examination of these exons, spanning seven vertebrate species, suggests an evolutionary model in which the alternative state is a derivative of an ancestral constitutive exon, where a mutation inside the exon or along the flanking intron resulted in the creation of a new splice site that competes with the original one, leading to alternative splice site selection. This model was validated experimentally on four exons, showing that they indeed originated from constitutive exons that acquired a new competing splice site during evolution.

  19. Splice Expression Variation Analysis (SEVA) for Inter-tumor Heterogeneity of Gene Isoform Usage in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Bahman; Guo, Theresa; Considine, Michael; Florea, Liliana; Kagohara, Luciane T; Stein-O'Brien, Genevieve L; Kelley, Dylan; Flam, Emily; Zambo, Kristina D; Ha, Patrick K; Geman, Donald; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A; Gaykalova, Daria A; Favorov, Alexander V; Fertig, Elana J

    2018-01-12

    Current bioinformatics methods to detect changes in gene isoform usage in distinct phenotypes compare the relative expected isoform usage in phenotypes. These statistics model differences in isoform usage in normal tissues, which have stable regulation of gene splicing. Pathological conditions, such as cancer, can have broken regulation of splicing that increases the heterogeneity of the expression of splice variants. Inferring events with such differential heterogeneity in gene isoform usage requires new statistical approaches. We introduce Splice Expression Variability Analysis (SEVA) to model increased heterogeneity of splice variant usage between conditions (e.g., tumor and normal samples). SEVA uses a rank-based multivariate statistic that compares the variability of junction expression profiles within one condition to the variability within another. Simulated data show that SEVA is unique in modeling heterogeneity of gene isoform usage, and benchmark SEVA's performance against EBSeq, DiffSplice, and rMATS that model differential isoform usage instead of heterogeneity. We confirm the accuracy of SEVA in identifying known splice variants in head and neck cancer and perform cross-study validation of novel splice variants. A novel comparison of splice variant heterogeneity between subtypes of head and neck cancer demonstrated unanticipated similarity between the heterogeneity of gene isoform usage in HPV-positive and HPV-negative subtypes and anticipated increased heterogeneity among HPV-negative samples with mutations in genes that regulate the splice variant machinery. These results show that SEVA accurately models differential heterogeneity of gene isoform usage from RNA-seq data. SEVA is implemented in the R/Bioconductor package GSReg. bahman@jhu.edu, ejfertig@jhmi.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Prevalence and coexistence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, NRAS, TP53, and APC mutations in Indian colorectal cancer patients: Next-generation sequencing-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhri, Mayank; Bhatnagar, Akanksha; Gupta, Satish; Bp, Manasa; Minhas, Sachin; Shokeen, Yogender; Aggarwal, Shyam

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer incidences are on a rise in India. In this study, we have analyzed the mutation frequencies of six potential biomarkers, their coexistence, association with clinicopathological characteristics, and tumor location in Indian colorectal cancer patients. Next-generation sequencing was performed to identify mutations in the six potential biomarker genes using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 112 colorectal cancer patients. The mutation frequency observed in KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, NRAS, TP53, and APC was 35.7%, 7.1%, 16.1%, 6.3%, 39.3%, and 29.5%, respectively. The significant associations of mutations were KRAS with age less than 60 years (p = 0.041), PIK3CA with males (p = 0.032), tumor stage I-II (p = 0.013), lack of metastasis in lymph nodes (p = 0.040), NRAS with rectum (p = 0.002), and APC with T2 stage of tumor growth (p = 0.013). No single patient harbored mutations in these six genes or any five genes simultaneously. Significance was noted in coexistence of KRAS with APC (p = 0.024) and mutual exclusion of KRAS with BRAF (p = 0.029). PIK3CA exon 9 was observed to be more frequently associated with KRAS mutations than PIK3CA exon 20 (p = 0.072). NRAS mutations were mutually exclusive with BRAF and PIK3CA mutations. As per our knowledge, this is the first next-generation sequencing-based biomarker study in Indian colorectal cancer patients. Frequent coexistence of gene mutations in pairs and triplets suggests that synergistic effect of overlapping mutations might further trigger the disease. In addition, infrequent coexistence of multiple gene mutations hints toward different signaling pathways for colorectal cancer tumorigenesis.

  1. Cold adaptation generates mutations associated with the growth of influenza B vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsuh; Velkov, Tony; Camuglia, Sarina; Rockman, Steven P; Tannock, Gregory A

    2015-10-26

    Seasonal inactivated influenza vaccines are usually trivalent or quadrivalent and are prepared from accredited seed viruses. Yields of influenza A seed viruses can be enhanced by gene reassortment with high-yielding donor strains, but similar approaches for influenza B seed viruses have been largely unsuccessful. For vaccine manufacture influenza B seed viruses are usually adapted for high-growth by serial passage. Influenza B antigen yields so obtained are often unpredictable and selection of influenza B seed viruses by this method can be a rate-limiting step in seasonal influenza vaccine manufacture. We recently have shown that selection of stable cold-adapted mutants from seasonal epidemic influenza B viruses is associated with improved growth. In this study, specific mutations were identified that were responsible for growth enhancement as a consequence of adaptation to growth at lower temperatures. Molecular analysis revealed that the following mutations in the HA, NP and NA genes are required for enhanced viral growth: G156/N160 in the HA, E253, G375 in the NP and T146 in the NA genes. These results demonstrate that the growth of seasonal influenza B viruses can be optimized or improved significantly by specific gene modifications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutational jackpot events generate effective frequency-dependent selection in adapting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    The site-frequency spectrum is one the most easily measurable quantities that characterize the genetic diversity of a population. While most neutral models predict that site frequency spectra should decay with increasing frequency, a high-frequency uptick has been reported in many populations. Anomalies in the high-frequency tail are particularly unsettling because the highest frequencies can be measured with greatest accuracy. Here, we show that an uptick in the spectrum of neutral mutations generally arises when mutant frequencies are dominated by rare jackpot events, mutational events with large descendant numbers. This leads to an effective pattern of frequency-dependent selection (or unstable internal equilibrium at one half frequency) that causes an accumulation of high-frequency polymorphic sites. We reproduce the known uptick occurring for recurrent hitchhiking (genetic draft) as well as rapid adaptation, and (in the future) generalize the shape of the high-frequency tail to other scenarios that are dominated by jackpot events, such as frequent range expansions. We also tackle (in the future) the inverse approach to use the high-frequency uptick for learning about the tail of the offspring number distribution. Positively selected alleles need to surpass, typically, an u NSF Career Award (PoLS), NIH NIGMS R01, Simons Foundation.

  3. Identifying Highly Penetrant Disease Causal Mutations Using Next Generation Sequencing: Guide to Whole Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mesut Erzurumluoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent technological advances have created challenges for geneticists and a need to adapt to a wide range of new bioinformatics tools and an expanding wealth of publicly available data (e.g., mutation databases, and software. This wide range of methods and a diversity of file formats used in sequence analysis is a significant issue, with a considerable amount of time spent before anyone can even attempt to analyse the genetic basis of human disorders. Another point to consider that is although many possess “just enough” knowledge to analyse their data, they do not make full use of the tools and databases that are available and also do not fully understand how their data was created. The primary aim of this review is to document some of the key approaches and provide an analysis schema to make the analysis process more efficient and reliable in the context of discovering highly penetrant causal mutations/genes. This review will also compare the methods used to identify highly penetrant variants when data is obtained from consanguineous individuals as opposed to nonconsanguineous; and when Mendelian disorders are analysed as opposed to common-complex disorders.

  4. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  5. Primer system for single cell detection of double mutation for Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M C; Drury, K C; Kipersztok, S; Zheng, W; Williams, R S

    2000-02-01

    Nearly 100% of infantile Tay-Sachs disease is produced by two mutations occurring in the alpha chain of the lysosomal enzyme beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase (HEXA) in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Although others have described primer systems used to amplify both sites simultaneously, few discuss the allele dropout problems inherent in this test. Our goal was to construct a more robust test enabling stronger signal generation for single cell preimplantation genetic diagnosis and to investigate the occurrence of allele dropout. New nested primers were designed to optimize detection of both major Tay-Sachs mutations. Four hundred fifty-seven single cells, including normal cells and those carrying mutations of either the 4bp insertion exon 11 or splice-site intron 12 defects, were used to screen a new primer system. Based on PCR amplified product analysis, total efficiency of amplification was 85.3%, (390/457). The allele dropout rate for the 4bp insertion mutation in exon 11 and splice-site mutation in intron 12 was 4.8% and 5.8%, respectively. Multiple mutation detection and analysis within the Tay-Sachs disease gene (HEXA) is possible using single cells for clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Alternative PCR primers and conditions offer various methods for developing systems compatible to specific program requirements.

  6. Convergent origins and rapid evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in metazoa: insights from the ctenophora and hydrozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derelle, Romain; Momose, Tsuyoshi; Manuel, Michael; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Houliston, Evelyn

    2010-04-01

    Replacement of mRNA 5' UTR sequences by short sequences trans-spliced from specialized, noncoding, spliced leader (SL) RNAs is an enigmatic phenomenon, occurring in a set of distantly related animal groups including urochordates, nematodes, flatworms, and hydra, as well as in Euglenozoa and dinoflagellates. Whether SL trans-splicing has a common evolutionary origin and biological function among different organisms remains unclear. We have undertaken a systematic identification of SL exons in cDNA sequence data sets from non-bilaterian metazoan species and their closest unicellular relatives. SL exons were identified in ctenophores and in hydrozoan cnidarians, but not in other cnidarians, placozoans, or sponges, or in animal unicellular relatives. Mapping of SL absence/presence obtained from this and previous studies onto current phylogenetic trees favors an evolutionary scenario involving multiple origins for SLs during eumetazoan evolution rather than loss from a common ancestor. In both ctenophore and hydrozoan species, multiple SL sequences were identified, showing high sequence diversity. Detailed analysis of a large data set generated for the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica revealed trans-splicing of given mRNAs by multiple alternative SLs. No evidence was found for a common identity of trans-spliced mRNAs between different hydrozoans. One feature found specifically to characterize SL-spliced mRNAs in hydrozoans, however, was a marked adenosine enrichment immediately 3' of the SL acceptor splice site. Our findings of high sequence divergence and apparently indiscriminate use of SLs in hydrozoans, along with recent findings in other taxa, indicate that SL genes have evolved rapidly in parallel in diverse animal groups, with constraint on SL exon sequence evolution being apparently rare.

  7. Spliceosome mutations exhibit specific associations with epigenetic modifiers and proto-oncogenes mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Syed A; Smith, Alexander E; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Kizilors, Aytug; Mohamedali, Azim M; Lea, Nicholas C; Mitsopoulos, Konstantinos; Ford, Kevin; Nasser, Erick; Seidl, Thomas; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-07-01

    The recent identification of acquired mutations in key components of the spliceosome machinery strongly implicates abnormalities of mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, questions remain as to how these aberrations functionally combine with the growing list of mutations in genes involved in epigenetic modification and cell signaling/transcription regulation identified in these diseases. In this study, amplicon sequencing was used to perform a mutation screen in 154 myelodysplastic syndrome patients using a 22-gene panel, including commonly mutated spliceosome components (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), and a further 18 genes known to be mutated in myeloid cancers. Sequencing of the 22-gene panel revealed that 76% (n=117) of the patients had mutations in at least one of the genes, with 38% (n=59) having splicing gene mutations and 49% (n=75) patients harboring more than one gene mutation. Interestingly, single and specific epigenetic modifier mutations tended to coexist with SF3B1 and SRSF2 mutations (P<0.03). Furthermore, mutations in SF3B1 and SRSF2 were mutually exclusive to TP53 mutations both at diagnosis and at the time of disease transformation. Moreover, mutations in FLT3, NRAS, RUNX1, CCBL and C-KIT were more likely to co-occur with splicing factor mutations generally (P<0.02), and SRSF2 mutants in particular (P<0.003) and were significantly associated with disease transformation (P<0.02). SF3B1 and TP53 mutations had varying impacts on overall survival with hazard ratios of 0.2 (P<0.03, 95% CI, 0.1-0.8) and 2.1 (P<0.04, 95% CI, 1.1-4.4), respectively. Moreover, patients with splicing factor mutations alone had a better overall survival than those with epigenetic modifier mutations, or cell signaling/transcription regulator mutations with and without coexisting mutations of splicing factor genes, with worsening prognosis (P<0.001). These findings suggest that splicing factor mutations are maintained throughout disease

  8. FUBP1: a new protagonist in splicing regulation of the DMD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miro, Julie; Laaref, Abdelhamid Mahdi; Rofidal, Valérie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Hem, Sonia; Thorel, Delphine; Méchin, Déborah; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2015-02-27

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms for in-frame skipping of DMD exon 39 caused by the nonsense c.5480T>A mutation in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. RNase-assisted pull down assay coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that the mutant RNA probe specifically recruits hnRNPA1, hnRNPA2/B1 and DAZAP1. Functional studies in a human myoblast cell line transfected with DMD minigenes confirmed the splicing inhibitory activity of hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1, and showed that DAZAP1, also known to activate splicing, acts negatively in the context of the mutated exon 39. Furthermore, we uncovered that recognition of endogenous DMD exon 39 in muscle cells is promoted by FUSE binding protein 1 (FUBP1), a multifunctional DNA- and RNA-binding protein whose role in splicing is largely unknown. By serial deletion and mutagenesis studies in minigenes, we delineated a functional intronic splicing enhancer (ISE) in intron 38. FUBP1 recruitment to the RNA sequence containing the ISE was established by RNA pull down and RNA EMSA, and further confirmed by RNA-ChIP on endogenous DMD pre-mRNA. This study provides new insights about the splicing regulation of DMD exon 39, highlighting the emerging role of FUBP1 in splicing and describing the first ISE for constitutive exon inclusion in the mature DMD transcript. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Kinetin improves IKBKAP mRNA splicing in patients with familial dysautonomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B.; Liebes, Leonard; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle; Mendoza, Sandra; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction in I-κ-B kinase complex associated protein/ elongation protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1) expression. Kinetin (6-furfurylaminopurine) has been shown to improve splicing and increase wild-type IKBKAP mRNA and IKAP protein expression in FD cell lines and carriers. To determine if oral kinetin treatment could alter mRNA splicing in FD subjects and was tolerable, we administered kinetin to eight FD individuals homozygous for the splice mutation. Subjects received 23.5 mg/Kg/day for 28 days. An increase in wild-type IKBKAP mRNA expression in leukocytes was noted after eight days in six of eight individuals; after 28 days the mean increase as compared to baseline was significant (p=0.002). We have demonstrated that kinetin is tolerable in this medically fragile population. Not only did kinetin produce the desired effect on splicing in FD patients, but also that effect appears to improve with time despite lack of dose change. This is the first report of a drug that produces in vivo mRNA splicing changes in individuals with FD and supports future long-term trials to determine if kinetin will prove therapeutic in FD patients. PMID:21775922

  10. DNA polymerases eta and theta function in the same genetic pathway to generate mutations at A/T during somatic hypermutation of Ig genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Keiji; Ouchida, Rika; Hikida, Masaki; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Yokoi, Masayuki; Masutani, Chikahide; Seki, Mineaki; Wood, Richard D; Hanaoka, Fumio; O-Wang, Jiyang

    2007-06-15

    Somatic hypermutation of the Ig genes requires the activity of multiple DNA polymerases to ultimately introduce mutations at both A/T and C/G base pairs. Mice deficient for DNA polymerase eta (POLH) exhibited an approximately 80% reduction of the mutations at A/T, whereas absence of polymerase (POLQ) resulted in approximately 20% reduction of both A/T and C/G mutations. To investigate whether the residual A/T mutations observed in the absence of POLH are generated by POLQ and how these two polymerases might cooperate or compete with each other to generate A/T mutations, here we have established mice deficient for both POLH and POLQ. Polq(-/-)Polh(-/-) mice, however, did not show a further decrease of A/T mutations as compared with Polh(-/-) mice, suggesting that POLH and POLQ function in the same genetic pathway in the generation of these mutations. Frequent misincorporation of nucleotides, in particular opposite template T, is a known feature of POLH, but the efficiency of extension beyond the misincorporation differs significantly depending on the nature of the mispairing. Remarkably, we found that POLQ catalyzed extension more efficiently than POLH from all types of mispaired termini opposite A or T. Moreover, POLQ was able to extend mispaired termini generated by POLH albeit at a relatively low efficiency. These results reveal genetic and biochemical interactions between POLH and POLQ and suggest that POLQ might cooperate with POLH to generate some of the A/T mutations during the somatic hypermutation of Ig genes.

  11. Stabilized cyclopropane analogs of the splicing inhibitor FD-895.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Reymundo; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Kumar, Deepak; Kipps, Thomas J; Castro, Januario E; La Clair, James J; Burkart, Michael D

    2013-09-12

    Targeting the spliceosome with small molecule inhibitors provides a new avenue to target cancer by intercepting alternate splicing pathways. Although our understanding of alternate mRNA splicing remains poorly understood, it provides an escape pathway for many cancers resistant to current therapeutics. These findings have encouraged recent academic and industrial efforts to develop natural product spliceosome inhibitors, including FD-895 (1a), pladienolide B (1b), and pladienolide D (1c), into next-generation anticancer drugs. The present study describes the application of semisynthesis and total synthesis to reveal key structure-activity relationships for the spliceosome inhibition by 1a. This information is applied to deliver new analogs with improved stability and potent activity at inhibiting splicing in patient derived cell lines.

  12. 0-6652 : spliced Texas girder bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Spliced girder technology continues to attract : attention due to its versatility over traditional : prestressed concrete highway bridge construction. : By joining multiple precast concrete girders using : post-tensioning, spliced girder technology :...

  13. Muscle 3243A-->G mutation load and capacity of the mitochondrial energy-generating system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.M.; Schuelke, M.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Trijbels, F.J.M.; Sengers, R.C.A.; Lucke, B.; Wintjes, L.T.M.; Morava, E.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Smits, B.W.; Hol, F.A.; Siers, M.H.; Ter Laak, H.; van der Knaap, M.S.; van Spronsen, F.J.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; van den Heuvel, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) encompasses the mitochondrial enzymatic reactions from oxidation of pyruvate to the export of adenosine triphosphate. It is investigated in intact muscle mitochondria by measuring the pyruvate oxidation and adenosine triphosphate

  14. Frequency of ABL gene mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant to imatinib and results of treatment switch to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, Silvia; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Xicoy, Blanca; Boqué, Concha; Fernández, Cristalina; Grau, Javier; Navarro, José-Tomás; Fernández de Sevilla, Alberto; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Feliu, Evarist; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-08-04

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients do not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Treatment with second-generation TKI has produced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in mutated ABL patients. The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of ABL mutations in patients who were resistant to imatinib or had lost the response, and to analyze the effect of second-generation TKI on their outcome. The presence of ABL mutations in 45 CML patients resistant to imatinib was evaluated by direct sequencing and was correlated with the results of the cytogenetic study (performed in 39 cases). The outcome of these patients after therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib was analyzed. ABL mutations were detected in 14 out of 45 resistant patients. Patients with clonal cytogenetic evolution tended to develop mutations more frequently than those without clonal evolution. Nine out of the 15 patients with ABL mutation responded to a treatment switch to nilotinib (n=4), dasatinib (n=2), interferon (n=1) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n=2). The frequency of ABL mutations in CML patients resistant to imatinib is high and is more frequent among those with clonal cytogenetic evolution. The change to second-generation TKI can overcome imatinib resistance in most of the mutated patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of genome-wide non-canonical spliced regions and analysis of biological functions for spliced sequences using Read-Split-Fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yongsheng; Kinne, Jeff; Ding, Lizhong; Rath, Ethan C; Cox, Aaron; Naidu, Siva Dharman

    2017-10-03

    It is generally thought that most canonical or non-canonical splicing events involving U2- and U12 spliceosomes occur within nuclear pre-mRNAs. However, the question of whether at least some U12-type splicing occurs in the cytoplasm is still unclear. In recent years next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field. The "Read-Split-Walk" (RSW) and "Read-Split-Run" (RSR) methods were developed to identify genome-wide non-canonical spliced regions including special events occurring in cytoplasm. As the significant amount of genome/transcriptome data such as, Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, have been generated, we have advanced a newer more memory-efficient version of the algorithm, "Read-Split-Fly" (RSF), which can detect non-canonical spliced regions with higher sensitivity and improved speed. The RSF algorithm also outputs the spliced sequences for further downstream biological function analysis. We used open access ENCODE project RNA-Seq data to search spliced intron sequences against the U12-type spliced intron sequence database to examine whether some events could occur as potential signatures of U12-type splicing. The check was performed by searching spliced sequences against 5'ss and 3'ss sequences from the well-known orthologous U12-type spliceosomal intron database U12DB. Preliminary results of searching 70 ENCODE samples indicated that the presence of 5'ss with U12-type signature is more frequent than U2-type and prevalent in non-canonical junctions reported by RSF. The selected spliced sequences have also been further studied using miRBase to elucidate their functionality. Preliminary results from 70 samples of ENCODE datasets show that several miRNAs are prevalent in studied ENCODE samples. Two of these are associated with many diseases as suggested in the literature. Specifically, hsa-miR-1273 and hsa-miR-548 are associated with many diseases and cancers. Our RSF pipeline is able to detect many possible junctions

  16. Screening for germline mutations in mismatch repair genes in patients with Lynch syndrome by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Barbara Luísa; Brant, Ayslan Castro; Gomes, Renan; Pastor, Tatiane; Schneider, Naye Balzan; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea; de Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Achatz, Maria Isabel W; Ashton-Prolla, Patrícia; Moreira, Miguel Angelo Martins

    2017-09-20

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, with high penetrance that affects approximately 3% of the cases of colorectal cancer. Affected individuals inherit germline mutations in genes responsible for DNA mismatch repair, mainly at MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2. The molecular screening of these individuals is frequently costly and time consuming due to the large size of these genes. In addition, PMS2 mutation detection is often a challenge because there are 16 different pseudogenes identified until now. In the present work we evaluate a molecular screening strategy based in next generation sequencing (NGS) in order to optimize the mutation detection in LS patients. We established 16 multiplex PCRs for MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 and 5 Long-Range PCRs for PMS2, coupled with NGS. The strategy was validated by screening 66 patients who filled Bethesda and Amsterdam criteria for LS from health institutions of Brazil. The mean depth of coverage for MSH2, MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2 genes was 7.988, 36.313, 11.899 and 4.772 times, respectively. Ninety-four variants were found in exons and flanking intron/exon regions for the four MMR genes. Twenty-five were pathogenic or VUS and found in 32 patients (7 in MSH2, 5 in MSH6, 12 in MLH1 e 1 in PMS2). All variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The strategy was efficient to reduce time consuming and costs to identify genetic changes at these MMR genes, reducing in three times the number of PCR reactions performed per patient and was efficient in identifying variants at PMS2 gene.

  17. Splice-correction strategies for treatment of X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestas, Burcu; Turunen, Janne J; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Wang, Qing; Månsson, Robert; El Andaloussi, Samir; Berglöf, Anna; Smith, C I Edvard

    2015-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the gene coding for Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Deficiency of BTK leads to a developmental block in B cell differentiation; hence, the patients essentially lack antibody-producing plasma cells and are susceptible to various infections. A substantial portion of the mutations in BTK results in splicing defects, consequently preventing the formation of protein-coding mRNA. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are therapeutic compounds that have the ability to modulate pre-mRNA splicing and alter gene expression. The potential of ASOs has been exploited for a few severe diseases, both in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Recently, advances have also been made in using ASOs as a personalized therapy for XLA. Splice-correction of BTK has been shown to be feasible for different mutations in vitro, and a recent proof-of-concept study demonstrated the feasibility of correcting splicing and restoring BTK both ex vivo and in vivo in a humanized bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-transgenic mouse model. This review summarizes the advances in splice correction, as a personalized medicine for XLA, and outlines the promises and challenges of using this technology as a curative long-term treatment option.

  18. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a patient with hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia 2A (MEN2A syndrome with RET mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hadoux

    2016-07-01

    Currently, there is no satisfactory animal model recapitulating all the features of the disease especially at the level of stem cells. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a patient with RET mutation at codon 634 who developed pheochromocytoma and MTC. RETC634Y-mutated cells were reprogrammed by non-integrative viral transduction. These iPSCs had normal karyotype, harboured the RETC634Y mutation and expressed pluripotency hallmarks as well as RET. A comprehensive pathological assessment of teratoma was performed after injection in immunodeficient mice.

  19. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousparou Christina A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. Methods The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21. This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model with differing p21 or p53 status. Results Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Conclusions Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology.

  20. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousparou, Christina A; Yiacoumi, Efthymia; Deonarain, Mahendra P; Epenetos, Agamemnon A

    2012-01-01

    A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp) and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21). This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model) with differing p21 or p53 status. Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology

  1. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from an atrial fibrillation patient carrying a PITX2 p.M200V mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora, Cristina; Serzanti, Marialaura; Giacomelli, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    the molecular mechanisms underlying AF, we reprogrammed to pluripotency polymorphonucleated leukocytes isolated from the blood of a patient carrying a PITX2 p.M200V mutation, using a commercially available non-integrating expression system. The generated iPSCs expressed pluripotency markers and differentiated...... toward cells belonging to the three embryonic germ layers. Moreover, the cells showed a normal karyotype and retained the PITX2 p.M200V mutation....

  2. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from an atrial fibrillation patient carrying a KCNA5 p.D322H mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora, Cristina; Serzanti, Marialaura; Giacomelli, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    . To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying AF, we reprogrammed to pluripotency polymorphonucleated leukocytes isolated from the blood of a patient carrying a KCNA5 p.D322H mutation, using a commercially available non-integrating system. The generated iPSCs expressed pluripotency markers...... and differentiated toward cells belonging to the three embryonic germ layers. Moreover, the cells showed a normal karyotype and retained the p.D322H mutation....

  3. Next Generation Education for Prevention: Defining Educational Needs, Attitudes, Concerns, Life Plans of 18 to 24 Year Old Daughters of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Pap smears . Another daughter thought being a mutation carrier raised one’s risk for all types of cancer . One daughter was surprised to learn that she...detection of ovarian cancer : a. ultrasound d. pelvic examination b. pap smear e. Don’t know c. CA-125 blood test 68 Directions...testing only for people with cancer . ®Mutation can skip generation. ®Separate genes control breast, ovarian risk. ® Cervical cancer related to BRCA 1 I

  4. Generation of a gene-corrected isogenic control cell line from an Alzheimer's disease patient iPSC line carrying a A79V mutation in PSEN1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pires, Carlota; Schmid, Benjamin; Petræus, Carina

    2016-01-01

    mutation in PSEN1 as an in vitro disease model. Here we generated a gene-corrected version from this hiPSC line by substituting the point mutation with the wild-type sequence. The reported A79V-GC-iPSCs line is a very useful resource in combination with the A79V-iPSC line in order to study pathological...

  5. Alternative Splicing of the Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Receptor PAC1: Mechanisms of Fine Tuning of Brain Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna eBlechman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA encoding for the neuropeptide receptor PAC1/ADCYAP1R1 generates multiple protein products that exhibit pleiotropic activities. Recent studies in mammals and zebrafish have implicated some of these splice isoforms in control of both cellular and body homeostasis. Here, we review the regulation of PAC1 splice variants and their underlying signal transduction and physiological processes in the nervous system.

  6. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L.D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation

  7. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  8. Biochemical and computational analyses of two phenotypically related GALT mutations (S222N and S135L that lead to atypical galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Cocanougher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene [1,2]. We encountered a patient heterozygous for a known pathogenic H132Q mutation and a novel S222N variant of unknown significance [3]. Reminiscent of patients with the S135L mutation, our patient had loss of GALT enzyme activity in erythrocytes but a very mild clinical phenotype [3–8]. We performed splicing experiments and computational structural analyses to investigate the role of the novel S222N variant. Alamut software data predicted loss of splicing enhancers for the S222N and S135L mutations [9,10]. A cDNA library was generated from our patient׳s RNA to investigate for splicing errors, but no change in transcript length was seen [3]. In silico structural analysis was performed to investigate enzyme stability and attempt to understand the mechanism of the atypical galactosemia phenotype. Stability results are publicly available in the GALT Protein Database 2.0 [11–14]. Animations were created to give the reader a dynamic view of the enzyme structure and mutation locations. Protein database files and python scripts are included for further investigation.

  9. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2015-12-22

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system.

  10. Genetic variations and alternative splicing. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eZaphiropoulos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a post-transcriptional regulatory process that is attaining stronger recognition as a modulator of gene expression. Alternative splicing occurs when the primary RNA transcript is differentially processed into more than one mature RNAs. This is the result of a variable definition/inclusion of the exons, the sequences that are excised from the primary RNA to form the mature RNAs. Consequently, RNA expression can generate a collection of differentially spliced RNAs, which may distinctly influence subsequent biological events, such as protein synthesis or other biomolecular interactions. Still the mechanisms that control exon definition and exon inclusion are not fully clarified. This mini-review highlights advances in this field as well as the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in affecting splicing decisions. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1, is taken as an example in addressing the role of nucleotide substitutions for splicing regulation.

  11. Efficient CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Generation of Knockin Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Lacking Undesired Mutations at the Targeted Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T. Merkle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR-Cas9 system has the potential to revolutionize genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, but its advantages and pitfalls are still poorly understood. We systematically tested the ability of CRISPR-Cas9 to mediate reporter gene knockin at 16 distinct genomic sites in hPSCs. We observed efficient gene targeting but found that targeted clones carried an unexpectedly high frequency of insertion and deletion (indel mutations at both alleles of the targeted gene. These indels were induced by Cas9 nuclease, as well as Cas9-D10A single or dual nickases, and often disrupted gene function. To overcome this problem, we designed strategies to physically destroy or separate CRISPR target sites at the targeted allele and developed a bioinformatic pipeline to identify and eliminate clones harboring deleterious indels at the other allele. This two-pronged approach enables the reliable generation of knockin hPSC reporter cell lines free of unwanted mutations at the targeted locus.

  12. Next generation sequencing identifies mutations in Atonal homolog 7 (ATOH7) in families with global eye developmental defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kamron; Logan, Clare V.; McKibbin, Martin; Sheridan, Eamonn; Elçioglu, Nursel H.; Yenice, Ozlem; Parry, David A.; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Abdelhamed, Zakia I.A.; Al-Maskari, Ahmed; Poulter, James A.; Mohamed, Moin D.; Carr, Ian M.; Morgan, Joanne E.; Jafri, Hussain; Raashid, Yasmin; Taylor, Graham R.; Johnson, Colin A.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Toomes, Carmel; Ali, Manir

    2012-01-01

    The atonal homolog 7 (ATOH7) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in determining the fate of retinal progenitor cells and is particularly required for optic nerve and ganglion cell development. Using a combination of autozygosity mapping and next generation sequencing, we have identified homozygous mutations in this gene, p.E49V and p.P18RfsX69, in two consanguineous families diagnosed with multiple ocular developmental defects, including severe vitreoretinal dysplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia, persistent fetal vasculature, microphthalmia, congenital cataracts, microcornea, corneal opacity and nystagmus. Most of these clinical features overlap with defects in the Norrin/β-catenin signalling pathway that is characterized by dysgenesis of the retinal and hyaloid vasculature. Our findings document Mendelian mutations within ATOH7 and imply a role for this molecule in the development of structures at the front as well as the back of the eye. This work also provides further insights into the function of ATOH7, especially its importance in retinal vascular development and hyaloid regression. PMID:22068589

  13. A Single Active Site Mutation in the Pikromycin Thioesterase Generates a More Effective Macrocyclization Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Aaron A; Hansen, Douglas A; Shende, Vikram V; Furan, Lawrence R; Houk, K N; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Sherman, David H

    2017-09-27

    Macrolactonization of natural product analogs presents a significant challenge to both biosynthetic assembly and synthetic chemistry. In the preceding paper , we identified a thioesterase (TE) domain catalytic bottleneck processing unnatural substrates in the pikromycin (Pik) system, preventing the formation of epimerized macrolactones. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations showing the epimerized hexaketide was accommodated within the Pik TE active site; however, intrinsic conformational preferences of the substrate resulted in predominately unproductive conformations, in agreement with the observed hydrolysis. Accordingly, we engineered the stereoselective Pik TE to yield a variant (TE S148C ) with improved reaction kinetics and gain-of-function processing of an unnatural, epimerized hexaketide. Quantum mechanical comparison of model TE S148C and TE WT reaction coordinate diagrams revealed a change in mechanism from a stepwise addition-elimination (TE WT ) to a lower energy concerted acyl substitution (TE S148C ), accounting for the gain-of-function and improved reaction kinetics. Finally, we introduced the S148C mutation into a polyketide synthase module (PikAIII-TE) to impart increased substrate flexibility, enabling the production of diastereomeric macrolactones.

  14. Generation of novel resistance genes using mutation and targeted gene editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical breeding for virus resistance is a lengthy process and is restricted by the availability of resistance genes. Precise genome editing is a "dream technology" to improve plants for virus resistance and these tools have opened new and very promising ways to generate virus resistant plants by ...

  15. A System To Generate Chromosomal Mutations in Lactococcus lactis Which Allows Fast Analysis of Targeted Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Jean; Buist, Girbe; Haandrikman, Alfred; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus; Leenhouts, Kees

    1995-01-01

    A system for generating chromosomal insertions in lactococci is described. It is based on the conditional replication of lactococcal pWV01-derived Ori+ RepA- vector pORI19, containing lacZα and the multiple cloning site of pUC19. Chromosomal AluI fragments of Lactococcus lactis were cloned in pORI19

  16. Functional diversity of human protein kinase splice variants marks significant expansion of human kinome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Krishanpal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases are involved in diverse spectrum of cellular processes. Availability of draft version of the human genomic data in the year 2001 enabled recognition of repertoire of protein kinases. However, over the years the human genomic data is being refined and the current release of human genomic data has helped us to recognize a larger repertoire of over 900 human protein kinases represented mainly by splice variants. Results Many of these identified protein kinases are alternatively spliced products. Interestingly, some of the human kinase splice variants appear to be significantly diverged in terms of their functional properties as represented by incorporation or absence of one or more domains. Many sets of protein kinase splice variants have substantially different domain organization and in a few sets of splice variants kinase domains belong to different subfamilies of kinases suggesting potential participation in different signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Addition or deletion of a domain between splice variants of multi-domain kinases appears to be a means of generating differences in the functional features of otherwise similar kinases. It is intriguing that marked sequence diversity within the catalytic regions of some of the splice variant kinases result in kinases belonging to different subfamilies. These human kinase splice variants with different functions might contribute to diversity of eukaryotic cellular signaling.

  17. Novel de novo BRCA2 mutation in a patient with a family history of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Jønson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Mutations are widespread and unclassified splice variants are frequently encountered. We describe the parental origin and functional characterization of a novel de novo BRCA2 splice site mutation found in a patient...... exhibiting a ductal carcinoma at the age of 40. METHODS: Variations were identified by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The effect of the mutation on splicing was examined by exon trapping in COS-7 cells and by RT-PCR on RNA isolated from...... leucocytes and carcinoma tissue. RESULTS: A novel BRCA2 variant in the splice donor site of exon 21 (nucleotide 8982+1 G-->A/c.8754+1 G-->A) was identified. Exon trapping showed that the mutation activates a cryptic splice site 46 base pairs 3' of exon 21, resulting in the inclusion of a premature stop codon...

  18. The creation and selection of mutations resistant to a gene drive over multiple generations in the malaria mosquito.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Hammond

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene drives have enormous potential for the control of insect populations of medical and agricultural relevance. By preferentially biasing their own inheritance, gene drives can rapidly introduce genetic traits even if these confer a negative fitness effect on the population. We have recently developed gene drives based on CRISPR nuclease constructs that are designed to disrupt key genes essential for female fertility in the malaria mosquito. The construct copies itself and the associated genetic disruption from one homologous chromosome to another during gamete formation, a process called homing that ensures the majority of offspring inherit the drive. Such drives have the potential to cause long-lasting, sustainable population suppression, though they are also expected to impose a large selection pressure for resistance in the mosquito. One of these population suppression gene drives showed rapid invasion of a caged population over 4 generations, establishing proof of principle for this technology. In order to assess the potential for the emergence of resistance to the gene drive in this population we allowed it to run for 25 generations and monitored the frequency of the gene drive over time. Following the initial increase of the gene drive we observed a gradual decrease in its frequency that was accompanied by the spread of small, nuclease-induced mutations at the target gene that are resistant to further cleavage and restore its functionality. Such mutations showed rates of increase consistent with positive selection in the face of the gene drive. Our findings represent the first documented example of selection for resistance to a synthetic gene drive and lead to important design recommendations and considerations in order to mitigate for resistance in future gene drive applications.

  19. Sequence Analysis of In Vivo-Expressed HIV-1 Spliced RNAs Reveals the Usage of New and Unusual Splice Sites by Viruses of Different Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; de la Barrera, Jorge; Carrera, Cristina; Zaballos, Ángel; Cuesta, Isabel; Mariño, Ana; Ocampo, Antonio; Miralles, Celia; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Álvarez, Hortensia; López-Miragaya, Isabel; García-Bodas, Elena; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; Thomson, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 RNAs are generated through a complex splicing mechanism, resulting in a great diversity of transcripts, which are classified in three major categories: unspliced, singly spliced (SS), and doubly spliced (DS). Knowledge on HIV-1 RNA splicing in vivo and by non-subtype B viruses is scarce. Here we analyze HIV-1 RNA splice site usage in CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals through pyrosequencing. HIV-1 DS and SS RNAs were amplified by RT-PCR in 19 and 12 samples, respectively. 13,108 sequences from HIV-1 spliced RNAs, derived from viruses of five subtypes (A, B, C, F, G), were identified. In four samples, three of non-B subtypes, five 3' splice sites (3'ss) mapping to unreported positions in the HIV-1 genome were identified. Two, designated A4i and A4j, were used in 22% and 25% of rev RNAs in two viruses of subtypes B and A, respectively. Given their close proximity (one or two nucleotides) to A4c and A4d, respectively, they could be viewed as variants of these sites. Three 3'ss, designated A7g, A7h, and A7i, located 20, 32, and 18 nucleotides downstream of A7, respectively, were identified in a subtype C (A7g, A7h) and a subtype G (A7i) viruses, each in around 2% of nef RNAs. The new splice sites or variants of splice sites were associated with the usual sequence features of 3'ss. Usage of unusual 3'ss A4d, A4e, A5a, A7a, and A7b was also detected. A4f, previously identified in two subtype C viruses, was preferentially used by rev RNAs of a subtype C virus. These results highlight the great diversity of in vivo splice site usage by HIV-1 RNAs. The fact that four of five newly identified splice sites or variants of splice sites were detected in non-subtype B viruses allows anticipating an even greater diversity of HIV-1 splice site usage than currently known.

  20. Mutational Profiling of Therapy-related Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia by Next Generation Sequencing, a Comparison with de novo Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Chi Young; Patel, Keyur P.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Routbort, Mark J.; Fu, Bin; Tang, Guilin; Goswami, Maitrayee; Singh, Rajesh; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Pierce, Sherry A.; Young, Ken H.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Wang, Sa A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we used a next generation sequencing-based approach to profile gene mutations in therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes (t-MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML); and compared these findings with de novo MDS/AML. Consecutive bone marrow samples of 498 patients, including 70 therapy-related (28 MDS and 42 AML) and 428 de novo (147 MDS and 281 AML) were analyzed using a modified-TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel (Illumina) covering mutation hotspots of 53 genes. Overall, mutation(s) were detected in 58.6% of t-MDS/AML and 56.8% of de novo MDS/AML. Of therapy-related cases, mutations were detected in 71.4% of t-AML versus 39.3% t-MDS (p=0.0127). TP53 was the most common mutated gene in t-MDS (35.7%) as well as t-AML (33.3%), significantly higher than de novo MDS (17.7%) (p=0.0410) and de novo AML (12.8%) (p=0.0020). t-AML showed more frequent PTPN11 but less NPM1 and FLT3 mutations than de novo AML. In summary, t-MDS/AML shows a mutation profile different from their de novo counterparts. TP53 mutations are highly and similarly prevalent in t-MDS and t-AML but mutations in genes other than TP53 were more frequent in t-AML than t-MDS. The molecular genetic profiling further expands our understanding in this group of clinically aggressive yet heterogeneous myeloid neoplasms. PMID:25573287

  1. Transposon mutagenesis in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae using a novel mariner-based system for generating random mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglennon, Gareth A; Cook, Beth S; Deeney, Alannah S; Bossé, Janine T; Peters, Sarah E; Langford, Paul R; Maskell, Duncan J; Tucker, Alexander W; Wren, Brendan W; Rycroft, Andrew N

    2013-12-21

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the cause of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, a chronic respiratory disease associated with significant economic losses to swine producers worldwide. The molecular pathogenesis of infection is poorly understood due to the lack of genetic tools to allow manipulation of the organism and more generally for the Mycoplasma genus. The objective of this study was to develop a system for generating random transposon insertion mutants in M. hyopneumoniae that could prove a powerful tool in enabling the pathogenesis of infection to be unraveled. A novel delivery vector was constructed containing a hyperactive C9 mutant of the Himar1 transposase along with a mini transposon containing the tetracycline resistance cassette, tetM. M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 was electroporated with the construct and tetM-expressing transformants selected on agar containing tetracycline. Individual transformants contained single transposon insertions that were stable upon serial passages in broth medium. The insertion sites of 44 individual transformants were determined and confirmed disruption of several M. hyopneumoniae genes. A large pool of over 10 000 mutants was generated that should allow saturation of the M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 genome. This is the first time that transposon mutagenesis has been demonstrated in this important pathogen and could be generally applied for other Mycoplasma species that are intractable to genetic manipulation. The ability to generate random mutant libraries is a powerful tool in the further study of the pathogenesis of this important swine pathogen.

  2. Modeling the ferrochelatase c.315-48C modifier mutation for erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Barman-Aksözen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP is caused by deficiency of ferrochelatase (FECH, which incorporates iron into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX to form heme. Excitation of accumulated PPIX by light generates oxygen radicals that evoke excessive pain and, after longer light exposure, cause ulcerations in exposed skin areas of individuals with EPP. Moreover, ∼5% of the patients develop a liver dysfunction as a result of PPIX accumulation. Most patients (∼97% have a severe FECH mutation (Mut in trans to an intronic polymorphism (c.315-48C, which reduces ferrochelatase synthesis by stimulating the use of an aberrant 3′ splice site 63 nt upstream of the normal site for exon 4. In contrast, with the predominant c.315-48T allele, the correct splice site is mostly used, and individuals with a T/Mut genotype do not develop EPP symptoms. Thus, the C allele is a potential target for therapeutic approaches that modify this splicing decision. To provide a model for pre-clinical studies of such approaches, we engineered a mouse containing a partly humanized Fech gene with the c.315-48C polymorphism. F1 hybrids obtained by crossing these mice with another inbred line carrying a severe Fech mutation (named m1Pas show a very strong EPP phenotype that includes elevated PPIX in the blood, enlargement of liver and spleen, anemia, as well as strong pain reactions and skin lesions after a short period of light exposure. In addition to the expected use of the aberrant splice site, the mice also show a strong skipping of the partly humanized exon 3. This will limit the use of this model for certain applications and illustrates that engineering of a hybrid gene may have unforeseeable consequences on its splicing.

  3. Titin Diversity—Alternative Splicing Gone Wild

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin is an extremely large protein found in highest concentrations in heart and skeletal muscle. The single mammalian gene is expressed in multiple isoforms as a result of alternative splicing. Although titin isoform expression is controlled developmentally and in a tissue specific manner, the vast number of potential splicing pathways far exceeds those described in any other alternatively spliced gene. Over 1 million human splice pathways for a single individual can be potentially derived from the PEVK region alone. A new splicing pattern for the human cardiac N2BA isoform type has been found in which the PEVK region includes only the N2B type exons. The alterations in splicing and titin isoform expression in human heart disease provide impetus for future detailed study of the splicing mechanisms for this giant protein.

  4. An intronic ABCA3 mutation that is responsible for respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Hamvas, Aaron; Cole, F Sessions; Wambach, Jennifer A; Wegner, Daniel; Coghill, Carl; Harrison, Keith; Nogee, Lawrence M

    2012-06-01

    Member A3 of the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters (ABCA3) is essential for surfactant metabolism. Nonsense, missense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations in the ABCA3 gene (ABCA3) have been reported as causes of neonatal respiratory failure (NRF) and interstitial lung disease. We tested the hypothesis that mutations in noncoding regions of ABCA3 may cause lung disease. ABCA3-specific cDNA was generated and sequenced from frozen lung tissue from a child with fatal lung disease with only one identified ABCA3 mutation. ABCA3 was sequenced from genomic DNA prepared from blood samples obtained from the proband, parents, and other children with NRF. ABCA3 cDNA from the proband contained sequences derived from intron 25 that would be predicted to alter the structure and function of the ABCA3 protein. Genomic DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous C>T transition in intron 25 trans to the known mutation, creating a new donor splice site. Seven additional infants with an ABCA3-deficient phenotype and inconclusive genetic findings had this same variant, which was not found in 2,132 control chromosomes. These findings support that this variant is a disease-causing mutation that may account for additional cases of ABCA3 deficiency with negative genetic studies.

  5. A novel NHS mutation causes Nance-Horan Syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qi; Li, Yunping; Kousar, Rizwana; Guo, Hui; Peng, Fenglan; Zheng, Yu; Yang, Xiaohua; Long, Zhigao; Tian, Runyi; Xia, Kun; Lin, Haiying; Pan, Qian

    2017-01-07

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) (OMIM: 302350) is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, with occasional dental anomalies, characteristic dysmorphic features, brachymetacarpia and mental retardation. Carrier females exhibit similar manifestations that are less severe than in affected males. Here, we report a four-generation Chinese family with multiple affected individuals presenting Nance-Horan Syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing combined with RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing was used to search for a genetic cause underlying the disease phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing identified in all affected individuals of the family a novel donor splicing site mutation (NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A) in intron 4 of the gene NHS, which maps to chromosome Xp22.13. The identified mutation results in an RNA processing defect causing a 416-nucleotide addition to exon 4 of the mRNA transcript, likely producing a truncated NHS protein. The donor splicing site mutation NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A of the NHS gene is the causative mutation in this Nance-Horan Syndrome family. This research broadens the spectrum of NHS gene mutations, contributing to our understanding of the molecular genetics of NHS.

  6. New ataxic tottering-6j mouse allele containing a Cacna1a gene mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Li

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca(2+ (Ca(v channels control neuronal functions including neurotransmitter release and gene expression. The Cacna1a gene encodes the α1 subunit of the pore-forming Ca(v2.1 channel. Mice with mutations in this gene form useful tools for defining channel functions. The recessive ataxic tottering-6j strain that was generated in the Neuroscience Mutagenesis Facility at The Jackson Laboratory has a mutation in the Cacna1a gene. However, the effect of this mutation has not been investigated in detail. In this study, mutation analysis shows a base substitution (C-to-A in the consensus splice acceptor sequence linked to exon 5, which results in the skipping of exon 5 and the splicing of exon 4 directly to exon 6. The effect of this mutation is expected to be severe as the expressed α1 subunit protein lacks a significant part of the S4-S5 linker, S5, and part of S5-S6 linker in domain I. Tottering-6j mice display motor dysfunctions in the footprint, rotating rod, and hind-limb extension tests. Although cytoarchitecture of the mutant brains appears normal, tyrosine hydroxylase was persistently expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells in the adult mutant mice. These results indicate that tottering-6j is a useful model for functional studies of the Ca(v2.1 channel.

  7. HIV-1 splicing at the major splice donor site is restricted by RNA structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nancy; van Bel, Nikki; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2014-11-01

    The 5' leader region of the HIV-1 RNA contains the major 5' splice site (ss) that is used in the production of all spliced viral RNAs. This splice-donor (SD) region can fold a stem-loop structure. We demonstrate that whereas stabilization of this SD hairpin reduces splicing efficiency, destabilization increases splicing. Both stabilization and destabilization reduce viral fitness. These results demonstrate that the stability of the SD hairpin can modulate the level of splicing, most likely by controlling the accessibility of the 5'ss for the splicing machinery. The natural stability of the SD hairpin restricts splicing and this stability seems to be fine-tuned to reach the optimal balance between unspliced and spliced RNAs for efficient virus replication. The 5'ss region of different HIV-1 isolates and the related SIVmac239 can fold a similar structure. This evolutionary conservation supports the importance of this structure in viral replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 454 next generation-sequencing outperforms allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and pyrosequencing for routine KRAS mutation analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altimari A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Annalisa Altimari,1,* Dario de Biase,2,* Giovanna De Maglio,3 Elisa Gruppioni,1 Elisa Capizzi,1 Alessio Degiovanni,1 Antonia D'Errico,1 Annalisa Pession,2 Stefano Pizzolitto,3 Michelangelo Fiorentino,1,# Giovanni Tallini2,#1Laboratory of Molecular Oncologic and Transplantation Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, 2Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Anatomic Pathology, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, 3Department of Pathology, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Udine, Italy*These authors contributed equally to this work #These authors share senior authorshipAbstract: Detection of KRAS mutations in archival pathology samples is critical for therapeutic appropriateness of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer. We compared the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Sanger sequencing, ARMS-Scorpion (TheraScreen® real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, pyrosequencing, chip array hybridization, and 454 next-generation sequencing to assess KRAS codon 12 and 13 mutations in 60 nonconsecutive selected cases of colorectal cancer. Twenty of the 60 cases were detected as wild-type KRAS by all methods with 100% specificity. Among the 40 mutated cases, 13 were discrepant with at least one method. The sensitivity was 85%, 90%, 93%, and 92%, and the accuracy was 90%, 93%, 95%, and 95% for Sanger sequencing, TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization, respectively. The main limitation of Sanger sequencing was its low analytical sensitivity, whereas TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization showed higher sensitivity but suffered from the limitations of predesigned assays. Concordance between the methods was k = 0.79 for Sanger sequencing and k > 0.85 for the other techniques. Tumor cell enrichment correlated significantly with the abundance of KRAS-mutated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, evaluated as ΔCt for TheraScreen real-time PCR (P = 0.03, percentage of mutation for

  9. Interplay between exonic splicing enhancers, mRNA processing, and mRNA surveillance in the dystrophic Mdx mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Buvoli

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Pre-mRNA splicing, the removal of introns from RNA, takes place within the spliceosome, a macromolecular complex composed of five small nuclear RNAs and a large number of associated proteins. Spliceosome assembly is modulated by the 5' and 3' splice site consensus sequences situated at the ends of each intron, as well as by exonic and intronic splicing enhancers/silencers recognized by SR and hnRNP proteins. Nonsense mutations introducing a premature termination codon (PTC often result in the activation of cellular quality control systems that reduce mRNA levels or alter the mRNA splicing pattern. The mdx mouse, a commonly used genetic model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, lacks dystrophin by virtue of a premature termination codon (PTC in exon 23 that also severely reduces the level of dystrophin mRNA. However, the effect of the mutation on dystrophin RNA processing has not yet been described.Using combinations of different biochemical and cellular assays, we found that the mdx mutation partially disrupts a multisite exonic splicing enhancer (ESE that is recognized by a 40 kDa SR protein. In spite of the presence of an inefficient intron 22 3' splice site containing the rare GAG triplet, the mdx mutation does not activate nonsense-associated altered splicing (NAS, but induces exclusively nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD. Functional binding sites for SR proteins were also identified in exon 22 and 24, and in vitro experiments show that SR proteins can mediate direct association between exon 22, 23, and 24.Our findings highlight the complex crosstalk between trans-acting factors, cis-elements and the RNA surveillance machinery occurring during dystrophin mRNA processing. Moreover, they suggest that dystrophin exon-exon interactions could play an important role in preventing mdx exon 23 skipping, as well as in facilitating the pairing of committed splice sites.

  10. Novel mutations in the transmembrane natriuretic peptide receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is an autosomal recessive disorder due to mutation in NPR2 gene which impairs skeletal growth. To screen the mutations in the gene NPR2, all of its coding exons and splice junction sites were PCR amplified from genomic DNA of affected individuals of four families and sequenced. Four homozygous mutations in four ...

  11. Neomycin B inhibits splicing of the td intron indirectly by interfering with translation and enhances missplicing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldsich, C; Semrad, K; Schroeder, R

    1998-12-01

    The aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin B inhibits translation in prokaryotes and interferes with RNA-protein interactions in HIV both in vivo and in vitro. Hitherto, inhibition of ribozyme catalysis has only been observed in vitro. We therefore monitored the activity of neomycin B and several other aminoglycoside antibiotics on splicing of the T4 phage thymidylate synthase (td) intron in vivo. All antibiotics tested inhibited splicing, even chloramphenicol, which does not inhibit splicing in vitro. Splicing of the td intron in vivo requires translation for proper folding of the pre-mRNA. In the absence of translation, two interactions between sequences in the upstream exon and the 5' and 3' splice sites trap the pre-mRNA in splicing-incompetent conformations. Their disruption by mutations rendered splicing less dependent on translation and also less sensitive to neomycin B. Intron splicing was affected by neither neomycin B nor gentamicin in Escherichia coli strains carrying antibiotic-resistance genes that modify the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, this demonstrates that in vivo splicing of td intron is not directly inhibited by aminoglycosides, but rather indirectly by their interference with translation. This was further confirmed by assaying splicing of the Tetrahymena group I intron, which is inserted in the E. coli 23 S rRNA and, thus, not translated. Furthermore, neomycin B, paromomycin, and streptomycin enhanced missplicing in antibiotic-sensitive strains. Missplicing is caused by an alternative structural element containing a cryptic 5' splice site, which serves as a substrate for the ribozyme. Our results demonstrate that aminoglycoside antibiotics display different effects on ribozymes in vivo and in vitro.

  12. Identification of minority resistance mutations in the HIV-1 integrase coding region using next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonager, Jannik; Larsson, Jonas T; Hussing, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current widely applied standard method to screen for HIV-1 genotypic resistance is based on Sanger population sequencing (Sseq), which does not allow for the identification of minority variants (MVs) below the limit of detection for the Sseq-method in patients receiving integrase...... strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTI). Next generation sequencing (NGS) has facilitated the detection of MVs at a much deeper level than Sseq. OBJECTIVES: Here, we compared Illumina MiSeq and Sseq approaches to evaluate the detection of MVs involved in resistance to the three commonly used INSTI......: raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (EVG) and dolutegravir (DTG). STUDY DESIGN: NGS and Sseq were used to analyze RT-PCR products of the HIV-1 integrase coding region from six patients and in serial samples from two patients. NGS sequences were assembled and analyzed using the low frequency variant detection...

  13. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain.

  14. Pms2 and uracil-DNA glycosylases act jointly in the mismatch repair pathway to generate Ig gene mutations at A-T base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli Zubani, Giulia; Zivojnovic, Marija; De Smet, Annie; Albagli-Curiel, Olivier; Huetz, François; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Storck, Sébastien

    2017-04-03

    During somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, uracils introduced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase are processed by uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways to generate mutations at G-C and A-T base pairs, respectively. Paradoxically, the MMR-nicking complex Pms2/Mlh1 is apparently dispensable for A-T mutagenesis. Thus, how detection of U:G mismatches is translated into the single-strand nick required for error-prone synthesis is an open question. One model proposed that UNG could cooperate with MMR by excising a second uracil in the vicinity of the U:G mismatch, but it failed to explain the low impact of UNG inactivation on A-T mutagenesis. In this study, we show that uracils generated in the G1 phase in B cells can generate equal proportions of A-T and G-C mutations, which suggests that UNG and MMR can operate within the same time frame during SHM. Furthermore, we show that Ung -/- Pms2 -/- mice display a 50% reduction in mutations at A-T base pairs and that most remaining mutations at A-T bases depend on two additional uracil glycosylases, thymine-DNA glycosylase and SMUG1. These results demonstrate that Pms2/Mlh1 and multiple uracil glycosylases act jointly, each one with a distinct strand bias, to enlarge the immunoglobulin gene mutation spectrum from G-C to A-T bases. © 2017 Girelli Zubani et al.

  15. Complex mutations & subpopulations of deletions at exon 19 of EGFR in NSCLC revealed by next generation sequencing: potential clinical implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marchetti

    Full Text Available Microdeletions at exon 19 are the most frequent genetic alterations affecting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and they are strongly associated with response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A series of 116 NSCLC DNA samples investigated by Sanger Sequencing (SS, including 106 samples carrying exon 19 EGFR deletions and 10 without deletions (control samples, were subjected to deep next generation sequencing (NGS. All samples with deletions at SS showed deletions with NGS. No deletions were seen in control cases. In 93 (88% cases, deletions detected by NGS were exactly corresponding to those identified by SS. In 13 cases (12% NGS resolved deletions not accurately characterized by SS. In 21 (20% cases the NGS showed presence of complex (double/multiple frameshift deletions producing a net in-frame change. In 5 of these cases the SS could not define the exact sequence of mutant alleles, in the other 16 cases the results obtained by SS were conventionally considered as deletions plus insertions. Different interpretative hypotheses for complex mutations are discussed. In 46 (43% tumors deep NGS showed, for the first time to our knowledge, subpopulations of DNA molecules carrying EGFR deletions different from the main one. Each of these subpopulations accounted for 0.1% to 17% of the genomic DNA in the different tumors investigated. Our findings suggest that a region in exon 19 is highly unstable in a large proportion of patients carrying EGFR deletions. As a corollary to this study, NGS data were compared with those obtained by immunohistochemistry using the 6B6 anti-mutant EGFR antibody. The immunoreaction was E746-A750del specific. In conclusion, NGS analysis of EGFR exon 19 in NSCLCs allowed us to formulate a new interpretative hypothesis for complex mutations and revealed the presence of subpopulations of deletions with potential pathogenetic and clinical impact.

  16. Clinical evaluation of integrated panel testing by next-generation sequencing for somatic mutations in neuroblastomas with MYCN unamplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanna; Jin, Yan; Yu, Jinpu; Wang, Jingfu; Qiu, Yanli; Duan, Xiaofeng; Ye, Yingnan; Cheng, Yanan; Dong, Li; Feng, Xiaolong; Wang, Daowei; Li, Zhongyuan; Tian, Xiangdong; Wang, Huijuan; Yan, Jie; Zhao, Qiang

    2017-07-25

    Neuroblastomas (NBs) exhibit heterogeneity and show clinically significant prognosis classified by genetic alterations. Among prognostic genes or genome factors, MYCN amplification (MNA) is the most established genomic marker of poor prognosis in patients with NB. However, the prognostic classification of more than 60% of patients without MNA has yet to be clarified. In this study, the application of target next-generation sequencing (NGS) was extended on the basis of a comprehensive panel of regions where copy number variations (CNVs) or point mutations occurred to improve the prognostic evaluation of these patients and obtain the sequence of 33 patients without MNA. A mean coverage depth of 887× was determined in the target regions in all of the samples, and the mapped read percentage was more than 99%. Somatic mutations in patients without MNA could be precisely defined on the basis of these findings, and 17 unique somatic aberrations, including 14 genes, were identified in 11 patients. Among these variations, most were CNVs with a number of 13. The 3-year event-free survival (EFS) of CNV(-) patients was 60.0% compared with the EFS (16.7%) of CNV(+) patients (P = 0.015, HR = 0.1344, 95%, CI = 0.027 to 0.678). CNVs were also associated with unfavorable histological characteristics (P = 0.003) and likely to occur in stage 4 (P = 0.041). These results might further indicate the role of CNVs in NB chemotherapy resistance (P = 0.059) and show CNVs as a therapeutic target. In multivariate analysis, the presence of CNVs was a clinically negative prognostic marker that impaired the outcome of patients without MNA and associated with poor prognosis in this tumor subset. Comprehensive genetic/genomic profiling instead of focusing on single genetic marker should be performed through in-depth NGS that could reveal prognostic information, improve NB target therapy, and provide a basis for investigations on NB pathogenesis.

  17. Mutation based treatment recommendations from next generation sequencing data: a comparison of web tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaymin M; Knopf, Joshua; Reiner, Eric; Bossuyt, Veerle; Epstein, Lianne; DiGiovanna, Michael; Chung, Gina; Silber, Andrea; Sanft, Tara; Hofstatter, Erin; Mougalian, Sarah; Abu-Khalaf, Maysa; Platt, James; Shi, Weiwei; Gershkovich, Peter; Hatzis, Christos; Pusztai, Lajos

    2016-04-19

    Interpretation of complex cancer genome data, generated by tumor target profiling platforms, is key for the success of personalized cancer therapy. How to draw therapeutic conclusions from tumor profiling results is not standardized and may vary among commercial and academically-affiliated recommendation tools. We performed targeted sequencing of 315 genes from 75 metastatic breast cancer biopsies using the FoundationOne assay. Results were run through 4 different web tools including the Drug-Gene Interaction Database (DGidb), My Cancer Genome (MCG), Personalized Cancer Therapy (PCT), and cBioPortal, for drug and clinical trial recommendations. These recommendations were compared amongst each other and to those provided by FoundationOne. The identification of a gene as targetable varied across the different recommendation sources. Only 33% of cases had 4 or more sources recommend the same drug for at least one of the usually several altered genes found in tumor biopsies. These results indicate further development and standardization of broadly applicable software tools that assist in our therapeutic interpretation of genomic data is needed. Existing algorithms for data acquisition, integration and interpretation will likely need to incorporate artificial intelligence tools to improve both content and real-time status.

  18. Generation, genome edition and characterization of iPSC lines from a patient with coenzyme Q10 deficiency harboring a heterozygous mutation in COQ4 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damià Romero-Moya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the generation, CRISPR/Cas9-edition and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines from a patient with coenzyme Q10 deficiency harboring the heterozygous mutation c.483G > C in the COQ4 gene. iPSCs were generated using non-integrative Sendai Viruses containing the reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and C-MYC. The iPSC lines carried the c.483G > C COQ4 mutation, silenced the OKSM expression and were mycoplasma-free. They were bona fide pluripotent cells as characterized by morphology, immunophenotype/gene expression for pluripotent-associated markers/genes, NANOG and OCT4 promoter demethylation, karyotype and teratoma formation. The COQ4 mutation was CRISPR/Cas9 edited resulting in isogenic, diploid and off-target free COQ4-corrected iPSCs.

  19. Histone H3 lysine 36 methylation affects temperature-induced alternative splicing and flowering in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajoro, A; Severing, E; Angenent, G C; Immink, R G H

    2017-06-01

    Global warming severely affects flowering time and reproductive success of plants. Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is an important mechanism underlying ambient temperature-controlled responses in plants, yet its regulation is poorly understood. An increase in temperature promotes changes in plant morphology as well as the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive phase in Arabidopsis thaliana via changes in splicing of key regulatory genes. Here we investigate whether a particular histone modification affects ambient temperature-induced alternative splicing and flowering time. We use a genome-wide approach and perform RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses and histone H3 lysine 36 tri-methylation (H3K36me3) chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) in plants exposed to different ambient temperatures. Analysis and comparison of these datasets reveal that temperature-induced differentially spliced genes are enriched in H3K36me3. Moreover, we find that reduction of H3K36me3 deposition causes alteration in temperature-induced alternative splicing. We also show that plants with mutations in H3K36me3 writers, eraser, or readers have altered high ambient temperature-induced flowering. Our results show a key role for the histone mark H3K36me3 in splicing regulation and plant plasticity to fluctuating ambient temperature. Our findings open new perspectives for the breeding of crops that can better cope with environmental changes due to climate change.

  20. Gene Therapy via Trans-Splicing for LMNA-Related Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feriel Azibani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the potential of Lmna-mRNA repair by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a therapeutic approach for LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy. This gene therapy strategy leads to reduction of mutated transcript expression for the benefit of corresponding wild-type (WT transcripts. We developed 5′-RNA pre-trans-splicing molecules containing the first five exons of Lmna and targeting intron 5 of Lmna pre-mRNA. Among nine pre-trans-splicing molecules, differing in the targeted sequence in intron 5 and tested in C2C12 myoblasts, three induced trans-splicing events on endogenous Lmna mRNA and confirmed at protein level. Further analyses performed in primary myotubes derived from an LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD mouse model led to a partial rescue of the mutant phenotype. Finally, we tested this approach in vivo using adeno-associated virus (AAV delivery in newborn mice and showed that trans-splicing events occurred in WT mice 50 days after AAV delivery, although at a low rate. Altogether, while these results provide the first evidence for reprogramming LMNA mRNA in vitro, strategies to improve the rate of trans-splicing events still need to be developed for efficient application of this therapeutic approach in vivo.

  1. In Vitro and In Vivo Modulation of Alternative Splicing by the Biguanide Metformin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Laustriat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Major physiological changes are governed by alternative splicing of RNA, and its misregulation may lead to specific diseases. With the use of a genome-wide approach, we show here that this splicing step can be modified by medication and demonstrate the effects of the biguanide metformin, on alternative splicing. The mechanism of action involves AMPK activation and downregulation of the RBM3 RNA-binding protein. The effects of metformin treatment were tested on myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1, a multisystemic disease considered to be a spliceopathy. We show that this drug promotes a corrective effect on several splicing defects associated with DM1 in derivatives of human embryonic stem cells carrying the causal mutation of DM1 as well as in primary myoblasts derived from patients. The biological effects of metformin were shown to be compatible with typical therapeutic dosages in a clinical investigation involving diabetic patients. The drug appears to act as a modifier of alternative splicing of a subset of genes and may therefore have novel therapeutic potential for many more diseases besides those directly linked to defective alternative splicing.

  2. RNA-binding protein RBM20 represses splicing to orchestrate cardiac pre-mRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatz, Henrike; Jens, Marvin; Liss, Martin; Schafer, Sebastian; Heinig, Matthias; Kirchner, Marieluise; Adami, Eleonora; Rintisch, Carola; Dauksaite, Vita; Radke, Michael H; Selbach, Matthias; Barton, Paul J R; Cook, Stuart A; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Gotthardt, Michael; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein RBM20 have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of chronic heart failure, presumably through altering cardiac RNA splicing. Here, we combined transcriptome-wide crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP-seq), RNA-seq, and quantitative proteomics in cell culture and rat and human hearts to examine how RBM20 regulates alternative splicing in the heart. Our analyses revealed the presence of a distinct RBM20 RNA-recognition element that is predominantly found within intronic binding sites and linked to repression of exon splicing with RBM20 binding near 3' and 5' splice sites. Proteomic analysis determined that RBM20 interacts with both U1 and U2 small nuclear ribonucleic particles (snRNPs) and suggested that RBM20-dependent splicing repression occurs through spliceosome stalling at complex A. Direct RBM20 targets included several genes previously shown to be involved in DCM as well as genes not typically associated with this disease. In failing human hearts, reduced expression of RBM20 affected alternative splicing of several direct targets, indicating that differences in RBM20 expression may affect cardiac function. Together, these findings identify RBM20-regulated targets and provide insight into the pathogenesis of human heart failure.

  3. Integrative analysis revealed the molecular mechanism underlying RBM10-mediated splicing regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongbo; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Hu, Hao; Fröhler, Sebastian; Ma, Yunxia; Jens, Marvin; Maaskola, Jonas; Murakawa, Yasuhiro; Quedenau, Claudia; Landthaler, Markus; Kalscheuer, Vera; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wang, Yang; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-01

    RBM10 encodes an RNA binding protein. Mutations in RBM10 are known to cause multiple congenital anomaly syndrome in male humans, the TARP syndrome. However, the molecular function of RBM10 is unknown. Here we used PAR-CLIP to identify thousands of binding sites of RBM10 and observed significant RBM10-RNA interactions in the vicinity of splice sites. Computational analyses of binding sites as well as loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments provided evidence for the function of RBM10 in regulating exon skipping and suggested an underlying mechanistic model, which could be subsequently validated by minigene experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrated the splicing defects in a patient carrying an RBM10 mutation, which could be explained by disrupted function of RBM10 in splicing regulation. Overall, our study established RBM10 as an important regulator of alternative splicing, presented a mechanistic model for RBM10-mediated splicing regulation and provided a molecular link to understanding a human congenital disorder. © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  4. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX): an association of pulverulent cataracts and pseudo-dominant developmental delay in a family with a splice site mutation in CYP27A1--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourkiza, Rabia; Joyce, Sarah; Patel, Himanshu; Chan, Michelle; Meyer, Esther; Maher, Eamonn R; Reddy, M Ashwin

    2010-06-01

    A 15-year-old boy with developmental delay presented to the pediatric ophthalmology clinic with bilateral pulverulent cataracts. The family was examined for developmental delay, cataracts and systemic problems. The parents were consanguineous and originally from Bangladesh. All the children were born in the UK. The mother and 5 children had developmental delay. Three children had global developmental delay, diarrhea and pulverulent cataracts. Two children had microcephaly, developmental delay, constipation and no cataracts. The mother did not have microcephaly, cataracts or gastrointestinal problems. Linkage analysis via autozygosity testing was performed for detection of loci and candidate genes. The patients with cataracts were segregated with homozygous mutations in the CYP27A1 (G to A substitution at position +1 of intron 6). The complex nature of this family's findings suggested that it had an unusual autosomal dominant condition with variable expression. Autozygosity testing demonstrated that three members had Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The aetiology of the developmental delay in other family members remains unknown. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive condition that can result in neurological deficits and early death if left untreated. In view of the reversible nature of the condition with appropriate treatment, there needs to be a high level of suspicion of CTX for any child with cataracts and developmental delay even if the pattern of inheritance is not straightforward at initial assessment.

  5. Generation of a human iPSC line from a patient with congenital glaucoma caused by mutation in CYP1B1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantxa Bolinches-Amorós

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The human iPSC cell line, GLC-FiPS4F1 (ESi047-A, derived from dermal fibroblast from the patient with congenital glaucoma caused by the mutation of the gene CYP1B1, was generated by non-integrative reprogramming technology using OCT3/4, SOX2, CMYC and KLF4 reprogramming factors.

  6. Generation of a gene-corrected isogenic control hiPSC line derived from a familial Alzheimer's disease patient carrying a L150P mutation in presenilin 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Anna Fong-Yee; Schmid, Benjamin; Pires, Carlota

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene lead to the most aggressive form of familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from AD patients and subsequently differentiated can be used for disease modeling. We have previously generated a hiPSC line from...

  7. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks. © 2015 Yue et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. Diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Exonization of Alu elements is a major mechanism for birth of new exons in primate genomes. Prior analyses of expressed sequence tags show that almost all Alu-derived exons are alternatively spliced, and the vast majority of these exons have low transcript inclusion levels. In this work, we provide genomic and experimental evidence for diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues. Using Exon array data of 330 Alu-derived exons in 11 human tissues and detailed RT-PCR analyses of 38 exons, we show that some Alu-derived exons are constitutively spliced in a broad range of human tissues, and some display strong tissue-specific switch in their transcript inclusion levels. Most of such exons are derived from ancient Alu elements in the genome. In SEPN1, mutations of which are linked to a form of congenital muscular dystrophy, the muscle-specific inclusion of an Alu-derived exon may be important for regulating SEPN1 activity in muscle. Realtime qPCR analysis of this SEPN1 exon in macaque and chimpanzee tissues indicates human-specific increase in its transcript inclusion level and muscle specificity after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. Our results imply that some Alu exonization events may have acquired adaptive benefits during the evolution of primate transcriptomes.

  9. Alternative Splicing Regulation of Cancer-Related Pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: An In Vivo Model System with a Powerful Reverse Genetics Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Barberán-Soler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing allows for the generation of protein diversity and fine-tunes gene expression. Several model systems have been used for the in vivo study of alternative splicing. Here we review the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to study splicing regulation in vivo. Recent studies have shown that close to 25% of genes in the worm genome undergo alternative splicing. A big proportion of these events are functional, conserved, and under strict regulation either across development or other conditions. Several techniques like genome-wide RNAi screens and bichromatic reporters are available for the study of alternative splicing in worms. In this review, we focus, first, on the main studies that have been performed to dissect alternative splicing in this system and later on examples from genes that have human homologs that are implicated in cancer. The significant advancement towards understanding the regulation of alternative splicing and cancer that the C. elegans system has offered is discussed.

  10. A novel cell line generated using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology as universal quality control material for KRAS G12V mutation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shiyu; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Guigao; Peng, Rongxue; Gao, Peng; Han, Yanxi; Fu, Yu; Ding, Jiansheng; Wu, Qisheng; Zhang, Kuo; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2018-01-30

    KRAS mutations are the key indicator for EGFR monoclonal antibody-targeted therapy and acquired drug resistance, and their accurate detection is critical to the clinical decision-making of colorectal cancer. However, no proper quality control material is available for the current detection methods, particularly next-generation sequencing (NGS). The ideal quality control material for NGS needs to provide both the tumor mutation gene and the matched background genomic DNA, which is uncataloged in public databases, to accurately distinguish germline polymorphisms and somatic mutations. We developed a novel KRAS G12V mutant cell line using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) technique to make up for the deficiencies in existing quality control material and further validated the feasibility of the cell line as quality control material by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), Sanger sequencing, digital PCR (dPCR), and NGS. We verified that the edited cell line specifically had the G12V mutation, and the validation results presented a high consistency among the four methods of detection. The three cell lines screened contained the G12V mutation and the mutation allele fractions of G12V-1, G12V-2, and G12V-3 were 52.01%, 82.06%, and 17.29%, respectively. The novel KRAS G12V cell line generated using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system is suitable as a quality control material for all current detection methods and provides a new direction in the development of quality control material. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Mutation testing in Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, P E; Dawson, M; Dixon, M J

    2002-12-01

    To report on a study where 97 subjects were screened for mutations in the Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) gene TCOF1. Ninety-seven subjects with a clinical diagnosis of TCS were screened for potential mutations in TCOF1, by means of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. In those subjects where potential mutations were detected, sequence analysis was performed to determine the site and type of mutation present. Thirty-six TCS-specific mutations are reported including 27 deletions, six point mutations, two splice junction mutations, and one insertion/deletion. This brings the total number of mutations reported to date to 105. The importance of detection of these mutations is mainly in postnatal diagnosis and genetic counselling. Knowledge of the family specific mutation may also be used in prenatal diagnosis to confirm whether the foetus is affected or not, and give the parents the choice of whether to continue with the pregnancy.

  12. Consistency and reproducibility of next-generation sequencing and other multigene mutational assays: A worldwide ring trial study on quantitative cytological molecular reference specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malapelle, Umberto; Mayo-de-Las-Casas, Clara; Molina-Vila, Miguel A; Rosell, Rafael; Savic, Spasenija; Bihl, Michel; Bubendorf, Lukas; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; de Biase, Dario; Tallini, Giovanni; Hwang, David H; Sholl, Lynette M; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Weynand, Birgit; Vander Borght, Sara; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Bongiovanni, Massimo; Stieber, Daniel; Vielh, Philippe; Schmitt, Fernando; Rappa, Alessandra; Barberis, Massimo; Pepe, Francesco; Pisapia, Pasquale; Serra, Nicola; Vigliar, Elena; Bellevicine, Claudio; Fassan, Matteo; Rugge, Massimo; de Andrea, Carlos E; Lozano, Maria D; Basolo, Fulvio; Fontanini, Gabriella; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; da Cunha Santos, Gilda; Nikiforova, Marina N; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Troncone, Giancarlo

    2017-08-01

    Molecular testing of cytological lung cancer specimens includes, beyond epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), emerging predictive/prognostic genomic biomarkers such as Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), neuroblastoma RAS viral [v-ras] oncogene homolog (NRAS), B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and other multigene mutational assays are suitable for cytological specimens, including smears. However, the current literature reflects single-institution studies rather than multicenter experiences. Quantitative cytological molecular reference slides were produced with cell lines designed to harbor concurrent mutations in the EGFR, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA genes at various allelic ratios, including low allele frequencies (AFs; 1%). This interlaboratory ring trial study included 14 institutions across the world that performed multigene mutational assays, from tissue extraction to data analysis, on these reference slides, with each laboratory using its own mutation analysis platform and methodology. All laboratories using NGS (n = 11) successfully detected the study's set of mutations with minimal variations in the means and standard errors of variant fractions at dilution points of 10% (P = .171) and 5% (P = .063) despite the use of different sequencing platforms (Illumina, Ion Torrent/Proton, and Roche). However, when mutations at a low AF of 1% were analyzed, the concordance of the NGS results was low, and this reflected the use of different thresholds for variant calling among the institutions. In contrast, laboratories using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (n = 2) showed lower concordance in terms of mutation detection and mutant AF quantification. Quantitative molecular reference slides are a useful tool for monitoring the performance of different multigene mutational

  13. Capacity of columns with splice imperfections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, E.P.; Stephen, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    To study the behavior of spliced columns subjected to tensile forces simulating situations which may develop in an earthquake, all of the spliced specimens were tested to failure in tension after first having been subjected to large compressive loads. The results of these tests indicate that the lack of perfect contact at compression splices of columns may not be important, provided that the gaps are shimmed and welding is used to maintain the sections in alignment

  14. Insertion of a T next to the donor splice site of intron 1 causes aberrantly spliced mRNA in a case of infantile GM1-gangliosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, A; Morreau, H; Zhou, X Y; Zammarchi, E; Kleijer, W J; Galjaard, H; d'Azzo, A

    1994-01-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome are caused by a complete or partial deficiency of acid beta-galactosidase. Here, we have characterized the mutation segregating in a family with two siblings affected by the severe infantile form of GM1-gangliosidosis. In total mRNA preparations derived from the patients' fibroblasts at least two aberrantly spliced beta-galactosidase transcripts (1 and 2) have been identified. Both transcripts contain a 20 nucleotide (nt) insertion derived from the 5' end of intron 1 of the beta-galactosidase gene. Furthermore, in transcript 2 sequences encoded by exon II are deleted during the splicing process. Comparison of the 20-nt insertion with wild-type intronic sequences indicated that in the genomic DNA of the patients an extra T nucleotide is present immediately downstream of the conserved GT splice donor dinucleotide of intron 1. Both patients are homozygous for the T nucleotide insertion. We propose that this single base insertion is the mutation responsible for aberrant splicing of beta-galactosidase pre-mRNA, giving rise to transcripts that cannot encode a normal protein.

  15. Alternative Splicing in Neurogenesis and Brain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hao Su

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is an important mechanism that increases transcriptomic and proteomic diversity and also post-transcriptionally regulates mRNA levels. Alternative splicing occurs at high frequency in brain tissues and contributes to every step of nervous system development, including cell-fate decisions, neuronal migration, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. Genetic manipulation and RNA sequencing have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of alternative splicing in stem cell self-renewal and neuronal fate specification. Timely expression and perhaps post-translational modification of neuron-specific splicing regulators play important roles in neuronal development. Alternative splicing of many key transcription regulators or epigenetic factors reprograms the transcriptome and hence contributes to stem cell fate determination. During neuronal differentiation, alternative splicing also modulates signaling activity, centriolar dynamics, and metabolic pathways. Moreover, alternative splicing impacts cortical lamination and neuronal development and function. In this review, we focus on recent progress toward understanding the contributions of alternative splicing to neurogenesis and brain development, which has shed light on how splicing defects may cause brain disorders and diseases.

  16. Strategy for robust detection of insertions, deletions, and point mutations in CEBPA, a GC-rich content gene, using 454 next-generation deep-sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Vera; Schnittger, Susanne; Schindela, Sonja; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Eder, Christiane; Dugas, Martin; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    CEBPA mutations are of prognostic relevance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are currently detected using a combination of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), gene scan/fragment length analysis, and direct Sanger sequencing. Next-generation deep pyrosequencing, principally, allows for the highly sensitive detection of molecular mutations. However, standard 454 chemistry laboratory procedures lack efficient amplification of guanine-cytosine (GC)-rich amplicons during the emulsion PCR (emPCR) steps allowing direct massively parallel clonal amplification of PCR products. To solve this problem, we investigated six distinct emPCR conditions. The coding sequence of CEBPA was subdivided into four overlapping amplicons: GC content for amplicon 1, 74%; amplicon 2, 76%; amplicon 3, 77%; and amplicon 4, 69%. A new emPCR condition, improving the standard titanium assay, presents a robust solution to sequence amplicons with a GC content of up to 77%. Moreover, this assay was subsequently tested on a larger independent cohort of 23 AML patients. For each patient, a median of 737 reads was generated (coverage range, 397-fold to 1194-fold) and therefore allowed a robust detection of insertions, deletions, and point mutations. In conclusion, next-generation amplicon sequencing enables the highly sensitive detection of molecular mutations and is a feasible assay for routine assessment of GC-rich content amplicons. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Fang

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae.

  18. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th) subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae.

  19. Human aging and somatic point mutations in mtDNA: a comparative study of generational differences (grandparents and grandchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Nonato do Rosário Marinho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of somatic mutations in mtDNA is correlated with aging. In this work, we sought to identify somatic mutations in the HVS-1 region (D-loop of mtDNA that might be associated with aging. For this, we compared 31 grandmothers (mean age: 63 ± 2.3 years and their 62 grandchildren (mean age: 15 ± 4.1 years, the offspring of their daughters. Direct DNA sequencing showed that mutations absent in the grandchildren were detected in a presumably homoplasmic state in three grandmothers and in a heteroplasmic state in an additional 13 grandmothers; no mutations were detected in the remaining 15 grandmothers. However, cloning followed by DNA sequencing in 12 grandmothers confirmed homoplasia in only one of the three mutations previously considered to be homoplasmic and did not confirm heteroplasmy in three out of nine grandmothers found to be heteroplasmic by direct sequencing. Thus, of 12 grandmothers in whom mtDNA was analyzed by cloning, eight were heteroplasmic for mutations not detected in their grandchildren. In this study, the use of genetically related subjects allowed us to demonstrate the occurrence of age-related (> 60 years old mutations (homoplasia and heteroplasmy. It is possible that both of these situations (homoplasia and heteroplasmy were a long-term consequence of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation that can lead to the accumulation of mtDNA mutations throughout life.

  20. Efficient Generation of Orthologous Point Mutations in Pigs via CRISPR-assisted ssODN-mediated Homology-directed Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise genome editing in livestock is of great value for the fundamental investigation of disease modeling. However, genetically modified pigs carrying subtle point mutations were still seldom reported despite the rapid development of programmable endonucleases. Here, we attempt to investigate single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODN mediated knockin by introducing two orthologous pathogenic mutations, p.E693G for Alzheimer's disease and p.G2019S for Parkinson's disease, into porcine APP and LRRK2 loci, respectively. Desirable homology-directed repair (HDR efficiency was achieved in porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs by optimizing the dosage and length of ssODN templates. Interestingly, incomplete HDR alleles harboring partial point mutations were observed in single-cell colonies, which indicate the complex mechanism of ssODN-mediated HDR. The effect of mutation-to-cut distance on incorporation rate was further analyzed by deep sequencing. We demonstrated that a mutation-to-cut distance of 11 bp resulted in a remarkable difference in HDR efficiency between two point mutations. Finally, we successfully obtained one cloned piglet harboring the orthologous p.C313Y mutation at the MSTN locus via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. Our proof-of-concept study demonstrated efficient ssODN-mediated incorporation of pathogenic point mutations in porcine somatic cells, thus facilitating further development of disease modeling and genetic breeding in pigs.

  1. A directed approach for the identification of transcripts harbouring the spliced leader sequence and the effect of trans-splicing knockdown in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Marina de Moraes; Bitar, Mainá; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Peconick, Ana Paula; Grynberg, Priscila; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Waisberg, Michael; Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; Yoshino, Timothy; Franco, Glória Regina

    2013-09-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease caused by trematodes from the genus Schistosoma. Because schistosomes exhibit a complex life cycle and numerous mechanisms for regulating gene expression, it is believed that spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing could play an important role in the biology of these parasites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the function of trans-splicing in Schistosoma mansoni through analysis of genes that may be regulated by this mechanism and via silencing SL-containing transcripts through RNA interference. Here, we report our analysis of SL transcript-enriched cDNA libraries from different S. mansoni life stages. Our results show that the trans-splicing mechanism is apparently not associated with specific genes, subcellular localisations or life stages. In cross-species comparisons, even though the sets of genes that are subject to SL trans-splicing regulation appear to differ between organisms, several commonly shared orthologues were observed. Knockdown of trans-spliced transcripts in sporocysts resulted in a systemic reduction of the expression levels of all tested trans-spliced transcripts; however, the only phenotypic effect observed was diminished larval size. Further studies involving the findings from this work will provide new insights into the role of trans-splicing in the biology of S. mansoni and other organisms. All Expressed Sequence Tags generated in this study were submitted to dbEST as five different libraries. The accessions for each library and for the individual sequences are as follows: (i) adult worms of mixed sexes (LIBEST_027999: JZ139310 - JZ139779), (ii) female adult worms (LIBEST_028000: JZ139780 - JZ140379), (iii) male adult worms (LIBEST_028001: JZ140380 - JZ141002), (iv) eggs (LIBEST_028002: JZ141003 - JZ141497) and (v) schistosomula (LIBEST_028003: JZ141498 - JZ141974).

  2. A directed approach for the identification of transcripts harbouring the spliced leader sequence and the effect of trans-splicing knockdown in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina de Moraes Mourao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease caused by trematodes from the genus Schistosoma. Because schistosomes exhibit a complex life cycle and numerous mechanisms for regulating gene expression, it is believed that spliced leader (SL trans-splicing could play an important role in the biology of these parasites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the function of trans-splicing in Schistosoma mansoni through analysis of genes that may be regulated by this mechanism and via silencing SL-containing transcripts through RNA interference. Here, we report our analysis of SL transcript-enriched cDNA libraries from different S. mansoni life stages. Our results show that the trans-splicing mechanism is apparently not associated with specific genes, subcellular localisations or life stages. In cross-species comparisons, even though the sets of genes that are subject to SL trans-splicing regulation appear to differ between organisms, several commonly shared orthologues were observed. Knockdown of trans-spliced transcripts in sporocysts resulted in a systemic reduction of the expression levels of all tested trans-spliced transcripts; however, the only phenotypic effect observed was diminished larval size. Further studies involving the findings from this work will provide new insights into the role of trans-splicing in the biology of S. mansoni and other organisms. All Expressed Sequence Tags generated in this study were submitted to dbEST as five different libraries. The accessions for each library and for the individual sequences are as follows: (i adult worms of mixed sexes (LIBEST_027999: JZ139310 - JZ139779, (ii female adult worms (LIBEST_028000: JZ139780 - JZ140379, (iii male adult worms (LIBEST_028001: JZ140380 - JZ141002, (iv eggs (LIBEST_028002: JZ141003 - JZ141497 and (v schistosomula (LIBEST_028003: JZ141498 - JZ141974.

  3. Next-Generation Sequencing in Gynaecological Tumours : The Prognostic and Predictive Value of the Most Common Mutations Found in Ovarian, Endometrial, and Cervical Tumours: Literature Review and the University Medical Centre Utrecht Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkel, Eline; de Leng, Wendy W.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822140; Witteveen, Petronella O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/17530808X; Jonges, Trudy G N|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113937172; Willems, Stefan M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33189582X; Langenberg, Marlies H.G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether next-generation sequencing (NGS) in ovarian and endometrial tumours can discover mutations with a relevant prognostic or predictive value. Methods: After a literature search, selected studies were critically appraised using the Quality in Prognostic Studies tool.

  4. C.57 C > T Mutation in MIR 184 is Responsible for Congenital Cataracts and Corneal Abnormalities in a Five-generation Family from Galicia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Caiado Canedo, Ana L; Wright, Kenneth W; Rabinowitz, Yaron S

    2015-01-01

    A c.57 C > T mutation in the seed region of MIR184 located at the 15q25.1 chromosomal region has been independently associated with autosomal dominant keratoconus with early-onset anterior polar cataract in the Northern Irish family and with autosomal dominant EDICT (Endothelial Dystrophy, Iris hypoplasia, Congenital cataracts, and stromal Thinning) syndrome. In this study we report a five-generation family originating in Galicia, Spain with early onset cataracts and variable corneal abnormalities which include non-ectatic corneal thinning and severe early-onset keratoconus. We identified a heterozygous c.57 C > T mutation in miR-184 in the proband and two additional affected relatives on the maternal side. This finding represents a third independent occurrence of this mutation in familiar ocular disease thus strengthening the link between miR-184 abnormalities and inherited eye defects.

  5. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a patient with hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B (MEN2B) syndrome with "highest risk" RET mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennaceur-Griscelli, A; Hadoux, J; Féraud, O; Opolon, P; Divers, D; Gobbo, E; Schlumberger, M; Griscelli, F; Turhan, A G

    2017-08-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B (MEN2B) is a cancer-predisposing syndrome that affects patients with germline RET mutations. The clinical spectrum of the syndrome includes medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and pheochromocytoma. Currently, there is no satisfactory model recapitulating all the features of the disease especially at the level of stem cells. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient with RET mutation at codon 918 who developed pheochromocytoma and MTC. These iPSC had normal karyotype, harboured the RET M918T mutation and expressed pluripotency hallmarks. A comprehensive pathological assessment of teratoma was performed after injection in immunodeficient mice. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of Peptide Nucleic Acid Antisense Oligonucleotides for Local and Systemic Dystrophin Splice Correction in the mdx Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, HaiFang; Betts, Corinne; Saleh, Amer F; Ivanova, Gabriela D; Lee, Hyunil; Seow, Yiqi; Kim, Dalsoo; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew JA

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) have the capacity to alter the processing of pre-mRNA transcripts in order to correct the function of aberrant disease-related genes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle degenerative disease that arises from mutations in the DMD gene leading to an absence of dystrophin protein. AOs have been shown to restore the expression of functional dystrophin via splice correction by intramuscular and systemic delivery in animal models of DMD and in DMD patients via intramuscular administration. Major challenges in developing this splice correction therapy are to optimize AO chemistry and to develop more effective systemic AO delivery. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) AOs are an alternative AO chemistry with favorable in vivo biochemical properties and splice correcting abilities. Here, we show long-term splice correction of the DMD gene in mdx mice following intramuscular PNA delivery and effective splice correction in aged mdx mice. Further, we report detailed optimization of systemic PNA delivery dose regimens and PNA AO lengths to yield splice correction, with 25-mer PNA AOs providing the greatest splice correcting efficacy, restoring dystrophin protein in multiple peripheral muscle groups. PNA AOs therefore provide an attractive candidate AO chemistry for DMD exon skipping therapy. PMID:20068555

  7. A novel splice variant in the N-propeptide of COL5A1 causes an EDS phenotype with severe kyphoscoliosis and eye involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Symoens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility and soft tissue fragility. The classic subtype of EDS is caused by mutations in one of the type V collagen genes (COL5A1 and COL5A2. Most mutations affect the type V collagen helical domain and lead to a diminished or structurally abnormal type V collagen protein. Remarkably, only two mutations were reported to affect the extended, highly conserved N-propeptide domain, which plays an important role in the regulation of the heterotypic collagen fibril diameter. We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide mutation, resulting in an unusual but severe classic EDS phenotype and a remarkable splicing outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation (IVS6-2A>G, NM_000093.3_c.925-2A>G in a patient with cutaneous features of EDS, severe progressive scoliosis and eye involvement. Two mutant transcripts were identified, one with an exon 7 skip and one in which exon 7 and the upstream exon 6 are deleted. Both transcripts are expressed and secreted into the extracellular matrix, where they can participate in and perturb collagen fibrillogenesis, as illustrated by the presence of dermal collagen cauliflowers. Determination of the order of intron removal and computational analysis showed that simultaneous skipping of exons 6 and 7 is due to the combined effect of delayed splicing of intron 7, altered pre-mRNA secondary structure, low splice site strength and possibly disturbed binding of splicing factors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation in intron 6, which not only affects splicing of the adjacent exon 7, but also causes a splicing error of the upstream exon 6. Our findings add further insights into the COL5A1 splicing order and show for the first time that a single COL5A1 acceptor-splice site

  8. Influenza A Virus Utilizes Suboptimal Splicing to Coordinate the Timing of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Chua

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is unique as an RNA virus in that it replicates in the nucleus and undergoes splicing. With only ten major proteins, the virus must gain nuclear access, replicate, assemble progeny virions in the cytoplasm, and then egress. In an effort to elucidate the coordination of these events, we manipulated the transcript levels from the bicistronic nonstructural segment that encodes the spliced virus product responsible for genomic nuclear export. We find that utilization of an erroneous splice site ensures the slow accumulation of the viral nuclear export protein (NEP while generating excessive levels of an antagonist that inhibits the cellular response to infection. Modulation of this simple transcriptional event results in improperly timed export and loss of virus infection. Together, these data demonstrate that coordination of the influenza A virus life cycle is set by a “molecular timer” that operates on the inefficient splicing of a virus transcript.

  9. Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific alternative splicing of Mef2D required for muscle differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runfola, Valeria; Sebastian, Soji; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-02-15

    Among the Mef2 family of transcription factors, Mef2D is unique in that it undergoes tissue-specific splicing to generate an isoform that is essential for muscle differentiation. However, the mechanisms mediating this muscle-specific processing of Mef2D remain unknown. Using bioinformatics, we identified Rbfox proteins as putative modulators of Mef2D muscle-specific splicing. Accordingly, we found direct and specific Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 binding to Mef2D pre-mRNA in vivo. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 cooperate in promoting Mef2D splicing and subsequent myogenesis. Thus, our findings reveal a new role for Rbfox proteins in regulating myogenesis through activation of essential muscle-specific splicing events. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Targeted next-generation sequencing detects novel gene-phenotype associations and expands the mutational spectrum in cardiomyopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Forleo

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of primary diseases of the myocardium, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC, with higher morbidity and mortality. These diseases are genetically diverse and associated with rare mutations in a large number of genes, many of which overlap among the phenotypes. To better investigate the genetic overlap between these three phenotypes and to identify new genotype-phenotype correlations, we designed a custom gene panel consisting of 115 genes known to be associated with cardiomyopathic phenotypes and channelopathies. A cohort of 38 unrelated patients, 16 affected by DCM, 14 by HCM and 8 by ARVC, was recruited for the study on the basis of more severe phenotypes and family history of cardiomyopathy and/or sudden death. We detected a total of 142 rare variants in 40 genes, and all patients were found to be carriers of at least one rare variant. Twenty-eight of the 142 rare variants were also predicted as potentially pathogenic variants and found in 26 patients. In 23 out of 38 patients, we found at least one novel potential gene-phenotype association. In particular, we detected three variants in OBSCN gene in ARVC patients, four variants in ANK2 gene and two variants in DLG1, TRPM4, and AKAP9 genes in DCM patients, two variants in PSEN2 gene and four variants in AKAP9 gene in HCM patients. Overall, our results confirmed that cardiomyopathic patients could carry multiple rare gene variants; in addition, our investigation of the genetic overlap among cardiomyopathies revealed new gene-phenotype associations. Furthermore, as our study confirms, data obtained using targeted next-generation sequencing could provide a remarkable contribution to the molecular diagnosis of cardiomyopathies, early identification of patients at risk for arrhythmia development, and better clinical management of cardiomyopathic patients.

  11. Multiple splice defects in ABCA1 cause low HDL-C in a family with Hypoalphalipoproteinemia and premature coronary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations at splice junctions causing exon skipping are uncommon compared to exonic mutations, and two intronic mutations causing an aberrant phenotype have rarely been reported. Despite the high number of functional ABCA1 mutations reported to date, splice variants have been reported infrequently. We screened DNA from a 41 year-old male with low HDL-C (12 mg/dL [0.31 mmol/L] and a family history of premature coronary heart disease (CHD using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP analysis. Methods Family members with low levels of HDL-C (n = 6 were screened by SSCP for mutations in ABCA1. Samples with altered SSCP patterns were sequenced directly using either an ABI 3700 or ABI3730Xl DNA Analyzer. To screen for splicing defects, cDNA was isolated from the proband's RNA and was sequenced as above. A series of minigenes were constructed to determine the contribution of normal and defective alleles. Results Two novel splice variants in ABCA1 were identified. The first mutation was a single base pair change (T->C in IVS 7, 6 bps downstream from the exon7/intron7 junction. Amplification of cDNA and allelic subcloning identified skipping of Exon 7 that results in the elimination of 59 amino acids from the first extracellular loop of the ABCA1 protein. The second mutation was a single base pair change (G->C at IVS 31 -1, at the intron/exon junction of exon 32. This mutation causes skipping of exon 32, resulting in 8 novel amino acids followed by a stop codon and a predicted protein size of 1496 AA, compared to normal (2261 AA. Bioinformatic studies predicted an impact on splicing as confirmed by in vitro assays of constitutive splicing. Conclusion In addition to carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT deficiency and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 3, this represents only the third reported case in which 2 different splice mutations has resulted in an aberrant clinical phenotype.

  12. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Sasabe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  13. A DSPP Mutation Causing Dentinogenesis Imperfecta and Characterization of the Mutational Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Kyung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  14. Spliced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addison, Courtney Page

    2017-01-01

    Human gene therapy (HGT) aims to cure disease by inserting or editing the DNA of patients with genetic conditions. Since foundational genetic techniques came into use in the 1970s, the field has developed to the point that now three therapies have market approval, and over 1800 clinical trials have...... been initiated. In this article I present a brief history of HGT, showing how the ethical and practical viability of the field was achieved by key scientific and regulatory actors. These parties carefully articulated gene therapy’s scope, limiting it to therapeutic interventions on somatic cells......, and cultivated alliances and divisions that bolstered the field’s legitimacy. At times these measures faltered, and then practitioners and sometimes patients would invoke an ethical imperative, posing gene therapy as the best solution to life and death problems. I suggest that we consider how boundary...

  15. Aberrant splicing of androgen receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G. G.; Faber, P. W.; Schweikert, H. U.; van Rooij, H. C.; Zegers, N. D.; Hodgins, M. B.; Degenhart, H. J.; Trapman, J.; Brinkmann, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symptoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. We report a G----T mutation in the splice donor site of

  16. Profiling cancer gene mutations in clinical formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tumor specimens using targeted next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangxuan; Chen, Liangjing; Sah, Sachin; Latham, Gary J; Patel, Rajesh; Song, Qinghua; Koeppen, Hartmut; Tam, Rachel; Schleifman, Erica; Mashhedi, Haider; Chalasani, Sreedevi; Fu, Ling; Sumiyoshi, Teiko; Raja, Rajiv; Forrest, William; Hampton, Garret M; Lackner, Mark R; Hegde, Priti; Jia, Shidong

    2014-04-01

    The success of precision oncology relies on accurate and sensitive molecular profiling. The Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Panel, a targeted enrichment method for next-generation sequencing (NGS) using the Ion Torrent platform, provides a fast, easy, and cost-effective sequencing workflow for detecting genomic "hotspot" regions that are frequently mutated in human cancer genes. Most recently, the U.K. has launched the AmpliSeq sequencing test in its National Health Service. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical application of the AmpliSeq methodology. We used 10 ng of genomic DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human colorectal cancer (CRC) tumor specimens to sequence 46 cancer genes using the AmpliSeq platform. In a validation study, we developed an orthogonal NGS-based resequencing approach (SimpliSeq) to assess the AmpliSeq variant calls. Validated mutational analyses revealed that AmpliSeq was effective in profiling gene mutations, and that the method correctly pinpointed "true-positive" gene mutations with variant frequency >5% and demonstrated high-level molecular heterogeneity in CRC. However, AmpliSeq enrichment and NGS also produced several recurrent "false-positive" calls in clinically druggable oncogenes such as PIK3CA. AmpliSeq provided highly sensitive and quantitative mutation detection for most of the genes on its cancer panel using limited DNA quantities from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. For those genes with recurrent "false-positive" variant calls, caution should be used in data interpretation, and orthogonal verification of mutations is recommended for clinical decision making.

  17. Mutational profiling of acute myeloid leukemia with normal cytogenetics in Brazilian patients: the value of next-generation sequencing for genomic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Noronha, Thiago Rodrigo; Mitne-Neto, Miguel; Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes

    2017-12-01

    Karyotype (KT) aberrations are important prognostic factors for acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, around 50% of cases present normal results. Single nucleotide polymorphism array can detect chromosomal gains, losses or uniparental disomy that are invisible to KT, thus improving patients' risk assessment. However, when both tests are normal, important driver mutations can be detected by the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS). Fourteen adult patients with AML with normal cytogenetics were investigated by NGS for 19 AML-related genes. Every patient presented at least one mutation: DNMT3A in nine patients; IDH2 in six; IDH1 in three; NRAS and NPM1 in two; and TET2 , ASXL1 , PTPN11 , and RUNX1 in one patient. No mutations were found in FLT3 , KIT , JAK2 , CEBPA , GATA2 , TP53 , BRAF , CBL , KRAS, and WT1 genes. Twelve patients (86%) had at least one mutation in genes related with DNA methylation ( DNMT3A , IDH1 , IDH2, and TET2 ), which is involved in regulation of gene expression and genomic stability. All patients could be reclassified based on genomic status and nine had their prognosis modified. In summary, NGS offers insights into the molecular pathogenesis and biology of cytogenetically normal AML in Brazilian patients, indicating that the prognosis could be further stratified by different mutation combinations. This study shows a different frequency of mutations in Brazilian population that should be confirmed. © American Federation for Medical Research (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. New insights into the genomic organization and splicing of the doublesex gene, a terminal regulator of sexual differentiation in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Duan

    Full Text Available Sex-determination mechanisms differ among organisms. The primary mechanism is diverse, whereas the terminal regulator is relatively-conserved. We analyzed the transcripts of the Bombyx mori doublesex gene (Bmdsx, and reported novel results concerning the genomic organization and expression of Bmdsx. Bmdsx consists of nine exons and eight introns, of which two exons are novel and have not been reported previously. Bmdsx transcripts are spliced to generate seventeen alternatively-spliced forms and eleven putative trans-spliced variants. Thirteen of the alternatively-spliced forms and five of the putative trans-spliced forms are reported here for the first time. Sequence analysis predicts that ten female-specific, six male-specific splice forms and one splice form found in males and females will result in four female-specific, two male-specific Dsx proteins and one Dsx protein common to males and females. The Dsx proteins are expected to be functional and regulate downstream target genes. Some of the predicted Dsx proteins are described here for the first time. Therefore the expression of the dsx gene in B. mori results in a variety of cis- and trans-spliced transcripts and multiple Dsx proteins. These findings show that in B. mori there is a complicated pattern of dsx splicing, and that the regulation of splicing and sex-specific functions of lepidopteran dsx have evolved complexity.

  19. NOTCH2 and FLT3 gene mis-splicings are common events in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): new potential targets in AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamia, Sophia; Bar-Natan, Michal; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Pilarski, Patrick M; Bach, Christian; Pevzner, Samuel; Calimeri, Teresa; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Lode, Laurence; Verselis, Sigitas; Fox, Edward A; Galinsky, Ilene; Mathews, Steven; Dagogo-Jack, Ibiayi; Wadleigh, Martha; Steensma, David P; Motyckova, Gabriela; Deangelo, Daniel J; Quackenbush, John; Tenen, Daniel G; Stone, Richard M; Griffin, James D

    2014-05-01

    Our previous studies revealed an increase in alternative splicing of multiple RNAs in cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared with CD34(+) bone marrow cells from normal donors. Aberrantly spliced genes included a number of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and genes involved in regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle, and cell differentiation. Among the most commonly mis-spliced genes (>70% of AML patients) were 2, NOTCH2 and FLT3, that encode myeloid cell surface proteins. The splice variants of NOTCH2 and FLT3 resulted from complete or partial exon skipping and utilization of cryptic splice sites. Longitudinal analyses suggested that NOTCH2 and FLT3 aberrant splicing correlated with disease status. Correlation analyses between splice variants of these genes and clinical features of patients showed an association between NOTCH2-Va splice variant and overall survival of patients. Our results suggest that NOTCH2 and FLT3 mis-splicing is a common characteristic of AML and has the potential to generate transcripts encoding proteins with altered function. Thus, splice variants of these genes might provide disease markers and targets for novel therapeutics.

  20. Depolarization-mediated regulation of alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok eSharma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing in eukaryotes plays an important role in regulating gene expression by selectively including alternative exons. A wealth of information has been accumulated that explains how alternative exons are selected in a developmental stage- or tissue-specific fashion. However, our knowledge of how cells respond to environmental changes to alter alternative splicing is very limited. For example, although a number of alternative exons have been shown to be regulated by calcium level alterations, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. As calcium signaling in neurons plays a crucial role in essential neuronal functions such as learning and memory formation, it is important to understand how this process is regulated at every level in gene expression. The significance of the dynamic control of alternative splicing in response to changes of calcium levels has been largely unappreciated. In this communication, we will summarize the recent advances in calcium signaling-mediated alternative splicing that have provided some insights into the important regulatory mechanisms. In addition to describing the cis-acting RNA elements on the pre-mRNA molecules that respond to changes of intracellular calcium levels, we will summarize how splicing regulators change and affect alternative splicing in this process. We will also discuss a novel mode of calcium-mediated splicing regulation at the level of chromatin structure and transcription.

  1. A novel splicing mutation in the V2 vasopressin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Siggaard, C; Herlin, Troels

    2000-01-01

    In order to elucidate the molecular basis and the clinical characteristics of X-linked recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI) in a kindred of Danish descent, we performed direct sequencing of the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene in five members of the family, as well as clini......In order to elucidate the molecular basis and the clinical characteristics of X-linked recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI) in a kindred of Danish descent, we performed direct sequencing of the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene in five members of the family, as well...

  2. A single aspartate mutation in the conserved catalytic site of Rev3L generates a hypomorphic phenotype in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzen, Rémi; Delbos, Frédéric; De Smet, Annie; Palancade, Benoît; Canman, Christine E; Aoufouchi, Said; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Storck, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Rev3, the catalytic subunit of yeast DNA polymerase ζ, is required for UV resistance and UV-induced mutagenesis, while its mammalian ortholog, REV3L, plays further vital roles in cell proliferation and embryonic development. To assess the contribution of REV3L catalytic activity to its in vivo function, we generated mutant mouse strains in which one or two Ala residues were substituted to the Asp of the invariant catalytic YGDTDS motif. The simultaneous mutation of both Asp (ATA) phenocopies the Rev3l knockout, which proves that the catalytic activity is mandatory for the vital functions of Rev3L, as reported recently. Surprisingly, although the mutation of the first Asp severely impairs the enzymatic activity of other B-family DNA polymerases, the corresponding mutation of Rev3 (ATD) is hypomorphic in yeast and mouse, as it does not affect viability and proliferation and moderately impacts UVC-induced cell death and mutagenesis. Interestingly, Rev3l hypomorphic mutant mice display a distinct, albeit modest, alteration of the immunoglobulin gene mutation spectrum at G-C base pairs, further documenting its role in this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Benzo[a]pyrene treatment leads to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Chunlan; Wu Wei [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Li Haiyan [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Huzhou Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Huzhou, Zhejiang 313000 (China); Zhang Guanglin [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J. [Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Zhu Xinqiang, E-mail: zhuxq@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: gastate@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a potent pro-carcinogen generated from the combustion of fossil fuel and cigarette smoke. Previously, using a proteomic approach, we have shown that BaP can induce changes in the expression of many cellular proteins, including transcription regulators. In the present study, using a similar approach, we examined the nuclear protein response to BaP in HeLa cells and found that BaP treatment caused expression changes in many nuclear proteins. Twenty-four of these proteins were successfully identified, several of which are involved in the alternative splicing of mRNA, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The changed expression levels were further confirmed by immunoblot analysis using specific antibodies for two proteins, Lamin A and mitotic checkpoint protein Bub3. The nuclear localization of these two proteins was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. To determine whether alternative splicing was activated following BaP treatment, we examined Fas and CD44, two genes previously shown to be targets of alternative splicing in respond to DNA damage. While no significant activation of alternative splicing was observed for Fas, CD44 splicing variants were found after BaP treatment. Together, these data show that DNA damage induces dramatic changes in nuclear protein expression, and that alternative splicing might be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  4. The evolutionary landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yimeng; Zhou, Hongxia; Yu, Yao; Chen, Longxian; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    To explore the landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events and characterize their functions and evolutionary dynamics, we conduct a mega-data study of a phylogeny containing eight species across five orders of class Insecta, a model system spanning 400 million years of evolution. A total of 1,627 trans-splicing events involving 2,199 genes are identified, accounting for 1.58% of the total genes. Homology analysis reveals that mod(mdg4)-like trans-splicing is the only conserved event that is consistently observed in multiple species across two orders, which represents a unique case of functional diversification involving trans-splicing. Thus, evolutionarily its potential for generating proteins with novel function is not broadly utilized by insects. Furthermore, 146 non-mod trans-spliced transcripts are found to resemble canonical genes from different species. Trans-splicing preserving the function of ‘breakup' genes may serve as a general mechanism for relaxing the constraints on gene structure, with profound implications for the evolution of genes and genomes. PMID:26521696

  5. Evaluation of point mutations in dystrophin gene in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cycle sequencing revealed four nonsense, one frameshift and two splice site mutations as well as two missense variants. [Haghshenas M., Akbari M. T., Zare Karizi S., Khordadpoor Deilamani F., Nafissi S. and Salehi Z. 2016 Evaluation of point mutations in dystrophin gene in Iranian Duchenne and Becker muscular ...

  6. RAGE splicing variants in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterenczak, Katharina Anna; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor of environmental stressors which plays key roles in pathophysiological processes, including immune/inflammatory disorders, Alzheimer's disease, diabetic arteriosclerosis, tumorigenesis, and metastasis. Besides the full-length RAGE protein in humans nearly 20 natural occurring RAGE splicing variants were described on mRNA and protein level. These naturally occurring isoforms are characterized by either N-terminally or C-terminally truncations and are discussed as possible regulators of the full-length RAGE receptor either by competitive ligand binding or by displacing the full-length protein in the membrane. Accordingly, expression deregulations of the naturally occurring isoforms were supposed to have significant effect on RAGE-mediated disorders. Thereby the soluble C-truncated RAGE isoforms present in plasma and tissues are the mostly focused isoforms in research and clinics. Deregulations of the circulating levels of soluble RAGE forms were reported in several RAGE-associated pathological disorders including for example atherosclerosis, diabetes, renal failure, Alzheimer's disease, and several cancer types. Regarding other mammalian species, the canine RAGE gene showed high similarities to the corresponding human structures indicating RAGE to be evolutionary highly conserved between both species. Similar to humans the canine RAGE showed a complex and extensive splicing activity leading to a manifold pattern of RAGE isoforms. Due to the similarities seen in several canine and human diseases-including cancer-comparative structural and functional analyses allow the development of RAGE and ligand-specific therapeutic approaches beneficial for human and veterinary medicine.

  7. Generation of a novel live rabies vaccine strain with a high level of safety by introducing attenuating mutations in the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Kento; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Katayama, Yukie; Oba, Mami; Mitake, Hiromichi; Okada, Kazuma; Yamaoka, Satoko; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Masatani, Tatsunori; Okadera, Kota; Ito, Naoto; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Makoto

    2017-10-09

    The current live rabies vaccine SAG2 is attenuated by only one mutation (Arg-to-Glu) at position 333 in the glycoprotein (G333). This fact generates a potential risk of the emergence of a pathogenic revertant by a back mutation at this position during viral propagation in the body. To circumvent this risk, it is desirable to generate a live vaccine strain highly and stably attenuated by multiple mutations. However, the information on attenuating mutations other than that at G333 is very limited. We previously reported that amino acids at positions 273 and 394 in the nucleoprotein (N273/394) (Leu and His, respectively) of fixed rabies virus Ni-CE are responsible for the attenuated phenotype by enhancing interferon (IFN)/chemokine gene expressions in infected neural cells. In this study, we found that amino acid substitutions at N273/394 (Phe-to-Leu and Tyr-to-His, respectively) attenuated the pathogenicity of the oral live vaccine ERA, which has a virulent-type Arg at G333. Then we generated ERA-N273/394-G333 attenuated by the combination of the above attenuating mutations at G333 and N273/394, and checked its safety. Similar to the ERA-G333, which is attenuated by only the mutation at G333, ERA-N273/394-G333 did not cause any symptoms in adult mice after intracerebral inoculation, indicating a low level of residual pathogenicity of ERA-N273/394-G333. Further examination revealed that infection with ERA-N273/394-G333 induces IFN-β and CXCL10 mRNA expressions more strongly than ERA-G333 infection in a neuroblastoma cell line. Importantly, we found that the ERA-N273/394-G333 stain has a lower risk for emergence of a pathogenic revertant than does the ERA-G333. These results indicate that ERA-N273/394-G333 has a potential to be a promising candidate for a live rabies vaccine strain with a high level of safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Generation of KCL025 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in NF1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heema Hewitson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The KCL025 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation in the NF1 gene encoding neurofibromin (c.3739–3742 ΔTTTG. Mutations in this gene have been linked to neurofibromatosis type 1, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and Watson syndrome. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays.

  9. A genome-wide aberrant RNA splicing in patients with acute myeloid leukemia identifies novel potential disease markers and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamia, Sophia; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Pilarski, Patrick M; Bar-Natan, Michal; Pevzner, Samuel; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Lode, Laurence; Verselis, Sigitas; Fox, Edward A; Burke, John; Galinsky, Ilene; Dagogo-Jack, Ibiayi; Wadleigh, Martha; Steensma, David P; Motyckova, Gabriela; Deangelo, Daniel J; Quackenbush, John; Stone, Richard; Griffin, James D

    2014-03-01

    Despite new treatments, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains an incurable disease. More effective drug design requires an expanded view of the molecular complexity that underlies AML. Alternative splicing of RNA is used by normal cells to generate protein diversity. Growing evidence indicates that aberrant splicing of genes plays a key role in cancer. We investigated genome-wide splicing abnormalities in AML and based on these abnormalities, we aimed to identify novel potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. We used genome-wide alternative splicing screening to investigate alternative splicing abnormalities in two independent AML patient cohorts [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) (Boston, MA) and University Hospital de Nantes (UHN) (Nantes, France)] and normal donors. Selected splicing events were confirmed through cloning and sequencing analysis, and than validated in 193 patients with AML. Our results show that approximately 29% of expressed genes genome-wide were differentially and recurrently spliced in patients with AML compared with normal donors bone marrow CD34(+) cells. Results were reproducible in two independent AML cohorts. In both cohorts, annotation analyses indicated similar proportions of differentially spliced genes encoding several oncogenes, tumor suppressor proteins, splicing factors, and heterogeneous-nuclear-ribonucleoproteins, proteins involved in apoptosis, cell proliferation, and spliceosome assembly. Our findings are consistent with reports for other malignances and indicate that AML-specific aberrations in splicing mechanisms are a hallmark of AML pathogenesis. Overall, our results suggest that aberrant splicing is a common characteristic for AML. Our findings also suggest that splice variant transcripts that are the result of splicing aberrations create novel disease markers and provide potential targets for small molecules or antibody therapeutics for this disease. ©2013 AACR

  10. Splicing pattern - ASTRA | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us ASTRA Splicing pattern Data detail Data name Splicing pattern DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00371-0...04 Description of data contents The patterns of alternative splicing/transcriptional initiation Data file Fi...le name: astra_splicing_pattern.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/astra/LATEST/astra_splicing_patte...ogodb/view/astra_splicing_pattern#en Data acquisition method For the five organisms (H. sapiens, M. musculus...apping data into bit arrays, detection of splicing patterns and distribution to t

  11. Tissue Restricted Splice Junctions Originate Not Only from Tissue-Specific Gene Loci, but Gene Loci with a Broad Pattern of Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Hestand

    Full Text Available Cellular mechanisms that achieve protein diversity in eukaryotes are multifaceted, including transcriptional components such as RNA splicing. Through alternative splicing, a single protein-coding gene can generate multiple mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms, some of which are tissue-specific. We have conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of the Bodymap 2.0 messenger RNA-sequencing data from 16 human tissue samples and identified 209,363 splice junctions. Of these, 22,231 (10.6% were not previously annotated and 21,650 (10.3% were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Tissue-restricted alternative splicing was found to be widespread, with approximately 65% of expressed multi-exon genes containing at least one tissue-specific splice junction. Interestingly, we observed many tissue-specific splice junctions not only in genes expressed in one or a few tissues, but also from gene loci with a broad pattern of expression.

  12. Divergent mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum association of DMPK splice isoforms depends on unique sequence arrangements in tail anchors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, R.E.M.A. van; Oude Ophuis, R.J.A.; Wijers-Rouw, M.J.P.; Bennink, M.B.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Fransen, J.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a Ser/Thr-type protein kinase with unknown function, originally identified as the product of the gene that is mutated by triplet repeat expansion in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Alternative splicing of DMPK transcripts results in multiple

  13. Genetic counseling for a three-generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II associated with a rare SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The SOX10 mutation related with Waardenburg syndrome type II is rare in Chinese. This study aimed to uncover the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation family to improve genetic counseling. Complete clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a three-generation Han Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Targeted genetic counseling was provided to this family. We identified a rare heterozygous dominant mutation c.621C>A (p.Y207X) in SOX10 gene in this family. The premature termination codon occurs in exon 4, 27 residues downstream of the carboxyl end of the high mobility group box. Bioinformatics prediction suggested this variant to be disease-causing, probably due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Useful genetic counseling was given to the family for prenatal guidance. Identification of a rare dominant heterozygous SOX10 mutation c.621C>A in this family provided an efficient way to understand the causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II and improved genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeted next-generation sequencing identification of mutations in disease resistance gene anologs (RGAs) in wild and cultivated beets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance gene analogs (RGAs) were searched bioinformatically in the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) genome as potential candidates for improving resistance against different diseases. In the present study, Ion Torrent sequencing technology was used to identify mutations in 21 RGAs. The DNA samples o...

  15. Mutational analysis using Sanger and next generation sequencing in sporadic spindle cell hemangiomas: A study of 19 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, R.W. ten; Bekers, E.M.; Leng, W.W.J. de; Strengman, E.; Tops, B.B.J.; Kutzner, H.; Leeuwis, J.W.; Gorp, J.M. van; Creytens, D.H.; Mentzel, T.; Diest, P.J. van; Eijkelenboom, A.; Flucke, U.

    2017-01-01

    Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH) is a distinct vascular soft-tissue lesion characterized by cavernous blood vessels and a spindle cell component mainly occurring in the distal extremities of young adults. The majority of cases harbor heterozygous mutations in IDH1/2 sporadically or rarely in

  16. A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Identify Gene Mutations in Early- and Late-Onset Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients of an Italian Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubattu, Speranza; Bozzao, Cristina; Pennacchini, Ermelinda; Pagannone, Erika; Musumeci, Beatrice Maria; Piane, Maria; Germani, Aldo; Savio, Camilla; Francia, Pietro; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo; Chessa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of sarcomere protein genes in patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) identifies a disease-causing mutation in 35% to 60% of cases. Age at diagnosis and family history may increase the yield of mutations screening. In order to assess whether Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) may fulfil the molecular diagnostic needs in HCM, we included 17 HCM-related genes in a sequencing panel run on PGM IonTorrent. We selected 70 HCM patients, 35 with early (≤25 years) and 35 with late (≥65 years) diagnosis of disease onset. All samples had a 98.6% average of target regions, with coverage higher than 20× (mean coverage 620×). We identified 41 different mutations (seven of them novel) in nine genes: MYBPC3 (17/41 = 41%); MYH7 (10/41 = 24%); TNNT2, CAV3 and MYH6 (3/41 = 7.5% each); TNNI3 (2/41 = 5%); GLA, MYL2, and MYL3 (1/41=2.5% each). Mutation detection rate was 30/35 (85.7%) in early-onset and 8/35 (22.9%) in late-onset HCM patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). The overall detection rate for patients with positive family history was 84%, and 90.5% in patients with early disease onset. In our study NGS revealed higher mutations yield in patients with early onset and with a family history of HCM. Appropriate patient selection can increase the yield of genetic testing and make diagnostic testing cost-effective. PMID:27483260

  17. Phenotype and frequency of STUB1 mutations: next-generation screenings in Caucasian ataxia and spastic paraplegia cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Schüle, Rebecca; Schulze, Martin; Gburek-Augustat, Janina; Schweizer, Roland; Schirmacher, Anja; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Gonzalez, Michael; Young, Peter; Züchner, Stephan; Schöls, Ludger; Bauer, Peter

    2014-04-17

    Mutations in the gene STUB1, encoding the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein), have recently been suggested as a cause of recessive ataxia based on the findings in few Chinese families. Here we aimed to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of STUB1 mutations, and to assess their frequency in different Caucasian disease cohorts. 300 subjects with degenerative ataxia (n = 167) or spastic paraplegia (n = 133) were screened for STUB1 variants by whole-exome-sequencing (n = 204) or shotgun-fragment-library-sequencing (n = 96). To control for the specificity of STUB1 variants, we screened an additional 1707 exomes from 891 index families with other neurological diseases. We identified 3 ataxia patients (3/167 = 1.8%) with 4 novel missense mutations in STUB1, including 3 mutations in its tetratricopeptide-repeat domain. All patients showed evidence of pyramidal tract damage. Cognitive impairment was present only in one and hypogonadism in none of them. Ataxia did not start before age 48 years in one subject. No recessive STUB1 variants were identified in families with other neurological diseases, demonstrating that STUB1 variants are not simply rare polymorphisms ubiquitous in neurodegenerative disease. STUB1-disease occurs also in Caucasian ataxia populations (1.8%). Our results expand the genotypic spectrum of STUB1-disease, showing that pathogenic mutations affect also the tetratricopeptide-repeat domain, thus providing clinical evidence for the functional importance of this domain. Moreover, they further delineate the phenotypic core features of STUB1-ataxia. Pyramidal tract damage is a common accompanying feature and can include lower limb spasticity, thus adding STUB1-ataxia to the differential diagnosis of "spastic ataxias". However, STUB1 is rare in subjects with predominant spastic paraplegia (0/133). In contrast to previous reports, STUB1-ataxia can start even above age 40 years, and neither hypogonadism nor prominent cognitive

  18. Structural basis for regulation of GPR56/ADGRG1 by its alternatively spliced extracellular domains

    OpenAIRE

    Salzman, Gabriel S.; Ackerman, Sarah D.; Ding, Chen; Koide, Akiko; Leon, Katherine; Luo, Rong; Stoveken, Hannah M.; Fernandez, Celia G.; Tall, Gregory G.; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R.; Koide, Shohei; Araç, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) play critical roles in diverse neurobiological processes including brain development, synaptogenesis, and myelination. aGPCRs have large alternatively spliced extracellular regions (ECRs) that likely mediate intercellular signaling; however, the precise roles of ECRs remain unclear. The aGPCR GPR56/ADGRG1 regulates both oligodendrocyte and cortical development. Accordingly, human GPR56 mutations cause myelination defects and brain malformations. H...

  19. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC from an atrial fibrillation patient carrying a PITX2 p.M200V mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Mora

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia associated with several cardiac risk factors, but increasing evidences indicated a genetic component. Indeed, genetic variations of the specific PITX2 gene have been identified in patients with early-onset AF. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying AF, we reprogrammed to pluripotency polymorphonucleated leukocytes isolated from the blood of a patient carrying a PITX2 p.M200V mutation, using a commercially available non-integrating expression system. The generated iPSCs expressed pluripotency markers and differentiated toward cells belonging to the three embryonic germ layers. Moreover, the cells showed a normal karyotype and retained the PITX2 p.M200V mutation.

  20. Targeted ultradeep next-generation sequencing as a method for KIT D816V mutation analysis in mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Vestergaard, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    -specific qPCR. Measurements of the background level in D816V-negative samples supported a cutoff for positivity of 0.2% in three different NGS panels. Clinical samples from patients with SM that tested positive using qPCR with a D816V allele burden >0.2% also tested positive using NGS. Samples that tested...... positive using qPCR with an allele burden ...Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is becoming increasingly used for diagnostic mutation analysis in myeloid neoplasms and may also represent a feasible technique in mastocytosis. However, detection of the KIT D816V mutation requires a highly sensitive method in most patients due to the typically low...

  1. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a Bernard–Soulier syndrome patient carrying a W71R mutation in the GPIX gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Lopez-Onieva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from a Bernard–Soulier Syndrome (BSS patient carrying the mutation p.Trp71Arg in the GPIX locus (BSS1-PBMC-iPS4F4. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were reprogrammed using heat sensitive non-integrative Sendai viruses containing the reprogramming factors Oct3/4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Successful silencing of the exogenous reprogramming factors was checked by RT-PCR. Characterization of BSS1-PBMC-iPS4F4 included mutation analysis of GPIX locus, Short Tandem Repeats (STR profiling, alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity, analysis of conventional pluripotency-associated factors at mRNA and protein level and in vivo differentiation studies. BSS1-PBMC-iPS4F4 will provide a powerful tool to study BSS.

  2. Protein splicing and its evolution in eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starokadomskyy P. L.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Inteins, or protein introns, are parts of protein sequences that are post-translationally excised, their flanking regions (exteins being spliced together. This process was called protein splicing. Originally inteins were found in prokaryotic or unicellular eukaryotic organisms. But the general principles of post-translation protein rearrangement are evolving yielding different post-translation modification of proteins in multicellular organisms. For clarity, these non-intein mediated events call either protein rearrangements or protein editing. The most intriguing example of protein editing is proteasome-mediated splicing of antigens in vertebrates that may play important role in antigen presentation. Other examples of protein rearrangements are maturation of Hg-proteins (critical receptors in embryogenesis as well as maturation of several metabolic enzymes. Despite a lack of experimental data we try to analyze some intriguing examples of protein splicing evolution.

  3. HOLLYWOOD: a comparative relational database of alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holste, Dirk; Huo, George; Tung, Vivian; Burge, Christopher B

    2006-01-01

    RNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression, and is often variable, giving rise to multiple alternatively spliced mRNA and protein isoforms from a single gene locus. The design of effective databases to support experimental and computational investigations of alternative splicing (AS) is a significant challenge. In an effort to integrate accurate exon and splice site annotation with current knowledge about splicing regulatory elements and predicted AS events, and to link information about the splicing of orthologous genes in different species, we have developed the Hollywood system. This database was built upon genomic annotation of splicing patterns of known genes derived from spliced alignment of complementary DNAs (cDNAs) and expressed sequence tags, and links features such as splice site sequence and strength, exonic splicing enhancers and silencers, conserved and non-conserved patterns of splicing, and cDNA library information for inferred alternative exons. Hollywood was implemented as a relational database and currently contains comprehensive information for human and mouse. It is accompanied by a web query tool that allows searches for sets of exons with specific splicing characteristics or splicing regulatory element composition, or gives a graphical or sequence-level summary of splicing patterns for a specific gene. A streamlined graphical representation of gene splicing patterns is provided, and these patterns can alternatively be layered onto existing information in the UCSC Genome Browser. The database is accessible at http://hollywood.mit.edu.

  4. Age at Death of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in subsequent family generation carrying the E200K mutation of the prion protein gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pocchiari

    Full Text Available The E200K mutation of the prion protein gene (PRNP is the most frequent amino acid substitution in genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and is the only one responsible for the appearance of clustered cases in the world. In the Israel and Slovakian clusters, age of disease onset was reduced in successive generations but the absence of a clear molecular basis raised the possibility that this event was an observational bias. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible selection biases or confounding factors related to anticipation in E200K CJD patients belonging to a cluster in Southern Italy.Clinical and demographical data of 41 parent-offspring pairs from 19 pedigrees of the Italian cluster of E200K patients were collected. Age at death of parents was compared with age at death of E200K CJD offspring. Subgroup analyses were performed for controlling possible selection biases, confounding factors, or both.The mean age at death/last follow-up of the parent generation was 71.4 years while that of CJD offspring was 59.3 years with an estimated anticipation of 12.1 years. When the same analysis was performed including only parents with CJD or carrying the E200K mutation (n = 26, the difference between offspring and parents increased to 14.8 years.These results show that early age at death occurs in offspring of families carrying the E200K PRNP mutation and that this event is not linked to observational biases. Although molecular or environmental bases for this occurrence remain unsettled, this information is important for improving the accuracy of information to give to mutated carriers.

  5. Pre-mRNA trans-splicing: from kinetoplastids to mammals, an easy language for life diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Gustavo Mayer

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery that genes are split into intron and exons, the studies of the mechanisms involved in splicing pointed to presence of consensus signals in an attempt to generalize the process for all living cells. However, as discussed in the present review, splicing is a theme full of variations. The trans-splicing of pre-mRNAs, the joining of exons from distinct transcripts, is one of these variations with broad distribution in the phylogenetic tree. The biological meaning of this phenomenon is discussed encompassing reactions resembling a possible noise to mechanisms of gene expression regulation. All of them however, can contribute to the generation of life diversity.

  6. RNA-Seq Analysis of Differential Splice Junction Usage and Intron Retentions by DEXSeq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafang Li

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is an important biological process in the generation of multiple functional transcripts from the same genomic sequences. Differential analysis of splice junctions (SJs and intron retentions (IRs is helpful in the detection of alternative splicing events. In this study, we conducted differential analysis of SJs and IRs by use of DEXSeq, a Bioconductor package originally designed for differential exon usage analysis in RNA-seq data analysis. We set up an analysis pipeline including mapping of RNA-seq reads, the preparation of count tables of SJs and IRs as the input files, and the differential analysis in DEXSeq. We analyzed the public RNA-seq datasets generated from RNAi experiments on Drosophila melanogaster S2-DRSC cells to deplete RNA-binding proteins (GSE18508. The analysis confirmed previous findings on the alternative splicing of the trol and Ant2 (sesB genes in the CG8144 (ps-depletion experiment and identified some new alternative splicing events in other RNAi experiments. We also identified IRs that were confirmed in our SJ analysis. The proposed method used in our study can output the genomic coordinates of differentially used SJs and thus enable sequence motif search. Sequence motif search and gene function annotation analysis helped us infer the underlying mechanism in alternative splicing events. To further evaluate this method, we also applied the method to public RNA-seq data from human breast cancer (GSE45419 and the plant Arabidopsis (SRP008262. In conclusion, our study showed that DEXSeq can be adapted to differential analysis of SJs and IRs, which will facilitate the identification of alternative splicing events and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of transcription processes and disease development.

  7. Characterization of cryptic splicing in germline PTEN intronic variants in Cowden syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hannah Jinlian; Romigh, Todd; Sesock, Kaitlin; Eng, Charis

    2017-10-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor-suppressor gene PTEN predispose to subsets of Cowden syndrome (CS), Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and autism. Evidence-based classification of PTEN variants as either deleterious or benign is urgently needed for accurate molecular diagnosis and gene-informed genetic counseling. We studied 34 different germline PTEN intronic variants from 61 CS patients, characterized their PTEN mRNA processing, and analyzed PTEN expression and downstream readouts of P-AKT and P-ERK1/2. While we found that many mutations near splice junctions result in exon skipping, we also identified the presence of cryptic splicing that resulted in premature termination or a shift in isoform usage. PTEN protein expression is significantly lower in the group with splicing changes while P-AKT, but not P-ERK1/2, is significantly increased. Our observations of these PTEN intronic variants should contribute to the determination of pathogenicity of PTEN intronic variants and aid in genetic counseling. © 2017 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  9. Thermopriming Triggers Splicing Memory in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Yu

    2018-02-20

    Abiotic and biotic stresses limit crop productivity. Exposure to a non-lethal stress, referred to as priming, can allow plants to survive subsequent and otherwise lethal conditions; the priming effect persists even after a prolonged stress-free period. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying priming are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the molecular basis of heat shock memory and the role of priming in Arabidopsisthaliana. Comprehensive analysis of transcriptome-wide changes in gene expression and alternative splicing in primed and non-primed plants revealed that alternative splicing functions as a novel component of heat shock memory. We show that priming of plants with a non-lethal heat stress results in de-repression of splicing after a second exposure to heat stress. By contrast, non-primed plants showed significant repression of splicing. These observations link ‘splicing memory’ to the ability of plants to survive subsequent and otherwise lethal heat stress. This newly discovered priming-induced splicing memory may represent a general feature of heat stress responses in plants and other organisms as many of the key components of heat shock responses are conserved among eukaryotes. Furthermore, this finding could facilitate the development of novel approaches to improve plant survival under extreme heat stress.

  10. Compound heterozygous mutations in UBA5 causing early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in two sisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnadottir, Gudny A; Jensson, Brynjar O; Marelsson, Sigurdur E; Sulem, Gerald; Oddsson, Asmundur; Kristjansson, Ragnar P; Benonisdottir, Stefania; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Masson, Gisli; Thorisson, Gudmundur A; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Jonasdottir, A